WorldWideScience

Sample records for syndrome promising potential

  1. Modelling of potentially promising SARS protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Hoffmann, Marcin [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Grotthuss, Marcin von [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Knizewski, Lukasz [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Rychewski, Leszek [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Eitner, Krystian [BioInfoBank Institute, Limanowskiego 24A/16, 60-744 Poznan (Poland); Ginalski, Krzysztof [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, ICM, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-18

    In many cases, at the beginning of a high throughput screening experiment some information about active molecules is already available. Active compounds (such as substrate analogues, natural products and inhibitors of related proteins) are often identified in low throughput validation studies on a biochemical target. Sometimes the additional structural information is also available from crystallographic studies on protein and ligand complexes. In addition, the structural or sequence similarity of various protein targets yields a novel possibility for drug discovery. Co-crystallized compounds from homologous proteins can be used to design leads for a new target without co-crystallized ligands. In this paper we evaluate how far such an approach can be used in a real drug campaign, with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus providing an example. Our method is able to construct small molecules as plausible inhibitors solely on the basis of the set of ligands from crystallized complexes of a protein target, and other proteins from its structurally homologous family. The accuracy and sensitivity of the method are estimated here by the subsequent use of an electronic high throughput screening flexible docking algorithm. The best performing ligands are then used for a very restrictive similarity search for potential inhibitors of the SARS protease within the million compounds from the Ligand.Info small molecule meta-database. The selected molecules can be passed on for further experimental validation.

  2. Multivariate meta-analysis: Potential and promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dan; Riley, Richard; White, Ian R

    2011-01-01

    The multivariate random effects model is a generalization of the standard univariate model. Multivariate meta-analysis is becoming more commonly used and the techniques and related computer software, although continually under development, are now in place. In order to raise awareness of the multivariate methods, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages, we organized a one day ‘Multivariate meta-analysis’ event at the Royal Statistical Society. In addition to disseminating the most recent developments, we also received an abundance of comments, concerns, insights, critiques and encouragement. This article provides a balanced account of the day's discourse. By giving others the opportunity to respond to our assessment, we hope to ensure that the various view points and opinions are aired before multivariate meta-analysis simply becomes another widely used de facto method without any proper consideration of it by the medical statistics community. We describe the areas of application that multivariate meta-analysis has found, the methods available, the difficulties typically encountered and the arguments for and against the multivariate methods, using four representative but contrasting examples. We conclude that the multivariate methods can be useful, and in particular can provide estimates with better statistical properties, but also that these benefits come at the price of making more assumptions which do not result in better inference in every case. Although there is evidence that multivariate meta-analysis has considerable potential, it must be even more carefully applied than its univariate counterpart in practice. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21268052

  3. Big data analytics in healthcare: promise and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathi, Wullianallur; Raghupathi, Viju

    2014-01-01

    To describe the promise and potential of big data analytics in healthcare. The paper describes the nascent field of big data analytics in healthcare, discusses the benefits, outlines an architectural framework and methodology, describes examples reported in the literature, briefly discusses the challenges, and offers conclusions. The paper provides a broad overview of big data analytics for healthcare researchers and practitioners. Big data analytics in healthcare is evolving into a promising field for providing insight from very large data sets and improving outcomes while reducing costs. Its potential is great; however there remain challenges to overcome.

  4. Ukraine’s renewable energy potential as promising investment area

    OpenAIRE

    Sivitska, Svitlana

    2013-01-01

    In this research types of enewable energy have been considered, the necessity of investing has been substantiated and the main factors for alternative energy development in Ukraine have been identified.The most promising regions for investment in alternative energy on the basis of a comparison of its development potential in each regions of Ukraine have been identified and also the territorial aspect of each renewable energy sources type development has been analyzed.

  5. Lithium: a promising treatment for fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhonghua; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2014-06-18

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an inherited disorder that results in intellectual disability and a characteristic behavioral profile that includes autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, sensory hypersensitivity, hyperarousal, and anxiety. The epigenetic silencing of FMR1 and the consequent absence of its protein product, FMRP, is the most common cause of fragile X. The development of animal models of fragile X syndrome 20 years ago has produced a considerable increase in our understanding of the consequences of the absence of FMRP on the structure and function of the nervous system. Some of the insights gained have led to proposals of treatment strategies that are based on cellular and molecular changes observed in animals lacking FMRP. One such proposal is treatment with lithium, a drug with a long history of clinical efficacy in psychiatry and a drug with newly described uses in degenerative disorders of the nervous system. Lithium treatment has been studied extensively in both mouse and fruit fly models of FXS, and it has been shown to reverse numerous behavioral, physiological, cellular, and molecular phenotypes. A report of a pilot clinical trial on a limited number of adult FXS patients indicated that measurable improvements in behavior and function were seen after 2 months of lithium treatment. A double-blind clinical trial of lithium treatment in FXS patients is now needed.

  6. Potential therapeutic approaches for Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaoning; Sun, Jiandong; Ji, Angela X; Baudry, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deficiency of maternally inherited UBE3A, an ubiquitin E3 ligase. Despite recent progress in understanding the mechanism underlying UBE3A imprinting, there is no effective treatment. Further investigation of the roles played by UBE3A in the central nervous system (CNS) is needed for developing effective therapies. This review covers the literature related to genetic classifications of AS, recent discoveries regarding the regulation of UBE3A imprinting, alterations in cell signaling in various brain regions and potential therapeutic approaches. Since a large proportion of AS patients exhibit comorbid autism spectrum disorder (ASD), potential common molecular bases are discussed. Advances in understanding UBE3A imprinting provide a unique opportunity to induce paternal UBE3A expression, thus targeting the syndrome at its 'root.' However, such efforts have yielded less-than-expected rescue effects in AS mouse models, raising the concern that activation of paternal UBE3A after a critical period cannot correct all the CNS defects that developed in a UBE3A-deficient environment. On the other hand, targeting abnormal downstream cell signaling pathways has provided promising rescue effects in preclinical research. Thus, combined reinstatement of paternal UBE3A expression with targeting abnormal signaling pathways should provide better therapeutic effects.

  7. Gold nanoparticles in breast cancer treatment: Promise and potential pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihyoun; Chatterjee, Dev Kumar; Lee, Min Hyuk; Krishnan, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Despite remarkable achievements in the treatment of breast cancer, some obstacles still remain. Gold nanoparticles may prove valuable in addressing these problems owing to their unique characteristics, including their enhanced permeability and retention in tumor tissue, their light absorbance and surface plasmon resonance in near-infrared light, their interaction with radiation to generate secondary electrons, and their ability to be conjugated with drugs or other agents. Herein, we discuss some basic concepts of gold nanoparticles, and early results from studies regarding their use in breast cancer, including toxicity and side effects. We also discuss these particles’ potential clinical applications. PMID:24556077

  8. Curcumin is a promising inhibitor of genotype 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Taofeng; Shi, Yunpeng; Xiao, Shuqi; Li, Na; Zhao, Qin; Zhang, Angke; Nan, Yuchen; Mu, Yang; Sun, Yani; Wu, Chunyan; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhou, En-Min

    2017-10-10

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) could lead to pandemic diseases and huge financial losses to the swine industry worldwide. Curcumin, a natural compound, has been reported to serve as an entry inhibitor of hepatitis C virus, chikungunya virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of curcumin on early stages of PRRSV infection. Curcumin inhibited infection of Marc-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) by four different genotype 2 PRRSV strains, but had no effect on the levels of major PRRSV receptor proteins on Marc-145 cells and PAMs or on PRRSV binding to Marc-145 cells. However, curcumin did block two steps of the PRRSV infection process: virus internalization and virus-mediated cell fusion. Our results suggested that an inhibition of genotype 2 PRRSV infection by curcumin is virus strain-independent, and mainly inhibited by virus internalization and cell fusion mediated by virus. Collectively, these results demonstrate that curcumin holds promise as a new anti-PRRSV drug.

  9. Electronic prescribing in ambulatory practice: promises, pitfalls, and potential solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papshev, D; Peterson, A M

    2001-07-01

    To examine advantages of and obstacles to electronic prescribing in the ambulatory care environment. MEDLINE and International Pharmaceutical Abstract searches were conducted for the period from January 1980 to September 2000. Key words were electronic prescribing, computerized physician order entry, prior authorization, drug utilization review, and consumer satisfaction. In September 2000, a public search engine (www.google.com) was used to find additional technical information. In addition, pertinent articles were cross-referenced to identify other resources. Articles, symposia proceedings, and organizational position statements published in the United States on electronic prescribing and automation in healthcare are cited. Electronic prescribing can eliminate the time gap between point of care and point of service, reduce medication errors, improve quality of care, and increase patient satisfaction. Considerable funding requirements, segmentation of healthcare markets, lack of technology standardization, providers' resistance to change, and regulatory indecisiveness create boundaries to the widespread use of automated prescribing. The potential solutions include establishing a standardizing warehouse or a router and gaining stakeholder support in implementation of the technology. Electronic prescribing can provide immense benefits to healthcare providers, patients, and managed care. Resolution of several obstacles that limit feasibility of this technology will determine its future.

  10. Visual Evoked Potentials in Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Boston Children's Hospital recorded pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs in Mecp2 heterozygous female mice and in 34 girls with Rett syndrome (RTT.

  11. Emotion Potentiated Startle in Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Elizabeth C.; Cordeiro, Lisa; Chavez, Alyssa D.; Hagerman, Randi J.; Hessl, David

    2014-01-01

    Social avoidance and anxiety are prevalent in fragile X syndrome (FXS) and are potentially mediated by the amygdala, a brain region critical for social behavior. Unfortunately, functional brain resonance imaging investigation of the amygdala in FXS is limited by the difficulties experienced by intellectually impaired and anxious participants. We…

  12. γ-Tocotrienol as a Promising Countermeasure for Acute Radiation Syndrome: Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay K. Singh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The hazard of ionizing radiation exposure due to nuclear accidents or terrorist attacks is ever increasing. Despite decades of research, still, there is a shortage of non-toxic, safe and effective medical countermeasures for radiological and nuclear emergency. To date, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA has approved only two growth factors, Neupogen (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, filgrastim and Neulasta (PEGylated G-CSF, pegfilgrastim for the treatment of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS following the Animal Efficacy Rule. Promising radioprotective efficacy results of γ-tocotrienol (GT3; a member of the vitamin E family in the mouse model encouraged its further evaluation in the nonhuman primate (NHP model. These studies demonstrated that GT3 significantly aided the recovery of radiation-induced neutropenia and thrombocytopenia compared to the vehicle controls; these results particularly significant after exposure to 5.8 or 6.5 Gray (Gy whole body γ-irradiation. The stimulatory effect of GT3 on neutrophils and thrombocytes (platelets was directly and positively correlated with dose; a 75 mg/kg dose was more effective compared to 37.5 mg/kg. GT3 was also effective against 6.5 Gy whole body γ-irradiation for improving neutrophils and thrombocytes. Moreover, a single administration of GT3 without any supportive care was equivalent, in terms of improving hematopoietic recovery, to multiple doses of Neupogen and two doses of Neulasta with full supportive care (including blood products in the NHP model. GT3 may serve as an ultimate radioprotector for use in humans, particularly for military personnel and first responders. In brief, GT3 is a promising radiation countermeasure that ought to be further developed for U.S. FDA approval for the ARS indication.

  13. Endogenous thrombin potential in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aziz, Mubeena; Sidelmann, Johannes J; Wissing, Marie Louise Muff

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to investigate plasma endogenous thrombin generation in four different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) defined by Body Mass Index (BMI) and insulin resistance (IR). PCOS is diagnosed according to the Rotterdam criteria. DESIGN: Multicenter......: Endogenous thrombin potential (ETP). RESULTS: PCOS women with phenotype BMI > 25 + IR have increased potential of thrombin generation. ETP is associated with total body fat mass, IR, and CRP. CONCLUSIONS: Obese and insulin resistant women with PCOS have elevated level of ETP corresponding to increased risk...

  14. Glycogen synthase kinase-3: A promising therapeutic target for Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjelo M. Mines

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to Fragile X Syndrome (FXS have increased optimism that drug interventions can provide significant therapeutic benefits. FXS results from inadequate expression of functional fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. FMRP may have several functions, but it is most well-established as an RNA-binding protein that regulates translation, and it is by this mechanism that FMRP is capable of affecting numerous cellular processes by selectively regulating protein levels. The multiple cellular functions regulated by FMRP suggest that multiple interventions may be required for reversing the effects of deficient FMRP. Evidence that inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3 may contribute to the therapeutic treatment of FXS is reviewed here. In the mouse model of FXS, which lacks FMRP expression (FX mice, GSK3 is hyperactive in several brain regions. Furthermore, significant improvements in several FX-related phenotypes have been obtained in FX mice following the administration of lithium, and in some case other GSK3 inhibitors. These responses include normalization of heightened audiogenic seizure susceptibility and of hyperactive locomotor behavior, enhancement of passive avoidance learning retention and of sociability behaviors, and corrections of macroorchidism, neuronal spine density, and neural plasticity measured electrophysiologically as long term depression. A pilot clinical trial of lithium in FXS patients also found improvements in several measures of behavior. Taken together, these findings indicate that lithium and other inhibitors of GSK3 are promising candidate therapeutic agents for treating FXS.

  15. Neurogenetics and gene therapy for reward deficiency syndrome: are we going to the Promised Land?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Thanos, Peter K; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Febo, Marcelo; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Fratantonio, James; Demotrovics, Zsolt; Gold, Mark S

    2015-07-01

    Addiction is a substantial health issue with limited treatment options approved by the FDA and as such currently available. The advent of neuroimaging techniques that link neurochemical and neurogenetic mechanisms to the reward circuitry brain function provides a framework for potential genomic-based therapies. Through candidate and genome-wide association studies approaches, many gene polymorphisms and clusters have been implicated in drug, food and behavioral dependence linked by the common rubric reward deficiency syndrome (RDS). The results of selective studies that include the role of epigenetics, noncoding micro RNAs in RDS behaviors especially drug abuse involving alcohol, opioids, cocaine, nicotine, pain and feeding are reviewed in this article. New targets for addiction treatment and relapse prevention, treatment alternatives such as gene therapy in animal models, and pharmacogenomics and nutrigenomics methods to manipulate transcription and gene expression are explored. The recognition of the clinical benefit of early genetic testing to determine addiction risk stratification and dopaminergic agonistic, rather than antagonistic therapies are potentially the genomic-based wave of the future. In addition, further development, especially in gene transfer work and viral vector identification, could make gene therapy for RDS a possibility in the future.

  16. Toward Fulfilling the Promise of Molecular Medicine in Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Dilja D.; Bear, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of mental retardation and a leading known cause of autism. It is caused by loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein that negatively regulates protein synthesis. In neurons, multiple lines of evidence suggest that protein synthesis at synapses is triggered by activation of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (Gp1 mGluRs) and that many functional consequences of activating these receptors are altered in the absence of FMRP. These observations have led to the theory that exaggerated protein synthesis downstream of Gp1 mGluRs is a core pathogenic mechanism in FXS. This excess can be corrected by reducing signaling by Gp1 mGluRs, and numerous studies have shown that inhibition of mGluR5, in particular, can ameliorate multiple mutant phenotypes in animal models of FXS. Clinical trials based on this therapeutic strategy are currently under way. FXS is therefore poised to be the first neurobehavioral disorder in which corrective treatments have been developed from the bottom up: from gene identification to pathophysiology in animals to novel therapeutics in humans. The insights gained from FXS and other autism-related single-gene disorders may also assist in identifying molecular mechanisms and potential treatment approaches for idiopathic autism. PMID:21090964

  17. Saffron: a promising natural medicine in the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2017-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a disorder which encompasses obesity, high blood glucose, high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. Moreover, metabolic syndrome is considered as the most important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD is the leading cause of mortality in the world for both men and women. Several chemical drugs are available to treat metabolic risk factors, but because of the safety, efficacy, cultural acceptability and lesser side effects, nowadays herbal therapy has a critical role in the treatment of these CVD risk factors. Crocus sativus L. (saffron) is a perennial herb that belongs to the Iridaceae family. Saffron is an extensively used food additive for its colour and taste and has been widely used in traditional as well as modern medicine to treat several illnesses including cardiovascular diseases. Most of the unique properties of this plant are attributed to the presence of three major components, including crocin, safranal and crocetin. It has been proved that saffron has an important role in the management of metabolic syndrome because of its marvelous activities including anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, hypotensive and hypolipidaemic properties. In this review article, we discuss the beneficial properties of saffron and its active components to treat different components of metabolic syndrome and most relevant animal and human studies regarding the use of this plant in cardiovascular disease, with focus on the metabolic risk factors. This review also suggests that after randomised clinical trials, saffron may be implicated as a preventive or therapeutic agent against metabolic syndrome. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Immunotherapy options for painful bladder syndrome: what's the potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykoniatis, Ioannis; Katafigiotis, Ioannis; Sfoungaristos, Stavros; Yutkin, Vladimir

    2017-12-01

    Painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC) is an enigmatic disease characterized by lack of evidence-based knowledge and an ongoing scientific debate regarding its definition, pathogenesis, diagnostic and treatment algorithm. An autoimmune theory for PBS/IC etiology has suggested immunotherapy as a potential treatment choice. Areas covered: In this review, the authors report existing and future immunotherapeutic options, potentially valuable to the management of PBS/IC while evidence for the immunological aspect of PBS/IC pathogenesis are also presented. Relevant data reported in human clinical studies but also in experimental studies using animal PBS/IC models have been reviewed. Expert opinion: Promising data has emerged lately regarding use of immunotherapy drugs for PBS/IC treatment. Specifically, human monoclonal antibodies inhibiting nerve growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-a have shown high efficacy in pain control for PBS/IC. Also, many other agents modulating immunopathways linked to PBS symptom etiology and leading to positive treatment effects have been reported lately mainly in experimental animal studies. Immunotherapy could potentially improve disease-related and patient-reported outcome; nevertheless, lack of consensus regarding PBS/IC diagnostic criteria, leading to high heterogeneity of patients enrolled in PBS/IC treatment studies, and low number of well-designed randomized clinical trials are limitations which must be addressed in the future.

  19. Promising Potential of Dietary (Poly)Phenolic Compounds in the Prevention and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Tania R; Alves, Marco G; Casal, Susana; Oliveira, Pedro F; Silva, Branca M

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is reaching alarming proportions worldwide, particularly because it is increasingly affecting younger people. This reflects the sedentary lifestyle and inappropriate dietary habits, especially due to the advent of processed foods in modern societies. Thus, unsurprisingly, the first medical recommendation to patients with clinically evident DM is the alteration in their eating behaviour, particularly regarding carbohydrates and total energy intake. Despite individual and cultural preferences, human diet makes available a large amount of phytochemicals with therapeutic potential. Phenolic compounds are the most abundant class of phytochemicals in edible plants, fruits and beverages. These compounds have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that have been associated with specific features of their chemical structure. Among others, such properties make them promising antidiabetic agents and several mechanisms of action have already been proposed. Herein, we discuss the recent findings on the potential of dietary phenolic compounds for the prevention and/or treatment of (pre)diabetes, and associated complications. A broad range of studies supports the innate potential of phenolic compounds to protect against DM-associated deleterious effects. Their antidiabetic activity has been demonstrated by: i) regulation of carbohydrate metabolism; ii) improvement of glucose uptake; iii) protection of pancreatic β-cells; iv) enhancement of insulin action and v) regulation of crucial signalling pathways to cell homeostasis. Dietary phenolic compounds constitute an easy, safe and cost-effective way to combat the worrying scenario of DM. The interesting particularities of phenolic compounds reinforce the implementation of a (poly)phenolic-rich nutritional regime, not only for (pre)diabetic patients, but also for non-diabetic people. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Novel benzophenone-3 derivatives with promising potential as UV filters: Relationship between structure, photoprotective potential and phototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, María Teresa Páez; Fumagalli, Fernando; Benevenuto, Carolina Gomes; da Silva Emery, Flavio; Gaspar, Lorena Rigo

    2017-04-01

    Benzophenone-3 (BP-3) is a UV filter with absorption at the UVB and UVA wavelengths which has not been extensively studied in experiments involving its absorbing effects and toxicity. We synthetized four BP-3 derivatives and characterized their photoprotective potential by UV absorption and photodegradation, their phototoxicity potential by 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (3T3 NRU PT) and their photoreactivity by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay. The UV absorption, photodegradation, phototoxicity and photoreactivity of the four BP-3 derivatives (BP-3 carbonate, BP-3 carbazole, BP-3 phenylamine and BP-3 methoxy-phenylamine) were evaluated and compared to those of BP-3. Results showed that all derivatives were photostable, except BP-3 carbonate, which did not absorb in the UVA range. BP-3 phenylamine and BP-3 methoxy-phenylamine were considered non-phototoxic and weakly photoreactive in the ROS assay, while the carbazole derivative was considered phototoxic and non-photoreactive due to its rigid structure. The UV spectra of BP-3 carbonate, BP-3 phenylamine and BP-3 methoxy-phenylamine showed the influence of hydrogen bonding on their UV absorption. Based on these results, we concluded that BP-3 phenylamine and BP-3 methoxy-phenylamine could be promising UVA filters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cytokines in Sjogren's syndrome: potential therapeutic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roescher, N.; Tak, P.P.; Illei, G.G.

    2010-01-01

    The dysregulated cytokine network in Sjogren's Syndrome (SS) is reflected by local and systemic overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and absent or low levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. To date, the use of cytokine based therapies in SS has been disappointing. Oral administration of low

  2. Genetic and cellular techniques emerge as promising modalities for the treatment of diabetic foot syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Iosifovich Konenkov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Two patient groups potentially to benefit most from these novel methods are patients with critical lower limb ischemia (CLLI in whom angiosurgery is not indicated, and patients with trophic ulcers resistant to conventional therapy. A series of clinical trials has shown positive effects of transferring VEGF, HIF-1, FGF, PDGF, HGF and certain other growth factor genes to stimulate blood vessel formation and healing of diabetic ulcers. Autologous transplantation of mononuclear bone marrow and peripheral blood cells, endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and stromal cell of the adipose tissue has also demonstrated its clinical potential in patients with diabetes mellitus and CLLI. Randomized clinical trials report beneficial effects of gene and cell therapy on such surrogate endpoints as ischemic index, rest pain and ulcer healing, though data on amputation rates is controversial. Further studies are necessary to determine optimal dosage and route of administration of biological agents and predictors of their efficacy, as well as long-term safety of these novel treatment modalities.

  3. Auditory evoked potentials in children and adolescents with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Letícia; Rosa, Rafael F M; Zen, Paulo R G; Sleifer, Pricila

    2018-01-01

    Down syndrome, or trisomy 21, is the most common genetic alteration in humans. The syndrome presents with several features, including hearing loss and changes in the central nervous system, which may affect language development in children and lead to school difficulties. The present study aimed to investigate group differences in the central auditory system by long-latency auditory evoked potentials and cognitive potential. An assessment of 23 children and adolescents with Down syndrome was performed, and a control group composed of 43 children and adolescents without genetic and/or neurological changes was used for comparison. All children underwent evaluation with pure tone and vocal audiometry, acoustic immitance measures, long-latency auditory evoked potentials, and cognitive potential. Longer latencies of the waves were found in the Down syndrome group than the control group, without significant differences in amplitude, suggesting that individuals with Down syndrome have difficulty in discrimination and auditory memory. It is, therefore, important to stimulate and monitor these children in order to enable adequate development and improve their life quality. We also emphasize the importance of the application of auditory evoked potentials in clinical practice, in order to contribute to the early diagnosis of hearing alterations and the development of more research in this area. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Promises, Problems, and Potentials of a Bourdieu-Inspired Staging of International Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leander, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The promise of Bourdieu-inspired analysts to provide a “different reading” of the international is receiving increasing attention in the academic discipline of international relations (IR). This attention also generates awareness and of problems inherent in the Bourdieuian approach and a desire...... to develop it further (or abandon it). These discussions have often focused on the difficulties that arise for IR as a consequence of the structuralism of Bourdieu’s approach, and as such they dovetail with the discussions between Bourdieu’s “critical sociology” and the “pragmatic school” in the French...

  5. Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Dalmasso

    Full Text Available With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI between 10-3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections.

  6. Governing the Potentials of Life Itself? Interrogating the Promises in Affective Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunaes, Dorthe

    2011-01-01

    This article critically explores how educational leadership is becoming increasingly affective in order to cultivate pupil potential and thereby meet the challenge of creating the best schools in the world. It critically analyses policy and handbook approaches to affective educational leadership technologies by showing the difficulty in keeping…

  7. Mentoring for Young People Leaving Foster Care: Promise and Potential Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Renee; Collins, Mary Elizabeth; Ward, Rolanda; Smashnaya, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring for youths transitioning out of the foster care system has been growing in popularity as mentoring programs have enjoyed unprecedented growth in recent years. However, the existing empirical literature on the conditions associated with more effective youth mentoring relationships and the potential for harm in their absence should give us…

  8. Moringa oleifera with promising neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth promoting potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Md Abdul; Kang, Ji-Young; Mohibbullah, Md; Hong, Yong-Ki; Lee, Hyunsook; Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon; Moon, Il Soo

    2014-02-27

    Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) by virtue of its high nutritional as well as ethnomedical values has been gaining profound interest both in nutrition and medicinal research. The leaf of this plant is used in ayurvedic medicine to treat paralysis, nervous debility and other nerve disorders. In addition, research evidence also suggests the nootropic as well as neuroprotective roles of Moringa oleifera leaf in animal models. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Moringa oleifera leaf in the primary hippocampal neurons regarding its neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties. The primary culture of embryonic hippocampal neurons was incubated with the ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera leaf (MOE). After an indicated time, cultures were either stained directly with a lipophilic dye, DiO, or fixed and immunolabeled to visualize the neuronal morphology. Morphometric analyses for neurite maturation and synaptogenesis were performed using Image J software. Neuronal viability was evaluated using trypan blue exclusion and lactate dehydrogenase assays. MOE promoted neurite outgrowth in a concentration-dependent manner with an optimal concentration of 30 μg/mL. As a very initial effect, MOE significantly promoted the earlier stages of neuronal differentiation. Subsequently, MOE significantly increased the number and length of dendrites, the length of axon, and the number and length of both dendrite and axonal branches, and eventually facilitated synaptogenesis. The β-carotene, one major compound of MOE, promoted neuritogensis, but the increase was not comparable with the effect of MOE. In addition, MOE supported neuronal survival by protecting neurons from naturally occurring cell death in vitro. Our findings indicate that MOE promotes axodendritic maturation as well as provides neuroprotection suggesting a promising pharmacological importance of this nutritionally and ethnomedically important plant for the well-being of nervous system. Copyright

  9. The Promise and Potential Perils of Big Data for Advancing Symptom Management Research in Populations at Risk for Health Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Suzanne; Reame, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Symptom management research is a core area of nursing science and one of the priorities for the National Institute of Nursing Research, which specifically focuses on understanding the biological and behavioral aspects of symptoms such as pain and fatigue, with the goal of developing new knowledge and new strategies for improving patient health and quality of life. The types and volume of data related to the symptom experience, symptom management strategies, and outcomes are increasingly accessible for research. Traditional data streams are now complemented by consumer-generated (i.e., quantified self) and "omic" data streams. Thus, the data available for symptom science can be considered big data. The purposes of this chapter are to (a) briefly summarize the current drivers for the use of big data in research; (b) describe the promise of big data and associated data science methods for advancing symptom management research; (c) explicate the potential perils of big data and data science from the perspective of the ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, and justice; and (d) illustrate strategies for balancing the promise and the perils of big data through a case study of a community at high risk for health disparities. Big data and associated data science methods offer the promise of multidimensional data sources and new methods to address significant research gaps in symptom management. If nurse scientists wish to apply big data and data science methods to advance symptom management research and promote health equity, they must carefully consider both the promise and perils.

  10. Sphingolipids: promising lipid-class molecules with potential applications for industry. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miazek, K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sphingolipids are a group of lipid molecules, the focus on which has been gradually increasing during recent years. This review presents sphingolipids, as valuable compounds with a high potential for industry. Literature. Structures of sphingolipids are described and their natural sources are presented. Different methods for extraction, purification and structural characterization of sphingolipids are evaluated. Activity of sphingolipids towards various microorganisms is discussed and methods for chemical modifications of natural sphingolipids to obtain novel properties are depicted. Finally, applications for implementing sphingolipid molecules in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical or medical industry are proposed. Conclusions. Sphingolipids are molecules of high impact and their importance will inevitably increase in the future.

  11. Targeting glucagon receptor signalling in treating metabolic syndrome and renal injury in Type 2 diabetes: theory versus promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao C; Zhuo, Jia L

    2007-08-01

    Pancreatic bi-hormones insulin and glucagon are the Yin and Yang in the regulation of glucose metabolism and homoeostasis. Insulin is synthesized primarily by pancreatic beta-cells and is released in response to an increase in blood glucose levels (hyperglycaemia). By contrast, glucagon is synthesized by pancreatic alpha-cells and is released in response to a decrease in blood glucose (hypoglycaemia). The principal role of glucagon is to counter the actions of insulin on blood glucose homoeostasis, but it also has diverse non-hyperglycaemic actions. Although Type 1 diabetes is caused by insulin deficiency (insulin-dependent) and can be corrected by insulin replacement, Type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease and its treatment is not dependent on insulin therapy alone. Type 2 diabetes in humans is characterized by increased insulin resistance, increased fasting blood glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and the development of glomerular hyperfiltration and microalbuminuria, ultimately leading to diabetic nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. Clinical studies have suggested that an inappropriate increase in hyperglycaemic glucagon (hyperglucagonaemia) over hypoglycaemic insulin (not insulin deficiency until advanced stages) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Type 2 diabetes. However, for decades, research efforts and resources have been devoted overwhelmingly to studying the role of insulin and insulin-replacement therapy. By contrast, the implication of glucagon and its receptor signalling in the development of Type 2 diabetic metabolic syndromes and end-organ injury has received little attention. The aim of this review is to examine the evidence as to whether glucagon and its receptor signalling play any role(s) in the pathogenesis of Type 2 diabetic renal injury, and to explore whether targeting glucagon receptor signalling remains only a theoretical antidiabetic strategy in Type 2 diabetes or may realize its promise in the future.

  12. Cranberry as promising natural source of potential anticancer agents: current evidence and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsargyris, Athanasios; Tampaki, Ekaterini-Christina; Giaginis, Constantinos; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2012-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that dietary modification can lower the risk for several cancer types' development. Cranberry in particular, has been shown to have anti-oxidative, -inflammatory and -proliferative properties in vitro. To present the latest knowledge regarding the role of cranberry extracts against human cancer several types. A review of the literature documenting both in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects of whole cranberry and/or its extracts is conducted. Current data provide evidence for several anti-cancer properties of either whole cranberry and/or its extracts. The discovery of the specific cranberry components and the appropriate concentrations that exert such beneficial effects along with verification of the preliminary in vitro results in in vivo settings could potentially lead to the invention of novel safer and efficient anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  13. Asymmetric Meckel Cave Enlargement: A Potential Marker of PHACES Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J N; Wycoco, V

    2017-06-01

    PHACES syndrome is a complex of morphologic abnormalities of unknown cause and includes posterior fossa abnormalities; head and neck infantile hemangiomas; arterial, cardiac, and eye anomalies; and sternal or abdominal wall defects. Accurate identification of the syndrome is important for optimal treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of asymmetric Meckel cave enlargement, a potential novel imaging marker, in a population of patients referred for evaluation of possible PHACES syndrome. Eighty-five patients referred for neuroimaging evaluation of possible PHACES syndrome were identified and stratified on the basis of their ultimate clinical PHACES diagnosis categorization into PHACES, possible PHACES, or not PHACES. MR imaging studies were subsequently reviewed for the presence or absence of unilateral Meckel cave enlargement, with the reviewer blinded to the ultimate PHACES syndrome categorization. Twenty-five of 85 patients (29%) were ultimately categorized as having PHACES or possible PHACES according to consensus guidelines. Asymmetric Meckel cave enlargement was present in 76% (19/25) of these patients and in 82% (19/23) of only those patients with definite PHACES. This finding was present in none of the 60 patients determined not to have PHACES syndrome. In 7/19 patients (37%) with this finding, subtle MR imaging abnormalities consistent with PHACES were missed on the initial MR imaging interpretation. Asymmetric Meckel cave enlargement was a common feature of patients with PHACES in our cohort and may serve as a novel imaging marker. Increased awareness of this imaging feature has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy of PHACES. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  14. The potential role of neuropathic mechanisms in dry eye syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. Mcmonnies

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry eye syndromes can involve both nociceptive and neuropathic symptoms. Nociceptive symptoms are the normal physiological responses to noxious stimuli. Neuropathic symptoms are caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system and can be the result of hypersensitisation of peripheral or central corneal and conjunctival somatosensory nerves. For example, inflammation could induce neuroplastic peripheral sensitisation of the ocular surface or lid wiper and exacerbate nociceptive symptoms. Neuropathic symptoms may explain the incommensurate relation between signs and symptoms in some dry eye syndromes although absence of signs of a dry eye syndrome may also be a consequence of inappropriate methods used when examining for them. Involvement of neuropathic mechanisms may also help explain dry eye symptoms which occur in association with reduced corneal sensitivity. This review includes a discussion of the potential for ocular symptoms involving neuropathic mechanisms to contribute to psychosocial problems such as depression, stress, anxiety and sleep disorders as well as for these types of psychosocial problems to contribute to neuropathic mechanisms and dry eye syndromes. Failure to consider the possibility that neuropathic mechanisms can contribute to dry eye syndromes may reduce accuracy of diagnosis and the suitability of treatment provided. Dry eye symptoms in the absence of commensurate evidence of tear dysfunction, and unsatisfactory response to tear dysfunction therapies should prompt consideration of neuropathic mechanisms being involved. Symptoms which persist after local anaesthetic instillation are more likely to be neuropathic in origin. Reducing inflammation may help limit any associated neuroplastic hypersensitivity.

  15. The missing link between submarine volcano and promising geothermal potential in Jinshan, Northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. C.; Hutchings, L.; Chang, C. C.; Lee, C. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Tatun volcanic group (TVG) and the Keelung submarine volcano (KSV) are active volcanoes and surrounding three nuclear plant sites in north Taiwan. The famous Jinshan-Wanli hot springs locates between TVG and KSV, moreover, the geochemical anomalies of acidic boiling springs on the seacoast infer that the origin is from magmatic fluids, sea water and meteoric water mixture, strongly implying that mantle fluids ascends into the shallow crust. The evidence for a magma chamber, submarine volcano, and boiling springs have a close spatial relationship. Based on UNECE specifications to Geothermal Energy Resources (2016), the Jinshan-Wanli geothermal area could be classified as Known Geothermal Energy Source for geothermal direct use and Potential Geothermal Energy Source for conventional geothermal system. High resolution reservoir exploration and modeling in Jinshan-Wanli geothermal area is developing for drilling risk mitigation. The geothermal team of National Taiwan Ocean University and local experts are cooperating for further exploration drilling and geothermal source evaluation. Keywords: geothermal resource evaluation, Jinshan-Wanli geothermal area, submarine volcano

  16. Engaging First-year University Students in Research: Promise, Potentials, and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Sangster

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, the Undergraduate Research Initiative at the University of Saskatchewan implemented a pilot project to organize, support, and promote curriculum-based research experience as an integral aspect of participating first-year courses. The framework for the course-based initiative was the research arc; usually in groups, students in these classes would develop a research question, investigate it using discipline-appropriate methodologies, and disseminate the results. Nine classes (Agriculture, Animal Bioscience, Environmental Science, Women’s and Gender Studies, Psychology, Kinesiology, and Interdisciplinary Studies participated in this program pilot. There were four key agents in the program: faculty instructors, research coaches, students in participating first-year classes, and university administrative staff. This preliminary evaluation of the pilot suggests that first-year undergraduate research experiences have potential to benefit the undergraduate student participants as well as the faculty and research coaches involved. The primary benefits that faculty reported experiencing included an increased interest in ways to engage learners, reexamination of and reflection on their teaching strategies, the pragmatic support of a research coach helping with their work load, and an invigoration of their research. The primary benefits to research coaches included enhancement of their professional skills, experience in lesson planning and facilitation, CV building, and an ideology shift in how to best facilitate learning for undergraduate students. The most prominent benefits for undergraduate students appeared to be that they gained a better idea about how researchers think and work, that they increased their understanding of how research works, and that their own research and professional skills had improved. Early, bottom-up evaluation identified characteristics of implementation that appear to best facilitate achievement of the initiative

  17. Gene Transfer and Modulation for the Production of Food with Enhanced Quali-Quantitative Values: Potentials, Promises and Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Karbarz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the research and achievements of applications of molecular tools based on gene transfer and gene modulation (gene knock-down and knock-out, aimed at enhancing food production, improving food properties and producing various valuable compounds for human nutrition. Selected cases of genetically manipulated plants (biofortification and allergene silencing and animals (fish and livestock are examined. Promises and accomplishments are considered when giving topic examples of the potentials offered by some applications of molecular biology for obtaining goods, among them milk, with enhanced value, and of their impact on society at large.

  18. The role of transient receptor potential channels in metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming; Tepel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is correlated with increased cardiovascular risk and characterized by several factors, including visceral obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Several members of a large family of nonselective cation entry channels, e.g., transient receptor potential (TRP......) canonical (TRPC), vanilloid (TRPV), and melastatin (TRPM) channels, have been associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Thus, disruption of TRP channel expression or function may account for the observed increased cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome patients. TRPV1 regulates...... adipogenesis and inflammation in adipose tissues, whereas TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPC6, TRPV1, and TRPM7 are involved in vasoconstriction and regulation of blood pressure. Other members of the TRP family are involved in regulation of insulin secretion, lipid composition, and atherosclerosis. Although...

  19. Infliximab Biosimilars: A Promising but Unusual Treatment for Mycobacterial Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Guillermo; Ryan, Pablo; Díez, Victorino; Izquierdo, Elsa; Escobar, Ismael; Solís, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome can present as a paradoxical reaction after initiation of antiretroviral treatment in patients with severe immunosuppression and underlying infections. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has often been associated with mycobacteria, and the clinical response to traditional treatment with corticosteroids is not always satisfactory. Consequently, administration of an infliximab biosimilar could lead to an improvement in the clinical status of these patients. PMID:28948183

  20. Satellite provided customer promises services, a forecast of potential domestic demand through the year 2000. Volume 4: Sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvil, D.; Bowyer, J.; Bhushan, C.; Steinnagel, K.; Kaushal, D.; Al-Kinani, G.

    1984-03-01

    The overall purpose was to forecast the potential United States domestic telecommunications demand for satellite provided customer promises voice, data and video services through the year 2000, so that this information on service demand would be available to aid in NASA program planning. To accomplish this overall purpose the following objectives were achieved: (1) development of a forecast of the total domestic telecommunications demand; (2) identification of that portion of the telecommunications demand suitable for transmission by satellite systems; (3) identification of that portion of the satellite market addressable by consumer promises service (CPS) systems; (4) identification of that portion of the satellite market addressable by Ka-band CPS system; and (5) postulation of a Ka-band CPS network on a nationwide and local level. The approach employed included the use of a variety of forecasting models, a parametric cost model, a market distribution model and a network optimization model. Forecasts were developed for: 1980, 1990, and 2000; voice, data and video services; terrestrial and satellite delivery modes; and C, Ku and Ka-bands.

  1. The potential of infant fMRI research and the study of early life stress as a promising exemplar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. Graham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI research with infants and toddlers has increased rapidly over the past decade, and provided a unique window into early brain development. In the current report, we review the state of the literature, which has established the feasibility and utility of task-based fMRI and resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI during early periods of brain maturation. These methodologies have been successfully applied beginning in the neonatal period to increase understanding of how the brain both responds to environmental stimuli, and becomes organized into large-scale functional systems that support complex behaviors. We discuss the methodological challenges posed by this promising area of research. We also highlight that despite these challenges, early work indicates a strong potential for these methods to influence multiple research domains. As an example, we focus on the study of early life stress and its influence on brain development and mental health outcomes. We illustrate the promise of these methodologies for building on, and making important contributions to, the existing literature in this field.

  2. Design and synthesis of substituted morpholin/piperidin-1-yl-carbamodithioates as promising vaginal microbicides with spermicidal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Veenu; Jangir, Santosh; Kumar, Vikas; Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Gupta, Sonal; Kumar, Lalit; Kushwaha, Bhavana; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Krishna, Atul; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Shukla, Praveen K; Bhatta, Rabi S; Gupta, Gopal; Sharma, Vishnu L

    2014-12-15

    A series of seventeen morpholin/piperidin-1-yl-carbamodithioate (3-19) were synthesized as topical vaginal microbicidal spermicides. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-Trichomonas activity against MTZ susceptible and resistant strains along with their spermicidal and antifungal potential. All the synthesized compounds were assessed for their safety through cytotoxic assay against human cervical cell line (HeLa) and compatibility with vaginal flora, Lactobacillus. The study identified eleven dually active compounds with apparent safety. The plausible mode of action of these compounds was through sulfhydryl binding, confirmed via reduction in available free thiols on human sperm. The most promising compound 9 significantly inhibited (P<0.001) thiol-sensitive sperm hexokinase. The stability of compound 9 in simulated vaginal fluid (SVF) was performed via HPLC-PDA method, which supported its utility for vaginal administration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Potential hazards and technical considerations associated with myocardial cell transplantation protocols for ischemic myocardial syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Dor, Itsik; Fuchs, Shmuel; Kornowski, Ran

    2006-10-17

    Cell transplantation has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic approach to ischemic cardiomyopathy syndromes. Clinical studies suggest important benefits, including improved myocardial perfusion and function. The safety profile so far seems to be high overall, although the technique may harbor several adverse effects, such as ventricular arrhythmia, acceleration of atherosclerosis or restenosis, and induction of ischemic events. Multiple factors may affect the safety of cell infusion into the diseased heart, including the mode of delivery, the type of cells injected, compound characterization, and the heart status, function, and arrhythmogenic potential. Also, any adjunctive treatment used to enhance cellular homing and/or transdifferentiation increases the likelihood of unexpected local or systemic toxicity or side effects. In the present review, we discuss the potential hazards of this novel treatment and its relationship to technical considerations.

  4. Rikkunshito, a ghrelin potentiator, ameliorates anorexia-cachexia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki eFujitsuka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia-cachexia syndrome develops during the advanced stages of various chronic diseases in which patients exhibit a decreased food intake, weight loss, and muscle tissue wasting. For these patients, this syndrome is a critical problem leading to an increased rate of morbidity and mortality. The present pharmacological therapies for treating anorexia-cachexia have limited effectiveness. The Japanese herbal medicine rikkunshito is often prescribed for the treatment of anorexia and upper gastrointestinal disorders. Thus, rikkunshito is expected to be beneficial for the treatment of patients with anorexia-cachexia syndrome. In this review, we summarize the effects of rikkunshito and its mechanisms of action on anorexia-cachexia.Persistent loss of appetite leads to a progressive depletion of body energy stores, which is frequently associated with cachexia. Consequently, regulating appetite and energy homeostasis is critically important for treating cachexia. Ghrelin is mainly secreted from the stomach, and it plays an important role in initiating feeding, controlling gastrointestinal motility, and regulating energy expenditure. Recent clinical and basic science studies have demonstrated that the critical mechanism of rikkunshito underlies endogenous ghrelin activity. Interestingly, several components of rikkunshito target multiple gastric and central sites, and regulate the secretion, receptor sensitization, and degradation of ghrelin. Rikkunshito is effective for the treatment of anorexia, body weight loss, muscle wasting, and anxiety-related behavior. Furthermore, treatment with rikkunshito was observed to prolong survival in an animal model of cachexia. The use of a potentiator of ghrelin signaling, such as rikkunshito, may represent a novel approach for the treatment of anorexia-cachexia syndrome.

  5. Hepatoblastoma and prune belly syndrome: a potential association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becknell, Brian; Pais, Priya; Onimoe, Grace; Rangarajan, Hemalatha; Schwaderer, Andrew L; McHugh, Kirk; Ranalli, Mark A; Hains, David S

    2011-08-01

    Prune belly syndrome (PBS) is a congenital anomaly characterized by the clinical triad of lax abdominal musculature, bilateral cryptorchidism, and abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract. Previous reports of malignancy in patients with PBS have been limited to germ cell tumors. Hepatoblastoma (HBL) is the most common hepatic malignancy of childhood, affecting approximately 100 children each year in the USA. We describe a set of 4 pediatric patients with PBS and HBL. All individuals were born after 2002. These subjects lacked genetic, natal, or environmental factors known to confer risk of HBL. The occurrence of PBS and HBL in these patients constitutes a novel potential association.

  6. Adapting Phonological Awareness Interventions for Children with Down Syndrome Based on the Behavioral Phenotype: A Promising Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Christopher J.; King, Seth A.; Davidson, Kimberly A.; Puranik, Cynthia S.; Fulmer, Deborah; Mrachko, Alicia A.; Partanen, Jane; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Fidler, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Many children with Down syndrome demonstrate deficits in phonological awareness, a prerequisite to learning to read in an alphabetic language. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adapting a commercially available phonological awareness program to better align with characteristics associated with the behavioral phenotype of Down…

  7. Gene expression profiling in a mouse model identifies fetal liver- and placenta-derived potential biomarkers for Down Syndrome screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen L A Pennings

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As a first step to identify novel potential biomarkers for prenatal Down Syndrome screening, we analyzed gene expression in embryos of wild type mice and the Down Syndrome model Ts1Cje. Since current Down Syndrome screening markers are derived from placenta and fetal liver, these tissues were chosen as target. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Placenta and fetal liver at 15.5 days gestation were analyzed by microarray profiling. We confirmed increased expression of genes located at the trisomic chromosomal region. Overall, between the two genotypes more differentially expressed genes were found in fetal liver than in placenta. Furthermore, the fetal liver data are in line with the hematological aberrations found in humans with Down Syndrome as well as Ts1Cje mice. Together, we found 25 targets that are predicted (by Gene Ontology, UniProt, or the Human Plasma Proteome project to be detectable in human serum. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Fetal liver might harbor more promising targets for Down Syndrome screening studies. We expect these new targets will help focus further experimental studies on identifying and validating human maternal serum biomarkers for Down Syndrome screening.

  8. Identification of potentially safe promising fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide natural food colorants using chemotaxonomic rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapari, Sameer As; Meyer, Anne S; Thrane, Ulf; Frisvad, Jens C

    2009-04-27

    extrolites is a rational approach towards selection of fungal polyketide pigment producers considering the enormous chemical diversity and biodiversity of ascomycetous fungi. This rationale could be very handy for the selection of potentially safe fungal cell factories not only for polyketide pigments but also for the other industrially important polyketides; the molecular and genetic basis for the biosynthesis of which has not yet been examined in detail. In addition, 4 out of the 10 chemotaxonomically selected promising Penicillium strains were shown to produce extracellular pigments in the liquid media using a solid support indicating future cell factory possibilities for polyketide natural food colorants.

  9. Identification of potentially safe promising fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide natural food colorants using chemotaxonomic rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frisvad Jens C

    2009-04-01

    of chemotaxonomic tools and a priori knowledge of fungal extrolites is a rational approach towards selection of fungal polyketide pigment producers considering the enormous chemical diversity and biodiversity of ascomycetous fungi. This rationale could be very handy for the selection of potentially safe fungal cell factories not only for polyketide pigments but also for the other industrially important polyketides; the molecular and genetic basis for the biosynthesis of which has not yet been examined in detail. In addition, 4 out of the 10 chemotaxonomically selected promising Penicillium strains were shown to produce extracellular pigments in the liquid media using a solid support indicating future cell factory possibilities for polyketide natural food colorants.

  10. Identification of potentially safe promising fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide natural food colorants using chemotaxonomic rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapari, Sameer AS; Meyer, Anne S; Thrane, Ulf; Frisvad, Jens C

    2009-01-01

    a priori knowledge of fungal extrolites is a rational approach towards selection of fungal polyketide pigment producers considering the enormous chemical diversity and biodiversity of ascomycetous fungi. This rationale could be very handy for the selection of potentially safe fungal cell factories not only for polyketide pigments but also for the other industrially important polyketides; the molecular and genetic basis for the biosynthesis of which has not yet been examined in detail. In addition, 4 out of the 10 chemotaxonomically selected promising Penicillium strains were shown to produce extracellular pigments in the liquid media using a solid support indicating future cell factory possibilities for polyketide natural food colorants. PMID:19397825

  11. A study of new potential risk factors for Down syndrome in Upper Egypt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hatem M.A. Shalaby

    Down syndrome;. Possible risk factors;. Sohag;. Upper Egypt. Abstract Down syndrome is a common chromosomal anomaly causing multiple congenital mal- formations ... clarify that issue and throw some lights on other potential risk factors in Down syndrome. ..... coffee consumption on the risk of having a recognized Down.

  12. Fuzzy promises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Thomas Boysen; Kappel, Klemens; Eadie, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    This article clarifies the commonplace assumption that brands make promises by developing definitions of brand promise delivery. Distinguishing between clear and fuzzy brand promises, we develop definitions of what it is for a brand to deliver on fuzzy functional, symbolic, and experiential...

  13. Hyperuricemia as a Potential Determinant of Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Lee, Eun Soo; Kim, Hong Min; Lee, Eun Young; Choi, Eunhee; Chung, Choon Hee

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on hyperuricemia as a modulator for metabolic syndrome. Hyperuricemia has reported in many studies as a causal marker in a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In fact, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, obesity and hypertension, each of these variables of metabolic syndrome gets influenced by the serum uric acid level. High level of uric acid has been associated with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Hyperuricemia has attributed t...

  14. Neonatal Cushing Syndrome: A Rare but Potentially Devastating Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsi, Christina; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2018-03-01

    Neonatal Cushing syndrome (CS) is most commonly caused by exogenous administration of glucocorticoids and rarely by endogenous hypercortisolemia. CS owing to adrenal lesions is the most common cause of endogenous CS in neonates and infants, and adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) represent most cases. Many ACTs develop in the context of a TP53 gene mutation, which causes Li-Fraumeni syndrome. More rarely, neonatal CS presents as part of other syndromes such as McCune-Albright syndrome or Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Management usually includes resection of the primary tumor with or without additional medical treatment, but manifestations may persist after resolution of hypercortisolemia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. The Potential Use of Salivary miRNAs as Promising Biomarkers for Detection of Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuanjie; Ma, Qing; Liu, Fen; Zhao, Lei; Wei, Wenqiang

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) could serve as promising molecular biomarkers for cancer detection. This study aims to systematically assess the diagnostic performance of salivary miRNAs in detection of cancer through a comprehensive meta-analysis. Eligible studies were identified using PubMed and other computerized databases up to October 31, 2015, supplemented by a manual search of references from retrieved articles. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and other measurements of accuracy of salivary miRNAs in the diagnosis of cancer were analyzed using the bivariate binomial mixed model. Seventeen studies from 8 articles with 694 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. All studies have a relatively high score of quality assessment. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of salivary miRNAs in detection of cancer were 0.77 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.69-0.84), 0.77 (95%CI: 0.65-0.88), 3.37 (95%CI: 2.26-5.02), 0.29 (95%CI: 0.23-0.38), and 11.41 (95%CI: 7.35-17.73), respectively. The AUC was 0.84 (95%CI: 0.80-0.87). Moreover, both whole saliva and saliva supernatant could be used as sources of clinical specimens for miRNAs detection. Our meta-analysis demonstrated that salivary miRNAs may serve as potential noninvasive biomarkers for cancer detection. The findings need to be confirmed with further research before it can be applied in the clinic.

  16. Poor oral health, a potential new geriatric syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Putten, Gert-Jan; de Baat, Cees; De Visschere, Luc; Schols, Jos

    2014-02-01

    This article presents a brief introduction to the medical aspects of ageing and age-related diseases, and to some geriatric syndromes, followed by a discussion on their impact on general and oral healthcare provision to community-dwelling older people. Recent investigations suggest that inflammation constitutes a biological foundation of ageing and the onset of age-related diseases. Multimorbidity and polypharmacy, together with alterations in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, make older people at risk of adverse medication reactions. A side effect of several medications is causing xerostomia and hyposalivation, and both the type and number of medications used are relevant. New options of general healthcare provision to community-dwelling older people are the use of mobility aids and assistive technology devices, domiciliary health care, respite care and telecare. Their oral health status may be jeopardised by frailty, disability, care dependency and limited access to professional oral health care. Recommendations for improvement are the following: better integrating oral health care into general health care, developing and implementing an oral healthcare guideline, providing customised oral hygiene care aids, domiciliary oral healthcare provision, visiting dental hygienists and/or nurses, oral hygiene telecare, easily and safely accessible dental offices, transforming dentistry into medical oral health care and upgrading dentists to oral physicians. In case oral healthcare providers do not take the responsibility of persuading society of the importance of adequate oral health, weakened oral health of community-dwelling older people will become a potential new geriatric syndrome. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Evaluation of functional characteristics of preactivated thiolated chitosan as potential therapeutic agent for dry mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffleur, Flavia; Fischer, Alexander; Schmutzler, Matthias; Hintzen, Fabian; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate preactivated thiomers for their potential in the treatment of dry mouth syndrome. Chitosan-thioglycolic-mercaptonicotinamide conjugates (chitosan-TGA-MNA) were synthesized by the oxidative S-S coupling of chitosan-thioglycolic acid (chitosan-TGA) with 6-mercaptonicotinamide (MNA). Test disks were compressed out of unmodified chitosan, chitosan-TGA (thiomers) and chitosan-TGA-MNA conjugates to investigate cohesive properties, cytotoxicity assays and mucoadhesion studies. Immobilizing the MNA achieved higher swelling and cohesive properties of chitosan-TGA-MNA conjugates compared to unmodified chitosan. Rotating cylinder studies displayed a 3.1-fold improvement of mucoadhesiveness of chitosan-TGA-MNA conjugates compared to thiolated polymers. Findings in tensile strength were in good agreement with rotating cylinder ones. Furthermore, preactivated thiomers exhibit higher stability. All conjugates were found non-toxic against Caco-2 cells. Preactivated thiolated chitosan could be a promising system for the treatment of dry mouth syndrome where mucosa requires lubrication and mucoadhesiveness. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Activated signature of antiphospholipid syndrome neutrophils reveals potential therapeutic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jason S.; Meng, He; Coit, Patrick; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Sule, Gautam; Gandhi, Alex A.; Grenn, Robert C.; Mazza, Levi F.; Ali, Ramadan A.; Renauer, Paul; Wren, Jonathan D.; Bockenstedt, Paula L.; Wang, Hui; Eitzman, Daniel T.; Sawalha, Amr H.

    2017-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies, present in one-third of lupus patients, increase the risk of thrombosis. We recently reported a key role for neutrophils — neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), in particular — in the thrombotic events that define antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). To further elucidate the role of neutrophils in APS, we performed a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of neutrophils isolated from patients with primary APS. Moreover, APS-associated venous thrombosis was modeled by treating mice with IgG prepared from APS patients, followed by partial restriction of blood flow through the inferior vena cava. In patients, APS neutrophils demonstrated a proinflammatory signature with overexpression of genes relevant to IFN signaling, cellular defense, and intercellular adhesion. For in vivo studies, we focused on P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), a key adhesion molecule overexpressed in APS neutrophils. The introduction of APS IgG (as compared with control IgG) markedly potentiated thrombosis in WT mice, but not PSGL-1–KOs. PSGL-1 deficiency was also associated with reduced leukocyte vessel wall adhesion and NET formation. The thrombosis phenotype was restored in PSGL-1–deficient mice by infusion of WT neutrophils, while an anti–PSGL-1 monoclonal antibody inhibited APS IgG–mediated thrombosis in WT mice. PSGL-1 represents a potential therapeutic target in APS. PMID:28931754

  19. Hyperuricemia as a Potential Determinant of Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhananjay; Lee, Eun Soo; Kim, Hong Min; Lee, Eun Young; Choi, Eunhee; Chung, Choon Hee

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on hyperuricemia as a modulator for metabolic syndrome. Hyperuricemia has reported in many studies as a causal marker in a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome. In fact, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, obesity and hypertension, each of these variables of metabolic syndrome gets influenced by the serum uric acid level. High level of uric acid has been associated with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Hyperuricemia has attributed to hyperinsulinemia in metabolic syndrome and decreased excretion of uric acid causing endothelial dysfunction in kidney leads to renal disease and cardiovascular disorders. This review focus on the role of uric acid in the development of metabolic syndrome and onthe possible pathophysiology. PMID:26064845

  20. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential responses in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Murad; Bayır, Ömer; Yüceege, Melike B; Karagöz, Tuğba; Fırat, Hikmet; Özdek, Ali; Akın, İstemihan; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2015-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) provokes oxidative stress and ischemia, which affects the central nervous system. The degeneration of neurons in the brainstem due to periodic hypoxia can be evaluated by vestibular and audiologic tests. The objective of this study is to determine brainstem damage in severe OSAS patients with the help of vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) responses. Prospective, randomize, double-blind. Research-training hospital. We compared cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) responses between severe OSAS patients and a control group. 54 patients were included and divided into the OSAS group, with severe OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI >70), and a control group with snoring without OSAS (AHI <5). Both groups underwent cVEMP. Bilateral recordings with simultaneous binaural logon stimulations were used during VEMP recordings. The existing p1n1 and n2p2 responses, p1, n1, n2, and p2 latencies and amplitudes, and p1n1 and n2p2 intervals were measured. Statistically significant differences were revealed between patients and controls for the response rate of the p1n1, n2p2 and p1n1, n2p2 amplitudes. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the latencies of p1, n1, n2 and p2, or the p1n1 and n2p2 intervals. The VEMP response rate was lower in severe OSAS patients, and all amplitudes were shorter than in healthy subjects. VEMP recordings in severe OSAS subjects demonstrates abnormalities in brainstem pathways. It appears that brainstem damage in severe OSAS can be detected by cVEMP recordings.

  1. The amniotic band syndrome: antenatal sonographic diagnosis and potential pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, B S; Filly, R A; Callen, P W; Golbus, M S

    1985-05-01

    Amniotic band syndrome causes a variety of fetal malformations involving the limbs, craniofacial region, and trunk. Six prenatally diagnosed cases of amniotic band syndrome are discussed. The diagnosis was based on sonographic visualization of either amniotic sheets or bands associated with fetal deformation or deformities in nonembryologic distributions known to characterize the amniotic band syndrome. Seven additional cases are considered in which an aberrant sheet of tissue with a free edge was visualized within the amniotic cavity but no restriction of fetal motion or subsequent deformity was demonstrated.

  2. Testicular dysgenesis syndrome: mechanistic insights and potential new downstream effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharpe, R.M.; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive disorders of newborn (cryptorchidism, hypospadias) and young adult males (low sperm counts, testicular germ cell cancer) are common and/or increasing in incidence. It has been hypothesized that these disorders may comprise a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) with a common origin...

  3. Testicular dysgenesis syndrome: mechanistic insights and potential new downstream effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharpe, R.M.; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive disorders of newborn (cryptorchidism, hypospadias) and young adult males (low sperm counts, testicular germ cell cancer) are common and/or increasing in incidence. It has been hypothesized that these disorders may comprise a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) with a common origin...... androgen production/action during fetal testis development, may play in the origin of downstream disorders Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  4. Poor oral health, a potential new geriatric syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, G.J. van der; Baat, C. de; Visschere, L. De; Schols, J.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a brief introduction to the medical aspects of ageing and age-related diseases, and to some geriatric syndromes, followed by a discussion on their impact on general and oral healthcare provision to community-dwelling older people. Recent investigations suggest that inflammation

  5. Tumor necrosis factor alpha is a promising circulating biomarker for the development of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingsheng; Zheng, Xin

    2017-04-18

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder. The relationship between tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and OSAS has been widely evaluated, but the results thus far remain inconclusive. We thereby decided to quantify the changes of TNF-alpha between OSAS patients and controls by a meta-analysis. This study complies with the MOOSE guidelines. Two reviewers independently searched articles and abstracted relevant data. In total, 47 articles (59 studies) were analyzed, including 2857 OSAS patients and 2115 controls. Overall, OSAS patients had a significantly higher level of circulating TNF-alpha than controls (weighted mean difference [WMD]: 9.66 pg/mL, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.66 to 11.24, Pgrades of OSAS. In patients with mild, mild-to-moderate, moderate, moderate-to-severe and severe OSAS, circulating TNF-alpha was higher than respective controls by 0.99, 1.48. 7.79, 10.08 and 8.85 pg/mL, with significant heterogeneity (I2: 91.2%, 74.5%, 97.6%, 99.0% and 98.1%). In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that circulating TNF-alpha was significantly higher in OSAS patients than in controls, and this difference became more pronounced with the more severe grades of OSAS, indicating that TNF-alpha might be a promising circulating biomarker for the development of OSAS.

  6. Identification of potentially safe promising fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide natural food colorants using chemotaxonomic rationale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mapari, Sameer Shamsuddin; Meyer, Anne S.; Thrane, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    cultivation technology. This approach could secure efficient production of pigments avoiding use of genetic manipulation. Results: Polyketide pigment producing ascomycetous fungi were evaluated for their potential as production organisms based on a priori knowledge on species-specific pigment and potential...... mycotoxin production and BioSafety level (BSL) classification. Based on taxonomic knowledge, we pre-selected ascomycetous fungi belonging to Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium that produced yellow, orange or red pigments while deselecting Penicillium marneffei; a well known human pathogen in addition......Background: Colorants derived from natural sources look set to overtake synthetic colorants in market value as manufacturers continue to meet the rising demand for clean label ingredients-particularly in food applications. Many ascomycetous fungi naturally synthesize and secrete pigments and thus...

  7. Emerging clinical applications of PET based molecular imaging in oncology: the promising future potential for evolving personalized cancer care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhingra, Vandana K; Mahajan, Abhishek; Basu, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the potential of advanced applications of functional molecular imaging in assessing tumor biology and cellular characteristics with emphasis on positron emission tomography (PET) applications with both 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and non-FDG tracers. The inherent heterogeneity of cancer cells with their varied cellular biology and metabolic and receptor phenotypic expression in each individual patient and also intra-and inter-lesionally in the same individual mandates for transitioning from a generalized “same-size-fits-all” approach to personalized medicine in oncology. The past two decades have witnessed improvement of oncological imaging through CT, MR imaging, PET, subsequent movement through hybrid or fusion imaging with PET/CT and single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT-CT), and now toward the evolving PET/MR imaging. These recent developments have proven invaluable in enhancing oncology care and have the potential to help image the tumor biology at the cellular level, followed by providing a tailored treatment. Molecular imaging, integrated diagnostics or Radiomics, biology-driven interventional radiology and theranostics, all hold immense potential to serve as a guide to give “start and stop” treatment for a patient on an individual basis. This will likely have substantial impact on both treatment costs and outcomes. In this review, we bring forth the current trends in molecular imaging with established techniques (PET/CT), with particular emphasis on newer molecules (such as amino acid metabolism and hypoxia imaging, somatostatin receptor based imaging, and hormone receptor imaging) and further potential for FDG. An introductory discussion on the novel hybrid imaging techniques such as PET/MR is also made to understand the futuristic trends

  8. Emerging clinical applications of PET based molecular imaging in oncology: the promising future potential for evolving personalized cancer care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana K Dhingra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the potential of advanced applications of functional molecular imaging in assessing tumor biology and cellular characteristics with emphasis on positron emission tomography (PET applications with both 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG and non-FDG tracers. The inherent heterogeneity of cancer cells with their varied cellular biology and metabolic and receptor phenotypic expression in each individual patient and also intra-and inter-lesionally in the same individual mandates for transitioning from a generalized "same-size-fits-all" approach to personalized medicine in oncology. The past two decades have witnessed improvement of oncological imaging through CT, MR imaging, PET, subsequent movement through hybrid or fusion imaging with PET/CT and single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT-CT, and now toward the evolving PET/MR imaging. These recent developments have proven invaluable in enhancing oncology care and have the potential to help image the tumor biology at the cellular level, followed by providing a tailored treatment. Molecular imaging, integrated diagnostics or Radiomics, biology-driven interventional radiology and theranostics, all hold immense potential to serve as a guide to give "start and stop" treatment for a patient on an individual basis. This will likely have substantial impact on both treatment costs and outcomes. In this review, we bring forth the current trends in molecular imaging with established techniques (PET/CT, with particular emphasis on newer molecules (such as amino acid metabolism and hypoxia imaging, somatostatin receptor based imaging, and hormone receptor imaging and further potential for FDG. An introductory discussion on the novel hybrid imaging techniques such as PET/MR is also made to understand the futuristic trends.

  9. A calcium-dependent protease as a potential therapeutic target for Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Simin; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Hara, Takashi; Mahadevan, Jana; Spears, Larry D; Oslowski, Christine M; Martinez, Rita; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Toyoda, Masashi; Neilson, Amber; Blanner, Patrick; Brown, Cris M; Semenkovich, Clay F; Marshall, Bess A; Hershey, Tamara; Umezawa, Akihiro; Greer, Peter A; Urano, Fumihiko

    2014-12-09

    Wolfram syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by diabetes and neurodegeneration and considered as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) disease. Despite the underlying importance of ER dysfunction in Wolfram syndrome and the identification of two causative genes, Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) and Wolfram syndrome 2 (WFS2), a molecular mechanism linking the ER to death of neurons and β cells has not been elucidated. Here we implicate calpain 2 in the mechanism of cell death in Wolfram syndrome. Calpain 2 is negatively regulated by WFS2, and elevated activation of calpain 2 by WFS2-knockdown correlates with cell death. Calpain activation is also induced by high cytosolic calcium mediated by the loss of function of WFS1. Calpain hyperactivation is observed in the WFS1 knockout mouse as well as in neural progenitor cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells of Wolfram syndrome patients. A small-scale small-molecule screen targeting ER calcium homeostasis reveals that dantrolene can prevent cell death in neural progenitor cells derived from Wolfram syndrome iPS cells. Our results demonstrate that calpain and the pathway leading its activation provides potential therapeutic targets for Wolfram syndrome and other ER diseases.

  10. Humanized CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins exhibit promising anti-T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Li, Jialu; Zhu, Xuejun; Tang, Xiaowen; Bao, Yangyi; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Yuhui; Tian, Fang; Liu, Xiaomei; Yang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    transplanted with CEM cells without any obvious decrease in body weight. Further studies on NCG mice model with patient-derived T-ALL cells, dhuVHH6-PE38 treatment, significantly prolonged mice survival with ~40% survival improvement. However, it was also noticed that although dhuVHH6-PE-LR showed strong antitumor effect in vitro, its in vivo antitumor efficacy was disappointing. We have successfully constructed a targeted CD7 molecule-modified nanobody (CD7 molecule-improved nanobody) immunotoxin dhuVHH6-PE38 and demonstrated its potential for treating CD7-positive malignant tumors, especially T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  11. Humanized CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins exhibit promising anti-T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2017-03-01

    all immunotoxins still maintained the ability to bind specifically to CD7-positive T lymphocyte strains without binding to CD7-negative control cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that these proteins can be endocytosed into the cytoplasm after binding with CD7-positive cells and that this phenomenon was not observed in CD7-negative cells. WST-8 experiments showed that all immunotoxins retained the highly effective and specific growth inhibition activity in CD7-positive cell lines and primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL cells. Further in vivo animal model experiments showed that humanized dhuVHH6-PE38 immunotoxin can tolerate higher doses and extend the survival of NOD-Prkdcem26Il2rgem26Nju (NCG mice transplanted with CEM cells without any obvious decrease in body weight. Further studies on NCG mice model with patient-derived T-ALL cells, dhuVHH6-PE38 treatment, significantly prolonged mice survival with ~40% survival improvement. However, it was also noticed that although dhuVHH6-PE-LR showed strong antitumor effect in vitro, its in vivo antitumor efficacy was disappointing. Conclusion: We have successfully constructed a targeted CD7 molecule-modified nanobody (CD7 molecule-improved nanobody immunotoxin dhuVHH6-PE38 and demonstrated its potential for treating CD7-positive malignant tumors, especially T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Keywords: CD7, humanized nanobody, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, patient-derived xenograft model, recombinant immunotoxins, Pseudomonas exotoxin A

  12. Functional foods as potential therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L; Poudyal, H; Panchal, S K

    2015-11-01

    Obesity as part of metabolic syndrome is a major lifestyle disorder throughout the world. Current drug treatments for obesity produce small and usually unsustainable decreases in body weight with the risk of major adverse effects. Surgery has been the only treatment producing successful long-term weight loss. As a different but complementary approach, lifestyle modification including the use of functional foods could produce a reliable decrease in obesity with decreased comorbidities. Functional foods may include fruits such as berries, vegetables, fibre-enriched grains and beverages such as tea and coffee. Although health improvements continue to be reported for these functional foods in rodent studies, further evidence showing the translation of these results into humans is required. Thus, the concept that these fruits and vegetables will act as functional foods in humans to reduce obesity and thereby improve health remains intuitive and possible rather than proven. © 2015 World Obesity.

  13. Gene expression profiling in a mouse model identifies fetal liver- and placenta-derived potential biomarkers for Down syndrome screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, J.L.A.; Rodenburg, W.; Imholz, S.; Koster, M.P.H.; van Oostrom, C.T.M.; Breit, T.M.; Schielen, P.C.J.I.; de Vries, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: As a first step to identify novel potential biomarkers for prenatal Down Syndrome screening, we analyzed gene expression in embryos of wild type mice and the Down Syndrome model Ts1Cje. Since current Down Syndrome screening markers are derived from placenta and fetal liver, these tissues

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Metabolic Syndrome: Current Understanding and Potential Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Matsushita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is an obesity-based, complicated clinical condition that has become a global epidemic problem with a high associated risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes or glucose dysmetabolism are the major factors constituting metabolic syndrome, and these factors are interrelated and share underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Severe obesity predisposes individuals to metabolic syndrome, and recent data suggest that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs contribute significantly to adipocyte generation by increasing the number of adipocytes. Accordingly, an increasing number of studies have examined the potential roles of MSCs in managing obesity and metabolic syndrome. However, despite the growing bank of experimental and clinical data, the efficacy and the safety of MSCs in the clinical setting are still to be optimized. It is thus hoped that ongoing and future studies can elucidate the roles of MSCs in metabolic syndrome and lead to MSC-based therapeutic options for affected patients. This review discusses current understanding of the relationship between MSCs and metabolic syndrome and its potential implications for patient management.

  15. The potential role of antioxidants in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregório, Bianca Martins; De Souza, Diogo Benchimol; de Morais Nascimento, Fernanda Amorim; Pereira, Leonardo Matta; Fernandes-Santos, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of risk factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as obesity. The clustering of metabolic abnormality is closely related to oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as the progression of atherosclerosis. Antioxidants are reducing agents which inhibit the oxidation of other molecules and can be used not only to prevent but also to treat health complications of MS and atherosclerosis. They can be ingested in the normal diet, since they are found in many food sources, or in supplement formulations. Herein, we aim to review the literature concerning the effect of antioxidants on MS. We focus on antioxidants with some evidence of action on this condition, like flavonoids, arginine, vitamin C, vitamin E, carotenoids, resveratrol and selenium. Experimental and clinical studies show that most of the above-mentioned antioxidants exhibit a wide range of effects in protecting the human body, especially in MS patients. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated for most of these compounds. Also, some of them should be used with caution because their excess can be toxic to the body. In general, antioxidants (especially those present in foods) can be used by MS individuals because of their direct effect on oxidative stress. Additionally, they should be encouraged as part of a nutritional lifestyle change, since this is part of the therapy for all diseases involved in metabolic disorders.

  16. Meconium aspiration syndrome: possible pathophysiological mechanisms and future potential therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenskov, Paal Helge Haakonsen; Castellheim, Albert; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Does meconium cause meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) or is meconium discharge only a marker of fetal hypoxia? This dispute has lasted for centuries, but since the 1960s, detrimental effects of meconium itself on the lungs have been demonstrated in animal experiments. In clinical MAS, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn is the leading cause of death in MAS. Regarding the complex chemical composition of meconium, it is difficult to identify a single agent responsible for the pathophysiology. However, considering that meconium is stored in the intestines, partly unexposed to the immune system, aspirated meconium could be recognized as ‘danger', representing damaged self. The common denominator in the pathophysiology could therefore be activation of innate immunity. Thus, a bulk of evidence implies that meconium is a potent activator of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, complement, prostaglandins and reactive oxygen species. We hypothesize that the two main recognition systems of innate immunity, the Toll-like receptors and the complement system, recognize meconium as ‘danger', which leads not only to lung dysfunction but also to a systemic inflammatory response. This might have therapeutic implications in the future.

  17. Sickle Cell Disease in Central India: A Potentially Severe Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Dipty; Warthe, Vinit; Dayama, Paridhi; Sarate, Dilip; Colah, Roshan; Mehta, Pallavi; Serjeant, Graham

    2016-10-01

    To explore clinical, hematological and molecular features of homozygous sickle cell (SS) disease in central India. Focusing on the pediatric age group attending a clinic at the Akola Government Medical College, Akola, Maharashtra State, India, a cross-sectional assessment of 91 patients with sickle cell disease was performed during one week in March 2015. Of the 91 patients, there were 49 with SS disease, 36 with sickle cell-beta thalassemia, and 6 with sickle cell-HbD Punjab. Alpha globin gene deletions occurred in only 8/49 (16 %) SS disease but fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels were markedly elevated with mean and median of 24.4 %; all except 3 SS disease patients had the Xmn1(+/+) polymorphism consistent with the Asian haplotype. Among the 36 patients with sickle cell-beta thalassemia, 25 (69 %) had the severe beta(+) mutation, IVS1-5 G > C, and seven other molecular mutations, all beta(o) occurred in the other 11 patients. Many patients had a relatively severe clinical course. Comparison of SS disease and sickle cell-beta thalassemia showed no differences in the prevalence of dactylitis, bone pain crisis, acute chest syndrome, hemoglobin level, reticulocyte counts or hydroxyurea usage but patients with sickle cell-beta thalassemia had significantly more blood transfusions, and greater frequencies of splenomegaly and hepatomegaly. Many patients in central India have relatively severe manifestations. This may result from lower frequencies of alpha thalassemia and more frequent severe sickle cell-beta(+) thalassemia. There is a need for assessment of the indications and policies for blood transfusion and for hydroxyurea.

  18. Maternal phenylketonuria syndrome: studies in mice suggest a potential approach to a continuing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeile, William L; McCune, Helen C; Musson, Donald G; O'Donnell, Brian; O'Neill, Charles A; Tsuruda, Laurie S; Zori, Roberto T; Laipis, Philip J

    2018-01-31

    BackgroundUntreated phenylketonuria (PKU), one of the most common human genetic disorders, usually results in mental retardation. Although a protein-restricted artificial diet can prevent retardation, dietary compliance in adults is often poor. In pregnant PKU women, noncompliance can result in maternal PKU syndrome, where high phenylalanine (Phe) levels cause severe fetal complications. Enzyme substitution therapy using Phe ammonia lyase (PAL) corrects PKU in BTBR Phe hydroxylase (Pah enu2 ) mutant mice, suggesting a potential for maternal PKU syndrome treatment in humans.MethodsWe reviewed clinical data to assess maternal PKU syndrome incidence in pregnant PKU women. We treated female PKU mice (on normal diet) with PAL, stabilizing Phe at physiological levels, and mated them to assess pregnancy outcomes.ResultsPatient records show that, unfortunately, the efficacy of diet to prevent maternal PKU syndrome has not significantly improved since the problem was first noted 40 years ago. PAL treatment of pregnant PKU mice shows that offspring of PAL-treated dams survive to adulthood, in contrast to the complete lethality seen in untreated mice, or limited survival seen in mice on a PKU diet.ConclusionPAL treatment reduced maternal PKU syndrome severity in mice and may have potential for human PKU therapy.Pediatric Research advance online publication, 31 January 2018; doi:10.1038/pr.2017.323.

  19. Potential health benefits of Indian spices in the symptoms of the metabolic syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Abishek; Panchal, Sunil; Poudyal, Hemant; Brown, Lindsay

    2009-12-01

    Spices used in Indian cooking have a long history of use as medicines to prevent and treat diseases. Many studies have confirmed that spices can be useful medicines, but the major challenge is now to provide scientific evidence and plausible mechanisms for their therapeutic responses. This review focuses on the therapeutic potential of Indian spices to treat multiple symptoms of the metabolic syndrome such as insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity, altered lipid profile and hypertension. The metabolic syndrome is prevalent and has become an important financial burden to the healthcare system in both developed and developing countries. Inflammation and oxidative stress have been proposed as initiators of the metabolic syndrome, especially of insulin resistance. Natural products with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties are found in spices. Adequate doses of these compounds may be effective in treating the metabolic syndrome. Testing these potential treatments requires adequate animal models, usually rodents, so the limitations of these models are important. Furthermore, this review highlights the need for adequate legislation and regulation to ensure the safety and success of evidence-based functional foods and nutraceuticals. Spices, Diabetes, Cardiovascular disease, Metabolic syndrome, Inflammation, Oxidative stress,

  20. Dipyridamole Body Surface Potential Mapping: Noninvasive Differentiation of Syndrome X from Coronary Artery Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boudík, F.; Anger, Z.; Aschermann, M.; Vojáček, J.; Tomečková, Marie

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 3 (2002), s. 181-191 ISSN 0022-0736 R&D Projects: GA MZd IZ4038 Keywords : body surface potential mapping * dipyridamole * coronary artery disease * syndrome X Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 0.599, year: 2002

  1. CXCR4-specific Nanobodies as potential therapeutics for WHIM syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Wit, Raymond H; Heukers, Raimond; Brink, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    effective approach, we tested the potency and efficacy of CXCR4-specific Nanobodies on inhibiting CXCR4-WHIM mutants. Nanobodies(®) are therapeutic proteins based on the smallest functional fragments of heavy chain antibodies. They combine the advantages of small-molecule drugs and antibody......-based therapeutics due to their relative small size, high stability and high affinity. We compared the potential of monovalent and bivalent CXCR4-specific Nanobodies to inhibit CXCL12-induced CXCR4-WHIM-mediated signaling with the small molecule clinical candidate AMD3100. The CXCR4-targeting Nanobodies displace...... CXCL12 binding and bind CXCR4-WT and -WHIM (R334X/S338X) mutants and with (sub-) nanomolar affinities. The Nanobodies' epitope was mapped to the extracellular loop 2 of CXCR4, overlapping with the binding site of CXCL12. Monovalent, and in particular bivalent Nanobodies were more potent than AMD3100...

  2. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome: a complex case demonstrating the potential for misdiagnosis as asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (Jeune syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keogh Steven J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differential diagnosis of a neonate or fetus presenting with a bell-shaped or long narrow thorax includes a wide range of bony dysplasia syndromes. Where this is accompanied by respiratory distress, asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD, Jeune syndrome is an important potential diagnosis. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS is widely recognised as a cause of exocrine pancreatic dysfunction, short stature and bone marrow failure. It is not so well appreciated that rib and/or thoracic cage abnormalities occur in 30–50% of patients and that, in severe cases, these abnormalities may lead to thoracic dystrophy and respiratory failure in the newborn. There are, however, at least three previous case reports of children who were initially diagnosed with ATD who were subsequently shown to have SDS. Case presentation This report details the case history of a patient misdiagnosed as having ATD as a neonate following the neonatal asphyxial death of her brother. She subsequently developed progressive pancytopenia but was only diagnosed with SDS at 11 years of age after referral for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for bone marrow failure accompanied by trilineage dysplasia and clonal cytogenetic abnormalities on bone marrow examination. Subsequent testing revealed the presence of fat globules in stools, reduced faecal chymotrypsin, fat-soluble vitamin deficiency, metaphyseal dysplasia on skeletal survey and heterozygous mutations of the SBDS gene. Conclusion This report highlights the potential for diagnostic confusion between ATD and SDS. It is important to include SDS in the differential diagnosis of newborns with thoracic dystrophy and to seek expert clinical and radiological assessment of such children.

  3. Grapes (Vitis vinifera) as a Potential Candidate for the Therapy of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaberi, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Hosein

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with several disorders, including hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia as well as cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Plant-derived polyphenols, compounds found in numerous plant species, play an important role as potential treatments for components of metabolic syndrome. Studies have provided evidence for protective effects of various polyphenol-rich foods against metabolic syndrome. Fruits, vegetables, cereals, nuts, and berries are rich in polyphenolic compounds. Grapes (Vitis vinifera), especially grape seeds, stand out as rich sources of polyphenol potent antioxidants and have been reported helpful for inhibiting the risk factors involved in the metabolic syndrome such as hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. There are also many studies about gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, and anti-obesity effects of grape polyphenolic compounds especially proanthocyanidins in the literature. The present study investigates the protective effects of grape seeds in metabolic syndrome. The results of this study show that grape polyphenols have significant effects on the level of blood glucose, lipid profile, blood pressure, as well as beneficial activities in liver and heart with various mechanisms. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of grape polyphenols is discussed. More detailed mechanistic investigations and phytochemical studies for finding the exact bioactive component(s) and molecular signaling pathways are suggested. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Conduction abnormalities in the right ventricular outflow tract in Brugada syndrome detected body surface potential mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillem, Maria S; Climent, Andreu M; Millet, Jose; Berne, Paola; Ramos, Rafael; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) causes sudden death in patients with structurally normal hearts. Manifestation of BrS in the ECG is dynamical and most patients do not show unequivocal signs of the syndrome during ECG screening. We have obtained 67-lead body surface potential mapping recordings of 25 patients with BrS and analyzed their spatial distribution of surface potentials during ventricular activation. Six patients presented spontaneous type I ECGs during the recording. These patients showed non-dipolarities in isopotential maps at the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) region during the development of terminal R waves in right precordial leads. Same finding was observed in 95% of BrS patients not presenting a type I ECG. Conduction delay in the RVOT may be a consistent finding in BrS patients that can be identified by Body Surface Potential Mapping.

  5. A Potential Life-Threatening Reaction to Glatiramer Acetate in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenkorn, Andreea; Kidon, Mona; Ben-Zeev, Bruria

    2017-03-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder manifesting with severe intellectual disability in females caused by various mutations in the MECP2 gene. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the main proteins regulated by the MECP2 protein; its overexpression in the MeCP2 mouse model partially corrects the Rett phenotype. Pharmacologic manipulations that lead to increased BDNF in individuals with Rett syndrome are expected to have a positive effect on the disorder. Glatiramer acetate, a well-known and safe multiple sclerosis immune modulator, increases BDNF levels in multiple sclerosis animal models and patients responding to treatment, as well as in Rett mouse models. Fourteen patients with mutation-proven Rett syndrome were recruited for a clinical trial with glatiramer acetate. Baseline data and follow-up data were collected during the trial, which had to be stopped because of a severe adverse event. Our objective is to describe this unexpected potentially life-threatening event in response to glatiramer in patients with Rett syndrome. Four of 14 patients with Rett syndrome who were recruited and treated with daily injections of glatiramer acetate as part of an open-label clinical trial developed an exaggerated immediate postinjection response, which was experienced as life threatening in three of the patients, necessitating arrest of the trial. Despite the known safety profile of glatiramer acetate in adult and pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis, its use in Rett syndrome should be cautiously reconsidered. The described severe adverse event can be related to these patients' primary autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of Hydrogen Rich Water on Antioxidant Status of Subjects with Potential Metabolic Syndrome?An Open Label Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nakao, Atsunori; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Sharma, Prachi; Evans, Malkanthi; Guthrie, Najla

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by cardiometabolic risk factors that include obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Oxidative stress is known to play a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of hydrogen rich water (1.5?2?L/day) in an open label, 8-week study on 20 subjects with potential metabolic syndrome. Hydrogen rich water was produced, by placing a metallic magnesium stick into drinking w...

  7. Diethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone): a novel highly potent inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase with promising properties for potential chemotherapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, H; Mutikainen, I; Alhonen-Hongisto, L; Laine, R; Jänne, J

    1988-07-01

    Diethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (DEGBG), a novel analog of the antileukemic agent methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) was synthesized. It was found to be the most powerful inhibitor of yeast S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) so far studied (Ki approx. 9 nM). This property, together with the finding that the compound is a weaker inhibitor of intestinal diamine oxidase than are MGBG and its glyoxal, ethylglyoxal and ethylmethylglyoxal analogs, makes the compound a promising candidate as a polyamine antimetabolite for chemotherapy studies. DEGBG was also found to potentiate the antiproliferative effect of the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor alpha-difluoromethyl ornithine against mouse L1210 leukemia cells in vitro. DEGBG increased several-fold the intracellular putrescine concentration of cultured L1210 cells, just as MGBG and its ethylglyoxal analog are known to do. The results strongly suggest that DEGBG is worth further studies. Combined with previous studies, they also made possible the construction of some empirical rules concerning the structure-activity relationships of bis(guanylhydrazone) type inhibitors of AdoMetDC. The identity of DEGBG was confirmed by a single-crystal X-ray analysis and by 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. It consisted of the same isomer as MGBG and several of its analogs are known to consist of.

  8. Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS): a systematic review of anatomy and potential risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Waryasz, Gregory R; McDermott, Ann Y

    2008-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), a common cause of anterior knee pain, is successfully treated in over 2/3 of patients through rehabilitation protocols designed to reduce pain and return function to the individual. Applying preventive medicine strategies, the majority of cases of PFPS may be avoided if a pre-diagnosis can be made by clinician or certified athletic trainer testing the current researched potential risk factors during a Preparticipation Screening Evaluation (PPSE)...

  9. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome: potential mechanisms for the benefit of capsaicin and hot water hydrotherapy in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John R; Lapoint, Jeff M; Burillo-Putze, Guillermo

    2018-01-01

    Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a clinical disorder that has become more prevalent with increasing use of cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids, and which is difficult to treat. Standard antiemetics commonly fail to alleviate the severe nausea and vomiting characteristic of the syndrome. Curiously, cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome patients often report dramatic relief of symptoms with hot showers and baths, and topical capsaicin. In this review, we detail the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of capsaicin and explore possible mechanisms for its beneficial effect, including activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and neurohumoral regulation. Putative mechanisms responsible for the benefit of hot water hydrotherapy are also investigated. An extensive search of PubMed, OpenGrey, and Google Scholar from inception to April 2017 was performed to identify known and theoretical thermoregulatory mechanisms associated with the endocannabinoid system. The searches resulted in 2417 articles. These articles were screened for relevant mechanisms behind capsaicin and heat activation having potential antiemetic effects. References from the selected articles were also hand-searched. A total of 137 articles were considered relevant and included. Capsaicin: Topical capsaicin is primarily used for treatment of neuropathic pain, but it has also been used successfully in some 20 cases of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of capsaicin as a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 agonist may explain this effect. Topical capsaicin has a longer half-life than oral administration, thus its potential duration of benefit is longer. Capsaicin and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1: Topical capsaicin binds and activates the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor, triggering influx of calcium and sodium, as well as release of inflammatory neuropeptides leading to transient burning, stinging, and itching. This elicits

  10. Mechanisms of Anorexia Cancer Cachexia Syndrome and Potential Benefits of Traditional Medicine and Natural Herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming-Hua, Cong; Bao-Hua, Zou; Lei, Yu

    Anorexia cancer cachexia syndrome is prevalent in advanced cancer patients, which is featured by anorexia, decreased dietary intake, body weight loss (skeletal muscle mass loss), and is unable to be reversed by routine nutritional support therapy. Up to now, the main mechanisms involved in cancer cachexia include excessive systemic inflammation, which is represented by increased plasma levels of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, tumor-induced factors, such as PIF and LMF. These factors eventually act on orexigenic and anorexigenicneurons located in the hypothalamus or protein and lipid metabolism of peripheral tissues, which lead to anorexia, decreased dietary intake, enhanced basic metabolism rate and hypercatabolism. The treatment modality includes early nutritional intervention, physical activity and drug treatment. However, studies about drugs used to treat cachexia are always controversial or merely effective in stimulating appetite and increasing body weight, though not lean body mass. The main target of pharmaceutical treatment is to improve appetite, decrease systemic inflammation and promote anabolic metabolism. Nevertheless, the treatment effectiveness of chemical drugs are not reaching consensus by existing cachexia guidelines. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is recently known as a promising treatment to improve cachaxia status and quality of life of cancer patients. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural herbal medicines have been used in the treatment of cancer for thousands of years worldwide, particularly in China. More and more research show that traditional Hanfang (Chinese medicines) and some natural herbs with less side reactions, have the effects of antagonizing pro-inflammatory cytokines, enhancing immune system, inhibiting protein catabolism, boosting the appetite and body weight, which maybe a promising treatment strategy and development tendency for anorexia cancer cachexia syndrome.

  11. The potential role of cardiac resynchronization therapy in acute heart failure syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Norman C; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been demonstrated to improve mortality and morbidity in patients with chronic, stable heart failure who have reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and prolonged QRS duration. Patients with acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) have been excluded from major CRT trials. The potential benefits and risks of implementation of these devices in the AHFS setting are largely unknown. In this review, we discuss the role that early implementation of CRT may have in improving postdischarge outcomes. In addition, we also discuss the potential adverse consequences of inserting these devices in patients who are in the tenuous clinical state of AHFS.

  12. Evaluation of Visual Evoked Potentials in Patient with Angelmans Syndrome - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Knezevic

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Angelman syndrome (AS is a genetic disorder with varying degrees of neurological impairment. It is often associated with ocular involvement. Case Report: We present a child diagnosed with AS who had a deletion on the short arm of chromosome 15. The child seemed to be happy, with developmental delay, speech problem, and altering strabismus. To assess the potential presence and degree of damage in the visual pathway, we recorded monocular flash visual evoked potentials (VEPs. Our results revealed the presence of severe central afferent dysfunction in both optical pathways. Conclusion: VEPs can be used in patients with AS and visual disturbances to assess the integrity of the visual system.

  13. Social jet-lag potentiates obesity and metabolic syndrome when combined with cafeteria diet in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espitia-Bautista, Estefania; Velasco-Ramos, Mario; Osnaya-Ramírez, Iván; Ángeles-Castellanos, Manuel; Buijs, Ruud M; Escobar, Carolina

    2017-07-01

    Modern lifestyle promotes shifted sleep onset and shifted wake up time between weekdays and weekends, producing a condition termed "social-jet lag." Disrupted sleep promotes increased appetite for carbohydrate and fat-rich food, which in long term leads to overweight, obesity and metabolic syndrome. In order to mimic the human situation we produced an experimental model of social-jet lag (Sj-l). With this model, we explored the link between shifted sleep time with consumption of a cafeteria diet (CafD) and the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The first experiment was designed to create and confirm the model of Sj-l. Rats (n=8-10/group) were exposed to a shifted sleep time protocol achieved by placing the rats in slow rotating wheels from Monday to Friday during the first 4h of the light period, while on weekends they were left undisturbed. The second experiment (n=8-12/group) explored the combined effect of Sj-l with the opportunity to ingest CafD. All protocols lasted 12weeks. We evaluated the development of overweight and indicators of metabolic syndrome. The statistical significance for all variables was set at P<0.05. Sj-l alone did not affect body weight gain but induced significant changes in cholesterol in metabolic variables representing a risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Daily restricted access to CafD in the day or night induced glucose intolerance and only CafD during the day led to overweight. Sj-l combined with CafD induced overconsumption of the diet, potentiated body weight gain (16%) and promoted 5 of the criteria for metabolic syndrome including high insulin and dislipidemia. Present data provide an experimental model of social-jet lag that combined with overconsumption of CafD, and maximized the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Importantly, access to CafD during the night did not lead to overweight nor metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Augmented ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials to air-conducted sound in large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachael L; Bradshaw, Andrew P; Magnussen, John S; Gibson, William P R; Halmagyi, G Michael; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate the value of recording air-conducted ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (oVEMP) in a patient with bilaterally enlarged vestibular aqueducts. Cervical VEMP and oVEMP were recorded from a patient presenting with bilateral hearing loss and imbalance, attributable to large vestibular aqueduct syndrome. The stimuli were air-conducted tone bursts at octave frequencies from 250 to 2000 Hz. Amplitudes and thresholds were measured and compared with the normal response range of 32 healthy control subjects. oVEMP reflexes demonstrated pathologically increased amplitudes and reduced thresholds for low-frequency tone bursts. Cervical VEMP amplitudes and thresholds were within normal limits for both ears across all frequencies of stimulation. This study is the first to describe the augmentation of AC oVEMPs in an adult with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

  15. Phenoxybenzamine in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Potential Role and Novel Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchiosa, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a relatively long history of the use of the α-adrenergic antagonist, phenoxybenzamine, for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). One form of this syndrome, CRPS I, was originally termed reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) because of an apparent dysregulation of the sympathetic nervous system in the region of an extremity that had been subjected to an injury or surgical procedure. The syndrome develops in the absence of any apparent continuation of the inciting trauma. Hallmarks of the condition are allodynia (pain perceived from a nonpainful stimulus) and hyperalgesia (exaggerated pain response to a painful stimulus). In addition to severe, unremitting burning pain, the affected limb is typically warm and edematous in the early weeks after trauma but then progresses to a primarily cold, dry limb in later weeks and months. The later stages are frequently characterized by changes to skin texture and nail deformities, hypertrichosis, muscle atrophy, and bone demineralization. Earlier treatments of CRPS syndromes were primarily focused on blocking sympathetic outflow to an affected extremity. The use of an α-adrenergic antagonist such as phenoxybenzamine followed from this perspective. However, the current consensus on the etiology of CRPS favors an interpretation of the symptomatology as an evidence of decreased sympathetic activity to the injured limb and a resulting upregulation of adrenergic sensitivity. The clinical use of phenoxybenzamine for the treatment of CRPS is reviewed, and mechanisms of action that include potential immunomodulatory/anti-inflammatory effects are presented. Also, a recent study identified phenoxybenzamine as a potential intervention for pain mediation from its effects on gene expression in human cell lines; on this basis, it was tested and found to be capable of reducing pain behavior in a classical animal model of chronic pain. PMID:24454356

  16. Phenoxybenzamine in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Potential Role and Novel Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Inchiosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a relatively long history of the use of the α-adrenergic antagonist, phenoxybenzamine, for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS. One form of this syndrome, CRPS I, was originally termed reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD because of an apparent dysregulation of the sympathetic nervous system in the region of an extremity that had been subjected to an injury or surgical procedure. The syndrome develops in the absence of any apparent continuation of the inciting trauma. Hallmarks of the condition are allodynia (pain perceived from a nonpainful stimulus and hyperalgesia (exaggerated pain response to a painful stimulus. In addition to severe, unremitting burning pain, the affected limb is typically warm and edematous in the early weeks after trauma but then progresses to a primarily cold, dry limb in later weeks and months. The later stages are frequently characterized by changes to skin texture and nail deformities, hypertrichosis, muscle atrophy, and bone demineralization. Earlier treatments of CRPS syndromes were primarily focused on blocking sympathetic outflow to an affected extremity. The use of an α-adrenergic antagonist such as phenoxybenzamine followed from this perspective. However, the current consensus on the etiology of CRPS favors an interpretation of the symptomatology as an evidence of decreased sympathetic activity to the injured limb and a resulting upregulation of adrenergic sensitivity. The clinical use of phenoxybenzamine for the treatment of CRPS is reviewed, and mechanisms of action that include potential immunomodulatory/anti-inflammatory effects are presented. Also, a recent study identified phenoxybenzamine as a potential intervention for pain mediation from its effects on gene expression in human cell lines; on this basis, it was tested and found to be capable of reducing pain behavior in a classical animal model of chronic pain.

  17. Potential therapeutic effect of intravesical botulinum toxin type A on bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2014-04-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is characterized by bladder pain associated with urgency, frequency, nocturia, dysuria and sterile urine. Recent studies have shown that these bladder dysfunctions could originate from chronic inflammation or urothelial insult and proceed to a cascade of tissue reactions, which finally ascends to the central nervous system. Pilot studies of intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis had been introduced since 2005 with a promising result. Recent evidence suggests that botulinum toxin type A could significantly improve symptoms such as daytime frequency, nocturia, pain, quality of life and bladder capacity in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis patients. Single injection of botulinum toxin could not achieve long-term successful therapeutic result, and repeat injections could provide a better long-term success rate. However, patients with ulcer type bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis might not gain a benefit from botulinum toxin type A injection. Laboratory evidence showed that botulinum toxin type A for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis injection could induce peripheral desensitization, reduces bladder chronic inflammation and decreases apoptotic signal molecules in the urothelium. The present article reviewed the recent advances of botulinum toxin type A on bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  18. Reconstruction of action potential of repolarization in patients with congenital long-QT syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandori, Akihiko; Shimizu, Wataru; Yokokawa, Miki; Kamakura, Shiro; Miyatake, Kunio; Murakami, Masahiro; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Ogata, Kuniomi; Tsukada, Keiji

    2004-01-01

    A method for reconstructing an action potential during the repolarization period was developed. This method uses a current distribution-plotted as a current-arrow map (CAM)-calculated using magnetocardiogram (MCG) signals. The current arrows are summarized during the QRS complex period and subtracted during the ST-T wave period in order to reconstruct the action-potential waveform. To ensure the similarity between a real action potential and the reconstructed action potential using CAM, a monophasic action potential (MAP) and an MCG of the same patient with type-I long-QT syndrome were measured. Although the MAP had one notch that was associated with early afterdepolarization (EAD), the reconstructed action potential had two large and small notches. The small notch timing agreed with the occurrence of the EAD in the MAP. On the other hand, the initiation time of an abnormal current distribution coincides with the appearance timing of the first large notch, and its end time coincides with that of the second small notch. These results suggest that a simple reconstruction method using a CAM based on MCG data can provide a similar action-potential waveform to a MAP waveform without having to introduce a catheter

  19. Promising effects of oxytocin on social and food-related behaviour in young children with Prader-Willi syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppens, R J; Donze, S H; Hokken-Koelega, A C S

    2016-12-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is known for hyperphagia with impaired satiety and a specific behavioural phenotype with stubbornness, temper tantrums, manipulative and controlling behaviour and obsessive-compulsive features. PWS is associated with hypothalamic and oxytocinergic dysfunction. In humans without PWS, intranasal oxytocin administration had positive effects on social and eating behaviour, and weight balance. To evaluate the effects of intranasal oxytocin compared to placebo administration on social behaviour and hyperphagia in children with PWS. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study in a PWS Reference Center in the Netherlands. Crossover intervention with twice daily intranasal oxytocin (dose range 24-48 IU/day) and placebo administration, both during 4 weeks, in 25 children with PWS (aged 6 to 14 years). In the total group, no significant effects of oxytocin on social behaviour or hyperphagia were found, but in the 17 children younger than 11 years, parents reported significantly less anger (P = 0·001), sadness (P = 0·005), conflicts (P = 0·010) and food-related behaviour (P = 0·011), and improvement of social behaviour (P = 0·018) during oxytocin treatment compared with placebo. In the eight children older than 11 years, the items happiness (P = 0·039), anger (P = 0·042) and sadness (P = 0·042) were negatively influenced by oxytocin treatment compared to placebo. There were no side effects or adverse events. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study suggests that intranasal oxytocin administration has beneficial effects on social behaviour and food-related behaviour in children with PWS younger than 11 years of age, but not in those older than 11 years of age. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical Endocrinology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A calcium-dependent protease as a potential therapeutic target for Wolfram syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Simin; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Hara, Takashi; Mahadevan, Jana; Spears, Larry D.; Oslowski, Christine M.; Martinez, Rita; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Toyoda, Masashi; Neilson, Amber; Blanner, Patrick; Brown, Cris M.; Semenkovich, Clay F.; Marshall, Bess A.; Hershey, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by juvenile diabetes and neurodegeneration, and is considered a prototype of human endoplasmic reticulum (ER) disease. Wolfram syndrome is caused by loss of function mutations of Wolfram syndrome 1 or Wolfram syndrome 2 genes, which encode transmembrane proteins localized to the ER. Despite its rarity, Wolfram syndrome represents the best human disease model currently available to identify drugs and biomarkers associated with E...

  1. Review article: transient receptor potential channels as possible therapeutic targets in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, A B; Weerts, Z Z R M; Helyes, Z; Masclee, A A M; Keszthelyi, D

    2017-11-01

    Abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains challenging to treat effectively. Researchers have attempted to elucidate visceral nociceptive processes in order to guide treatment development. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been implied in the generation (TRPV1, TRPV4, TRPA1) and inhibition (TRPM8) of visceral pain signals. Pathological changes in their functioning have been demonstrated in inflammatory conditions, and appear to be present in IBS as well. To provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on TRP channels involved in visceral nociception. In particular, we emphasise the clinical implications of these nociceptors in the treatment of IBS. Evidence to support this review was obtained from an electronic database search via PubMed using the search terms "visceral nociception," "visceral hypersensitivity," "irritable bowel syndrome" and "transient receptor potential channels." After screening the abstracts the articles deemed relevant were cross-referenced for additional manuscripts. Recent studies have resulted in significant advances in our understanding of TRP channel mediated visceral nociception. The diversity of TRP channel sensitization pathways is increasingly recognised. Endogenous TRP agonists, including poly-unsaturated fatty acid metabolites and hydrogen sulphide, have been implied in augmented visceral pain generation in IBS. New potential targets for treatment development have been identified (TRPA1 and TRPV4,) and alternative means of affecting TRP channel signalling (partial antagonists, downstream targeting and RNA-based therapy) are currently being explored. The improved understanding of mechanisms involved in visceral nociception provides a solid basis for the development of new treatment strategies for abdominal pain in IBS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodder R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rick Hodder*Divisions of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada, *Dr Rick Hodder passed away on Tuesday April 17,2012. Please see the Dedication for more information on Dr Hodder.Abstract: Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1 an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2 a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician.Keywords: acute asthma, acute lung injury, ARDS, acute respiratory failure

  3. Therapeutic Potential of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Against Painful Bladder Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C V

    2016-11-01

    Painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a debilitating chronic bladder disease that primarily affects women. The disease is due to a damage of urothelial cell lining. As a result, potassium particles and other toxic substances in urine can leak into bladder mucosa, causing the symptoms of lower abdominal/pelvic discomfort, pain, increased urination frequency, urgency, nocturia, and so on, all of which can substantially reduce the quality of daily life. There are multiple symptom reliving therapies. Among them, only pentosan polysulfate sodium, sold under the brand name of Elmiron, has been approved for oral use by US Food and Drug Administration. It provides the relief after several months of use. Based on the scientific leads presented in this article, we propose that human chorionic gonadotropin has a therapeutic potential that is worth investigating for the treatment of this disease. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Elicited vs. voluntary promises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismayilov, H.; Potters, Jan

    2017-01-01

    We set up an experiment with pre-play communication to study the impact of promise elicitation by trustors from trustees on trust and trustworthiness. When given the opportunity a majority of trustors solicits a promise from the trustee. This drives up the promise making rate by trustees to almost

  5. Ecological niche modeling for predicting the potential risk areas of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhaohui; Wang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yunxia; Wang, Hao; Xue, Fuzhong; Liu, Yanxun

    2014-09-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging infectious disease caused by a novel bunyavirus. The spatial distribution has continued to expand, while the areas at potential high risk of SFTS have, to date, remained unclear. Using ecological factors as predictors, the MaxEnt model was first trained based on the locations of human SFTS occurrence in Shandong Province. The risk prediction map of China was then created by projecting the training model onto the whole country. The performance of the model was assessed using the known locations of disease occurrence in China. The key environmental factors affecting SFTS occurrence were temperature, precipitation, land cover, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and duration of sunshine. The risk prediction maps suggested that central, southwestern, northeastern, and the eastern coast of China are potential areas at high risk of SFTS. The potential high risk SFTS areas are distributed widely in China. The epidemiological surveillance system should be enhanced in these high risk regions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Potential role of uric acid in metabolic syndrome, hypertension, kidney injury, and cardiovascular diseases: is it time for reappraisal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Zohreh; Rasheed, Kashaf; Kapusta, Daniel R; Reisin, Efrain

    2013-06-01

    Elevated serum uric acid concentration is a common laboratory finding in subjects with metabolic syndrome/obesity, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular events. Hyperuricemia has been attributed to hyperinsulinemia in metabolic syndrome and to decreased uric acid excretion in kidney dysfunction, and is not acknowledged as a main mediator of metabolic syndrome, renal disease, and cardiovascular disorder development. However, more recent investigations have altered this traditional view and shown, by providing compelling evidence, to support an independent link between hyperuricemia and increased risk of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disorders. However, despite these new findings, controversy regarding the exact role of uric acid in inducing these diseases remains to be unfolded. Furthermore, recent data suggest that the high-fructose diet in the United State, as a major cause of hyperuricemia, may be contributing to the metabolic syndrome/obesity epidemic, diabetes, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disorder. Our focus in this review is to discuss the available evidence supporting a role for uric acid in the development of metabolic syndrome, hypertension, renal disease, and cardiovascular disorder; and the potential pathophysiology mechanisms involved.

  7. Potential urine and serum biomarkers for patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2014-04-01

    There is a lack of consensus on the pathophysiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. The chronic pain symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis refractory to local treatment could be a result of central nervous system sensitization and persisting abnormalities in the bladder wall, which activate the afferent sensory system. Evidence also shows that bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a heterogeneous syndrome and that the two subtypes, the ulcerative (classic) and non-ulcerative types, represent different disease entities. There is a need for non-invasive markers for the differential diagnoses of the subtypes of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, and between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and bladder sensory disorders, such as hypersensitive bladder syndrome or overactive bladder. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, but not overactive bladder, involves an aberrant differentiation program in the bladder urothelium that leads to altered synthesis of several proteoglycans, cell adhesion and tight junction proteins, and bacterial defense molecules. These findings have led to the rationale for identifying urinary biomarkers to detect bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis in patients with frequency urgency syndrome. Recently, the markers that have been the focus of the most research are antiproliferative factor, epidermal growth factor, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor, glycosaminoglycans and bladder nitric oxide. In addition, inflammatory proteins in the urine and serum play important roles in the pathogenesis of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. The urinary proteome is an easily accessible source of biomarkers for differentiation between inflammatory bladder disorders. Analysis of multiple urinary proteins and serum cytokines could provide a diagnostic basis for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis, and could be a tool for the differential diagnosis of bladder pain

  8. Nerve growth factor (NGF): a potential urinary biomarker for overactive bladder syndrome (OAB)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Jai H; Sahai, Arun; Khan, Mohammad S; van der Aa, Frank; de Ridder, Dirk; Panicker, Jalesh N; Dasgupta, Prokar; Fowler, Clare J

    2013-03-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: The search for a biomarker in overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) is an emerging field of interest, as bladder dysfunction is a common complaint that causes significant morbidity. A biomarker may give us insight as a diagnostic tool, and also inform us about how severe the condition is, how it may progress and how it may best be treated. The protein of interest here is nerve growth factor (NGF) and it has been shown to be a dynamic molecule in the bladder of patients with OAB. Urinary levels have been seen to rise in patients with OAB and fall in those who respond to treatment. However, there have also been many studies that examine this trend in numerous other conditions, e.g. interstitial cystitis, bladder outflow obstruction, renal stone disease and patients with neurological impairment after stroke. As a result the specificity of this as a potential urinary biomarker for OAB is questioned. This is a review of published studies, which discusses the pros and cons of NGF as a potential urinary biomarker. The evidence is examined and the studies are summarised together in a Table. Questions remain about the reliability, practicality and specificity of NGF as a biomarker for OAB. These questions need to be addressed by further studies that could clarify the points raised. To review the current literature on the use of urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) as a potential biomarker for overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). A comprehensive electronic literature search was conducted using the PubMed database to identify publications relating to urinary NGF. There are a growing number of publications that have measured urinary NGF levels in different types of bladder dysfunction. These range from OAB, bladder pain syndrome, idiopathic and neurogenic detrusor overactivity, bladder oversensitivity and bladder outflow obstruction. Urinary NGF levels do appear to be raised in these pathological states when compared with

  9. In vitro evaluation of the cyto-genotoxic potential of Ruthenium(II) SCAR complexes: a promising class of antituberculosis agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grandis, Rone Aparecido; Resende, Flávia Aparecida; da Silva, Monize Martins; Pavan, Fernando Rogério; Batista, Alzir Azevedo; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a top infectious disease killer worldwide, caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Increasing incidences of multiple drug-resistance (MDR) strains are emerging as one of the major public health threats. However, the drugs in use are still incapable of controlling the appalling upsurge of MDR. In recent years a marked number of research groups have devoted their attention toward the development of specific and cost-effective antimicrobial agents against targeted MDR-Tuberculosis. In previous studies, ruthenium(II) complexes (SCAR) have shown a promising activity against MDR-Tuberculosis although few studies have indeed considered ruthenium toxicity. Therefore, within the preclinical requirements, we have sought to determine the cyto-genotoxicity of three SCAR complexes in this present study. The treatment with the SCARs induced a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability in CHO-K1 and HepG2 cells. Based on the clonogenic survival, SCAR 5 was found to be more cytotoxic while SCAR 6 exhibited selectivity action on tumor cells. Although SCAR 4 and 5 did not indicate any mutagenic activity as evidenced by the Ames and Cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assays, the complex SCAR 6 was found to engender a frameshift mutation detected by Salmonella typhimurium in the presence of S9. Similarly, we observed a chromosomal damage in HepG2 cells with significant increases of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges. These data indicate that SCAR 4 and 5 complexes did not show genotoxicity in our models while SCAR 6 was considered mutagenic. This study presented a comprehensive genotoxic evaluation of SCAR complexes were shown to be genotoxic in vitro. All in all, further studies are required to fully elucidate how the properties can affect human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Geriatric syndromes are potential determinants of the medication adherence status in prevalent dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ter Chao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Geriatric syndromes (GS exhibit high prevalence in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD under chronic dialysis irrespective of age. We sought to determine whether GS influences medication adherence in ESRD patients. Methods. A prospective cohort of chronic dialysis patients was assembled. The presence of GS components, including frailty/prefrailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition, were ascertained through a validated questionnaire, electronic records and chart abstraction, and laboratory tests. The severity of medication non-adherence was defined using the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed targeting MMAS results and incorporating relevant clinical features and GS. Results. The prevalence of frailty/pre-frailty, polypharmacy, and hypoalbuminemia/ malnutrition among the enrolled participants was 66.7%, 94%, and 14%, respectively. The average MMAS scores in these dialysis patients were 2 ± 1.7 (range, 0–6, with only 15.7% exhibiting high medication adherence. Multiple regression analyses showed that the absence of frailty/pre-frailty (P = 0.01 were significantly associated with poorer medication adherence, while the presence of polypharmacy (P = 0.02 and lower serum albumin, a potential sign of malnutrition (P = 0.03, were associated with poor adherence in another model. Conclusion. This study is among the very few reports addressing GS and medication adherence, especially in ESRD patients. Interventions targeting frailty, polypharmacy, and malnutrition might potentially improve the medication non-adherence and symptom control in these pill-burdened patients.

  11. Potential Relationship between Inadequate Response to DNA Damage and Development of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are responsible for the continuous regeneration of all types of blood cells, including themselves. To ensure the functional and genomic integrity of blood tissue, a network of regulatory pathways tightly controls the proliferative status of HSCs. Nevertheless, normal HSC aging is associated with a noticeable decline in regenerative potential and possible changes in other functions. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is an age-associated hematopoietic malignancy, characterized by abnormal blood cell maturation and a high propensity for leukemic transformation. It is furthermore thought to originate in a HSC and to be associated with the accrual of multiple genetic and epigenetic aberrations. This raises the question whether MDS is, in part, related to an inability to adequately cope with DNA damage. Here we discuss the various components of the cellular response to DNA damage. For each component, we evaluate related studies that may shed light on a potential relationship between MDS development and aberrant DNA damage response/repair.

  12. [Clinical characterization of audiometric and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Wang, Jinling; Xie, Juan; Han, Liping; Gao, Lei

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the clinical and diagnostic characteristics of audiometric findings and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS). Thirty LVAS subjects (60 ears) recruited received pure tone audiometry, acoustic immittance, auditory brain stem responses (ABRs), distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE), Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) and caloric test, and the diagnostic significance of the results was analyzed. All 30 cases (60 ears) showed progressive and fluctuating hearing loss, while 16 cases experienced dizziness when hearing fluctuated. Most of our cases showed sensorineural hearing loss, and 47 ears (94.0%) showed air-bone gap in the low frequencies, with mean gaps of (43 +/- 17) dB HL at 250 Hz, (33 +/- 18) dB HL at 500 Hz, in which the middle ear function showed normal. The acoustically evoked short latency negative response (ASNR) with medium latency (3.06 +/- 0.52) ms was elicited from 18 ears (64.3%). The mean amplitude of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) of 42 ears was (147.10 +/- 107.55) microv, and the threshold of VEMP of 19 ears was 75 dB nHL, of 7 ears was 65 dB nHL. Characteristics of hearing performance, such as progressive and fluctuating hearing loss, air-bone gap at the low frequencies with normal middle ears, the ASNR, and increased amplitude and decreased threshold of the VEMPs, will help clinicians make initial diagnosis of LVAS, and provide a reference for further imaging examination.

  13. Biochar from Biomass and its Potential Agronomic and Environmental Use in Washington: A Promising Alternative to Drawdown Carbon from the Atmosphere and Develop a New Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amonette, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Garcia-Perez, Manuel [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Sjoding, David [Washington State Energy Program Office, Olympia, WA (United States); Fuchs, Mark R. [Washington Dept. of Ecology, Spokane, WA (United States)

    2016-03-04

    Climate change is one of the most serious issues facing the world today. Increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other long-lived greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere continue to warm the planet and destabilize the climate. It has been estimated that the impact from this warming could cost the state 10 billion per year by 2020, and 16 billion per year by 2040. Long-term solutions to the climate problem likely will require that large quantities of CO2 be removed from the atmosphere. In fact, massive CO2 drawdowns from the atmosphere have occurred in earth’s recent past from events occurring in our hemisphere. Studies of those analogs provide insight into the potential magnitude for specific actions to drawdown significant CO2 from the atmosphere. One of these potential actions is the large-scale production of biochar from abundant woody biomass waste and its storage in soils, where it remains stable for hundreds to thousands of years. Moreover, for the carbon emission intensity of Washington’s fuel mix, biochar production from biomass is twice as effective in offsetting GHG emissions as complete biomass combustion of the same biomass. Washington State has large quantities of wood waste biomass that could be purposed for production of combined heat/power/biochar (CHPB) through existing biomass boilers. We propose to 1) evaluate the quantities of Washington wood waste biomass, 2) inventory existing boiler capacity and assess the technical merits and challenges to repurpose the boilers to CHPB, and 3) apply literature values and analog biochar examples to better quantify the extent of CO2 drawdown that could be achieved in Washington State over the next century using engineered biochar. This white paper explores the potential to replicate the historical drawdowns of atmospheric CO2, a topic the authors think should be part of current climate-change mitigation discussions. This

  14. MicroRNAs in Taenia solium Neurocysticercosis: Insights as Promising Agents in Host-Parasite Interaction and Their Potential as Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Loli, Renzo; Orrego, Miguel A.; Sevillano-Quispe, Oscar G.; Herrera-Arrasco, Luis; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, endogenous, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Although, several miRNAs have been identified in parasitic helminths, there is little information about their identification and function in Taenia. Furthermore, the impact of miRNAs in neurocysticercosis, the brain infection caused by larvae of Taenia solium is still unknown. During chronic infection, T. solium may activate numerous mechanisms aimed to modulate host immune responses. Helminthic miRNAs might also have effects on host mRNA expression and thus play an important role regulating host-parasite interactions. Also, the diagnosis of this disease is difficult and it usually requires neuroimaging and confirmatory serology. Since miRNAs are stable when released, they can be detected in body fluids and therefore have potential to diagnose infection, determine parasite burden, and ascertain effectiveness of treatment or disease progression, for instance. This review discusses the potential roles of miRNAs in T. solium infection, including regulation of host-parasite relationships and their eventual use as diagnostic or disease biomarkers. Additionally, we summarize the bioinformatics resources available for identification of T. solium miRNAs and prediction of their targets. PMID:29033926

  15. MicroRNAs in Taenia solium Neurocysticercosis: Insights as Promising Agents in Host-Parasite Interaction and Their Potential as Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Gutierrez-Loli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short, endogenous, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Although, several miRNAs have been identified in parasitic helminths, there is little information about their identification and function in Taenia. Furthermore, the impact of miRNAs in neurocysticercosis, the brain infection caused by larvae of Taenia solium is still unknown. During chronic infection, T. solium may activate numerous mechanisms aimed to modulate host immune responses. Helminthic miRNAs might also have effects on host mRNA expression and thus play an important role regulating host-parasite interactions. Also, the diagnosis of this disease is difficult and it usually requires neuroimaging and confirmatory serology. Since miRNAs are stable when released, they can be detected in body fluids and therefore have potential to diagnose infection, determine parasite burden, and ascertain effectiveness of treatment or disease progression, for instance. This review discusses the potential roles of miRNAs in T. solium infection, including regulation of host-parasite relationships and their eventual use as diagnostic or disease biomarkers. Additionally, we summarize the bioinformatics resources available for identification of T. solium miRNAs and prediction of their targets.

  16. Cinnamon: potential role in the prevention of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The metabolic syndrome is associated with insulin resistance, elevated glucose and lipids, inflammation, decreased antioxidant activity, increased weight gain, and increased glycation of proteins. Cinnamon has been shown to improve aspects of metabolic syndrome in cells cultured in vitro, and in an...

  17. Contributing to the Early Detection of Rett Syndrome: The Potential Role of Auditory Gestalt Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschik, Peter B.; Einspieler, Christa; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    To assess whether there are qualitatively deviant characteristics in the early vocalizations of children with Rett syndrome, we had 400 native Austrian-German speakers listen to audio recordings of vocalizations from typically developing girls and girls with Rett syndrome. The audio recordings were rated as (a) inconspicuous, (b) conspicuous or…

  18. A study of new potential risk factors for Down syndrome in Upper Egypt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Down syndrome is a common chromosomal anomaly causing multiple congenital malformations and mental retardation (MR) in humans. The well-established risk factor, advanced maternal age, was not found in many of the Down syndrome cases in Egypt, while other possible risk factors have not been well studied yet.

  19. Tic related local field potentials in the thalamus and the effect of deep brain stimulation in Tourette syndrome: Report of three cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bour, L.J.; Ackermans, L.; Foncke, E.M.J.; Cath, D.; van der Linden, C.; Vandewalle, V.V.; Tijssen, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Three patients with intractable Tourette syndrome (TS) underwent thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS). To investigate the role of thalamic electrical activity in tic generation, local field potentials (LFP), EEG and EMG simultaneously were recorded. Methods: Event related potentials and

  20. Tic related local field potentials in the thalamus and the effect of deep brain stimulation in Tourette syndrome: Report of three cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bour, L. J.; Ackermans, L.; Foncke, E. M. J.; Cath, D.; van der Linden, C.; Visser Vandewalle, V.; Tijssen, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Three patients with intractable Tourette syndrome (TS) underwent thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS). To investigate the role of thalamic electrical activity in tic generation, local field potentials (LFP), EEG and EMG simultaneously were recorded. Event related potentials and event related

  1. Tic related local field potentials in the thalamus and the effect of deep brain stimulation in Tourette syndrome : Report of three cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bour, L. J.; Ackermans, L.; Foncke, E. M. J.; Cath, D.; van der Linden, C.; Vandewalle, V. Visser; Tijssen, M. A.

    Objective: Three patients with intractable Tourette syndrome (TS) underwent thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS). To investigate the role of thalamic electrical activity in tic generation, local field potentials (LFP), EEG and EMG simultaneously were recorded. Methods: Event related potentials and

  2. Kaposi Sarcoma Inflammatory Cytokine Syndrome (KICS): A Rare but Potentially Treatable Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karass, Michael; Grossniklaus, Emily; Seoud, Talal; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Daniel A

    2017-05-01

    Kaposi sarcoma inflammatory cytokine syndrome (KICS) is a newly-described condition affecting individuals who are HIV-positive and are infected with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). This is a syndrome that in some ways mimics severe sepsis with associated acute respiratory distress syndrome, possibly requiring a ventilator and vasopressor support. However, unlike severe sepsis, antibiotics provide no benefit. Management of KICS has not been fully elucidated because of its high mortality rate. However, the syndrome has been successfully treated in some cases with immunomodulatory therapy. It is crucial for oncologists to be able to recognize this syndrome and to institute the appropriate therapy. The Oncologist 2017;22:623-625. © AlphaMed Press 2017.

  3. Recovery from parkinson syndrome and prolonged visually evoked potentials in hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Bernauer, Elisabeth

    2005-03-01

    The combination of Parkinson syndrome (PS) and prolonged visually evoked potentials (VEPs) in a single patient with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) has not been reported. A 52-year-old male with chronic HE developed PS in early 2001. Treatment with L-DOPA was only of minimal effect. In August 2001 he was admitted because of worsening PS and HE. There was anemia, hyperlipidaemia, markedly elevated liver-function-parameters, hyperammonemia, elevated resting-lactate, steatosis hepatis and hepatomegalia. VEPs showed markedly prolonged P100-latencies. Under L-DOPA, pramipexol, L-ornithin-L-aspartate, paromomycin-sulfate, and lactulose liver-function-parameters normalized and PS markedly improved. In February 2003, VEPs were normal. L-DOPA was discontinued by the patient in April 2003 and pramipexol in December 2003. Since then PS did not recur. This case shows that HE may go along with reversible PS and prolonged VEPs. Under adequate therapy liver-function-parameters and VEPs normalize and PS disappears.

  4. [Superior canal dehiscence syndrome : Diagnosis with vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and fremitus nystagmus. German version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürkov, R; Jerin, C; Flatz, W; Maxwell, R

    2018-01-23

    Superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) is a relatively rare neurotological disorder that is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical picture. Recently, vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) measurementwas established for the diagnosis of SCDS. In the present study, a case series of patients with SCDS were analyzed, with a focus on VEMP. Four patients with SCDS were prospectively examined with ocular VEMP (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP). The clinical features and the standard audiovestibular test battery results are summarized and analyzed. The diagnostic accuracy of VEMP testing is evaluated. The increased oVEMP amplitudes had a specificity of 100% in this patient population. All patients had normal caloric function and head impulse testing. The Tullio sign was observed in two patients. Three patients had autophony. The airbone gap was not greater than 10 dB in any of the patients. Two patients had marked fremitus nystagmus. All patients had a bony dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal on computed tomography imaging. The subjective and clinical features in this case series of SCDS patients were heterogeneous. However, objective oVEMP testing had the highest diagnostic value. Furthermore, we describe a new diagnostic clinical sign: fremitus nystagmus.

  5. Superior canal dehiscence syndrome : Diagnosis with vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and fremitus nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürkov, R; Jerin, C; Flatz, W; Maxwell, R

    2018-01-01

    Superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) is a relatively rare neurotological disorder that is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical picture. Recently, vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) measurement was established for the diagnosis of SCDS. In the present study, a case series of patients with SCDS were analyzed, with a focus on VEMP. Four patients with SCDS were prospectively examined with ocular VEMP (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP). The clinical features and the standard audiovestibular test battery results are summarized and analyzed. The diagnostic accuracy of VEMP testing is evaluated. The increased oVEMP amplitudes had a specificity of 100% in this patient population. All patients had normal caloric function and head impulse testing. The Tullio sign was observed in two patients. Three patients had autophony. The air-bone gap was not greater than 10 dB in any of the patients. Two patients had marked fremitus nystagmus. All patients had a bony dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal on computed tomography imaging. The subjective and clinical features in this case series of SCDS patients were heterogeneous. However, objective oVEMP testing had the highest diagnostic value. Furthermore, we describe a new diagnostic clinical sign: fremitus nystagmus.

  6. The effect of increased intracranial pressure on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in superior canal dehiscence syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janky, Kristen L; Zuniga, M Geraldine; Schubert, Michael C; Carey, John P

    2015-04-01

    To determine if vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) responses change during inversion in patients with superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) compared to controls. Sixteen subjects with SCDS (mean: 43, range 30-57 years) and 15 age-matched, healthy subjects (mean: 41, range 22-57 years) completed cervical VEMP (cVEMP) in response to air conduction click stimuli and ocular VEMP (oVEMP) in response to air conduction 500 Hz tone burst stimuli and midline tap stimulation. All VEMP testing was completed in semi-recumbent and inverted conditions. SCDS ears demonstrated significantly larger oVEMP peak-to-peak amplitudes in comparison to normal ears in semi-recumbency. While corrected cVEMP peak-to-peak amplitudes were larger in SCDS ears; this did not reach significance in our sample. Overall, there was not a differential change in o- or cVEMP amplitude with inversion between SCDS and normal subjects. Postural-induced changes in o- and cVEMP responses were measured in the steady state regardless of whether the labyrinth was intact or dehiscent. VEMP responses are blunted during inversion. Although steady-state measurements of VEMPs during inversion do not increase diagnostic accuracy for SCDS, the findings suggest that inversion may provide more general insights into the equilibration of pressures between intracranial and intralabyrinthine fluids. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. BRAINSTEM AUDITORY EVOKED POTENTIAL AS AN INDEX OF CNS DEMYELINATION IN GUILLAIN -BARRÉ SYNDROME (GBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS is an acute, frequently severe and fulminant polyradicular neuropathy that is autoimmune in nature. GBS manifest as rapidly evolving areflexic motor paralysis with or without sensory disturbances. It mainly involves peripheral nervous system and autonomic nervous system. There are rare evidences about the involvement of central nervous system (CNS in GBS. Aims: The main objective of the study was to assess the CNS involvement in GBS using the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential (BAEP. Methods & Material: The study was conducted in the clinical neurophysiology lab in the department of physiology, CSMMU Lucknow. Study group involved 26 subjects (n=26 having GBS and control group involved 30 normal subjects (n=30. BAEPS were recorded by Neuroperfect- EMG 2000 EMG/NCV/EPsytem. The data so obtained were subjected to analysis using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Version 13.0. Results & Conclusions: There was significant increase in PIII & PV peak latencies and PI-PIII & PI-PV interpeak latencies in both left and right ear in the study group, which showed the CNS involvement in GBS which can be assessed using BAEP.

  8. Proposed minimal diagnostic criteria for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and potential pre-MDS conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Peter; Orazi, Attilio; Steensma, David P; Ebert, Benjamin L; Haase, Detlef; Malcovati, Luca; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Haferlach, Torsten; Westers, Theresia M; Wells, Denise A; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Loken, Michael; Orfao, Alberto; Lübbert, Michael; Ganser, Arnold; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Ogata, Kiyoyuki; Schanz, Julie; Béné, Marie C; Hoermann, Gregor; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Sotlar, Karl; Bettelheim, Peter; Stauder, Reinhard; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Horny, Hans-Peter; Germing, Ulrich; Greenberg, Peter; Bennett, John M

    2017-09-26

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of myeloid neoplasms characterized by peripheral cytopenia, dysplasia, and a variable clinical course with about 30% risk to transform to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the past 15 years, diagnostic evaluations, prognostication, and treatment of MDS have improved substantially. However, with the discovery of molecular markers and advent of novel targeted therapies, new challenges have emerged in the complex field of MDS. For example, MDS-related molecular lesions may be detectable in healthy individuals and increase in prevalence with age. Other patients exhibit persistent cytopenia of unknown etiology without dysplasia. Although these conditions are potential pre-phases of MDS they may also transform into other bone marrow neoplasms. Recently identified molecular, cytogenetic, and flow-based parameters may add in the delineation and prognostication of these conditions. However, no generally accepted integrated classification and no related criteria are as yet available. In an attempt to address this challenge, an international consensus group discussed these issues in a working conference in July 2016. The outcomes of this conference are summarized in the present article which includes criteria and a proposal for the classification of pre-MDS conditions as well as updated minimal diagnostic criteria of MDS. Moreover, we propose diagnostic standards to delineate between ´normal´, pre-MDS, and MDS. These standards and criteria should facilitate diagnostic and prognostic evaluations in clinical studies as well as in clinical practice.

  9. Capparis spinosa L. in A Systematic Review: A Xerophilous Species of Multi Values and Promising Potentialities for Agrosystems under the Threat of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedraoui, Stephanie; Abi-Rizk, Alain; El-Beyrouthy, Marc; Chalak, Lamis; Ouaini, Naim; Rajjou, Loïc

    2017-01-01

    Caper ( Capparis spinosa L.) is a xerophytic shrub with a remarkable adaptability to harsh environments. This plant species is of great interest for its medicinal/pharmacological properties and its culinary uses. Its phytochemical importance relies on many bioactive components present in different organs and its cultivation can be of considerable economic value. Moreover, taxonomic identification of C. spinosa L. has been difficult due to its wide heterogeneity, and many authors fell into confusion due to the scarcity of genetic studies. The present review summarizes information concerning C. spinosa L. including agronomic performance, botanical description, taxonomical approaches, traditional pharmacological uses, phytochemical evaluation and genetic studies. This knowledge represents an important tool for further research studies and agronomic development on this indigenous species with respect to the emerging climatic change in the Eastern Mediterranean countries. Indeed, this world region is particularly under the threat of global warming and it appears necessary to rethink agricultural systems to adapt them to current and futures challenging environmental conditions. Capparis spinosa L. could be a part of this approach. So, this review presents a state of the art considering caper as a potential interesting crop under arid or semi-arid regions (such as Eastern Mediterranean countries) within the climate change context. The aim is to raise awareness in the scientific community (geneticists, physiologists, ecophysiologists, agronomists, …) about the caper strengths and interest to the development of this shrub as a crop.

  10. The medicinal chemistry and neuropharmacology of kratom: A preliminary discussion of a promising medicinal plant and analysis of its potential for abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruegel, Andrew C; Grundmann, Oliver

    2017-08-19

    The leaves of Mitragyna speciosa (commonly known as kratom), a tree endogenous to parts of Southeast Asia, have been used traditionally for their stimulant, mood-elevating, and analgesic effects and have recently attracted significant attention due to increased use in Western cultures as an alternative medicine. The plant's active alkaloid constituents, mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine, have been shown to modulate opioid receptors, acting as partial agonists at mu-opioid receptors and competitive antagonists at kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. Furthermore, both alkaloids are G protein-biased agonists of the mu-opioid receptor and therefore, may induce less respiratory depression than classical opioid agonists. The Mitragyna alkaloids also appear to exert diverse activities at other brain receptors (including adrenergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic receptors), which may explain the complex pharmacological profile of raw kratom extracts, although characterization of effects at these other targets remains extremely limited. Through allometric scaling, doses of pure mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine used in animal studies can be related to single doses of raw kratom plant commonly consumed by humans, permitting preliminary interpretation of expected behavioral and physiological effects in man based on this preclinical data and comparison to both anecdotal human experience and multiple epidemiological surveys. Kratom exposure alone has not been causally associated with human fatalities to date. However, further research is needed to clarify the complex mechanism of action of the Mitragyna alkaloids and unlock their full therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Capparis spinosa L. in A Systematic Review: A Xerophilous Species of Multi Values and Promising Potentialities for Agrosystems under the Threat of Global Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Chedraoui

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Caper (Capparis spinosa L. is a xerophytic shrub with a remarkable adaptability to harsh environments. This plant species is of great interest for its medicinal/pharmacological properties and its culinary uses. Its phytochemical importance relies on many bioactive components present in different organs and its cultivation can be of considerable economic value. Moreover, taxonomic identification of C. spinosa L. has been difficult due to its wide heterogeneity, and many authors fell into confusion due to the scarcity of genetic studies. The present review summarizes information concerning C. spinosa L. including agronomic performance, botanical description, taxonomical approaches, traditional pharmacological uses, phytochemical evaluation and genetic studies. This knowledge represents an important tool for further research studies and agronomic development on this indigenous species with respect to the emerging climatic change in the Eastern Mediterranean countries. Indeed, this world region is particularly under the threat of global warming and it appears necessary to rethink agricultural systems to adapt them to current and futures challenging environmental conditions. Capparis spinosa L. could be a part of this approach. So, this review presents a state of the art considering caper as a potential interesting crop under arid or semi-arid regions (such as Eastern Mediterranean countries within the climate change context. The aim is to raise awareness in the scientific community (geneticists, physiologists, ecophysiologists, agronomists, … about the caper strengths and interest to the development of this shrub as a crop.

  12. 2D DIGE analysis of maternal plasma for potential biomarkers of Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg Julie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prenatal screening for Down Syndrome (DS would benefit from an increased number of biomarkers to improve sensitivity and specificity. Improving sensitivity and specificity would decrease the need for potentially risky invasive diagnostic procedures. Results We have performed an in depth two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE study to identify potential biomarkers. We have used maternal plasma samples obtained from first and second trimesters from mothers carrying DS affected fetuses compared with mothers carrying normal fetuses. Plasma samples were albumin/IgG depleted and expanded pH ranges of pH 4.5 - 5.5, pH 5.3 - 6.5 and pH 6 - 9 were used for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE. We found no differentially expressed proteins in the first trimester between the two groups. Significant up-regulation of ceruloplasmin, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4, complement proteins C1s subcomponent, C4-A, C5, and C9 and kininogen 1 were detected in the second trimester in maternal plasma samples where a DS affected fetus was being carried. However, ceruloplasmin could not be confirmed as being consistently up-regulated in DS affected pregnancies by Western blotting. Conclusions Despite the in depth 2DE approach used in this study the results underline the deficiencies of gel-based proteomics for detection of plasma biomarkers. Gel-free approaches may be more productive to increase the number of plasma biomarkers for DS for non-invasive prenatal screening and diagnosis.

  13. Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (VEMP Triggered by Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS: A Promising Tool to Assess Spinal Cord Function in Schistosomal Myeloradiculopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Fonseca de Morais Caporali

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomal myeloradiculopathy (SMR, the most severe and disabling ectopic form of Schistosoma mansoni infection, is caused by embolized ova eliciting local inflammation in the spinal cord and nerve roots. The treatment involves the use of praziquantel and long-term corticotherapy. The assessment of therapeutic response relies on neurological examination. Supplementary electrophysiological exams may improve prediction and monitoring of functional outcome. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP triggered by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS is a simple, safe, low-cost and noninvasive electrophysiological technique that has been used to test the vestibulospinal tract in motor myelopathies. This paper reports the results of VEMP with GVS in patients with SMR.A cross-sectional comparative study enrolled 22 patients with definite SMR and 22 healthy controls that were submitted to clinical, neurological examination and GVS. Galvanic stimulus was applied in the mastoid bones in a transcranial configuration for testing VEMP, which was recorded by electromyography (EMG in the gastrocnemii muscles. The VEMP variables of interest were blindly measured by two independent examiners. They were the short-latency (SL and the medium-latency (ML components of the biphasic EMG wave.VEMP showed the components SL (p = 0.001 and ML (p<0.001 delayed in SMR compared to controls. The delay of SL (p = 0.010 and of ML (p = 0.020 was associated with gait dysfunction.VEMP triggered by GVS identified alterations in patients with SMR and provided additional functional information that justifies its use as a supplementary test in motor myelopathies.

  14. Olive-pomace harbors bacteria with the potential for hydrocarbon-biodegradation, nitrogen-fixation and mercury-resistance: promising material for waste-oil-bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Narjes; Ali, Nedaa; Khanafer, Majida; Al-Awadhi, Husain; Sorkhoh, Naser; Radwan, Samir

    2015-05-15

    Olive-pomace, a waste by-product of olive oil industry, took up >40% of its weight crude oil. Meanwhile, this material harbored a rich and diverse hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial population in the magnitude of 10(6) to 10(7) cells g(-1). Using this material for bioaugmentation of batch cultures in crude oil-containing mineral medium, resulted in the consumption of 12.9, 21.5, 28.3, and 43% oil after 2, 4, 6 and 8 months, respectively. Similar oil-consumption values, namely 11.0, 29.3, 34.7 and 43.9%, respectively, were recorded when a NaNO3-free medium was used instead of the complete medium. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria involved in those bioremediation processes, as characterized by their 16S rRNA-gene sequences, belonged to the genera Agrococcus, Pseudomonas, Cellulosimicrobium, Streptococcus, Sinorhizobium, Olivibacter, Ochrobactrum, Rhizobium, Pleomorphomonas, Azoarcus, Starkeya and others. Many of the bacterial species belonging to those genera were diazotrophic; they proved to contain the nifH-genes in their genomes. Still other bacterial species could tolerate the heavy metal mercury. The dynamic changes of the proportions of various species during 8 months of incubation were recorded. The culture-independent, phylogenetic analysis of the bacterioflora gave lists different from those recorded by the culture-dependent method. Nevertheless, those lists comprised among others, several genera known for their hydrocarbonoclastic potential, e.g. Pseudomonas, Mycobacterium, Sphingobium, and Citrobacter. It was concluded that olive-pomace could be applied in oil-remediation, not only as a physical sorbent, but also for bioaugmentation purposes as a biological source of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Promise Zones for Applicants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This tool assists applicants to HUD's Promise Zone initiative prepare data to submit with their application by allowing applicants to draw the exact location of the...

  16. Potential mechanisms supporting the value of motor cortex stimulation to treat chronic pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Fabio DosSantos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the first years of the twenty-first century, neurotechnologies such as motor cortex stimulation (MCS, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have attracted scientific attention and been considered as potential tools to centrally modulate chronic pain, especially for those conditions more difficult to manage and refractory to all types of available pharmacological therapies. Interestingly, although the role of the motor cortex in pain has not been fully clarified, it is one of the cortical areas most commonly targeted by invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation technologies. Recent studies have provided significant advances concerning the establishment of the clinical effectiveness of primary motor cortex stimulation to treat different chronic pain syndromes. Concurrently, the neuromechanisms related to each method of primary motor cortex (M1 modulation have been unveiled. In this respect, the most consistent scientific evidence originates from MCS studies, which indicate the activation of top-down controls driven by M1 stimulation. This concept has also been applied to explain M1-TMS mechanisms. Nevertheless, activation of remote areas in the brain, including cortical and subcortical structures, has been reported with both invasive and non-invasive methods and the participation of major neurotransmitters (e.g. glutamate, GABA and serotonin as well as the release of endogenous opioids has been demonstrated. In this critical review, the putative mechanisms underlying the use of motor cortex stimulation to provide relief from chronic migraine and other types of chronic pain are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the most recent scientific evidence obtained from chronic pain research studies involving MCS and non-invasive neuromodulation methods (e.g. tDCS and TMS, which are analyzed comparatively.

  17. Potential Mechanisms Supporting the Value of Motor Cortex Stimulation to Treat Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DosSantos, Marcos F; Ferreira, Natália; Toback, Rebecca L; Carvalho, Antônio C; DaSilva, Alexandre F

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the first years of the twenty-first century, neurotechnologies such as motor cortex stimulation (MCS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have attracted scientific attention and been considered as potential tools to centrally modulate chronic pain, especially for those conditions more difficult to manage and refractory to all types of available pharmacological therapies. Interestingly, although the role of the motor cortex in pain has not been fully clarified, it is one of the cortical areas most commonly targeted by invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation technologies. Recent studies have provided significant advances concerning the establishment of the clinical effectiveness of primary MCS to treat different chronic pain syndromes. Concurrently, the neuromechanisms related to each method of primary motor cortex (M1) modulation have been unveiled. In this respect, the most consistent scientific evidence originates from MCS studies, which indicate the activation of top-down controls driven by M1 stimulation. This concept has also been applied to explain M1-TMS mechanisms. Nevertheless, activation of remote areas in the brain, including cortical and subcortical structures, has been reported with both invasive and non-invasive methods and the participation of major neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate, GABA, and serotonin) as well as the release of endogenous opioids has been demonstrated. In this critical review, the putative mechanisms underlying the use of MCS to provide relief from chronic migraine and other types of chronic pain are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the most recent scientific evidence obtained from chronic pain research studies involving MCS and non-invasive neuromodulation methods (e.g., tDCS and TMS), which are analyzed comparatively.

  18. PET Neuroimaging: Insights on Dystonia and Tourette syndrome and potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaolo eAlongi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary Dystonia (pD is a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric developmental disorder characterised by motor and phonic tics, which could progress to behavioural changes. GTS and obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD are often seen in comorbidity, also suggesting a possible overlap in the pathophysiological bases of these two conditions. PET techniques are of considerable value in detecting functional and molecular abnormalities in vivo, according to the adopted radioligands. For example, PET is the unique technique that allows in vivo investigation of neurotransmitter systems, providing evidence of changes in GTS or pD. For example, presynaptic and postsynaptic dopaminergic studies with PET have shown alterations compatible with dysfunction or loss of D2-bearing neurons, increased synaptic dopamine levels, or both. Measures of cerebral glucose metabolism with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET are very sensitive in showing brain functional alterations as well. 18F-FDG PET data have shown metabolic changes within the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical and cerebello-thalamo-cortical networks, revealing possible involvement of brain circuits not limited to basal ganglia in pD and GTS. The aim of this work is to overview PET consistent neuroimaging literature on pD and GTS that has provided functional and molecular knowledge of the underlying neural dysfunction. Furthermore we suggest potential applications of these techniques in monitoring treatments.

  19. Lhermitte's Syndrome After Chemo-IMRT of Head and Neck Cancer: Incidence, Doses, and Potential Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Daniel; Vineberg, Karen; Feng, Felix; Haken, Randall K. Ten; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We have observed a higher rate of Lhermitte's syndrome (LS) after chemo-IMRT of head and neck cancer than the published rates after conventional radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the inhomogeneous spinal cord dose distributions produced by IMRT caused a “bath and shower” effect, characterized by low doses in the vicinity of high doses, reducing spinal cord tolerance. Methods and Materials 73 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx participated in a prospective study of IMRT concurrent with weekly carboplatin and taxol. 15 (21%) reported LS in at least 2 consecutive follow-up visits. Mean dose, maximum dose, partial (Vd) as well as the absolute volume (cc) of spinal cord receiving specified doses (≥10 Gy, 20 Gy, 30 Gy, 40 Gy), and the pattern of dose distributions at the “anatomical” (from the base of the skull to the aortic arch) and “plan-related” (from the top through the bottom of the PTV's) spinal cords were compared between LS and 34 non-LS patients. Results LS patients had significantly higher spinal cord mean doses, V30, V40, and volumes receiving ≥30 and ≥ 40 Gy compared to the non-LS patients (p shower”) in LS compared to non-LS patients. Conclusions Greater mean dose, V30, V40, and cord volumes receiving ≥30 and ≥40 Gy characterized LS compared to non-LS patients. “Bath and shower” effects could not be validated in this study as a potential contributor to LS. The higher than expected rates of LS may be due to the specific concurrent chemotherapy agents, or to more accurate identification of LS in the setting of a prospective study. PMID:22284690

  20. Trichloroethylene Hypersensitivity Syndrome Is Potentially Mediated through Its Metabolite Chloral Hydrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshun Huang

    Full Text Available We documented previously the entity of trichloroethylene (TCE hypersensitivity syndrome (THS in occupational workers.To identify the culprit causative compound, determine the type of hypersensitivity of THS, and establish a screening test for subjects at risk of THS.TCE and its main metabolites chloral hydrate (CH, trichloroethanol (TCOH and trichloroacetic acid (TCA were used as allergens at different concentrations in skin patch tests. The study included 19 case subjects diagnosed with occupational THS, 22 control healthy workers exposed to TCE (exposure >12 weeks, and 20 validation new workers exposed to TCE for <12 weeks free of THS. All subjects were followed-up for 12 weeks after the patch test.The highest patch test positive rate in subjects with THS was for CH, followed by TCOH, TCA and TCE. The CH patch test positive rate was 100% irrespective of CH concentrations (15%, 10% and 5%. The TCOH patch test positive rate was concentration-dependent (89.5%, 73.7% and 52.6% for 5%, 0.5% and 0.05%, respectively. Lower patch test positive rates were noted for TCA and TCE. All patch tests (including four allergens were all negative in each of the 22 control subjects. None of the subjects of the validation group had a positive 15% CH patch test.Chloral hydrate seems to be the culprit causative compound of THS and type IV seems to be the major type of hypersensitivity of THS. The CH patch test could be potentially useful for screening workers at risk of THS.

  1. Ogilvie syndrome: a potentially life-threatening phenotype of immobilization hypercalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Chi; Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Chen, Mei-Chen; Chen, Jui-Chang; Tsao, Yu-Tzu

    2014-07-01

    Ogilvie syndrome, also known as acute colonic pseudo-obstruction, is characterized by the clinical presentation and imaging evidence of acute colonic obstruction in the absence of a mechanical cause. Several comorbidities and serious associated medical or surgical conditions have been described to be relevant to this syndrome. In general, a preferred initial management with favorable treatment outcomes is virtually to correct underlying disorders. Although disrupted electrolyte homeostasis may induce impaired colonic motility, hypercalcemia secondary to immobilization as a major culprit in this syndrome has rarely been studied. In this report, we profiled radiographic features, therapeutic strategies, and pathogenetic hypothesis of this clinical entity and highlighted the need for clinicians to maintain awareness of this distinct manifestation.

  2. Mucosal-associated invariant T cell is a potential marker to distinguish fibromyalgia syndrome from arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Chie; Konno, Takahiko; Wakao, Rika; Fujita, Hiroko; Fujita, Hiroyoshi; Wakao, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is defined as a widely distributed pain. While many rheumatologists and pain physicians have considered it to be a pain disorder, psychiatry, psychology, and general medicine have deemed it to be a syndrome (FMS) or psychosomatic disorder. The lack of concrete structural and/or pathological evidence has made patients suffer prejudice that FMS is a medically unexplained symptom, implying inauthenticity. Furthermore, FMS often exhibits comorbidity with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or spondyloarthritis (SpA), both of which show similar indications. In this study, disease specific biomarkers were sought in blood samples from patients to facilitate objective diagnoses of FMS, and distinguish it from RA and SpA. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients and healthy donors (HD) were subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis. The percentage of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in PBMCs and the mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) of cell surface antigen expression in MAIT cells were analyzed. There was a decrease in the MAIT cell population in FMS, RA, and SpA compared with HD. Among the cell surface antigens in MAIT cells, three chemokine receptors, CCR4, CCR7, and CXCR1, a natural killer (NK) receptor, NKp80, a signaling lymphocyte associated molecule (SLAM) family, CD150, a degrunulation marker, CD107a, and a coreceptor, CD8β emerged as potential biomarkers for FMS to distinguish from HD. Additionally, a memory marker, CD44 and an inflammatory chemokine receptor, CXCR1 appeared possible markers for RA, while a homeostatic chemokine receptor, CXCR4 deserved for SpA to differentiate from FMS. Furthermore, the drug treatment interruption resulted in alternation of the expression of CCR4, CCR5, CXCR4, CD27, CD28, inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS), CD127 (IL-7 receptor α), CD94, NKp80, an activation marker, CD69, an integrin family member, CD49d, and a dipeptidase, CD26, in FMS. Combined with the currently available

  3. Mucosal-associated invariant T cell is a potential marker to distinguish fibromyalgia syndrome from arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chie Sugimoto

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM is defined as a widely distributed pain. While many rheumatologists and pain physicians have considered it to be a pain disorder, psychiatry, psychology, and general medicine have deemed it to be a syndrome (FMS or psychosomatic disorder. The lack of concrete structural and/or pathological evidence has made patients suffer prejudice that FMS is a medically unexplained symptom, implying inauthenticity. Furthermore, FMS often exhibits comorbidity with rheumatoid arthritis (RA or spondyloarthritis (SpA, both of which show similar indications. In this study, disease specific biomarkers were sought in blood samples from patients to facilitate objective diagnoses of FMS, and distinguish it from RA and SpA.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from patients and healthy donors (HD were subjected to multicolor flow cytometric analysis. The percentage of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells in PBMCs and the mean fluorescent intensity (MFI of cell surface antigen expression in MAIT cells were analyzed.There was a decrease in the MAIT cell population in FMS, RA, and SpA compared with HD. Among the cell surface antigens in MAIT cells, three chemokine receptors, CCR4, CCR7, and CXCR1, a natural killer (NK receptor, NKp80, a signaling lymphocyte associated molecule (SLAM family, CD150, a degrunulation marker, CD107a, and a coreceptor, CD8β emerged as potential biomarkers for FMS to distinguish from HD. Additionally, a memory marker, CD44 and an inflammatory chemokine receptor, CXCR1 appeared possible markers for RA, while a homeostatic chemokine receptor, CXCR4 deserved for SpA to differentiate from FMS. Furthermore, the drug treatment interruption resulted in alternation of the expression of CCR4, CCR5, CXCR4, CD27, CD28, inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS, CD127 (IL-7 receptor α, CD94, NKp80, an activation marker, CD69, an integrin family member, CD49d, and a dipeptidase, CD26, in FMS.Combined with the currently available

  4. Clinical performance of antibodies to prothrombin and thrombin in Chinese patients with antiphospholipid syndrome: potential interest in discriminating patients with thrombotic events and non-thrombotic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shulan; Wu, Ziyan; Li, Jing; Li, Ping; Chen, Si; Wen, Xiaoting; Li, Liubing; Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Jiuliang; Zhang, Fengchun; Li, Yongzhe

    2017-04-01

    A hallmark feature of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the presence of a wide spectrum of antiphospholipid antibodies. In this study, we evaluated the clinical relevance of antibodies to prothrombin (PT) (aPT) and thrombin (aThr) in Chinese patients with APS. A total of 229 subjects were tested, including 86 patients with APS [35 patients with primary APS (PAPS), 51 patients with APS associated with other diseases (APSAOD)], 104 patients with non-APS diseases (disease controls), and 39 healthy controls. Serum IgG/IgM/IgA aPT and aThr were determined by ELISA. The levels of both IgG/IgM/IgA aPT and IgG/IgM/IgA aThr were significantly increased in patients with PAPS and APSAOD compared with patients with non-APS thrombosis and non-APS PRM, and HC. Both IgG aPT and IgG aThr exhibited promising diagnostic potentials for APS with sensitivities and specificities of 16.3 and 95.8% (IgG aPT), and 19.8 and 99.3% (IgG aThr), respectively. Importantly, both IgG aPT (OR 4.06; 95% CI 1.49-11.05) and IgG aThr (OR 4.49; 95% CI 1.62-12.45) were significantly correlated with arterial, but not venous, thrombotic events. Our findings highlighted that IgG aPT and IgG aThr could serve as promising biomarkers to identify patients at risk of arterial thrombosis in China.

  5. Dummy (pacifier) use and sudden infant death syndrome: Potential advantages and disadvantages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horne, R.S.C.; Moon, R.Y; L'Hoir, M.P.; Blair, P.S.

    2014-01-01

    The large decline in deaths due to the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in the last 20 years in many countries is largely due to risk-reduction advice resulting from observational studies that examined the relationship between infant care practices and SIDS. Most of this advice remains largely

  6. High circulating ghrelin: a potential cause for hyperphagia and obesity in prader-willi syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DelParigi, Angelo; Tschöp, Matthias; Heiman, Mark L

    2002-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder occurring in 1 of 10,000-16,000 live births and is characterized by excessive appetite with progressive massive obesity as well as short stature and mental retardation. Most patients have GH deficiency and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The causes...

  7. The GABA(A) receptor is an FMRP target with therapeutic potential in fragile X syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat, Sien; D'Hulst, Charlotte; Heulens, Inge; De Rubeis, Silvia; Mientjes, Edwin; Nelson, David L.; Willemsen, Rob; Bagni, Claudia; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter P.; Kooy, R. Frank

    2015-01-01

    Previous research indicates that the GABA(A)ergic system is involved in the pathophysiology of the fragile X syndrome, a frequent form of inherited intellectual disability and associated with autism spectrum disorder. However, the molecular mechanism underlying GABA(A)ergic deficits has remained

  8. The potential role of adenosine in the pathophysiology of the insulin resistance syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, SJL; Gans, ROB; ter Maaten, JC; Teerlink, T; Westerhoff, HV; Heine, RJ

    An increased intracellular availability of the co-enzyme A esters of long-chain fatty acids is thought to underlie many aspects of the insulin resistance syndrome. However, the cause of clustering of a hyperdynamic circulation, sympathetic activation. hypertension, hyperuricaemia, and a raised

  9. Murine Joubert syndrome reveals Hedgehog signaling defects as a potential therapeutic target for nephronophthisis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, A.M.; Giles, R.H.; Srivastava, S.K.; Eley, L.; Whitehead, J.; Danilenko, M.; Raman, S.; Slaats, G.G.G.; Colville, J.G.; Ajzenberg, H.; Kroes, H.Y.; Thelwall, P.E.; Simmons, N.L.; Miles, C.G.; Sayer, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is the major cause of pediatric renal failure, yet the disease remains poorly understood, partly due to the lack of appropriate animal models. Joubert syndrome (JBTS) is an inherited ciliopathy giving rise to NPHP with cerebellar vermis aplasia and retinal degeneration. Among

  10. Avian Influenza: Potential Impact on Sub-Saharan Military Populations with High Rates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feldman, Robert L; Nickell, Kent

    2007-01-01

    ...)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. With the arrival of avian influenza in Africa, the potential exists that some of those soldiers might also become infected with H5N1, the virus responsible for the disease...

  11. Cinnamon: Potential Role in the Prevention of Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, and Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Bolin; Panickar, Kiran S.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with insulin resistance, elevated glucose and lipids, inflammation, decreased antioxidant activity, increased weight gain, and increased glycation of proteins. Cinnamon has been shown to improve all of these variables in in vitro, animal, and/or human studies. In addition, cinnamon has been shown to alleviate factors associated with Alzheimer's disease by blocking and reversing tau formation in vitro and in ischemic stroke by blocking cell swelling. In vitro s...

  12. IGF1 as a Potential Treatment for Rett Syndrome: Safety Assessment in Six Rett Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pini, Giorgio; Scusa, Maria Flora; Congiu, Laura; Benincasa, Alberto; Morescalchi, Paolina; Bottiglioni, Ilaria; Di Marco, Pietro; Borelli, Paolo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Della-Chiesa, Andrea; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Tropea, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that affects one in ten thousand girls and has no cure. The majority of RTT patients display mutations in the gene that codes for the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Clinical observations and neurobiological analysis of mouse models suggest that defects in the expression of MeCP2 protein compromise the development of the central nervous system, especially synaptic and circuit maturation. Thus, agents that promote brain dev...

  13. Clinical Characterization of Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia: A Potential Manifestation of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elliot; Tekola, Bezawit; Patrie, James; Cornella, Scott; Caldwell, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    Gastric antral vascular ectasia is a relatively common endoscopic finding. Past studies have shown an association of gastric antral vascular ectasia with cirrhosis and autoimmune disorders. We aimed to re-examine these associations and to investigate a possible association of gastric antral vascular ectasia with features of the metabolic syndrome. There were 135 patients with a diagnosis of gastric antral vascular ectasia from years 1995-2013 seen at the University of Virginia who were identified from a clinical data repository and age and sex matched to a cohort of patients without gastric antral vascular ectasia undergoing endoscopy within the same time frame as the index cases. The groups were compared for comorbidities including autoimmune disease, cirrhosis, vascular disease, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus, and cirrhosis due to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Sixty-four percent of gastric antral vascular ectasia patients were cirrhotic, compared with 14% of controls (P correlation of gastric antral vascular ectasia with features of metabolic syndrome such as diabetes, BMI, vascular disease, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis cirrhosis. The pathophysiology of gastric antral vascular ectasia remains uncertain, but we speculate that it may be a manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Using an Emergency Department Syndromic Surveillance System to Evaluate Reporting of Potential Rabies Exposures, Illinois, 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, Kelley; Frias, Mabel; Patel, Megan Toth; Christiansen, Demian

    Mandatory reporting of potential rabies exposures and initiation of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) allow local health authorities to monitor PEP administration for errors. Our objectives were to use an emergency department (ED) syndromic surveillance system to (1) estimate reporting compliance for exposure to rabies in suburban Cook County, Illinois, and (2) initiate interventions to improve reporting and reassess compliance. We queried ED records from 45 acute care hospitals in Cook County and surrounding areas from January 1, 2013, through June 30, 2015, for chief complaints or discharge diagnoses pertaining to rabies, PEP, or contact with a wild mammal (eg, bat, raccoon, skunk, fox, or coyote). We matched patients with ≥1 ED visit for potential rabies exposure to people with potential rabies exposure reported to the Cook County Department of Public Health. We considered nonmatches to have unreported exposures. We then initiated active surveillance in July 2015, disseminated education on reporting requirements in August and September 2015, and reassessed reporting completeness from July 2015 through February 2016. Of 248 patients with rabies-related ED visits from January 2013 through June 2015, 63 (25.4%) were reported. After interventions were implemented to increase reporting compliance, 53 of 98 (54.1%) patients with rabies-related ED visits from July 2015 through February 2016 were reported. Patients with ED visits for potential rabies exposure were twice as likely to be reported postintervention than preintervention (risk ratio = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.6-2.8). The volume of potential rabies exposure cases reported to the health department from July 2015 through February 2016 increased by 252% versus the previous year. Potential rabies exposures and PEP initiation are underreported in suburban Cook County. ED syndromic surveillance records can be used to estimate reporting compliance and conduct active surveillance.

  15. The promise of dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Louise Jane

    traditions - dialogic communication theory, action research, and science and technology studies. It also provides an empirically rich account of the dialogic turn through case studies of how dialogue is enacted in the fields of planned communication, public engagement with science and collaborative research...... in the fields in which it is practised and how can we analyse those practices in ways that take account of their complexities? The Promise of Dialogue presents a novel theoretical framework for analysing the dialogic turn in the production and communication of knowledge that builds bridges across three research...

  16. Promising change, delivering continuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens Friis; Sungusia, Eliezeri; Mabele, Mathew Bukhi

    2017-01-01

    that compares the emergence of REDD+ in Tanzania with that of a previous forest-policy model called Participatory Forest Management. Our study describes how the advent of REDD+ implies change at the discursive level, but also continuity and repetitiveness in terms of the initial promises and expectations...... leading to substantial donor financing, pilot project activities, and policy development and implementation processes. In both epochs, these have achieved little in terms of changing actual forest management and use on the ground outside selected pilot project sites, but have sustained the livelihoods...

  17. Reduced numbers of switched memory B cells with high terminal differentiation potential in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsetti, Rita; Valentini, Diletta; Marcellini, Valentina; Scarsella, Marco; Marasco, Emiliano; Giustini, Ferruccio; Bartuli, Andrea; Villani, Alberto; Ugazio, Alberto G

    2015-03-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have increased susceptibility to infections and a high frequency of leukemia and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that immunodeficiency and immune dysfunction are integral parts of the syndrome. A reduction in B-cell numbers has been reported, associated with moderate immunodeficiency and normal immunoglobulin levels. Here, we compared B-cell populations of 19 children with DS with those in healthy age-matched controls. We found that all steps of peripheral B-cell development are altered in DS, with a more severe defect during the later stages of B-cell development. Transitional and mature-naïve B-cell numbers are reduced by 50% whereas switched memory B cells represent 10-15% of the numbers in age-matched controls. Serum IgM levels were slightly reduced, but all other immunoglobulin isotypes were in the normal range. The frequency of switched memory B cells specific for vaccine antigens was significantly lower in affected children than in their equivalently vaccinated siblings. In vitro switched memory B cells of patients with DS have an increased ability to differentiate into antibody-forming cells in response to TLR9 signals. Tailored vaccination schedules increasing the number of switched memory B cells may improve protection and reduce the risk of death from infection in DS. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. [PRES (Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome): potential complication of hypertensive crisis. Case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergura, Michele; Prencipe, Michele; Del Giudice, Antonio Maria; Grifa, Rachele; Miscio, Filomena; Pennelli, Anna Maria; Popolizio, Teresa; Simeone, Anna; Ferrara, Mariangela; Leone, Maurizio; Aucella, Filippo

    2017-04-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical-radiological syndrome, usually reversible, characterized by vasogenic oedema in cerebral posterior regions in patients with autoimmune diseases, nephropathies, hypertensive crisis, eclampsia and exposure to cytotoxic drugs. The main symptoms are: headache, nausea, vomiting, seizures, visual disturbance and altered consciousness. Complications as cerebral hemorrhage and recurrences are rare. We describe a case of a 65 years old woman, affected by chronic kidney disease, recently exacerbated, diabetes and hypertension in treatment, who showed an heterogeneous clinical presentation with vomiting, headache, blurred vision and impaired consciousness during an episode of acute hypertension. After an adjustement of the antihypertensive treatment we observed a regression of symptoms in one week. FLAIR sequences on MRI showed cerebral bilateral vasogenic oedema in posterior regions, typical for PRES. This case was suggestive for PRES and a prompt adjustement of the antihypertensive treatment was critical for clinical recovery. Brain MRI was crucial for diagnosis. It is important for clinicians to recognize PRES as a possible complication of renal disease and hypertensive crisis. Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  19. Cannabidiol: promise and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Timothy E; Luebke, Adrienne; Gidal, Barry E

    2014-09-01

    Over the past few years, increasing public and political pressure has supported legalization of medical marijuana. One of the main thrusts in this effort has related to the treatment of refractory epilepsy-especially in children with Dravet syndrome-using cannabidiol (CBD). Despite initiatives in numerous states to at least legalize possession of CBD oil for treating epilepsy, little published evidence is available to prove or disprove the efficacy and safety of CBD in patients with epilepsy. This review highlights some of the basic science theory behind the use of CBD, summarizes published data on clinical use of CBD for epilepsy, and highlights issues related to the use of currently available CBD products. Cannabidiol is the major nonpsychoactive component of Cannabis sativa. Over the centuries, a number of medicinal preparations derived from C. sativa have been employed for a variety of disorders, including gout, rheumatism, malaria, pain, and fever. These preparations were widely employed as analgesics by Western medical practitioners in the 19(th) century (1). More recently, there is clinical evidence suggesting efficacy in HIV-associated neuropathic pain, as well as spasms associated with multiple sclerosis (1).

  20. Platelet doubling after the first azacitidine cycle is a promising predictor for response in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients in the Dutch azacitidine compassionate named patient programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, Lieke H.; Alhan, Canan; Wijermans, Pierre W.; van Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Schaafsma, Ron; Biemond, Bart J.; Beeker, Aart; Hoogendoorn, Mels; van Rees, Bastiaan P.; de Weerdt, Okke; Wegman, Jurgen; Libourel, Ward J.; Luykx-de Bakker, Sylvia A.; Minnema, Monique C.; Brouwer, Rolf E.; Croon-de Boer, Fransien; Eefting, Matthijs; Jie, Kon-Siong G.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.; Koedam, Jan; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Vellenga, Edo; Huls, Gerwin

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of azacitidine in the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) (20-30% blasts) has been demonstrated. To investigate the efficacy of azacitidine in daily clinical practice and to identify predictors

  1. Potential Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Sjögren Syndrome With Human Chorionic Gonadotropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C V

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Sjögren syndrome (SS) ameliorate during pregnancy, through dampening (immunotolerance) of the maternal immune system which protects the fetus from rejection. A large number of studies have shown that human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) contributes to this tolerance. Studies on animal models have reaffirmed that hCG treatment mimics the benefits of pregnancy. Based on the scientific evidence, randomized clinical trials comparing hCG with current therapies and/or placebo are recommended for RA, SS, and for other autoimmune diseases such as, type 1 diabetes and ankylosing spondylitis, which also get better during pregnancy and hCG treatment seems to help. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Auditory hair cell defects as potential cause for sensorineural deafness in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohi Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available WHSC1 is a histone methyltransferase (HMT that catalyses the addition of methyl groups to lysine 36 on histone 3. In humans, WHSC1 haploinsufficiency is associated with all known cases of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS. The cardinal feature of WHS is a craniofacial dysmorphism, which is accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss in 15% of individuals with WHS. Here, we show that WHSC1-deficient mice display craniofacial defects that overlap with WHS, including cochlea anomalies. Although auditory hair cells are specified normally, their stereocilia hair bundles required for sound perception fail to develop the appropriate morphology. Furthermore, the orientation and cellular organisation of cochlear hair cells and their innervation are defective. These findings identify, for the first time, the likely cause of sensorineural hearing loss in individuals with WHS.

  3. Auditory hair cell defects as potential cause for sensorineural deafness in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohi; Ura, Kiyoe; Streit, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    WHSC1 is a histone methyltransferase (HMT) that catalyses the addition of methyl groups to lysine 36 on histone 3. In humans, WHSC1 haploinsufficiency is associated with all known cases of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS). The cardinal feature of WHS is a craniofacial dysmorphism, which is accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss in 15% of individuals with WHS. Here, we show that WHSC1-deficient mice display craniofacial defects that overlap with WHS, including cochlea anomalies. Although auditory hair cells are specified normally, their stereocilia hair bundles required for sound perception fail to develop the appropriate morphology. Furthermore, the orientation and cellular organisation of cochlear hair cells and their innervation are defective. These findings identify, for the first time, the likely cause of sensorineural hearing loss in individuals with WHS. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Potential role of retinoids in ovarian physiology and pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanwen; Li, Chunjin; Chen, Lu; Wang, Fengge; Zhou, Xu

    2017-06-01

    Retinoids (retinol and its derivatives) are required for maintaining vision, immunity, barrier function, reproduction, embryogenesis, cell proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, retinoid signaling plays a key role in initiating meiosis of germ cells of the mammalian fetal ovary. Recently, studies indicated that precise retinoid level regulation in the ovary provides a molecular control of ovarian development, steroidogenesis and oocyte maturation. Besides, abnormal retinoid signaling may be involved in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common ovarian endocrinopathies in reproductive-aged women worldwide. This review primarily summarizes recent advancements made in investigating the action of retinoid signaling in ovarian physiology as well as the abnormal retinoid signaling in PCOS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Gender-related differences in irritable bowel syndrome: Potential mechanisms of sex hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleine, Mathieu; Matricon, Julien

    2014-01-01

    According to epidemiological studies, twice as many women as men are affected by irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in western countries, suggesting a role for sex hormones in IBS pathophysiology. Despite growing evidence about the implications of sex hormones in IBS symptom modulation, data on mechanisms by which they influence disease development are sparse. This review aims to determine the state of knowledge about the role of sex hormones in sensorimotor dysfunctions and to address the possible interplay of sex hormones with common risk factors associated with IBS. The scientific bibliography was searched using the following keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, sex, gender, ovarian hormone, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, symptoms, pain, sensitivity, motility, permeability, stress, immune system, brain activity, spinal, supraspinal, imaging. Ovarian hormones variations along the menstrual cycle affect sensorimotor gastrointestinal function in both healthy and IBS populations. They can modulate pain processing by interacting with neuromodulator systems and the emotional system responsible for visceral pain perception. These hormones can also modulate the susceptibility to stress, which is a pivotal factor in IBS occurrence and symptom severity. For instance, estrogen-dependent hyper-responsiveness to stress can promote immune activation or impairments of gut barrier function. In conclusion, whereas it is important to keep in mind that ovarian hormones cannot be considered as a causal factor of IBS, they arguably modulate IBS onset and symptomatology. However, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited and studies assessing the link between IBS symptoms and ovarian hormone levels are needed to improve our knowledge of the disease evolution with regard to gender. Further studies assessing the role of male hormones are also needed to understand fully the role of sex hormones in IBS. Finally, investigation of brain-gut interactions is critical

  6. Migraine in Gulf War Illness and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Prevalence, potential mechanisms, and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakib eRayhan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence of headache subtypes in Gulf War Illness and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome compared to controls. Background: Migraines are reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS. Approximately, 25% of the military personnel who served in the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War have developed Gulf War Illness (GWI. Symptoms in GWI share considerable overlap with CFS, including headache complaints. The type and prevalence of headaches in GWI have not been adequately assessed.Methods: 50 GWI, 39 CFS and 45 controls were examined. Participants had structured headache evaluations based on the 2004 International Headache Society criteria. All subjects had history and physical examinations, measurements of systemic hyperalgesia (dolorimetry, assessments for exclusionary indicators, fatigue and symptom related questionnaires. Results: Migraines were detected in 64% of GWI (odds ratio, 11.6, [±95% CI, 4.1 to 32.5] and 82% of CFS subjects (odds ratio, 22.5, [±95% CI, 7.8 to 64.8] compared to only 13% of controls. There was a predominance of females in the CFS compared to GWI and controls. However, gender did not influence migraine status (x2= 2.7; P = 0.101. Measures of fatigue, pain, and other ancillary criteria were comparable between GWI and CFS subjects with and without headache. Conclusion: Results validate previous findings of migraine in CFS and confirms similar increased prevalence in GWI compared to controls. This suggests GWI and CFS subjects share pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie migraine attacks and contribute to the extensive overlap of symptom constructs and disease pathophysiology. The high migraine prevalence warrants the inclusion of a structured headache evaluation that coincides with clinical assessments of GWI and CFS diagnosis.

  7. Unique DNA repair gene variations and potential associations with the primary antibody deficiency syndromes IgAD and CVID.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Offer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite considerable effort, the genetic factors responsible for >90% of the antibody deficiency syndromes IgAD and CVID remain elusive. To produce a functionally diverse antibody repertoire B lymphocytes undergo class switch recombination. This process is initiated by AID-catalyzed deamination of cytidine to uridine in switch region DNA. Subsequently, these residues are recognized by the uracil excision enzyme UNG2 or the mismatch repair proteins MutSalpha (MSH2/MSH6 and MutLalpha (PMS2/MLH1. Further processing by ubiquitous DNA repair factors is thought to introduce DNA breaks, ultimately leading to class switch recombination and expression of a different antibody isotype. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Defects in AID and UNG2 have been shown to result in the primary immunodeficiency hyper-IgM syndrome, leading us to hypothesize that additional, potentially more subtle, DNA repair gene variations may underlie the clinically related antibody deficiencies syndromes IgAD and CVID. In a survey of twenty-seven candidate DNA metabolism genes, markers in MSH2, RAD50, and RAD52 were associated with IgAD/CVID, prompting further investigation into these pathways. Resequencing identified four rare, non-synonymous alleles associated with IgAD/CVID, two in MLH1, one in RAD50, and one in NBS1. One IgAD patient carried heterozygous non-synonymous mutations in MLH1, MSH2, and NBS1. Functional studies revealed that one of the identified mutations, a premature RAD50 stop codon (Q372X, confers increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with a class switch recombination model in which AID-catalyzed uridines are processed by multiple DNA repair pathways. Genetic defects in these DNA repair pathways may contribute to IgAD and CVID.

  8. Loss of KCNJ10 protein expression abolishes endocochlear potential and causes deafness in Pendred syndrome mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Susan M

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pendred syndrome, a common autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by congenital deafness and goiter, is caused by mutations of SLC26A4, which codes for pendrin. We investigated the relationship between pendrin and deafness using mice that have (Slc26a4+/+ or lack a complete Slc26a4 gene (Slc26a4-/-. Methods Expression of pendrin and other proteins was determined by confocal immunocytochemistry. Expression of mRNA was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The endocochlear potential and the endolymphatic K+ concentration were measured with double-barreled microelectrodes. Currents generated by the stria marginal cells were recorded with a vibrating probe. Tissue masses were evaluated by morphometric distance measurements and pigmentation was quantified by densitometry. Results Pendrin was found in the cochlea in apical membranes of spiral prominence cells and spindle-shaped cells of stria vascularis, in outer sulcus and root cells. Endolymph volume in Slc26a4-/- mice was increased and tissue masses in areas normally occupied by type I and II fibrocytes were reduced. Slc26a4-/- mice lacked the endocochlear potential, which is generated across the basal cell barrier by the K+ channel KCNJ10 localized in intermediate cells. Stria vascularis was hyperpigmented, suggesting unalleviated free radical damage. The basal cell barrier appeared intact; intermediate cells and KCNJ10 mRNA were present but KCNJ10 protein was absent. Endolymphatic K+ concentrations were normal and membrane proteins necessary for K+ secretion were present, including the K+ channel KCNQ1 and KCNE1, Na+/2Cl-/K+ cotransporter SLC12A2 and the gap junction GJB2. Conclusions These observations demonstrate that pendrin dysfunction leads to a loss of KCNJ10 protein expression and a loss of the endocochlear potential, which may be the direct cause of deafness in Pendred syndrome.

  9. Loss of KCNJ10 protein expression abolishes endocochlear potential and causes deafness in Pendred syndrome mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangemann, Philine; Itza, Erin M; Albrecht, Beatrice; Wu, Tao; Jabba, Sairam V; Maganti, Rajanikanth J; Ho Lee, Jun; Everett, Lorraine A; Wall, Susan M; Royaux, Ines E; Green, Eric D; Marcus, Daniel C

    2004-01-01

    Background Pendred syndrome, a common autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by congenital deafness and goiter, is caused by mutations of SLC26A4, which codes for pendrin. We investigated the relationship between pendrin and deafness using mice that have (Slc26a4+/+) or lack a complete Slc26a4 gene (Slc26a4-/-). Methods Expression of pendrin and other proteins was determined by confocal immunocytochemistry. Expression of mRNA was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The endocochlear potential and the endolymphatic K+ concentration were measured with double-barreled microelectrodes. Currents generated by the stria marginal cells were recorded with a vibrating probe. Tissue masses were evaluated by morphometric distance measurements and pigmentation was quantified by densitometry. Results Pendrin was found in the cochlea in apical membranes of spiral prominence cells and spindle-shaped cells of stria vascularis, in outer sulcus and root cells. Endolymph volume in Slc26a4-/- mice was increased and tissue masses in areas normally occupied by type I and II fibrocytes were reduced. Slc26a4-/- mice lacked the endocochlear potential, which is generated across the basal cell barrier by the K+ channel KCNJ10 localized in intermediate cells. Stria vascularis was hyperpigmented, suggesting unalleviated free radical damage. The basal cell barrier appeared intact; intermediate cells and KCNJ10 mRNA were present but KCNJ10 protein was absent. Endolymphatic K+ concentrations were normal and membrane proteins necessary for K+ secretion were present, including the K+ channel KCNQ1 and KCNE1, Na+/2Cl-/K+ cotransporter SLC12A2 and the gap junction GJB2. Conclusions These observations demonstrate that pendrin dysfunction leads to a loss of KCNJ10 protein expression and a loss of the endocochlear potential, which may be the direct cause of deafness in Pendred syndrome. PMID:15320950

  10. A clinical case study of a Wolfram syndrome-affected family: pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials and electroretinography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Broniek-Kowalik, Karina; Szulborski, Kamil

    2012-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS), or DIDMOAD, is a rare (1/100 000 to 1/770 000), progressive neurodegenerative disorder. In its early stages, it is characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and loss of sensorineural hearing-this is followed by diabetes insipidus, progressive neurological abnormalities and other endocrine abnormalities, which occur in later years. The aim of this study was to report on the clinical and electrophysiological findings from a family with the WFS1 mutation. The five family members were subjected to a complete ophthalmic examination, which included a flash full-field electroretinogram and pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) performed according to ISCEV standards. Optic atrophy was confirmed in two homozygotic patients, where P100 latencies were significantly delayed-up to 146 ms in PVEP. P100 latencies were normal in the three heterozygotic patients we examined. Curve morphology abnormalities were observed in all five patients we examined. No literature describing the morphology of PVEP in Wolfram syndrome patients was found. In flash electroretinography, scotopic and photopic responses appeared in normal morphology and value. Diabetic retinopathy was not observed in the diabetes mellitus patients.

  11. Review article: potential mechanisms of action of rifaximin in the management of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of gut microbiota in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is supported by various lines of evidence, including differences in mucosal and faecal microbiota between patients with IBS and healthy individuals, development of post-infectious IBS, and the efficacy of some probiotics and nonsystemic antibiotics (e.g. rifaximin). To review the literature regarding the role of rifaximin in IBS and its potential mechanism(s) of action. A literature search was conducted using the terms 'rifaximin', 'irritable bowel syndrome' and 'mechanism of action'. Rifaximin was approved in 2015 for the treatment of IBS with diarrhoea. In contrast to other currently available IBS therapies that require daily administration to maintain efficacy, 2-week rifaximin treatment achieved symptom improvement that persisted ≥12 weeks post-treatment. The mechanisms of action of rifaximin, therefore, may extend beyond direct bactericidal effects. Data suggest that rifaximin may decrease host proinflammatory responses to bacterial products in patients with IBS. In some cases, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may play a role in the clinical symptoms of IBS. Because of the high level of solubility of rifaximin in the small intestine, rifaximin may reset microbial diversity in this environment. Consistent with this hypothesis, rifaximin has antibiotic efficacy against isolates derived from patients with SIBO. Resetting microbial diversity via rifaximin use may lead to a decrease in bacterial fermentation and a reduction in the clinical symptoms of IBS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. "Smart Pills" Promising, Problematic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    An explosion in the variety and availability of cognitive-enhancing drugs, from prescriptions like Ritalin to commercial drinks like NeuroFuel, raises concerns for scientists and educators alike--not just over the potential for abuse, but also over what educators and researchers consider, and how they approach, normal achievement. Evidence is…

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interleukin-6: Potential Interorgan Inflammatory Mediators Contributing to Destructive Periodontal Disease in Obesity or Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Khosravi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has become a worldwide health burden in the last two decades. Obesity has been associated with increased comorbidities, such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, and destructive periodontal disease. Obesity is also part of a group of risk factors occurring together in an individual, which is referred to as metabolic syndrome. Clinical studies have shown higher risk for destructive periodontal disease in obesity and metabolic syndrome. However, the role of obesity and metabolic syndrome in the onset and development of destructive periodontal disease has not yet been fully understood. In this review, we discuss a working model, which focuses on interorgan inflammation as a common etiological factor for destructive periodontal disease associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Specifically, we suggest that elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α or interleukin 6 (IL-6—both adipokines and known risk factors for destructive periodontal disease—in obesity and metabolic syndrome contribute to the onset and development of destructive periodontal disease. The connections between destructive periodontal disease and systemic conditions, such as obesity or metabolic syndrome, are complex and potentially multidirectional. This review largely focuses on TNF-α and IL-6, inflammatory mediators, as potential common risk factors and does not exclude other biological mechanisms.

  14. "Lycopene: A Promising Antioxidant"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshumalee Nisheeth

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lycopene is a red colored fat soluble carotenoid, which gives tomatoes and several other fruits their deep red colour. It has shown potential role in prevention and cure of various systemic and oral diseases including malignancies due to its antioxidant and other cancer preventing properties. Lycopene with its 11 conjugated and 2 non conjugated double bonds is the most efficient singIet oxygen quencher and is considered most potent antioxidant among carotenoids. It has shown to be efficient in the management of oral cancer and precancer like leukoplakia and has shown the potential in the management of other oral mucosal lesions thought to arise due to free radical onslaught such as oral lichen planes.

  15. Overactive Bladder Syndrome and the Potential Role of Prostaglandins and Phosphodiesterases: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama'i, Mohammad Sajjad; Van Koeveringe, Gommert A.; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a general introduction is given, presenting the overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) and its impact on the quality of life and economical burden in patients affected. Moreover, the anatomy, physiology and histology of the lower urinary tract are discussed, followed by a brief overview on the possible role of prostaglandin (PG) and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) in the urinary bladder. The current literature on the role and distribution of PGE2 and its receptors in the urinary bladder is discussed. In both animal models and in human studies, high levels of signaling molecules such as PG and cGMP have been implicated, in decreased functional bladder capacity and micturition volume, as well as in increased voiding contraction amplitude. As a consequence, inhibition of prostanoid production, the use of prostanoid receptor antagonists, or PDE inhibitors might be a rational way to treat patients with detrusor overactivity. Similarly, prostanoid receptor agonists, or agents that stimulate their production, might have a function in treating bladder underactivity. PMID:24350100

  16. Erectile dysfunction in patients with psoriasis: potential impact of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasliyurt, T; Bilir, Y; Sahin, S; Seckin, H Y; Kaya, S U; Sivgin, H; Demir, A K; Erdemir, F

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects up to 5.5% of world population and is associated with erectile dysfunction (ED). Aim of the present study was to investigate impact of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on association between psoriasis and ED as well as to improve our understanding of this association via studying other possible causes of ED such as psychological factors and disease effects. The patient group included 37 male psoriasis patients and control group 28 healthy men. Severity of psoriasis was determined using Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), and ED was evaluated using International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) Scale. Psychiatric state of the patients were determined using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). MetS was diagnosed using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. MetS, ED prevalence and BDI score were significantly higher in psoriasis patient group (p = 0.032, p = 0.018 and p old age and smoking (but not MetS) were found to be independent predictors of ED. ED, MetS and depression frequencies were significantly higher in psoriasis patient group. In addition, psoriasis severity and ED parameters were closely associated. Depression, old age and smoking were found to be independent risk factors for ED.

  17. Bicuspid aortic valve syndrome and fibrillinopathies: potential impact on clinical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosina De Cario

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is a common heterogeneous disorder whose natural history is determined by hemodynamic valvular impairment and/or increased prevalence of aortic abnormalities ranging from dilatation to aneurysm and dissection. BAV-related aortopathy is frequently associated with relevant aortic pathologic changes leading to structural alterations, characteristic degenerative lesions and histological changes of the aorta very similar to those identified and described in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS, an inherited connective tissue disorder associated with mutations in fibrillin 1 (FBN1 gene in more than 90% of patients. Recently, a 4-fold increase in the prevalence of BAV in MFS patients has been reported. Subsequently, pathogenetic FBN1 mutations in patients with BAV and aortic dilatation/aneurysm in whom MFS and other more severe type 1 fibrillinopathies were clinically excluded have been identified. In this review we discuss how this evidence, together with that of the wide heterogeneity in pathogenetic mechanisms of BAV-related aortopathy, may impact the clinical management of BAV.

  18. Dummy (pacifier) use and sudden infant death syndrome: potential advantages and disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Rosemary S C; Hauck, Fern R; Moon, Rachel Y; L'hoir, Monique P; Blair, Peter S

    2014-03-01

    The large decline in deaths due to the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in the last 20 years in many countries is largely due to risk-reduction advice resulting from observational studies that examined the relationship between infant care practices and SIDS. Most of this advice remains largely uncontroversial and educators and researchers in this field are in agreement as to the specific recommendations that should be given to parents and health professionals. However, advice surrounding the apparent protective effect of dummies (also known as pacifiers) has been controversial. Several systematic reviews have demonstrated a strong association between the lack of a pacifier being used by the infant for the final sleep and SIDS, but it is not clear how pacifiers confer protection or if this is a marker for something as yet unmeasured. The Epidemiology and Physiology Working Groups of the International Society for the Study and Prevention of Perinatal and Infant Death (ISPID) are comprised of leading SIDS researchers with an objective to provide evidence-based position statements surrounding the factors associated with SIDS (http://www.ispid.org/) and risk-reduction strategies. The evidence, discussion and conclusions from these working groups regarding dummies (pacifiers) are described below to help inform this debate and describe the future evidence required so that we might find a common recommendation about dummies (pacifiers) and SIDS. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  19. Sjögren's syndrome: the diagnostic potential of early oral manifestations preceding hyposalivation/xerostomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignogna, M D; Fedele, S; Lo Russo, L; Lo Muzio, L; Wolff, A

    2005-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a systemic autoimmune exocrinopathy that affects mainly the salivary and lacrimal glands, leading to progressive reduction in saliva and tear flow. Although the underlying immuno-mediated glandular destruction is thought to develop slowly over several years, a long delay from the start of the symptoms to final diagnosis has been frequently reported. A limited knowledge concerning SS natural history is among the major causes of the actual diagnostic delay. Although very few studies have been focused on the analysis of SS early clinical onset, a series of oral features preceding xerostomia/hyposalivation development in patients eventually diagnosed as having SS have been reported. Sialochemistry alterations, salivary gland swelling, early dental loss and sialorrhea have been observed before the onset of typical signs and symptoms (namely xerostomia and/or hyposalivation), which usually lead to SS clinical presentation and diagnosis. Here we suggest, after evaluating available data, that the traditional 'untouchable' association between SS and xerostomia/hyposalivation might probably be reconsidered, and that astute clinicians should not underestimate the possible presence or development of SS in patients without xerostomia/hyposalivation and presenting these atypical early oral features.

  20. Saliva as a potential tool for diagnosis of dry mouth including Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, K; Moriyama, M; Hayashida, J-N; Tanaka, A; Maehara, T; Ieda, S; Furukawa, S; Ohta, M; Imabayashi, Y; Nakamura, S

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the use of saliva as a diagnostic tool has gained considerable attention because it is non-invasive and easy to perform repeatedly. In this study, we focused on soluble molecules in saliva to establish a new diagnostic method for xerostomia. Saliva was obtained from 90 patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS), 22 patients with xerostomia associated with neurogenic/neuropsychiatric disorders and drugs (XND), 30 patients with radiation-induced xerostomia (RX), and 36 healthy controls. Concentrations of helper T (Th) cytokines in saliva were measured by flow cytometric analysis. Concentrations of secretory IgA (SIgA) and chromogranin A (CgA) were measured by ELISA. Unstimulated and stimulated whole saliva from patients with SS, XND, and RX was significantly reduced compared with controls. Th1 and Th2 cytokines from SS patients were significantly higher than controls. Furthermore, Th2 cytokines were closely associated with strong lymphocytic accumulation in salivary glands from SS patients, while Th1 and Th17 cytokines were negatively associated. SIgA levels were not significantly different between all patient groups and controls. CgA levels from XND patients were significantly higher than controls. The measurement of cytokines, CgA, and SIgA in saliva is suggested to be useful for the diagnosis of xerostomia and also to reveal disease status. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as potential markers of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlagea, Alexandru; Gil, Antonio; Cuesta, Maria V; Arribas, Florencia; Diez, Jesús; Lavilla, Paz; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora

    2013-06-01

    The antiphospholipid antibodies present in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are directed at a number of phospholipid-binding proteins: β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI), prothrombin, and so on. Antibodies directed at β2GPI are accepted as a classification criterion for APS, while the presence of antiprothrombin antibodies is not. In the present article, we investigated the possible role of antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as marker of APS on a cohort of 295 individuals with APS (95 primary APS and 45 secondary APS) and APS-related diseases. We found aPS/PT to be highly associated with venous thrombosis (immunoglobulin G [IgG] aPS/PT odds ratio [OR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.97-13.92 and IgM aPS/PT OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.35-4.77) and obstetric abnormalities (IgG aPS/PT OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.04-5.43), but not with arterial thrombosis. A very high degree of concordance between the concentration of aPS/PT and lupus anticoagulant activity was demonstrated. Therefore, we support the inclusion of aPS/PT determination as second-level assay to confirm APS classification.

  2. Computer vision syndrome: a review of ocular causes and potential treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is the combination of eye and vision problems associated with the use of computers. In modern western society the use of computers for both vocational and avocational activities is almost universal. However, CVS may have a significant impact not only on visual comfort but also occupational productivity since between 64% and 90% of computer users experience visual symptoms which may include eyestrain, headaches, ocular discomfort, dry eye, diplopia and blurred vision either at near or when looking into the distance after prolonged computer use. This paper reviews the principal ocular causes for this condition, namely oculomotor anomalies and dry eye. Accommodation and vergence responses to electronic screens appear to be similar to those found when viewing printed materials, whereas the prevalence of dry eye symptoms is greater during computer operation. The latter is probably due to a decrease in blink rate and blink amplitude, as well as increased corneal exposure resulting from the monitor frequently being positioned in primary gaze. However, the efficacy of proposed treatments to reduce symptoms of CVS is unproven. A better understanding of the physiology underlying CVS is critical to allow more accurate diagnosis and treatment. This will enable practitioners to optimize visual comfort and efficiency during computer operation. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2011 The College of Optometrists.

  3. Dental optical coherence tomography: new potential diagnostic system for cracked-tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Lee, Jong-Jin; Chung, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jong-Tae; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the reliability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detecting cracked teeth and its relative clinical effectiveness by comparing it with other diagnostic methods including conventional visual inspection, trans-illumination, and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). The reliability of swept source OCT (SS-OCT) was verified by comparing the number of detected crack lines on 109 surfaces of 61 teeth with those detected with other conventional methods. One to one comparison revealed that crack lines that were invisible with naked eyes could be found in SS-OCT images. The detection ability of SS-OCT was superior or similar to those of micro-CT (100.0 %) and trans-illumination. Crack lines shown in the SS-OCT images had distinct characteristics, and structural crack lines and craze lines could be distinguished in SS-OCT images. Thus, the detection ability of SS-OCT renders it an acceptable diagnostic device for cracked-tooth syndrome.

  4. Decision Taking versus Promise Issuing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    An alignment is developed between the terminology of outcome oriented decision taking and a terminology for promise issuing. Differences and correspondences are investigated between the concepts of decision and promise. For decision taking, two forms are distinguished: the external outcome

  5. The Potentially Fatal Ogilvie's Syndrome in Lateral Transpsoas Access Surgery: A Multi-Institutional Experience with 2930 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszewski, Jacob; Keem, Sean K; Smith, William; Beckman, Joshua M; Kanter, Adam S; Oskuian, Rod J; Taylor, William; Uribe, Juan S

    2017-03-01

    Ogilvie's syndrome (OS) is a relatively uncommon pathology characterized by significant colonic dilation in the absence of mechanical obstruction. If unrecognized and untreated, cecal perforation resulting in a mortality rate of 25%-71% may occur. It is a potentially underdiagnosed condition in the lateral transpsoas approach population because of its uncommon nature and imitation of other well-known pathologies. Two thousand nine hundred and thirty patients from 6 separate institutions were retrospectively reviewed since 2007 and screened for OS. All patients underwent a minimum of single-level lateral transpsoas fusion. Diagnostic criteria included signs of a postoperative paralytic ileus combined with abdominal computed tomography showing a cecal diameter greater than 9 cm. Treatment modalities and outcomes were recorded. Eight cases (0.22%) of OS were diagnosed at 6 separate institutions. Most institutions recorded more than 350 lateral access procedures. Four cases were initially diagnosed as a routine postoperative ileus; however, they failed conservative therapy and underwent abdominal CT imaging. Neostigmine treatment was required for 1 patient in the intensive care unit setting, and 3 patients were managed conservatively without complications. Four other patients demonstrated bowel perforation at least 48 hours after surgery and required laparotomy with diversion ileostomy. Ogilvie's syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal complication that can mimic a postoperative ileus. It is likely underdiagnosed in the lateral transpsoas approach population because of its uncommon nature and a high index of suspicion should remain. Neostigmine can be administered safely under close observation with immediate and successful outcomes. Patients with perforation require urgent laparotomy and primary repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An Epidemiologic Investigation of Potential Risk Factors for Nodding Syndrome in Kitgum District, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Foltz

    Full Text Available Nodding Syndrome (NS, an unexplained illness characterized by spells of head bobbing, has been reported in Sudan and Tanzania, perhaps as early as 1962. Hypothesized causes include sorghum consumption, measles, and onchocerciasis infection. In 2009, a couple thousand cases were reportedly in Northern Uganda.In December 2009, we identified cases in Kitgum District. The case definition included persons who were previously developmentally normal who had nodding. Cases, further defined as 5- to 15-years-old with an additional neurological deficit, were matched to village controls to assess risk factors and test biological specimens. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations.Surveillance identified 224 cases; most (95% were 5-15-years-old (range = 2-27. Cases were reported in Uganda since 1997. The overall prevalence was 12 cases per 1,000 (range by parish = 0·6-46. The case-control investigation (n = 49 case/village control pairs showed no association between NS and previously reported measles; sorghum was consumed by most subjects. Positive onchocerciasis serology [age-adjusted odds ratio (AOR1 = 14·4 (2·7, 78·3], exposure to munitions [AOR1 = 13·9 (1·4, 135·3], and consumption of crushed roots [AOR1 = 5·4 (1·3, 22·1] were more likely in cases. Vitamin B6 deficiency was present in the majority of cases (84% and controls (75%.NS appears to be increasing in Uganda since 2000 with 2009 parish prevalence as high as 46 cases per 1,000 5- to 15-year old children. Our results found no supporting evidence for many proposed NS risk factors, revealed association with onchocerciasis, which for the first time was examined with serologic testing, and raised nutritional deficiencies and toxic exposures as possible etiologies.

  7. Preliminary clinical findings on NEUMUNE as a potential treatment for acute radiation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stickney, Dwight R; Groothuis, Jessie R; Ahlem, Clarence; Kennedy, Mike; Miller, Barry S; Onizuka-Handa, Nanette; Schlangen, Karen M; Destiche, Daniel; Reading, Chris; Garsd, Armando; Frincke, James M [Harbor Biosciences, 9171 Towne Centre Drive, Suite 180, San Diego, CA 92122 (United States)

    2010-12-01

    5-androstenediol (5-AED) has been advanced as a possible countermeasure for treating the haematological component of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). It has been used in animal models to stimulate both innate and adaptive immunity and treat infection and radiation-induced immune suppression. We here report on the safety, tolerability and haematologic activity of 5-AED in four double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled studies on healthy adults including elderly subjects. A 5-AED injectable suspension formulation (NEUMUNE) or placebo was administered intramuscularly as either a single injection, or once daily for five consecutive days at doses of 50, 100, 200 or 400 mg. Subjects (n = 129) were randomized to receive NEUMUNE (n = 95) or the placebo (n = 34). NEUMUNE was generally well-tolerated; the most frequent adverse events were local injection site reactions (n = 104, 81%) that were transient, dose-volume dependent, mild to moderate in severity, and that resolved over the course of the study. Blood chemistries revealed a transient increase (up to 28%) in creatine phosphokinase and C-reactive protein levels consistent with intramuscular injection and injection site irritation. The blood concentration profile of 5-AED is consistent with a depot formulation that increases in disproportionate increments following each dose. NEUMUNE significantly increased circulating neutrophils (p < 0.001) and platelets (p < 0.001) in the peripheral blood of adult and elderly subjects. A dose-response relationship was identified. Findings suggest that parenteral administration of 5-AED in aqueous suspension may be a safe and effective means to stimulate innate immunity and alleviate neutropenia and thrombocytopenia associated with ARS.

  8. Cast iron promises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hawker

    2007-09-01

    Events in the ten years prior to this disaster still have some resonance today. Ambitions to exploit new technology are not always matched by foresight in the planning, financing or management of projects. Contracts may be based on wrong assumptions, and prove difficult to enforce. Once a project has gathered momentum, those working on it may fear that any attempt to draw attention to risks or defects will be seen as disloyal. When work is completed, it cannot be assumed that formal inspections will reveal potential flaws, or that those using the technology will appreciate the need to follow the procedures laid down for them. Some possible parallels with recent experiences in NHS computing are noted.

  9. The Promises of Talent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandvad, Sara Malou; Sommerlund, Julie

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we address the question of talent from a performative perspective. Instead of entering the discussion about whether talent should be considered an individual or a social construction, we suggest looking into how talents are performed. Inspired by the sociology of expectations, we...... explore when talents are made and what effects they have. Based on studies of Danish film directors and designers, our research suggests that talent is constituted during three processes: identification, self-technology, and materialization. Identification is when others locate potentiality...... in the individual. Self-technology describes the work which the individual carries out to cultivate his or her talent. Materialization refers to the objects that manifest the talent and the necessity of enrolling other participants to create these objects....

  10. An investigation of enzymatic detergents as a potential cause of toxic anterior segment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Henry A; Goodkin, Margot; Buchen, Shelley Y; Calogero, Don; Hilmantel, Gene; Hitchins, Victoria M; Eydelman, Malvina B

    2012-07-01

    To investigate whether enzymatic detergents used in cleaning ophthalmic surgical instruments can cause toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS)-like responses in a rabbit model. Randomized, investigator-masked, controlled experimental animal study. Thirty-five New Zealand white rabbits. The rabbit eyes were randomized into 7 treatment groups to receive intracameral injection of 1 of 3 different doses of Medline Dual Detergent or Enzol Detergent, or sterile limulus amoebocyte lysate reagent water as a control. The eyes were evaluated for anterior segment inflammation at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours after treatment by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Anterior chamber (AC) inflammation, including cells, flare, fibrin, and iris injection; time course of inflammation; and residual detergent levels in luminated instruments. Moderate to marked injection of the iris vessels was seen as early as 1 hour after treatment with the enzymatic detergents in 41 of 60 eyes, with the response being more severe in the Enzol Detergent-exposed eyes. Severe iris hemorrhages were accompanied by blood in the AC in 13 eyes, which usually persisted through 72 hours, with an associated increase in AC cell and flare. Corneal haze was present in 52 of 56 eyes 1 hour after treatment, but was mild and resolved within 24 hours in all but the Enzol 4.5%-exposed eyes. Median AC cell and flare peaked at 6 hours and resolved by 48 hours. Enzymatic detergents caused a severe but unusual response from the iris when injected intracamerally into rabbit eyes. This response has not been reported in humans with TASS. The time course of inflammation was faster (peak at 6 hours) and resolved more quickly (within 48 hours) than TASS. Simulated cleaning and extraction studies indicate that the level of residual detergent to which a patient could be exposed is significantly less than the lowest dose used in this study. Because that low dose caused no significant observations other than injection of the

  11. Cast iron promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    During the Victorian era, a fiercely competitive industry emerged to build and operate Britain's railways. Many of the design and construction skills required were still fairly rudimentary, and were typically developed through practical experience. The resulting mix of entrepreneurship and new technology reshaped the landscape, but often in ways which proved hazardous for passengers. Minor accidents were commonplace, and a number of major failures occurred, one such being the collapse of the Tay Bridge, in 1879. Events in the ten years prior to this disaster still have some resonance today. Ambitions to exploit new technology are not always matched by foresight in the planning, financing or management of projects. Contracts may be based on wrong assumptions, and prove difficult to enforce. Once a project has gathered momentum, those working on it may fear that any attempt to draw attention to risks or defects will be seen as disloyal. When work is completed, it cannot be assumed that formal inspections will reveal potential flaws, or that those using the technology will appreciate the need to follow the procedures laid down for them. Some possible parallels with recent experiences in NHS computing are noted.

  12. The Promises of Biology and the Biology of Promises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jieun

    2015-01-01

    commitments with differently imagined futures. I argue that promises are constitutive of the stem cell biology, rather than being derivative of it. Since the biological concept of stem cells is predicated on the future that they promise, the biological life of stem cells is inextricably intertwined...... patients’ bodies in anticipation of materializing the promises of stem cell biology, they are produced as a new form of biovaluable. The promises of biology move beyond the closed circuit of scientific knowledge production, and proliferate in the speculative marketplaces of promises. Part II looks at how...... of technologized biology and biological time can appear promising with the backdrop of the imagined intransigence of social, political, and economic order in the Korean society....

  13. Lacrimal proline rich 4 (LPRR4 protein in the tear fluid is a potential biomarker of dry eye syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saijyothi Venkata Aluru

    Full Text Available Dry eye syndrome (DES is a complex, multifactorial, immune-associated disorder of the tear and ocular surface. DES with a high prevalence world over needs identification of potential biomarkers so as to understand not only the disease mechanism but also to identify drug targets. In this study we looked for differentially expressed proteins in tear samples of DES to arrive at characteristic biomarkers. As part of a prospective case-control study, tear specimen were collected using Schirmer strips from 129 dry eye cases and 73 age matched controls. 2D electrophoresis (2DE and Differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE was done to identify differentially expressed proteins. One of the differentially expressed protein in DES is lacrimal proline rich 4 protein (LPRR4. LPRR4 protein expression was quantified by enzyme immune sorbent assay (ELISA. LPRR4 was down regulated significantly in all types of dry eye cases, correlating with the disease severity as measured by clinical investigations. Further characterization of the protein is required to assess its therapeutic potential in DES.

  14. Promising pesticide results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Paula

    2012-01-01

    wastewater. For example, DDT has been linked to diabetes and liver, pancreatic and breast cancer, and is a 'probable' carcinogen, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency.” DDT has a half-life of up to 30 years in soil, which means only half its toxicity is naturally depleted through chemical breakdown over a 30-year period. Arsenic, however, which was used in DDT pesticides, does not breakdown at all over time. Moreover, epidemiological studies suggest that DDT and DDE cause serious illness. “Perhaps more worrying is the finding that DDT and its breakdown products are transported from warmer to colder climates around the world by a process called global distillation, thereby concentrating in colder climates and accumulating in the food web, leading to long-term ecological damage,” said Barros. By reducing DDT in the environment, these findings have the potential to aid in the sustainable global management of legacy pesticide contamination. For example, Virotec notes there are some 347 former cattle dip sites inthe region of Kyogle Shire Council in northern NSW, 259 in Lismore Shire Council and a further 211 in Richmond Valley Shire Council. The number of sheep dip sites throughout NSW and Queensland, which are also contaminated with arsenic and DDT, are of a comparable scale. Barros went on to point out that while the treatment of arsenic in soil is relatively straightforward, irrespective of whether treated in situ or ex situ, the treatment of DDT in soil is highly problematic. “Most soil treatments designed to destroy organic compounds in soil involve the introduction of key bacterial agents, because lower sources of energy simply do not have the requisite power to breakdown the long-chain organic molecules. However, as DDT is a pesticide it tends to kill both indigenous and introduced bacteria before they can break down the DDT molecule, thereby eliminating the source of potential remediation,” said Barros. Another challenge relates to the

  15. Development of a symptoms questionnaire for complex regional pain syndrome and potentially related illnesses: the Trauma Related Neuronal Dysfunction Symptoms Inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, S.; van Hilten, J.J.; Marinus, J.J.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; de Lange, J.J.; Perez, R.S.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Collins S, van Hilten JJ, Marinus J, Zuurmond WW, de Lange JJ, Perez RS. Development of a symptoms questionnaire for complex regional pain syndrome and potentially related illnesses: the Trauma Related Neuronal Dysfunction Symptoms Inventory. Objective: To develop a questionnaire to evaluate

  16. Non-decussating retinal-fugal fibre syndrome. An inborn achiasmatic malformation associated with visuotopic misrouting, visual evoked potential ipsilateral asymmetry and nystagmus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apkarian, P.; Bour, L. J.; Barth, P. G.; Wenniger-Prick, L.; Verbeeten, B.

    1995-01-01

    We report a newly identified syndrome in which nasal retinal fibres fail to decussate due to the inborn absence of an optic chiasm. Visual evoked potential (VEP) assessment and neuro-opththalmic evaluation in two unrelated, non-albino children revealed the unusual visual pathway anomaly in the form

  17. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 deletion rescues auditory evoked potential habituation deficit in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Jonathan W; Wen, Teresa H; Reinhard, Sarah; Hsu, Mike S; Sidhu, Harpreet; Ethell, Iryna M; Binder, Devin K; Razak, Khaleel A

    2016-05-01

    Sensory processing deficits are common in autism spectrum disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is a leading genetic cause of intellectual disability and autism. Electrophysiological responses in humans with FXS show reduced habituation with sound repetition and this deficit may underlie auditory hypersensitivity in FXS. Our previous study in Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice revealed an unusually long state of increased sound-driven excitability in auditory cortical neurons suggesting that cortical responses to repeated sounds may exhibit abnormal habituation as in humans with FXS. Here, we tested this prediction by comparing cortical event related potentials (ERP) recorded from wildtype (WT) and Fmr1 KO mice. We report a repetition-rate dependent reduction in habituation of N1 amplitude in Fmr1 KO mice and show that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), one of the known FMRP targets, contributes to the reduced ERP habituation. Our studies demonstrate a significant up-regulation of MMP-9 levels in the auditory cortex of adult Fmr1 KO mice, whereas a genetic deletion of Mmp-9 reverses ERP habituation deficits in Fmr1 KO mice. Although the N1 amplitude of Mmp-9/Fmr1 DKO recordings was larger than WT and KO recordings, the habituation of ERPs in Mmp-9/Fmr1 DKO mice is similar to WT mice implicating MMP-9 as a potential target for reversing sensory processing deficits in FXS. Together these data establish ERP habituation as a translation relevant, physiological pre-clinical marker of auditory processing deficits in FXS and suggest that abnormal MMP-9 regulation is a mechanism underlying auditory hypersensitivity in FXS. Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the leading known genetic cause of autism spectrum disorders. Individuals with FXS show symptoms of auditory hypersensitivity. These symptoms may arise due to sustained neural responses to repeated sounds, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. For the first time, this study shows deficits

  18. Impaired induction of long-term potentiation-like plasticity in patients with high-functioning autism and Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Janzarik, Wibke G; Delvendahl, Igor; Münchau, Alexander; Biscaldi, Monica; Mainberger, Florian; Bäumer, Tobias; Rauh, Reinhold; Mall, Volker

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity by paired associative stimulation (PAS) in patients with high-functioning autism and Asperger syndrome (HFA/AS). PAS with an interstimulus interval between electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation of 25 ms (PAS(25)) was performed in patients with HFA/AS (n=9; eight males, one female; mean age 17 y 11 mo, SD 4 y 5 mo) and in typically developing age-matched volunteers (n=9; five males, four females; mean age 22 y 4 mo, SD 5 y 2 mo). The amplitude of motor-evoked potentials was measured before PAS(25), immediately after stimulation, and 30 minutes and 60 minutes later. A PAS protocol adapted to individual N20 latency (PAS(N20+2)) was performed in six additional patients with HFA/AS. Short-interval intracortical inhibition was measured using paired-pulse stimulation. In contrast to the typically developing participants, the patients with HFA/AS did not show a significant increase in motor-evoked potentials after PAS(25). This finding could also be demonstrated after adaptation for N20 latency. Short-interval intracortical inhibition of patients with HFA/AS was normal compared with the comparison group and did not correlate with PAS effect. Our results show a significant impairment of LTP-like plasticity induced by PAS in individuals with HFA/AS compared with typically developing participants. This finding is in accordance with results from animal studies as well as human studies. Impaired LTP-like plasticity in patients with HFA/AS points towards reduced excitatory synaptic connectivity and deficits in sensory-motor integration in these patients. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  19. Bodily Sensory Inputs and Anomalous Bodily Experiences in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Evaluation of the Potential Effects of Sound Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tajadura-Jiménez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscientific studies have shown that human's mental body representations are not fixed but are constantly updated through sensory feedback, including sound feedback. This suggests potential new therapeutic sensory approaches for patients experiencing body-perception disturbances (BPD. BPD can occur in association with chronic pain, for example in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS. BPD often impacts on emotional, social, and motor functioning. Here we present the results from a proof-of-principle pilot study investigating the potential value of using sound feedback for altering BPD and its related emotional state and motor behavior in those with CRPS. We build on previous findings that real-time alteration of the sounds produced by walking can alter healthy people's perception of their own body size, while also resulting in more active gait patterns and a more positive emotional state. In the present study we quantified the emotional state, BPD, pain levels and gait of twelve people with CRPS Type 1, who were exposed to real-time alteration of their walking sounds. Results confirm previous reports of the complexity of the BPD linked to CRPS, as participants could be classified into four BPD subgroups according to how they mentally visualize their body. Further, results suggest that sound feedback may affect the perceived size of the CRPS affected limb and the pain experienced, but that the effects may differ according to the type of BPD. Sound feedback affected CRPS descriptors and other bodily feelings and emotions including feelings of emotional dominance, limb detachment, position awareness, attention and negative feelings toward the limb. Gait also varied with sound feedback, affecting the foot contact time with the ground in a way consistent with experienced changes in body weight. Although, findings from this small pilot study should be interpreted with caution, they suggest potential applications for regenerating BDP and its related

  20. The Pilgaard-Dahl syndrome: laughter-induced pneumothorax - one of the many potentially detrimental consequences of laughter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Dorthe Bach; El Fassi, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In this article we propose the eponym Pilgaard-Dahl syndrome (named after two Danish revue actors). The syndrome consists of laughter-induced pneumothorax in smoking middle-aged men when exposed to hearty humour. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of spontaneous pneumothorax - in particular...

  1. Effect of capsule 'UB03' containing potential probiotic strains for the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, M Ratna; Sawant, P

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this research was to study the efficacy and safety of capsule 'UB03' to treat patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Thirty patients with Rome II IBS were assigned to receive capsule 'UB03' (10 billion lyophilised bacteria and yeast/capsule produced by Unique Biotech Limited, India) twice daily for 90 days. Assessment of IBS was carried out according with Rome II criteria and their severity for 90 days of treatment with an interval of 30 days. Complete haemogram, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase, serum creatinine were performed as a part of safety evaluation at the time of inclusion and after 90 days of treatment. There was significant improvement in frequency of defecation (23%), consistency of stool, abdominal discomfort, bloating and flatulence. However, there was no significant change in abdominal pain and mucus in stool. This trial demonstrates that the consumption of capsule 'UB03' containing potential probiotic strains is found to be effective and safe for the treatment of patients with IBS.

  2. From High Intellectual Potential to Asperger Syndrome: Evidence for Differences and a Fundamental Overlap—A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Aurélie; Planche, Pascale; Hemimou, Cherhazad; Demily, Caroline; Vaivre-Douret, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of clinicians point to similar clinical features between some children with High Intellectual Potential (HIP or “Giftedness” = Total IQ > 2 SD), and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) without intellectual or language delay, formerly diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome. Some of these common features are social interaction impairments, special interests, and in some cases high-verbal abilities. The aim of this article is to determine whether these similarities exist at more fundamental levels, other than clinical, and to explore the literature in order to provide empirical support for an overlap between ASD and HIP. Method: First, comparative studies between ASD and HIP children were sought. Because of a lack of data, the respective characteristics of ASD and HIP subjects were explored by a cross-sectional review of different areas of research. Emphasis was placed on psychometric and cognitive evaluations, experimental and developmental assessments, and neurobiological research, following a “bottom-up” procedure. Results: This review highlights the existence of similarities in the neurocognitive, developmental and neurobiological domains between these profiles, which require further study. In addition, the conclusions of several studies show that there are differences between HIP children with a homogeneous Intellectual Quotient profile and children with a heterogeneous Intellectual Quotient profile. Conclusion: HIP seems to cover different developmental profiles, one of which might share features with ASD. A new line of investigation providing a possible starting-point for future research is proposed. Its implications, interesting from both clinical and research perspectives, are discussed. PMID:27812341

  3. From High Intellectual Potential to Asperger Syndrome: Evidence for Differences and a Fundamental Overlap-A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Aurélie; Planche, Pascale; Hemimou, Cherhazad; Demily, Caroline; Vaivre-Douret, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of clinicians point to similar clinical features between some children with High Intellectual Potential (HIP or "Giftedness" = Total IQ > 2 SD ), and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) without intellectual or language delay, formerly diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome. Some of these common features are social interaction impairments, special interests, and in some cases high-verbal abilities. The aim of this article is to determine whether these similarities exist at more fundamental levels, other than clinical, and to explore the literature in order to provide empirical support for an overlap between ASD and HIP. Method: First, comparative studies between ASD and HIP children were sought. Because of a lack of data, the respective characteristics of ASD and HIP subjects were explored by a cross-sectional review of different areas of research. Emphasis was placed on psychometric and cognitive evaluations, experimental and developmental assessments, and neurobiological research, following a "bottom-up" procedure. Results: This review highlights the existence of similarities in the neurocognitive, developmental and neurobiological domains between these profiles, which require further study. In addition, the conclusions of several studies show that there are differences between HIP children with a homogeneous Intellectual Quotient profile and children with a heterogeneous Intellectual Quotient profile. Conclusion: HIP seems to cover different developmental profiles, one of which might share features with ASD. A new line of investigation providing a possible starting-point for future research is proposed. Its implications, interesting from both clinical and research perspectives, are discussed.

  4. Nerve growth factor and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D): a potential therapeutic target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-juan; Liu, Liang; Yao, Shu-kun

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort associated with abnormal bowel habits. Diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) is a major subtype of IBS, the predominant manifestations of which are abdominal pain and diarrhea. The pathogenesis of IBS-D remained unknown until recently. The effects of psychosocial stress, central hypervigilance, neuroendocrine abnormality, disturbed gastrointestinal motility, mucosal immune activation, intestinal barrier dysfunction, visceral hypersensitivity (VH), altered gut flora, and genetic susceptibility may be involved in its development. Recently, increased attention has been placed on the neural-immune-endocrine network mechanism in IBS-D, especially the role of various neuroendocrine mediators. As a member of the neurotrophin family, nerve growth factor (NGF) has diverse biological effects, and participates in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Basic studies have demonstrated that NGF is associated with inflammatory- and stress-related VH, as well as stress-related intestinal barrier dysfunction. The aim of this study is to summarize recent literature and discuss the role of NGF in the pathophysiology of IBS-D, especially in VH and intestinal barrier dysfunction, as well as its potential as a therapeutic target in IBS-D.

  5. Tissue loss (white syndrome) in the coral Montipora capitata is a dynamic disease with multiple host responses and potential causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Russell, Robin; Aeby, Greta S.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue loss diseases or white syndromes (WS) are some of the most important coral diseases because they result in significant colony mortality and morbidity, threatening dominant Acroporidae in the Caribbean and Pacific. The causes of WS remain elusive in part because few have examined affected corals at the cellular level. We studied the cellular changes associated with WS over time in a dominant Hawaiian coral, Montipora capitata, and showed that: (i) WS has rapidly progressing (acute) phases mainly associated with ciliates or slowly progressing (chronic) phases mainly associated with helminths or chimeric parasites; (ii) these phases interchanged and waxed and waned; (iii) WS could be a systemic disease associated with chimeric parasitism or a localized disease associated with helminths or ciliates; (iv) corals responded to ciliates mainly with necrosis and to helminths or chimeric parasites with wound repair; (v) mixed infections were uncommon; and (vi) other than cyanobacteria, prokaryotes associated with cell death were not seen. Recognizing potential agents associated with disease at the cellular level and the host response to those agents offers a logical deductive rationale to further explore the role of such agents in the pathogenesis of WS in M. capitata and helps explain manifestation of gross lesions. This approach has broad applicability to the study of the pathogenesis of coral diseases in the field and under experimental settings.

  6. Protective effect of eugenol against restraint stress-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction: Potential use in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabadu, Debapriya; Shah, Ankit; Singh, Sanjay; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2015-07-01

    Eugenol, an essential constituent found in plants such as Eugenia caryophyllata Thunb. (Myrtaceae) is reported to possess neuroprotective and anti-stress activities. These activities can potentially be useful in the treatment of stress-induced irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The protective effect of eugenol was assessed against restraint stress (RS)-induced IBS-like gastrointestinal dysfunction in rats. Further, its centrally mediated effect was evaluated in this model. Eugenol (12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg), ondansetron (4.0 mg/kg, p.o.), and vehicle were administered to rats for 7 consecutive days before exposure to 1 h RS. One control group was not exposed to RS-induction. The effect of eugenol (50 mg/kg) with and without RS exposure was evaluated for mechanism of action and per se effect, respectively. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortex (HPA)-axis function was evaluated by estimating the plasma corticosterone level. The levels of brain monoamines, namely serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and their metabolites were estimated in stress-responsive regions such as hippocampus, hypothalamus, pre-frontal cortex (PFC), and amygdala. Oxidative damage and antioxidant defenses were also assessed in brain regions. Eugenol (50 mg/kg) reduced 80% of RS-induced increase in fecal pellets similar to that of ondansetron. Eugenol attenuated 80% of stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone and modulated the serotonergic system in the PFC and amygdala. Eugenol attenuated stress-induced changes in norepinephrine and potentiated the antioxidant defense system in all brain regions. Eugenol protected against RS-induced development of IBS-like gastrointestinal dysfunction through modulation of HPA-axis and brain monoaminergic pathways apart from its antioxidant effect.

  7. Plasma miR-122 and miR-3149 Potentially Novel Biomarkers for Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangdong Li

    Full Text Available We evaluated the potentiality of plasma microRNAs (miRNAs, or miRs that were considered as novel biomarkers for acute coronary syndrome (ACS, including acute myocardial infarction (AMI and unstable angina (UA.We initially identified plasma miR-122, -140-3p, -144, -720, -1225-3p, -2861, and -3149 as candidate miRNAs associated with AMI (≥2 fold and P < 0.05 by comparing expression differences of miRNAs among AMI, non-coronary heart disease (non-CHD and stable angina (SA groups, using miRNA microarrays (n = 8 independent arrays in each group. Those seven plasma miRNAs were further examined with qRT-PCR analyses in two replications including 111 and 428 patients separately, and the results demonstrated that plasma miR-122, -140-3p, -720, -2861, and -3149 were elevated in the ACS group vs. the non-ACS (non-CHD + SA group (P < 0.01. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of the five miRNAs for ACS classification was 0.838, 0.818, 0.865, 0.852, and 0.670, respectively (all P < 0.001, while the values reached 0.843 and 0.925 when simultaneously with miR-122 and -3149 or with miR-122, -2861, and -3149 together (all P < 0.001. In plasma of pigs after coronary ligation, miR-122 was increased from 180 min to 240 min and miR-3149 was augmented from 30 min to 240 min compared with the sham pigs (all P < 0.05.Plasma miR-122, -140-3p, -720, -2861, and -3149 were associated with and potentially novel biomarkers for ACS.

  8. Evaluation of Potential Modifiers of the Cardiac Phenotype in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Driscoll, Deborah A.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Mei, Minghua; Zackai, Elaine; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The phenotype associated with deletion of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region is highly variable, yet little is known about the source of this variability. Cardiovascular anomalies, including tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic arch type B, perimembranous ventricular septal defects, and aortic arch anomalies, occur in approximately 75% of individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion. METHODS Data from 343 subjects enrolled in a study of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were used to evaluate potential modifiers of the cardiac phenotype in this disorder. Subjects with and without cardiac malformations, and subjects with and without aortic arch anomalies were compared with respect to sex and race. In addition, in the subset of subjects from whom a DNA sample was available, genotypes for variants of four genes that are involved in the folate-homocysteine metabolic pathway and that have been implicated as risk factors for other birth defects were compared. Five variants in four genes were genotyped by heteroduplex or restriction digest assays. The chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was used to evaluate the association between the cardiac phenotype and each potential modifier. RESULTS The cardiac phenotype observed in individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion was not significantly associated with either sex or race. The genetic variants that were evaluated also did not appear to be associated with the cardiovascular phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Variation in the cardiac phenotype observed between individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion does not appear to be related to sex, race, or five sequence variants in four folate-related genes that are located outside of the 22q11.2 region. PMID:18770859

  9. Serial auditory-evoked potentials in the diagnosis and monitoring of a child with Landau-Kleffner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyler, Erin; Harkrider, Ashley W

    2013-01-01

    A boy, aged 2 1/2 yr, experienced sudden deterioration of speech and language abilities. He saw multiple medical professionals across 2 yr. By almost 5 yr, his vocabulary diminished from 50 words to 4, and he was referred to our speech and hearing center. The purpose of this study was to heighten awareness of Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and emphasize the importance of an objective test battery that includes serial auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) to audiologists who often are on the front lines of diagnosis and treatment delivery when faced with a child experiencing unexplained loss of the use of speech and language. Clinical report. Interview revealed a family history of seizure disorder. Normal social behaviors were observed. Acoustic reflexes and otoacoustic emissions were consistent with normal peripheral auditory function. The child could not complete behavioral audiometric testing or auditory processing tests, so serial AEPs were used to examine central nervous system function. Normal auditory brainstem responses, a replicable Na and absent Pa of the middle latency responses, and abnormal slow cortical potentials suggested dysfunction of auditory processing at the cortical level. The child was referred to a neurologist, who confirmed LKS. At age 7 1/2 yr, after 2 1/2 yr of antiepileptic medications, electroencephalographic (EEG) and audiometric measures normalized. Presently, the child communicates manually with limited use of oral information. Audiologists often are one of the first professionals to assess children with loss of speech and language of unknown origin. Objective, noninvasive, serial AEPs are a simple and valuable addition to the central audiometric test battery when evaluating a child with speech and language regression. The inclusion of these tests will markedly increase the chance for early and accurate referral, diagnosis, and monitoring of a child with LKS which is imperative for a positive prognosis. American Academy of Audiology.

  10. Quinoline: a promising antitubercular target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keri, Rangappa S; Patil, Siddappa A

    2014-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global public health problem in recent years. TB originated mainly from various strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a highly infectious and chronic disease with high infection rate since ancient times. Since the last 50 years, the same long-duration, multidrug treatment plan is being followed for the treatment of tuberculosis. Due to the development of resistance to conventional antibiotics there is a need for new therapeutic strategies to combat M. tuberculosis. Subsequently, there is an urgent need for the development of new drug molecules with newer targets and with an alternative mechanism of action. Among hetrocyclic compounds, quinoline compounds are important privileged structure in medicinal chemistry, are widely used as "parental" compounds to synthesize molecules with medical benefits, especially with anti-malarial and anti-microbial activities. Certain, quinoline-based compounds, also show effective anti-TB activity. This broad spectrum of biological and biochemical activities has been further facilitated by the synthetic versatility of quinoline, which allows the generation of a large number of structurally diverse derivatives. To pave the way for future research, there is a need to collect the latest information in this promising area. In the present review, we have collated published reports on this versatile core to provide an insight so that its full therapeutic potential can be utilized for the treatment tuberculosis. It is hoped that, this review will be helpful for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic quinoline-based anti-TB drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The potential of heliox as a therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults and children: a descriptive review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens, Charlotte J. P.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Preckel, Benedikt; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2015-01-01

    In neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and acute RDS (ARDS) mechanical ventilation is often necessary to manage hypoxia, whilst protecting the lungs through lower volume ventilation and permissive hypercapnia. Mechanical ventilation can, however, induce or aggravate the lung injury caused

  12. Electrophysiological signs of supplementary-motor-area deficits in high-functioning autism but not Asperger syndrome: an examination of internally cued movement-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Peter G; Bradshaw, John L; Iansek, Robert; Tonge, Bruce J; Rinehart, Nicole J

    2009-10-01

    Motor dysfunction is common to both autism and Asperger syndrome, but the underlying neurophysiological impairments are unclear. Neurophysiological examinations of motor dysfunction can provide information about likely sites of functional impairment and can contribute to the debate about whether autism and Asperger syndrome are variants of the same disorder or fundamentally distinct neurodevelopmental conditions. We investigated the neurophysiology of internally determined motor activity in autism and Asperger syndrome via examination of movement-related potentials (MRPs). We used electroencephalography to investigate MRPs, via an internally cued movement paradigm, in the following three groups: (1) individuals with high-functioning autism (14 males, one female; mean age 13 y 1 mo, SD 4 y 2 mo, range 7 y 8 mo to 20 y 9 mo; mean Full-scale IQ 93.40, SD 20.72); (2) individuals with Asperger syndrome (10 males, two females; mean age 13 y 7 mo, SD 3 y 9 mo, range 8 y 11 mo to 20 y 4 mo; mean Full-scale IQ 103.25, SD 19.37), and (3) a healthy control group (13 males, seven females; mean age 14 y 0 mo, SD 3 y 11 mo; range 8 y 4 mo to 21 y 0 mo; mean Full-scale IQ 114.25, SD 11.29). Abnormal MRPs can reflect disruption of motor-related neural networks involving the basal ganglia, thalamus, and supplementary motor area. There was evidence for abnormal MRPs in autism (e.g. increased post-movement cortical activity, abnormal peak time) but not in Asperger syndrome. The results support basal ganglia, thalamus, and supplementary motor area involvement as a likely source of motor dysfunction in autism, and provide further evidence for the neurobiological separateness of autism and Asperger syndrome.

  13. Gene expression analysis of urine sediment: evaluation for potential noninvasive markers of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Eric M; Korrect, Garrett S; Stromberg, Arnold J; Erickson, Deborah R

    2012-02-01

    We determined whether gene expression profiles in urine sediment could provide noninvasive markers for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome with and/or without Hunner lesions. Fresh catheterized urine was collected and centrifuged from 5 controls, and 5 Hunner lesion-free and 5 Hunner lesion bearing patients. RNA was extracted from pelleted material and quantified by gene expression microarray using the GeneChip® Human Gene ST Array. Three biologically likely hypotheses were tested, including 1) all 3 groups are distinct from each other, 2) controls are distinct from the 2 types combined of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and 3) patients with Hunner lesion-interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome are distinct from controls and patients with nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome combined. For statistical parity an unlikely fourth hypothesis was included, that is patients with nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome are distinct from controls and patients with Hunner lesion-interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome combined. Analysis supported selective up-regulation of genes in the Hunner lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome group (hypothesis 3), which were primarily associated with inflammation. The inflammatory profile was statistically similar to that reported in a prior Hunner lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome bladder biopsy study. Gene expression analysis of urine sediment was feasible in this pilot study. Expression profiles failed to discriminate nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome from controls and they are unlikely to be a noninvasive marker for nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. In contrast, patients with Hunner lesion had increased proinflammatory gene expression in urine sediment, similar to that in a prior microarray study of bladder biopsies. If these preliminary results are validated in

  14. Adiponectin Potentially Contributes to the Antidepressive Effects of Baduanjin Qigong Exercise in Women With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jessie S M; Li, Ang; Ng, Siu-Man; Ho, Rainbow T H; Xu, Aimin; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Wang, Xiao-Min; So, Kwok-Fai; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2017-03-13

    Our recent study demonstrates that adiponectin signaling plays a significant role in mediating physical exercise-exerted effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepression in mice. Whether the findings can be translated to humans remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Baduanjin Qigong exercise on adiponectin and to evaluate whether adiponectin is involved in the antidepressive effects of Qigong exercise on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)-like illness. This is a randomized, waitlist-controlled trial. One hundred eight female participants were randomly assigned to either Qigong exercise or waitlist groups. Sixteen 1.5-h Qigong lessons were conducted. Outcome measures were taken at three time points. Baseline adiponectin levels were negatively associated with body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist/hip ratio in women with CFS-like illness. Compared with the waitlist control, Qigong exercise significantly reduced anxiety and depression symptoms and significantly raised plasma adiponectin levels (median = 0.8 vs. -0.1, p Qigong exercise were associated with decreases in depression scores for the Qigong group (r = -0.38, p = 0.04). Moreover, adjusted linear regression analysis further identified Qigong exercise and change in adiponectin levels as the significant factors accounting for reduction of depression symptoms. Baduanjin Qigong significantly increased adiponectin levels in females with CFS-like illness. Decreases in depression symptoms were associated with increases in adiponectin levels following Qigong exercise, indicating that the potential contribution of adiponectin to Qigong exercise elicited antidepressive effects in human subjects.

  15. NGF and HB-EGF: potential biomarkers that reflect the effects of fesoterodine in patients with overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Rim; Moon, Yeo Jung; Kim, Sei Kwang; Bai, Sang Wook

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can be used to objectively assess overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) treatment outcome and to evaluate the effects of fixed-dose fesoterodine on OAB symptoms. This study included 124 participants (62 patients with OAB and 62 controls) in Severance Hospital between 2010 and 2012. In patients with OAB, 4 mg fesoterodine was administered once daily. Repeated evaluations of putative biomarker levels, urine creatinine (Cr) levels, and questionnaire responses, including the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) and the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB q), were performed from baseline to 16 weeks. Urinary levels of NGF/Cr (OAB: 1.13±0.9 pg/mg; control: 0.5±0.29 pg/mg) and HB-EGF/Cr (OAB: 8.73±6.55 pg/mg; control: 4.45±2.93 pg/mg) were significantly higher in subjects with OAB than in controls (p<0.001). After 16 weeks of fixed-dose fesoterodine treatment, urinary NGF/Cr levels (baseline: 1.13±0.08 pg/mg; 16 weeks: 0.60±0.4 pg/mg; p=0.02) and HB-EGF/Cr levels significantly decreased (baseline: 8.73±6.55 pg/mg; 16 weeks: 4.72±2.69 pg/mg; p=0.03, respectively). Both the OABSS and OAB q scores improved (p<0.001). However, there were no a statistically significant correlations between these urinary markers and symptomatic scores. Urinary levels of NGF and HB-EGF may be potential biomarkers for evaluating outcome of OAB treatment. Fixed-dose fesoterodine improved OAB symptoms. Future studies are needed to further examine the significance of urinary NGF and HB-EGF levels as therapeutic markers for OAB.

  16. Potential protective effects of Nigella sativa and Allium sativum against fructose-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rasheed, Nawal; Al-Rasheed, Nouf; Bassiouni, Yieldez; Faddah, Laila; Mohamad, Azza M

    2014-01-01

    Among famous medicinal plants with known antioxidant activity; black seed (Nigella sativa, NS) and garlic (Allium sativum) which have been used in traditional medicine. In recent years, rates of metabolic syndrome (MS) have been increasing globally. The present work was designed to study the potential protective effects of black seed and raw garlic homogenate against fructose-induced MS in rats and to assess the benefits gained from their combination. Fifty male albino Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups. A control group was allowed to feed on normal chow and drink tap water. MS group was fed the same diet plus 10% fructose in drinking water. Treated groups received NS or garlic either alone or in combination as oral supplements along with high fructose diet for 8 weeks. Results revealed that body weight, liver weight, fasting blood glucose, serum triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were significantly increased while high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and the activities of Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glucose -6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PHD) and catalase in liver tissues were significantly decreased in MS group compared to the control group. Administration of NS or garlic either alone or in combination significantly ameliorated all the above-mentioned altered parameters. Treatment with both NS and garlic showed the utmost reduction in serum LDL-C and TG levels and could restore the activities of the studied enzymes in liver nearly to normal values. It was concluded that both NS and garlic were effective in attenuating multiple abnormalities of MS. Combination of these medicinal plants may have additional effectiveness in reducing serum TC, LDL-C and increasing HDL-C levels which could be a step in the prevention and management of MS.

  17. From High Intellectual Potential to Asperger Syndrome: Evidence for Differences and a Fundamental Overlap – A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Boschi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: An increasing number of clinicians point to similar clinical features between some children with High Intellectual Potential (HIP or Giftedness = Total IQ > 2 SD, and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD without intellectual or language delay, formerly diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome. Some of these common features are social interaction impairments, special interests, and in some cases high-verbal abilities. The aim of this article is to determine whether theses similarities exist at more fundamental levels, other than clinical, and to explore the literature in order to provide empirical support for an overlap between ASD and HIP.Method: First, comparative studies between ASD and HIP children were sought. Because of a lack of data, the respective characteristics of ASD and HIP subjects were explored by a cross-sectional review of different areas of research. Emphasis was placed on psychometric and cognitive evaluations, experimental and developmental assessments, and neurobiological research, following a bottom-up procedure.Results: This review highlights the existence of similarities in the neurocognitive, developmental and neurobiological domains between these profiles, which require further study. In addition, the conclusions of several studies show that there are differences between HIP children with a homogeneous Intellectual Quotient profile and children with a heterogeneous Intellectual Quotient profile.Conclusion: HIP seems to cover different developmental profiles, one of which might share features with ASD. A new line of investigation providing a possible starting-point for future research is proposed. Its implications, interesting from both clinical and research perspectives, are discussed.

  18. Phenotype-genotype correlation in potential female carriers of X-linked developmental cataract (Nance-Horan syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif O; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Mohamed, Jawahir Y; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2012-06-01

    To correlate clinical examination with underlying genotype in asymptomatic females who are potential carriers of X-linked developmental cataract (Nance-Horan syndrome). An ophthalmologist blind to the pedigree performed comprehensive ophthalmic examination for 16 available family members (two affected and six asymptomatic females, five affected and three asymptomatic males). Facial features were also noted. Venous blood was collected for sequencing of the gene NHS. All seven affected family members had congenital or infantile cataract and facial dysmorphism (long face, bulbous nose, abnormal dentition). The six asymptomatic females ranged in age from 4-35 years old. Four had posterior Y-suture centered lens opacities; these four also exhibited the facial dysmorphism of the seven affected family members. The fifth asymptomatic girl had scattered fine punctate lens opacities (not centered on the Y-suture) while the sixth had clear lenses, and neither exhibited the facial dysmorphism. A novel NHS mutation (p.Lys744AsnfsX15 [c.2232delG]) was found in the seven patients with congenital or infantile cataract. This mutation was also present in the four asymptomatic girls with Y-centered lens opacities but not in the other two asymptomatic girls or in the three asymptomatic males (who had clear lenses). Lens opacities centered around the posterior Y-suture in the context of certain facial features were sensitive and specific clinical signs of carrier status for NHS mutation in asymptomatic females. Lens opacities that did not have this characteristic morphology in a suspected female carrier were not a carrier sign, even in the context of her affected family members.

  19. The Potential Association of Later Initiation of Oral/Enteral Nutrition on Euthyroid Sick Syndrome in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Pérez-Guisado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to determine if early initiation of oral/enteral nutrition in burn patients minimizes the drop in fT3 levels, reduces the potential for euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS, and shortens the length of hospital stay (LHS. Subjects and Methods. We retrospectively evaluated the statistical association of serum fT3, fT4, and TSH at the first (2nd–5th day and second sample collection (9th–12th day after the burn injury in 152 burn patients. Three groups were established depending on time of initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition: 48 h after the injury (Group 3. Results. They were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. We found that LHS and the fT3 levels were statistically different in the 3 groups. The LHS (in days was, respectively, in each group, 16.77±4.56, 21.98±4.86, and 26.06±5.47. Despite the quantifiable drop in fT3, ESS was present only at the first sample collection (2.61±0.92 days in Group 3, but there was no group with ESS at the second sample collection (9.89±1.01 days. Our data suggest that early initiation of nutritional supplementation decreases the length of hospitalization and is associated with decreasing fT3 serum concentration depression. Conclusion. Early initiation of oral/enteral nutrition counteracts ESS and improves the LHS in burn patients.

  20. The Potential Association of Later Initiation of Oral/Enteral Nutrition on Euthyroid Sick Syndrome in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; de Haro-Padilla, Jesús M.; Rioja, Luis F.; DeRosier, Leo C.; de la Torre, Jorge I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to determine if early initiation of oral/enteral nutrition in burn patients minimizes the drop in fT3 levels, reduces the potential for euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS), and shortens the length of hospital stay (LHS). Subjects and Methods. We retrospectively evaluated the statistical association of serum fT3, fT4, and TSH at the first (2nd–5th day) and second sample collection (9th–12th day) after the burn injury in 152 burn patients. Three groups were established depending on time of initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition: 48 h after the injury (Group 3). Results. They were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. We found that LHS and the fT3 levels were statistically different in the 3 groups. The LHS (in days) was, respectively, in each group, 16.77 ± 4.56, 21.98 ± 4.86, and 26.06 ± 5.47. Despite the quantifiable drop in fT3, ESS was present only at the first sample collection (2.61 ± 0.92 days) in Group 3, but there was no group with ESS at the second sample collection (9.89 ± 1.01 days). Our data suggest that early initiation of nutritional supplementation decreases the length of hospitalization and is associated with decreasing fT3 serum concentration depression. Conclusion. Early initiation of oral/enteral nutrition counteracts ESS and improves the LHS in burn patients. PMID:23401683

  1. [Maxillofacial and dental abnormalities in some multiple abnormality syndromes. "Cri du chat" syndrome, Wilms' tumor-aniridia syndrome; Sotos syndrome; Goldenhar syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berio, A; Trucchi, R; Meliota, M

    1992-05-01

    The paper describes the maxillo-facial and dental anomalies observed in some chromosome and non-chromosome poly-malformative syndromes ("Cri du chat" syndrome; Wilms' tumour; Sotos' syndrome; Goldenhar's syndrome). The Authors emphasise the possibility of diagnosing these multiple deformity syndromes from maxillo-facial alterations in early infancy; anomalous tooth position and structure cal also be successfully treated immediately after the first appearance of teeth. This is a particularly promising field of pediatrics and preventive pediatric medicine.

  2. Promising Products for Printing and Publishing Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Činčikaitė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article surveys printing and publishing market and its strong and weak aspects. The concept of a new product is described as well as its lifetime and the necessity of its introduction to the market. The enterprise X operating on the market is analyzed, its strong and weak characteristics are presented. The segmentation of the company consumers is performed. On the basis of the performed analysis the potential promising company products are defined.Article in Lithuanian

  3. Mastering JavaScript promises

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, Muzzamil

    2015-01-01

    This book is for all the software and web engineers wanting to apply the promises paradigm to their next project and get the best outcome from it. This book also acts as a reference for the engineers who are already using promises in their projects and want to improve their current knowledge to reach the next level. To get the most benefit from this book, you should know basic programming concepts, have a familiarity with JavaScript, and a good understanding of HTML.

  4. America: No Promise Without Agony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert McAfee

    We may discover signs of promise in the midst of agony if we make some shifts of perspective. (1) "Our fear of overt violence must be countered by our acknowledgement of covert violence." Covert violence is subtle and more destructive than physical violence because it is the "denial of personhood"--the insinuation by an act or by neglect that a…

  5. Promising Electric Aircraft Drive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of electric aircraft propulsion technology performance thresholds for key power system components is presented. A weight comparison of electric drive systems with equivalent total delivered energy is made to help identify component performance requirements, and promising research and development opportunities.

  6. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise. Desirazu N Rao Bharath Wootla. General Article Volume 12 Issue ... Keywords. Catalytic antibodies; abzymes; hybridome technology; Diels– Alder reaction; Michaelis– Menten kinetics; Factor VIII.

  7. An Early Warning System Based on Syndromic Surveillance to Detect Potential Health Emergencies among Migrants: Results of a Two-Year Experience in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Napoli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Profound geopolitical changes have impacted the southern and eastern Mediterranean since 2010 and defined a context of instability that is still affecting several countries today. Insecurity combined with the reduction of border controls has led to major population movements in the region and to migration surges from affected countries to southern Europe, especially to Italy. To respond to the humanitarian emergency triggered by this migration surge, Italy implemented a syndromic surveillance system in order to rapidly detect potential public health emergencies in immigrant reception centres. This system was discontinued after two years. This paper presents the results of this experience detailing its strengths and weaknesses in order to document the applicability and usefulness of syndromic surveillance in this specific context.

  8. An Early Warning System Based on Syndromic Surveillance to Detect Potential Health Emergencies among Migrants: Results of a Two-Year Experience in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Christian; Riccardo, Flavia; Declich, Silvia; Dente, Maria Grazia; Pompa, Maria Grazia; Rizzo, Caterina; Rota, Maria Cristina; Bella, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    Profound geopolitical changes have impacted the southern and eastern Mediterranean since 2010 and defined a context of instability that is still affecting several countries today. Insecurity combined with the reduction of border controls has led to major population movements in the region and to migration surges from affected countries to southern Europe, especially to Italy. To respond to the humanitarian emergency triggered by this migration surge, Italy implemented a syndromic surveillance system in order to rapidly detect potential public health emergencies in immigrant reception centres. This system was discontinued after two years. This paper presents the results of this experience detailing its strengths and weaknesses in order to document the applicability and usefulness of syndromic surveillance in this specific context. PMID:25140999

  9. The Stress-Metabolic Syndrome Relationship in Adolescents: An Examination of the Moderating Potential of Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Megan E; Pivarnik, Jim; Pfeiffer, Karin; Maier, Kimberly S; Eisenmann, Joey C; Ewing, Martha

    2016-10-01

    The role of psychosocial stress in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome is receiving increased attention and has led to examination of whether physical activity may moderate the stress-metabolic syndrome relationship. The current study examined relationships among physical activity, stress, and metabolic syndrome in adolescents. Participants (N = 126; 57 girls, 69 boys) were assessed for anthropometry, psychosocial stress, physical activity, and metabolic syndrome variables; t tests were used to examine sex differences, and regression analysis was used to assess relationships among variables controlling for sex and maturity status. Mean body mass index approached the 75th percentile for both sexes. Typical sex differences were observed for systolic blood pressure, time spent in moderate and vigorous physical activity, and perceived stress. Although stress was not associated with MetS (β = -.001, P = .82), a modest, positive relationship was observed with BMI (β = .20, P = .04). Strong relationships between physical activity and stress with MetS or BMI were not found in this sample. Results may be partially explained by overall good physical health status of the participants. Additional research in groups exhibiting varying degrees of health is needed.

  10. Physical activity and physical activity cognitions are potential factors maintaining fatigue in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Eveline J. M.; van Leeuwen, Ninke; Bossema, Ercolie R.; Kruize, Aike A.; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bijlsma, Johannes W. J.; Geenen, Rinie

    Background Fatigue is a prevalent and debilitating problem in Sjogren's syndrome. It has been suggested that physical activity and cognitions about physical activity can influence fatigue. Objective The aim of this study was to examine fatigue and physical activity levels in patients with Sjogren's

  11. Physical activity and physical activity cognitions are potential factors maintaining fatigue in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwen; Bossema; Kruize; Geenen; Bijlsma; Bootsma; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2012-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a prevalent and debilitating problem in Sjögren's syndrome. It has been suggested that physical activity and cognitions about physical activity can influence fatigue. Objective The aim of this study was to examine fatigue and physical activity levels in patients with Sjögren's

  12. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome Kaposi sarcoma in the liver manifesting as acute obstructive hepatitis: another potential role for montelukast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, P J; Lucas, S; Morris, S; Kulasegaram, R

    2013-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been described in Kaposi sarcoma, but does not usually manifest as acute hepatitis. We describe a case of rapid obstructive jaundice after initiation of antiretroviral therapy, in which the liver biopsy confirmed hepatic Kaposi sarcoma, and the clinical course was altered by the addition of montelukast.

  13. Freedom: A Promise of Possibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkers, Sandra Schmidt

    2015-10-01

    The idea of freedom as a promise of possibility is explored in this column. The core concepts from a research study on considering tomorrow (Bunkers, 1998) coupled with humanbecoming community change processes (Parse, 2003) are used to illuminate this notion. The importance of intentionality in human freedom is discussed from both a human science and a natural science perspective. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Adiponectin Potentially Contributes to the Antidepressive Effects of Baduanjin Qigong Exercise in Women with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Jessie S. M.; Li, Ang; Ng, Siu-Man; Ho, Rainbow T. H.; Xu, Aimin; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Wang, Xiao-Min; So, Kwok-Fai; Chan, Cecilia L. W.

    2017-01-01

    Our recent study demonstrates that adiponectin signaling plays a significant role in mediating physical exercise-exerted effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepression in mice. Whether the findings can be translated to humans remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Baduanjin Qigong exercise on adiponectin and to evaluate whether adiponectin is involved in the antidepressive effects of Qigong exercise on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)-like illness. This is a ran...

  15. Evidence of Reduced CBG Cleavage in Abdominal Obesity: A Potential Factor in Development of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenke, M A; Lewis, J G; Rankin, W; Torpy, D J

    2016-08-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is involved in the regulation of cortisol delivery. Neutrophil elastase-mediated cleavage of high to low affinity CBG (haCBG to laCBG) induces cortisol release at inflammatory sites. Past studies have shown reduced CBG in obesity, an inflammatory state, particularly in central adiposity/metabolic syndrome. We performed an observational, cross-sectional study of the effects of obesity, age and sex on ha/laCBG in 100 healthy volunteers. Total and haCBG levels were 11% higher in women but did not vary with age or menopausal status. Total CBG levels were lower with increased body weight and waist circumference; laCBG levels were lower with increased body weight, waist circumference, body mass index and body fat; higher haCBG levels were seen with increased body fat. The relation between CBG and adiposity appeared to be driven predominantly by the metabolic syndrome group. The results suggest reduced CBG cleavage in central obesity, possibly contributing to the characteristic inflammatory phenotype of the central obesity and metabolic syndrome. The mechanism of gender differences in CBG levels is unclear. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Akitoshi; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased

  17. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Akitoshi, E-mail: akitoshi-tamura@ds-pharma.co.jp; Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: • We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. • The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. • Some of allergic drugs increased

  18. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  19. Chitin fulfilling a biomaterials promise

    CERN Document Server

    Khor, Eugene

    2001-01-01

    The second edition of Chitin underscores the important factors for standardizing chitin processing and characterization. It captures the essential interplay between chitin's assets and limitations as a biomaterial, placing the past promises of chitin in perspective, addressing its present realities and offering insight into what is required to realize chitin's destiny (including its derivative, chitosan) as a biomaterial of the twenty-first century. This book is an ideal guide for both industrialists and researchers with a vested interest in commercializing chitin.An upd

  20. Evaluation of potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome in bottlenose dolphins:feeding and activity patterns of dolphins in Sarasota Bay, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Randall S.; McHugh, Katherine A.; Douglas, David C.; Shippee, Steve; McCabe, Elizabeth Berens; Barros, Nélio B.; Phillips, Goldie T.

    2014-01-01

    Free-ranging bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) living in Sarasota Bay, Florida appear to have a lower risk of developing insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome compared to a group of dolphins managed under human care. Similar to humans, differences in diet and activity cycles between these groups may explain why Sarasota dolphins have lower insulin, glucose, and lipids. To identify potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome, existing and new data were incorporated to describe feeding and activity patterns of the Sarasota Bay wild dolphin community. Sarasota dolphins eat a wide variety of live fish and spend 10–20% of daylight hours foraging and feeding. Feeding occurs throughout the day, with the dolphins eating small proportions of their total daily intake in brief bouts. The natural pattern of wild dolphins is to feed as necessary and possible at any time of the day or night. Wild dolphins rarely eat dead fish or consume large amounts of prey in concentrated time periods. Wild dolphins are active throughout the day and night; they may engage in bouts of each key activity category at any time during daytime. Dive patterns of radio-tagged dolphins varied only slightly with time of day. Travel rates may be slightly lower at night, suggesting a diurnal rhythm, albeit not one involving complete, extended rest. In comparison, the managed dolphins are older; often fed a smaller variety of frozen-thawed fish types; fed fish species not in their natural diet; feedings and engaged activities are often during the day; and they are fed larger but fewer meals. In summary, potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome in dolphins may include young age, activity, and small meals fed throughout the day and night, and specific fish nutrients. These protective factors against insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are similar to those reported in humans. Further studies may benefit humans and dolphins.

  1. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Novel Hypomethylated Non-Pericentromeric Genes with Potential Clinical Implications in ICF Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Simo-Riudalbas

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome (ICF is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by severe hypomethylation in pericentromeric regions of chromosomes (1, 16 and 9, marked immunodeficiency and facial anomalies. The majority of ICF patients present mutations in the DNMT3B gene, affecting the DNA methyltransferase activity of the protein. In the present study, we have used the Infinium 450K DNA methylation array to evaluate the methylation level of 450,000 CpGs in lymphoblastoid cell lines and untrasformed fibroblasts derived from ICF patients and healthy donors. Our results demonstrate that ICF-specific DNMT3B variants A603T/STP807ins and V699G/R54X cause global DNA hypomethylation compared to wild-type protein. We identified 181 novel differentially methylated positions (DMPs including subtelomeric and intrachromosomic regions, outside the classical ICF-related pericentromeric hypomethylated positions. Interestingly, these sites were mainly located in intergenic regions and inside the CpG islands. Among the identified hypomethylated CpG-island associated genes, we confirmed the overexpression of three selected genes, BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221, in ICF compared to healthy controls, which are supposed to be expressed in germ line and silenced in somatic tissues.In conclusion, this study contributes in clarifying the direct relationship between DNA methylation defect and gene expression impairment in ICF syndrome, identifying novel direct target genes of DNMT3B. A high percentage of the DMPs are located in the subtelomeric regions, indicating a specific role of DNMT3B in methylating these chromosomal sites. Therefore, we provide further evidence that hypomethylation in specific non-pericentromeric regions of chromosomes might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of ICF syndrome. The detection of DNA hypomethylation at BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221 may pave the way for the development of specific

  2. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Novel Hypomethylated Non-Pericentromeric Genes with Potential Clinical Implications in ICF Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo-Riudalbas, L; Diaz-Lagares, A; Gatto, S; Gagliardi, M; Crujeiras, A B; Matarazzo, M R; Esteller, M; Sandoval, J

    2015-01-01

    Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by severe hypomethylation in pericentromeric regions of chromosomes (1, 16 and 9), marked immunodeficiency and facial anomalies. The majority of ICF patients present mutations in the DNMT3B gene, affecting the DNA methyltransferase activity of the protein. In the present study, we have used the Infinium 450K DNA methylation array to evaluate the methylation level of 450,000 CpGs in lymphoblastoid cell lines and untrasformed fibroblasts derived from ICF patients and healthy donors. Our results demonstrate that ICF-specific DNMT3B variants A603T/STP807ins and V699G/R54X cause global DNA hypomethylation compared to wild-type protein. We identified 181 novel differentially methylated positions (DMPs) including subtelomeric and intrachromosomic regions, outside the classical ICF-related pericentromeric hypomethylated positions. Interestingly, these sites were mainly located in intergenic regions and inside the CpG islands. Among the identified hypomethylated CpG-island associated genes, we confirmed the overexpression of three selected genes, BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221, in ICF compared to healthy controls, which are supposed to be expressed in germ line and silenced in somatic tissues. In conclusion, this study contributes in clarifying the direct relationship between DNA methylation defect and gene expression impairment in ICF syndrome, identifying novel direct target genes of DNMT3B. A high percentage of the DMPs are located in the subtelomeric regions, indicating a specific role of DNMT3B in methylating these chromosomal sites. Therefore, we provide further evidence that hypomethylation in specific non-pericentromeric regions of chromosomes might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of ICF syndrome. The detection of DNA hypomethylation at BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221 may pave the way for the development of specific clinical biomarkers

  3. Sexual dimorphism in an animal model of Sjögren's syndrome: a potential role for Th17 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandria Voigt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome is a complex autoimmune disease with an array of diverse immunological, genetic and environmental etiologies, making identification of the precise autoimmune mechanism difficult to define. One of the most distinctive aspects of Sjögren's syndrome is the high sexual dimorphism with women affected 10-20 times more than men. It is nearly impossible to study the sexual dimorphic development of Sjögren's syndrome in human patients; therefore it is pertinent to develop an appropriate animal model which resembles human disease. The data indicated that female C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice developed an earlier onset of sialadenitis with a higher composition of CD3+ T cells and a 10-fold increase in glandular infiltration of Th17 cells at the onset of clinical disease compared to male mice. Inflammatory Th17 cells of female mice exhibited a stronger proliferation in response to disease-specific antigen than their male counterpart. At the clinical disease stage, altered autoantibody patterns can be detected in females whereas they are seldom observed in male C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice. Interestingly, male C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice developed an earlier loss of secretory function, despite the fact that female C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice exhibited a more rapid secretory loss. This data indicates the strong sexual dimorphism in the SjS-susceptible C57BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 animal model, making it an appropriate animal model to examine human disease.

  4. Early Acquisition of Pneumocystis jirovecii Colonization and Potential Association With Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Preterm Newborn Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Pilar; Friaza, Vicente; García, Elisa; de la Horra, Carmen; Vargas, Sergio L; Calderón, Enrique J; Pavón, Antonio

    2017-09-15

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a well-recognized lung disease of premature and malnourished babies. Even though serologic studies have shown that children are exposed to Pneumocystis jirovecii early in life, the epidemiology of human P. jirovecii infection and the host-microorganism relationship in infancy remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of P. jirovecii colonization in preterm infants and its possible association with medical complications. A prospective observational study of preterm infants (birth weight newborns studied. A significant increase of respiratory distress syndrome in colonized group, even after adjusting for confounding factors (odds ratio, 2.7 [95% CI, 1.0-7.5]; P = .04), was observed. No differences were observed in other medical conditions between the 2 groups. Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization is frequent in preterm births and could be a risk factor to develop respiratory distress syndrome among preterm infants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. The promising opportunity of dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    Civil engineering, mechanics and waste conditioning companies are thriving around the market of nuclear facilities dismantlement which is promised to a huge development in the coming decade. This paper presents a map of the opportunities of the dismantlement market throughout Europe (research and power reactors, fuel fabrication plants, spent fuel reprocessing plants) and a cost estimation of a given dismantling work with respect to the different steps of the work. In France a small core of about twenty companies is involved in nuclear dismantlement but the French market is also looking towards foreign specialists of this activity. The British market is also targeted by the French companies but for all the actors the technological or commercial advance gained today will be determining for the future markets. (J.S.)

  6. Cancer chemoprevention: progress and promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelloff, G J; Sigman, C C; Greenwald, P

    1999-12-01

    Cancer chemoprevention is the use of agents to inhibit, delay or reverse carcinogenesis. The focus of chemoprevention research in the next millennium will include defining the genotypic and phenotypic (functional and histological) changes during carcinogenesis, the cancer risk conferred by these changes, their modulation in preclinical experimentation and randomised clinical trials by chemopreventive drugs, dietary agents and regimens and treatments resulting from early detection. The key elements of this research effort will be basic and translational risk evaluation programmes; chemopreventive and dietary agent drug discovery and development; development of transgenic animal models; required safety and pharmacology studies; well-designed phase I, II and III chemoprevention studies; and much expanded early detection programmes. The large number of chemoprevention research programmes now ongoing ensures that the promise of chemoprevention will continue to be realised in the next decade.

  7. Exercise-induced intra-ventricular gradients as a frequent potential cause of myocardial ischemia in cardiac syndrome X patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Ana G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of intra-ventricular gradients (IVG during dobutamine or exercise stress is not infrequent, and can be associated to symptoms during stress. The purpose of this study was to assess the occurrence of IVG during exercise stress echocardiography in cardiac syndrome X patients. Methods We prospectively evaluated 91 patients (pts mean aged 51 ± 12 years (age ranged 20 to 75 years old, 44 of whom were women. All pts had angina, positive exercise ECG treadmill testing, normal rest echocardiogram and no coronary artery disease on coronary angiogram (cardiac X syndrome. After complete Doppler echocardiographic evaluation with determination of left ventricular outflow tract index (LVOTi, relative left ventricular wall thickness (RLVWT and left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVDVi, all patients underwent stress echocardiography with two-dimensional and Doppler echographic evaluation during and after treadmill exercise. Results For analysis purpose patients were divided in 2 groups, according to the development of IVG. Doppler evidence of IVG was found in 33 (36% of the patients (Group A, with mean age 47 ± 14 years old (age ranged 20 to 72 years and with a mean end-systolic peak gradient of 86 ± 34 mmHg (ranging from 30 to 165 mmHg. The IVG development was accompanied by SAM of the mitral valve in 23 pts. Three of these pts experienced symptomatic hypotension. Ten were women (30% pts. 58 pts in group B, 34 of whom were women (59% (p = 0,01 vs group A, mean aged 53,5 ± 10,9 years old (age ranged 34 to 75 years (p = 0,03 vs group A, did not develop IVG. LVOTi was 10,29 ± 0,9 mm/m2 in group A and 11,4 ± 1 mm/m2 in group B (p 2 in group A and 56 ± 11,6 ml/m2 in group B (p = 0,000. Conclusion 1. A significant number of patients with cardiac X syndrome developed IVG during upright exercise in treadmill. These pts (group A are mainly males and younger than those who did not develop IVG. 2. The development of IVG

  8. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  9. Cannabidiol as a Potential Treatment for Febrile Infection-Related Epilepsy Syndrome (FIRES) in the Acute and Chronic Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofshteyn, Jacqueline S; Wilfong, Angus; Devinsky, Orrin; Bluvstein, Judith; Charuta, Joshi; Ciliberto, Michael A; Laux, Linda; Marsh, Eric D

    2017-01-01

    Febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES) is a devastating epilepsy affecting normal children after a febrile illness. FIRES presents with an acute phase with super-refractory status epilepticus and all patients progress to a chronic phase with persistent refractory epilepsy. The typical outcome is severe encephalopathy or death. The authors present 7 children from 5 centers with FIRES who had not responded to antiepileptic drugs or other therapies who were given cannabadiol (Epidiolex, GW Pharma) on emergency or expanded investigational protocols in either the acute or chronic phase of illness. After starting cannabidiol, 6 of 7 patients' seizures improved in frequency and duration. One patient died due to multiorgan failure secondary to isoflourane. An average of 4 antiepileptic drugs were weaned. Currently 5 subjects are ambulatory, 1 walks with assistance, and 4 are verbal. While this is an open-label case series, the authors add cannabidiol as a possible treatment for FIRES.

  10. Potential Role of Cortisol in Social and Memory Impairments in Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Daniel; Bursch, Megan; Lajiness-O'Neill, Renee

    2016-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by physiological and psychological symptoms. This study investigated the role of cortisol on the social and cognitive impairments in children with 22q11.2. A total of 11 children with 22q11.2 were assessed for baseline cortisol levels and received broad neuropsychological testing. Results were compared with 11 controls. Children with 22q11.2 had significantly higher cortisol levels. A significant negative correlation was observed between the general memory and attention/concentration indices of the Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning, 2nd edition and cortisol concentrations in the control population. These data provide evidence of a possible causal mechanism that underlies social impairments in stress disorders. PMID:27617156

  11. A survey of antiepileptic drug responses identifies drugs with potential efficacy for seizure control in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Karen S; Markham, Leah M; Twede, Hope; Lortz, Amanda; Olson, Lenora M; Sheng, Xiaoming; Weng, Cindy; Wassman, E Robert; Newcomb, Tara; Wassman, E Robert; Carey, John C; Battaglia, Agatino

    2018-04-01

    Seizures are present in over 90% of infants and children with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS). When present, they significantly affect quality of life. The goal of this study was to use caregiver reports to describe the comparative efficacies of commonly used antiepileptic medications in a large population of individuals with WHS. A web-based, confidential caregiver survey was developed to capture seizure semiology and a chronologic record of seizure treatments as well as responses to each treatment. Adverse events for each drug were also cataloged. We received 141 complete survey responses (47% response rate) describing the seizures of individuals ranging in age from 4months to 61years (90 females: 51 males). Using the Early Childhood Epilepsy Severity Scale (E-Chess), WHS-associated seizures are demonstrably severe regardless of deletion size. The best-performing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for controlling seizures in this cohort were broad spectrum drugs clobazam, levetiracetam, and lamotrigine; whereas, the three commonly used carboxamide class drugs: carbamazepine, phenytoin, and oxcarbazepine, were reported to have little effect on, or even exacerbate, seizures. The carboxamide class drugs, along with phenobarbital and topiramate, were also associated with the highest rate of intolerance due to cooccurrence of adverse events. Levetiracetam, clobazam, and clonazepam demonstrated higher tolerability and comparatively less severe adverse events (Wilcoxon rank sum comparison between performance of levetiracetam and carboxamide class drugs gives a pWHS seizures. This study design is susceptible to possible bias, as the data are largely drawn from caregiver report and investigators had limited access to medical records. Despite this, our data suggest that the genetic etiology of seizures, together with an accurate electroclinical delineation, are important components of drug selection, even in contiguous gene syndromes which may have complex seizure etiologies

  12. Resveratrol analogs: promising chemopreventive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogas, Talysa; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Pezzuto, John M

    2013-07-01

    Although resveratrol can modulate multiple stages of carcinogenesis, by most common standards it is not a good drug candidate. Resveratrol lacks potency, high efficacy, and target specificity; it is rapidly metabolized and serum concentrations are low. Using resveratrol as a scaffold, we produced over 100 derivatives, some of which have target specificity in the nanomolar range. Aromatase inhibition was enhanced over 6000-fold by using 1,3-thiazole as the central ring of resveratrol. Optimizing the substitution pattern of the two phenyl rings and the central heterocyclic linker led to selective QR1 induction with a CD value of 87 nM. Several derivatives have been selected for evaluation of synergistic effects. Preliminary results with pairs of compounds are promising and further experiments, in a constant multidrug manner, will allow us to create polygonograms for larger combinations of derivatives. The objective is to develop a highly efficacious cocktail of derivatives based on the structure of resveratrol. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Developmental excitatory-to-inhibitory GABA-polarity switch is disrupted in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: a potential target for clinical therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Hayder; Marinaro, Federica; De Pietri Tonelli, Davide; Berdondini, Luca

    2017-11-16

    Individuals with 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) show cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions, developmental delays in childhood and risk of developing schizophrenia and autism. Despite extensive previous studies in adult animal models, a possible embryonic root of this syndrome has not been determined. Here, in neurons from a 22q11.2 DS mouse model (Lgdel +/- ), we found embryonic-premature alterations in the neuronal chloride cotransporters indicated by dysregulated NKCC1 and KCC2 protein expression levels. We demonstrate with large-scale spiking activity recordings a concurrent deregulation of the spontaneous network activity and homeostatic network plasticity. Additionally, Lgdel +/- networks at early development show abnormal neuritogenesis and void of synchronized spontaneous activity. Furthermore, parallel experiments on Dgcr8 +/- mouse cultures reveal a significant, yet not exclusive contribution of the dgcr8 gene to our phenotypes of Lgdel +/- networks. Finally, we show that application of bumetanide, an inhibitor of NKCC1, significantly decreases the hyper-excitable action of GABA A receptor signaling and restores network homeostatic plasticity in Lgdel +/- networks. Overall, by exploiting an on-a-chip 22q11.2 DS model, our results suggest a delayed GABA-switch in Lgdel +/- neurons, which may contribute to a delayed embryonic development. Prospectively, acting on the GABA-polarity switch offers a potential target for 22q11.2 DS therapeutic intervention.

  14. Irradiation's promise: fewer foodborne illnesses?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.

    1986-01-01

    Food irradiation offers a variety of potential benefits to the food supply. It can delay ripening and sprouting of fruits and vegetables, and substitute for chemical fumigants to kill insects. However, one of the most important benefits of food irradiation is its potential use for destroying microbial pathogens that enter the food supply, including the two most common disease causing bacteria: salmonella and campylobacter. Animal products are one of the primary carriers of pathogens. Food borne illnesses are on the rise, and irradiation of red meats and poultry could significantly reduce their occurrence. Food irradiation should be examined more closely to determine its possible benefits in curtailing microbial diseases

  15. Online Training of Teachers Using OER: Promises and Potential Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Pradeep Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Teacher education nowadays needs a change in vision and action to cater to the demands of changing societies. Reforms, improvements, and new approaches in teacher education are an immediate need. Online training of teachers using OER has emerged as a new approach in this direction. This approach is based on the assumption that online training will…

  16. Smoldering multiple myeloma: present position and potential promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tageja, Nishant; Manasanch, Elisabet E; Korde, Neha; Kwok, Mary; Mailankody, Sham; Bhutani, Manisha; Roschewski, Mark; Landgren, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Since smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) was first described over three decades ago based on a case series of six patients, its definition and our understanding of the entity have evolved considerably. The risk of progression to symptomatic myeloma (MM) varies greatly among individuals diagnosed with myeloma precursor disease. Epidemiologic, molecular, flow cytometric and radiological techniques have demonstrated that this transformation to MM from precursor states is not sudden but rather a continuous overlapping series of events with evidence of end-organ damage that could manifest in the earliest stages of disease. Contemporary antimyeloma therapies can yield rapid, deep, and durable responses with manageable toxicities, and molecular-cell-based measures are now available to rule out minimal residual disease. With this information, clinical studies with correlative measures can now be developed to test the fundamental hypothesis that intervention in early myeloma may provide a measurable clinical benefit to patients by either delaying progression or eradicating plasma cell clones. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Paradigms, promises, and the potential of clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauman, T J

    2001-09-01

    Both Plaud's and Ilardi and Feldman's articles call for clinical psychology to redefine itself according to a particular paradigm or "unifying framework." This commentary focuses on the nature of clinical psychology as an applied discipline, whether clinical psychology in fact has an urgent need for a unifying framework, and whether radical behaviorism or cognitive neuroscience could provide such a framework. It is concluded that, as an applied field that draws both theory and method from a number of natural and social sciences, clinical psychology is served best by continued development and appropriation of competing scientific viewpoints rather than by fealty to a single perspective or paradigm. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Online training of teachers using OER: Promises and potential strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Pradeep Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Teacher education nowadays needs a change in vision and action to cater to the demands of changing societies. Reforms, improvements, and new approaches in teacher education are an immediate need. Online training of teachers using OER has emerged as a new approach in this direction. This approach is based on the assumption that online training will facilitate mass training of teachers as per their convenience and ease and will be helpful in filling the huge gap in demand for skilled teachers. ...

  19. Transportation and energy efficiency: Promised potentials, serious roadblocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft-Oliver, T.V.

    1995-12-31

    Transportation is both a critical element of achieving national economic development goals and a major consumer of scarce and expensive energy resources. Improvements in access and mobility from reduced congestion, higher speeds, additional non motorized and pedestrian options, and better mass transit will result in reductions in energy use in most cases. Additional improvements in vehicle efficiency are possible but will not meet the needs of the region for transportation and energy efficiency improvements in the absence of these other improvements. The barriers to success in the transport sector are obvious on a superficial level. They include lack of road space, inadequate or incomplete road networks, insufficient mass transit capacity, predation of pedestrian and nonmotorized vehicle space by motor vehicles, and financing. The lack of progress in solving many of these problems over the past ten to twenty years indicates that there are underlying issues not yet addressed. Perceptions of these problems have changed since the middle 1970s and early 1980s as international lending and technical assistance began to focus on transportation. In those early years the problems were described as financial, and `meeting demand` challenges. The World Bank is now conducting a review of their Transport Sector Policy. While the review has not progressed to a final document and certainly not to articulation or transformation of Bank policy, early drafts reflect a view that past failures to improve transportation circumstances are human resource and institutional problems.

  20. Lemierre's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, J.; Garcia, J.

    1999-01-01

    Postanginal sepsis, or Lemierre's syndrome, is rare but with life-threatening potential involving mainly infants and adolescents. The morbidity or mortality is caused mainly by lack of knowledge of the syndrome. The 18-year-old boy described here developed a jugular thrombosis 7 days after an angina. Fusobacterium necrophorum was isolated from the culture of the excised jugular vein. Secondary embolism involved the lungs, associated with an iliac osteomyelitis and sacroiliitis. Computed tomography was used for diagnosis and follow-up. (orig.)

  1. Microarray technology: a promising tool in nutrigenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masotti, Andrea; Da Sacco, Letizia; Bottazzo, Gian Franco; Alisi, Anna

    2010-08-01

    Microarray technology is a powerful tool for the global evaluation of gene expression profiles in tissues and for understanding many of the factors controlling the regulation of gene transcription. This technique not only provides a considerable amount of information on markers and predictive factors that may potentially characterize a specific clinical picture, but also promises new applications for therapy. One of the most recent applications of microarrays concerns nutritional genomics. Nutritional genomics, known as nutrigenomics, aims to identify and understand mechanisms of molecular interaction between nutrients and/or other dietary bioactive compounds and the genome. Actually, many nutrigenomic studies utilize new approaches such as microarrays, genomics, and bioinformatics to understand how nutrients influence gene expression. The coupling of these new technologies with nutrigenomics promises to lead to improvements in diet and health. In fact, it may provide new information which can be used to ameliorate dietary regimens and to discover novel natural agents for the treatment of important diseases such as diabetes and cancer. This critical review gives an overview of the clinical relevance of a nutritional approach to several important diseases, and proposes the use of microarray for nutrigenomic studies.

  2. Promises in intelligent plant control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The control system is the brain of a power plant. The traditional goal of control systems has been productivity. However, in nuclear power plants the potential for disaster requires safety to be the dominant concern, and the worldwide political climate demands trustworthiness for nuclear power plants. To keep nuclear generation as a viable option for power in the future, trust is the essential critical goal which encompasses all others. In most of today's nuclear plants the control system is a hybrid of analog, digital, and human components that focuses on productivity and operates under the protective umbrella of an independent engineered safety system. Operation of the plant is complex, and frequent challenges to the safety system occur which impact on their trustworthiness. Advances in nuclear reactor design, computer sciences, and control theory, and in related technological areas such as electronics and communications as well as in data storage, retrieval, display, and analysis have opened a promise for control systems with more acceptable human brain-like capabilities to pursue the required goals. This paper elaborates on the promise of futuristic nuclear power plants with intelligent control systems and addresses design requirements and implementation approaches

  3. Functional Inference of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Gene Polymorphisms on Enzyme Stability as a Potential Risk Factor for Down Syndrome in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadranka Vraneković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the biochemical structure and function of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR provides new evidence in elucidating the risk of having a child with Down syndrome (DS in association with two common MTHFR polymorphisms, C677T and A1298C. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk for DS according to the presence of MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms as well as the stability of the enzyme configuration. This study included mothers from Croatia with a liveborn DS child (n = 102 or DS pregnancy (n = 9 and mothers with a healthy child (n = 141. MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms were assessed by PCR-RFLP. Allele/genotype frequencies differences were determined using χ2 test. Odds ratio and the 95% confidence intervals were calculated to evaluate the effects of different alleles/genotypes. No statistically significant differences were found between the frequencies of allele/genotype or genotype combinations of the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in the case and the control groups. Additionally, the observed frequencies of the stable (677CC/1298AA, 677CC/1298AC, 677CC/1298CC and unstable (677CT/1298AA, 677CT/1298AC, 677TT/1298AA enzyme configurations were not significantly different. We found no evidence to support the possibility that MTHFR polymorphisms and the stability of the enzyme configurations were associated with risk of having a child with DS in Croatian population.

  4. Eugenia uniflora fruit (red type) standardized extract: a potential pharmacological tool to diet-induced metabolic syndrome damage management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pathise Souto; Chaves, Vitor Clasen; Bona, Natália Pontes; Soares, Mayara Sandrielly Pereira; Cardoso, Juliane de Souza; Vasconcellos, Flávia Aleixo; Tavares, Rejane Giacomelli; Vizzotto, Marcia; Silva, Luísa Mariano Cerqueira da; Grecco, Fabiane Borelli; Gamaro, Giovana Duzzo; Spanevello, Roselia Maria; Lencina, Claiton Leoneti; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Stefanello, Francieli Moro

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Eugenia uniflora fruit (red type) extract on metabolic status, as well as on neurochemical and behavioral parameters in an animal model of metabolic syndrome induced by a highly palatable diet (HPD). Rats were treated for 150days and divided into 4 experimental groups: standard chow (SC) and water orally, SC and E. uniflora extract (200mg/kg daily, p.o), HPD and water orally, HPD and extract. Our data showed that HPD caused glucose intolerance, increased visceral fat, weight gain, as well as serum glucose, triacylglycerol, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol; however, E. uniflora prevented these alterations. The extract decreased lipid peroxidation and prevented the reduction of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum of animals submitted to HPD. We observed a HPD-induced reduction of thiol content in these cerebral structures. The extract prevented increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the prefrontal cortex caused by HPD and the increase in immobility time observed in the forced swim test. Regarding chemical composition, LC/MS analysis showed the presence of nine anthocyanins as the major compounds. In conclusion, E. uniflora extract showed benefits against metabolic alterations caused by HPD, as well as exhibited antioxidant and antidepressant-like effects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Assessing the Cognitive Translational Potential of a Mouse Model of the 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Simon Ro; Fejgin, Kim; Gastambide, Francois; Vogt, Miriam A; Kent, Brianne A; Nielsen, Vibeke; Nielsen, Jacob; Gass, Peter; Robbins, Trevor W; Saksida, Lisa M; Stensbøl, Tine B; Tricklebank, Mark D; Didriksen, Michael; Bussey, Timothy J

    2016-10-01

    A chromosomal microdeletion at the 22q11.2 locus is associated with extensive cognitive impairments, schizophrenia and other psychopathology in humans. Previous reports indicate that mouse models of the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) may model the genetic basis of cognitive deficits relevant for neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. To assess the models usefulness for drug discovery, a novel mouse (Df(h22q11)/+) was assessed in an extensive battery of cognitive assays by partners within the NEWMEDS collaboration (Innovative Medicines Initiative Grant Agreement No. 115008). This battery included classic and touchscreen-based paradigms with recognized sensitivity and multiple attempts at reproducing previously published findings in 22q11.2DS mouse models. This work represents one of the most comprehensive reports of cognitive functioning in a transgenic animal model. In accordance with previous reports, there were non-significant trends or marginal impairment in some tasks. However, the Df(h22q11)/+ mouse did not show comprehensive deficits; no robust impairment was observed following more than 17 experiments and 14 behavioral paradigms. Thus - within the current protocols - the 22q11.2DS mouse model fails to mimic the cognitive alterations observed in human 22q11.2 deletion carriers. We suggest that the 22q11.2DS model may induce liability for cognitive dysfunction with additional "hits" being required for phenotypic expression. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. [Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJSTEN) related to insecticide: Second case in the literature and potential implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moullan, M; Ahossi, V; Zwetyenga, N

    2016-06-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJSTEN) is a rare acute drug reaction characterized by the brutal destruction of the superficial layer of the skin and mucosa. SJSTEN is favoured by some drugs (90 % of cases) and genetic factors. It occurs at any age in both sexes. The pathophysiology is not completely understood. To our knowledge, only one case linked to an insecticide has been described. We present the second case involving a combination of lambdacyhalothrin and thiamethoxam. A 34-year-old farmer was admitted in emergency for a severe allergic reaction occurring few days after the use of an insecticide to treat his field with no particular precaution. The disease progression was swift: deterioration of general condition, generalized itching, blisters, bubbles, hyperthermia, tachycardia, significant oral pain and oral lesions and dysphagia. Hands, feet were concerned and external genitalia was responsible for burning urination. Oral lesions have rapidly evolved from edema to infected lesions. The diagnosis of SJSTEN was confirmed by histopathology. After complete assessment and adequate treatment, the patient was discharged after 17 days of hospitalization. The etiological research concluded to a probable poisoning by lambdacyhalothrin and thiamethoxam. This is the second published case of a SJSTEN linked to an insecticide combining lambdacyhalothrin and thiamethoxam. Manufacturers, users, regulators and physicians should take these data into account. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Gray matter textural heterogeneity as a potential in-vivo biomarker of fine structural abnormalities in Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, E; Ganeshan, B; Minati, L; Beacher, F D C C; Gray, M A; Chatwin, C; Young, R C D; Harrison, N A; Critchley, H D

    2013-02-01

    Brain imaging studies contribute to the neurobiological understanding of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC). Herein, we tested the prediction that distributed neurodevelopmental abnormalities in brain development impact on the homogeneity of brain tissue measured using texture analysis (TA; a morphological method for surface pattern characterization). TA was applied to structural magnetic resonance brain scans of 54 adult participants (24 with Asperger syndrome (AS) and 30 controls). Measures of mean gray-level intensity, entropy and uniformity were extracted from gray matter images at fine, medium and coarse textures. Comparisons between AS and controls identified higher entropy and lower uniformity across textures in the AS group. Data reduction of texture parameters revealed three orthogonal principal components. These were used as regressors-of-interest in a voxel-based morphometry analysis that explored the relationship between surface texture variations and regional gray matter volume. Across the AS but not control group, measures of entropy and uniformity were related to the volume of the caudate nuclei, whereas mean gray-level was related to the size of the cerebellar vermis. Similar to neuropathological studies, our study provides evidence for distributed abnormalities in the structural integrity of gray matter in adults with ASC, in particular within corticostriatal and corticocerebellar networks. Additionally, this in-vivo technique may be more sensitive to fine microstructural organization than other more traditional magnetic resonance approaches and serves as a future testable biomarker in AS and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

  8. Botulinum toxin type A potentiates the effect of neuromotor rehabilitation of Pisa syndrome in Parkinson disease: a placebo controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassorelli, C; De Icco, R; Alfonsi, E; Bartolo, M; Serrao, M; Avenali, M; De Paoli, I; Conte, C; Pozzi, N G; Bramanti, P; Nappi, G; Sandrini, G

    2014-11-01

    Pisa syndrome (PS) is a tonic lateral flexion of trunk that represents a disabling complication of advanced Parkinson disease (PD). Conventional rehabilitation treatment (CT) ameliorates axial posture and trunk mobility in PD patients, but the improvement tends to wane in 4-6 months. Botulin toxin (BT) may reduce muscle hyperactivity, therefore improving CT effectiveness. We evaluated whether the injection of incabotulinum toxin type A (iBTA) into the hyperactive trunk muscles might improve the effectiveness of rehabilitation in a group of PD patients with PS. Twenty-six PD patients were enrolled in a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Group A was treated with iBTA before undergoing CT (a 4-week intensive programme), while Group B received saline before the 4-week CT treatment. Patients were evaluated at baseline, at the end of the rehabilitative period, 3 and 6 months with kinematic analysis of movement, UPDRS, Functional Independence Measure and Visual Analog Scale for pain. At the end of the rehabilitation period, both groups improved significantly in terms of static postural alignment and of range of motion. Group A showed a significantly more marked reduction in pain score as compared with Group B and a more prolonged efficacy on several clinical and kinematic variables. Our preliminary data suggest that BT may be considered an important addition to the rehabilitation programme for PD subjects with PS for improving axial posture and trunk mobility, as well as for a better control of pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis: A Case Report and Review of the Diagnosis and Treatment of a Rare but Potentially Life-Threatening Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T. Jaqua

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old male Marine with an uncomplicated medical history and a long history of strenuous, daily exercise presented to the emergency department after experiencing anaphylactic shock while running. Symptoms resolved following administration of intramuscular diphenhydramine, ranitidine, intravenous methylprednisolone, and intravenous fluids. On followup in the allergy clinic, a meticulous clinical history was obtained which elucidated a picture consistent with exercise-induced anaphylaxis. He had experienced diffuse pruritus and urticaria while exercising on multiple occasions over the last three years. His symptoms would usually increase as exercise continued. Prior to the first episode, he regularly exercised without symptoms. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis is a rare but potentially life-threatening syndrome that requires a careful clinical history and is a diagnosis of exclusion. Treatment is primarily exercise avoidance. Prophylactic mediations are inconsistently effective but are empirically used. Successful treatment with omalizumab was recently reported in a case of refractory exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

  10. A case with double-chambered right ventricle and left ventricular-right atrial communication (Gerbode defect): potential pitfall for Eisenmenger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Demet Ozkaramanli; Gur, Ozcan; Goksuluk, Huseyin; Oral, Dervis

    2012-09-01

    The ventricular septal defect (VSD) can rarely be associated with other malformations such as double-chambered right ventricle (DCRV) in which hypertrophied muscle bundles divide the right ventricle into two chambers causing progressive obstruction (Mao et al., Asia Pac J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 5:14-17, 1996). Most VSDs close spontaneously by apposition of the tricuspid leaflets, but the process is rarely disrupted, resulting in communication between left ventricle and right atrium called Gerbode defect [Cho et al., J Cardiovasc Ultrasound 19(3):148-151, 2011]. Hence, the Gerbode defect involves potential misinterpretation of its high-velocity shunt as pulmonary hypertension. Here we present a case with DCRV and Gerbode defect initially misdiagnosed to have Eisenmenger syndrome.

  11. Cyanobacteria: Promising biocatalysts for sustainable chemical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoot, Cory J; Ungerer, Justin; Wangikar, Pramod P; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2018-04-06

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes showing great promise as biocatalysts for the direct conversion of CO 2 into fuels, chemicals, and other value-added products. Introduction of just a few heterologous genes can endow cyanobacteria with the ability to transform specific central metabolites into many end products. Recent engineering efforts have centered around harnessing the potential of these microbial biofactories for sustainable production of chemicals conventionally produced from fossil fuels. Here, we present an overview of the unique chemistry that cyanobacteria have been co-opted to perform. We highlight key lessons learned from these engineering efforts and discuss advantages and disadvantages of various approaches. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Promising treatments of tomorrow for multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis are rapidly expanding. What was once seen as a disease with little hope for treatment is now a target of rapid drug development. Current therapies have demonstrated efficacy in limiting the impact of the disease, but none is fully effective in all patients. However, promising new treatments are on the horizon. In this review we will discuss potential novel immunomodulating drugs that are in advanced stages of investigation; these drugs include monoclonal antibodies, chimeric molecules, and oral therapies. The use of hematopoietic stem cells will also be discussed and, in addition, we will look farther ahead at possible novel targets for the development of new immunomodulatory or neuroprotective pharmaceuticals.

  13. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease.

  14. Taking forward a 'One Health' approach for turning the tide against the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus and other zoonotic pathogens with epidemic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Dar, Osman; Kock, Richard; Muturi, Matthew; Ntoumi, Francine; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Eusebio, Macete; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Ansumana, Rashid; Khan, Mishal; Alagaili, Abdulaziz N; Cotten, Matthew; Azhar, Esam I; Maeurer, Markus; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Petersen, Eskild

    2016-06-01

    The appearance of novel pathogens of humans with epidemic potential and high mortality rates have threatened global health security for centuries. Over the past few decades new zoonotic infectious diseases of humans caused by pathogens arising from animal reservoirs have included West Nile virus, Yellow fever virus, Ebola virus, Nipah virus, Lassa Fever virus, Hanta virus, Dengue fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, and Zika virus. The recent Ebola Virus Disease epidemic in West Africa and the ongoing Zika Virus outbreak in South America highlight the urgent need for local, regional and international public health systems to be be more coordinated and better prepared. The One Health concept focuses on the relationship and interconnectedness between Humans, Animals and the Environment, and recognizes that the health and wellbeing of humans is intimately connected to the health of animals and their environment (and vice versa). Critical to the establishment of a One Health platform is the creation of a multidisciplinary team with a range of expertise including public health officers, physicians, veterinarians, animal husbandry specialists, agriculturalists, ecologists, vector biologists, viral phylogeneticists, and researchers to co-operate, collaborate to learn more about zoonotic spread between animals, humans and the environment and to monitor, respond to and prevent major outbreaks. We discuss the unique opportunities for Middle Eastern and African stakeholders to take leadership in building equitable and effective partnerships with all stakeholders involved in human and health systems to take forward a 'One Health' approach to control such zoonotic pathogens with epidemic potential. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Taking forward a ‘One Health’ approach for turning the tide against the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus and other zoonotic pathogens with epidemic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimuddin Zumla

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of novel pathogens of humans with epidemic potential and high mortality rates have threatened global health security for centuries. Over the past few decades new zoonotic infectious diseases of humans caused by pathogens arising from animal reservoirs have included West Nile virus, Yellow fever virus, Ebola virus, Nipah virus, Lassa Fever virus, Hanta virus, Dengue fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, and Zika virus. The recent Ebola Virus Disease epidemic in West Africa and the ongoing Zika Virus outbreak in South America highlight the urgent need for local, regional and international public health systems to be be more coordinated and better prepared. The One Health concept focuses on the relationship and interconnectedness between Humans, Animals and the Environment, and recognizes that the health and wellbeing of humans is intimately connected to the health of animals and their environment (and vice versa. Critical to the establishment of a One Health platform is the creation of a multidisciplinary team with a range of expertise including public health officers, physicians, veterinarians, animal husbandry specialists, agriculturalists, ecologists, vector biologists, viral phylogeneticists, and researchers to co-operate, collaborate to learn more about zoonotic spread between animals, humans and the environment and to monitor, respond to and prevent major outbreaks. We discuss the unique opportunities for Middle Eastern and African stakeholders to take leadership in building equitable and effective partnerships with all stakeholders involved in human and health systems to take forward a ‘One Health’ approach to control such zoonotic pathogens with epidemic potential.

  16. Assessing the feasibility, acceptability, and potential effectiveness of a behavioral-automaticity focused lifestyle intervention for African Americans with metabolic syndrome: The Pick two to Stick to protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Fritz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS significantly increases the risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Being physically active and eating a healthy diet can reduce MetS risk factors. Too frequently, however, studies report that the effects of interventions targeting those factors are not maintained once interventions are withdrawn. A potential solution to the problem is targeting behavioral automaticity (habit-development to aid in initiation and maintenance of health-behavior changes. The Pick two to Stick To (P2S2, is an 8-week, theory-based hybrid (face-to-face/telecoaching habit focused lifestyle intervention designed to increase healthful physical activity and dietary behavioral automaticity. The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale and protocol for evaluating the P2S2 program's feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness. Methods: Using a prospective, non-comparative design, the P2S2 program will be implemented by trained occupational therapy ‘coaches’ to 40 African Americans aged 40 and above with MetS recruited from the emergency department. Semi-structured interviews with participants, bi-weekly research meetings with study staff, and observations of intervention delivery will provide data for a process evaluation. Estimates of effectiveness include weight, blood pressure, waist circumference, BMI, and behavioral automaticity measures that will be collected at baseline and week 20. Conclusion: The P2S2 program could facilitate the development of healthful dietary and physical activity habits in an underserved population. Whether interventions aimed at changing habits can feasibly influence this automaticity, particularly for high-risk, low resource communities where other barriers exist, is not known. This pilot study, therefore, will fill an important gap, providing insight to inform subsequent trials. Keywords: Habits, Behavioral automaticity, Health behavior, Metabolic syndrome

  17. Discovery of potential new gene variants and inflammatory cytokine associations with fibromyalgia syndrome by whole exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinong Feng

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is a chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder affecting 2% to 5% of the general population. Both genetic and environmental factors may be involved. To ascertain in an unbiased manner which genes play a role in the disorder, we performed complete exome sequencing on a subset of FMS patients. Out of 150 nuclear families (trios DNA from 19 probands was subjected to complete exome sequencing. Since >80,000 SNPs were found per proband, the data were further filtered, including analysis of those with stop codons, a rare frequency (<2.5% in the 1000 Genomes database, and presence in at least 2/19 probands sequenced. Two nonsense mutations, W32X in C11orf40 and Q100X in ZNF77 among 150 FMS trios had a significantly elevated frequency of transmission to affected probands (p = 0.026 and p = 0.032, respectively and were present in a subset of 13% and 11% of FMS patients, respectively. Among 9 patients bearing more than one of the variants we have described, 4 had onset of symptoms between the ages of 10 and 18. The subset with the C11orf40 mutation had elevated plasma levels of the inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1 and IP-10, compared with unaffected controls or FMS patients with the wild-type allele. Similarly, patients with the ZNF77 mutation have elevated levels of the inflammatory cytokine, IL-12, compared with controls or patients with the wild type allele. Our results strongly implicate an inflammatory basis for FMS, as well as specific cytokine dysregulation, in at least 35% of our FMS cohort.

  18. Potential novel mechanism for Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome: deletion of a distant region containing regulatory elements of PITX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Bethany A; Zinkevich, Natalya S; Mustonen, Aki; Schilter, Kala F; Bosenko, Dmitry V; Reis, Linda M; Broeckel, Ulrich; Link, Brian A; Semina, Elena V

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in PITX2 are associated with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS), which involves ocular, dental, and umbilical abnormalities. Identification of cis-regulatory elements of PITX2 is important to better understand the mechanisms of disease. Conserved noncoding elements surrounding PITX2/pitx2 were identified and examined through transgenic analysis in zebrafish; expression pattern was studied by in situ hybridization. Patient samples were screened for deletion/duplication of the PITX2 upstream region using arrays and probes. Zebrafish pitx2 demonstrates conserved expression during ocular and craniofacial development. Thirteen conserved noncoding sequences positioned within a gene desert as far as 1.1 Mb upstream of the human PITX2 gene were identified; 11 have enhancer activities consistent with pitx2 expression. Ten elements mediated expression in the developing brain, four regions were active during eye formation, and two sequences were associated with craniofacial expression. One region, CE4, located approximately 111 kb upstream of PITX2, directed a complex pattern including expression in the developing eye and craniofacial region, the classic sites affected in ARS. Screening of ARS patients identified an approximately 7600-kb deletion that began 106 to 108 kb upstream of the PITX2 gene, leaving PITX2 intact while removing regulatory elements CE4 to CE13. These data suggest the presence of a complex distant regulatory matrix within the gene desert located upstream of PITX2 with an essential role in its activity and provides a possible mechanism for the previous reports of ARS in patients with balanced translocations involving the 4q25 region upstream of PITX2 and the current patient with an upstream deletion.

  19. Applying Machine Learning to Facilitate Autism Diagnostics: Pitfalls and Promises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, Daniel; Goodwin, Matthew S.; Black, Matthew P.; Lee, Chi-Chun; Audhkhasi, Kartik; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning has immense potential to enhance diagnostic and intervention research in the behavioral sciences, and may be especially useful in investigations involving the highly prevalent and heterogeneous syndrome of autism spectrum disorder. However, use of machine learning in the absence of clinical domain expertise can be tenuous and lead…

  20. LATE POTENTIALS IN A BRADYCARDIA-DEPENDENT LONG QT-SYNDROME ASSOCIATED WITH SUDDEN-DEATH DURING SLEEP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TOBE, TJM; DELANGEN, CDJ; BINKBOELKENS, MTE; MOOK, PH; VIERSMA, JW; LIE, KI; WESSELING, H

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of late potentials and their relation to QT prolongation in a family with a high incidence of sudden death during sleep at a young age and bradycardia-dependent QT prolongation (n = 9) and to compare the findings with those in consanguineous

  1. Food irradiation - Problems and promises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, J.R.

    1974-01-01

    It has been stated that food irradiation represents the most significant discovery in food processing since Nicholas Appert invented canning in 1810. Certainly it is a process with great future potential; it is attractive because it works without heating the product, it is effective within sealed containers as well as for bulk usage, and it does not leave chemical residues on the treated food. Of course, no one process can be expected to solve all problems relating to preservation of food. Ionizing radiation can be used effectively to solve many of these problems, but the process is no panacea to cure the world's food problems. Unfortunately, early ill-founded claims about irradiation led to expectations which have proved beyond the reasonable capabilities of the process. Nevertheless, the number of foods that have been successfully treated, and the broad range of effects that can be achieved by radiation processing is impressive. (author)

  2. Transient receptor potential A1 receptor-mediated neural cross-talk and afferent sensitization induced by oxidative stress: implication for the pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Akira; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Hayashi, Norihiro; Egawa, Shin; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2012-05-01

    Although the pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome remains unknown, there is a significant correlation of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome with other chronic pain disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, endometriosis and fibromyalgia syndrome. In this review, we highlight evidence supporting neural cross-talk in the dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord and brain levels, which might play a role in the development of chronic pain disorders through central sensitization. In addition, we focus on transient receptor potential V1 and transient receptor potential A1 as the receptor targets for chronic pain conditions, because transient receptor potential V1 and transient receptor potential A1 act as a nocisensor to mediate not only an afferent signal to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, but also an efferent signal in the periphery through secretion of inflammatory agents, such as substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in nociceptive sensory neurons. Furthermore, peripheral inflammation produces multiple inflammatory mediators that act on their cognate receptors to activate intracellular signal transduction pathways and thereby modify the expression and function of transient receptor potential V1 and transient receptor potential A1 (peripheral sensitization). During tissue damage and inflammation, oxidative stress, such as reactive oxygen species or reactive carbonyl species is also generated endogenously. The highly diffusible nature might account for the actions of free radical formation far from the site of injury, thereby producing systemic pain conditions without central sensitization through neural cross-talk. Because oxidative stress is considered to induce activation of transient receptor potential A1, we also discuss exogenous and endogenous oxidative stress to elucidate its role in the pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and other chronic pain conditions. © 2012 The Japanese Urological

  3. Establishing an ISO 10001-based promise in inpatients care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Ashiqur Rahman; Karapetrovic, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore ISO 10001:2007 in planning, designing and developing a customer satisfaction promise (CSP) intended for inpatients care. Through meetings and interviews with research participants, who included a program manager, unit managers and registered nurses, information about potential promises and their implementation was obtained and analyzed. A number of promises were drafted and one was finally selected to be developed as a CSP. Applying the standard required adaptation and novel interpretation. Additionally, ISO 10002:2004 (Clause 7) was used to design the feedback handling activities. A promise initially chosen for development turned out to be difficult to implement, experience that helped in selecting and developing the final promise. Research participants found the ISO 10001-based method useful and comprehensible. This paper presents a specific health care example of how to adapt a standard's guideline in establishing customer promises. The authors show how a promise can be used in alleviating an existing issue (i.e. communication between carers and patients). The learning can be beneficial in various health care settings. To the knowledge, this paper shows the first example of applying ISO 10001:2007 in a health care case. A few activities suggested by the standard are further detailed, and a new activity is introduced. The integrated use of ISO 10001:2007 and 10002:2004 is presented and how one can be "augmented" by the other is demonstrated.

  4. Evaluation of potential models for imprinted and nonimprinted components of human chromosome 15q11-q13 syndromes by fine-structure homology mapping in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholls, R.D.; Gottlieb, W.; Davda, M. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States)); Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Horsthemke, B. (Universitatsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstrasse (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes are complex neurobehavioral contiguous gene syndromes whose expression depends on the unmasking of genomic imprinting for different genetic loci in human chromosome 15q11-q13. The homologous chromosomal region in the mouse genome has been fine-mapped by using interspecific (Mus spretus) crosses and overlapping, radiation-induced deletions to evaluate potential animal models for both imprinted and nonimprinted components of these syndromes. Four evolutionarily conserved sequences from human 15q11-q13, including two cDNAs from fetal brain (DN10, D15S12h; DN34, D15S9h-1), a microdissected clone (MN7; D15F37S1h) expressed in mouse brain, and the gene for the [beta]3 subunit of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (Gabrb3), were mapped in mouse chromosome 7 by analysis of deletions at the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus. Three of these loci are deleted in pre- and postnatally lethal p-locus mutations, which extend up to 5.5 [plus minus] 1.7 centimorgans (cM) proximal to p; D15S9h-1, which maps 1.1 [plus minus] 0.8 cM distal to p and is the mouse homolog of the human gene D15S9 (which shows a DNA methylation imprint), is not deleted in any of the p-locus deletion series. A transcript from the Gabrb3 gene, but not the transcript detected by MN7 at the D15F37S1h locus, is expressed in mice homozygous for the p[sup 6H] deletion, which have an abnormal neurological phenotype. Furthermore, the Gabrb3 transcript is expressed equally well from the maternal or paternal chromosome 7 and, therefore, its expression is not imprinted in mouse brain. Deletions, at the mouse p locus should serve as intermediate genetic reagents and models with which to analyze the genetics and etiology of individual components of human 15q11-q13 disorders. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  5. The Potential Role for Early Biomarker Testing as Part of a Modern, Multidisciplinary Approach to Sjögren's Syndrome Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Kenneth A; Luchs, Jodi; Milner, Mark S; Ambrus, Julian L

    2017-04-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic and progressive multisystem autoimmune disease typically managed by rheumatologists. Diagnostic delays are common, due in large part to the non-specific and variable nature of SS symptoms and the slow progression of disease. The hallmark characteristics of SS are dry eye and dry mouth, but there are a broad range of other possible symptoms such as joint and muscle pain, skin rashes, chronic dry cough, vaginal dryness, extremity numbness or tingling, and disabling fatigue. Given that dry eye and dry mouth are typically the earliest presenting complaints, eye care clinicians and dental professionals are often the first point of medical contact and can provide critical collaboration with rheumatologists to facilitate both timely diagnosis and ongoing care of patients with SS. Current diagnostic criteria advocated by the American College of Rheumatology are predicated on the presence of signs/symptoms suggestive of SS along with at least two objective factors such as traditional biomarker positivity, salivary gland biopsy findings, and/or presence of keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Traditional biomarkers for SS include the autoantibodies anti-Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen A (SS-A/Ro), anti-Sjögren's syndrome-related antigen B (SS-B/La), antinuclear antibody (ANA) titers, and rheumatoid factor (RF). While diagnostically useful, these biomarkers have low specificity for SS and are not always positive, especially in early cases of SS. Several newly-identified biomarkers for SS include autoantibodies to proteins specific to the salivary and lacrimal glands [SP-1 (salivary gland protein-1), PSP (parotid secretory protein), CA-6 (carbonic anhydrase VI)]. Data suggest that these novel biomarkers may appear earlier in the course of disease and are often identified in cases that test negative to traditional biomarkers. The Sjö ® test is a commercially available diagnostic panel that incorporates testing for traditional SS biomarkers

  6. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  7. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  8. Hunter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in girls. There's no cure for Hunter syndrome. Treatment of Hunter syndrome involves management of symptoms and complications. Symptoms Hunter syndrome is one type of a group of inherited metabolic disorders called mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs), and Hunter syndrome is ...

  9. Early intervention with psychostimulants or antidepressants to increase methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) expressions: a potential therapy for Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chia-Ho; Tsai, Shihjen

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe X-linked postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder. The syndrome is caused primarily by mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene on Xq28. Most individuals with RTT are female, and female RTT is normally heterozygous for mutations in MeCP2. Patients with RTT display a normal period of development prior to the onset of symptoms, at which point they undergo a period of regression. Currently, no effective medication is available for this disorder, although animal studies have suggested that RTT symptoms are potentially reversible. For females with RTT, the severity of symptoms and progression of the disease varies a great deal, despite its homogenous genetic origin. These differences could be attributed to differences in the mutation points of MeCP2 and the skew caused by X-chromosome inactivation. Thus, the increased expression in the normal MeCP2 gene could decrease the severity of the disease. Based on findings from studies on animals indicating that fluoxetine (an antidepressant) and cocaine (a psychostimulant) can increase MeCP2 expression in the brain, it is suggested that early intervention with antidepressants or psychostimulants could increase the normal MeCP2 expression in females with RTT, who are normally heterozygous. This therapeutic hypothesis could be tested in an RTT animal model. Following the identification of the antidepressants or psychostimulants with the greatest influence on MeCP2 expression, a combination of early detection of the disorder with early intervention may result in improved therapeutic outcomes. Furthermore, a trial investigating the effects of antidepressants or psychostimulants on MeCP2 expression in lymphocyte culture from patients with RTT is suggested for clinical therapeutic prediction.

  10. Artificial Intelligence in Surgery: Promises and Perils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Daniel A; Rosman, Guy; Rus, Daniela; Meireles, Ozanan R

    2018-01-31

    The aim of this review was to summarize major topics in artificial intelligence (AI), including their applications and limitations in surgery. This paper reviews the key capabilities of AI to help surgeons understand and critically evaluate new AI applications and to contribute to new developments. AI is composed of various subfields that each provide potential solutions to clinical problems. Each of the core subfields of AI reviewed in this piece has also been used in other industries such as the autonomous car, social networks, and deep learning computers. A review of AI papers across computer science, statistics, and medical sources was conducted to identify key concepts and techniques within AI that are driving innovation across industries, including surgery. Limitations and challenges of working with AI were also reviewed. Four main subfields of AI were defined: (1) machine learning, (2) artificial neural networks, (3) natural language processing, and (4) computer vision. Their current and future applications to surgical practice were introduced, including big data analytics and clinical decision support systems. The implications of AI for surgeons and the role of surgeons in advancing the technology to optimize clinical effectiveness were discussed. Surgeons are well positioned to help integrate AI into modern practice. Surgeons should partner with data scientists to capture data across phases of care and to provide clinical context, for AI has the potential to revolutionize the way surgery is taught and practiced with the promise of a future optimized for the highest quality patient care.

  11. In vitro inhibitory potential of Cynara scolymus, Silybum marianum, Taraxacum officinale, and Peumus boldus on key enzymes relevant to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Angela; Sala, Filippo; Suter, Andy; Butterweck, Veronika

    2015-01-15

    Boldocynara®, a proprietary dietary supplement product consisting of the plants Cynara scolymus, Silybum marianum, Taraxacum officinale, and Peumus boldus, used to promote functions of the liver and the gallbladder. It was the aim of the present study to look from a different perspective at the product by investigating the in vitro potential of Boldocynara® as a combination product and its individual extracts on key enzymes relevant to metabolic syndrome. Peumus boldus extract exhibited pronounced inhibitory activities on α-glucosidase (80% inhibition at 100 µg/ml, IC50: 17.56 µg/ml). Silybum marianum had moderate pancreatic lipase (PL) inhibitory activities (30% at 100 µg/ml) whereas Cynara scolymus showed moderate ACE inhibitory activity (31% at 100 µg/ml). The combination had moderate to weak effects on the tested enzymes. In conclusion, our results indicate some moderate potential of the dietary supplement Boldocynara® and its single ingredients for the prevention of metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of Novel Proteins Co-Purifying with Cockayne Syndrome Group B (CSB Reveals Potential Roles for CSB in RNA Metabolism and Chromatin Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Nicolai

    Full Text Available The CSB protein, a member of the SWI/SNF ATP dependent chromatin remodeling family of proteins, plays a role in a sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER known as transcription coupled repair (TCR. CSB is frequently mutated in Cockayne syndrome group B, a segmental progeroid human autosomal recessive disease characterized by growth failure and degeneration of multiple organs. Though initially classified as a DNA repair protein, recent studies have demonstrated that the loss of CSB results in pleiotropic effects. Identification of novel proteins belonging to the CSB interactome may be useful not only for predicting the molecular basis for diverse pathological symptoms of CS-B patients but also for unraveling the functions of CSB in addition to its authentic role in DNA repair. In this study, we performed tandem affinity purification (TAP technology coupled with mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation studies to identify and characterize the proteins that potentially interact with CSB-TAP. Our approach revealed 33 proteins that were not previously known to interact with CSB. These newly identified proteins indicate potential roles for CSB in RNA metabolism involving repression and activation of transcription process and in the maintenance of chromatin dynamics and integrity.

  13. Motor performance in Prader-Willi syndrome patients and its potential influence on caregiver’s quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Jia-Yi Chiu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is a complex, multisystem genetic disorder characterized by a variety of physical, cognitive, and behavioral impairments. PWS is a unique sarcopenia model characterized by an abnormal increase in body fat mass and a decrease in muscle mass that predisposes patients to reduced physical activity, functional limitations, and disability. These manifestations may require both symptomatic and supportive management, thus negatively influencing their lifelong family caregiver’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the functional motor performance of adults with PWS in Taiwan and to measure the quality of life of their primary family caregivers. Methods The functional motor tests consisted of the following: (1 30-s sit-to-stand test, (2 timed up-and-go test, (3 hand grip and lateral pinch strength tests, and (4 Berg Balance Scale. The World Health Organization Quality of Life-short form (WHOQOL-BREF and the Short-Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36 were used to evaluate health-related quality of life, and the parenting stress index was used to assess the magnitude of stress within the parent-child system. Results The participants included seven adults (two females and five males with genetically confirmed PWS and their respective main caregivers. The mean age of the adults with PWS was 25.28 years; range 18–31 years, SD 5.10; the mean BMI was 29.2 kg/m2, SD 6.43. All adults with PWS showed lower hand grip and lateral pinch strengths, fewer sit-to-stand cycles during the 30-s chair stand test, and greater average time during the timed up-and-go test when compared to the normative data on healthy adults. Balance was negatively correlated with the caregiver’s health concepts of social functioning (rs −0.879, P = 0.009 and with role limitations due to physical problems (rs −0.899, P = 0.006 and emotional problems (rs −0.794, P = 0.033; hand grip strength was negatively correlated

  14. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sarraf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed.

  15. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes...

  16. Perceived efficacy of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis extracts for treatment of pediatric epilepsy: A potential role for infantile spasms and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shaun A; Zhou, Raymond; Jacobson, Catherine; Weng, Julius; Cheng, Emily; Lay, Johnson; Hung, Phoebe; Lerner, Jason T; Sankar, Raman

    2015-06-01

    There is a great need for safe and effective therapies for treatment of infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS). Based on anecdotal reports and limited experience in an open-label trial, cannabidiol (CBD) has received tremendous attention as a potential treatment for pediatric epilepsy, especially Dravet syndrome. However, there is scant evidence of specific utility for treatment of IS and LGS. We sought to document the experiences of children with IS and/or LGS who have been treated with CBD-enriched cannabis preparations. We conducted a brief online survey of parents who administered CBD-enriched cannabis preparations for the treatment of their children's epilepsy. We specifically recruited parents of children with IS and LGS and focused on perceived efficacy, dosage, and tolerability. Survey respondents included 117 parents of children with epilepsy (including 53 with IS or LGS) who had administered CBD products to their children. Perceived efficacy and tolerability were similar across etiologic subgroups. Eighty-five percent of all parents reported a reduction in seizure frequency, and 14% reported complete seizure freedom. Epilepsy was characterized as highly refractory with median latency from epilepsy onset to CBD initiation of five years, during which the patient's seizures failed to improve after a median of eight antiseizure medication trials. The median duration and the median dosage of CBD exposure were 6.8 months and 4.3mg/kg/day, respectively. Reported side effects were far less common during CBD exposure, with the exception of increased appetite (30%). A high proportion of respondents reported improvement in sleep (53%), alertness (71%), and mood (63%) during CBD therapy. Although this study suggests a potential role for CBD in the treatment of refractory childhood epilepsy including IS and LGS, it does not represent compelling evidence of efficacy or safety. From a methodological standpoint, this study is extraordinarily vulnerable

  17. HEPATORENAL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Hafner

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is acommon complication of advanced hepatic disease characterizedby marked abnormalities in arterial circulation and byrenal failure. An extreme arteriolar vasodilatation located inthe splanchnic circulation results in a reduction of total systemicvascular resistence and arterial hypotension. Vasoconstrictionoccurs in the renal circulation as in all other extrasplanchnicvascular territories. In the kidney, marked renalvasoconstriction results in a low glomerular filtration rate.Conclusions. The diagnosis of HRS is currently based on exclusionof other causes of renal failure. Prognosis of patientswith HRS is very poor. Liver transplantation is the best therapeuticoption, but it is seldom applicable due to the short survivalexpectancy of most patients with HRS, particularly thosewith the rapidly progressive type of HRS. New therapies developedduring the last few years, such as the use of systemicvasoconstrictors or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemicshunts (TIPS appear promising. Such treatments are of interestnot only as a bridge to liver transplantation but also as atherapy for patients who are not candidates for transplantation.

  18. Identification of potential saliva and tear biomarkers in primary Sjögren's syndrome, utilising the extraction of extracellular vesicles and proteomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqrawi, Lara A; Galtung, Hilde Kanli; Vestad, Beate; Øvstebø, Reidun; Thiede, Bernd; Rusthen, Shermin; Young, Alix; Guerreiro, Eduarda M; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Chen, Xiangjun; Utheim, Øygunn Aass; Palm, Øyvind; Jensen, Janicke Liaaen

    2017-01-25

    There is a long-lasting need for non-invasive, more accurate diagnostic techniques when evaluating primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) patients. Incorporation of additional diagnostics involving screening for disease-specific biomarkers in biological fluid is a promising concept that requires further investigation. In the current study we aimed to explore novel disease biomarkers in saliva and tears from pSS patients. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed on stimulated whole saliva and tears from 27 pSS patients and 32 healthy controls, and salivary and tear proteomic biomarker profiles were generated. LC-MS was also combined with size exclusion chromatography to isolate extracellular vesicles (EVs) from both fluids. Nanoparticle tracking analysis was conducted on joint fractions from the saliva and tears to determine size distribution and concentration of EVs. Further EV characterisation was performed by immunoaffinity capture of CD9-positive EVs using magnetic beads, detected by flow cytometry. The LC-MS data were analysed for quantitative differences between patient and control groups using Scaffold, and the proteins were further analysed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID), for gene ontology overrepresentation, and the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins for protein-protein interaction network analysis. Upregulation of proteins involved in innate immunity (LCN2), cell signalling (CALM) and wound repair (GRN and CALML5) were detected in saliva in pSS. Saliva EVs also displayed biomarkers critical for activation of the innate immune system (SIRPA and LSP1) and adipocyte differentiation (APMAP). Tear analysis indicated overexpression of proteins involved in TNF-α signalling (CPNE1) and B cell survival (PRDX3). Moreover, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin was upregulated in saliva and tears in pSS. Consistently, DAVID analysis demonstrated pathways of the adaptive

  19. Down syndrome detection from facial photographs using machine learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Rosenbaum, Kenneth; Sze, Raymond; Zand, Dina; Summar, Marshall; Linguraru, Marius George

    2013-02-01

    Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition; one in every 691 babies in United States is born with it. Patients with Down syndrome have an increased risk for heart defects, respiratory and hearing problems and the early detection of the syndrome is fundamental for managing the disease. Clinically, facial appearance is an important indicator in diagnosing Down syndrome and it paves the way for computer-aided diagnosis based on facial image analysis. In this study, we propose a novel method to detect Down syndrome using photography for computer-assisted image-based facial dysmorphology. Geometric features based on facial anatomical landmarks, local texture features based on the Contourlet transform and local binary pattern are investigated to represent facial characteristics. Then a support vector machine classifier is used to discriminate normal and abnormal cases; accuracy, precision and recall are used to evaluate the method. The comparison among the geometric, local texture and combined features was performed using the leave-one-out validation. Our method achieved 97.92% accuracy with high precision and recall for the combined features; the detection results were higher than using only geometric or texture features. The promising results indicate that our method has the potential for automated assessment for Down syndrome from simple, noninvasive imaging data.

  20. Candida Biofilms: Threats, Challenges, and Promising Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Teixeira, Miguel Cacho

    2018-01-01

    Candida species are fungal pathogens known for their ability to cause superficial and systemic infections in the human host. These pathogens are able to persist inside the host due to the development of pathogenicity and multidrug resistance traits, often leading to the failure of therapeutic strategies. One specific feature of Candida species pathogenicity is their ability to form biofilms, which protects them from external factors such as host immune system defenses and antifungal drugs. This review focuses on the current threats and challenges when dealing with biofilms formed by Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida parapsilosis, highlighting the differences between the four species. Biofilm characteristics depend on the ability of each species to produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and display dimorphic growth, but also on the biofilm substratum, carbon source availability and other factors. Additionally, the transcriptional control over processes like adhesion, biofilm formation, filamentation, and EPS production displays great complexity and diversity within pathogenic yeasts of the Candida genus. These differences not only have implications in the persistence of colonization and infections but also on antifungal resistance typically found in Candida biofilm cells, potentiated by EPS, that functions as a barrier to drug diffusion, and by the overexpression of drug resistance transporters. The ability to interact with different species in in vivo Candida biofilms is also a key factor to consider when dealing with this problem. Despite many challenges, the most promising strategies that are currently available or under development to limit biofilm formation or to eradicate mature biofilms are discussed. PMID:29487851

  1. Endothelial Extracellular Vesicles-Promises and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromada, Carina; Mühleder, Severin; Grillari, Johannes; Redl, Heinz; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microparticles, and apoptotic bodies, are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles that have once been considered as cell debris lacking biological functions. However, they have recently gained immense interest in the scientific community due to their role in intercellular communication, immunity, tissue regeneration as well as in the onset, and progression of various pathologic conditions. Extracellular vesicles of endothelial origin have been found to play a versatile role in the human body, since they are on the one hand known to contribute to cardiovascular diseases, but on the other hand have also been reported to promote endothelial cell survival. Hence, endothelial extracellular vesicles hold promising therapeutic potential to be used as a new tool to detect as well as treat a great number of diseases. This calls for clinically approved, standardized, and efficient isolation and characterization protocols to harvest and purify endothelial extracellular vesicles. However, such methods and techniques to fulfill stringent requirements for clinical trials have yet to be developed or are not harmonized internationally. In this review, recent advances and challenges in the field of endothelial extracellular vesicle research are discussed and current problems and limitations regarding isolation and characterization are pointed out.

  2. Therapeutic Potential of Interferon-γ and Its Antagonists in Autoinflammation: Lessons from Murine Models of Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Macrophage Activation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneleen Avau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ (IFN-γ affects immune responses in a complex fashion. Its immunostimulatory actions, such as macrophage activation and induction of T helper 1-type responsiveness, are widely acknowledged, however, as documented by a large body of literature, IFN-γ has also the potential to temper inflammatory processes via other pathways. In autoimmune and autoinflammatory disorders, IFN-γ can either play a disease-enforcing role or act as protective agent, depending on the nature of the disease. In animal models of any particular autoimmune disease, certain changes in the induction procedure can reverse the net outcome of introduction or ablation of IFN-γ. Here, we review the role of endogenous IFN-γ in inflammatory disorders and related murine models, with a focus on systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS. In particular, we discuss our recent findings in a mouse model of sJIA, in which endogenous IFN-γ acts as a regulatory agent, and compare with results from mouse models of MAS. Also, we elaborate on the complexity in the activity of IFN-γ and the resulting difficulty of predicting its value or that of its antagonists as treatment option.

  3. Vitamin B1-deficient mice show impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation and loss of hippocampal neurons and dendritic spines: potential microendophenotypes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hiroyoshi; Kishimoto, Takuya; Oishi, Satoru; Nagata, Kan; Hasegawa, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Tamae; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Patients with severe Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) associated with vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency (TD) show enduring impairment of memory formation. The mechanisms of memory impairment induced by TD remain unknown. Here, we show that hippocampal degeneration is a potential microendophenotype (an endophenotype of brain disease at the cellular and synaptic levels) of WKS in pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) mice, a rodent model of WKS. PTD mice show deficits in the hippocampus-dependent memory formation, although they show normal hippocampus-independent memory. Similarly with WKS, impairments in memory formation did not recover even at 6 months after treatment with PTD. Importantly, PTD mice exhibit a decrease in neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus and reduced density of wide dendritic spines in the DG. Our findings suggest that TD induces hippocampal degeneration, including the loss of neurons and spines, thereby leading to enduring impairment of hippocampus-dependent memory formation.

  4. Age-Dependent Long-Term Potentiation Deficits in the Prefrontal Cortex of the Fmr1 Knockout Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Henry G S; Lassalle, Olivier; Brown, Jonathan T; Manzoni, Olivier J

    2016-05-01

    The most common inherited monogenetic cause of intellectual disability is Fragile X syndrome (FXS). The clinical symptoms of FXS evolve with age during adulthood; however, neurophysiological data exploring this phenomenon are limited. The Fmr1 knockout (Fmr1KO) mouse models FXS, but studies in these mice of prefrontal cortex (PFC) function are underrepresented, and aging linked data are absent. We studied synaptic physiology and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the medial PFC of Fmr1KO mice from 2 to 12 months. In young adult Fmr1KO mice, NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated long-term potentiation (LTP) is intact; however, in 12-month-old mice this LTP is impaired. In parallel, there was an increase in the AMPAR/NMDAR ratio and a concomitant decrease of synaptic NMDAR currents in 12-month-old Fmr1KO mice. We found that acute pharmacological blockade of mGlu5 receptor in 12-month-old Fmr1KO mice restored a normal AMPAR/NMDAR ratio and LTP. Taken together, the data reveal an age-dependent deficit in LTP in Fmr1KO mice, which may correlate to some of the complex age-related deficits in FXS. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. 76 FR 13152 - Promise Neighborhoods Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... to attain an excellent education and successfully transition to college and a career. A Promise... parents or family members who report talking with their child about the importance of college and career... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION RIN 1855-ZA07 Promise Neighborhoods Program Catalog of Federal Domestic...

  6. Tennessee Promise: A Response to Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlepage, Ben; Clark, Teresa; Wilson, Randal; Stout, Logan

    2018-01-01

    Community colleges in Tennessee, either directly or indirectly, experienced unprecedented change as a result of Tennessee Promise. The present study explored how student support service administrators at three community colleges responded to organizational change as a result of the Tennessee Promise legislation. Investigators selected community…

  7. Inferences from counterfactual threats and promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Suzanne M; Byrne, Ruth M J

    2012-01-01

    We examine how people understand and reason from counterfactual threats, for example, "if you had hit your sister, I would have grounded you" and counterfactual promises, for example, "if you had tidied your room, I would have given you ice-cream." The first experiment shows that people consider counterfactual threats, but not counterfactual promises, to have the illocutionary force of an inducement. They also make the immediate inference that the action mentioned in the "if" part of the counterfactual threat and promise did not occur. The second experiment shows that people make more negative inferences (modus tollens and denial of the antecedent) than affirmative inferences (modus ponens and affirmation of the consequent) from counterfactual threats and promises, unlike indicative threats and promises. We discuss the implications of the results for theories of the mental representations and cognitive processes that underlie conditional inducements.

  8. Usher's Syndrome: Evaluation of the Vestibular System with Cervical and Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials and the Video Head Impulse Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Gagliardi, Silvia; Iozzo, Nicola; Plateroti, Rocco; Plateroti, Pasquale; Re, Massimo; Vingolo, Enzo Maria

    2015-09-01

    The Usher's syndrome (USH) is composed of a group of inherited disorders characterized by a dual sensory impairment of the audiovestibular and visual systems. Despite the established hearing loss, few authors have investigated vestibular dysfunction in these patients.The aim of this article is to investigate otolith or ampullary dysfunction in a group of patients affected by USH by means of a diagnostic protocol using caloric vestibular tests, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (C-VEMPs), ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (O-VEMPs), and video head impulse test (v-HIT) to show any selective damage of the vestibular nerve and also to identify if it is present in patients with a previous diagnosis of USH Type II. Prospective study with C-VEMPs, O-VEMPs, and v-HIT. Tertiary referral center. Fifteen patients with USH. Evaluation of otolith dysfunction with caloric test, C-VEMPs, and O-VEMPs and the measurement of the vestibular-ocular reflex using the v-HIT. Only three cases showed normal values of all the vestibular tests performed. O-VEMPs and C-VEMPs appeared pathologic in nine and seven cases, respectively. V-HITs showed ampullary dysfunction in 10 patients. In our study, eight of the 11 patients belonging to the group of USH Type II showed a pathologic response to at least one of the vestibular tests performed. Today, in patients affected by USH, any vestibular diagnostic protocol must include VEMPs and v-HIT to confirm the vestibular damage, identify selective deficit of the vestibular nerve, and provide useful information for a correct classification of USH.

  9. Pro-arrhythmogenic Effects of the V141M KCNQ1 Mutation in Short QT Syndrome and Its Potential Therapeutic Targets: Insights from Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiang-Chun; Rudy, Yoram; Liang, Hongwu; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Cui, Jianmin

    2017-10-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the pore-forming subunit of I Ks channels, KCNQ1, lead to short QT syndrome (SQTS) and lethal arrhythmias. However, how mutant I Ks channels cause SQTS and the possibility of I Ks -specific pharmacological treatment remain unclear. V141M KCNQ1 is a SQTS associated mutation. We studied its effect on I Ks gating properties and changes in the action potentials (AP) of human ventricular myocytes. Xenopus oocytes were used to study the gating mechanisms of expressed V141M KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels. Computational models were used to simulate human APs in endocardial, mid-myocardial, and epicardial ventricular myocytes with and without β-adrenergic stimulation. V141M KCNQ1 caused a gain-of-function in I Ks characterized by increased current density, faster activation, and slower deactivation leading to I Ks accumulation. V141M KCNQ1 also caused a leftward shift of the conductance-voltage curve compared to wild type (WT) I Ks (V 1/2 = 33.6 ± 4.0 mV for WT, and 24.0 ± 1.3 mV for heterozygous V141M). A Markov model of heterozygous V141M mutant I Ks was developed and incorporated into the O'Hara-Rudy model. Compared to the WT, AP simulations demonstrated marked rate-dependent shortening of AP duration (APD) for V141M, predicting a SQTS phenotype. Transmural electrical heterogeneity was enhanced in heterozygous V141M AP simulations, especially under β-adrenergic stimulation. Computational simulations identified specific I K1 blockade as a beneficial pharmacologic target for reducing the transmural APD heterogeneity associated with V141M KCNQ1 mutation. V141M KCNQ1 mutation shortens ventricular APs and enhances transmural APD heterogeneity under β-adrenergic stimulation. Computational simulations identified I K1 blockers as a potential antiarrhythmic drug of choice for SQTS.

  10. Assessing the feasibility, acceptability, and potential effectiveness of a behavioral-automaticity focused lifestyle intervention for African Americans with metabolic syndrome: The Pick two to Stick to protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Heather; Brody, Aaron; Levy, Philip

    2017-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) significantly increases the risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Being physically active and eating a healthy diet can reduce MetS risk factors. Too frequently, however, studies report that the effects of interventions targeting those factors are not maintained once interventions are withdrawn. A potential solution to the problem is targeting behavioral automaticity (habit-development) to aid in initiation and maintenance of health-behavior changes. The Pick two to Stick To (P2S2), is an 8-week, theory-based hybrid (face-to-face/telecoaching) habit focused lifestyle intervention designed to increase healthful physical activity and dietary behavioral automaticity. The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale and protocol for evaluating the P2S2 program's feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness. Using a prospective, non-comparative design, the P2S2 program will be implemented by trained occupational therapy 'coaches' to 40 African Americans aged 40 and above with MetS recruited from the emergency department. Semi-structured interviews with participants, bi-weekly research meetings with study staff, and observations of intervention delivery will provide data for a process evaluation. Estimates of effectiveness include weight, blood pressure, waist circumference, BMI, and behavioral automaticity measures that will be collected at baseline and week 20. The P2S2 program could facilitate the development of healthful dietary and physical activity habits in an underserved population. Whether interventions aimed at changing habits can feasibly influence this automaticity, particularly for high-risk, low resource communities where other barriers exist, is not known. This pilot study, therefore, will fill an important gap, providing insight to inform subsequent trials.

  11. Reversal of Impaired Hippocampal Long-term Potentiation and Contextual Fear Memory Deficits in Angelman Syndrome Model Mice by ErbB Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphzan, Hanoch; Hernandez, Pepe; Jung, Joo In; Cowansage, Kiriana K.; Deinhardt, Katrin; Chao, Moses V.; Abel, Ted; Klann, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Background Angelman syndrome (AS) is a human neuropsychiatric disorder associated with autism, mental retardation, motor abnormalities, and epilepsy. In most cases, AS is caused by the deletion of the maternal copy of UBE3A gene, which encodes the enzyme ubiquitin ligase E3A, also termed E6-AP. A mouse model of AS has been generated and these mice exhibit many of the observed neurological alterations in humans. Because of clinical and neuroanatomical similarities between AS and schizophrenia, we examined AS model mice for alterations in the neuregulin-ErbB4 pathway, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We focused our studies on the hippocampus, one of the major brain loci impaired in AS mice. Methods We determined the expression of NRG1 and ErbB4 receptors in AS mice and wild-type littermates (ages 10-16 weeks), and studied the effects of ErbB inhibition on long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal area CA1 and on hippocampus-dependent contextual fear memory. Results We observed enhanced neuregulin-ErbB4 signaling in the hippocampus of AS model mice and found that ErbB inhibitors could reverse deficits in LTP, a cellular substrate for learning and memory. In addition, we found that an ErbB inhibitor enhanced long-term contextual fear memory in AS model mice. Conclusions Our findings suggest that neuregulin-ErbB4 signaling is involved in synaptic plasticity and memory impairments in AS model mice, suggesting that ErbB inhibitors have therapeutic potential for the treatment of AS. PMID:22381732

  12. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as potential diagnostic markers and risk predictors of venous thrombosis and obstetric complications in antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hui; Zheng, Hui; Yin, Yu-Feng; Hu, Qiong-Yi; Teng, Jia-Lin; Sun, Yue; Liu, Hong-Lei; Cheng, Xiao-Bing; Ye, Jun-Na; Su, Yu-Tong; Wu, Xin-Yao; Zhou, Jin-Feng; Norman, Gary L; Gong, Hui-Yun; Shi, Xin-Ming; Peng, Yi-Bing; Wang, Xue-Feng; Yang, Cheng-De

    2018-03-28

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and clinical associations of antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) with thrombosis and pregnancy loss in Chinese patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and seronegative APS (SNAPS). One hundred and eighty six Chinese patients with APS (67 primary, 119 secondary), 48 with SNAPS, 176 disease controls (79 systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], 29 Sjogren's syndrome [SS], 30 ankylosing spondylitis [AS], 38 rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) and 90 healthy donors were examined. IgG and IgM aPS/PT, IgG/IgM/IgA anticardiolipin (aCL) and IgG/IgM/IgA anti-β2-glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) antibodies were tested by ELISA. One hundred and sixty (86.0%) of APS patients were positive for at least one aPS/PT isotype. One hundred and thirty five (72.6%) were positive for IgG aPS/PT, 124/186 (66.7%) positive for IgM aPS/PT and 99 (53.2%) positive for both. Approximately half of the SNAPS patients were positive for IgG and/or IgM aPS/PT. Highly significant associations between IgG aPS/PT and venous thrombotic events (odds ratio [OR]=6.72) and IgG/IgM aPS/PT and pregnancy loss (OR=9.44) were found. Levels of IgM aPS/PT were significantly different in APS patients with thrombotic manifestations and those with fetal loss (p=0.014). The association between IgG/IgM aPS/PT and lupus anticoagulant (LAC) was highly significant (pAPS was 101.6. Notably, 91.95% (80/87) of LAC-positive specimens were positive for IgG and/or IgM aPS/PT, suggesting aPS/PT is an effective option when LAC testing is not available. Anti-PS/PT antibody assays demonstrated high diagnostic performance for Chinese patients with APS, detected some APS patients negative for criteria markers and may serve as potential risk predictors for venous thrombosis and obstetric complications.

  13. Candida Biofilms: Threats, Challenges, and Promising Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda Cavalheiro

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida species are fungal pathogens known for their ability to cause superficial and systemic infections in the human host. These pathogens are able to persist inside the host due to the development of pathogenicity and multidrug resistance traits, often leading to the failure of therapeutic strategies. One specific feature of Candida species pathogenicity is their ability to form biofilms, which protects them from external factors such as host immune system defenses and antifungal drugs. This review focuses on the current threats and challenges when dealing with biofilms formed by Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida parapsilosis, highlighting the differences between the four species. Biofilm characteristics depend on the ability of each species to produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS and display dimorphic growth, but also on the biofilm substratum, carbon source availability and other factors. Additionally, the transcriptional control over processes like adhesion, biofilm formation, filamentation, and EPS production displays great complexity and diversity within pathogenic yeasts of the Candida genus. These differences not only have implications in the persistence of colonization and infections but also on antifungal resistance typically found in Candida biofilm cells, potentiated by EPS, that functions as a barrier to drug diffusion, and by the overexpression of drug resistance transporters. The ability to interact with different species in in vivo Candida biofilms is also a key factor to consider when dealing with this problem. Despite many challenges, the most promising strategies that are currently available or under development to limit biofilm formation or to eradicate mature biofilms are discussed.

  14. Enantioselectivity of mass spectrometry: challenges and promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Hanan; El-Aneed, Anas

    2013-01-01

    With the fast growing market of pure enantiomer drugs and bioactive molecules, new chiral-selective analytical tools have been instigated including the use of mass spectrometry (MS). Even though MS is one of the best analytical tools that has efficiently been used in several pharmaceutical and biological applications, traditionally MS is considered as a "chiral-blind" technique. This limitation is due to the MS inability to differentiate between two enantiomers of a chiral molecule based merely on their masses. Several approaches have been explored to assess the potential role of MS in chiral analysis. The first approach depends on the use of MS-hyphenated techniques utilizing fast and sensitive chiral separation tools such as liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography (GC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled to MS detector. More recently, several alternative separation techniques have been evaluated such as supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC); the latter being a hybrid technique that combines the efficiency of CE with the selectivity of LC. The second approach is based on using the MS instrument solely for the chiral recognition. This method depends on the behavioral differences between enantiomers towards a foreign molecule and the ability of MS to monitor such differences. These behavioral differences can be divided into three types: (i) differences in the enantiomeric affinity for association with the chiral selector, (ii) differences of the enantiomeric exchange rate with a foreign reagent, and (iii) differences in the complex MS dissociation behaviors of the enantiomers. Most recently, ion mobility spectrometry was introduced to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate chiral compounds. This article provides an overview of MS role in chiral analysis by discussing MS based methodologies and presenting the challenges and promises associated with each approach. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  16. WIEDEMANN SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    BILATERAL BENIGN HAEMORRHAGIC ADRENAL CYSTS IN BECKWITH - WIEDEMANN. SYNDROME: CASE REPORT. P. ANOOP and M. A. ANJAY. SUMMARY. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is the most common overgrowth malformation syndrome. The classical features include macrosomia, macroglossia, ...

  17. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  18. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  19. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Piriformis Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Piriformis syndrome ...

  20. The potential impact of family history of metabolic syndrome and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: In a highly endogamous population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Bener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to determine the potential impact of positive family history of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS among two generations, on developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM and the potential relation of consanguineous marriage among patients with MetS to the risk of developing T2DM among a sample of Qataris. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Primary healthcare (PHC centers. Materials and Methods: The survey and measurement were conducted from April 2011 to December 2012 among Qatari nationals above 20 years of age. Of the 2,182 subjects, who were approached to participate in the study, 1,552 (71% gave their consent. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire followed by anthropometric measurements and laboratory tests. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program-Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III as well as International Diabetes Federation (IDF. Results: Overall, the prevalence of MetS was 26.2% according to ATP III and 36.9% according to IDF (P < 0.0001. The mean age of MetS patients with T2DM was significantly higher than those without T2DM (Mean 48 ± 9.9 vs. 42.5 ± 9.2; P < 0.001. The proportion of females was higher among MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (61% vs. 51%; P = 0.053. In addition, there were significant differences between MetS patients with and without DM in terms of co-morbidities of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and high cholesterol. The proportion of MetS patients with positive family history for MetS was significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (46.7% vs. 33.8%; P = 0.009. The proportion of positive family history of MetS among fathers (35% vs. 21.9%; P = 0.005, mothers (30.5% vs. 18.8%; P = 0.008, maternal aunt (18.3% vs. 11.2%; P = 0.055, and maternal grand father (19.5% vs. 10%; P = 0.010 were significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to the

  1. Doctor-patient relationship and quality of life in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: an exploratory study of the potential mediating role of illness perceptions and acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Katrin; Chilcot, Joseph; Smith, Michael A

    2017-12-20

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterised by unpredictable bowel symptoms. These can be difficult to manage, consequently impacting quality of life (QoL). In addition, a strained doctor-patient relationship is independently reported in the qualitative literature. Given the doctor is often the first port of call for people with IBS, a difficult relationship may influence subsequent IBS management. Research suggests illness perceptions are important in determining IBS outcomes in therapy; however, their association with doctor-patient relationship and QoL is yet to be investigated. This exploratory study aimed to investigate the association between these constructs in IBS, as well as potential mediation by illness perceptions. Online questionnaires measuring doctor-patient relationship, illness perceptions, acceptance and QoL, were completed by 167 participants who reported an IBS diagnosis (144 female, mean age = 44.22 years, SD = 15.91 years). Bootstrapped pathway analysis was used to model the relationship and mediation effects. There was a significant positive correlation between patient-doctor relationship and QoL, r = .258, n = 167, p = .001. There was a significant indirect effect between doctor-patient relationship and QoL through illness coherence and acceptance (bootstrapped estimate = .058, 95%CI Lower-Upper = .02, .095, p = .002). No other indirect effects were observed in combination with good fit indices for the other illness perceptions. Findings suggest a doctor-patient relationship which fosters mutual understanding and helps patients make sense of symptoms, increases their ability to manage their IBS in a psychologically flexible manner, subsequently helping them maintain their QoL.

  2. Profiling and functional data on the developing olfactory/GnRH system reveal cellular and molecular pathways essential for this process and potentially relevant for the Kallmann syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eGaraffo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic development, immature neurons in the olfactory epithelium (OE extend axons through the nasal mesenchyme, to contact projection neurons in the olfactory bulb. Axon navigation is accompanied by migration of the GnRH+ neurons, which enter the anterior forebrain and home in the septo-hypothalamic area. This process can be interrupted at various points and lead to the onset of the Kallmann syndrome (KS, a disorder characterized by anosmia and central hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Several genes has been identified in human and mice that cause KS or a KS-like phenotype. In mice a set of transcription factors appears to be required for olfactory connectivity and GnRH neuron migration; thus we explored the transcriptional network underlying this developmental process by profiling the OE and the adjacent mesenchyme at three embryonic ages. We also profiled the OE from embryos null for Dlx5, a homeogene that causes a KS-like phenotype when deleted. We identified 20 interesting genes belonging to the following categories: 1 transmembrane adhesion/receptor, 2 axon-glia interaction, 3 scaffold/adapter for signalling, 4 synaptic proteins. We tested some of them in zebrafish embryos: the depletion of five (of six Dlx5 targets affected axonal extension and targeting, while three (of three affected GnRH neuron position and neurite organization. Thus, we confirmed the importance of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and identified new molecules needed for olfactory connection and GnRH neuron migration. Using available and newly generated data, we predicted/prioritized putative KS-disease genes, by building conserved co-expression networks with all known disease genes in human and mouse. The results show the overall validity of approaches based on high-throughput data and predictive bioinformatics to identify genes potentially relevant for the molecular pathogenesis of KS. A number of candidate will be discussed, that should be tested in

  3. Integrated biomarker responses of the invasive species Corbicula fluminea in relation to environmental abiotic conditions: a potential indicator of the likelihood of clam's summer mortality syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cristiana; Vilares, Pedro; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the variation of several biomarkers in wild populations of Corbicula fluminea in relation to abiotic condition changes to identify environmental factors associated with increased stress in this species potentially leading to massive mortality events. The study was carried out from July to October in the freshwater tidal areas of the estuaries of Minho and Lima Rivers (NW Iberian Peninsula). Monthly, 7 biomarkers (biotransformation, energy production, anti-oxidant defenses and lipid peroxidation damages) were determined in C. fluminea and 17 abiotic parameters were determined in water or sediments in 4 sampling sites: M1, M2 and M3 in Minho (up=> downstream); and L in Lima estuaries. The results of biomarkers were integrated using the Integrated Biomarker Response (IBR), Index and also analysed in relation to environmental parameters by Redundancy Analysis (RDA). Overall, the findings of the present study indicate that July and August are particularly stressful months for the studied C. fluminea populations, especially at downstream sites; the increase of nutrients and ammonium water concentrations, water temperature and conductivity are major contributors for this increased stress; the biomarkers indicated that in July/August C. fluminea is exposed to oxidative stress inducers, environmental chemical contaminants biotransformed by esterases and glutathione S-transferase enzymes, and that organisms need additional energy to cope with the chemical and/or thermally-induced stress. The findings of the present study stress the importance of biomonitoring the health condition of C. fluminea because it may allow determining the likelihood of summer/post summer mortality syndrome in this species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel gene expressions and TRP melastatin (TRPM) channel gene polymorphisms in obesity-related metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabur, S; Oztuzcu, S; Duzen, I V; Eraydin, A; Eroglu, S; Ozkaya, M; Demiryürek, A T

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is correlated with increased cardiovascular risk and characterized by several factors, including visceral obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. The etiology of MetS is complex, and can be influenced by genetic susceptibility. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible association of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels gene expressions and TRP melastatin (TRPM) gene polymorphisms with MetS in a Turkish population. A total of 142 patients with obesity-related MetS and 166 healthy controls with similar age and sex were enrolled to this study. For polymorphism studies, genomic DNA from the participants was analyzed by a BioMark 96.96 dynamic array system (Fluidigm, South San Francisco, CA, USA). For gene expression studies, mRNA from blood samples was extracted, and real time polymerase chain reaction on the BioMark HD system was performed. There was an increase in A allele (64.6% in patients vs. 49.5% in controls) and decrease in G allele frequencies (35.4% in patients vs. 50.5% in control, p = 0.0019) of the TRPM5 gene rs4929982 (Arg578Gln) polymorphism. We also observed that the distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of the TRPM8 gene rs12472151 in MetS patients were significantly different from controls (p TRPM5, TRPV4, TRPV5, TRPV6, MCOLN2 (TRPML2), and MCOLN3 (TRPML3) gene expressions, an augmentation was noted in TRPC6 gene expression. Genetic polymorphisms in TRPM5 and TRPM8 genes may modify individual susceptibility to MetS in the Turkish population. This study also revealed that there is a significant relationship between TRP channels gene expressions and MetS.

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Confalonieri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foster geographic variability and contrasting outcome data. A large international multicentre prospective cohort study including 50 countries across five continents reported that ARDS is underdiagnosed, and there is potential for improvement in its management. Furthermore, epidemiological data from low-income countries suggest that a revision of the current definition of ARDS is needed in order to improve its recognition and global clinical outcome. In addition to the well-known risk-factors for ARDS, exposure to high ozone levels and low vitamin D plasma concentrations were found to be predisposing circumstances. Drug-based preventive strategies remain a major challenge, since two recent trials on aspirin and statins failed to reduce the incidence in at-risk patients. A new disease-modifying therapy is awaited: some recent studies promised to improve the prognosis of ARDS, but mortality and disabling complications are still high in survivors in intensive care.

  6. Cholesteatoma has a high prevalence in Turner syndrome, highlighting the need for earlier diagnosis and the potential benefits of otoscopy training for paediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, D B N; Gault, E J; Kubba, H; Morrissey, M S C; Wynne, D M; Donaldson, M D C

    2014-07-01

    Girls with Turner syndrome are prone to cholesteatoma, a serious suppurative middle ear disease. We aimed to confirm its high prevalence in Turner syndrome, identify risk factors and suggest possible strategies for earlier detection. We reviewed 179 girls with Turner syndrome between 1989 and 2012 to identify cases of cholesteatoma. Seven girls (3.9%) had cholesteatoma (index girls) and each was compared with three age-matched girls without cholesteatoma (comparison girls). All the index girls had either the 45,X or 45,X/46X,i(Xq) karyotypes. Nine ears were initially affected, with three recurrences in two girls. Median age at first cholesteatoma presentation was 11.9 years (range: 7.5-15.2), with otorrhoea for three (range: one to seven) months in all 12 affected ears. Index girls had a significantly higher proportion of previous recurrent acute (p = 0.007) and chronic otitis media (p = 0.008), chronic perforation (p = 0.038) aural polyps (p Turner syndrome. Risk factors include 45,X and 46,XiXq karyotypes; a history of chronic otitis media, tympanic membrane retraction and persistent otorrhoea; and older age. Earlier recognition of ear disease is needed and otoscopy training for paediatricians caring for Turner syndrome patients may be beneficial. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pharmacological management of metabolic syndrome and its lipid complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Binesh Marvasti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity epidemic has been spread all over the world in the past few decades and has caused a major public health concern due to its increasing global prevalence. Obese individuals are at higher risks of developing dyslipidemic characteristics resulting in increased triglyceride and LDL-cholesterol content and reduced HDL-cholesterol levels. This disorder has profound implications as afflicted individuals have been demonstrated to be at increased risk of development of hypertension, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Today, this phenotype is designated as metabolic syndrome. According to the criteria set by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF, for a patient to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome, the person must have central obesity plus any two of the following conditions: raised TG, reduced HDL-cholesterol, raised blood pressure, and increased fasting plasma glucose. Current National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III guidelines for the treatment of patients with the metabolic syndrome encourage therapies that lower LDL cholesterol and TG and raise HDL-cholesterol. Primary intervention often involves treatment with statins to improve the lipid profiles of these patients. However, recent studies suggest the potential of newly identified drugs including thiazolidinediones, GLP-1 agonists, and DPP-4 inhibitors that seem to be promising in reducing the level of progression of metabolic syndrome related disorders. This review discusses the current pharmacological treatments of the metabolic syndrome with the above mentioned drugs.

  8. Epigenetic epidemiology: promises for public health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakulski, Kelly M; Fallin, M Daniele

    2014-04-01

    Epigenetic changes underlie developmental and age related biology. Promising epidemiologic research implicates epigenetics in disease risk and progression, and suggests epigenetic status depends on environmental risks as well as genetic predisposition. Epigenetics may represent a mechanistic link between environmental exposures, or genetics, and many common diseases, or may simply provide a quantitative biomarker for exposure or disease for areas of epidemiology currently lacking such measures. This great promise is balanced by issues related to study design, measurement tools, statistical methods, and biological interpretation that must be given careful consideration in an epidemiologic setting. This article describes the promises and challenges for epigenetic epidemiology, and suggests directions to advance this emerging area of molecular epidemiology. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Green and social bonds - A promising tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, Dominique; Barochez, Aurelie de; Cozic, Aela

    2013-11-01

    Issues of green bonds, socially responsible bonds and climate bonds are on the rise. Novethic estimates that some Euro 5 billion in such bonds has been issued since the start of 2013 by development banks, the main issuers of this type of debt. The figure is equal to over half of their total issues since 2007. Including local authorities, corporations and banks, a total Euro 8 billion of these bonds has been issued thus far in 2013. Given the size of the bond market, which the OECD estimated at Euro 95,000 billion in 2011, green and social bonds are still something of a niche but have strong growth potential. A number of large issues, from Euro 500 million to Euro 1 billion, were announced at the end of the year. Unlike conventional bonds, green and social bonds are not intended to finance all the activities of the issuer or refinance its debt. They serve instead to finance specific projects, such as producing renewable energy or adapting to climate change, the risk of which is shouldered by the issuer. This makes them an innovative instrument, used to earmark investments in projects with a direct environmental or social benefit rather than simply on the basis of the issuer's sustainable development policy. With financing being sought for the ecological transition, green and social bonds are promising instruments, sketching out at global level the shape of tools adapted to the financing of a green economy. On the strength of these advantages, the interest of responsible investors - the main target of green and social bond issuers - is growing fast. Judging by issuer press releases and the most commonly used currencies, the main subscribers today are US investors, among them CalSTRS and fund managers like Calvert Investment Management and Trillium Asset Management. European asset owners are also starting to focus on green and social bonds. A Novethic survey shows that 13% of them have already subscribed to such an issue or plan to do so. The present study

  10. β2-glycoprotein-1 autoantibodies from patients with antiphospholipid syndrome are sufficient to potentiate arterial thrombus formation in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arad, Ariela; Proulle, Valerie; Furie, Richard A.; Furie, Barbara C.

    2011-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, and the presence of the lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, or anti–β2-glycoprotein-1 (anti–β2-GP1) antibodies. Although anti–β2-GP1 antibodies have been documented as a biomarker for diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome, their direct role in the pathogenesis of thrombosis is unknown. We have demonstrated using intravital microscopy that anti–β2-GP1 autoantibodies purified from the sera of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome complicated by thrombosis greatly amplify thrombus size after laser-induced vessel wall injury in live mice. Anti–β2-GP1 autoantibodies from 3 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome were affinity-purified using human β2-GP1 bound to agarose. The effects of purified anti–β2-GP1 IgG autoantibodies, of anti–β2-GP1–depleted IgG, and of IgG from normal human sera on thrombus formation were measured in mice after arterial injury in the cremaster muscle. Before injury, purified anti–β2-GP1 IgG autoantibodies, anti–β2-GP1 antibody–depleted IgG, or IgG from normal human sera were infused. Increasing amounts of purified anti–β2-GP1 autoantibodies increased thrombus size in a dose-dependent manner, whereas neither anti–β2-GP1 antibody-depleted IgG nor IgG from normal serum affected thrombus size. These results indicate that anti–β2-GP1 IgG autoantibodies in antiphospholipid syndrome patient sera are not only a marker of antiphospholipid syndrome but are directly involved in the pathogenesis of thrombosis. PMID:21245481

  11. Degradation of proteoglycan 4/lubricin by cathepsin S: Potential mechanism for diminished ocular surface lubrication in Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Suresh C; Samsom, Michael L; Heynen, Miriam L; Jay, Gregory D; Sullivan, Benjamin D; Srinivasan, Sruthi; Caffery, Barbara; Jones, Lyndon; Schmidt, Tannin A

    2017-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease affecting the lacrimal and salivary glands with hallmark clinical symptoms of dry eye and dry mouth. Recently, markedly increased cathepsin S (CTSS) activity has been observed in the tears of SS patients. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), also known as lubricin, is an effective boundary lubricant that is naturally present on the ocular surface. While PRG4 is susceptible to proteolytic digestion, the potential effect of CTSS on PRG4 remains unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of CTSS to enzymatically degrade purified PRG4, and PRG4 naturally present in human tears, and alter ocular surface boundary lubricating properties. To assess the potential time course and dose-dependency of PRG4 digestion by CTSS, full-length recombinant human PRG4 (rhPRG4) was incubated at 37 °C with or without CTSS in an enzymatic digestion buffer. Digestion of PRG4 by CTSS was also examined within normal human tear samples, both with and without supplementation by rhPRG4. Finally, digestion of endogenous PRG4 by CTSS, and the effect of a CTSS inhibitor, was examined in SS tears on Schirmer strips. Digestion products were separated on 3-8% SDS-PAGE and visualized by protein staining and western blotting. The boundary lubricating ability of rhPRG4 samples was assessed using an in vitro human eyelid-cornea friction test. Finally, SDS-PAGE protein stain bands resulting from rhPRG4 digestion were submitted for tandem mass spectrometry analysis to confirm their identity as PRG4 and identify non-tryptic cleavage sites. CTSS digested rhPRG4 in a time and dose dependent manner. CTSS digestion of rhPRG4 at 1% (where % is the mass ratio of CTSS to rhPRG4) resulted in a time dependent decrease in the full-length, ∼460 kDa, monomeric rhPRG4 band, and an appearance of lower MW fragments. After 20 h, no full-length rhPRG4 was observed. Furthermore, with an increased relative enzyme concentration of 3%, no protein bands were observed

  12. Comparison of the antibacterial activity of essential oils and extracts of medicinal and culinary herbs to investigate potential new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder, which may result from alteration of the gastrointestinal microbiota following gastrointestinal infection, or with intestinal dysbiosis or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. This may be treated with antibiotics, but there is concern that widespread antibiotic use might lead to antibiotic resistance. Some herbal medicines have been shown to be beneficial, but their mechanism(s) of action remain incompletely understood. To try to understand whether antibacterial properties might be involved in the efficacy of these herbal medicines, and to investigate potential new treatments for IBS, we have conducted a preliminary study in vitro to compare the antibacterial activity of the essential oils of culinary and medicinal herbs against the bacterium, Esherichia coli. Methods Essential oils were tested for their ability to inhibit E. coli growth in disc diffusion assays and in liquid culture, and to kill E. coli in a zone of clearance assay. Extracts of coriander, lemon balm and spearmint leaves were tested for their antibacterial activity in the disc diffusion assay. Disc diffusion and zone of clearance assays were analysed by two-tailed t tests whereas ANOVA was performed for the turbidometric assays. Results Most of the oils exhibited antibacterial activity in all three assays, however peppermint, lemon balm and coriander seed oils were most potent, with peppermint and coriander seed oils being more potent than the antibiotic rifaximin in the disc diffusion assay. The compounds present in these oils were identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Finally, extracts were made of spearmint, lemon balm and coriander leaves with various solvents and these were tested for their antibacterial activity against E. coli in the disc diffusion assay. In each case, extracts made with ethanol and methanol exhibited potent antibacterial activity. Conclusions Many of the essential oils

  13. MSC transplantation: a promising therapeutic strategy to manage the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo E Ezquer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, one of the main threats to public health is diabetes mellitus. Its most detrimental complication is diabetic nephropathy (DN, a clinical syndrome associated with kidney damage and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Irrespective of the type of diabetes, DN follows a well-known temporal course. The earliest detectable signs are microalbuminuria and histopathological changes including extracellular matrix deposition, glomerular basement membrane thickening, glomerular and mesangial expansion. Later on macroalbuminuria appears, followed by a progressive decline in glomerular filtration rate and the loss of glomerular podocytes, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, glomerulosclerosis and arteriolar hyalinosis. Tight glycemic and hypertension controls remain the key factors for preventing or arresting the progression of DN. Nevertheless, despite considerable educational effort to control the disease, a significant number of patients not only develop DN, but also progress to chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the availability of a strategy aimed to prevent, delay or revert DN would be highly desirable. In this article, we review the pathophysiological features of DN and the therapeutic mechanisms of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, also referred to as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. The perfect match between them, together with encouraging pre-clinical data available, allow us to support the notion that MSC transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy to manage DN onset and progression, not only because of the safety of this procedure, but mainly because of the renoprotective potential of MSCs.

  14. Beware of Products Promising Miracle Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Updates Beware of Products Promising Miracle Weight Loss Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Year’s resolution, know this: many so-called “miracle” weight loss supplements and foods (including teas and coffees) don’ ...

  15. Big data in nephrology: promises and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Coca, Steven G; Wyatt, Christina M

    2016-08-01

    Data from the electronic health records hold great promise for nephrology research. However, due to significant limitations, reporting guidelines have been formulated for analyses conducted using electronic health records data. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 76 FR 39589 - Promise Neighborhoods Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... Innovation and Improvement, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of final priorities, requirements... Dropout/Graduation Crisis Among American Indian and Alaska Native Students: Failure to Respond Places the... success of Promise Neighborhoods will require the use of both short-term and long-term goals to measure...

  17. Complexity of Propositional Proofs Under a Promise

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dershowitz, N.; Tzameret, Iddo

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2010), s. 1-29 ISSN 1529-3785 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : theory * promise problems * propositional proof complexity * random 3CNF * resolution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.391, year: 2010 http://dl.acm.org/ citation .cfm?doid=1740582.1740586

  18. Complexity of Propositional Proofs Under a Promise

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dershowitz, N.; Tzameret, Iddo

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2010), s. 1-29 ISSN 1529-3785 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : theory * promise problems * propositional proof complexity * random 3CNF * resolution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.391, year: 2010 http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=1740582.1740586

  19. Pregnancy associated plasma protein A, a potential marker for vulnerable plaque in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper K; Teisner, Ane S; Teisner, Borge

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the presence and time-related pattern of circulating pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) levels in patients with non ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). DESIGN AND METHODS: Consecutively admitted patients (N=573) with clinical signs of NSTE...

  20. Service Users perspectives in PROMISE and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Sarah

    2017-09-01

    Since its inception in 2013, PROMISE (PROactive Management of Integrated Services and Environments) has been supporting service users and staff at the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust (CPFT) on a journey to reduce reliance on force. The author's own personal experiences led to the founding of PROMISE and illustrates how individual experiences can influence a patient to lead change. Coproduction is actively embedded in PROMISE. Patients have been meaningfully involved because they are innovators and problem solvers who bring an alternative viewpoint by the very nature of their condition. A patient is more than just a person who needs to be 'fixed' they are individuals with untapped skills and added insight. There have been 2 separate Patient Advisory Groups (PAGs) since the project was first established. The first Patient Advisory Group was recruited to work with the PROMISE researchers on a study which used a participatory qualitative approach. Drawing on their lived experience and different perspectives the PAG was instrumental in shaping the qualitative study, including the research questions. Their active involvement helped to ensure that that the study was sensitively designed, methodologically robust and ethically sound. The 2 nd PAG was formed in 2016 to give the project an overall steer. Patients in this group contributed to the work on the 'No' Audit and reviewed several CPFT policies such as the Seclusion and Segregation policy which has impacted on frontline practice. They also made a significant contribution to the study design for a funding application that was submitted by the PROMISE team to the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). Both PAGs were supported by funding from East of England Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC EoE) and were influential in different ways. An evaluation of the 2 nd PAG which was conducted in June 2017 showed very high satisfaction levels. The free text

  1. Thymoquinone-based nanotechnology for cancer therapy: promises and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballout, Farah; Habli, Zeina; Rahal, Omar Nasser; Fatfat, Maamoun; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala

    2018-01-31

    Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of black seed, is a promising anticancer molecule that inhibits cancer cell growth and progression in vitro and in vivo. Despite the promising anticancer activities of TQ, its translation to the clinic is limited by its poor bioavailability and hydrophobicity. As such, we and others encapsulated TQ in nanoparticles to improve its delivery and limit undesirable cytotoxicity. These TQ-nanoparticle formulations showed improved anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities when compared with free TQ. Here, we provide an overview of the various TQ-nanoparticle formulations, highlight their superior efficacy and discuss up-to-date solutions to further enhance TQ bioavailability and anticancer activity, thus improving potential for clinical translation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Natural Flavonoids as Promising Analgesic Candidates: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Wang, Xiaoyu; Gui, Xuan; Chen, Lu; Huang, Baokang

    2016-11-01

    Due to the chemical structural diversity and various analgesic mechanisms, an increasing number of studies indicated that some flavonoids from medicinal plants could be promising candidates for new natural analgesic drugs, which attract high interests of advanced users and academic researchers. The aim of this systematic review is to report flavonoids and its derivatives as new analgesic candidates based on the pharmacological evidences. Sixty-four papers were found concerning the potential analgesic activity of 46 flavonoids. In this case, the evidence for analgesic activity of flavonoids and total flavonoids was investigated. Meanwhile, the corresponding analgesic mechanism of flavonoids was discussed by generalizing and analyzing the current publications. Based on this review, the conclusion can be drawn that some flavonoids are promising candidates for painful conditions and deserve particular attention in further research and development. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  3. Stem cells: a promising source for vascular regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammal, Hassan; Harmouch, Chaza; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Laurent-Maquin, Dominique; Labrude, Pierre; Menu, Patrick; Kerdjoudj, Halima

    2014-12-15

    The rising and diversity of many human vascular diseases pose urgent needs for the development of novel therapeutics. Stem cell therapy represents a challenge in the medicine of the twenty-first century, an area where tissue engineering and regenerative medicine gather to provide promising treatments for a wide variety of diseases. Indeed, with their extensive regeneration potential and functional multilineage differentiation capacity, stem cells are now highlighted as promising cell sources for regenerative medicine. Their multilineage differentiation involves environmental factors such as biochemical, extracellular matrix coating, oxygen tension, and mechanical forces. In this review, we will focus on human stem cell sources and their applications in vascular regeneration. We will also discuss the different strategies used for their differentiation into both mature and functional smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

  4. The deepwater Gulf of Mexico : promises delivered?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    A summary review of deepwater Gulf of Mexico (GOM) oil production was presented for the years 1989 to 1998. Trends and prospects in deepwater GOM production and leasing were assessed. Promises and forecasts made in the early 1990s were compared with what actually happened since then. Forecasts in the early 1990s promised deeper, faster and cheaper developments in the deepwater Gulf. Results of the comparison showed that the prognosticators were correct on all three counts. Regarding the future of the Gulf, one can be justified in being optimistic in so far as more experience, robust economics, more and cheaper rigs can be taken as reliable indicators of optimism. In contrast, there are certain negatives to consider, such as low commodity prices, budget constraints, lease expirations, technical challenges and increased competition. . 12 figs

  5. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Autoantibodies Are Potential Early Indicators of Cardiac Dysfunction and Patient Outcome in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lynch, IVPhD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The degradation and release of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C upon cardiac damage may stimulate an inflammatory response and autoantibody (AAb production. We determined whether the presence of cMyBP-C-AAbs associated with adverse cardiac function in cardiovascular disease patients. Importantly, cMyBP-C-AAbs were significantly detected in acute coronary syndrome patient sera upon arrival to the emergency department, particularly in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients. Patients positive for cMyBP-C-AAbs had reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and elevated levels of clinical biomarkers of myocardial infarction. We conclude that cMyBP-C-AAbs may serve as early predictive indicators of deteriorating cardiac function and patient outcome in acute coronary syndrome patients prior to the infarction. Key Words: acute myocardial infarction, autoantibodies, cardiac myosin binding protein-c, cardiomyopathy

  6. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood cells, and the cells have a specific mutation in their DNA. Myelodysplastic syndrome with excess blasts — ... Chemicals linked to myelodysplastic syndromes include tobacco smoke, pesticides and industrial chemicals, such as benzene. Exposure to ...

  7. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and supports a broad range of research on neurogenetic disorders, including Moebius syndrome. The goals of these ... and supports a broad range of research on neurogenetic disorders, including Moebius syndrome. The goals of these ...

  8. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan) to look for two characteristics of Pendred syndrome. One characteristic might be a cochlea with too few turns. ... Inner Ear Credit: NIH Medical Arts A second characteristic of Pendred syndrome is an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (see figure). The ...

  9. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and ...

  10. Ohtahara Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but be profoundly handicapped. As they grow, some children will progress into other epileptic disorders such as West syndrome and Lennox-Gestaut syndrome. What research is being done? The NINDS conducts and supports an extensive research program on seizures ...

  11. Gardner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrado Junior, C.W.; Bresser, A.; Cerri, G.G.; Habr-Gama, A.; Pinotti, H.W.; Magalhaes, A.

    1988-01-01

    A case of familiar poliposis of colon related to a right mandibular osteoma is reported (this association is usually called Gardner's syndrome). Radiologic pictures ae shown and some commentaries about this syndrome concerning the treatment are made. (author) [pt

  12. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete X ... work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  13. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  14. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  15. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that ... your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  16. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  17. Piriformis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudosciatica; Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... Sciatica is the main symptom of piriformis syndrome. Other symptoms include: Tenderness or a dull ache in ...

  18. Dressler's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome Overview Dressler's syndrome is a type of pericarditis — inflammation of the sac surrounding the heart (pericardium). ... reducing its ability to pump blood efficiently. Constrictive pericarditis. Recurring or chronic inflammation can cause the pericardium ...

  19. Potencial evocado auditivo tardio relacionado a eventos (P300 na síndrome de Down Late auditory event-related evoked potential (P300 in Down's syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Patrícia Hernandez Alves Ribeiro César

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Down é causada pela trissomia do cromossomo 21 e está associada com alteração do processamento auditivo, distúrbio de aprendizagem e, provavelmente, início precoce de Doença de Alzheimer. OBJETIVO: Avaliar as latências e amplitudes do potencial evocado auditivo tardio relacionado a eventos (P300 e suas alterações em indivíduos jovens adultos com síndrome de Down. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo de caso prospectivo. Latências e amplitudes do P300 foram avaliadas em 17 indivíduos com síndrome de Down e 34 indivíduos sadios. RESULTADOS: Foram identificadas latências do P300 (N1, P2, N2 e P3 prolongadas e amplitude N2 - P3 diminuída nos indivíduos com síndrome de Down quando comparados ao grupo controle. CONCLUSÃO: Em indivíduos jovens adultos com síndrome de Down ocorre aumento das latências N1, P2, N2 e P3, e diminuição significativa da amplitude N2-P3 do potencial evocado auditivo tardio relacionado a eventos (P300, sugerindo prejuízo da integração da área de associação auditiva com as áreas corticais e subcorticais do sistema nervoso central.Down syndrome is caused by a trisomy of chromosome 21 and is associated with central auditory processing deficit, learning disability and, probably, early-onset Alzheimer's disease. AIM: to evaluate the latencies and amplitudes of evoked late auditory potential related to P300 events and their changes in young adults with Down's syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective case study. P300 test latency and amplitudes were evaluated in 17 individuals with Down's syndrome and 34 healthy individuals. RESULTS The P300 latency (N1, P2, N2 and P3 was longer and the N2-P3 amplitude was lower in individuals with Down syndrome when compared to those in the control group. CONCLUSION: In young adults with Down syndrome, N1, P2, N2 and P3 latencies of late auditory evoked potential related to P300 events were prolonged, and N2 - P3 amplitudes were significantly reduced

  20. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ...

  1. [Capgras syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoverro Fortuny, O; Sierra Acín, A C

    2001-01-01

    The authors report a case of Capgras' syndrome in a 16-years-old child, who had been hospitalized for psychotic disorder. A review of the literature is performed. Most authors state that Capgras' syndrome would represent a symptom of underlying medical o functional disorders, although the term syndrome is used. The main etiopathogenic hypothesis of this syndrome are put forward (psychodynamic, disconnection, neuropsychological and medical).

  2. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  3. Yielding and its adaptability of several promising bulk cocoa clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Suhendi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Yielding and its adaptability are considered to be an important criteria for clones recommendation. An experiment to evaluate yield and its adaptability of several promising bulk cocoa clones has been executed during 1996—2003 in three locations having different altitude and type of climate, consisted of Jatirono(450 m asl., B type of climate, Kalisepanjang (275 m asl., C type of climate and Kalitelepak (145 m asl., B type of climate. Randomized completely block design (RCBD was used in each location with 14 promising clones and four replications. Recommended clones of ICS 60 and GC 7 were used as standard. The promising clones were originated from mother trees selection with the main criteria of yield. Observations were conducted on yield and its components as well as bean characteristics. Determination of adaptability of each clone by using yield performance and its stability. Statistical analysis was done by using combined analysis. The results showed that KW 30 and KW 48 perform higher yield (2.3 ton/ha than that of standard clone (1.7 ton/ha as well as consistant yield stability between location and over years. There for, the two clones performed good adaptability. KW 30 and KW 48 also perform good yield components, and high percentage of fat content i.e 55%. So, those clones are potential to be recommended for commercial planting materials. Key words : bulk cocoa, yield, clone, stability, adaptability.

  4. Analysis of promising sustainable renovation concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhoutteghem, Lies; Tommerup, Henrik M.; Svendsen, Svend

    This report focuses on analyses of the most promising existing sustainable renovation concepts, i.e. full-service concepts and technical concepts, for single-family houses. As a basis for the analyses a detailed building stock analysis was carried out. Furthermore, as a basis a general working...... and contractors and the idea is to help the homeowner with design and decision making process. The building stock analysis shows that detached single-family houses account for large share of the total number of dwellings in all Nordic countries. Final energy use for space heating and hot water is in the range...

  5. Black cumin seeds show promising anti-cancer effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is responsible for millions of death worldwide each year and it is the second most common cancer in both men and women. According to the American Cancer Society, lung cancer is responsible for about 1 in 4 cancer deaths and 14% of all new cases. More and more people require treatment, but due to the side effects and complications of modern drugs, there has been a growing interest in naturally occurring compounds with anti-cancer potential. Black cumin seed is one of the most promising and extensively studied plants which could provide support in considering this compound as an emerging drug.

  6. 47,XXY Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Link, Katarina; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    to 75% of the patients left undetected. Typically, diagnosis is delayed with the majority of patients identified during fertility workup in adulthood, and only 10% of patients diagnosed prior to puberty. Early detection of this syndrome is recommended in order to offer treatment and intervention...... at the appropriate ages and stages of development for the purpose of preventing osteopenia/osteoporosis, metabolic syndrome, and other medical conditions related to hypogonadism and to the XXY as well as minimizing potential learning and psychosocial problems. The aim of this review is to present the clinical......47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) is the most frequent sex chromosomal disorder and affects approximately one in 660 newborn boys. The syndrome is characterized by varying degrees of cognitive, social, behavioral, and learning difficulties and in adulthood additionally primary testicular failure...

  7. Update on the management of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome with a focus on rufinamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl E Stafstrom

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Carl E StafstromSection of Pediatric Neurology, Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USAObjective: This review summarizes the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, an intractable epileptic encephalopathy of early childhood. In particular, the review focuses on rufinamide, a recently released anticonvulsant medication with reported effectiveness in this epilepsy syndrome.Methods: A systematic literature search (PubMed was performed to review the existing literature pertaining to the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome as well as studies involving rufinamide as an anticonvulsant medication.Results: The published literature to date documents a beneficial effect of rufinamide on children over 4 years old with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Studies indicate a significant decrease in tonic and atonic seizure frequency as well as total seizure frequency compared to placebo-treated children. Rufinamide appears to be well tolerated and a safe medication, somnolence and vomiting being the most common side effects.Conclusions: Rufinamide is a promising adjunctive therapy for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, an intractable childhood epilepsy. To ensure its optimal effectiveness, clinicians must be familiar with the medication’s clinical response profile and potential for adverse effects.Keywords: pediatric, epilepsy, epileptic encephalopathy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, rufinamide

  8. Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome and Associated Medical Conditions With an Emphasis on Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, J.C.; Tripp, D.A.; Pontari, M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We characterized and compared the impact of clinical phenotypic associations between interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and controls in relation to potentially related conditions, particularly irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. Materials...... cystitis/painful bladder syndrome vs controls was irritable bowel syndrome 38.6% vs 5.2%, fibromyalgia 17.7% vs 2.6% and chronic fatigue syndrome 9.5% vs 1.7% (all p painful bladder syndrome cohort 50.3% reported no other associated condition, 24.4% had interstitial...... cystitis/painful bladder syndrome + irritable bowel syndrome only, 2.5% had interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome + fibromyalgia only, 1.5% had interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome + chronic fatigue syndrome only, while 20.2% had multiple associated conditions. As the number...

  9. Promising strategies for the prevention of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Laura E; Yaffe, Kristine

    2009-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of dementia are expected to increase several-fold in the coming decades. Given that the current pharmaceutical treatment of dementia can only modestly improve symptoms, risk factor modification remains the cornerstone for dementia prevention. Some of the most promising strategies for the prevention of dementia include vascular risk factor control, cognitive activity, physical activity, social engagement, diet, and recognition of depression. In observational studies, vascular risk factors-including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity-are fairly consistently associated with increased risk of dementia. In addition, people with depression are at high risk for cognitive impairment. Population studies have reported that intake of antioxidants or polyunsaturated fatty acids may be associated with a reduced incidence of dementia, and it has been reported that people who are cognitively, socially, and physically active have a reduced risk of cognitive impairment. However, results from randomized trials of risk factor modification have been mixed. Most promising, interventions of cognitive and physical activity improve cognitive performance and slow cognitive decline. Future studies should continue to examine the implication of risk factor modification in controlled trials, with particular focus on whether several simultaneous interventions may have additive or multiplicative effects.

  10. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  11. The insulin-like growth factor I system: physiological and pathophysiological implication in cardiovascular diseases associated with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Anversa, Piero

    2015-02-15

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors including obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance. A number of theories have been speculated for the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome including impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, lipotoxicity, oxidative stress, interrupted neurohormonal regulation and compromised intracellular Ca(2+) handling. Recent evidence has revealed that adults with severe growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) deficiency such as Laron syndrome display increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular diseases. IGF-1 signaling may regulate contractility, metabolism, hypertrophy, apoptosis, autophagy, stem cell regeneration and senescence in the heart to maintain cardiac homeostasis. An inverse relationship between plasma IGF-1 levels and prevalence of metabolic syndrome as well as associated cardiovascular complications has been identified, suggesting the clinical promises of IGF-1 analogues or IGF-1 receptor activation in the management of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms between IGF-1 and metabolic syndrome are still poorly understood. This mini-review will discuss the role of IGF-1 signaling cascade in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in particular the susceptibility to overnutrition and sedentary life style-induced obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and other features of metabolic syndrome. Special attention will be dedicated in IGF-1-associated changes in cardiac responses in various metabolic syndrome components such as insulin resistance, obesity, hypertension and dyslipidemia. The potential risk of IGF-1 and IGF-1R stimulation such as tumorigenesis is discussed. Therapeutic promises of IGF-1 and IGF-1 analogues including mecasermin, mecasermin rinfabate and PEGylated IGF-1 will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. CATASTROPHIC ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME IN LEPROSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Vaibhav Chewoolkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is an acute and life threatening variant of antiphospholipid syndrome with a high mortality rate. Many infections are known to be accompanied by the thrombotic manifestations of this syndrome. We came across a patient of leprosy who developed bowel ischaemia secondary to mesenteric venous thrombosis as a part of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and later on succumbed. We thereby wish to highlight the need for early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of this potentially fatal condition in patients with infections.

  13. Synaptogenesis and Myelination in the Nucleus/Tractus Solitarius: Potential Role in Apnea of Prematurity, Congenital Central Hypoventilation, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Fetuses as early as 15 weeks' gestation exhibit rhythmical respiratory movements shown by real-time ultrasonography. The nucleus/tractus solitarius is the principal brainstem respiratory center; other medullary nuclei also participate. The purpose was to determine temporal maturation of synaptogenesis. Delayed synaptic maturation may explain neurogenic apnea or hypoventilation of prematurity and some cases of sudden infant death syndrome. Sections of medulla oblongata were studied from 30 human fetal and neonatal brains 9 to 41 weeks' gestation. Synaptophysin demonstrated the immunocytochemical sequence of synaptogenesis. Other neuronal markers and myelin stain also were applied. The nucleus/tractus solitarius was similarly studied in fetuses with chromosomopathies, metabolic encephalopathies, and brain malformations. Synapse formation in the nucleus solitarius begins at about 12 weeks' gestation and matures by 15 weeks; myelination initiated at 33 weeks. Synaptogenesis was delayed in 3 fetuses with different conditions, but was not specific for only nucleus solitarius. Delayed synaptogenesis or myelination in the nucleus solitarius may play a role in neonatal hypoventilation, especially in preterm infants and in some sudden infant death syndrome cases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Human 45,X fibroblast transcriptome reveals distinct differentially expressed genes including long noncoding RNAs potentially associated with the pathophysiology of Turner syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriram N Rajpathak

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality characterized by the absence of whole or part of the X chromosome in females. This X aneuploidy condition is associated with a diverse set of clinical phenotypes such as gonadal dysfunction, short stature, osteoporosis and Type II diabetes mellitus, among others. These phenotypes differ in their severity and penetrance among the affected individuals. Haploinsufficiency for a few X linked genes has been associated with some of these disease phenotypes. RNA sequencing can provide valuable insights to understand molecular mechanism of disease process. In the current study, we have analysed the transcriptome profiles of human untransformed 45,X and 46,XX fibroblast cells and identified differential expression of genes in these two karyotypes. Functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressing genes are associated with bone differentiation, glucose metabolism and gonadal development pathways. We also report differential expression of lincRNAs in X monosomic cells. Our observations provide a basis for evaluation of cellular and molecular mechanism(s in the establishment of Turner syndrome phenotypes.

  15. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53).

  16. Cobalt Derivatives as Promising Therapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffern, Marie C.; Yamamoto, Natsuho; Holbrook, Robert J.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic complexes are versatile platforms for the development of potent and selective pharmaceutical agents. Cobalt possesses a diverse array of properties that can be manipulated to yield promising drug candidates. Investigations into the mechanism of cobalt therapeutic agents can provide valuable insight into the physicochemical properties that can be harnessed for drug development. This review presents examples of bioactive cobalt complexes with special attention to their mechanisms of action. Specifically, cobalt complexes that elicit biological effects through protein inhibition, modification of drug activity, and bioreductive activation are discussed. Insights gained from these examples reveal features of cobalt that can be rationally tuned to produce therapeutics with high specificity and improved efficacy for the biomolecule or pathway of interest. PMID:23270779

  17. The promise and paradox of cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Rebecca J

    2012-12-01

    Cultural competence has become a ubiquitous and unquestioned aspect of professional formation in medicine. It has been linked to efforts to eliminate race-based health disparities and to train more compassionate and sensitive providers. In this article, I question whether the field of cultural competence lives up to its promise. I argue that it does not because it fails to grapple with the ways that race and racism work in U.S. society today. Unless we change our theoretical apparatus for dealing with diversity to one that more critically engages with the complexities of race, I suggest that unequal treatment and entrenched health disparities will remain. If the field of cultural competence incorporates the lessons of critical race scholarship, however, it would not only need to transform its theoretical foundation, it would also need to change its name.

  18. Underexploited tropical plants with promising economic value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    The apparent advantages of staple plants over the minor tropical plants often result only from the disproportionate research attention they have been given. A world-wide inquiry resulted in a list of 400 promising but neglected species. The 36 most important species are described in compact monographs and concern cereals (Echinochloa turnerana, grain amaranths, quinua and Zosterea mazina), roots and tubers (Arrachacha, cocoyams and taro), vegetables (chaya, hearts of palms, wax gourd, winged bean), fruits (durian, mangosteen, naranjilla, pejibaye, pummelo, soursop, uvilla), oilseeds (babassu palm, buffalo gourd, Caryocar species, Hessenia polycarpa and jojoba), forage (Acacia albida, Brosimum alicastrum Cassia sturtii, saltbushes and tamarugo) and other crops (buriti palm, Calathea lutea, candelilla, guar, guayule, Paspalum vaginatum, ramie and Spirulina).

  19. Does environmental archaeology need an ethical promise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riede, Felix; Andersen, Per; Price, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Environmental catastrophes represent profound challenges faced by societies today. Numerous scholars in the climate sciences and the humanities have argued for a greater ethical engagement with these pressing issues. At the same time, several disciplines concerned with hazards are moving towards...... formalized ethical codes or promises that not only guide the dissemination of data but oblige scientists to relate to fundamentally political issues. This article couples a survey of the recent environmental ethics literature with two case studies of how past natural hazards have affected vulnerable...... societies in Europe?s prehistory. We ask whether cases of past calamities and their societal effects should play a greater role in public debates and whether archaeologists working with past environmental hazards should be more outspoken in their ethical considerations. We offer no firm answers, but suggest...

  20. Does environmental archaeology need an ethical promise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riede, Felix; Andersen, Per; Price, Neil

    2016-01-01

    societies in Europe?s prehistory. We ask whether cases of past calamities and their societal effects should play a greater role in public debates and whether archaeologists working with past environmental hazards should be more outspoken in their ethical considerations. We offer no firm answers, but suggest......Environmental catastrophes represent profound challenges faced by societies today. Numerous scholars in the climate sciences and the humanities have argued for a greater ethical engagement with these pressing issues. At the same time, several disciplines concerned with hazards are moving towards...... formalized ethical codes or promises that not only guide the dissemination of data but oblige scientists to relate to fundamentally political issues. This article couples a survey of the recent environmental ethics literature with two case studies of how past natural hazards have affected vulnerable...

  1. Revolutionizing Education: The Promise of Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, Rene

    2018-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) has the potential to revolutionize education, as it immerses students in their learning more than any other available medium. By blocking out visual and auditory distractions in the classroom, it has the potential to help students deeply connect with the material they are learning in a way that has never been possible before.…

  2. Endophytic actinomycetes: promising source of novel bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Atsuko; Takahashi, Yōko

    2017-05-01

    Endophytic actinomycetes associated with plant roots are a relatively untapped source of potential new bioactive compounds. This is becoming increasingly important, as the returns from discovery research on soil-dwelling microbes, have been continuously diminishing. We have isolated more than 1000 strains of actinomycetes from plant roots in our search for novel bioactive compounds, identified and assayed their bioactive metabolites, as well as investigated their biosynthetic genes for generating secondary metabolites. This has resulted in the discovery of several interesting compounds. Creation of plant root clone libraries enabled us to confirm that we had, indeed, isolated endophytes. In this paper, we introduce our approach to this promising line of research, incorporating data from other publications, and illustrate the potential that endophytic actinomycetes offer as a new source of novel lead compounds.

  3. [Microbiota and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntaş, Yüksel; Batman, Adnan

    2017-04-01

    The role of gut bacteria in the pathogenesis and treatment of various diseases has been a focus of attention in the last 10 years. Prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases continues to increase, in spite of technological developments and treatment alternatives. Microbial dysbiosis, described as the decrease of useful bacteria and the increase of harmful bacteria, has been associated with diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis, and metabolic syndrome. In microbial dysbiosis, increase of harmful metabolites and changes to composition of bile acids occur via carbohydrate and protein fermentation. As a result, insulin resistance pathways are activated, which initiate the processes of obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Healthy diet recommendations, including prebiotic and probiotic foods and the use of probiotic agents, look promising for future treatment of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases.

  4. A catalog for the transcripts from the venomous structures of the caterpillar Lonomia obliqua: identification of the proteins potentially involved in the coagulation disorder and hemorrhagic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Ana B. G.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Guimarães, Jorge A.; Francischetti, Ivo M.B.

    2010-01-01

    Accidents with the caterpillar Lonomia obliqua are often associated with a coagulation disorder and hemorrhagic syndrome in humans. In the present study, we have constructed cDNA libraries from two venomous structures of the caterpillar, namely the tegument and the bristle. High-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analyses were performed in parallel. Over one thousand cDNAs were obtained and clustered to produce a database of 538 contigs and singletons (clusters) for the tegument library and 368 for the bristle library. We have thus identified dozens of full-length cDNAs coding for proteins with sequence homology to snake venom prothrombin activator, trypsin-like enzymes, blood coagulation factors and prophenoloxidase cascade activators. We also report cDNA coding for cysteine proteases, Group III phospholipase A2, C-type lectins, lipocalins, in addition to protease inhibitors including serpins, Kazal-type inhibitors, cystatins and trypsin inhibitor-like molecules. Antibacterial proteins and housekeeping genes are also described. A significant number of sequences were devoid of database matches, suggesting that their biologic function remains to be defined. We also report the N-terminus of the most abundant proteins present in the bristle, tegument, hemolymph, and "cryosecretion". Thus, we have created a catalog that contains the predicted molecular weight, isoelectric point, accession number, and putative function for each selected molecule from the venomous structures of L. obliqua. The role of these molecules in the coagulation disorder and hemorrhagic syndrome caused by envenomation with this caterpillar is discussed. All sequence information and the Supplemental Data, including Figures and Tables with hyperlinks to FASTA-formatted files for each contig and the best match to the Databases, are available at http://www.ncbi.nih.gov/projects/omes. PMID:16023793

  5. Urinary cystatin C as a potential risk marker for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease in patients with obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Suganami, Takayoshi; Majima, Takafumi; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Kato, Yasuhisa; Araki, Rika; Koyama, Kazunori; Okajima, Taiichiro; Tanabe, Makito; Oishi, Mariko; Himeno, Akihiro; Kono, Shigeo; Sugawara, Akira; Hattori, Masakazu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Shimatsu, Akira

    2011-02-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), chronic kidney disease (CKD), and all-cause mortality. Serum cystatin C (S-CysC), a marker of GFR, has been shown to be associated with CVD and CKD. This study was designed to elucidate the association of urinary CysC (U-CysC), a marker of renal tubular dysfunction, with CVD and CKD risk factors in patients with obesity and MS. The U-CysC-creatinine ratio (UCCR) was examined in 343 Japanese obese outpatients enrolled in the multi-centered Japan Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Study. UCCR was positively correlated with urine albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) and S-CysC and negatively correlated with estimated GFR (eGFR). Among obese patients, UCCR was significantly higher in MS patients than in non-MS patients. UCCR had significant correlations with the number of components of MS and arterial stiffness, all of which are CVD predictors, similarly to UACR (P<0.05). Interestingly, diet- and exercise-induced weight reduction for 3 months significantly decreased only UCCR among all of the renal markers examined (P<0.01), in parallel with the decrease in BMI, HbA1c, and arterial stiffness, suggesting the beneficial effect of weight reduction on renal tubular dysfunction. This study demonstrates that UCCR is significantly associated with renal dysfunction, the severity of MS, arterial stiffness, and weight change in obese patients. The data of this study suggest that U-CysC could serve as a CVD and CKD risk factor in patients with obesity and MS.

  6. Curing the Epilepsies: The Promise of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the marketplace by giving researchers a common platform for submitting potential therapeutic agents to standardized testing ... BRAIN Initiative® Health Scientist Administrator Channels Synapses Circuits Cluster Neurosurgery Research Fellowships Scientific Director, Division of Intramural ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Gitelman syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a potentially dangerous abnormal heart rhythm called ventricular arrhythmia. The signs and symptoms of Gitelman syndrome vary ... Celebrates Its 15th Anniversary National DNA Day 2018 Newborn Screening Saves Lives Act Turns 10 All Bulletins ...

  8. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  9. Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanti Devi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  10. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  11. Joubert Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner (meaning both parents must have a copy of ... physical, occupational, and speech therapy may benefit some children. Infants with abnormal ...

  12. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that contain aspirin. Some hospitals and medical facilities conduct newborn screenings for fatty acid oxidation disorders to determine which children are at greater risk of developing Reye's syndrome. ...

  13. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See More About Research The NINDS supports and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Angelman syndrome, to develop techniques to diagnose, treat, ... Publications Definition Angelman ...

  14. Medical big data: promise and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong Ho; Yoon, Hyung-Jin

    2017-03-01

    The concept of big data, commonly characterized by volume, variety, velocity, and veracity, goes far beyond the data type and includes the aspects of data analysis, such as hypothesis-generating, rather than hypothesis-testing. Big data focuses on temporal stability of the association, rather than on causal relationship and underlying probability distribution assumptions are frequently not required. Medical big data as material to be analyzed has various features that are not only distinct from big data of other disciplines, but also distinct from traditional clinical epidemiology. Big data technology has many areas of application in healthcare, such as predictive modeling and clinical decision support, disease or safety surveillance, public health, and research. Big data analytics frequently exploits analytic methods developed in data mining, including classification, clustering, and regression. Medical big data analyses are complicated by many technical issues, such as missing values, curse of dimensionality, and bias control, and share the inherent limitations of observation study, namely the inability to test causality resulting from residual confounding and reverse causation. Recently, propensity score analysis and instrumental variable analysis have been introduced to overcome these limitations, and they have accomplished a great deal. Many challenges, such as the absence of evidence of practical benefits of big data, methodological issues including legal and ethical issues, and clinical integration and utility issues, must be overcome to realize the promise of medical big data as the fuel of a continuous learning healthcare system that will improve patient outcome and reduce waste in areas including nephrology.

  15. Medical big data: promise and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong Ho; Yoon, Hyung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    The concept of big data, commonly characterized by volume, variety, velocity, and veracity, goes far beyond the data type and includes the aspects of data analysis, such as hypothesis-generating, rather than hypothesis-testing. Big data focuses on temporal stability of the association, rather than on causal relationship and underlying probability distribution assumptions are frequently not required. Medical big data as material to be analyzed has various features that are not only distinct from big data of other disciplines, but also distinct from traditional clinical epidemiology. Big data technology has many areas of application in healthcare, such as predictive modeling and clinical decision support, disease or safety surveillance, public health, and research. Big data analytics frequently exploits analytic methods developed in data mining, including classification, clustering, and regression. Medical big data analyses are complicated by many technical issues, such as missing values, curse of dimensionality, and bias control, and share the inherent limitations of observation study, namely the inability to test causality resulting from residual confounding and reverse causation. Recently, propensity score analysis and instrumental variable analysis have been introduced to overcome these limitations, and they have accomplished a great deal. Many challenges, such as the absence of evidence of practical benefits of big data, methodological issues including legal and ethical issues, and clinical integration and utility issues, must be overcome to realize the promise of medical big data as the fuel of a continuous learning healthcare system that will improve patient outcome and reduce waste in areas including nephrology. PMID:28392994

  16. Promising Gene Therapeutics for Salivary Gland Radiotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renjith Parameswaran Nair

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available More than 0.5 million new cases of head and neck cancer are diagnosed worldwide each year, and approximately 75% of them are treated with radiation alone or in combination with other cancer treatments. A majority of patients treated with radiotherapy develop significant oral off-target effects because of the unavoidable irradiation of normal tissues. Salivary glands that lie within treatment fields are often irreparably damaged and a decline in function manifests as dry mouth or xerostomia. Limited ability of the salivary glands to regenerate lost acinar cells makes radiation-induced loss of function a chronic problem that affects the quality of life of the patients well beyond the completion of radiotherapy. The restoration of saliva production after irradiation has been a daunting challenge, and this review provides an overview of promising gene therapeutics that either improve the gland’s ability to survive radiation insult, or alternately, restore fluid flow after radiation. The salient features and shortcomings of each approach are discussed.

  17. The Renewed Promise of Medical Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bemmel, J H; McCray, A T

    2016-05-20

    The promise of the field of Medical Informatics has been great and its impact has been significant. In 1999, the Yearbook editors of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) - also the authors of the present paper - sought to assess this impact by selecting a number of seminal papers in the field, and asking experts to comment on these articles. In particular, it was requested whether and how the expectations, represented by these papers, had been fulfilled since their publication several decades earlier. Each expert was also invited to comment on what might be expected in the future. In the present paper, these areas are briefly reviewed again. Where did these early papers have an impact and where were they not as successful as originally expected? It should be noted that the extraordinary developments in computer technology observed in the last two decades could not have been foreseen by these early researchers. In closing, some of the possibilities and limitations of research in medical informatics are outlined in the context of a framework that considers six levels of computer applications in medicine and health care. For each level, some predictions are made for the future, concluded with thoughts on fruitful areas for ongoing research in the field.

  18. Medical big data: promise and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong Ho Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of big data, commonly characterized by volume, variety, velocity, and veracity, goes far beyond the data type and includes the aspects of data analysis, such as hypothesis-generating, rather than hypothesis-testing. Big data focuses on temporal stability of the association, rather than on causal relationship and underlying probability distribution assumptions are frequently not required. Medical big data as material to be analyzed has various features that are not only distinct from big data of other disciplines, but also distinct from traditional clinical epidemiology. Big data technology has many areas of application in healthcare, such as predictive modeling and clinical decision support, disease or safety surveillance, public health, and research. Big data analytics frequently exploits analytic methods developed in data mining, including classification, clustering, and regression. Medical big data analyses are complicated by many technical issues, such as missing values, curse of dimensionality, and bias control, and share the inherent limitations of observation study, namely the inability to test causality resulting from residual confounding and reverse causation. Recently, propensity score analysis and instrumental variable analysis have been introduced to overcome these limitations, and they have accomplished a great deal. Many challenges, such as the absence of evidence of practical benefits of big data, methodological issues including legal and ethical issues, and clinical integration and utility issues, must be overcome to realize the promise of medical big data as the fuel of a continuous learning healthcare system that will improve patient outcome and reduce waste in areas including nephrology.

  19. The Zollinger-Ellison syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poitras, Pierre; Gingras, Marie-Hélène; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) are treated by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to protect them from severe and potentially lethal peptic complications related to massive gastric acid hypersecretion. We report here on the dangerous consequences of interrupting PPI therapy.......Patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) are treated by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to protect them from severe and potentially lethal peptic complications related to massive gastric acid hypersecretion. We report here on the dangerous consequences of interrupting PPI therapy....

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome is positively related to metabolic syndrome: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinting Guo

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome is a common gastrointestinal disorder that may affect dietary pattern, food digestion, and nutrient absorption. The nutrition-related factors are closely related to metabolic syndrome, implying that irritable bowel syndrome may be a potential risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, few epidemiological studies are available which are related to this potential link. The purpose of this study is to determine whether irritable bowel syndrome is related to metabolic syndrome among middle-aged people. We designed a cross-sectional study of 1,096 subjects to evaluate the relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and metabolic syndrome and its components. Diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome was based on the Japanese version of the Rome III Questionnaire. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of the American Heart Association scientific statements of 2009. Dietary consumption was assessed via a validated food frequency questionnaire. Principal-components analysis was used to derive 3 major dietary patterns: "Japanese", "sweets-fruits", and "Izakaya (Japanese Pub "from 39 food groups. The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome and metabolic syndrome were 19.4% and 14.6%, respectively. No significant relationship was found between the dietary pattern factor score tertiles and irritable bowel syndrome. After adjustment for potential confounders (including dietary pattern, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval of having metabolic syndrome and elevated triglycerides for subjects with irritable bowel syndrome as compared with non-irritable bowel syndrome are 2.01(1.13-3.55 and 1.50(1.03-2.18, respectively. Irritable bowel syndrome is significantly related to metabolic syndrome and it components. This study is the first to show that irritable bowel syndrome was significantly related to a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome and elevated triglycerides among an adult population. The findings suggest that

  1. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... One in 10 children with this syndrome has a problem involving chromosome 7. In other people with the syndrome, it may affect chromosome 11. Most of the time, it ...

  2. Design, challenge, and promise of stimuli-responsive nanoantibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Julius A.; Kwon, Young Jik

    2016-10-01

    Over the past few years, there have been calls for novel antimicrobials to combat the rise of drug-resistant bacteria. While some promising new discoveries have met this call, it is not nearly enough. The major problem is that although these new promising antimicrobials serve as a short-term solution, they lack the potential to provide a long-term solution. The conventional method of creating new antibiotics relies heavily on the discovery of an antimicrobial compound from another microbe. This paradigm of development is flawed due to the fact that microbes can easily transfer a resistant mechanism if faced with an environmental pressure. Furthermore, there has been some evidence to indicate that the environment of the microbe can provide a hint as to their virulence. Because of this, the use of materials with antimicrobial properties has been garnering interest. Nanoantibiotics, (nAbts), provide a new way to circumvent the current paradigm of antimicrobial discovery and presents a novel mechanism of attack not found in microbes yet; which may lead to a longer-term solution against drug-resistance formation. This allows for environment-specific activation and efficacy of the nAbts but may also open up and create new design methods for various applications. These nAbts provide promise, but there is still ample work to be done in their development. This review looks at possible ways of improving and optimizing nAbts by making them stimuli-responsive, then consider the challenges ahead, and industrial applications.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Flavonoids: promising natural compounds against viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaryan, Hovakim; Arabyan, Erik; Oo, Adrian; Zandi, Keivan

    2017-09-01

    Flavonoids are widely distributed as secondary metabolites produced by plants and play important roles in plant physiology, having a variety of potential biological benefits such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activity. Different flavonoids have been investigated for their potential antiviral activities and several of them exhibited significant antiviral properties in in vitro and even in vivo studies. This review summarizes the evidence for antiviral activity of different flavonoids, highlighting, where investigated, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action on viruses. We also present future perspectives on therapeutic applications of flavonoids against viral infections.

  4. [Ballantyne syndrome or mirror syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Silva-González, María Eugenia; González-Hernández, Rigoberto

    2010-11-01

    Ballantyne syndrome or mirror syndrome is a triad consisting of the presence of fetal hydrops, generalized edema placentomegaly mother. May be related to any cause of fetal hydrops. The fetal prognosis is poor in untreated cases, the mother has reference to be the cause or the termination of pregnancy. Present the case of a 26-year-old who developed mirror syndrome secondary to non-immune fetal hydrops of unknown origin, accompanied by preeclampsia.

  5. Surface modification of promising cerium oxide nanoparticles for nanomedicine applications

    KAUST Repository

    Nanda, Himansu Sekhar

    2016-11-14

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) or nanoceria have emerged as a potential nanomedicine for the treatment of several diseases such as cancer. CNPs have a natural tendency to aggregate or agglomerate in their bare state, which leads to sedimentation in a biological environment. Since the natural biological environment is essentially aqueous, nanoparticle surface modification using suitable biocompatible hydrophilic chemical moieties is highly desirable to create effective aqueous dispersions. In this report, (6-{2-[2-(2-methoxy-ethoxy)-ethoxy]-ethoxy}-hexyl)triethoxysilane was used as a functional, biocompatible organosilane to modify the surface of CNPs to produce promising nanoparticles which open substantial therapeutic avenues. The surface modified nanoparticles were produced in situ via an ammonia-induced ethylene glycol-assisted precipitation method and were characterized using complimentary characterization techniques. The interaction between the functional moiety and the nanoparticle was studied using powerful cross polarization/magic angle sample spinning solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The surface-modified nanoparticles were extremely small and demonstrated a significant improvement in aqueous dispersibility. Moreover, the existence of a strong ionic coordination between the functional moiety and the surface of the nanoparticle was realised, indicating that the surface modified nanoceria are stable and that the nanoparticles should demonstrate an enhanced circulation time in a biological environment. The surface modification approach should be promising for the production of CNPs for nanomedicine applications. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Adolescent Literacy Instruction: Policies and Promising Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jill, Ed.; Moorman, Gary, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This comprehensive resource explores how adolescence and academic achievement are defined within today's political context, examines the in-school potential of teens' out-of-school immersion in digital technologies and popular culture, and shows teachers how to embed comprehension strategies into classroom instruction. The book contains innovative…

  7. Public Health Issues – Promise and Peril

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    governments and policy-makers. Prioritizing suicide prevention on the global public health and public policy agendas and to raise awareness of suicide as a public health issue is necessary. So what about potentially vulnerable populations? Transgender people often lack a support system and are more likely to face.

  8. Alternative therapies for seizures: promises and dangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirven, Joseph I

    2007-09-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasingly being used for a multitude of medical problems, one of them being seizures. This article discusses the prevalence of CAM use for seizures and epilepsy. Evidence-based data regarding CAM for epilepsy are presented as well as potential safety concerns regarding ephedra and cannabis use.

  9. Secukinumab: a promising therapeutic option in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Ficco, Hernan; Perez-Alamino, Rodolfo; Maldonado-Cocco, José A

    2016-09-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is the second most common chronic inflammatory joint disease. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is another less common but equally chronic and disabling spondyloarthritis (SpA). Therapeutic agents for the treatment of these diseases have been somewhat lacking as compared with those available for rheumatoid arthritis, which represents a significant challenge for both the treating physician and the pharmaceutical industry. A promising development for our understanding of the physiopathology of PsA and AS involves new targets to interrupt IL-17 and IL-12/IL-23 pathways. Up to 30-40 % of SpA patients have inadequate or poor response, or are intolerant to anti-TNF therapies. Therefore, there has been a clear unmet medical need in an important group of these patients. As a result, new therapeutic targets have emerged for the treatment of both axial and peripheral SpA. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is increased in psoriatic lesions as well as in the synovial fluid of patients with PsA and in sites of enthesitis in SpA. IL-23 has been shown to play an important role in the polarization of CD4+ T-cells to become IL-17 producers. Based on these evidences, blockade of the cytokine IL-17 or its receptors was considered to have therapeutic implications for the treatment of psoriasis, as well as PsA and AS.This article presents a thorough review of an IL-17 A blocking agent, its mechanism of action, its clinical efficacy and its therapeutic safety.

  10. The promise of innovation: Nuclear energy horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourogov, V.

    2003-01-01

    The 21st century promises the most open, competitive, and globalized markets in human history, as well as the most rapid pace of technological change ever. For nuclear energy, as any other, that presents challenges. Though the atom now supplies a good share of world electricity, its share of total energy is relatively small, anywhere from four to six per cent depending on how it is calculated. And, while energy is most needed in the developing world, four of every five nuclear plants are in industrialized countries. Critical problems that need to be overcome are well known - high capital costs for new plants, and concerns over proliferation risks and safety, (including safety of waste disposal) stand high among them. The IAEA and other programmes are confronting these problems through ambitious initiatives involving both industrialized and developing countries. They include the collaborative efforts known as the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) and the IAEA International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). They use ideas, results and the best experiences from today's research and development tools and advanced types of nuclear energy systems to meet tomorrow's challenges. Though the market often decides the fate of new initiatives, the market is not always right for the common good. Governments, and the people that influence them, play an indispensable role in shaping progress in energy fields for rich and poor countries alike. They shoulder the main responsibilities for fundamental science, basic research, and long-term investments. For energy in particular, government investment and support will prove instrumental in the pace of innovation toward long-term options that are ready to replace limited fossil fuel supplies, and respond to the growing premium put on clean energy alternatives. Yet governments cannot go it alone. The challenges are too diverse and complex, and public concerns - about proliferation or safety - go beyond

  11. Early disease progression of Hurler syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kiely, Bridget T.; Kohler, Jennifer L.; Coletti, Hannah Y.; Poe, Michele D.; Escolar, Maria L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Newborn screening for mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) shows promise to improve outcomes by facilitating early diagnosis and treatment. However, diagnostic tests for MPS I are of limited value in predicting whether a child will develop severe central nervous system disease associated with Hurler syndrome, or minimal or no central nervous system involvement associated with the attenuated phenotypes (Hurler?Scheie and Scheie syndromes). Given that the optimal treatment differs be...

  12. Uremic restless legs syndrome (RLS) and sleep quality in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis: potential role of homocysteine and parathyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Katrin; Blaschke, Sabine; Rodenbeck, Andrea; Becker, Andreas; Anderson-Schmidt, Heike; Cohrs, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aetiology of uremic restless legs syndrome (RLS) remains unclear. Our research investigated whether an elevated plasma concentration of the excitatory amino acid homocysteine might be associated with RLS occurrence in patients with chronic renal insufficiency on hemodialysis. Total plasma homocysteine as well as creatinine, urea, folate, parathyroid hormone, hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, phosphate, calcium, magnesium, and albumin levels were compared between 26 RLS-affected (RLSpos) and 26 non-affected (RLSneg) patients on chronic hemodialysis. We further compared subjective sleep quality between RLSpos and RLSneg patients using the Pittsburgh-Sleep-Quality-Index and investigated possible relationships between laboratory parameters and sleep quality. Taking individual albumin concentrations into account, a significant positive correlation between total plasma homocysteine and RLS occurrence was observed (r= 0.246; p=0.045). Sleep quality was significantly more reduced in RLSpos compared to RLSneg patients and RLS severity correlated positively with impairment of sleep quality. Bad sleep quality in all patients was associated with higher concentrations of parathyroid hormone. Our results suggest a possible aetiological role of homocysteine in uremic RLS. They confirm that uremic RLS is an important factor causing sleep impairment in patients on hemodialysis. Higher parathyroid hormone levels might also be associated with bad sleep quality in these patients. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Uremic Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS and Sleep Quality in Patients With End-Stage Renal Disease on Hemodialysis: Potential Role of Homocysteine and Parathyroid Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Gade

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aetiology of uremic restless legs syndrome (RLS remains unclear. Our research investigated whether an elevated plasma concentration of the excitatory amino acid homocysteine might be associated with RLS occurrence in patients with chronic renal insufficiency on hemodialysis. Methods: Total plasma homocysteine as well as creatinine, urea, folate, parathyroid hormone, hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, phosphate, calcium, magnesium, and albumin levels were compared between 26 RLS-affected (RLSpos and 26 non-affected (RLSneg patients on chronic hemodialysis. We further compared subjective sleep quality between RLSpos and RLSneg patients using the Pittsburgh-Sleep-Quality-Index and investigated possible relationships between laboratory parameters and sleep quality. Results: Taking individual albumin concentrations into account, a significant positive correlation between total plasma homocysteine and RLS occurrence was observed (r= 0.246; p=0.045. Sleep quality was significantly more reduced in RLSpos compared to RLSneg patients and RLS severity correlated positively with impairment of sleep quality. Bad sleep quality in all patients was associated with higher concentrations of parathyroid hormone. Conclusion: Our results suggest a possible aetiological role of homocysteine in uremic RLS. They confirm that uremic RLS is an important factor causing sleep impairment in patients on hemodialysis. Higher parathyroid hormone levels might also be associated with bad sleep quality in these patients.

  14. In-utero exposure to nicotine alters the development of the rabbit cardiac conduction system and provides a potential mechanism for sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Anh Tuan; Biet, Michael; Delabre, Jean-Francois; Morin, Nathalie; Dumaine, Robert

    2017-12-01

    In-utero exposure to tobacco smoke remains the highest risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). To alleviate the risks, nicotine replacement therapies are often prescribed to women who wish to quit smoking during their pregnancy. Cardiac arrhythmias is considered the final outcome leading to sudden death. Our goal in this study was to determine if exposing rabbit fetus to nicotine altered the cardiac conduction system of newborn kittens in a manner susceptible to cause SIDS. Using neuronal markers and a series of immunohistological and electrophysiological techniques we found that nicotine delayed the development of the cardiac pacemaker center (sinoatrial node) and decreased its innervation. At the molecular level, nicotine favored the expression of cardiac sodium channels with biophysical properties that will tend to slow heart rate and diminish electrical conduction. Our results show that alterations of the cardiac sodium current may contribute to the bradycardia, conduction disturbances and other cardiac arrhythmias often associated to SIDS and raise awareness on the use of replacement therapy during pregnancy.

  15. Monitoring the status of Gray Bats (Myotis grisescens) in Virginia, 2009-2014, and potential impacts of White-nose Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Karen E.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Orndorff, Wil; Hyzy, Brenna A.; Hobson, Christopher S.; Ford, W. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Myotis grisescens (Gray Bat) is a federally endangered species distributed over the mid-South with a summer range that extends across the upper Tennessee River Basin, including southwest Virginia. Given the onset of White-nose Syndrome (WNS) in the Commonwealth in the winter of 2009, we initiated yearly surveys in late summer 2009 to monitor the status of known summer populations. Our objectives were to examine the relative health of these bats using body mass index (BMI), and determine any changes in juvenile recruitment across sites and years. We did not find any marked changes in BMI across years after WNS for Gray Bats. This finding suggests that surviving bats are either not negatively impacted by WNS or have recovered sufficiently by late summer as to not document obvious differences across years. After limiting our analyses of juvenile recruitment to only the individuals that we had definitively aged via backlit photos (2010–2014), we found a non-significant declining trend in juvenile recruitment; a trend that merits continued monitoring in the years to come. As Gray Bats have only recently shown to be susceptible to WNS infection, it is possible that observable population declines are forthcoming.

  16. Potential mechanisms of effects of serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate therapy in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Nelson; Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Harrington, Sean C; Eckert, Deborah; O'Neill, Jessica; Burton, Duane; Chen, Jun; Shaw, Audrey L; Acosta, Andres

    2017-03-01

    Serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate (SBI), an oral nutritional therapy, is efficacious in diverse diarrheal diseases. In an open-label study in 15 patients with irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea (IBS-D), we evaluated effects of SBI (5.0 g, twice a day) for 8 weeks on safety, on bowel function and abdominal pain, tryptophan metabolism (K:T ratio), intestinal permeability ( 13 C-mannitol and lactulose excretion), bile acid synthesis (fasting serum FGF-19 and C4), duodenal and stool microbiome, and the expression of 90 genes related to inflammation, immune function, and tight junctions in duodenal mucosa. Statistical analysis (paired tests, baseline vs. treatment) was based on intention to treat (ITT) principles. One of 15 Caucasian patients (13F, 2M, age 40.3 ± 2.3y, BMI 34.3 ± 3.0 kg/m 2 ) withdrew without completing studies. There were improvements in stools/day (decrease, P  D patients is associated with improved bowel function; the mechanism of benefit is unclear, though there were microbiota structure differences in duodenal brushings. Further studies in patients with low-grade inflammation and intestinal barrier dysfunction at baseline are indicated. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  17. Macroautophagy and Selective Mitophagy Ameliorate Chondrogenic Differentiation Potential in Adipose Stem Cells of Equine Metabolic Syndrome: New Findings in the Field of Progenitor Cells Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS is mainly characterized by insulin resistance, obesity, and local or systemic inflammation. That unfriendly environment of adipose tissue has huge impact on stem cells population (ASC residing within. In the present study, using molecular biology techniques and multiple imaging techniques (SEM, FIB-SEM, and confocal microscopy, we evaluated the impact of EMS on ASC viability and chondrogenic differentiation. Moreover, we visualized the mitochondrial network and dynamics in ASCCTRL and ASCEMS during control and chondrogenic conditions. In control conditions, ASCEMS were characterized by increased mitochondrial fission in comparison to ASCCTRL. We found that extensive remodeling of mitochondrial network including fusion and fission occurs during early step of differentiation. Moreover, we observed mitochondria morphology deterioration in ASCEMS. These conditions seem to cause autophagic shift in ASCEMS, as we observed increased accumulation of LAMP2 and formation of multiple autophagosomes in those cells, some of which contained dysfunctional mitochondria. “Autophagic” switch may be a rescue mechanism allowing ASCEMS to clear impaired by ROS proteins and mitochondria. Moreover it provides a precursors-to-macromolecules synthesis, especially during chondrogenesis. Our data indicates that autophagy in ASCEMS would be crucial for the quality control mechanisms and maintenance of cellular homeostasis ASCEMS allowing them to be in “stemness” status.

  18. Macroautophagy and Selective Mitophagy Ameliorate Chondrogenic Differentiation Potential in Adipose Stem Cells of Equine Metabolic Syndrome: New Findings in the Field of Progenitor Cells Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Kornicka, Katarzyna; Grzesiak, Jakub; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Szłapka, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is mainly characterized by insulin resistance, obesity, and local or systemic inflammation. That unfriendly environment of adipose tissue has huge impact on stem cells population (ASC) residing within. In the present study, using molecular biology techniques and multiple imaging techniques (SEM, FIB-SEM, and confocal microscopy), we evaluated the impact of EMS on ASC viability and chondrogenic differentiation. Moreover, we visualized the mitochondrial network and dynamics in ASC CTRL and ASC EMS during control and chondrogenic conditions. In control conditions, ASC EMS were characterized by increased mitochondrial fission in comparison to ASC CTRL . We found that extensive remodeling of mitochondrial network including fusion and fission occurs during early step of differentiation. Moreover, we observed mitochondria morphology deterioration in ASC EMS . These conditions seem to cause autophagic shift in ASC EMS , as we observed increased accumulation of LAMP2 and formation of multiple autophagosomes in those cells, some of which contained dysfunctional mitochondria. "Autophagic" switch may be a rescue mechanism allowing ASC EMS to clear impaired by ROS proteins and mitochondria. Moreover it provides a precursors-to-macromolecules synthesis, especially during chondrogenesis. Our data indicates that autophagy in ASC EMS would be crucial for the quality control mechanisms and maintenance of cellular homeostasis ASC EMS allowing them to be in "stemness" status.

  19. Potential Association between Breakfast Skipping and Concomitant Late-Night-Dinner Eating with Metabolic Syndrome and Proteinuria in the Japanese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayano Kutsuma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skipping breakfast is considered to be an unhealthy eating habit linked to predispositions to obesity and type 2 diabetes. Because eating dinner late at night can elicit subsequent breakfast skipping, we investigated if skipping breakfast concomitant with late-night-dinner eating (LNDE was associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS and proteinuria in the general Japanese population. We examined self-reported habitual breakfast skipping and LNDE, MetS (modified ATP-III criteria, and proteinuria in a cross-sectional study of 60,800 Japanese adults aged 20–75 years. A total of 14,068 subjects (23.1% skipped breakfast, of whom approximately half (52.8% skipped breakfast alone (without LNDE. The percentages of subjects who skipped breakfast showed a J-shaped relationship with body mass index (BMI. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that skipping breakfast concomitant with LNDE (n = 6,645 was significantly associated with MetS and proteinuria, even after adjusting for relevant confounders (odds ratio (95% CI, 1.17 (1.08–1.28, P=0.0003, and 1.37 (1.24–1.52, P<0.0001, resp.. Skipping breakfast alone and LNDE alone were not associated with MetS and proteinuria, respectively. In conclusion, habitual breakfast skipping concomitant with LNDE may represent poorer eating behavior than skipping breakfast alone, associated with MetS, asymptomatic proteinuria, obesity, and low body weight in the general Japanese population.

  20. Secreted phospholipase A2 is increased in meconium-stained amniotic fluid of term gestations: potential implications for the genesis of meconium aspiration syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Roberto; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Cortez, Josef; Park, Chan-Wook; Gonzalez, Rogelio; Behnke, Ernesto; Hassan, Sonia S; Gotsch, Francesca; Yeo, Lami; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn

    2014-07-01

    Meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) represents the passage of fetal colonic content into the amniotic cavity. Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a complication that occurs in a subset of infants with MSAF. Secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) is detected in meconium and is implicated in the development of MAS. The purpose of this study was to determine if sPLA2 concentrations are increased in the amniotic fluid of women in spontaneous labor at term with MSAF. This was a cross-sectional study of patients in spontaneous term labor who underwent amniocentesis (n = 101). The patients were divided into two study groups: (1) MSAF (n = 61) and (2) clear fluid (n = 40). The presence of bacteria and endotoxin as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and sPLA2 concentrations in the amniotic fluid were determined. Statistical analyses were performed to test for normality and bivariate analysis. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to study the relationship between sPLA2 and IL-6 concentrations in the amniotic fluid. Patients with MSAF have a higher median sPLA2 concentration (ng/mL) in amniotic fluid than those with clear fluid [1.7 (0.98-2.89) versus 0.3 (0-0.6), p meconium is aspirated before birth.

  1. Potential Harmful Effects of PM2.5 on Occurrence and Progression of Acute Coronary Syndrome: Epidemiology, Mechanisms, and Prevention Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Meng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The harmful effects of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of <2.5 µm (PM2.5 and its association with acute coronary syndrome (ACS has gained increased attention in recent years. Significant associations between PM2.5 and ACS have been found in most studies, although sometimes only observed in specific subgroups. PM2.5-induced detrimental effects and ACS arise through multiple mechanisms, including endothelial injury, an enhanced inflammatory response, oxidative stress, autonomic dysfunction, and mitochondria damage as well as genotoxic effects. These effects can lead to a series of physiopathological changes including coronary artery atherosclerosis, hypertension, an imbalance between energy supply and demand to heart tissue, and a systemic hypercoagulable state. Effective strategies to prevent the harmful effects of PM2.5 include reducing pollution sources of PM2.5 and population exposure to PM2.5, and governments and organizations publicizing the harmful effects of PM2.5 and establishing air quality standards for PM2.5. PM2.5 exposure is a significant risk factor for ACS, and effective strategies with which to prevent both susceptible and healthy populations from an increased risk for ACS have important clinical significance in the prevention and treatment of ACS.

  2. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  3. Ascher syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Zhai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ascher syndrome is a rare, benign skin disorder characterized by a double upper lip, blepharochalasis, and nontoxic enlargement of the thyroid gland. The exact cause is unknown, but it is considered to be a hereditary disease with an autosomal dominant trait. We report here a case of forme fruste Ascher syndrome in a 29-year-old man.

  4. Passwell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available There is an expanding list of syndromes that combine ichthyosis with neuroectodermal and mesodermal defects. We report a syndrome of congenital ichthyosis with atrophy, mental retardation, dwarfism, aminoaciduria, primary amenorrhoea and underdeveloped secondary sexual characters in a 38-year-old woman of non consanguinous parentage.

  5. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  6. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causing...

  7. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  8. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. × Definition Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. View Full Definition Treatment There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, ...

  9. Tradeoffs in fuel cycle performance for most promising options - 15346

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiwo, T.; Kim, T.K.; Feng, B.; Stauff, N.; Hoffman, E.; Ganda, F.; Todosow, M.; Brown, N.; Raitses, G.; Gehin, J.; Powers, J.; Youinou, G.; Hiruta, H.; Wigeland, R.

    2015-01-01

    A recent Evaluation and Screening (E/S) study of nuclear fuel cycle options was conducted by grouping all potential options into 40 Evaluation Groups (EGs) based on similarities in fundamental physics characteristics and fuel cycle performance. Through a rigorous evaluation process considering benefit and challenge metrics, 4 of these EGs were identified by the E/S study as 'most promising'. All 4 involve continuous recycle of U/Pu or U/TRU with natural uranium feed in fast critical reactors. However, these most promising EGs also include fuel cycle groups with variations on feed materials, neutron spectra, and reactor criticality. Therefore, the impacts of the addition of natural thorium fuel feed to a system that originally only used natural uranium fuel feed, using an intermediate spectrum instead of a fast spectrum, and using externally-driven systems versus critical reactors were evaluated. It was found that adding thorium to the natural uranium feed mixture leads to lower burnup, higher mass flows, and degrades fuel cycle benefit metrics (waste management, resource utilization, etc.) for fuel cycles that continuously recycle U/Pu or U/TRU. Adding thorium results in fissions of 233 U instead of just 239 Pu and in turn results in a lower average number of neutrons produced per absorption (η) for the fast reactor system. For continuous recycling systems, the lower η results in lower excess reactivity and subsequently lower achievable fuel burnup. This in turn leads to higher mass flows (fabrication, reprocessing, disposal, etc.) to produce a given amount of energy and subsequent lower metrics performance. The investigated fuel cycle options with intermediate spectrum reactors also exhibited degraded performance in the benefit metrics compared to fast spectrum reactors. Similarly, this is due to lower η values as the spectrum softens. The best externally-driven systems exhibited similar performance as fast critical reactors in terms of mass flows

  10. TAFRO Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is a common major complication in patients with advanced cirrhosis and generally indicates a poor prognosis when combined with liver failure. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is characterised by a combination of disturbances in circulatory and kidney function. Arterial pressure is decreased in the systemic circulation due to reduced total systemic vascular resistance. Kidney dysfunction is caused by reduction in renal blood flow. The diagnosis of HRS is based on exclusion of other disorders that cause acute kidney injury in cirrhosis as there are no specific tests. There are two types of HRS with different characteristics and prognostics. Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for all patients without contraindication. The best approach to the pharmacologic management is the administration vasoconstrictor drugs based on the pathogenesis. Many vasoconstrictors including vasopressin analogues (terlipressin, ornipressin and vasopressin, somatostatin analogues (octreotide and alpha-adrenergic analogues (midodrine and norepinephrine have been studied. In most of the studies intravenous albumin therapy was coadministered with vasoconstrictor drugs and suggested that albumin should be considered as the component of pharmacologic intervention in patients with HRS. Renal replacement therapy in the form of hemodialysis or continuous venovenous hemofiltration has been used in the management of HRS patients awaiting transplantation or in those with acute potentially reversible conditions. The artificial hepatic support systems require further investigation. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 37-44

  12. Enhancing crop innate immunity: new promising trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin-Yao eHuang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly exposed to potentially pathogenic microbes present in their surrounding environment. Due to the activation of the pattern-triggered immunity (PTI response that largely relies on accurate detection of pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, plants are resistant to the majority of potential pathogens. However, adapted pathogens may avoid recognition or repress plant PTI and resulting diseases significantly affect crop yield worldwide. PTI provides protection against a wide range of pathogens. Reinforcement of PTI through genetic engineering may thus generate crops with broad-spectrum field resistance. In this review, new approaches based on fundamental discoveries in PTI to improve crop immunity are discussed. Notably, we highlight recent studies describing the interfamily transfer of PRRs or key regulators of PTI signalling.

  13. BMI-1, a promising therapeutic target for human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, MIN-CONG; LI, CHUN-LI; CUI, JIE; JIAO, MIN; WU, TAO; JING, LI; NAN, KE-JUN

    2015-01-01

    BMI-1 oncogene is a member of the polycomb-group gene family and a transcriptional repressor. Overexpression of BMI-1 has been identified in various human cancer tissues and is known to be involved in cancer cell proliferation, cell invasion, distant metastasis, chemosensitivity and patient survival. Accumulating evidence has revealed that BMI-1 is also involved in the regulation of self-renewal, differentiation and tumor initiation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these biological processes remain unclear. The present review summarized the function of BMI-1 in different human cancer types and CSCs, and discussed the signaling pathways in which BMI-1 is potentially involved. In conclusion, BMI-1 may represent a promising target for the prevention and therapy of various cancer types. PMID:26622537

  14. Barium titanate nanoparticles: promising multitasking vectors in nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giada Graziana; Marino, Attilio; Rocca, Antonella; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2016-06-10

    Ceramic materials based on perovskite-like oxides have traditionally been the object of intense interest for their applicability in electrical and electronic devices. Due to its high dielectric constant and piezoelectric features, barium titanate (BaTiO3) is probably one of the most studied compounds of this family. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been focused on the exploitation of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) in the biomedical field, owing to the high biocompatibility of BTNPs and their peculiar non-linear optical properties that have encouraged their use as nanocarriers for drug delivery and as label-free imaging probes. In this review, we summarize all the recent findings about these 'smart' nanoparticles, including the latest, most promising potential as nanotransducers for cell stimulation.

  15. [Nanotechnology offers a promising therapeutic approach for hypertension treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Giménez, V M; Kassuha, D; Manucha, W

    Hypertension is a medical condition considered one of the most important public health problems in developed countries, affecting around one billion people. Therefore, the study of its mechanisms, development and treatment is a priority. Of particular interest are the multiple contributing factors, and efforts by experts to fully understand it are also important. However, studies are currently insufficient and consequently, attention is focused on the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. This raises a growing interest in nanotechnology given the ability of certain structures to mimic the behavior of extracellular matrices. This opens a promising field in the treatment of diseases such as hypertension, where it stands to tissue engineering and its potential applications incorporating concepts such as controlled release drug, reduced side effects and receptor activation locally. Copyright © 2016 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene therapy for the inner ear: challenges and promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Allen F; Dazert, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Since the recognition of genes as the discrete units of heritability, and of DNA as their molecular substrate, the utilization of genes for therapeutic purposes has been recognized as a potential means of correcting genetic disorders. The tools of molecular biology, which allow the manipulation of DNA sequence, provided the means to put this concept into practice. However, progress in the implementation of these ideas has been slow. Here we review the history of the idea of gene therapy and the complexity of genetic disorders. We also discuss the requirements for sequence-based therapy to be accomplished for different types of inherited diseases, as well as the methods available for gene manipulation. The challenges that have limited the applications of gene therapy are reviewed, as are ethical concerns. Finally, we discuss the promise of gene therapy to address inherited and acquired disorders of the inner ear. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The promises and prospects of worldwide wireless power transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Voorhies, K.L.; Smith, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The promise of worldwide wireless power transfer began with the pioneering work of Nikola Tesla about 100 years ago. His principal approach is summarized. The viability of such a system must still be demonstrated and many questions remain. Potentially, a wireless system can transfer power more efficiently and flexibly, especially to and from remote regions. This paper includes principle elements of worldwide wireless power transfer: the source: an oscillator/transmitter, the path: the cavity bounded by the earth and the ionosphere, and the receiver: a means of extracting power from the path. The system transfers and stores energy via the resonance modes of the cavity. The key challenges facing demonstration of technical feasibility are in finding an efficient means of coupling power into and out of the earth-ionosphere cavity, and in devising a feasible receiver that is both small and efficient. Along with demonstrating technical feasibility, new research must consider safety, environmental impact, susceptibility to weather, and effects on weather

  18. Newly Emerging Immune Checkpoints: Promises for Future Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Torphy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy has been a great breakthrough, with immune checkpoint inhibitors leading the way. Despite the clinical effectiveness of certain immune checkpoint inhibitors, the overall response rate remains low, and the effectiveness of immunotherapies for many tumors has been disappointing. There is substantial interest in looking for additional immune checkpoint molecules that may act as therapeutic targets for cancer. Recent advances during the last decade have identified several novel immune checkpoint targets, including lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3, B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA, programmed death-1 homolog (PD-1H, T-cell immunoglobulin and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif domain (TIM-3/carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1, and the poliovirus receptor (PVR-like receptors. The investigations into these molecules have generated promising results in preclinical studies. Herein, we will summarize our current progress and understanding of these newly-characterized immune checkpoints and their potential application in cancer immunotherapy.

  19. The multi-omics promise in context

    OpenAIRE

    Gutleben, Johanna; Chaib De Mares, Maryam; Elsas, van, Jan Dirk; Smidt, Hauke; Overmann, Jörg; Sipkema, Detmer

    2018-01-01

    The numbers and diversity of microbes in ecosystems within and around us is unmatched, yet most of these microorganisms remain recalcitrant to in vitro cultivation. Various high-throughput molecular techniques, collectively termed multi-omics, provide insights into the genomic structure and metabolic potential as well as activity of complex microbial communities. Nonetheless, pure or defined cultures are needed to (1) decipher microbial physiology and thus test multi-omics-based ecological hy...

  20. Seaweed: Promising plant of the millennium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.; Pereira, N.

    marine organisms for drugs, we have not yet made any substantial breakthrough in this field. Preliminary clinical trials have shown the effectiveness of seaweeds on human hleath. There exist great potential for developing drugs to treat cancer, AIDS... in food products : biochemical and nutritional aspects. Trend in food Science and Technology, 4(4), 103-107, 1993. 16. A. Kjaervik, Seaweed fight diabetes and thicken cat food. Gemini Magazine. Dec. 1993. 17. J. Tease, J. Nutri, Cancer, 4(3), 217...

  1. Empagliflozin lessened cardiac injury and reduced visceral adipocyte hypertrophy in prediabetic rats with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaka, Hiroaki; Koibuchi, Nobutaka; Hasegawa, Yu; Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2016-11-11

    The potential benefit of SGLT2 inhibitors in metabolic syndrome is with prediabetic stage unclear. This work was undertaken to investigate the non-glycemic effect of empagliflozin on metabolic syndrome rats with prediabetes. SHR/NDmcr-cp(+/+) rats (SHRcp), a model of metabolic syndrome with prediabetes, were given empagliflozin for 10 weeks to examine the effects on urinary sodium and water balance, visceral and subcutaneous adipocyte, and cardiac injury. Further, the effect of empagliflozin on blood pressure and autonomic nervous system was continuously investigated by using radiotelemetry system. Empagliflozin significantly reduced urinary sodium and water balance of SHRcp only within 1 week of the treatment, but later than 1 week did not alter them throughout the treatment. Empagliflozin significantly reduced body weight of SHRcp, which was mainly attributed to the significant reduction of subcutaneous fat mass. Empagliflozin significantly reduced the size of visceral adipocytes and increased the number of smaller size of adipocytes, which was associated with the attenuation of oxidative stress. Empagliflozin ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis of SHRcp, in association with the attenuation of cardiac oxidative stress and inflammation. However, empagliflozin did not significantly change blood pressure, heart rate, sympathetic activity, or baroreceptor function, as evidenced by radiotelemetry analysis. Our present work provided the evidence that SGLT2 inhibition reduced visceral adipocytes hypertrophy and ameliorated cardiac injury in prediabetic metabolic syndrome rat, independently of diuretic effect or blood pressure lowering effect. Thus, SGLT2 inhibition seems to be a promising therapeutic strategy for prediabetic metabolic syndrome.

  2. Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Room Spotlight on Research Spotlight on Research Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder ... are under development. One promising approach involves protein replacement. Previous research has suggested that replacing the missing ...

  3. Histamine and histamine receptors in Tourette syndrome and other neuropsychiatric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Pittenger, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    The potential contributions of dysregulation of the brain's histaminergic modulatory system to neuropsychiatric disease, and the potential of histamine-targeting medications as therapeutic agents, are gradually coming into focus. The H3R receptor, which is expressed primarily in the central nervous system, is a promising pharmacotherapeutic target. Recent evidence for a contribution of histamine dysregulation to Tourette syndrome and tic disorders is particularly strong; although specific mutations in histamine-associated genes are rare, they have led to informative studies in animal models that may pave the way for therapeutic advances. A controlled study of an H3R antagonist in Tourette syndrome is ongoing. Preclinical studies of H3R antagonists in schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder, and narcolepsy have all shown promise. Recently reported controlled studies have been disappointing in schizophrenia and attention deficit disorder, but the H3R antagonist pitolisant shows promise in the treatment of narcolepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness and is currently under regulatory review for these conditions. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inhibition of porcine detrusor contractility by the flavonoid fraction of Bryophyllum pinnatum--a potential phytotherapeutic drug for the treatment of the overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürer, K; Eberli, D; Betschart, C; Brenneisen, R; De Mieri, M; Hamburger, M; Mennet-von Eiff, M; Potterat, O; Schnelle, M; Simões-Wüst, A P; von Mandach, U

    2015-01-15

    To determine if the phytotherapeutic agent, Bryophyllum pinnatum, could serve as an alternative drug for the overactive bladder syndrome, and to characterise the fraction responsible for the inhibition of detrusor contractility. Fractions were prepared from the MeOH extract of B. pinnatum and further analysed by HPLC-PDA-MS. Detrusor muscle strips were prepared from porcine bladders and the electrically induced muscle contractility measured by organ bath. The effect of B. pinnatum leaf press juice (2.5-10%), a flavonoid fraction (0.1-1 mg/ml), and a bufadienolide fraction (0.1-40 μg/ml) on detrusor contractility was assessed and compared with controls (polar fraction (0.5-5 mg/ml) and oxybutynin (10(-8)-10(-6) M)). The press juice, at a concentration of 10% led to a reduction of detrusor contractility. Bladder strips treated with the flavonoid fraction showed a significant reduction of the contractility to 21.3 ± 5.2% (1 mg/ml) while the bufadienolide fraction had no inhibitory effect in the investigated concentrations. The polar fraction showed a reduction of the contractility in a pH-dependent fashion. At 10(-6) M concentration oxybutynin reduced the detrusor contractility to 21.9 ± 4.7%. The flavonoid fraction of Bryophyllum pinnatum reduces the porcine detrusor contractility in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Fractions from B. pinnatum may be a new pharmacological approach for the treatment of OAB. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Evaluating the potential synergistic benefit of a realignment brace on patients receiving exercise therapy for patellofemoral pain syndrome: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Wolf; Ellermann, Andree; Rembitzki, Ingo Volker; Scheffler, Sven; Herbort, Mirco; Brüggemann, Gert Peter; Best, Raymond; Zantop, Thore; Liebau, Christian

    2016-07-01

    It has been previously shown that exercise programs for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) can be supported by medially directed taping. Evidence supporting the use of patellar braces is limited because previous studies have been low quality. The aim of this study is to compare the outcomes of patients with PFPS after treatment with a medially directed patellar realignment brace and supervised exercise. In a prospective randomized multicenter trial, 156 patients with PFPS were included and randomly assigned to 6 weeks of supervised physiotherapy in combination with the patellar realignment brace, or supervised physiotherapy alone. Outcome measures were the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscales, numeric analog pain scores, and the Kujala score at baseline, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year after the start of therapy. The patient's self-reported perception of recovery was also assessed at these points. Both treatment groups showed a significant improvement in all outcome measures over the study period. After 6 and 12 weeks of therapy, patients in the brace group had significantly higher KOOS sub-scale scores, a higher mean Kujala score, and less pain while climbing stairs or playing sports. After 54 weeks a group difference could be only detected for the KOOS ADL sub-scale. The use of a medially directed realignment brace leads to better outcomes in patients with PFPS than exercise alone after 6 and 12 weeks of treatment. After 1 year of follow-up this positive effect diminished.

  6. Diagnostic values of chest pain history, ECG, troponin and clinical gestalt in patients with chest pain and potential acute coronary syndrome assessed in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Arash; Dryver, Eric; Söderholm, Martin; Ekelund, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    In the assessment of chest pain patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the emergency department (ED), physicians rely on global diagnostic impressions ('gestalt'). The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of the ED physician's overall assessment of ACS likelihood, and the values of the main diagnostic modalities underlying this assessment, namely the chest pain history, the ECG and the initial troponin result. 1,151 consecutive ED chest pain patients were prospectively included. The ED physician's interpretation of the chest pain history, the ECG, and the global likelihood of ACS were recorded on special forms. The discharge diagnoses were retrieved from the medical records. A chart review was carried out to determine whether patients with a non-ACS diagnosis at the index visit had ACS or suffered cardiac death within 30 days. The gestalt was better than its components both at ruling in ("Obvious ACS", LR 29) and at ruling out ("No Suspicion of ACS", LR 0.01) ACS. In the "Strong suspicion of ACS" group, 60% of the patients did not have ACS. A positive TnT (LR 24.9) and an ischemic ECG (LR 8.3) were strong predictors of ACS and seemed superior to pain history for ruling in ACS. In patients with a normal TnT and non-ischemic ECG, chest pain history typical of AMI was not a significant predictor of AMI (LR 1.9) while pain history typical of unstable angina (UA) was a moderate predictor of UA (LR 4.7). Clinical gestalt was better than its components both at ruling in and at ruling out ACS, but overestimated the likelihood of ACS when cases were assessed as strong suspicion of ACS. Among the components of the gestalt, TnT and ECG were superior to the chest pain history for ruling in ACS, while pain history was superior for ruling out ACS.

  7. Elevated Urine Levels of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Inflammatory Bladder Conditions: a Potential Biomarker for a Subgroup of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Pedro L; Preston, David M; Moldwin, Robert M; Erickson, Deborah R; Mowlazadeh, Behzad; Ma, Fei; Kouzoukas, Dimitrios E; Meyer-Siegler, Katherine L; Fall, Magnus

    2018-03-23

    (1) Objectives: To investigate whether urinary levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) are elevated in Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS) patients with Hunner lesions and also whether urine MIF is elevated in other forms of inflammatory cystitis. (2) Methods: Urine samples were assayed for MIF by ELISA. Urine samples from three female groups were examined: IC/BPS patients without (N=55) and with Hunner lesions (N=43); Non-IC/BPS patients (N=100; control group; no history of IC/BPS; cancer or recent bacterial cystitis). Urine samples from three male groups were examined: patients with bacterial cystitis (N=50), radiation cystitis (N=18) and non-cystitis patients (N = 119; control group; negative for bacterial cystitis). (3) Results: Urine MIF (Mean MIF pg/ml ± SEM) was increased in female IC/BPS patients with Hunner lesions (2159 ± 435.3) compared to IC/BPS patients without Hunner lesions (460 ± 114.5) or non- IC/BPS patients (414 ± 47.6). Receiver-operating curve analyses showed that urine MIF levels discriminated between the two IC groups (AUC = 72%; CI: 61-82%). Male patients with bacterial and radiation cystitis had elevated urine MIF levels (2839 ± 757.1 and 4404 ± 1548.1; respectively) compared to non-cystitis patients (681 ± 75.2). (4) Conclusions: Urine MIF is elevated in IC/BPS patients with Hunner lesions and also in patients with other bladder inflammatory and painful conditions. MIF also may serve as a noninvasive biomarker to select IC/BPS patients more accurately for endoscopic evaluation and possible anti-inflammatory treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Case report: waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumayas, Grace Lea; Capó-Aponte, José E

    2015-03-01

    A case of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 is described and relevant literature is reviewed to raise awareness about this rare syndrome, including the classification of each subtype and the differentiating clinical manifestations. A 44-year-old African-American female presented for a routine evaluation with hearing loss, dystopia canthorum (W index = 2.74), and almost complete gray hair. In addition, she presented with heterochromia irides, different fundus pigmentation between eyes. The patient did not have any upper limbs defect, cranial skeletal abnormalities, or intestinal disorders. Facial abnormalities and a white forelock are prominent features difficult to overlook during a routine ophthalmological examination. A careful medical history in patients with suspected Waardenburg syndrome is important to accurately classify this rare condition and to identify potential systemic implications associated to each subtype. The associated systemic complications can be addressed and managed through referral to the appropriate subspecialties. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  9. Advances, challenges, and promises in pediatric neuroimaging of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Haley M; Kana, Rajesh K

    2018-03-31

    Recent years have witnessed the proliferation of neuroimaging studies of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), particularly of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and Tourette's syndrome (TS). Neuroimaging offers immense potential in understanding the biology of these disorders, and how it relates to clinical symptoms. Neuroimaging techniques, in the long run, may help identify neurobiological markers to assist clinical diagnosis and treatment. However, methodological challenges have affected the progress of clinical neuroimaging. This paper reviews the methodological challenges involved in imaging children with NDDs. Specific topics include correcting for head motion, normalization using pediatric brain templates, accounting for psychotropic medication use, delineating complex developmental trajectories, and overcoming smaller sample sizes. The potential of neuroimaging-based biomarkers and the utility of implementing neuroimaging in a clinical setting are also discussed. Data-sharing approaches, technological advances, and an increase in the number of longitudinal, prospective studies are recommended as future directions. Significant advances have been made already, and future decades will continue to see innovative progress in neuroimaging research endeavors of NDDs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Legal implications of translational promises of unproven stem cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The promise stem cell therapy holds for curing diseases for which no therapy currently exists is often translated as fact. Unfortunately, enforced misconceptions between fact and promise often also translate into exploitation and harming of patients. This article aims to clear up misconceptions about the biological promise ...

  11. Marfan syndrome: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Guglielmina; Giusti, Betti; Sticchi, Elena; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Nistri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a pleiotropic connective tissue disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, due to mutations in the FBN1 gene encoding fibrillin 1. It is an important protein of the extracellular matrix that contributes to the final structure of a microfibril. Few cases displaying an autosomal recessive transmission are reported in the world. The FBN1 gene, which is made of 66 exons, is located on chromosome 15q21.1. This review, after an introduction on the clinical manifestations that leads to the diagnosis of MFS, focuses on cardiovascular manifestations, pharmacological and surgical therapies of thoracic aortic aneurysm and/or dissection (TAAD), mechanisms underlying the progression of aneurysm or of acute dissection, and biomarkers associated with progression of TAADs. A Dutch group compared treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker, vs no other additional treatment (COMPARE clinical trial). They observed that losartan reduces the aortic dilatation rate in patients with Marfan syndrome. Later on, they also reported that losartan exerts a beneficial effect on patients with Marfan syndrome carrying an FBN1 mutation that causes haploinsufficiency (quantitative mutation), while it has no significant effect on patients displaying dominant negative (qualitative) mutations. Moreover, a French group in a 3-year trial compared the administration of losartan vs placebo in patients with Marfan syndrome under treatment with beta-receptor blockers. They observed that losartan decreases blood pressure but has no effect on aortic diameter progression. Thus, beta-receptor blockers remain the gold standard therapy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Three potential biochemical markers are mentioned in this review: total homocysteine, serum transforming growth factor beta, and lysyl oxidase. Moreover, markers of oxidative stress measured in plasma, previously correlated with clinical features of Marfan syndrome, may be explored as potential

  12. Marfan syndrome: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Guglielmina; Giusti, Betti; Sticchi, Elena; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Nistri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a pleiotropic connective tissue disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, due to mutations in the FBN1 gene encoding fibrillin 1. It is an important protein of the extracellular matrix that contributes to the final structure of a microfibril. Few cases displaying an autosomal recessive transmission are reported in the world. The FBN1 gene, which is made of 66 exons, is located on chromosome 15q21.1. This review, after an introduction on the clinical manifestations that leads to the diagnosis of MFS, focuses on cardiovascular manifestations, pharmacological and surgical therapies of thoracic aortic aneurysm and/or dissection (TAAD), mechanisms underlying the progression of aneurysm or of acute dissection, and biomarkers associated with progression of TAADs. A Dutch group compared treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker, vs no other additional treatment (COMPARE clinical trial). They observed that losartan reduces the aortic dilatation rate in patients with Marfan syndrome. Later on, they also reported that losartan exerts a beneficial effect on patients with Marfan syndrome carrying an FBN1 mutation that causes haploinsufficiency (quantitative mutation), while it has no significant effect on patients displaying dominant negative (qualitative) mutations. Moreover, a French group in a 3-year trial compared the administration of losartan vs placebo in patients with Marfan syndrome under treatment with beta-receptor blockers. They observed that losartan decreases blood pressure but has no effect on aortic diameter progression. Thus, beta-receptor blockers remain the gold standard therapy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Three potential biochemical markers are mentioned in this review: total homocysteine, serum transforming growth factor beta, and lysyl oxidase. Moreover, markers of oxidative stress measured in plasma, previously correlated with clinical features of Marfan syndrome, may be explored as potential

  13. Prosecuting the Leaders: Promises, Politics and Practicalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Cryer

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Given recent developments in relation to the prosecution of international crimes,  it might be thought that one of the last bastions of sovereignty has been breached, and international criminal law has not only entrenched itself in international law. Indeed further to this, it has assumed a supranational position that stands entirely above States, promising justice for all and as a trump card over depredations committed in the name of State sovereignty. After all, Charles Taylor from Liberia is standing trial before the Special Court for Sierra Leone, Slobodan Milošević only escaped judgment by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former

  14. Biosurfactants: Promising Molecules for Petroleum Biotechnology Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DARNE GERMANO DE ALMEIDA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The growing global demand for sustainable technologies that improves the efficiency of petrochemical processes in the oil industry has driven advances in petroleum biotechnology in recent years. Petroleum industry uses substantial amounts of petrochemical-based synthetic surfactants in its activities as mobilizing agents to increase the availability or recovery of hydrocarbons as well as many other applications related to extraction, treatment, cleaning and transportation. However, biosurfactants have several potential applications for use across the oil processing chain and in the formulations of petrochemical products such as emulsifying/demulsifying agents, anticorrosive, biocides for sulphate-reducing bacteria, fuel formulation, extraction of bitumen from tar sands and many other innovative applications. Due to their versatility and proven efficiency, biosurfactants are often presented as valuable versatile tools that can transform and modernise petroleum biotechnology in an attempt to provide a true picture of state of the art and directions or use in the oil industry. We believe that biosurfactants are going to have a significant role in many future applications in the oil industries and in this review therefore, we highlight recent important relevant applications, patents disclosures and potential future applications for biosurfactants in petroleum and related industries.

  15. Biosurfactants: Promising Molecules for Petroleum Biotechnology Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Almeida, Darne G; Soares Da Silva, Rita de Cássia F; Luna, Juliana M; Rufino, Raquel D; Santos, Valdemir A; Banat, Ibrahim M; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2016-01-01

    The growing global demand for sustainable technologies that improves the efficiency of petrochemical processes in the oil industry has driven advances in petroleum biotechnology in recent years. Petroleum industry uses substantial amounts of petrochemical-based synthetic surfactants in its activities as mobilizing agents to increase the availability or recovery of hydrocarbons as well as many other applications related to extraction, treatment, cleaning, and transportation. However, biosurfactants have several potential applications for use across the oil processing chain and in the formulations of petrochemical products such as emulsifying/demulsifying agents, anticorrosive, biocides for sulfate-reducing bacteria, fuel formulation, extraction of bitumen from tar sands, and many other innovative applications. Due to their versatility and proven efficiency, biosurfactants are often presented as valuable versatile tools that can transform and modernize petroleum biotechnology in an attempt to provide a true picture of state of the art and directions or use in the oil industry. We believe that biosurfactants are going to have a significant role in many future applications in the oil industries and in this review therefore, we highlight recent important relevant applications, patents disclosures and potential future applications for biosurfactants in petroleum and related industries.

  16. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  17. Bouveret's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, A.; Hasan, Z.; Saeed, A.; Abdullah, K.

    2008-01-01

    Gastric Outlet Obstruction (GOO) due to impaction of a gallstone in the duodenum after migration through a bilioduodenal fistula is known as Bouveret's syndrome. Its clinical symptoms are entirely vague and nonspecific. Because of its rarity, insidiousness and unpredictable symptomatology. Bouveret's syndrome is never thought of in the differential diagnosis as aetiology of gastric outlet obstruction. Recent advances in fiberoptics technology, advent of modern imaging modalities and minimally-invasive techniques like endoscopy and laparoscopy has brought a great revolution in the management of Bouveret's syndrome and have tremendously decreased morbidity and mortality associated with this rare clinical entity. (author)

  18. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  19. Cowden syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Prakash S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with variable expressions that result mainly from mutation in the PTEN gene on arm 10q. It is characterized by multiple hamartomatous neoplasms of the skin, oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, bones, CNS, eyes, and genitourinary tract. Mucocutaneous features include trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomatosis, acral keratosis, and palmoplantar keratosis. Here we present a case of Cowden syndrome in a 14-year-old female patient with the chief complaint of multiple oral papillomatous lesions.

  20. Ethanol-induced impairment of polyamine homeostasis – A potential cause of neural tube defect and intrauterine growth restriction in fetal alcohol syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghighi Poodeh, Saeid, E-mail: saeid.haghighi@oulu.fi [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland); Alhonen, Leena [Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, A.I. Virtanen Institute for Molecular Sciences, Kuopio (Finland); School of Pharmacy, Biocenter Kuopio, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Salonurmi, Tuire; Savolainen, Markku J. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Medical Research Center, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu (Finland)

    2014-03-28

    stage is so vulnerable to the development of neural tube defect, and growth restriction, the findings previously observed in fetal alcohol syndrome.

  1. Potential contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage associated molecular patterns in transfusion products to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome after multiple transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Jon D; Lee, Yann-Leei L; Pastukh, Viktor M; Capley, Gina; Muscat, Cherry A; Muscat, David C; Marshall, Michael L; Brevard, Sidney B; Gillespie, Mark N

    2017-06-01

    Massive transfusions are accompanied by an increased incidence of a particularly aggressive and lethal form of acute lung injury (delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury) which occurs longer than 24 hours after transfusions. In light of recent reports showing that mitochondrial (mt)DNA damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are potent proinflammatory mediators, and that their abundance in the sera of severely injured or septic patients is predictive of clinical outcomes, we explored the idea that mtDNA DAMPs are present in transfusion products and are associated with the occurrence of delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury. We prospectively enrolled fourteen consecutive severely injured patients that received greater than three units of blood transfusion products and determined if the total amount of mtDNA DAMPs delivered during transfusion correlated with serum mtDNA DAMPs measured after the last transfusion, and whether the quantity of mtDNA DAMPs in the serum-predicted development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We found detectable levels of mtDNA DAMPs in packed red blood cells (3 ± 0.4 ng/mL), fresh frozen plasma (213.7 ± 65 ng/mL), and platelets (94.8 ± 69.2), with the latter two transfusion products containing significant amounts of mtDNA fragments. There was a linear relationship between the mtDNA DAMPs given during transfusion and the serum concentration of mtDNA fragments (R = 0.0.74, p DAMPs in serum measured at 24 hours after transfusion predicted the occurrence of ARDS (9.9 ± 1.4 vs. 3.3 ± 0.9, p DAMPs administered during transfusion may be a determinant of serum mtDNA DAMP levels, and that serum levels of mtDNA DAMPs after multiple transfusions may predict the development of ARDS. Collectively, these findings support the idea that mtDNA DAMPs in transfusion products significantly contribute to the incidence of ARDS after massive transfusions. Prognostic study, level II; therapeutic study, level II.

  2. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search FAQs Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Patient Education FAQs Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish ...

  3. Metformin: A Hopeful Promise in Aging Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelle, Marta G.; Ali, Ahmed; Diéguez, Carlos; Bernier, Michel; de Cabo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Even though the inevitable process of aging by itself cannot be considered a disease, it is directly linked to life span and is the driving force behind all age-related diseases. It is an undisputable fact that age-associated diseases are among the leading causes of death in the world, primarily in industrialized countries. During the last several years, an intensive search of antiaging treatments has led to the discovery of a variety of drugs that promote health span and/or life extension. The biguanide compound metformin is widely used for treating people with type 2 diabetes and appears to show protection against cancer, inflammation, and age-related pathologies. Here, we summarize the recent developments about metformin use in translational aging research and discuss its role as a potential geroprotector. PMID:26931809

  4. Prenatal Diagnosis of WAGR Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrin Tezcan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilm’s tumour, aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation (WAGR syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 500,000 to 1 million. It is a contiguous gene syndrome due to deletion at chromosome 11p13 in a region containing WT1 and PAX6 genes. Children with WAGR syndrome mostly present in the newborn/infancy period with sporadic aniridia. The genotypic defects in WAGR syndrome have been well established. However, antenatal ultrasonographic presentation of this syndrome has never been reported. Prenatal diagnosis of this condition is possible in some cases with careful ultrasound examination of classical and nonclassical manifestations of this syndrome. The key point for this rare diagnosis was the decision to perform chromosomal microarray analysis after antenatal diagnosis of absent corpus callosum and absent cavum septum pellucidum, as this finding mandates search for potentially associated genetic disorders. We report a case of WAGR syndrome diagnosed prenatally at 29-week gestation. The diagnosis of the anomaly was based on two- and three-dimensional ultrasound as well as fetal MRI scan and microarray analysis. The ultrasonographic findings included borderline ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, and absent cavum septum pellucidum. Cytogenetic results from the amniotic fluid confirmed WAGR syndrome. Parental karyotype was normal, with no evidence of copy number change, deletion, or rearrangement of this region of chromosome 11.

  5. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vomiting Diarrhea Reye's syndrome Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  6. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... girls and women with TS may have low self- esteem, anxiety, or depression. How is Turner syndrome diagnosed? ... to active partners in their health care. This fact sheet is also available in Spanish at www. ...

  7. Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have equally severe disease. Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females ... and girls have hearing loss during childhood. With ADAS, it occurs later in life. Hearing loss usually ...

  8. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and social development; hypotonia (low muscle tone), and speech impairments. Clumsiness, an awkward gait, and unusual aggressiveness or irritability may also occur. Although most cases of Sotos syndrome occur sporadically (meaning they are not known to be inherited), familial ...

  9. Potter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter phenotype ... In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is ... kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine). Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that ...

  10. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... signs and symptoms may differ, based on age, gender and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, ... prevention and treatment of kidney disease. The Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Charity Seal provides the ...

  11. Gilbert's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor before taking new medications. Also, having certain types of Gilbert's syndrome may increase your risk of ... of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  12. Compartment syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... term (chronic) compartment syndrome can be caused by repetitive activities, such as running. The pressure in a compartment ... or loosened to relieve the pressure Stopping the repetitive activity or exercise, or changing the way it's done ...

  13. Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See More About Research The NINDS supports and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Aicardi syndrome. The goals of this research are to locate and understand ... Publications Definition Aicardi ...

  14. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... swallow. Some babies will be born with glaucoma, retinal degeneration, and impaired hearing. Jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding also may occur. Treatment There is no cure for Zellweger syndrome, nor ...

  15. Gerstmann's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drawings. Frequently, there is also an impairment in reading. Children with a high level of intellectual functioning as well as those with brain damage may be affected with the disorder. × Definition Gerstmann's syndrome is a cognitive impairment that results ...

  16. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with age. Decline in hearing and vision varies. Children with type 3 Usher syndrome often develop hearing loss by adolescence, requiring hearing aids by mid-to-late adulthood. Night blindness also usually begins during adolescence. Blind spots appear ...

  17. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may order additional tests. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans cannot diagnose piriformis syndrome, ... you are sitting, driving or standing. Don’t lift by bending over. Lift an object by bending ...

  18. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have an increased risk of an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) due to the autoimmune disorder Hashimoto's thyroiditis. They also have an increased risk of diabetes. Some women with Turner syndrome have gluten intolerance (celiac disease) or inflammatory bowel disease. Skeletal ...

  19. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now What Is Reye’s Syndrome? ...

  20. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Alagille Syndrome Back Alagille ...

  1. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mellitus High blood pressure (hypertension) Increased cholesterol and triglycerides (hyperlipidemia) Women with Cushing syndrome may have: Excess ... Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine, ...

  2. Stem cell therapy in spinal cord injury: Hollow promise or promising science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Goel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI remains one of the most physically, psychologically and socially debilitating conditions worldwide. While rehabilitation measures may help limit disability to some extent, there is no effective primary treatment yet available. The efficacy of stem cells as a primary therapeutic option in spinal cord injury is currently an area under much scrutiny and debate. Several laboratory and some primary clinical studies into the use of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells or embryonic stem cell-derived oligodentrocyte precursor cells have shown some promising results in terms of remyelination and regeneration of damaged spinal nerve tracts. More recently,laboratory and early clinical experiments into the use of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells, a type of glial cell derived from olfactory bulb and mucosa have provided some phenomenal preliminary evidence as to their neuroregenerative and neural bridging capacity. This report compares and evaluates some current research into selected forms of embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell therapy as well as olfactory ensheathing cell therapy in SCI, and also highlights some legal and ethical issues surrounding their use. While early results shows promise, more rigorous large scaleclinical trials are needed to shed light on the safety, efficacy and long term viability of stem cell and cellular transplant techniques in SCI.

  3. Justicidin B: A Promising Bioactive Lignan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Hemmati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adverse effects and drug resistance to the current onchopharmacologicals have increased the demand for alternative novel therapeutics. We herein introduce justicidin B, an arylnaphthalen lignan isolated from different plant origins, especially Justicia, Phyllanthus, Haplophyllum and Linum species. This cyclolignan exhibits a wide array of biological properties ranges from piscicidal to antifungal, antiviral and antibacterial activities. Activity against Trypanosoma brucei makes justicidin B a potential antiprotozoal agent for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases. Pharmacological properties like antiplatelet, anti-inflammatory and bone resorption inhibition have been also attributed to justicidin B. This compound is a potent cytotoxic substance on several cell lines, especially chronic myeloid and chronic lymphoid leukemia. Pharmacological values, natural variation, as well as biotechnological production of justicidin B by plant cell, tissue and organ culture are also described in this review. Chemical characteristics and chromatographic methods to identify justicidin B and its biosynthetic pathway have been discussed. Different approaches to the total synthesis of justicidin B are compared. This review would shed light on the role of justicidin B as an intriguing natural compound and provides a chance to optimize conditions for industrial applications.

  4. Ethnography in community psychology: promises and tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Andrew D; Todd, Nathan R; Kral, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Community psychology recognizes the need for research methods that illuminate context, culture, diversity, and process. One such method, ethnography, has crossed into multiple disciplines from anthropology, and indeed, community psychologists are becoming community ethnographers. Ethnographic work stands at the intersection of bridging universal questions with the particularities of people and groups bounded in time, geographic location, and social location. Ethnography is thus historical and deeply contextual, enabling a rich, in-depth understanding of communities that is aligned with the values and goals of community psychology. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the potential of ethnography for community psychology and to encourage its use within the field as a method to capture culture and context, to document process, and to reveal how social change and action occur within and through communities. We discuss the method of ethnography, draw connections to community psychology values and goals, and identify tensions from our experiences doing ethnography. Overall, we assert that ethnography is a method that resonates with community psychology and present this paper as a resource for those interested in using this method in their research or community activism.

  5. Realizing the promise of breast cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Erica Jackson, Hatem SolimanUniversity of South Florida/Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Breast cancer vaccines are being developed to stimulate adaptive antitumor immune responses in patients. These vaccines have the potential to treat breast cancer with minimal side effects and toxicity. However, many obstacles still need to be overcome to fully realize the vaccines' clinical benefit. A review of the literature was conducted to assess the use of vaccines in targeting transformed cells. Four vaccines currently under study were discussed, each summarizing the different vaccine platforms used to introduce target antigen to the patient's immune system. The advantages and disadvantages of each method were discussed, although no one method was found to be superior. Additional issues addressed included overcoming tumor-induced immunosuppression, immune evasion of transformed cells, the use of vaccines in combination therapy, and the challenges of using these vaccines in various clinical settings. Vaccines may be most effective in patients with minimal residual disease, as opposed to using them in the metastatic setting. Also, specific clinical trial design considerations for the use of vaccines in cancer patients, such as time-to-failure end points, were discussed. Understanding these various elements will be important to the translation of breast cancer vaccine therapy into routine clinical practice.Keywords: breast cancer, vaccine, immunotherapy, immune tolerance, peptide vaccine, dendritic cell vaccine

  6. Routinely collected data for randomized trials: promises, barriers, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Cord, Kimberly A; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Treweek, Shaun; Gardner, Heidi; Strech, Daniel; Whiteley, William; Ioannidis, John P A; Hemkens, Lars G

    2018-01-11

    Routinely collected health data (RCD) are increasingly used for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This can provide three major benefits: increasing value through better feasibility (reducing costs, time, and resources), expanding the research agenda (performing trials for research questions otherwise not amenable to trials), and offering novel design and data collection options (e.g., point-of-care trials and other designs directly embedded in routine care). However, numerous hurdles and barriers must be considered pertaining to regulatory, ethical, and data aspects, as well as the costs of setting up the RCD infrastructure. Methodological considerations may be different from those in traditional RCTs: RCD are often collected by individuals not involved in the study and who are therefore blinded to the allocation of trial participants. Another consideration is that RCD trials may lead to greater misclassification biases or dilution effects, although these may be offset by randomization and larger sample sizes. Finally, valuable insights into external validity may be provided when using RCD because it allows pragmatic trials to be performed. We provide an overview of the promises, challenges, and potential barriers, methodological implications, and research needs regarding RCD for RCTs. RCD have substantial potential for improving the conduct and reducing the costs of RCTs, but a multidisciplinary approach is essential to address emerging practical barriers and methodological implications. Future research should be directed toward such issues and specifically focus on data quality validation, alternative research designs and how they affect outcome assessment, and aspects of reporting and transparency.

  7. Magnetic hydroxyapatite: a promising multifunctional platform for nanomedicine application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sudip; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Bharathiraja, Subramaniyan; Santha Moorthy, Madhappan; Kim, Hye Hyun; Seo, Hansu; Lee, Kang Dae; Oh, Junghwan

    2017-01-01

    In this review, specific attention is paid to the development of nanostructured magnetic hydroxyapatite (MHAp) and its potential application in controlled drug/gene delivery, tissue engineering, magnetic hyperthermia treatment, and the development of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Both magnetite and hydroxyapatite materials have excellent prospects in nanomedicine with multifunctional therapeutic approaches. To date, many research articles have focused on biomedical applications of nanomaterials because of which it is very difficult to focus on any particular type of nanomaterial. This study is possibly the first effort to emphasize on the comprehensive assessment of MHAp nanostructures for biomedical applications supported with very recent experimental studies. From basic concepts to the real-life applications, the relevant characteristics of magnetic biomaterials are patented which are briefly discussed. The potential therapeutic and diagnostic ability of MHAp-nanostructured materials make them an ideal platform for future nanomedicine. We hope that this advanced review will provide a better understanding of MHAp and its important features to utilize it as a promising material for multifunctional biomedical applications.

  8. Potential Mechanisms Underlying Centralized Pain and Emerging Therapeutic Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia C. Eller-Smith

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Centralized pain syndromes are associated with changes within the central nervous system that amplify peripheral input and/or generate the perception of pain in the absence of a noxious stimulus. Examples of idiopathic functional disorders that are often categorized as centralized pain syndromes include fibromyalgia, chronic pelvic pain syndromes, migraine, and temporomandibular disorder. Patients often suffer from widespread pain, associated with more than one specific syndrome, and report fatigue, mood and sleep disturbances, and poor quality of life. The high degree of symptom comorbidity and a lack of definitive underlying etiology make these syndromes notoriously difficult to treat. The main purpose of this review article is to discuss potential mechanisms of centrally-driven pain amplification and how they may contribute to increased comorbidity, poorer pain outcomes, and decreased quality of life in patients diagnosed with centralized pain syndromes, as well as discuss emerging non-pharmacological therapies that improve symptomology associated with these syndromes. Abnormal regulation and output of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is commonly associated with centralized pain disorders. The HPA axis is the primary stress response system and its activation results in downstream production of cortisol and a dampening of the immune response. Patients with centralized pain syndromes often present with hyper- or hypocortisolism and evidence of altered downstream signaling from the HPA axis including increased Mast cell (MC infiltration and activation, which can lead to sensitization of nearby nociceptive afferents. Increased peripheral input via nociceptor activation can lead to “hyperalgesic priming” and/or “wind-up” and eventually to central sensitization through long term potentiation in the central nervous system. Other evidence of central modifications has been observed through brain imaging studies of functional

  9. Genetically Modified Crops: Risks and Promise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Conway

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available GM foods have the potential to provide significant benefits for developing countries. Over 800 million people are chronically undernourished, and 180 million children are severely underweight for their age. By 2020, there will be an extra two billion mouths to feed. Ecological approaches that underpin sustainable agriculture (e.g., integrated pest management and participatory approaches that strengthen farmers' own experimentation and decision making are key. Biotechnology will be an essential partner, if yield ceilings are to be raised, if crops are to be grown without excessive reliance on pesticides, and if farmers on less favored lands are to be provided with crops that are resistant to drought and salinity, and that can use nitrogen and other nutrients more efficiently. Over the past 10 years, in addition supporting ecological approaches, the Rockefeller Foundation has funded the training of some 400 developing-country scientists in the techniques of biotechnology. Most of the new crop varieties are the result of tissue culture and marker-aided selection. The Foundation also supports the production of genetically engineered rices, including a new rice engineered for beta carotene (the precursor of Vitamin A in the grain. Some specific steps can be taken by Monsanto that would improve acceptance of plant biotechnology in both the developing and the industrialized worlds: label; disavow gene protection (terminator systems; phase out the use of antibiotic resistance markers; agree (with big seed companies to use the plant variety protection system, rather than patents, in developing countries; establish an independently administered fellowship program to train developing-country scientists in crop biotechnology, biosafety, and intellectual property; donate useful technologies to developing countries; agree to share financial rewards from intellectual property rights on varieties such as basmati or jasmine rice with the countries of origin; and

  10. Locomotive Syndrome: Definition and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kozo; Ogata, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Locomotive syndrome is a condition of reduced mobility due to impairment of locomotive organs. Since upright bipedal walking involves minutely controlled movement patterns, impairment of any aspect of the locomotive organs has the potential to adversely affect it. In addition to trauma, chronic diseases of the locomotive organs, which progress with repeated bouts of acute exacerbations, are common causes of the locomotive syndrome. In Japan?s super-aging society, many people are likely to exp...

  11. Urinary Metabolite Profiling Offers Potential for Differentiation of Liver-Kidney Yin Deficiency and Dampness-Heat Internal Smoldering Syndromes in Posthepatitis B Cirrhosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zheng is the basic theory and essence of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM in diagnosing diseases. However, there are no biological evidences to support TCM Zheng differentiation. In this study we elucidated the biological alteration of cirrhosis with TCM “Liver-Kidney Yin Deficiency (YX” or “Dampness-Heat Internal Smoldering (SR” Zheng and the potential of urine metabonomics in TCM Zheng differentiation. Differential metabolites contributing to the intergroup variation between healthy controls and liver cirrhosis patients were investigated, respectively, and mainly participated in energy metabolism, gut microbiota metabolism, oxidative stress, and bile acid metabolism. Three metabolites, aconitate, citrate, and 2-pentendioate, altered significantly in YX Zheng only, representing the abnormal energy metabolism. Contrarily, hippurate and 4-pyridinecarboxylate altered significantly in SR Zheng only, representing the abnormalities of gut microbiota metabolism. Moreover, there were significant differences between two TCM Zhengs in three metabolites, glycoursodeoxycholate, cortolone-3-glucuronide, and L-aspartyl-4-phosphate, among all differential metabolites. Metabonomic profiling, as a powerful approach, provides support to the understanding of biological mechanisms of TCM Zheng stratification. The altered urinary metabolites constitute a panel of reliable biological evidence for TCM Zheng differentiation in patients with posthepatitis B cirrhosis and may be used for the potential biomarkers of TCM Zheng stratification.

  12. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome What Is Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  13. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Also known as Pickwickian Syndrome What ... your neck is larger than normal. Complications of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome When left untreated, OHS can cause ...

  14. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children who have WAGR syndrome may have normal intelligence. Other symptoms of WAGR syndrome may also include: ... mild. Some individuals with WAGR syndrome have normal intelligence. Children with WAGR syndrome should be referred for ...

  15. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may also be caused by toxins produced by group A streptococcus (strep) bacteria. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated ... syndrome. The syndrome can also be caused by group A streptococcus (strep) bacteria. Risk factors Toxic shock syndrome can ...

  16. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium ...

  17. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it? Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a random error ... The Down Syndrome Registry . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  18. Cannabinoids: New Promising Agents in the Treatment of Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Giacoppo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Cannabis sativa is considered the most extensively used narcotic. Nevertheless, this fame obscures its traditional employ in native medicine of South Africa, South America, Turkey, Egypt and in many regions of Asia as a therapeutic drug. In fact, the use of compounds containing Cannabis and their introduction in clinical practice is still controversial and strongly limited by unavoidable psychotropic effects. So, overcoming these adverse effects represents the main open question on the utilization of cannabinoids as new drugs for treatment of several pathologies. To date, therapeutic use of cannabinoid extracts is prescribed in patients with glaucoma, in the control of chemotherapy-related vomiting and nausea, for appetite stimulation in patients with anorexia-cachexia syndrome by HIV, and for the treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms. Recently, researcher efforts are aimed to employ the therapeutic potentials of Cannabis sativa in the modulation of cannabinoid receptor activity within the central nervous system, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as well as psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders. This review evaluates the most recent available data on cannabinoids utilization in experimental and clinical studies, and highlights their beneficial effects in the prevention of the main neurological diseases and for the clinical treatment of symptoms with them correlated.

  19. Cannabinoids: new promising agents in the treatment of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoppo, Sabrina; Mandolino, Giuseppe; Galuppo, Maria; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2014-11-17

    Nowadays, Cannabis sativa is considered the most extensively used narcotic. Nevertheless, this fame obscures its traditional employ in native medicine of South Africa, South America, Turkey, Egypt and in many regions of Asia as a therapeutic drug. In fact, the use of compounds containing Cannabis and their introduction in clinical practice is still controversial and strongly limited by unavoidable psychotropic effects. So, overcoming these adverse effects represents the main open question on the utilization of cannabinoids as new drugs for treatment of several pathologies. To date, therapeutic use of cannabinoid extracts is prescribed in patients with glaucoma, in the control of chemotherapy-related vomiting and nausea, for appetite stimulation in patients with anorexia-cachexia syndrome by HIV, and for the treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms. Recently, researcher efforts are aimed to employ the therapeutic potentials of Cannabis sativa in the modulation of cannabinoid receptor activity within the central nervous system, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as well as psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders. This review evaluates the most recent available data on cannabinoids utilization in experimental and clinical studies, and highlights their beneficial effects in the prevention of the main neurological diseases and for the clinical treatment of symptoms with them correlated.

  20. The promise and peril of the pharmacological enhancer Modafinil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The neuro-enhancement Modafinil promises to dramatically increase users' waking hours without much sacrifice to clarity of thought and without serious side effects (inducing addiction). For Modafinil to be advantageous, its usage must enable access to goods that themselves improve the quality of one's life. I draw attention to a variety of conditions that must be met for an experience, activity or object to improve the quality of one's life, such as positional, relational, and saturation conditions, as well as it's being good for its own sake. I discuss and describe the contexts in which widespread usage (legal or not) of Modafinil would undermine these conditions being met, and thus users would fail to significantly improve the quality of their lives and would in fact potentially make both themselves and nonusers worse off in important respects thus far overlooked by critics. In the right contexts, where free time is protected and prolonged, Modafinil does have a variety of potential benefits including, most interestingly, a distinctive form of agency possible only in free time. The potential disadvantages and advantages highlighted in this article are relevant not only to public institutions deciding whether to legalize Modafinil's use as an enhancement but also to individuals deciding whether to use it illegally, as well as to the questions of how and whether to alter key features of one's context (e.g. regulating work hours or extending social services) rather than, or in addition, to regulating the use of enhancement drugs such as Modafinil. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.