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Sample records for syndrome pmws affected

  1. PMWS Development in Pigs from Affected Farms in Spain and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau-Roma, L.; Stockmarr, Anders; Kristensen, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) is a worldwide spread condition that affects pigs in nursery and/or fattening units, and is considered to have a severe economic impact on swine production. The main clinical sign of PMWS is wasting, but can also include pallor of the skin, icteru...

  2. Infection, excretion and seroconversion dynamics of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in pigs from post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) affected farms in Spain and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau-Roma, L.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Sibila, M.

    2009-01-01

    -like signs and matched healthy cohorts were euthanized during the clinical outbreak. PMWS was diagnosed according to internationally accepted criteria and pigs were classified as: (i) PMWS cases, (ii) wasted non-PMWS cases and (iii) healthy pigs. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) quantitative PCR (qPCR...... indicates that nasal and rectal swabs were suitable indicators of PCV2 excretion. Sensitivity and/or specificity values observed from both tests used separately or combined suggested that qPCR and/or serology tests are not apparently able to substitute histopathology plus detection of PCV2 in tissues...... for the individual PMWS diagnosis within PMWS affected farms. However, qPCR appears to be a potential reliable technique to diagnose PMWS on a population basis....

  3. Viral Metagenomic Analysis Displays the Co-Infection Situation in Healthy and PMWS Affected Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Lie Blomström

    Full Text Available The development of high-throughput sequencing technologies have allowed the possibility to investigate and characterise the entire microbiome of individuals, providing better insight to the complex interaction between different microorganisms. This will help to understand how the microbiome influence the susceptibility of secondary agents and development of disease. We have applied viral metagenomics to investigate the virome of lymph nodes from Swedish pigs suffering from the multifactorial disease postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS as well as from healthy pigs. The aim is to increase knowledge of potential viruses, apart from porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2, involved in PMWS development as well as to increase knowledge on the virome of healthy individuals. In healthy individuals, a diverse viral flora was seen with several different viruses present simultaneously. The majority of the identified viruses were small linear and circular DNA viruses, such as different circoviruses, anelloviruses and bocaviruses. In the pigs suffering from PMWS, PCV2 sequences were, as expected, detected to a high extent but other viruses were also identified in the background of PCV2. Apart from DNA viruses also RNA viruses were identified, among them were a porcine pestivirus showing high similarity to a recently (in 2015 discovered atypical porcine pestivirus in the US. Majority of the viruses identified in the background of PCV2 in PMWS pigs could also be identified in the healthy pigs. PCV2 sequences were also identified in the healthy pigs but to a much lower extent than in PMWS affected pigs. Although the method used here is not quantitative the very clear difference in amount of PCV2 sequences in PMWS affected pigs and healthy pigs most likely reflect the very strong replication of PCV2 known to be a hallmark of PMWS. Taken together, these findings illustrate that pigs appear to have a considerable viral flora consisting to a large extent of

  4. Infectious risk factors for individual postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) development in pigs from affected farms in Spain and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau-Roma, Llorenç; Stockmarr, Anders; Kristensen, Charlotte S.

    2012-01-01

    collected serum samples to detect antibodies against, PCV2, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), swine influenza virus (SIV) and Lawsonia intracellularis (law), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky’s disease virus (ADV) and Salmonella spp. A Cox proportional...

  5. Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in Danish pig herds: productivity, clinical symptoms, and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, E. Okholm; Enøe, Claes; Jorsal, Sven Erik Lind

    2008-01-01

    A case-control study of 74 herds with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) and 74 matched control herds was carried out. In the case herds the mortality rates of weaner and finisher pigs were 11·2 and 5·2 per cent respectively, compared with 3·1 and 3·2 per cent in the control herds....... bronchial and inguinal lymph nodes, had a 0·7 probability of a positive PMWS diagnosis by laboratory examinations. However, for illthriven pigs, this probability of having PMWS was equal in the case herds and the control herds.......A case-control study of 74 herds with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) and 74 matched control herds was carried out. In the case herds the mortality rates of weaner and finisher pigs were 11·2 and 5·2 per cent respectively, compared with 3·1 and 3·2 per cent in the control herds....... In most case herds, PMWS developed within the first four weeks after weaning. Wasting, diarrhoea and respiratory signs were observed in 10 per cent of the weaner pigs (7 to 30 kg) in the case herds compared with 7 per cent in the control herds. The average daily gains of the weaner pigs and finisher pigs...

  6. Abscessos dentários periapicais em leitões com síndrome multissistêmica do definhamento Dental periapical abscesses in piglets affected by postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome PMWS

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    Felipe L. Koller

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Duzentos e oitenta leitões, entre 40 e 70 dias de idade, afetados pela sindrome multissistêmica do definhamento (SMD foram examinados após eutanásia para pesquisa de lesões dentárias. Pelo menos um abscesso periapical foi observado em 58 leitões (20,7%, dos quais 12 apresentaram abscessos múltiplos. Terceiros incisivos superiores, 3os incisivos inferiores, caninos superiores, caninos inferiores e outros dentes apresentaram respectivamente 22 (31,4%, 16 (22,9%, 4 (5,7%, 23 (32,9% e 5 (7,1% abscessos periapicais. A maior prevalência de abscessos observada nos dentes 3os incisivos e caninos inferiores está provavelmente associada com a maior área de corte ou desgaste que sofrem esses dentes. Entre as bactérias isoladas de amostras de 65 abscessos, Streptococcus sp. foi a mais prevalente e esteve presente em 21,48% e 27,7% dos isolados em aerobiose e anaerobiose, respectivamente. Na segunda posição em prevalência estiveram as bactérias corineformes, as quais foram mais freqüentemente isoladas em atmosfera anaeróbica do que aeróbica. Houve preponderância de isolamentos de bactérias Gram-positivas. Não foi possível determinar se as co-infecções bacterianas predispuseram às lesões características de SMD ou foram conseqüentes à imunossupressão causada pela infecção com PCV2.Swine producers have historically resected needle teeth of newborn pigs to prevent potential injuries to the sow mammary gland and faces of littermates. However, the possible impact of this practice on pig performance has been questioned. As part of a study, 280 PMWS affected piglets, with 40-70 days of age, were examined for the presence of dental lesions immediately after euthanasia. Most pigs were confirmed as PMWS by the detection of typical microscopic lesions and immunohistochemical pattern. At least one periapical abscess was observed in 58 piglets (20.7%, of which 12 had multiple abscesses. There were 22 (31.4%, 16 (22.9%, 4 (5.7%, 23 (32

  7. Porcine circovirus diseases: a review of PMWS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baekbo, P; Kristensen, C S; Larsen, L E

    2012-03-01

    This article is a review on post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), the first described disease among the porcine circovirus diseases (PCVD). Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome has, since its appearance in Canada in 1991, been seen in all major pig producing countries. To diagnose PMWS at herd level typical clinical appearance consisting of wasting and increased mortality must be combined with finding at autopsy of diseased pigs, where typical microscopic findings in the lymphatic tissue must be present. Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome significantly increases the mortality and reduces the daily weight gain in weaner pig and/or in finishing pigs. Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome can be transmitted by pig-to-pig contact and some studies point at airborne transmission as a possibility. Studies in Europe have shown several risk factors that either increase or decrease the risk for a pig herd to be affected by PMWS. At the pig level, studies have shown the importance of maternal immunity as protection for subsequent development of PMWS. To control PMWS, good production management and control of other diseases are crucial. Since 2004, commercial vaccines against Porcine Circo Virus type 2 have been coming on the market and many studies have shown great benefits of these to control PMWS. Today, sow vaccines as well as piglet vaccines are available in most countries. An extensive meta-analysis of many of the vaccines has shown a comparable good efficacy of the vaccines in significantly reducing mortality and increasing weight gain of the pigs. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. PMWS: Experimental model and co-infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allan, G. M.; McNeilly, F.; Ellis, J

    2004-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is now recognised as the causal agent of porcine multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), an economically important wasting disease of young pigs [J. Vet. Diagn. Invest. 12 (2000) 3]. Gross lesions of PMWS include generalised lymphadenopathy, hepatitis, nephritis...

  9. A locus on porcine chromosome 13 harboring the MyRIP gene is associated with development of PMWS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter

    Post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) has spread dramatically among pigs over the last years with devastating consequences for animal welfare and great economic losses for farmers. Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is the necessary causal infectious agent of PMWS, but other factors...... are needed for full development of the disease. Among such factors genetics or breed of pigs have been speculated to play a role and by now several studies have confirmed that breed or boar line is of importance. A linkage study in 14 litters, lead us to the hypothesis that a locus in a region close...... involved in transport of vesicles in the cytosol. It is an interesting candidate gene because a number of studies have shown that impaired transport and accumulation of PCV2 in cells of the innate immune system may be an important factor in PMWS pathogenesis. We sequenced MyRIP in PMWS affected...

  10. Porcine Circovirus Diseases: A review of PMWS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baekbo, P.; Kristensen, C. S.; Larsen, L. E.

    2012-01-01

    Porcine Circo Virus type 2 have been coming on the market and many studies have shown great benefits of these to control PMWS. Today, sow vaccines as well as piglet vaccines are available in most countries. An extensive meta‐analysis of many of the vaccines has shown a comparable good efficacy...... or decrease the risk for a pig herd to be affected by PMWS. At the pig level, studies have shown the importance of maternal immunity as protection for subsequent development of PMWS. To control PMWS, good production management and control of other diseases are crucial. Since 2004, commercial vaccines against...... of the vaccines in significantly reducing mortality and increasing weight gain of the pigs....

  11. Use of register data to assess the association between use of antimicrobials and outbreak of Postweaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS) in Danish pig herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigre, Håkan; Dohoo, Ian R; Stryhn, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    herd) used in herds before and after an outbreak of PMWS, and by comparing the amount of antimicrobials used in herds experiencing PMWS with the amount of antimicrobials used in herds not experiencing PMWS. The effects were estimated in a three-level (veterinarian/herd/study-month) linear mixed...

  12. Pig major acute-phase protein and haptoglobin serum concentrations correlate with PCV2 viremia and the clinical course of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau-Roma, Llorenc; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane

    2009-01-01

    with variatiions in APP's concentrations. A ROC analysis, made to determine the capacity of discrimination of both APPs between PMWS affected and non-affected pigs, showed higher sensitivity and specificity values using pig-MAP compared to HPT. These results suggest that pig-MAP might be a better indicator of PMWS......The aim of the present longitudinal study was to assess the evolution of two acute phase proteins (APPs), pig-major acute phase protein (pig-MAP) and haptoglobin (HPT), in serum from pigs that developed postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in comparison to healthy and wasted non...... and age-matched healthy controls were euthanized during the clinical outbreak. PMWS was diagnosed according to internationally accepted creteria and pigs were classified as: i)PMWS cases, ii) wasted non-PMWS cases and iii) healthy pigs. At the moment of PMWS occurrence, pig-MAP and HPT concentration...

  13. Spatial and temporal patterns of pig herds diagnosed with Postweaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS) during the first two years of its occurrence in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigre, Håkan; Bækbo, P.; Jorsal, Sven Erik Lind

    2005-01-01

    two years after the first herd was diagnosed, and we tested for spatial and spatio-temporal clustering using scan statistics. The study population consisted of pig herds that during the study period (October 2001 - September 2003) performed diagnostic submissions to the two major veterinary diagnostic...... laboratories in Denmark (6724 herds). Of these, 277 herds were diagnosed with PMWS. Two statistically significant spatial clusters of herds diagnosed with PMWS were identified. These clusters included 11% and 8% of the study herds, respectively. Within these two clusters the relative risk for a herd...

  14. Mental Health of the Prison Medical Workers (PMWs) and Influencing Factors in Jiangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Jiang, Dongdong; Hou, Zhaoxun; He, Meikun; Lu, Yuanan; Mao, Zongfu

    2017-11-26

    Prison medical workers (PMWs) are critically important, but they are also vulnerable to psychological problems. Currently, there is no study on examining PMWs' mental health conditions and possible influencing factors in China. Hence, we conducted this cross-sectional survey, aiming to understand the mental health status of the PMWs and related impact factors in Jiangxi province of China. We employed the Chinese version of the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) to assess the mental disorders and psychological health conditions of PMWs in Jiangxi. The t tests were used to compare the differences for the average score of SCL-90-R between the Chinese general population and targeted PMWs of this study. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the main factors associated with overall detection rate of PMWs' psychological health conditions. The scores of four dimensions (somatization, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, anxiety, and paranoid ideation) were significantly higher than the Chinese national norm, and the total positive rate was 49.09% among the PMWs. Gender, marital status, age, and length of employment are identified to be the most significant predictors to affect PMWs' mental health. Positive correlations between each of the nine dimensions of the SCL-90-R have been verified. This study demonstrated for the first time that PMWs are facing mental health risk and suffering serious psychological problems with psychopathology symptoms, which has become a growing concern in China. Our current findings suggest a need for more in-depth studies on this subject going forward to validate our conclusions and also to identify more impact factors, since such studies and knowledge of PMWs' mental health and influencing factors are very limited in China.

  15. Mental Health of the Prison Medical Workers (PMWs and Influencing Factors in Jiangxi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prison medical workers (PMWs are critically important, but they are also vulnerable to psychological problems. Currently, there is no study on examining PMWs’ mental health conditions and possible influencing factors in China. Hence, we conducted this cross-sectional survey, aiming to understand the mental health status of the PMWs and related impact factors in Jiangxi province of China. We employed the Chinese version of the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R to assess the mental disorders and psychological health conditions of PMWs in Jiangxi. The t tests were used to compare the differences for the average score of SCL-90-R between the Chinese general population and targeted PMWs of this study. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the main factors associated with overall detection rate of PMWs’ psychological health conditions. The scores of four dimensions (somatization, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, anxiety, and paranoid ideation were significantly higher than the Chinese national norm, and the total positive rate was 49.09% among the PMWs. Gender, marital status, age, and length of employment are identified to be the most significant predictors to affect PMWs’ mental health. Positive correlations between each of the nine dimensions of the SCL-90-R have been verified. This study demonstrated for the first time that PMWs are facing mental health risk and suffering serious psychological problems with psychopathology symptoms, which has become a growing concern in China. Our current findings suggest a need for more in-depth studies on this subject going forward to validate our conclusions and also to identify more impact factors, since such studies and knowledge of PMWs’ mental health and influencing factors are very limited in China.

  16. Clinical and laboratory studies on herds affected with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome in Denmark, France, Spain, and Sweden: Disease progression and a proposal for herd case definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau-Roma, L.; Baekbo, P.; Rose, N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To propose and evaluate a protocol to establish a diagnosis of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) at herd level. Materials and methods: The data used included both laboratory data from previous epidemiological studies carried out in Italy, Denmark, and Spain and original......, a significant increase in postweaning mortality, compared to the historical background in the herd, must be observed in association with clinical signs compatible with PMWS. Secondly, PMWS must be diagnosed in at least one of three to five necropsied pigs concurrently with the increase in mortality. Ruling out...

  17. Risk factors for clinical signs of PMWS and PDNS in pigs in the Netherlands: a case-control study = Bedrijfsrisicofactoren voor varkens met klinische verschijnselen van PMWS of PDNS in Nederland : een case-control onderzoek the Netherlands: a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, A.R.W.; Wellenberg, G.J.; Jong, de M.F.

    2006-01-01

    Potential risk factors for clinical signs of post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) and porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome (PDNS) in pigs in the Netherlands were investigated in a matched case-control study using a questionnaire (personal interview). Eighty-two pig farmers were

  18. Dynamics of porcine circovirus type 2 infection and excretion in pigs from postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome affected farms from Spain and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau-Roma, L.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Sibila, M.

    Serological and non-quantitative DNA detection techniques (PCR) have been widely used to monitor porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection dynamics (1,2). In spite of available epidemiological information, very few data on PCV2 load dynamics of Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) a...

  19. Experimental Airborne Transmission of Porcine Postweaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C. S.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Vestergaard, K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to investigate if porcine postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) could be induced in healthy pigs following contact with air from pigs with clinical signs of PMWS. The pigs were housed in different units. Either 31 (study I) or 25 (study II) pigs with...

  20. The Turner Syndrome: Cognitive Deficits, Affective Discrimination, and Behavior Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Elizabeth; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The study attemped to link cognitive and social problems seen in girls with Turner syndrome by assessing the girls' ability to process affective cues. Seventeen 9- to 17-year-old girls diagnosed with Turner syndrome were compared to a matched control group on a task which required interpretation of affective intention from facial expression.…

  1. Socioeconomic trajectories affect mortality in Klinefelter syndrome

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    Bojesen, Anders; Krag, Kirstine Stochholm; Juul, Svend

    2011-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is associated with male infertility, hypogonadism, and learning disability. Morbidity and mortality are increased and the causes behind remain unknown. Is it the chromosome aberration or is it caused by postulated poorer socioeconomic status?......Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is associated with male infertility, hypogonadism, and learning disability. Morbidity and mortality are increased and the causes behind remain unknown. Is it the chromosome aberration or is it caused by postulated poorer socioeconomic status?...

  2. The Turner syndrome: cognitive deficits, affective discrimination, and behavior problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, E; Kay, T; Ito, J; Treder, R

    1987-04-01

    Individuals with sex chromosomal anomalies are known to be at increased risk for learning problems and in some cases social or behavioral problems. Girls with an absent or structurally abnormal second sex chromosome (the Turner syndrome) have been found to have cognitive problem solving deficits and immature, inadequate social relationships. The present study attempted to link cognitive and social problems by assessing the girls' ability to process affective cues. 17 girls with karyotypes consistent with a diagnosis of Turner syndrome were compared to a group of 16 short-stature girls of comparable age, verbal intelligence scores, height, and family socioeconomic status on the Affective Discrimination Task, which required interpretation of affective intention from facial expression. The results revealed that the Turner syndrome girls were less accurate at inferring facial affect than the short-stature controls. Analyses revealed that the Turner syndrome girls performed more poorly on spatial, attentional, and short-term memory cognitive tasks and had more psychosocial problems than the short-stature controls. Ability to discriminate facial affect may be another area of cognitive weakness for girls with the Turner syndrome and may underlie the psychosocial problems found in this sample.

  3. Superior Canal Dehiscence Syndrome Affecting 3 Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Katherine D; Kileny, Paul R; Ahmed, Sameer; El-Kashlan, Hussam K; Melendez, Tori L; Basura, Gregory J; Lesperance, Marci M

    2017-07-01

    Superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) is an increasingly recognized cause of hearing loss and vestibular symptoms, but the etiology of this condition remains unknown. To describe 7 cases of SCDS across 3 families. This retrospective case series included 7 patients from 3 different families treated at a neurotology clinic at a tertiary academic medical center from 2010 to 2014. Patients were referred by other otolaryngologists or were self-referred. Each patient demonstrated unilateral or bilateral SCDS or near dehiscence. Clinical evaluation involved body mass index calculation, audiometry, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing, electrocochleography, and multiplanar computed tomographic (CT) scan of the temporal bones. Zygosity testing was performed on twin siblings. The diagnosis of SCDS was made if bone was absent over the superior semicircular canal on 2 consecutive CT images, in addition to 1 physiologic sign consistent with labyrinthine dehiscence. Near dehiscence was defined as absent bone on only 1 CT image but with symptoms and at least 1 physiologic sign of labyrinthine dehiscence. A total of 7 patients (5 female and 2 male; age range, 8-49 years) from 3 families underwent evaluation. Family A consisted of 3 adult first-degree relatives, of whom 2 were diagnosed with SCDS and 1 with near dehiscence. Family B included a mother and her child, both of whom were diagnosed with unilateral SCDS. Family C consisted of adult monozygotic twins, each of whom was diagnosed with unilateral SCDS. For all cases, dehiscence was located at the arcuate eminence. Obesity alone did not explain the occurrence of SCDS because 5 of the 7 cases had a body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) less than 30.0. Superior canal dehiscence syndrome is a rare, often unrecognized condition. This report of 3 multiplex families with SCDS provides evidence in support of a potential genetic contribution to the etiology

  4. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Interaction Between Syndromic and Non-Syndromic Factors Affecting Speech and Language Development in Treacher-Collins Syndrome

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    Marziyeh Poorjavad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treacher-Collins syndrome is a congenital craniofacial disorder with multiple anomalies. This syndrome affects the maxilla, mandible, eyes, middle and outer ears, and soft palate. Conductive hearing loss due to the deformities of the middle and external ears is prevalent. The characteristics of this syndrome include multiple and serious threats to normal communication development in children. In this study, speech and language features of a Persian speaking child with this syndrome are presented.Case: The case was an 8-year old girl with Treacher-Collins syndrome and bilateral moderate conductive hearing loss due to atretic canal. In language and speech assessments, moderate hypernasality, numerous compensatory errors and morphosyntactic deficits were observed. There were 13 phonemes that were incorrectly produced at least in one position. Besides, she used 22 types of phonological processes that were abnormal and disappear before the age of three in normal Persian speaking children.Conclusion: Moderate hearing loss, velopharyngeal incompetency, malocclusion and dental anomalies, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and environmental factors resulted in severe speech and language disorders in this case. These disorders affected her academic performance as well. Moderate hypernasality, numerous compensatory errors, and excessive and abnormal use of phonological processes were not presented as prevalent characteristics of Treacher-Collins syndrome in other resources.

  6. Airway inflammation in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, F G; Carpagnano, E; Guido, P; Bonsignore, M R; Roberti, A; Aliani, M; Vignola, A M; Spanevello, A

    2004-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been shown to be associated to upper airway inflammation. The object of the present study was to establish the presence of bronchial inflammation in OSAS subjects. In 16 subjects affected by OSAS, and in 14 healthy volunteers, airway inflammation was detected by the cellular analysis of the induced sputum. OSAS patients, as compared to control subjects, showed a higher percentage of neutrophils (66.7+/-18.9 vs. 25.8+/-15.6) (Pbronchial inflammation characterized by a significant increase in neutrophils.

  7. How Many People Are Affected by or at Risk for Down Syndrome?

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    ... people are affected by or at risk for Down syndrome? According to the Centers for Disease Control and ... ethnicity. 4 , 5 Maternal Age and Risk for Down Syndrome Because the likelihood that an egg will contain ...

  8. Obesity Differentially Affects Phenotypes of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

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    Carlos Moran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity or overweight affect most of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Phenotypes are the clinical characteristics produced by the interaction of heredity and environment in a disease or syndrome. Phenotypes of PCOS have been described on the presence of clinical hyperandrogenism, oligoovulation and polycystic ovaries. The insulin resistance is present in the majority of patients with obesity and/or PCOS and it is more frequent and of greater magnitude in obese than in non obese PCOS patients. Levels of sexual hormone binding globulin are decreased, and levels of free androgens are increased in obese PCOS patients. Weight loss treatment is important for overweight or obese PCOS patients, but not necessary for normal weight PCOS patients, who only need to avoid increasing their body weight. Obesity decreases or delays several infertility treatments. The differences in the hormonal and metabolic profile, as well as the different focus and response to treatment between obese and non obese PCOS patients suggest that obesity has to be considered as a characteristic for classification of PCOS phenotypes.

  9. Does Alport syndrome affect the basement membrane of peritoneal vessels?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampimon, Denise E.; Vlijm, Anniek; Struijk, Dirk G.; Krediet, Raymond T.

    2010-01-01

    Alport syndrome and encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) are both rare diseases. Their joint occurrence is highly unlikely. Two patients at our center with Alport syndrome developed EPS. We therefore hypothesized that Alport syndrome might predispose to the development of EPS and that this

  10. Facial Expression of Affect in Children with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, L.; Moss, J.; Jutley, J.; Cornish, K.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) have been reported to show comparatively high levels of flat and negative affect but there have been no empirical evaluations. In this study, we use an objective measure of facial expression to compare affect in CdLS with that seen in Cri du Chat syndrome (CDC) and a group of…

  11. How coffee affects metabolic syndrome and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baspinar, B; Eskici, G; Ozcelik, A O

    2017-06-21

    Metabolic syndrome, with its increasing prevalence, is becoming a major public health problem throughout the world. Many risk factors including nutrition play a role in the emergence of metabolic syndrome. Of the most-consumed beverages in the world, coffee contains more than 1000 components such as caffeine, chlorogenic acid, diterpenes and trigonelline. It has been proven in many studies that coffee consumption has a positive effect on chronic diseases. In this review, starting from the beneficial effects of coffee on health, the relationship between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome and its components has been investigated. There are few studies investigating the relationship between coffee and metabolic syndrome, and the existing ones put forward different findings. The factors leading to the differences are thought to stem from coffee variety, the physiological effects of coffee elements, and the nutritional ingredients (such as milk and sugar) added to coffee. It is reported that consumption of coffee in adults up to three cups a day reduces the risk of Type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  12. Delineation of Behavioral Phenotypes in Genetic Syndromes: Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder, Affect and Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Chris; Berg, Katy; Moss, Jo; Arron, Kate; Burbidge, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    We investigated autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptomatology, hyperactivity and affect in seven genetic syndromes; Angelman (AS; n = 104), Cri du Chat (CdCS; 58), Cornelia de Lange (CdLS; 101), Fragile X (FXS; 191), Prader-Willi (PWS; 189), Smith-Magenis (SMS; 42) and Lowe (LS; 56) syndromes (age range 4-51). ASD symptomatology was heightened in…

  13. A comparison of affective information processing in Noonan and Turner syndromes: Evidence of alexithymia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, R.L.; Wingbermühle, P.A.M.; Freriks, K.; Verhaak, C.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Noonan (NS) and Turner syndrome (TS) are associated with cognitive problems and difficulties in affective information processing. While both phenotypes share physical features, genetic etiology and neuropsychological phenotype differ significantly. The present study examines putative

  14. Allgrove syndrome: an Egyptian family with two affected siblings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ola H. Gebril

    2013-11-15

    Nov 15, 2013 ... Abstract Background: Allgrove or AAA (Triple A) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive dis- ease characterized by achalasia, alacrima, adrenocorticotrophic insufficiency and some neurologic abnormalities. Case report: Here we report two brothers 13 and 15 years old, with variable features of the syn-.

  15. Fibromyalgia syndrome and chronotype : late chronotypes are more affected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantermann, Thomas; Theadom, Alice; Roenneberg, Till; Cropley, Mark

    Sleep has strong links to the symptomology of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), a diffuse musculoskeletal pain disorder. Information about the involvement of the circadian clock is, however, sparse. In this study, 1548 individuals with FMS completed an online survey containing questions on demographics,

  16. Stimulus Characteristics Affect Humor Processing in Individuals with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Andrea C.; Hegenloh, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The present paper aims to investigate whether individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) show global humor processing deficits or whether humor comprehension and appreciation depends on stimulus characteristics. Non-verbal visual puns, semantic and Theory of Mind cartoons were rated on comprehension, funniness and the punchlines were explained. AS…

  17. Osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome. Update and report on two affected siblings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swoboda, W.; Grill, F.

    1988-07-01

    Two siblings (male, 29 years, and female, 13 years) with the rare autosomal recessive osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome are reported in detail. All essential signs and symptoms of the full clinical picture were present and are documented by impressive X-ray pictures. Some aspects of our patients are compared with relevant findings of previous reports. Collagen studies (skin biopsies) failed to reveal any significant disorder of the main collagen types composition. Striking similarities with established genetic disorders of collagen (like the osteogenesis imperfecta group and the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) suggest, however, that the OPS could be a primary collagen disorder. Genetic counselling and devoted socio-medical care for these handicapped children is presently the only help which can be offered.

  18. Acrocentric Chromosomes in Cultured Leukocytes from Mothers of Children Affected With the G1- Trisomy Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Cotton, James E.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of venous blood samples from 24 mothers of G1-trisomy-affected (Down's Syndrome) children and 23 mothers of chromosomally normal children indicated that mothers of G1-trisomy-affected children had a greater than expected involvement of the G-chromosomes in associations of acrocentric satellited (chromosome configuration) chromosomes.…

  19. Flavanol plasma bioavailability is affected by metabolic syndrome in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margalef, M.; Pons, Z.; Iglesias-Carres, L.; Bravo, F.I.; Muguerza, B.; Arola-Arnal, A.

    2017-01-01

    Flavanols, which exert several health benefits, are metabolized after ingestion. Factors such as the host physiological condition could affect the metabolism and bioavailability of flavanols, influencing their bioactivities. This study aimed to qualitatively evaluate whether a pathological state

  20. Human immunodeficiency syndromes affecting human natural killer cell cytolytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Denis Billadeau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T-cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with SNARE-dependent fusion promotes lytic granule release into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process.

  1. Childhood obesity affects adult metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yajun; Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Liang; Hu, Yuehua; Liu, Junting; Cheng, Hong; Yang, Ping; Shan, Xinying; Yan, Yinkun; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Mi, Jie

    2015-09-01

    We seek to observe the association between childhood obesity by different measures and adult obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes. Thousand two hundred and nine subjects from "Beijing Blood Pressure Cohort Study" were followed 22.9 ± 0.5 years in average from childhood to adulthood. We defined childhood obesity using body mass index (BMI) or left subscapular skinfold (LSSF), and adult obesity as BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2). MetS was defined according to the joint statement of International Diabetes Federation and American Heart Association with modified waist circumference (≥ 90/85 cm for men/women). Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L or blood glucose 2 h after oral glucose tolerance test ≥ 11.1 mmol/L or currently using blood glucose-lowering agents. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the association. The incidence of adult obesity was 13.4, 60.0, 48.3, and 65.1 % for children without obesity, having obesity by BMI only, by LSSF only, and by both, respectively. Compared to children without obesity, children obese by LSSF only or by both had higher risk of diabetes. After controlling for adult obesity, childhood obesity predicted independently long-term risks of diabetes (odds ratio 2.8, 95 % confidence interval 1.2-6.3) or abdominal obesity (2.7, 1.6-4.7) other than MetS as a whole (1.2, 0.6-2.4). Childhood obesity predicts long-term risk of adult diabetes, and the effect is independent of adult obesity. LSSF is better than BMI in predicting adult diabetes.

  2. SAPHO syndrome with affection of the mandible: diagnosis, treatment, and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemann, Wolfgang; Pau, Mauro; Feichtinger, Matthias; Ferra-Matschy, Barbara; Kaercher, Hans

    2011-02-01

    The synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome is a rare syndrome of unknown etiology. Involvement of the mandible is found in almost 10% of cases. In the literature, conservative treatment is recommended most often, because decortication and partial resection are found to be ineffective and of temporary profit. We report a case of SAPHO syndrome in a 44-year-old women with unilateral hyperostosis of the mandible and massive painful swelling of the surrounding soft tissues. Owing to facial disfiguration and pain, resection of the affected bone followed by immediate reconstruction with a microvascular iliac crest flap were performed. The aim of this paper was to present the necessity of surgical intervention in SAPHO syndrome of the mandible in cases of esthetic and functional limitation. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cortical correlates of affective syndrome in dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís T. Hayata

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer’s disease (AD are prevalent, however their relationship with patterns of cortical atrophy is not fully known. Objectives To compare cortical atrophy’s patterns between AD patients and healthy controls; to verify correlations between neuropsychiatric syndromes and cortical atrophy. Method 33 AD patients were examined by Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI. Patients and 29 controls underwent a 3T MRI scanning. We considered four NPI syndromes: affective, apathy, hyperactivity and psychosis. Correlations between structural imaging and neuropsychiatric scores were performed by Freesurfer. Results were significant with a p-value < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons. Results Patients exhibited atrophy in entorhinal cortices, left inferior and middle temporal gyri, and precuneus bilaterally. There was correlation between affective syndrome and cortical thickness in right frontal structures, insula and temporal pole. Conclusion Cortical thickness measures revealed atrophy in mild AD. Depression and anxiety symptoms were associated with atrophy of right frontal, temporal and insular cortices.

  4. Vascular affection in relation to oxidative DNA damage in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Aziz, Rokayaa; Fawzy, Mary Wadie; Khalil, Noha; Abdel Atty, Sahar; Sabra, Zainab

    2018-02-01

    Obesity has become an important issue affecting both males and females. Obesity is now regarded as an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis-related diseases. Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk for development of cardiovascular disease. Urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine concentration has been used to express oxidation status. Twenty-seven obese patients with metabolic syndrome, 25 obese patients without metabolic syndrome and 31 healthy subjects were included in our study. They were subjected to full history and clinical examination; fasting blood sugar (FBS), 2 hour post prandial blood sugar (2HPP), lipid profile, urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and carotid duplex, A/B index and tibial diameters were all assessed. There was a statistically significant difference ( p = 0.027) in diameter of the right anterior tibial artery among the studied groups, with decreased diameter of the right anterior tibial artery in obese patients with metabolic syndrome compared to those without metabolic syndrome; the ankle brachial index revealed a lower index in obese patients with metabolic syndrome compared to those without metabolic syndrome. There was a statistically insignificant difference ( p = 0.668) in the 8-oxodG in the studied groups. In obese patients with metabolic syndrome there was a positive correlation between 8-oxodG and total cholesterol and LDL. Urinary 8-oxodG is correlated to total cholesterol and LDL in obese patients with metabolic syndrome; signifying its role in the mechanism of dyslipidemia in those patients. Our study highlights the importance of anterior tibial artery diameter measurement and ankle brachial index as an early marker of atherosclerosis, and how it may be an earlier marker than carotid intima-media thickness.

  5. Early Negative Affect Predicts Anxiety, Not Autism, in Preschool Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnsen, Bridgette L.; Malone, Patrick S.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Roberts, Jane E.

    2013-01-01

    Children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) face high risk for anxiety disorders, yet no studies have explored FXS as a high-risk sample for investigating early manifestations of anxiety outcomes. Negative affect is one of the most salient predictors of problem behaviors and has been associated with both anxiety and autistic outcomes in clinical and…

  6. Acute tissue death (white syndrome) affects the microenvironment of tabular Acropora corals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sandra Breum; Vestergaard, Maj; Ainsworth, Tracy D.

    2010-01-01

    White syndrome (WS) is a collective term for coral diseases that cause acute tissue loss, resulting in apparently healthy tissue bordering on exposed skeleton. In this study, the microenvironmental condition and tissue structure of WS-affected tabular acroporid corals were assessed by O2 microele...

  7. Mutations affecting components of the SWI/SNF complex cause Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kosho, Tomoki; Imai, Yoko; Hibi-Ko, Yumiko; Kaname, Tadashi; Naritomi, Kenji; Kawame, Hiroshi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Homma, Tomomi; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Hiraki, Yoko; Yamagata, Takanori; Yano, Shoji; Mizuno, Seiji; Sakazume, Satoru; Ishii, Takuma; Nagai, Toshiro; Shiina, Masaaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Ohta, Tohru; Niikawa, Norio; Miyatake, Satoko; Okada, Ippei; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Doi, Hiroshi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-18

    By exome sequencing, we found de novo SMARCB1 mutations in two of five individuals with typical Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), a rare autosomal dominant anomaly syndrome. As SMARCB1 encodes a subunit of the SWItch/Sucrose NonFermenting (SWI/SNF) complex, we screened 15 other genes encoding subunits of this complex in 23 individuals with CSS. Twenty affected individuals (87%) each had a germline mutation in one of six SWI/SNF subunit genes, including SMARCB1, SMARCA4, SMARCA2, SMARCE1, ARID1A and ARID1B.

  8. Multi-layered mutation in hedgehog-related genes in Gorlin syndrome may affect the phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Onodera

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a genetic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance that predisposes the affected individual to a variety of disorders that are attributed largely to heterozygous germline patched1 (PTCH1 mutations. PTCH1 is a hedgehog (Hh receptor as well as a repressor, mutation of which leads to constitutive activation of Hh pathway. Hh pathway encompasses a wide variety of cellular signaling cascades, which involve several molecules; however, no associated genotype-phenotype correlations have been reported. Recently, mutations in Suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU or PTCH2 were reported in patients with Gorlin syndrome. These facts suggest that multi-layered mutations in Hh pathway may contribute to the development of Gorlin syndrome. We demonstrated multiple mutations of Hh-related genes in addition to PTCH1, which possibly act in an additive or multiplicative manner and lead to Gorlin syndrome. High-throughput sequencing was performed to analyze exome sequences in four unrelated Gorlin syndrome patient genomes. Mutations in PTCH1 gene were detected in all four patients. Specific nucleotide variations or frameshift variations of PTCH1 were identified along with the inferred amino acid changes in all patients. We further filtered 84 different genes which are closely related to Hh signaling. Fifty three of these had enough coverage of over ×30. The sequencing results were filtered and compared to reduce the number of sequence variants identified in each of the affected individuals. We discovered three genes, PTCH2, BOC, and WNT9b, with mutations with a predicted functional impact assessed by MutationTaster2 or PolyPhen-2 (Polymorphism Phenotyping v2 analysis. It is noticeable that PTCH2 and BOC are Hh receptor molecules. No significant mutations were observed in SUFU. Multi-layered mutations in Hh pathway may change the activation level of the Hh signals, which may explain the wide phenotypic variability of Gorlin syndrome.

  9. The phenotypic spectrum of Schaaf-Yang syndrome – 18 new affected individuals from 14 families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Michael D.; Aten, Emmelien; Cho, Megan T.; Juusola, Jane; Walkiewicz, Magdalena A.; Ray, Joseph W.; Xia, Fan; Yang, Yaping; Graham, Brett H.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Potocki, Lorraine; van Haeringen, Arie; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A.L.; Mancias, Pedro; Northrup, Hope; Kukolich, Mary K.; Weiss, Marjan M.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M.A.; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Levesque, Sebastien; Meeks, Naomi; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Lemke, Danielle; Hamosh, Ada; Lewis, Suzanne K.; Race, Simone; Stewart, Laura L.; Hay, Beverly; Lewis, Andrea M.; Guerreiro, Rita L.; Bras, Jose T.; Martins, Marcia P.; Derksen-Lubsen, Gerarda; Peeters, Els; Stumpel, Connie; Stegmann, Sander; Bok, Levinus A.; Santen, Gijs W.E.; Schaaf, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Truncating mutations in the maternally imprinted, paternally expressed gene MAGEL2, which is located in the Prader-Willi critical region 15q11-13, have recently been reported to cause Schaaf-Yang syndrome, a Prader-Willi-like disease, manifesting developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and autism spectrum disorder. The causality of the reported variants in the context of the patients’ phenotypes was questioned, as MAGEL2 whole gene deletions appear to cause little to no clinical phenotype. Methods Here we report a total of 18 new individuals with Schaaf-Yang syndrome from 14 families, including one family with three individuals found to be affected with a truncating variant of MAGEL2, 11 individuals clinically affected, but not tested molecularly, and a presymptomatic fetal sibling with carrying the pathogenic MAGEL2 variant. Results All cases harbor truncating mutations of MAGEL2, and nucleotides c.1990-1996 arise as a mutational hotspot, with 10 individuals and one fetus harboring a c.1996dupC (p.Q666fs) mutation and two fetuses harboring a c.1996delC (p.Q666fs). The phenotypic spectrum of Schaaf-Yang syndrome ranges from fetal akinesia to individuals with neurobehavioral disease and contractures of the small finger joints. Conclusion This study provides strong evidence for the pathogenicity of truncating mutations of the paternal allele of MAGEL2, refines the associated clinical phenotypes, and highlights implications for genetic counseling of affected families. PMID:27195816

  10. Evaluation of ten prognostic factors affecting the outcome of West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Tekgul, Hasan; Serdaroglu, Gul; Akcay, Ayfer; Gokben, Sarenur

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the seizure and developmental outcome and to determine the prognostic factors affecting the outcome of West syndrome in an etiologically well-defined large cohort. Demographic features, treatment modalities, etiology, seizure and developmental outcome of 216 cases with West syndrome were recorded retrospectively. Ten prognostic factors possibly affecting the outcome of West syndrome including (1) gender, (2) age at the onset (3) presence of seizures prior to spasms, (4) presence of asymmetric spasm, (5) presence of abnormal neurological signs, (6) treatment lag, (7) etiology, (8) drug chosen as the initial treatment, (9) response to initial treatment regardless of the kind, (10) development of other seizure types after spasms were evaluated in terms of seizure and developmental outcome. Twelve percent of the cases were developmentally normal at the end of 2-year follow-up. Ongoing seizures requiring antiepileptic drug medication at the last follow-up were noted in 90 % of the cases. Hypoxia (29 %), metabolic disorders (11 %), infectious diseases (9 %) and cerebral developmental disorders (8 %) were the most frequent etiological factors. Five of the ten prognostic factors (presence of seizures prior to spasms, presence of abnormal neurological signs, response to initial treatment regardless of the kind, etiology and development of other seizure types after spasms) were found to be statistically significant prognostic factors predicting the outcome. In conclusion, West syndrome is still a catastrophic epileptic encephalopathy. Preventable causes still constitute a substantial portion of the etiological causes of West syndrome. Therefore, the prevention of avoidable causes is at least as important as the treatment.

  11. Keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness syndrome: first affected family reported in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Fahaad H

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hamad Al FahaadDepartment of Dermatology, College of Medicine, Najran University, Najran, Saudi ArabiaIntroduction: Keratitis–ichthyosis–deafness (KID syndrome is a rare congenital multisystem disorder affecting certain tissues of ectodermal origin such as epidermis, cochlea, and cornea, leading mainly to palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, ichthyosiform scaling, deafness, and blindness. The author reports for the first time in the Middle East three family members suffering from KID syndrome in the southwestern part of Saudi Arabia.Case presentation: Three patients from one family (ages 26, 16, and 14 years of apparently normal parents, with the two eldest being females and the youngest being male. All three patients were referred from a peripheral hospital to our dermatology clinic due to recurrent cutaneous fungal infections on their trunk, forearms, legs, and nails. On full assessment, they also found to have nearly similar cutaneous problems manifested by palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, generalized ichthyosiform scaling, subungual hyperkeratosis, and nail dystrophies. All patients suffered from total hearing loss in both ears since childhood as confirmed by pure tune audiometry. However, there was no blindness in any case; blepharitis with marked photophobia was the only ocular complaint. All these features are classically suggestive of KID syndrome.Keywords: connexin 26, GJB2, ichthyosis, KID syndrome, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis

  12. Cognitive, Affective Problems and Renal Cross Ectopy in a Patient with 48,XXYY/47,XYY Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefa Resim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome abnormality (SCA in infertile patients and 47,XXY genomic configuration constitutes most of the cases. However, additional Xs and/or Y such as 48,XXYY, 48,XXXY, and 47,XYY can occur less frequently than 47,XXY. Those configurations were considered as variants of Klinefelter syndrome. In this report, we present an infertile man with tall stature and decreased testicular volume. Semen analysis and hormonal evaluation supported the diagnosis of nonobstructive azoospermia. Genetic investigation demonstrated an abnormal male karyotype with two X chromosomes and two Y chromosomes consistent with 48,XXYY(17/47,XYY (13. Additionally, the patient expressed cognitive and affective problems which were documented by psychomotor retardation and borderline intelligence measured by an IQ value between 70 and 80. Systemic evaluation also revealed cross ectopy and malrotation of the right kidney in the patient. The couple was referred to microtesticular sperm extraction (micro-TESE/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI cycles and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of combination of XYY and XXYY syndromes associated with cognitive, affective dysfunction and renal malrotation.

  13. Exploring the role of microorganisms in the disease-like syndrome affecting the sponge Ianthella basta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luter, Heidi M; Whalan, Steve; Webster, Nicole S

    2010-09-01

    A disease-like syndrome is currently affecting a large percentage of the Ianthella basta populations from the Great Barrier Reef and central Torres Strait. Symptoms of the syndrome include discolored, necrotic spots leading to tissue degradation, exposure of the skeletal fibers, and disruption of the choanocyte chambers. To ascertain the role of microbes in the disease process, a comprehensive comparison of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other eukaryotes was performed in healthy and diseased sponges using multiple techniques. A low diversity of microbes was observed in both healthy and diseased sponge communities, with all sponges dominated by an Alphaproteobacteria, a Gammaproteobacteria, and a group I crenarchaeota. Bacterial cultivation, community analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (Bacteria and Eukarya), sequencing of 16S rRNA clone libraries (Bacteria and Archaea), and direct visual assessment by electron microscopy failed to reveal any putative pathogens. In addition, infection assays could not establish the syndrome in healthy sponges even after direct physical contact with affected tissue. These results suggest that microbes are not responsible for the formation of brown spot lesions and necrosis in I. basta.

  14. Genetic analysis of a Chinese family with members affected with Usher syndrome type II and Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueling; Lin, Xiao-Jiang; Tang, Xiangrong; Chai, Yong-Chuan; Yu, De-Hong; Chen, Dong-Ye; Wu, Hao

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of a family presenting with multiple symptoms overlapping Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4). Targeted next-generation sequencing including the exon and flanking intron sequences of 79 deafness genes was performed on the proband. Co-segregation of the disease phenotype and the detected variants were confirmed in all family members by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The affected members of this family had two different recessive disorders, USH2 and WS4. By targeted next-generation sequencing, we identified that USH2 was caused by a novel missense mutation, p.V4907D in GPR98; whereas WS4 due to p.V185M in EDNRB. This is the first report of homozygous p.V185M mutation in EDNRB in patient with WS4. This study reported a Chinese family with multiple independent and overlapping phenotypes. In condition, molecular level analysis was efficient to identify the causative variant p.V4907D in GPR98 and p.V185M in EDNRB, also was helpful to confirm the clinical diagnosis of USH2 and WS4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Attitudes toward prenatal genetic testing for Treacher Collins syndrome among affected individuals and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rebecca L; Lawson, Cathleen S; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Sanderson, Saskia C

    2012-07-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a craniofacial syndrome that is both phenotypically variable and heterogeneous, caused by mutations in the TCOF1, POLR1C, and POLR1D genes. We examined attitudes towards TCS prenatal genetic testing among affected families using a telephone questionnaire. Participants were 31 affected adults and relatives recruited primarily through families cared for in the mid-Atlantic region. Nineteen participants (65%) reported that they would take a TCS prenatal genetic test which could not predict degree of disease severity. Interest in TCS genetic testing was associated with higher income, higher concern about having a child with TCS, lower religiosity, lower concern about genetic testing procedures, and having a sporadic rather than familial mutation. Over half reported that their decision to have TCS genetic testing would be influenced a great deal by their desire to relieve anxiety and attitudes toward abortion. Ten participants (32%) reported that they would be likely to end the pregnancy upon receiving a positive test result; this was lower amongst TCS affected individuals and higher amongst participants with children with TCS. Genetics healthcare providers need to be aware of affected individuals' and families' attitudes and interest in prenatal genetic testing for TCS, and the possible implications for other craniofacial disorders, so that patients' information needs can be met. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Detección de Mycoplasma suis en casos clínicos de síndrome del desmedro multisistémico posdestete en porcinos Detection of Mycoplasma suis in clinical cases with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Pereyra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma suis es un parásito obligado de los eritrocitos del cerdo. Produce anemia aguda o crónica y afecta a distintas categorías de animales. El síndrome del desmedro multisistémico posdestete (PMWS se considera causado por el circovirus porcino tipo 2 (PCV-2, aunque muchos aspectos de la patogenia del síndrome permanecen sin aclarar. Se manifiesta a través de retraso del crecimiento, anemia e ictericia en cerdos de 5 a 12 semanas de edad, en los que se produce una inmunosupresión que deriva en coinfecciones bacterianas. Se estudiaron tres granjas porcinas con sintomatología asociada a la presencia de estos dos agentes etiológicos. Se observaron formas compatibles con M. suis en extendidos de sangre y en lesiones histopatológicas indicativas de PMWS, en cortes de tejidos. Esta es la primera comunicación acerca de la asociación clínica entre las dos entidades mencionadas.Mycoplasma suis is a swine erythrocyte obligatory parasite. Its presence may result in chronic or acute anaemia in different pig categories. It is considered that the postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS is caused by porcine circovirus type 2, but some aspects of the pathogenesis remain unknown. PMWS signs are impaired weight gain, anaemia and jaundice in 5 to 12 week-old pigs that suffer from immunosuppression and bacterial co-infections. The pigs with signs of these diseases on three porcine farms were studied. Compatible M. suis forms in blood smears and typical PMWS lesions in tissue cuts were seen. This is the first communication of the clinical association between these two entities.

  17. Phytosterol supplementation does not affect plasma antioxidant capacity in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sialvera, Theodora-Eirini; Koutelidakis, Antonios E; Richter, Dimitris J; Yfanti, Georgia; Kapsokefalou, Maria; Micha, Renata; Goumas, Giorgos; Diamantopoulos, Emmanouil; Zampelas, Antonis

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have observed decreased levels of lipophilic antioxidants after supplementation with phytosterols and stanols. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of phytosterol supplementation on plasma total antioxidant capacity in patients with metabolic syndrome. In a parallel arm, randomized placebo-controlled design, 108 patients with metabolic syndrome were assigned to consume yogurt beverage which provided 4 g of phytosterols per day or yogurt beverage without phytosterols. The duration of the study was 2 months and the patients in both groups followed their habitual westernized type diet. Blood samples were drawn at baseline and after 2 months, and the total antioxidant capacity of plasma was measured using the ferric reducing antioxidant power of plasma and oxygen radical absorbance capacity assays. After 2 months of intervention, plasma total antioxidant capacity did not differ between and within the intervention and the control groups. Phytosterol supplementation does not affect plasma antioxidant status.

  18. Factors affecting participation in physical activities in Saudi children with Down syndrome: mothers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwhaibi, Reem M; Aldugahishem, Hayfa M

    2018-01-30

    Physical activity provides a wide range of benefits. Several studies conducted in various countries have examined factors influencing participation in physical activities in children with Down syndrome. This study aimed to explore factors affecting participation in physical activities in Saudi children with DS, from their mothers' perspectives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 36 mothers of children with Down syndrome to explore facilitators of and barriers to their children's participation in physical activities. All audio recordings were transcribed, validated, reviewed by the authors independently, and organized into themes. Transcript analysis resulted in four facilitators (mother's support and siblings' involvement, involvement of peers, type of physical activity experience, and child's physical ability, behavioral, and psychological status), and six barriers (conditions associated with Down syndrome, family responsibility, social barriers, environmental constraints, electronic devices, and mother's personal psychological barriers). The results regarding perceived barriers indicated a need to develop and implement programs involving family consultation. Environmental modifications should be made to accommodate the needs of children with Down syndrome. A well-organized partnership should be established and activated between private investors and the Ministries of Education, Social Affairs, and Health, to support the promotion of physical activity. Implications for rehabilitation The efficacy of home- and Internet-based programs for Saudi children with Down syndrome (DS) should be evaluated. Cultural and climactic conditions in Saudi Arabia suggest the need for environmental modifications to help children with DS engage in physical activity. Well-organized partnerships between private investors and the Ministries of Education, Social Affairs, and Health may be required to achieve higher participation of children with DS. Planning and designing of

  19. Increasing the Understanding and Demonstration of Appropriate Affection in Children with Asperger Syndrome: A Pilot Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Sofronoff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to examine relationships between affectionate behavior in children with Asperger syndrome and variables likely to influence its expression (e.g., tactile sensitivity, social ability. It also evaluated the impact of a cognitive behavioral intervention that aimed to improve a child's understanding and expression of affection. Twenty-one children, aged 7 to 12 years, participated in the trial. The results showed significant correlations between measures of affection and tactile sensitivity and social ability. After attending the 5-week program, parents identified significant increases in the appropriateness of children's affectionate behavior both towards immediate family and people outside the immediate family, despite reporting no significant changes in their child's general difficulties with affectionate behavior. There was a significant improvement in children's understanding of the purpose of affection. The findings are discussed as well as the limitations of the study.

  20. Increasing the Understanding and Demonstration of Appropriate Affection in Children with Asperger Syndrome: A Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronoff, Kate; Eloff, Johann; Sheffield, Jeanie; Attwood, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted to examine relationships between affectionate behavior in children with Asperger syndrome and variables likely to influence its expression (e.g., tactile sensitivity, social ability). It also evaluated the impact of a cognitive behavioral intervention that aimed to improve a child's understanding and expression of affection. Twenty-one children, aged 7 to 12 years, participated in the trial. The results showed significant correlations between measures of affection and tactile sensitivity and social ability. After attending the 5-week program, parents identified significant increases in the appropriateness of children's affectionate behavior both towards immediate family and people outside the immediate family, despite reporting no significant changes in their child's general difficulties with affectionate behavior. There was a significant improvement in children's understanding of the purpose of affection. The findings are discussed as well as the limitations of the study. PMID:22937243

  1. Role of negative affects in pathophysiology and clinical expression of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Scimeca, Giuseppe; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco A

    2014-06-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is regarded as a multifactorial disease in which alterations in the brain-gut axis signaling play a major role. The biopsychosocial model applied to the understanding of IBS pathophysiology assumes that psychosocial factors, interacting with peripheral/central neuroendocrine and immune changes, may induce symptoms of IBS, modulate symptom severity, influence illness experience and quality of life, and affect outcome. The present review focuses on the role of negative affects, including depression, anxiety, and anger, on pathogenesis and clinical expression of IBS. The potential role of the autonomic nervous system, stress-hormone system, and immune system in the pathophysiology of both negative affects and IBS are taken into account. Psychiatric comorbidity and subclinical variations in levels of depression, anxiety, and anger are further discussed in relation to the main pathophysiological and symptomatic correlates of IBS, such as sensorimotor functions, gut microbiota, inflammation/immunity, and symptom reporting.

  2. [Analysis of clinical characteristics and genetic mutation in a pedigree affected with Chediak-Higashi syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiangang; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Liyu; Sun, Hongli; Yang, Ying

    2018-04-10

    To explore the genetic basis for a pedigree affected with Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS). Clinical data of two CHS patients from the pedigree was collected and analyzed. Targeted next generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing were conducted to detect potential mutation of the LYST gene. Both patients presented immunodeficiency, oculocutaneous albinism, and acidophilic inclusion body on bone marrow and blood smears. A homozygous c.6077_6078insA (p.Tyr2026Terfs) mutation was detected in the LYST gene in both patients. Genetic testing can play an important role in the diagnosis of CHS.

  3. Distraction osteogenesis therapy in patients affected by Goldenhar syndrome: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Grecchi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemifacial microsomia (HM is a syndrome characterized by the presence of structural alterations of the skeletal, nervous, vascular, and muscular structures derived from the first and second branchial arch. Goldenhar syndrome (Gs consistisof the triad of craniofacial microsomia, ocular dermoid cysts, and spinal anomalies. When the patient has hypoplasia of the mandible, orthognatic surgery or distraction osteogenesis (DO can be used to correct the asymmetry. Mandibular DO has been applied for many years, but long-term reports showed controversial results. The aim of this paper is to describe three cases of patients affected by Gs in which DO was performed to correct the mandibular asymmetry. Case series: The cases reported show an increasing degree of dismorphism which required a increasing complexity of the surgical approach: a single mandibular DO in the first patient, and a mandibular DO associated with a Le Fort I osteotomy in the second one, a double mandibular DO associated with Le Fort I and surgical disjunction of the middle palatal suture in the third case. Discussion: The effects of DO involve not only the skeletal segment but also all the surrounding soft tissues. DO leads to rapid and remarkable improvement in facial symmetry due to emimandible hypoplasia. When correct spatial repositioning of the maxilla cann ot be expected, mandibular DO can be carried out by associating a Le Fort I osteotomy. In this way DO minimize the need for major osteotomies and allows an earlier treatment in selected cases.

  4. Chicken parvovirus viral loads in cloacal swabs from malabsorption syndrome-affected and healthy broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, Fabrine; de Lima, Diane Alves; Cerva, Cristine; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Dos Santos, Helton Fernandes; de Almeida, Laura Lopes; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2016-12-01

    Chicken parvovirus (ChPV) has been associated with malabsorption syndrome (MAS) in broilers. However, the participation of this virus in such syndrome is unclear, since it may be detected in diseased and healthy chickens. In the course of these studies, it was argued whether ChPV genome loads might be correlated to the occurrence of MAS. To check such a hypothesis, a SYBR green-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction was developed to detect and quantify ChPV genomes. Cloacal swabs from 68 broilers with MAS and 59 from healthy animals were collected from different poultry farms. Genomes of ChPV were detected in all samples, regardless of their health status. However, viral genome loads in MAS-affected broilers were significantly higher (1 × 10 5 genome copies per 100 ng DNA) than in healthy animals (1.3 × 10 3 GC/100 ng DNA). These findings indicate that there is an association between high ChPV genome loads and the occurrence of MAS in broilers.

  5. Diabetes mellitus may affect short-term outcome of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric, Stojan; Bozovic, Ivo; Bjelica, Bogdan; Berisavac, Ivana; Stojiljkovic, Olivera; Basta, Ivana; Beslac-Bumbasirevic, Ljiljana; Rakocevic-Stojanovic, Vidosava; Lavrnic, Dragana; Stevic, Zorica

    2017-06-01

    We sought to determine influence of diabetes mellitus on Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) course and short-term prognosis. Among the 257 GBS patients included in this retrospective study, diabetes mellitus was present in 17%. The degree of disability at admission and on discharge was assessed according to the GBS Disability Scale (mild disability = 0-3, severe disability = 4-6). Even after correction for age, diabetes mellitus was significantly associated with more severe disability at nadir (odds ratio, OR = 3.4, p diabetes were significant predictors of severe disability at nadir (adjusted R 2 = 0.21, p diabetes mellitus affects short-term prognosis of GBS, independent of age. © 2017 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  6. Fibrillin levels in a severely affected Marfan syndrome patient with a null allele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boxer, M.; Withers, A.P.; Al-Ghaban, Z. [Univ. of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)]|[Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by defects in the cardiovascular, skeletal and ocular systems. A patient was first examined in 1992 having survived an acute sortic dissection with subsequent composite repair and insertion of a prosthetic aortic valve. Clinical examination revealed arachnodactyly, narrow, high arched palate with dental crowding, an arm span exceeding her height by 10.5 cm, joint laxity and bilateral lens subluxation. Analysis of the family showed affected members in three generations and the fibrillin gene, FBN1, was shown to segregate with the disease when using polymorphic markers including an RsaI polymorphism in the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the gene. Analysis of patient mRNA for this RsaI polymorphism by RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-PCR) amplification and restriction enzyme digestion of the PCR products showed that the copy of the gene segregating with the disease was not transcribed. No low level expression of this allele was observed despite RT-PCR amplification incorporating radioactively labelled dCTP, thus revealing a null allele phenotype. Western blotting analysis of fibrillin secreted by the patient`s dermal fibroblasts using fibrillin-specific antibodies showed only normal sized fibrillin protein. However, immunohistochemical studies of the patient`s tissue and fibroblasts showed markedly lowered levels in staining of microfibrillar structures compared with age-matched controls. This low level of expression of the protein affected in Marfan syndrome in a patient with such severe clinical manifestations is surprising since current understanding would suggest that this molecular phenotype should lead to a mild clinical disorder.

  7. Mito-nuclear Interactions Affecting Lifespan and Neurodegeneration in aDrosophilaModel of Leigh Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Carin A; Ganetzky, Barry

    2018-03-01

    Proper mitochondrial activity depends upon proteins encoded by genes in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that must interact functionally and physically in a precisely coordinated manner. Consequently, mito-nuclear allelic interactions are thought to be of crucial importance on an evolutionary scale, as well as for manifestation of essential biological phenotypes, including those directly relevant to human disease. Nonetheless, detailed molecular understanding of mito-nuclear interactions is still lacking, and definitive examples of such interactions in vivo are sparse. Here we describe the characterization of a mutation in Drosophila ND23 , a nuclear gene encoding a highly conserved subunit of mitochondrial complex 1. This characterization led to the discovery of a mito-nuclear interaction that affects the ND23 mutant phenotype. ND23 mutants exhibit reduced lifespan, neurodegeneration, abnormal mitochondrial morphology and decreased ATP levels. These phenotypes are similar to those observed in patients with Leigh Syndrome, which is caused by mutations in a number of nuclear genes that encode mitochondrial proteins, including the human ortholog of ND23 A key feature of Leigh Syndrome, and other mitochondrial disorders, is unexpected and unexplained phenotypic variability. We discovered that the phenotypic severity of ND23 mutations varies depending on the maternally inherited mitochondrial background. Sequence analysis of the relevant mitochondrial genomes identified several variants that are likely candidates for the phenotypic interaction with mutant ND23 , including a variant affecting a mitochondrially-encoded component of complex I. Thus, our work provides an in vivo demonstration of the phenotypic importance of mito-nuclear interactions in the context of mitochondrial disease. Copyright © 2018, Genetics.

  8. Factors affecting executive functions in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and volumetric changes in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Zahide; Voyvoda, Nuray; İnan, Eda; Şirinocak, Pınar Bekdik; Terzi, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with cognitive changes and executive functions are among the cognitive domains most affected. However, it is not completely understood which of the factor(s) among hypoxemia, repeated arousal, and sleepiness affect the executive functions. This study aims to evaluate the possible relationship between the executive functions and nocturnal parameters, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores, and prefrontal cortex (PFC) volumes. A total of 28 patients aged between 18 and 60 years who were newly diagnosed with OSAS were included in this study. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and Stroop test which were used in the evaluation of executive functions were applied to all patients. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and volumetric measurements of the PFC were performed. Polysomnography (PSG), WCST, Stroop test, and cranial MRI were also applied to the control group which consisted of age- and education status-matched 15 healthy subjects. The correlation of WCST and Stroop tests and PFC volume, PSG parameters, and ESS scale was examined. The WCST-6 test scores were statistically significantly higher in the patient group (p = 0.022; p executive functions in OSAS is evident. The most influential factor is excessive daytime sleepiness, rather than hypoxemia and severity of the disease.

  9. Reproduction of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in immunostimulated and non-immunostimulated 3-week-old piglets experimentally infected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladekjær-Mikkelsen, A.S.; Nielsen, Jens; Stadejek, T.

    2002-01-01

    on postinoculation day (PID) 21, and one was euthanized on PID 25 in moribund condition. These animals had appeared lethargic with persistent fever from PID 12 onwards. The euthanized pig appeared smaller than littermates and suffered from jaundice. At postmortem examination, gastric ulceration, icterus, and liver...

  10. Identification of Stressors that Affect White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) Infection and Outbreak in Pond Cultured Penaeus monodon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tendencia Alapide, E.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has been a big problem to the worldwide shrimp industry. Exposure to stressors related to physicochemical water parameters affect WSSV infection but not all WSSV infections result in outbreaks. This paper describes a detailed monitoring of important physicochemical

  11. Socio-Dramatic Affective-Relational Intervention for Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome & High Functioning Autism: Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Matthew D.; Mikami, Amori Yee; Levine, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a novel intervention called "socio-dramatic affective-relational intervention" (SDARI), intended to improve social skills among adolescents with Asperger syndrome and high functioning autism diagnoses. SDARI adapts dramatic training activities to focus on in vivo practice of areas of social skill…

  12. CLINICAL INCIDENCE AND FREQUENCY OF LESIONS ASSOCIATED TO PORCINE CIRCOVIRUS TYPE 2 IN PIGS OF A FARM IN THE STATE OF YUCATAN, MEXICO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Leonardo Guillermo Cordero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence rate, the cumulative incidence of Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS and porcine dermatitis nephropathy syndrome (PDNS, and the frequency of macroscopic and microscopic lesions of PMWS and PDNS in pigs in a farm in the state of Yucatan, Mexico. A group of production consisting of 235 pigs was observed from 4 to 22 weeks of life to determine the number of new cases compatible with the PMWS and PDNS. In addition pigs necropsied on the farm that were discarded and with signs consistent with syndromes studied. 80 pigs were studied, the organs inspected during the necropsy were the lungs, lymphonodes, spleen, liver, tonsils, ileum, kidneys and skin, samples of all organs were obtained for histopathological studies. The results were: 14 pigs with signs consistent with syndromes mentioned, 7 with the PMWS and 7 with the PDNS. The cumulate incidence and incidence rate for both syndromes was 0.06 and 0.0034 respectively. 5 pigs died, the lethality rate calculated for PMWS y PDNS was 0.4 and 0.3 respectively. The average time elapsed since the start of the observation period until the pigs sick with the PMWS and PDNS were 13.8 and 16.8 weeks respectively. The principal organ affected were the lymphonodes (100% where the main macroscopic injury was a lymphadenomegaly with diffuse edema (56% and the microscopic was a histiocytic lymphadenitis with lymphoid atrophy (64%

  13. SLC30A9 mutation affecting intracellular zinc homeostasis causes a novel cerebro-renal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Yonatan; Shorer, Zamir; Liani-Leibson, Keren; Chabosseau, Pauline; Kadir, Rotem; Volodarsky, Michael; Halperin, Daniel; Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Shalev, Hanna; Schreiber, Ruth; Gradstein, Libe; Gurevich, Evgenia; Zarivach, Raz; Rutter, Guy A; Landau, Daniel; Birk, Ohad S

    2017-04-01

    A novel autosomal recessive cerebro-renal syndrome was identified in consanguineous Bedouin kindred: neurological deterioration was evident as of early age, progressing into severe intellectual disability, profound ataxia, camptocormia and oculomotor apraxia. Brain MRI was normal. Four of the six affected individuals also had early-onset nephropathy with features of tubulo-interstitial nephritis, hypertension and tendency for hyperkalemia, though none had rapid deterioration of renal function. Genome wide linkage analysis identified an ∼18 Mb disease-associated locus on chromosome 4 (maximal logarithm of odds score 4.4 at D4S2971; θ = 0). Whole exome sequencing identified a single mutation in SLC30A9 within this locus, segregating as expected within the kindred and not found in a homozygous state in 300 Bedouin controls. We showed that SLC30A9 (solute carrier family 30 member 9; also known as ZnT-9) is ubiquitously expressed with high levels in cerebellum, skeletal muscle, thymus and kidney. Confocal analysis of SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing SLC30A9 fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein demonstrated vesicular cytosolic localization associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, not co-localizing with endosomal or Golgi markers. SLC30A9 encodes a putative zinc transporter (by similarity) previously associated with Wnt signalling. However, using dual-luciferase reporter assay in SH-SY5Y cells we showed that Wnt signalling was not affected by the mutation. Based on protein modelling, the identified mutation is expected to affect SLC30A9's highly conserved cation efflux domain, putatively disrupting its transmembrane helix structure. Cytosolic Zn2+ measurements in HEK293 cells overexpressing wild-type and mutant SLC30A9 showed lower zinc concentration within mutant rather than wild-type SLC30A9 cells. This suggests that SLC30A9 has zinc transport properties affecting intracellular zinc homeostasis, and that the molecular mechanism of the disease is through

  14. Psychosocial and Pedagogical Means of Reduction of Hyper Dynamic Manifestations Syndrome Within the Affective Personality Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Novitska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of correction of affective personality disorders (for example, reducing the manifestations of hyper dynamic syndrome, analyzes the main approaches to its solution. We determined the causes and forms of attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity. To characterize the basic correction means reducing the manifestations of hyper dynamic behavior, which includes two areas with different content and psycho social and recreational components. The first direction is connected with the conduct of an individual or group psycho-correction work; the second – social and recreational include tasks aimed at providing social and psychological support to the individual. It is shown that the problem of hyperactive behavior is determined by the individual variability and natural features caused by human development. Psychological studies suggest the importance of external, social factors, primarily adequate forms of organization and communication, the influence of family relations on the manifestations of hyperactivity. It is shown that the implementation of psycho-pedagogical bases of overcoming hyperactivity leads to increased self-esteem, developing the ability to plan and predict their own behavior and, as a consequence – the disclosure of the individual adaptation possibilities.

  15. Neural correlates of cross-modal affective priming by music in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D; Gordon, Reyna L; Key, Alexandra P F; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2014-04-01

    Emotional connection is the main reason people engage with music, and the emotional features of music can influence processing in other domains. Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder where musicality and sociability are prominent aspects of the phenotype. This study examined oscillatory brain activity during a musical affective priming paradigm. Participants with WS and age-matched typically developing controls heard brief emotional musical excerpts or emotionally neutral sounds and then reported the emotional valence (happy/sad) of subsequently presented faces. Participants with WS demonstrated greater evoked fronto-central alpha activity to the happy vs sad musical excerpts. The size of these alpha effects correlated with parent-reported emotional reactivity to music. Although participant groups did not differ in accuracy of identifying facial emotions, reaction time data revealed a music priming effect only in persons with WS, who responded faster when the face matched the emotional valence of the preceding musical excerpt vs when the valence differed. Matching emotional valence was also associated with greater evoked gamma activity thought to reflect cross-modal integration. This effect was not present in controls. The results suggest a specific connection between music and socioemotional processing and have implications for clinical and educational approaches for WS.

  16. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Pleger

    Full Text Available The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1 and motor cortex (M1 contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  17. Complex regional pain syndrome type I affects brain structure in prefrontal and motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleger, Burkhard; Draganski, Bogdan; Schwenkreis, Peter; Lenz, Melanie; Nicolas, Volkmar; Maier, Christoph; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare but debilitating pain disorder that mostly occurs after injuries to the upper limb. A number of studies indicated altered brain function in CRPS, whereas possible influences on brain structure remain poorly investigated. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data from CRPS type I patients and applied voxel-by-voxel statistics to compare white and gray matter brain segments of CRPS patients with matched controls. Patients and controls were statistically compared in two different ways: First, we applied a 2-sample ttest to compare whole brain white and gray matter structure between patients and controls. Second, we aimed to assess structural alterations specifically of the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the CRPS affected side. To this end, MRI scans of patients with left-sided CRPS (and matched controls) were horizontally flipped before preprocessing and region-of-interest-based group comparison. The unpaired ttest of the "non-flipped" data revealed that CRPS patients presented increased gray matter density in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. The same test applied to the "flipped" data showed further increases in gray matter density, not in the S1, but in the M1 contralateral to the CRPS-affected limb which were inversely related to decreased white matter density of the internal capsule within the ipsilateral brain hemisphere. The gray-white matter interaction between motor cortex and internal capsule suggests compensatory mechanisms within the central motor system possibly due to motor dysfunction. Altered gray matter structure in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex may occur in response to emotional processes such as pain-related suffering or elevated analgesic top-down control.

  18. Literature review and global consensus on management of acute radiation syndrome affecting nonhematopoietic organ systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Gent, Robert Nicolas; Carr, Zhanat; Schneider, Rita; Bader, Judith; Buglova, Elena; Chao, Nelson; Coleman, C Norman; Ganser, Arnold; Gorin, Claude; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Huff, L Andrew; Lillis-Hearne, Patricia; Maekawa, Kazuhiko; Nemhauser, Jeffrey; Powles, Ray; Schünemann, Holger; Shapiro, Alla; Stenke, Leif; Valverde, Nelson; Weinstock, David; White, Douglas; Albanese, Joseph; Meineke, Viktor

    2011-10-01

    The World Health Organization convened a panel of experts to rank the evidence for medical countermeasures for management of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in a hypothetical scenario involving the hospitalization of 100 to 200 victims. The goal of this panel was to achieve consensus on optimal management of ARS affecting nonhematopoietic organ systems based upon evidence in the published literature. English-language articles were identified in MEDLINE and PubMed. Reference lists of retrieved articles were distributed to conferees in advance of and updated during the meeting. Published case series and case reports of ARS, publications of randomized controlled trials of relevant interventions used to treat nonirradiated individuals, reports of studies in irradiated animals, and prior recommendations of subject matter experts were selected. Studies were extracted using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation system. In cases in which data were limited or incomplete, a narrative review of the observations was made. No randomized controlled trials of medical countermeasures have been completed for individuals with ARS. Reports of countermeasures were often incompletely described, making it necessary to rely on data generated in nonirradiated humans and in experimental animals. A strong recommendation is made for the administration of a serotonin-receptor antagonist prophylactically when the suspected exposure is >2 Gy and topical steroids, antibiotics, and antihistamines for radiation burns, ulcers, or blisters; excision and grafting of radiation ulcers or necrosis with intractable pain; provision of supportive care to individuals with neurovascular syndrome; and administration of electrolyte replacement therapy and sedatives to individuals with significant burns, hypovolemia, and/or shock. A strong recommendation is made against the use of systemic steroids in the absence of a specific indication. A weak recommendation is made for the use

  19. How Does Fragile X Syndrome Affect Speech and Language Skills? FPG Snapshot. Number 51. January 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    FPG Child Development Institute, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Children with fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known inherited cause of intellectual disability, typically experience communication difficulties. Children with other intellectual disabilities such as Down syndrome also experience communication difficulties. Further, many boys with FXS (some estimates are as high as 35 percent) also are…

  20. How Do Object Size and Rigidity Affect Reaching and Grasping in Infants with Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, Ana Carolina; Francisco, Kelly Regina; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Reaching and grasping skills have been described to emerge from a dynamic interaction between intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the interaction between such an intrinsic factor, Down syndrome, and extrinsic factors, such as different object properties. Seven infants with Down syndrome and seven…

  1. Metabolic Syndrome as a Factor Affecting Systemic Inflammation in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsztajn, R; Przybyłowski, T; Maskey-Warzęchowska, M; Paplińska-Goryca, M; Nejman-Gryz, P; Karwat, K; Chazan, R

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a systemic disease which may be associated with other comorbidities. The aim of the study was to estimate the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in COPD patients and to assess its impact on systemic inflammation and lung function. MS was diagnosed in accordance with the recommendations of the Polish Forum for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases. The study group consisted of 267 patients with stable COPD in all stages of severity. All patients underwent spirometry with bronchial reversibility testing and 6 min walk test (6MWT). The following blood tests were evaluated: lipid profile, glucose and C-reactive protein as well as serum concentration of IL-6, leptin, adiponectin, and endothelin. MS was diagnosed in 93 patients (35.8%). No differences were observed in the incidence of MS in relation to airflow limitation severity (mild; moderate; severe and very severe: 38.9; 36.3; 35.2 and 25.0%, respectively). FEV 1 (% predicted), FVC (% predicted), 6MWT distance (6MWD), age, and the number of pack-years were similar in patients with and without MS. MS was more frequent in males than females (38.7 vs. 28.4%, p > 0.05). Serum concentrations of IL-6, endothelin, leptin, and CRP were higher in the MS group, contrary to adiponectin concentration which was lower (p < 0.01). MS was more frequent in male COPD patients, but there were no differences in its frequency between patients with different severity of airflow limitation. We conclude that MS, as a comorbidity, occurs in all COPD stages and affects systemic inflammation. MS incidence does not depend on COPD severity.

  2. Does Self-Efficacy Affect Cognitive Performance in Persons with Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Early Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Wesnes, Keith; van Geel, Bj?rn; Pop, Paul; Schrijver, Hans; Visser, Leo H.; Gilhuis, H. Jacobus; Sinnige, Ludovicus G.; Brands, Augustina M.

    2015-01-01

    In persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) a lowered self-efficacy negatively affects physical activities. Against this background we studied the relationship between self-efficacy and cognitive performance in the early stages of MS. Thirty-three patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS) and early Relapsing Remitting MS (eRRMS) were assessed for self-efficacy (MSSES-18), cognition (CDR System), fatigue (MFIS-5), depressive symptoms (BDI), disease impact (MSIS-29), and disability (EDSS). C...

  3. Thoracic outlet syndrome affecting high-performance musicians playing bowed string instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaree, Christopher J; Wang, Kevin; Lin, Peter H

    2017-06-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome, a condition due to neurovascular compression in the upper shoulder region, can be caused by chronic repetitive activity of the upper extremities. Studies have linked upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders to high-performance musicians who play bowed string instruments such as the violin or viola. We report herein a case series of five elite musicians, including three violinists and two violaists, who developed neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome following years of intense practice. Successful surgical treatment including first rib resection, scalenectomy, and brachial plexus neurolysis was performed in all patients. All patients were able to resume their musical career following surgical treatment. Our report represents the first description of thoracic outlet syndrome in high-performance bowed string instrumentalists. Clinicians should be aware of thoracic outlet syndrome as a differential diagnosis when treating string instrumentalists with upper extremity musculoskeletal ailments.

  4. Designing and determining validity and reliability of a questionnaire to identify factors affecting nutritional behavior among patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseh Esmaeili

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background : A number of studies have shown a clear relationship between diet and component of metabolic syndrome. Based on the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA, attitude and subjective norm are factors affecting behavioral intention and subsequently behavior. The aim of the present study is to design a valid questionnaire identifying factors affecting nutritional behavior among patients with metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: Via literature review, six focus group discussion and interview with nutrition specialists were performed to develop an instrument based on the theory of reasoned action. To determine validity of the instrument, content and face validity analyses with 15 expert panels conducted and also to determine reliability, Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient performed. Results: A draft of 100 items questionnaire was developed and after evaluation of validity and reliability, final questionnaire included 46 items: 17 items for attitude, 13 items for subjective norms and 16 items for behavioral intention. For the final questionnaire average of content validity index was 0/92 and Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient was 0/85. Conclusion: Based on the results of the current study the developed questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument and it can be used to identify factors affecting nutritional behavior among people with metabolic syndrome based on the theory of reasoned action.

  5. Sudden infant death syndrome: are we any closer to identifying which infants will be affected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez TL

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tara L Ramirez, Michael H MalloyDepartment of Pediatrics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Sudden infant death syndrome is a complex and multifactoral process. The classification and definition of the syndrome has changed over time. As knowledge in the genetics of this complex syndrome continues to advance, additional causes of vulnerability have been found, but no single cause has yet been discovered. Over the last 40 years there have also been many advances in the identification of risk factors that make a given infant more vulnerable to succumbing to sudden infant death. There have also been great strides made in decreasing the number of infant deaths from this syndrome by modification of these risk factors, most notably with the initiation of the Back to Sleep campaign. With the initiation of the Safe to Sleep campaign there is hope that sudden infant death syndrome as a component of all sudden unexpected infant deaths can be further reduced.Keywords: sudden infant death syndrome, sudden unexpected death of infancy, risk factors, sleep-related infant death, crib death, cot death

  6. Case report: long-term survival of an infant syndromic patient affected by atypical teratoid-rhabdoid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modena, Piergiorgio; Maestro, Roberta; Giangaspero, Felice; Massimino, Maura; Sardi, Iacopo; Brenca, Monica; Giunti, Laura; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Pollo, Bianca; Biassoni, Veronica; Genitori, Lorenzo; Antonelli, Manila

    2013-01-01

    Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) patients display a dismal median overall survival of less than 1 year. A consistent fraction of cases carries de-novo SMARCB1/INI1 constitutional mutations in the setting of the “rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome” and the outcome is worst in infant syndromic ATRT patients. We here describe a patient affected by mosaic Klinefelter syndrome and by rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome caused by constitutional SMARCB1/INI1 heterozygous mutation c.118C>T (Arg40X). Patient’s ATRT primary tumor occurred at 2 years of age concurrent with metastatic lesions. The patient was rendered without evidence of disease by combined surgery, high-dose poli-chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation, followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. At the onset of a spinal lesion 5.5 years later, both tumors were pathologically and molecularly evaluated at the national central pathology review board and defined as ATRT in a syndromic patient, with strong evidence of a clonal origin of the two lesions. The patient was then treated according to SIOP guidelines and is now alive without evidence of disease 24 months after the detection of metastatic disease and 90 months after the original diagnosis. The report underscores the current utility of multiple comprehensive approaches for the correct diagnosis and clinical management of patients affected by rare and atypical brain neoplasms. Successful local control of disease and achievement of long-term survival is possible in ATRT patients even in the setting of rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome, infant age at diagnosis and metastatic spread of disease, thus justifying the efforts for the management of this severe condition

  7. Can early physical therapy positively affect the onset of independent walking in infants with Down syndrome? A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Bruno; Sommella, Nadia; Ciardi, Gianluca; Raiano, Enza; Scala, Iris; Strisciuglio, Pietro; Servodio Iammarrone, Clemente

    2018-02-19

    The development of both gross and fine motor skills in a child with Down syndrome is generally delayed. The most seriously affected stage is the achievement of independent walking ability, which influences the onset of all following motor and cognityive skills. The study objectives were (a) to assess the time taken to achieve independent walking ability in a cohort of children with Down syndrome, (b) to examine differences in walking onset by patient characteristics, (c) to verify the effect of early physical therapy (Neurodevelopmental Treatment on the basis of Bobath Concept practised within the first months of life) in the achievement of that skill. A retrospective study was carried out on a cohort of 86 children with Down Syndrome. The knowledge of the exact age of walking onset and information about comorobities and rehabilitation practised since birth were the eligibility criteria. The average age at which walking began in the sample was 26 months (Standard Deviation = 9.66). Some patient characteristics proved to be related negatively to the walking onset: gender male, trisomy 21, improved joint ligamentous laxity. When practised, early physical therapy was able to contrast the delay in walking. NDT-Bobath is a well-known and valid instrument for a child with Down syndrome to attain his highest possible psychomotor functioning level. This study pointed out for the first time ever its capability to contrast the delay on walking onset, which can influences positively the development of the following motor and cognitive skills.

  8. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  9. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... One in 10 children with this syndrome has a problem involving chromosome 7. In other people with the syndrome, it may affect chromosome 11. Most of the time, it ...

  10. Cognitive-affective neuroscience of somatization disorder and functional somatic syndromes: reconceptualizing the triad of depression-anxiety-somatic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J; Muller, Jacqueline

    2008-05-01

    Somatization disorder is a somatoform disorder that overlaps with a number of functional somatic syndromes and has high comorbidity with major depression and anxiety disorders. Proposals have been made for revising the category of somatoform disorders, for simplifying the criteria for somatization disorder, and for emphasizing the unitary nature of the functional somatic syndromes in future classifications. A review of the cognitive-affective neuroscience of somatization disorder and related conditions suggests that overlapping psychobiological mechanisms mediate depression, anxiety, and somatization symptoms. Particular genes and environments may contribute to determining whether symptoms are predominantly depressive, anxious, or somatic, and there are perhaps also overlaps and distinctions in the distal evolutionary mechanisms that produce these symptoms.

  11. Mutations in MCT8 in patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley-Syndrome affecting its cellular distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kersseboom (Simone); G.J. Kremers (Gert-Jan); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); W. Edward Visser (W.); W. Klootwijk (Willem); R.P. Peeters (Robin); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMonocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a thyroid hormone (TH)-specific transporter. Mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), consisting of severe psychomotor retardation and disturbed TH parameters. To study the functional consequences of

  12. Aging rather than aneuploidy affects monoamine neurotransmitters in brain regions of Down syndrome mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Alain D; Vermeiren, Yannick; Albac, Christelle; Lana-Elola, Eva; Watson-Scales, Sheona; Gibbins, Dorota; Aerts, Tony; Van Dam, Debby; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Potier, Marie-Claude; De Deyn, Peter P

    Altered concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitters and metabolites have been repeatedly found in people with Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21). Because of the limited availability of human post-mortem tissue, DS mouse models are of great interest to study these changes and the underlying

  13. Why Dose Frequency Affects Spoken Vocabulary in Preschoolers with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Paul J.; Woynaroski, Tiffany; Fey, Marc E.; Warren, Steven F.; Gardner, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier randomized clinical trial, daily communication and language therapy resulted in more favorable spoken vocabulary outcomes than weekly therapy sessions in a subgroup of initially nonverbal preschoolers with intellectual disabilities that included only children with Down syndrome (DS). In this reanalysis of the dataset involving only…

  14. Metabolic syndrome in a cohort of affectively ill patients, a naturalistic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Madsen, Maiken; Breum, Leif

    2012-01-01

    at a Mood Disorder Clinic. Methods: Patients were evaluated for the presence of metabolic syndrome (MeS) according to modified NCEP ATP III criteria. Results: Of the 143 patients eligible for participation, 100 patients participated in the study (32% male, mean age 43.6 ± 14.2); the prevalence of MeS was 26...

  15. The number of hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons is not affected in Prader-Willi syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, Rolf; Lammers, Gert Jan; Balesar, Rawien; Unmehopa, Unga A.; Swaab, Dick F.

    2005-01-01

    Narcoleptic patients with cataplexy have a general loss of hypocretin (orexin) in the lateral hypothalamus, possibly due to an autoimmune-mediated degeneration of the hypocretin neurons. In addition to excessive daytime sleepiness, Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) patients may show narcolepsy-like

  16. The number of hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons is not affected in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Balesar, R.; Unm, U.A.hopa; Swaab, D.F.

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: Narcoleptic patients with cataplexy have a general loss of hypocretin (orexin) in the lateral hypothalamus, possibly due to an autoimmune-mediated degeneration of the hypocretin neurons. In addition to excessive daytime sleepiness, Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) patients may show

  17. Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance and Cognitive Dysfunction: Does your metabolic profile affect your brain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Jesper S; Møller, Katrine Dragsbæk; Christiansen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Dementia and type 2 diabetes are both characterized by long prodromal phases challenging the study of potential risk factors and their temporal relation. The progressive relation between metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and dementia has recently been questioned, wherefore the aim...... to be preventable by effective prevention and control of the insulin homeostasis....

  18. Does shoulder impingement syndrome affect the shoulder kinematics and associated muscle activity in archers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, H; Urabe, Y; Maeda, N; Xie, D; Sasadai, J; Fujii, E

    2014-12-01

    Archery related injuries, such as shoulder impingement syndrome are caused by repeated motion of the shoulder. The aim of this study was to analyze differences in the shoulder kinematics and the associated muscle activity between archers with shoulder impingement and uninjured archery players. Thirty male archers, who were divided into an impingement group and an uninjured group, were included in this study. The angle of scapular elevation, shoulder joint abduction, horizontal extension, and elbow joint flexion as well as the electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius, lower trapezius, deltoid middle, deltoid posterior, biceps brachii, and triceps brachii muscles at the point of stabilization during shooting were measured. Variables differing between impingement and uninjured groups were identified, and a stepwise regression analysis was performed to identify a combination of variables that effectively impingement syndrome. The results indicated that the angle of scapular elevation was significantly greater than that uninjured group (Pimpingement group was significantly smaller than that in the uninjured group (Pimpingement group was significantly smaller than that in the uninjured group (Pimpingement group, while the level of lower trapezius muscle activity was significantly lower (Pimpingement group had a greater angle of scapular elevation, smaller angle of horizontal extension, smaller angle of elbow flexion, higher the levels of upper trapezius, lower the levels of lower trapezius, higher deltoid middle muscle activity and higher UT/LT ratio (all differences were significant). A logistic model for predicting impingement syndrome showed that UT/LT ratio was significantly related impingement syndrome (Pshoulder impingement syndrome exhibit different kinematics and muscle activity compared to uninjured archers. Therefore, in order to prevent shoulder joint impingement during archery, training is necessary what can make lower trapezius muscle activity

  19. Executive dysfunction in children affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Lorenzo Antinolfi,1 Beatrice Gallai,2 Lucia Parisi,3 Michele Roccella,3 Rosa Marotta,4 Serena Marianna Lavano,4 Giovanni Mazzotta,5 Francesco Precenzano,1 Marco Carotenuto1 1Sleep Clinic for Developmental Age, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental and Physical Health and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy; 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 4Department of Psychiatry, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 5Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, AUSL Umbria 2, Terni, Italy Introduction: The role of sleep in cognitive processes can be considered clear and well established. Different reports have disclosed the association between sleep and cognition in adults and in children, as well as the impact of disturbed sleep on various aspects of neuropsychological functioning and behavior in children and adolescents. Behavioral and cognitive dysfunctions can also be considered as related to alterations in the executive functions (EF system. In particular, the EF concept refers to self-regulatory cognitive processes that are associated with monitoring and controlling both thought and goal directed behaviors. The aim of the present study is to assess the impact of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS on EF in a large sample of school aged children. Materials and methods: The study population comprised 79 children (51 males and 28 females aged 7–12 years (mean 9.14 ± 2.36 years with OSAS and 92 healthy children (63 males and 29 females, mean age 9.08 ± 2.44 years. To identify the severity of OSAS, an overnight respiratory evaluation was performed. All subjects filled out the Italian version of the Modified Card Sorting Test to screen EFs. Moreover, to check the degree of subjective perceived daytime sleepiness

  20. Why Dose Frequency Affects Spoken Vocabulary in Preschoolers With Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Paul J; Woynaroski, Tiffany; Fey, Marc E; Warren, Steven F; Gardner, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    In an earlier randomized clinical trial, daily communication and language therapy resulted in more favorable spoken vocabulary outcomes than weekly therapy sessions in a subgroup of initially nonverbal preschoolers with intellectual disabilities that included only children with Down syndrome (DS). In this reanalysis of the dataset involving only the participants with DS, we found that more therapy led to larger spoken vocabularies at posttreatment because it increased children's canonical syllabic communication and receptive vocabulary growth early in the treatment phase.

  1. Resistin, an adipokine, may affect the improvement of insulin sensitivity in the metabolic syndrome patient treated with metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hong; Weng, Chunyan; Yang, Youbo; Huang, Lihua; Xing, Xiaowei

    2013-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders arising from insulin resistance, characterized by the presence of central obesity, impaired fasting glucose level, dyslipidemia and hypertension. As the first-line medication, metformin is commonly used for MS to reduce insulin resistance. Comparing with rosiglitazone, metformin does not increase cardiovascular mortality risk in patients with MS. However, metformin is not good enough in improving insulin sensitivity. Its molecular mechanism is still not clear. Recent studies have demonstrated that resistin, an adipokine, could induce IR by both AMPK-dependent and AMPK-independent pathways. Though there were conflicting findings of resistin in metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus in different studies, resistin was significant decreased in the rosiglitazone treated patients than in the metformin-treated patients in most of studies. Here, we hypothesized that resistin, an adipokine, may affect the improvement of insulin sensitivity in the metabolic syndrome patient treated with metformin. This hypothesis could explain why rosiglitazone is superior to metformin in enhancement of insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Kluver-Bucy Syndrome in a Patient with Bipolar Affective Disorder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhur Basnet

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Kluver and Bucy described a behavioral syndrome in rhesus monkeys following bilateral temporal lobectomy which included psychic blindness, hyperorality, hypermetamorphosis, hypersexuality, and emotional unresponsiveness. Case report: A 44 years old right handed male of Indo-aryan origin, blacksmith by profession, had presented in manic phase of bipolar illness. He had hypersexuality, hypermetamorphosis, hyperorality, and altered dietary habits along with amnesia and fleeting misrecognition of even his close relatives. MRI of the patient showed mild cerebral atrophy with right temporal lobe atrophy. The patient was treated with lithium and olanzapine along with benzodiazepines. The symptoms resolved gradually with resolution of the manic phase. Patient had similar features in the previous manic episode as well that resolved with resolution of mania. Conclusion: The symptoms of Kluver-Bucy syndrome like increased libido, increased activity might be confused with that of mania. Other features of Kluver-Bucy syndrome and the overt hypersexuality could help identify it even during manic phase of bipolar illness.

  3. Shortening Anesthesia Duration does not Affect Severity of Withdrawal Syndrome in Patients Undergoing Ultra Rapid Opioid Detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaleh Shami

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultra rapid opioid detoxification (UROD is one of the new methods of detoxification. This method of detoxification involves putting patients under general anesthesia and actively giving them opioid antagonists. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of anesthesia duration in UROD on severity of withdrawal syndrome. Sixty addicted patients seeking UROD procedure assigned randomly to one of the 2hr, 4hr or 6hr anesthesia duration groups. Premedication and anesthesia procedure (induction and maintenance were the same for three groups. Detoxification was done for all patients with 50 mg oral naltroxane (prior to induction and 20 mg intravenous naloxane (8 mg/bolus and 12 mg/infusion. Blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate were automatically measured and recorded every 5 minutes. The severity of withdrawal syndrome was measured and recorded every one hour during anesthesia, 2hours post-anesthesia, and 12 and 24 hours following the induction of anesthesia according to the Wang Scale modified by Lomier (WSMBL. Patients aged 20-58 in three groups. Three cases experienced delirium after detoxification that lasted 24 hours in one. Severity of withdrawal syndrome in patients of groups 2, 4 and 6 hour were 8.7, 7.4 and 5.1 respectively during anesthesia and 12.3, 11.1 and 13.9 after 18 hours of anesthesia. Results of this study showed that, in standard settings, UROD is a safe method for detoxification and has low complications. The withdrawal symptoms during and after anesthesia are low. Shortening the duration of anesthesia has no affect on severity of withdrawal syndrome during and after anesthesia.

  4. Patterson-Stevenson-Fontaine syndrome: 30-year follow-up and clinical details of a further affected case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkie, A.O.M. [John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Goodacre, T.E.E. [Radcliffe Infirmary NHS Trust, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-14

    The nosology of the acrofacial dysostoses was reviewed extensively. The Patterson-Stevenson-Fontaine syndrome (MIM 183700) is a rare variant, characterized by variable oligosyndactyly of the feet, unusual ears, deafness, cleft palate and autosomal dominant inheritance. The original description by Patterson and Stevenson concerned an affected father and son; a second family with four affected individuals (some of whom also had learning difficulties) in three generations was described by Fontaine et al. Opitz et al. stated {open_quotes}A follow-up of these patients is strongly urged....{close_quotes} Recently we reviewed the son originally described by Patterson and Stevenson, who is now an adult (case JL). One of his three sons (case AL) has inherited the same condition. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Significance of lung anomalies in fetuses affected by tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenisch, Estelle; Raboisson, Marie-Josée; Rypens, Françoise; Déry, Julie; Grignon, Andrée; Lapierre, Chantale

    2017-11-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve syndrome is a rare form of tetralogy of Fallot with dilatation of large pulmonary arteries. Prognosis is related to the severity of the cardiac malformation and to bronchial tree compression by dilated pulmonary arteries. This study analyses the prenatal echographic lung appearance in fetuses with tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve and discusses its significance. We carried out a retrospective review of fetal and postnatal files of nine fetuses diagnosed with tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve syndrome in our institution. Correlations of prenatal ultrasound and cardiac imaging findings were obtained with outcome. Abnormal heterogeneous fetal lung echogenicity was detected in eight cases out of nine, always associated with significant lobar arterial dilatation. This aspect was well correlated with postnatal imaging and outcome in the four neonatal cases. The only fetus with normal lung echogenicity also had lower degree of pulmonary artery dilatation in the series. This study demonstrates that a heterogeneous ultrasound appearance of the fetal lungs can be detected in utero in the most severe cases. This aspect suggests an already significant compression of the fetal bronchial tree by the dilated arteries that may have prognostic implications.

  6. Bone involvement in adult patients affected with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller-Vainicher, C; Bassotti, A; Imeraj, A; Cairoli, E; Ulivieri, F M; Cortini, F; Dubini, M; Marinelli, B; Spada, A; Chiodini, I

    2016-08-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is characterized by abnormal connective tissue but bone involvement is debated. We found a reduced BMD and bone quality and increased prevalence of asymptomatic vertebral fractures in eugonadal patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. These findings suggest the need of a bone health evaluation in these patients. The Ehlers-Danlos (EDS) syndrome is characterized by abnormalities of the connective tissue leading to ligamentous laxity and skin and tissue fragility. We evaluated the bone metabolism, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone quality (measured by trabecular bone score, TBS), and the prevalence of vertebral fractures (VFx) in a group of eugonadal adult EDS patients. Fifty consecutive Caucasian patients, aged 30-50 years (36 females, 14 males) with classical or hypermobility EDS and 50 age-, gender-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched control subjects were enrolled. In all subjects' calcium-phosphorous metabolism, bone turnover, BMD at the lumbar spine (LS) and femur (femoral neck, FN and total femur, FT) and TBS by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and the VFx presence by spine radiograph were assessed. Patients showed reduced BMD (Z-scores LS -0.45 ± 1.00, FN -0.56 ± 1.01, FT -0.58 ± 0.92) and TBS (1.299 ± 0.111) and increased prevalence of morphometric VFx (32 %) than controls (Z-scores LS 0.09 ± 1.22, FN 0.01 ± 0.97, FT 0.08 ± 0.89; TBS 1.382 ± 0.176; VFx 8 %, p <0.05 for all comparisons), while vitamin D levels, calcium-phosphorous metabolism, and bone turnover were comparable. Fractured EDS patients showed lower TBS values than non-fractured ones (1.245 ± 0.138 vs 1.325 ± 0.086, p < 0.05), despite comparable BMD. In EDS patients, the VFx presence was significantly associated with TBS even after adjusting for sex, age, BMD, EDS type, and falls frequency. EDS patients have reduced BMD and bone quality (as measured by TBS) and increased prevalence of VFx.

  7. An Intron 7 Polymorphism in APP Affects the Age of Onset of Dementia in Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available People with Down syndrome (DS develop Alzheimer's disease (AD with an early age of onset. A tetranucleotide repeat, attt5−8, in intron 7 of the amyloid precursor protein has been associated with the age of onset of AD in DS in a preliminary study. The authors examine the impact of this polymorphism in a larger cohort of individuals with DS. Adults with DS were genotyped for attt5−8 and APOE. The results were analysed with respect to the age of onset of dementia. The presence of three copies of the six-repeat allele resulted in onset of dementia seven years earlier than in the presence of other genotypes. Further study is essential to elucidate the mechanism by which this polymorphism functions, with an exciting opportunity to identify novel treatment targets relevant for people with DS and AD.

  8. Orbital apex syndrome affecting head and neck cancer patients: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado-Ribeiro, A-C; Luiz, A-C; Montezuma, M-A; Mak, M-P; Santos-Silva, A-R; Brandão, T-B

    2017-05-01

    Orbital apex syndrome (OAS) is a complex and uncommon disorder that typically damages multiple cranial nerves in association with optic nerve dysfunction. OAS is associated with several different pathologies, however; only a few cases have been reported in association with head and neck cancer (HNC) so far. A case series of HNC patients diagnosed with OAS is described including clinicopathological data, image findings, and disease outcome. Ptosis and diplopia were diagnosed in four male patients with mean age of 61.2 years who were undergoing treatment for late-stage carcinomas of the tongue, larynx, and nasopharynx, eventually leading to the diagnosis of OAS. The mean overall survival rate after the diagnosis of OAS was 9.5 months. The current study reinforces evidence that OAS indicates poor prognosis and highlights the importance of early diagnosis.

  9. Personality and psychiatric disorders in women affected by polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaruffi, Elisabetta; Gambineri, Alessandra; Cattaneo, Stefania; Turra, Jenni; Vettor, Roberto; Mioni, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent endocrine disorder among fertile women. Studies show reduced quality of life, anxiety, depression, body dissatisfaction, eating disorder, and sexual dysfunction, but the etiology of these disturbs remains still debated. The aim of our study is to verify whether this hyperandrogenic syndrome characterizes a strong psycho(patho)logical personality. Sixty PCOS subjects (mean age 25.8 ± 4.7 years) were evaluated by anthropometric, metabolic, hormonal, clinical, and psychological parameters. After the certainty of the diagnosis of PCOS, the Rorschach test, according to Exner's comprehensive system (CS) and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) were administered to each patient. The control group, on which the comparison was carried out, was composed by 40 healthy and aged compared women who were exclusively administered the Rorschach test according to CS. MCMI-III evidenced axis II DSM-IV personality disorders [4.1% schizoid, depressive, sadistic, negativistic (passive-aggressive), and masochistic, 6.1% avoiding, 12.2% dependent, 20.4% histrionic, 16.3% narcissistic, 2.0% obsessive-compulsive], and axis I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders: 10.2% anxiety, 2.0% somatoform disorder and bipolar disorder, 16.3% major depressive disorder. Finally, we found 44.9% delusional disorder and 4.1% thought disorder. Rorschach test's results show 53.1% reduced coping abilities and social skills, 55.1% depression, 30.6% perceptual distortion and cognitive slippage, 24.5% constantly alert and worry, 8.1% at risk for suicide, and finally about 50% of our patients had chronic stress. PCOS women have relevant personality and psychiatric disorders, when compared with normal subjects.

  10. PERSONALITY AND PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS IN WOMEN AFFECTED BY POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME (PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta eScaruffi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most prevalent endocrine disorder among fertile women. Studies show reduced quality of life, anxiety, depression, body dissatisfaction, eating disorder and sexual dysfunction, but the etiology of these disturbs remains still debated. The aim of our study is to verify whether this hyperandrogenic syndrome characterizes a strong psycho(pathological personality. Method: Sixty PCOS subjects (mean age 25.8 ± 4.7 yrs were evaluated by antropometric, metabolic, hormonal, clinical and psychological parameters. After the certainty of the diagnosis of PCOS, the Rorschach test, according to Exner's Comprehensive System (CS and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III were administered to each patient. The control group, on which the comparison was carried out, was composed by 40 healthy and aged compared women who were exclusively administered the Rorschach test according to C.S. Results: MCMI-III evidenced axis II DSM-IV personality disorders (4.1% schizoid, depressive, sadistic, negativistic (passive-aggressive and masochistic, 6.1% avoiding, 12.2% dependent, 20.4% histrionic, 16.3% narcissistic, 2.0% obsessive-compulsive and axis I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders: 10.2% anxiety, 2.0%, somatoform disorder and bipolar disorder, 16.3% major depressive disorder. Finally we found 44.9% delusional disorder and 4.1% thought disorder. Rorschach test’s results show 53.1% reduced coping abilities and social skills, 55.1% depression, 30.6% perceptual distortion and cognitive slippage, 24.5% constantly alert and worry, 8.1% at risk for suicide and finally about 50% of our patients had chronic stress.Conclusion: PCOS women have relevant personality and psychiatric disorders, when compared with normal subjects.

  11. Variation in the Williams syndrome GTF2I gene and anxiety proneness interactively affect prefrontal cortical response to aversive stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbi, M; Chen, Q; Turner, N; Kohn, P; White, M; Kippenhan, J S; Dickinson, D; Kolachana, B; Mattay, V; Weinberger, D R; Berman, K F

    2015-08-18

    Characterizing the molecular mechanisms underlying the heritability of complex behavioral traits such as human anxiety remains a challenging endeavor for behavioral neuroscience. Copy-number variation (CNV) in the general transcription factor gene, GTF2I, located in the 7q11.23 chromosomal region that is hemideleted in Williams syndrome and duplicated in the 7q11.23 duplication syndrome (Dup7), is associated with gene-dose-dependent anxiety in mouse models and in both Williams syndrome and Dup7. Because of this recent preclinical and clinical identification of a genetic influence on anxiety, we examined whether sequence variation in GTF2I, specifically the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2527367, interacts with trait and state anxiety to collectively impact neural response to anxiety-laden social stimuli. Two hundred and sixty healthy adults completed the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire Harm Avoidance (HA) subscale, a trait measure of anxiety proneness, and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while matching aversive (fearful or angry) facial identity. We found an interaction between GTF2I allelic variations and HA that affects brain response: in individuals homozygous for the major allele, there was no correlation between HA and whole-brain response to aversive cues, whereas in heterozygotes and individuals homozygous for the minor allele, there was a positive correlation between HA sub-scores and a selective dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) responsivity during the processing of aversive stimuli. These results demonstrate that sequence variation in the GTF2I gene influences the relationship between trait anxiety and brain response to aversive social cues in healthy individuals, supporting a role for this neurogenetic mechanism in anxiety.

  12. [Affective syndromes in liver transplant recipients: ¿mediated neurotoxicity immunosuppressive?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Diana Patricia; Tamayo, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    The onset of affective and psychotic in liver transplant patients symptoms, raises the need to explore the possible etiologies of mental symptoms. Case report and literature review. Four clinical cases of patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation, who in the early post transplant showed affective symptoms, delusions and psychomotor agitation for which they needed psychiatric hospitalization and treatment with psychotropic drugs are presented. Three of the patients had clinical improvement and one patient died by suicide. The development of mental symptoms in the post-transplant period opens the possibility of considering the secondary organic mental disorder a basic condition. The adverse drug reaction may explain affective mental disorders in these four cases were reported. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. The "black evil" affecting patients with diabetes: a case of rhino orbito cerebral mucormycosis causing Garcin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Santhosh Narayanan,1 Geetha Panarkandy,1 Gomathy Subramaniam,2 Chandni Radhakrishnan,1 NK Thulaseedharan,1 Neeraj Manikath,1 Sreejith Ramaswamy,1 Suma Radhakrishnan,3 Danish Ekkalayil1 1Department of General Medicine, 2Department of Radiodiagnosis, 3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India Abstract: Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection affecting patients with diabetes. It is an angioinvasive disease often resistant to treatment with a debilitating course and high mortality. Here, we report a case of a 45 year old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus who presented to us with history of right-sided ptosis and facial palsy, and subsequently developed loss of vision and palatal palsy. She was in diabetic ketoacidosis. Nervous system examination revealed involvement of right second, third, fourth, sixth, seventh, ninth, and tenth cranial nerves, suggestive of Garcin syndrome. The hard palate had been eroded with formation of black eschar. Computed tomography of paranasal sinuses revealed right maxillary and ethmoid sinusitis, with spread of inflammation to infratemporal fossa and parapharynygeal neck spaces. Debridement of sinus mucosa was done, and culture of the same yielded growth of rhizopus species. Histopathological examination of the tissue showed angioinvasion and fungal hyphae suggestive of mucormycosis. She was treated with amphotericin B, posaconazole, and periodic nasal sinus debridement, but her general condition worsened after 8 weeks due to secondary sepsis and she succumbed to death. Keywords: diabetes, rhinoorbitocerebral, mucormycosis, garcin syndrome

  14. Olanzapine-induced neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a patient with bipolar affective disorder: Does quetiapine holds the solution?

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    Praveen Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS is a rare, severe and life threatening condition induced by antipsychotic medications. It is commonly encountered with the use of first generation antipsychotics, however cases of NMS have been reported with the use of second generation antipsychotics like Olanzapine, Risperidone, Paliperidone, Aripiprazole, Ziprasidone, Amisulpride, Quetiapine and Clozapine, though the incidence of such reports is rare. Due to decreased use of first generation antipsychotics, NMS is reported less frequently now a days. In this case report- we highlight the management issues of a patient suffering from bipolar affective disorder, who had developed NMS following intramuscular injection of haloperidol, which was withdrawn and olanzapine was given later on. The patient had again developed NMS with olanzapine. Finally the patient was managed with modified electroconvulsive therapy and discharged on Lithium carbonate and Quetiapine.

  15. Socio-dramatic affective-relational intervention for adolescents with asperger syndrome & high functioning autism: pilot study.

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    Lerner, Matthew D; Mikami, Amori Yee; Levine, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a novel intervention called 'socio-dramatic affective-relational intervention' (SDARI), intended to improve social skills among adolescents with Asperger syndrome and high functioning autism diagnoses. SDARI adapts dramatic training activities to focus on in vivo practice of areas of social skill deficit among this population. SDARI was administered as a six-week summer program in a community human service agency. Nine SDARI participants and eight age- and diagnosis-group matched adolescents not receiving SDARI were compared on child- and parent-report of social functioning at three week intervals beginning six weeks prior to intervention and ending six weeks post-intervention. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) was used to estimate growth trends between groups to assess treatment outcomes and post-treatment maintenance. Results indicated significant improvement and post-treatment maintenance among SDARI participants on several measures of child social functioning. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  16. A disturbance in sensory processing on the affected side of the body increases limb pain in complex regional pain syndrome.

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    Drummond, Peter D; Finch, Philip M

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a central disturbance in somatosensory processing contributes to limb pain in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In 37 patients with CRPS, the effect of cooling the ipsilateral forehead on pain in the affected limb was compared with the effect of cooling the contralateral forehead. In addition, symptoms associated with cold-evoked limb pain were explored. Limb pain generally increased when the ipsilateral side of the forehead was cooled but did not change when the contralateral side of the forehead was cooled. Increases were greatest in patients with heightened sensitivity to cold, brushing, and pressure-pain in the ipsilateral forehead, in patients with heightened sensitivity to pressure-pain in the limbs, and in patients with chronic symptoms. In contrast, sensitivity to light touch was diminished in the CRPS-affected limb of patients whose limb pain remained unchanged or decreased during ipsilateral forehead cooling. These preliminary findings suggest that a central disturbance in sensory processing and pain modulation, which extends beyond the affected limb to the ipsilateral forehead, contributes to symptoms in a subgroup of patients with CRPS.

  17. Isolation of a Genomic Region Affecting Most Components of Metabolic Syndrome in a Chromosome-16 Congenic Rat Model.

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    Lucie Šedová

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent human disease with substantial genomic and environmental components. Previous studies indicate the presence of significant genetic determinants of several features of metabolic syndrome on rat chromosome 16 (RNO16 and the syntenic regions of human genome. We derived the SHR.BN16 congenic strain by introgression of a limited RNO16 region from the Brown Norway congenic strain (BN-Lx into the genomic background of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR strain. We compared the morphometric, metabolic, and hemodynamic profiles of adult male SHR and SHR.BN16 rats. We also compared in silico the DNA sequences for the differential segment in the BN-Lx and SHR parental strains. SHR.BN16 congenic rats had significantly lower weight, decreased concentrations of total triglycerides and cholesterol, and improved glucose tolerance compared with SHR rats. The concentrations of insulin, free fatty acids, and adiponectin were comparable between the two strains. SHR.BN16 rats had significantly lower systolic (18-28 mmHg difference and diastolic (10-15 mmHg difference blood pressure throughout the experiment (repeated-measures ANOVA, P < 0.001. The differential segment spans approximately 22 Mb of the telomeric part of the short arm of RNO16. The in silico analyses revealed over 1200 DNA variants between the BN-Lx and SHR genomes in the SHR.BN16 differential segment, 44 of which lead to missense mutations, and only eight of which (in Asb14, Il17rd, Itih1, Syt15, Ercc6, RGD1564958, Tmem161a, and Gatad2a genes are predicted to be damaging to the protein product. Furthermore, a number of genes within the RNO16 differential segment associated with metabolic syndrome components in human studies showed polymorphisms between SHR and BN-Lx (including Lpl, Nrg3, Pbx4, Cilp2, and Stab1. Our novel congenic rat model demonstrates that a limited genomic region on RNO16 in the SHR significantly affects many of the features of metabolic

  18. Adolescents and adults affected by Cornelia de Lange syndrome: A report of 73 Italian patients.

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    Mariani, Milena; Decimi, Valentina; Bettini, Laura Rachele; Maitz, Silvia; Gervasini, Cristina; Masciadri, Maura; Ajmone, Paola; Kullman, Gaia; Dinelli, Marco; Panceri, Roberto; Cereda, Anna; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare genetic condition related to mutation of various cohesion complex related genes. Its natural history is quite well characterized as regard pediatric age. Relatively little information is available regarding the evolution of the disease in young-adult age. In medical literature, only one specific study has been published on this topic. We report on our experience on 73 Italian CdLS patients (40 males and 33 females) with and age range from 15 to 49 years. Our results confirm the previous study indicating that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the main medical problem of these patients in childhood and young-adult age. Other medical features that should be considered in the medical follow-up are tendency to overweight/frank obesity, constipation, discrepancy of limbs' length, epilepsy, hearing, and visual problems. Behavioral problems are particularly frequent as well. For this reason, every source of hidden pain should be actively searched for in evaluating a patient showing such a disorder. Finally, recommendations for medical follow-up in adult age are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Avian spinal cord chimeras. Further studies on the neurological syndrome affecting the chimeras after birth.

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    Kinutani, M; Tan, K; Desaki, J; Coltey, M; Kitaoka, K; Nagano, Y; Takashima, Y; Le Douarin, N M

    1989-03-01

    These experiments bring new information concerning the immunological status after birth of quail----chick spinal cord chimeras. Such birds have been produced using recipient flocks of chickens different from those in our previous experiments. The breakdown of tolerance after hatching has been recorded and found to vary with the origin of the embryos. Chickens of broiler JA 657 strain and of a white leghorn strain raised in Japan started to exhibit signs of neural graft rejection later in life than the white leghorn chickens from a French breeder used in our previous studies. As previously described, in two animals, long-term tolerance was observed only for allogeneic chick----chick neural tube grafts. In one chimera the neurological syndrome resulting from rejection was reversible, and no signs of immune attack of the grafted central nervous tissue could be detected at sacrifice. This and other observations reported in this article strongly support the contention that the host immune response to foreign neural tissues starts in peripheral nerves and ganglia where no blood-brain barrier exists rather than in the spinal cord. A humoral response of the host against non-polymorphic quail antigens present on fibroblasts was observed in all birds at the time of rejection.

  20. Parents’ Readiness to Change Affects BMI Reduction Outcomes in Adolescents with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

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    Karen P. Jakubowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence supports the importance of parental involvement for youth’s ability to manage weight. This study utilized the stages of change (SOC model to assess readiness to change weight control behaviors as well as the predictive value of SOC in determining BMI outcomes in forty adolescent-parent dyads (mean adolescent age = 15 ± 1.84 (13–20, BMI = 37 ± 8.60; 70% white participating in a weight management intervention for adolescent females with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Adolescents and parents completed a questionnaire assessing their SOC for the following four weight control domains: increasing dietary portion control, increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, decreasing dietary fat, and increasing usual physical activity. Linear regression analyses indicated that adolescent change in total SOC from baseline to treatment completion was not predictive of adolescent change in BMI from baseline to treatment completion. However, parent change in total SOC from baseline to treatment completion was predictive of adolescent change in BMI, (t(24 = 2.15, p=0.043. Findings support future research which carefully assesses adolescent and parent SOC and potentially develops interventions targeting adolescent and parental readiness to adopt healthy lifestyle goals.

  1. Mutant cohesin affects RNA polymerase II regulation in Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

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    Mannini, Linda; C Lamaze, Fabien; Cucco, Francesco; Amato, Clelia; Quarantotti, Valentina; Rizzo, Ilaria M; Krantz, Ian D; Bilodeau, Steve; Musio, Antonio

    2015-11-19

    In addition to its role in sister chromatid cohesion, genome stability and integrity, the cohesin complex is involved in gene transcription. Mutations in core cohesin subunits SMC1A, SMC3 and RAD21, or their regulators NIPBL and HDAC8, cause Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). Recent evidence reveals that gene expression dysregulation could be the underlying mechanism for CdLS. These findings raise intriguing questions regarding the potential role of cohesin-mediated transcriptional control and pathogenesis. Here, we identified numerous dysregulated genes occupied by cohesin by combining the transcriptome of CdLS cell lines carrying mutations in SMC1A gene and ChIP-Seq data. Genome-wide analyses show that genes changing in expression are enriched for cohesin-binding. In addition, our results indicate that mutant cohesin impairs both RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription initiation at promoters and elongation in the gene body. These findings highlight the pivotal role of cohesin in transcriptional regulation and provide an explanation for the typical gene dysregulation observed in CdLS patients.

  2. Does polycystic ovary syndrome affect cognition? A functional magnetic resonance imaging study exploring working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleman, Remi S; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Veltman, Dick J; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Hompes, Peter G A; Drent, Madeleine L; Lambalk, Cornelis B

    2016-05-01

    To study effects of overexposure to androgens and subsequent antiandrogenic treatment on brain activity during working memory processes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In this longitudinal study, working memory function was evaluated with the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in women with PCOS before and after antiandrogenic treatment. Department of reproductive medicine, university medical center. Fourteen women with PCOS and with hyperandrogenism and 20 healthy control women without any features of PCOS or other hormonal disorders. Antiandrogenic hormone treatment. Functional MRI response during a working memory task. At baseline women with PCOS showed more activation than the control group within the right superior parietal lobe and the inferior parietal lobe during task (all memory conditions). Task performance (speed and accuracy) did not differ between the groups. After antiandrogenic treatment the difference in overall brain activity between the groups disappeared and accuracy in the high memory load condition of the working memory task increased in women with PCOS. Women with PCOS may need additional neural resources during a working memory task compared with women without PCOS, suggesting less efficient executive functioning. This inefficiency may have effects on daily life functioning of women with PCOS. Antiandrogenic treatment appears to have a beneficial effect on this area of cognitive functioning. NTR2493. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Sporadic infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in PCDH19 resembles Dravet syndrome but mainly affects females.

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    Christel Depienne

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Dravet syndrome (DS is a genetically determined epileptic encephalopathy mainly caused by de novo mutations in the SCN1A gene. Since 2003, we have performed molecular analyses in a large series of patients with DS, 27% of whom were negative for mutations or rearrangements in SCN1A. In order to identify new genes responsible for the disorder in the SCN1A-negative patients, 41 probands were screened for micro-rearrangements with Illumina high-density SNP microarrays. A hemizygous deletion on chromosome Xq22.1, encompassing the PCDH19 gene, was found in one male patient. To confirm that PCDH19 is responsible for a Dravet-like syndrome, we sequenced its coding region in 73 additional SCN1A-negative patients. Nine different point mutations (four missense and five truncating mutations were identified in 11 unrelated female patients. In addition, we demonstrated that the fibroblasts of our male patient were mosaic for the PCDH19 deletion. Patients with PCDH19 and SCN1A mutations had very similar clinical features including the association of early febrile and afebrile seizures, seizures occurring in clusters, developmental and language delays, behavioural disturbances, and cognitive regression. There were, however, slight but constant differences in the evolution of the patients, including fewer polymorphic seizures (in particular rare myoclonic jerks and atypical absences in those with PCDH19 mutations. These results suggest that PCDH19 plays a major role in epileptic encephalopathies, with a clinical spectrum overlapping that of DS. This disorder mainly affects females. The identification of an affected mosaic male strongly supports the hypothesis that cellular interference is the pathogenic mechanism.

  4. HDAC8 mutations in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome affect the cohesin acetylation cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardorff, Matthew A.; Bando, Masashige; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Watrin, Erwan; Itoh, Takehiko; Minamino, Masashi; Saitoh, Katsuya; Komata, Makiko; Katou, Yuki; Clark, Dinah; Cole, Kathryn E.; Baere, Elfride De; Decroos, Christophe; Donato, Nataliya Di; Ernst, Sarah; Francey, Lauren J.; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Hirashima, Kyotaro; Hullings, Melanie; Ishikawa, Yuuichi; Jaulin, Christian; Kaur, Maninder; Kiyono, Tohru; Lombardi, Patrick M.; Magnaghi-Jaulin, Laura; Mortier, Geert R.; Nozaki, Naohito; Petersen, Michael B.; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Siu, Victoria M.; Suzuki, Yutaka; Takagaki, Kentaro; Wilde, Jonathan J.; Willems, Patrick J.; Prigent, Claude; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Christianson, David W.; Kaiser, Frank J.; Jackson, Laird G.; Hirota, Toru; Krantz, Ian D.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominantly inherited congenital malformation disorder caused by mutations in the cohesin-loading protein NIPBL1,2 for nearly 60% of individuals with classical CdLS3-5 and in the core cohesin components SMC1A (~5%) and SMC3 (<1%) for a smaller fraction of probands6,7. In humans, the multi-subunit complex cohesin is comprised of SMC1, SMC3, RAD21 and a STAG protein to form a ring structure proposed to encircle sister chromatids to mediate sister chromatid cohesion (SCC)8 as well as play key roles in gene regulation9. SMC3 is acetylated during S-phase to establish cohesiveness of chromatin-loaded cohesin10-13 and in yeast, HOS1, a class I histone deacetylase, deacetylates SMC3 during anaphase14-16. Here we report the identification of HDAC8 as the vertebrate SMC3 deacetylase as well as loss-of-function HDAC8 mutations in six CdLS probands. Loss of HDAC8 activity results in increased SMC3 acetylation (SMC3-ac) and inefficient dissolution of the “used” cohesin complex released from chromatin in both prophase and anaphase. While SMC3 with retained acetylation is loaded onto chromatin, ChIP-Seq analysis demonstrates decreased occupancy of cohesin localization sites that results in a consistent pattern of altered transcription seen in CdLS cell lines with either NIPBL or HDAC8 mutations. PMID:22885700

  5. Factors affecting visual loss and visual recovery in patients with pseudotumor cerebri syndrome

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    Clara L. Afonso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To investigate the frequency of visual loss (VL, possible predictive factors of VL, and improvement in patients with pseudotumor cerebri (PTC syndrome. Methods: We reviewed 50 PTC patients (43 females, seven males who underwent neuro-ophthalmic examination at the time of diagnosis and after treatment. Demographic data, body mass index (BMI, time from symptom onset to diagnosis (TD, maximum intracranial pressure (MIP, occurrence of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT, and treatment modalities were reviewed. VL was graded as mild, moderate, or severe on the basis of visual acuity and fields. Predictive factors for VL and improvement were assessed by regression analysis. Results: The mean ± SD age, BMI, and MIP were 35.2 ± 12.7 years, 32.0 ± 7.5 kg/cm2, and 41.9 ± 14.5 cmH2O, respectively. Visual symptoms and CVT were present in 46 and eight patients, respectively. TD (in months was 6 in 14 patients. Patients received medical treatment with (n=20 or without (n=30 surgery. At presentation, VL was mild in 16, moderate in 12, and severe in 22 patients. Twenty-eight patients improved and five worsened. MIP, TD, and hypertension showed a significant correlation with severe VL. The best predictive factor for severe VL was TD >6 months (p=0.04; odds ratio, 5.18. TD between 1 and 6 months was the only factor significantly associated with visual improvement (p=0.042. Conclusions: VL is common in PTC, and when severe, it is associated with a delay in diagnosis. It is frequently permanent; however, improvement may occur, particularly when diagnosed within 6 months of symptom onset.

  6. [Metabolic Syndrome and Bipolar Affective Disorder: A Review of the Literature].

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    Jaramillo, Carlos López; Mejía, Adelaida Castaño; Velásquez, Alicia Henao; Restrepo Palacio, Tomás Felipe; Zuluaga, Julieta Osorio

    2013-09-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder that is found within the first ten causes of disability and premature mortality. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a group of risk factors (RF) that predispose to cardiovascular disease (CV), diabetes and early mortality. Both diseases generate high costs to the health system. Major studies have shown that MS has a higher prevalence in patients with mental disorders compared to the general population. The incidence of MS in BD is multifactorial, and due to iatrogenic, genetic, economic, psychological, and behavioral causes related to the health system. The most common RF found is these patients was an increased abdominal circumference, and it was found that the risk of suffering this disease was greater in women and Hispanic patients. As regards the increase in RF to develop a CV in patients with BD, there have been several explanations based on the risky behavior of patients with mental illness, included tobacco abuse, physical inactivity and high calorie diets. An additional explanation described in literature is the view of BD as a multisystemic inflammatory illness, supported by the explanation that inflammation is a crucial element in atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, platelet rupture, and thrombosis. The pathophysiology of MS and BD include factors such as adrenal, thyroid and sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, as well as poor lifestyle and medication common in these patients. This article attempts to give the reader an overall view of the information published in literature to date, as regards the association between BD and MS. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Growth Hormone (GH) and Rehabilitation Promoted Distal Innervation in a Child Affected by Caudal Regression Syndrome.

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    Devesa, Jesús; Alonso, Alba; López, Natalia; García, José; Puell, Carlos I; Pablos, Tamara; Devesa, Pablo

    2017-01-23

    Caudal regression syndrome (CRS) is a malformation occurring during the fetal period and mainly characterized by an incomplete development of the spinal cord (SC), which is often accompanied by other developmental anomalies. We studied a 9-month old child with CRS who presented interruption of the SC at the L2-L3 level, sacral agenesis, a lack of innervation of the inferior limbs (flaccid paraplegia), and neurogenic bladder and bowel. Given the known positive effects of growth hormone (GH) on neural stem cells (NSCs), we treated him with GH and rehabilitation, trying to induce recovery from the aforementioned sequelae. The Gross Motor Function Test (GMFM)-88 test score was 12.31%. After a blood analysis, GH treatment (0.3 mg/day, 5 days/week, during 3 months and then 15 days without GH) and rehabilitation commenced. This protocol was followed for 5 years, the last GH dose being 1 mg/day. Blood analysis and physical exams were performed every 3 months initially and then every 6 months. Six months after commencing the treatment the GMFM-88 score increased to 39.48%. Responses to sensitive stimuli appeared in most of the territories explored; 18 months later sensitive innervation was complete and the patient moved all muscles over the knees and controlled his sphincters. Three years later he began to walk with crutches, there was plantar flexion, and the GMFM-88 score was 78.48%. In summary, GH plus rehabilitation may be useful for innervating distal areas below the level of the incomplete spinal cord in CRS. It is likely that GH acted on the ependymal SC NSCs, as the hormone does in the neurogenic niches of the brain, and rehabilitation helped to achieve practically full functionality.

  8. Does Congenital Heart Disease Affect Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Down Syndrome?

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    Alsaied, Tarek; Marino, Bradley S; Esbensen, Anna J; Anixt, Julia S; Epstein, Jeffery N; Cnota, James F

    2016-01-01

    The impact that congenital heart disease (CHD) has on the neurodevelopment of children with Down syndrome (DS) is unknown and potentially has implications for targeted early intervention. This study assessed the relationship between CHD that required surgery in the first year of life and neurodevelopmental, behavioral and emotional functioning outcomes in children with DS. A retrospective chart review of 1092 children (0-18 years) with DS who visited a single institution from 8/08-8/13 was performed. Children who underwent at least one of nine neurodevelopmental (cognitive, language, developmental) or academic tests were included in the analysis (N = 178). Cohort was age-divided into infants/toddlers (0-2 years), preschoolers (3-5 years), and school age/adolescent (6-18 years). Test scores of children with DS who underwent cardiac surgery in the first year of life were compared to children with DS without CHD. T test, chi-square and Mann Whitney U tests were used where appropriate. Infants/toddlers with cardiac surgery had lower scores for receptive (P = .01), expressive (P = .021) and composite language (P children with cardiac surgery there were no differences in IQ scores, language scores, or academic achievement scores compared to those without CHD. Also at school-age there was no difference in the incidence of ADHD, executive function or on internalizing and externalizing behavior scores. Children with DS undergoing cardiac surgery during the first year demonstrated poorer neurodevelopmental outcomes as infants/toddler but had no difference at school age compared to children with DS without CHD. These results will guide early interventions to optimize neurodevelopmental outcomes in children with DS and will help with family counseling after CHD repair. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Oxytocin and vasopressin are dysregulated in Williams Syndrome, a genetic disorder affecting social behavior.

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    Li Dai

    Full Text Available The molecular and neural mechanisms regulating human social-emotional behaviors are fundamentally important but largely unknown; unraveling these requires a genetic systems neuroscience analysis of human models. Williams Syndrome (WS, a condition caused by deletion of ~28 genes, is associated with a gregarious personality, strong drive to approach strangers, difficult peer interactions, and attraction to music. WS provides a unique opportunity to identify endogenous human gene-behavior mechanisms. Social neuropeptides including oxytocin (OT and arginine vasopressin (AVP regulate reproductive and social behaviors in mammals, and we reasoned that these might mediate the features of WS. Here we established blood levels of OT and AVP in WS and controls at baseline, and at multiple timepoints following a positive emotional intervention (music, and a negative physical stressor (cold. We also related these levels to standardized indices of social behavior. Results revealed significantly higher median levels of OT in WS versus controls at baseline, with a less marked increase in AVP. Further, in WS, OT and AVP increased in response to music and to cold, with greater variability and an amplified peak release compared to controls. In WS, baseline OT but not AVP, was correlated positively with approach, but negatively with adaptive social behaviors. These results indicate that WS deleted genes perturb hypothalamic-pituitary release not only of OT but also of AVP, implicating more complex neuropeptide circuitry for WS features and providing evidence for their roles in endogenous regulation of human social behavior. The data suggest a possible biological basis for amygdalar involvement, for increased anxiety, and for the paradox of increased approach but poor social relationships in WS. They also offer insight for translating genetic and neuroendocrine knowledge into treatments for disorders of social behavior.

  10. "Predictability of body mass index for diabetes: Affected by the presence of metabolic syndrome?"

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    Khalili Davood

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS and body mass index (BMI, kg.m-2 are established independent risk factors in the development of diabetes; we prospectively examined their relative contributions and joint relationship with incident diabetes in a Middle Eastern cohort. Method participants of the ongoing Tehran lipid and glucose study are followed on a triennial basis. Among non-diabetic participants aged≥ 20 years at baseline (8,121 those with at least one follow-up examination (5,250 were included for the current study. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate sex-specific adjusted odd ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs of baseline BMI-MetS categories (normal weight without MetS as reference group for incident diabetes among 2186 men and 3064 women, aged ≥ 20 years, free of diabetes at baseline. Result During follow up (median 6.5 years; there were 369 incident diabetes (147 in men. In women without MetS, the multivariate adjusted ORs (95% CIs for overweight (BMI 25-30 kg/m2 and obese (BMI≥30 participants were 2.3 (1.2-4.3 and 2.2 (1.0-4.7, respectively. The corresponding ORs for men without MetS were 1.6 (0.9-2.9 and 3.6 (1.5-8.4 respectively. As compared to the normal-weight/without MetS, normal-weight women and men with MetS, had a multivariate-adjusted ORs for incident diabetes of 8.8 (3.7-21.2 and 3.1 (1.3-7.0, respectively. The corresponding ORs for overweight and obese women with MetS reached to 7.7 (4.0-14.9 and 12.6 (6.9-23.2 and for men reached to 3.4(2.0-5.8 and 5.7(3.9-9.9, respectively. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of screening for MetS in normal weight individuals. Obesity increases diabetes risk in the absence of MetS, underscores the need for more stringent criteria to define healthy metabolic state among obese individuals. Weight reduction measures, thus, should be encouraged in conjunction with achieving metabolic targets not addressed by current definition of

  11. Treatment of scoliosis in patients affected with Prader-Willi syndrome using various techniques

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    Cioni Alfredo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of spinal deformity in children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is high, with 86% of these patients found to have a significant structural scoliosis; however, there are very few case reports describing surgical treatment for this deformity. Methods The authors reviewed a case series consisting of 6 patients who underwent spine surgery for scoliosis. Children's mean age at index surgery was 12 years and 10 months (range, 10 to 15 yrs. Clinical evaluation revealed the typical phenotypic features of the PWS in all of the patients; 4 subjects had a karyotype confirmation of PWS. Major structural curves showed preoperative mean Cobb angles of 80.8° (range, 65° to 96°. Hybrid instrumentation with sublaminar wires, hooks and screws was used in the first 2 patients, while the remaining 4 were treated with titanium pedicle screw constructs. Results The mean clinical and radiological follow-up was 3 years and 10 months (range, 2 years to 9 years. Major complication rate was 50%. One patient who developed a major intraoperative complication (paraparesis prevented spinal fusion to be obtained: the neurologic deficit resolved completely after instrumentation removal. Solid arthrodesis and deformity correction in both coronal and sagittal plane was, however, achieved in the other 5 cases and no significant curve progression was observed at follow-up. Another major short-term complication was encountered 3 months after surgery in a patient who experienced the detachment of a distally located rod and required correction through revision surgery and caudal extension by one level. Cervico-thoracic kyphosis was seen in 1 patient who did not require revision surgery. Conclusions Spine reconstructive surgery in patients with PWS is rare and highly demanding. The best method of reconstruction is posterior multilevel pedicle screw fixation. Moreover, even with modern techniques, the risk of complications is still high. These new

  12. A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study of Affect in Children and Adults with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

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    Nelson, Lisa; Moss, Jo; Oliver, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Studies of individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) have described changes in mood and behavior with age, although no empirical or longitudinal studies have been conducted. Caregivers of individuals with CdLS (N = 67), cri du chat syndrome (CdCS; N = 42), and Fragile X syndrome (FXS; N = 142) completed the Mood, Interest and Pleasure…

  13. The BDNF val-66-met Polymorphism Affects Neuronal Morphology and Synaptic Transmission in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons from Rett Syndrome Mice

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    Xin Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf has been implicated in several neurological disorders including Rett syndrome (RTT, an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the transcriptional modulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2. The human BDNF gene has a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP—a methionine (met substitution for valine (val at codon 66—that affects BDNF’s trafficking and activity-dependent release and results in cognitive dysfunction. Humans that are carriers of the met-BDNF allele have subclinical memory deficits and reduced hippocampal volume and activation. It is still unclear whether this BDNF SNP affects the clinical outcome of RTT individuals. To evaluate whether this BDNF SNP contributes to RTT pathophysiology, we examined the consequences of expression of either val-BDNF or met-BDNF on dendrite and dendritic spine morphology, and synaptic function in cultured hippocampal neurons from wildtype (WT and Mecp2 knockout (KO mice. Our findings revealed that met-BDNF does not increase dendritic growth and branching, dendritic spine density and individual spine volume, and the number of excitatory synapses in WT neurons, as val-BDNF does. Furthermore, met-BDNF reduces dendritic complexity, dendritic spine volume and quantal excitatory synaptic transmission in Mecp2 KO neurons. These results suggest that the val-BDNF variant contributes to RTT pathophysiology, and that BDNF-based therapies should take into consideration the BDNF genotype of the RTT individuals.

  14. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete X ... work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  15. Absence of heat intolerance (panting) syndrome in foot-and-mouth disease-affected Indian cattle (Bos indicus) is associated with intact thyroid gland function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddur, M S; Rao, S; Chockalingam, A K; Kishore, S; Gopalakrishna, S; Singh, N; Suryanarayana, V V S; Gajendragad, M R

    2011-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically important viral disease with high morbidity and reduced productivity of affected animals. We studied the heat intolerance (HI) (panting) syndrome and the effect of FMD virus (FMDV) infection on thyroid gland function in Indian cattle (Bos indicus). Experimental infection with FMDV Asia 1 resulted in a mild form of disease with superficial lesions. Heat intolerance syndrome and its signs were not observed among the recovered animals. Subtle changes in the serum level of thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T₃) and thyroxine (T₄) were observed. However, there were no distinct histological changes in the thyroid gland, and FMDV antigens were not detected in the thyroid tissues. Our results thus suggest that the absence of panting syndrome in FMD-affected Bos indicus cattle may be associated with intact thyroid gland function.

  16. [Pediatric complex regional pain syndrome affecting an upper limb: 7 cases and a brief review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, J; Sánchez, P

    2009-03-01

    To review the clinical, psychiatric, and social characteristics of complex regional pain syndrome in children and adolescents treated in the last 4 years at our pediatric pain clinic. We analyzed the specialty of the initial treating physician, age, sex, initial diagnosis, pain intensity, degree of disability, fear of movement, clinical stage, history of trauma, time between onset and diagnosis, psychiatric illness, family support and behavior, chronic pain in near relatives, school grades and attendance, treatment given at the pediatric pain clinic, recurrences, and course of disease. The cases of 7 patients (4 female, 3 male) between the ages of 8 and 15 years were analyzed. Four had been referred by the child psychiatry department. The initial diagnosis was erroneous in all but 1 case. Pain intensity and associated disability were severe in 5 patients and 4 expressed intense fear of moving the limb. Five patients had initial stage I disease, 5 had a history of trauma, and 5 had been previously treated by immobilization of the limb and prescription of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The time between onset and diagnosis ranged from 2 to 18 months (mean [SD], 6.4 [3.5] months). In most cases psychiatric disease and concomitant social disability were present. Treatment prescribed at the pediatric pain clinic consisted of a combination of oral medication, psychologic and psychiatric counseling, and intensive physiotherapy for all but 2 children, who required regional nerve blocks. The clinical course was satisfactory for all but 1 patient, who developed severe disability. Complex regional pain syndrome affecting an upper limb is uncommon in children but not rare.

  17. Psychosis in Machado-Joseph Disease: Clinical Correlates, Pathophysiological Discussion, and Functional Brain Imaging. Expanding the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga-Neto, Pedro; Pedroso, José Luiz; Gadelha, Ary; Laureano, Maura Regina; de Souza Noto, Cristiano; Garrido, Griselda Jara; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2016-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is the most common spinocerebellar ataxia worldwide with a broad range of clinical manifestations, but psychotic symptoms were not previously characterized. We investigated the psychiatric manifestations of a large cohort of Brazilian patients with MJD in an attempt to characterize the presence of psychotic symptoms. We evaluated 112 patients with clinical and molecular diagnosis of MJD from February 2008 to November 2013. Patients with psychotic symptoms were referred to psychiatric evaluation and brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) analysis. A specific scale-Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)-was used to characterize psychotic symptoms in MJD patients. We also performed an autopsy from one of the patients with MJD and psychotic symptoms. Five patients presented psychotic symptoms. Patients with psychotic symptoms were older and had a late onset of the disease (p < 0.05). SPECT results showed that MJD patients had significant regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) decrease in the cerebellum bilaterally and vermis compared with healthy subjects. No significant rCBF differences were found in patients without psychotic symptoms compared to patients with psychotic symptoms. The pathological description of a patient with MJD and psychotic symptoms revealed severe loss of neuron bodies in the dentate nucleus and substantia nigra. MJD patients with a late onset of the disease and older ones are at risk to develop psychotic symptoms during the disease progression. These clinical findings may be markers for an underlying cortical-cerebellar disconnection or degeneration of specific cortical and subcortical regions that may characterize the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome.

  18. A truncating mutation in CEP55 is the likely cause of MARCH, a novel syndrome affecting neuronal mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosk, Patrick; Arts, Heleen H; Philippe, Julien; Gunn, Carter S; Brown, Emma L; Chodirker, Bernard; Simard, Louise; Majewski, Jacek; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Russell, Chad; Liu, Yangfan P; Hegele, Robert; Katsanis, Nicholas; Goerz, Conrad; Del Bigio, Marc R; Davis, Erica E

    2017-07-01

    Hydranencephaly is a congenital anomaly leading to replacement of the cerebral hemispheres with a fluid-filled cyst. The goals of this work are to describe a novel autosomal-recessive syndrome that includes hydranencephaly (multinucleated neurons, anhydramnios, renal dysplasia, cerebellar hypoplasia and hydranencephaly (MARCH)); to identify its genetic cause(s) and to provide functional insight into pathomechanism. We used homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to identify recessive mutations in a single family with three affected fetuses. Immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and imaging in cell lines, and zebrafish models, were used to explore the function of the gene and the effect of the mutation. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in CEP55 segregating with MARCH. Testing the effect of this allele on patient-derived cells indicated both a reduction of the overall CEP55 message and the production of a message that likely gives rise to a truncated protein. Suppression or ablation of cep55l in zebrafish embryos recapitulated key features of MARCH, most notably renal dysplasia, cerebellar hypoplasia and craniofacial abnormalities. These phenotypes could be rescued by full-length but not truncated human CEP55 message. Finally, we expressed the truncated form of CEP55 in human cells, where we observed a failure of truncated protein to localise to the midbody, leading to abscission failure and multinucleated daughter cells. CEP55 loss of function mutations likely underlie MARCH, a novel multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. This association expands the involvement of centrosomal proteins in human genetic disorders by highlighting a role in midbody function. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. An affected core drives network integration deficits of the structural connectome in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

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    František Váša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS is a genetic disease known to lead to cerebral structural alterations, which we study using the framework of the macroscopic white-matter connectome. We create weighted connectomes of 44 patients with 22q11DS and 44 healthy controls using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, and perform a weighted graph theoretical analysis. After confirming global network integration deficits in 22q11DS (previously identified using binary connectomes, we identify the spatial distribution of regions responsible for global deficits. Next, we further characterize the dysconnectivity of the deficient regions in terms of sub-network properties, and investigate their relevance with respect to clinical profiles. We define the subset of regions with decreased nodal integration (evaluated using the closeness centrality measure as the affected core (A-core of the 22q11DS structural connectome. A-core regions are broadly bilaterally symmetric and consist of numerous network hubs — chiefly parietal and frontal cortical, as well as subcortical regions. Using a simulated lesion approach, we demonstrate that these core regions and their connections are particularly important to efficient network communication. Moreover, these regions are generally densely connected, but less so in 22q11DS. These specific disturbances are associated to a rerouting of shortest network paths that circumvent the A-core in 22q11DS, “de-centralizing” the network. Finally, the efficiency and mean connectivity strength of an orbito-frontal/cingulate circuit, included in the affected regions, correlate negatively with the extent of negative symptoms in 22q11DS patients, revealing the clinical relevance of present findings. The identified A-core overlaps numerous regions previously identified as affected in 22q11DS as well as in schizophrenia, which approximately 30–40% of 22q11DS patients develop.

  20. The Effect of Diagnostic Labels on the Affective Responses of College Students towards Peers with "Asperger's Syndrome" and "Autism Spectrum Disorder"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Mark; Mills, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Given the removal of Asperger's Syndrome label in "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition," the impact of clinical labels upon the affective responses of college students was explored. A total of 120 college students read two vignettes depicting social interactions typical of a person with autism spectrum…

  1. Does aerobic exercise affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal response in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Aysun; Tur, Birkan Sonel; Aytur, Yesim Kurtais; Oztuna, Derya; Erdogan, Murat Faik

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the etiopathogenesis of fibromyalgia is not clear. This study aimed to analyze the effects of a 6-week aerobic exercise program on the HPA axis in patients with fibromyalgia and to investigate the effects of this program on the disease symptoms, patients' fitness, disability, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty fibromyalgia patients were randomized to Group 1 (stretching and flexibility exercises at home for 6 weeks) and Group 2 (aerobic exercise three times a week and the same at-home exercises as Group 1 for 6 weeks). Serum levels of cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and growth hormone were analyzed at baseline and at the end of, and 1 hr after an exercise stress test. [Results] Group 2 showed better improvement in morning stiffness duration and pain. Growth hormone levels significantly increased after intervention and cortisol levels significantly decreased at time-time interaction in both groups. No significant differences in adrenocorticotropic hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 were found. [Conclusion] The results of this study seem to support the hypothesis that there is a dysregulation of the HPA axis in patients with FM, and that a six-week exercise program can influence symptoms and affect the HPA axis hormones.

  2. Outcome predictors affecting the efficacy of clonazepam therapy for the management of burning mouth syndrome (BMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji-Young; Kim, Moon-Jong; Lee, Sang-Goo; Kho, Hong-Seop

    2012-01-01

    BMS is a common condition characterized by chronic oral mucosal pain condition and primarily affects elderly women. Although clonazepam therapy has been widely used due to its efficacy, it is not always effective because of the complexity of BMS pathogenesis. In this study, we have investigated outcome predictors of clonazepam therapy in patients with BMS. One hundred patients with BMS (7 men and 93 women, mean age 58.5 ± 10.8 years) were instructed to take 0.5mg of clonazepam once or twice daily for 4 weeks. The patients were sub-grouped according to psychological status, salivary flow rate, presence of psychiatric medications, symptom area and duration, symptom severity, presence of oral parafunctions, and accompanying oral complaints. The changes in symptoms were analyzed and compared between the sub-groups. Subjects with T-scores ≤50 for each psychological symptom dimension, a greater degree of initial symptoms (visual analog scale (VAS)≥5), and accompanying oral complaints, such as xerostomia and taste disturbance, displayed greater decreases in symptoms compared with their counterparts. In conclusion, psychological status, initial symptom severity, and the presence of xerostomia and/or taste disturbance can serve as outcome predictors of clonazepam therapy for patients with BMS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel mutations affecting LRP5 splicing in patients with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, C M; Chung, B D; Susic, M; Prescott, T; Semler, O; Fiskerstrand, T; D'Eufemia, P; Castori, M; Pekkinen, M; Sochett, E; Cole, W G; Netzer, C; Mäkitie, O

    2011-08-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma sydrome (OPPG) is an autosomal recessive disorder with early-onset severe osteoporosis and blindness, caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. Heterozygous carriers exhibit a milder bone phenotype. Only a few splice mutations in LRP5 have been published. We present clinical and genetic data for four patients with novel LRP5 mutations, three of which affect splicing. Patients were evaluated clinically and by radiography and bone densitometry. Genetic screening of LRP5 was performed on the basis of the clinical diagnosis of OPPG. Splice aberrances were confirmed by cDNA sequencing or exon trapping. The effect of one splice mutation on LRP5 protein function was studied. A novel splice-site mutation c.1584+4A>T abolished the donor splice site of exon 7 and activated a cryptic splice site, which led to an in-frame insertion of 21 amino acids (p.E528_V529ins21). Functional studies revealed severely impaired signal transduction presumably caused by defective intracellular transport of the mutated receptor. Exon trapping was used on two samples to confirm that splice-site mutations c.4112-2A>G and c.1015+1G>T caused splicing-out of exons 20 and 5, respectively. One patient carried a homozygous deletion of exon 4 causing the loss of exons 4 and 5, as demonstrated by cDNA analysis. Our results broaden the spectrum of mutations in LRP5 and provide the first functional data on splice aberrations.

  4. The work experience of a patient affected by Williams Syndrome: a pilot project at the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Francesca; Macchiaiolo, Marina; Carlevaris, Carla Maria; Bartuli, Andrea

    2017-05-31

    A new approach has been designed at the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital in Rome aimed at increasing empowerment in Williams Syndrome individuals through tutor-assisted work activities. Williams Syndrome is characterized by a combination of distinguishing physical traits, congenital anomalies, intellectual disabilities, and a specific developmental profile.This manuscript describes the case of a Williams Syndrome patient.There are only few papers in the scientific literature describing interventions targeting improvement in the quality of life of adult Williams Syndrome individuals. Therefore, this experience may prove useful to several patients, their families, and the experts helping them.We described an example of intervention aimed at guiding and facilitating a Williams Syndrome patient within a work environment, taking into consideration the peaks and valleys of these individuals' specific abilities.Based on our results, we also stressed the need to promote a set of projects and initiatives aimed at enhancing as much as possible self-sufficiency and psycho-affective balance in Williams Syndrome individuals, in order to protect their dignity and self-esteem.

  5. Total glucosides of peony ameliorates Sjögren's syndrome by affecting Th1/Th2 cytokine balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guolin; Wu, Nayuan; Li, Tianyi; Lu, Wenwen; Yu, Guoyou

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of total glucosides of peony (TGP) in the treatment of Sjögren's syndrome (SS). A total of 40 mice with SS were evenly assigned into four groups, including: Control group; TGP group, receiving 1 mg TGP daily; hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) group, receiving 0.25 mg HCQ daily; and a combined group, receiving 1 mg TGP and 0.25 mg HCQ daily. After 8 weeks, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to detect the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), Fas and FasL in each group of mice. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis was used to determine the expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-4. IFN-γ, IL-4, Fas and FasL levels were significantly increased in the control group compared with the other three groups (PTGP and combined groups compared with the control group (PTGP ameliorates SS by affecting the Th1/Th2 cytokine balance and decreasing the expression levels of IFN-γ, IL-4, Fas and FasL. Therefore, TGP may represent a potential novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of SS.

  6. The association with Turner syndrome significantly affects the course of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in children, irrespective of karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aversa, Tommaso; Messina, Maria Francesca; Mazzanti, Laura; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Mussa, Alessandro; Faienza, Maria Felicia; Scarano, Emanuela; De Luca, Filippo; Wasniewska, Malgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Only few studies have investigated to now whether the association with Turner syndrome (TS) may affect the course of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in children. Aim of this study was to ascertain whether the presentation and long-term course of HT in TS children may be characterized by a peculiar and atypical pattern. The clinical and biochemical findings at HT diagnosis in 90 TS children (group A) were compared with those recorded in 449 girls with HT but without TS (group B); in group A patients, thyroid function tests were re-evaluated after a median time interval of 4.9 years. At HT diagnosis median TSH levels and the rate of cases presenting with a thyroid dysfunction picture were significantly lower in group A, irrespective of karyotype abnormalities. In group A only 34.8 % of the girls who had initially presented with euthyroidism remained euthyroid even at re-evaluation, whilst 67.7 % of those who had presented with subclinical hypothyroidism became overtly hypothyroid over time; also such evolutive pattern was irrespective of karyotype abnormalities. (1) In TS girls, HT presents with a milder hormonal pattern, which often deteriorates over time; (2) these biochemical features are not necessarily linked with a specific karyotype.

  7. What is the most important factor affecting the cognitive function of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients: a single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS usually complain of daytime hypersomnia and decrease in cognitive function, which affects the quality of their work and life. The reason why the cognitive function of OSAS patients decreased remains controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impairment and the main influencing factors of cognitive function in OSAS. Methods There were totally 50 OSAS patients (OSAS group and 25 volunteers (control group included in our study. All of them were monitored by polysomnography (PSG and tested by Continuous Performance Test (CPT, n-back test and Stroop Color?Word Test (CWT to evaluate their sleep condition and cognitive function. Results No significant difference was found between the two groups in total sleep time and sleep efficiency (P > 0.05, for all. Compared with control group, OSAS group had significant increased time of non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep stage Ⅰ and stage Ⅱ, significant decreased time of stage Ⅲ (P 0.05, for all, while had significant connection with AI and NREM Ⅲ (P < 0.05, for all. The rate of OSAS patients who underwent nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP treatment was very low, only 8% (4/50. Conclusion The abnormality of OSAS patients' sleep structure is characterized with sleep fragmentation and decrease of NREM Ⅲ, which may be the main factors of cognitive impairment. Exploration of treatment methods targeted on regulating the effected hormones and receptors is meaningful.

  8. Effect of CPAP-therapy on bronchial and nasal inflammation in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacedonia, D; Salerno, F G; Carpagnano, G E; Sabato, R; Depalo, A; Foschino-Barbaro, M P

    2011-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been shown to be associated to upper and lower airways inflammation. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the elective treatment of OSAS. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of CPAP-therapy on airway and nasal inflammation. In 13 non-smoking subjects affected by untreated OSAS and in 11 non-smoking normal volunteers, airway inflammation was detected by analyses of the induced sputum. In the OSAS group measurements were repeated after 1, 10 and 60 days of the appropriate CPAP treatment. In addition, in 12 subjects of the OSAS group, nasal inflammation was detected by the analysis of induced nasal secretions at baseline, and after 1, 10 and 60 days of CPAP treatment. OSAS patients, compared to normal controls, showed at baseline a higher percentage of neutrophils and a lower percentage of macrophages in the induced sputum. One, 10 and 60 days of appropriate CPAP-therapy did not change the cellular profile of the induced sputum. In addition, in the OSAS patients, the high neutrophilic nasal inflammation present under baseline conditions was not significantly modified by CPAP-therapy. Finally, no patients developed airway hyper-responsiveness after CPAP therapy. In OSAS subjects, the appropriate CPAP-therapy, while correcting the oxygen desaturation, does not modify the bronchial and nasal inflammatory profile.

  9. The amount and types of fatty acids acutely affect insulin, glycemic and gastrointestinal peptide responses but not satiety in metabolic syndrome subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chee-Yan; Kanthimathi, M S; Tan, Alexander Tong-Boon; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi; Teng, Kim-Tiu

    2018-02-01

    Limited clinical evidence is available on the effects of amount and types of dietary fats on postprandial insulinemic and gastrointestinal peptide responses in metabolic syndrome subjects. We hypothesized that meals enriched with designated: (1) amount of fats (50 vs 20 g), (2) fats with differing fatty acid composition (saturated, SFA; monounsaturated, MUFA or n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, PUFA) would affect insulinemic and gastrointestinal peptide releases in metabolic syndrome subjects. Using a randomized, crossover and double-blinded design, 15 men and 15 women with metabolic syndrome consumed high-fat meals enriched with SFA, MUFA or n-6 PUFA, or a low-fat/high-sucrose (SUCR) meal. C-peptide, insulin, glucose, gastrointestinal peptides and satiety were measured up to 6 h. As expected, SUCR meal induced higher C-peptide (45 %), insulin (45 %) and glucose (49 %) responses compared with high-fat meals regardless of types of fatty acids (P types of fatty acids affects insulin and glycemic responses. Both the amount and types of fatty acids acutely affect the gastrointestinal peptide release in metabolic syndrome subjects, but not satiety.

  10. Biochemical deficiency of pyridoxine does not affect interleukin-2 production of lymphocytes from patients with Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, A R; Gómez, E; Bourges, H; Ortíz, V; Kraus, A; Torres, N

    2002-11-01

    There is evidence that pyridoxine deficiency may alter the immune response. It is not known whether a deficiency of this vitamin is evident in subjects with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS). We studied whether subjects with primary SS showed a biochemical deficiency of pyridoxine, and if it is associated with abnormal production of interleukin-2 from lymphocytes stimulated in vitro with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Two studies were conducted, (i) biochemical and nutritional assessments were performed in a cross-over study in subjects with primary SS, who were supplemented with 25 mg/day of pyridoxine or placebo for 3 months. After 1 month washout, they were supplemented for 3 months with placebo, (ii) patients with SS and matched controls received pyridoxine or placebo for 45 days, and a blood sample was obtained to study IL-2 production and expression in T-lymphocytes stimulated with PHA. Subjects with primary SS showed limited dietary intake of pyridoxine and biochemical deficiency of this vitamin assessed through the activation coefficient of the erythrocyte aspartate aminotransferase. The biochemical deficiency did not affect production nor mRNA expression of IL-2 from T-lymphocytes stimulated in vitro with PHA compared with the control group. Supplementation of subjects with primary SS with 25 mg/day with pyridoxine for 45 days did not produce any significant change as compared to those patients supplemented with placebo. Subjects with primary SS showed biochemical deficiency of pyridoxine, possibly due to limited intake of this vitamin which was corrected by supplementation with pyridoxine. However, IL-2 production and mRNA expression from stimulated lymphocytes were unaffected by supplementation, probably because the deficiency was not severe enough to affect the immune system. This work was supported by the National Council of Science and Technology (CONACYT), Mexico, grant no. 212226-5-0902PM.

  11. Negative Affectivity, Depression, and Resting Heart Rate Variability (HRV as Possible Moderators of Endogenous Pain Modulation in Functional Somatic Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Van Den Houte

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that patients with functional somatic syndromes (FSS have, on average, deficient endogenous pain modulation (EPM, as well as elevated levels of negative affectivity (NA and high comorbidity with depression and reduced resting heart rate variability (HRV compared to healthy controls (HC. The goals of this study were (1 to replicate these findings and (2 to investigate the moderating role of NA, depression, and resting HRV in EPM efficiency within a patient group with fibromyalgia and/or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Resting HRV was quantified as the root mean square of successive differences between inter-beat intervals (RMSSD in rest, a vagally mediated time domain measure of HRV.Methods: Seventy-eight patients with fibromyalgia and/or CFS and 33 HC completed a counter-irritation paradigm as a measure of EPM efficiency. Participants rated the painfulness of electrocutaneous stimuli (of individually calibrated intensity on the ankle before (baseline phase, during (counter-irritation phase and after (recovery phase the application of a cold pain stimulus on the forearm. A larger reduction in pain in the counter-irritation phase compared to the baseline phase reflects a more efficient EPM.Results: In contrast to our expectations, there was no difference between pain ratings in the baseline compared to counter-irritation phase for both patients and HC. Therefore, reliable conclusions on the moderating effect of NA, depression, and RMSSD could not be made. Surprisingly, patients reported more pain in the recovery compared to the counter-irritation and baseline phase, while HC did not. This latter effect was more pronounced in patients with comorbid depression, patients who rated the painfulness of the counter-irritation stimulus as high and patients who rated the painfulness of the electrocutaneous stimuli as low. We did not manage to successfully replicate the counter-irritation effect in HC or FSS patients

  12. Intragenic deletions affecting two alternative transcripts of the IMMP2L gene in patients with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, Linea; Jensen, Lars R

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, and the disorder is often accompanied by comorbidities such as attention-deficit hyperactivity-disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Tourette syndrome has a complex etiology, but the underlyin...

  13. Ear necrosis syndrome in weaning pigs associated with PCV2 infection: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Papatsiros

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Porcine necrotic ear syndrome (PNES in pigs has been reported as an increasing health problem in many countries with intensive pig farming. The etiology of this disease is complex and the presumed triggering factors can be divided into infectious and non-infectious agents. The present report describes a case of Porcine Circovirus type 2 (PCV2, infection associated with lesions of PNES at the weaning stage of a farrow-to-finish pig farm. Approximately 35% of weaners (1-3 weeks after weaning presented clinical symptoms similar to Post-weaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS. About 2-3 weeks after weaning the first lesions of PNES occurred in approximately 20% of pigs, resulting in a significant health problem characterized by poor growth or severe wasting and finally mortality up to 15% in some batches. Moreover, approximately 5% of survived weaners, during growing / finishing stage, presented poor growth and secondary co-infections that lead to death. The present study based on the clinical signs, serological and pathological examinations, indicates that weaners suffered by sub-acute PCV2 infection resulting in PMWS associated with PNES. The lesions of PNES were initially observed at the same period (4-8 weeks of age with the higher seroprevalence of PCV2 infection. Metaphylaxis of this case included intramuscular injection of florfenicol for the treatment and control of skin lesions and respiratory signs. Moreover, piglets were vaccinated against PCV2. In conclusion, sub-acute PCV2 infection could be included in triggering factors PNES in weaners. The mass vaccination against PCV2 of infected piglets might be effective in reduction of clinical signs and losses of PNES in cases of PCV2 infection associated with PNES.

  14. Can Surgical Technique Affect the Success of Endoscopic Treatment in Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux and Overactive Bladder Syndrome?

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    Ahmet Şahan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective “Traditional subureteral transurethral injection” (STING and “Double hydrodistention-implantation” (Double-HIT injection techniques for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR treatment are a less invasive, yet very effective options. The influence of injection techniques in treatment success is not adequately searched in children with overactive bladder syndrome (OAB. The objective of this study to compare the short-term success rates of STING and Double-HIT techniques in children with OAB-VUR complex. Materials and Methods Children who underwent endoscopic injection for VUR between 2010 and 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were grouped into two groups according to the surgical techniques (STING or Double-HIT. Success of the treatment was defined with a negative voiding cystourethrogram at the 6th postoperative week. Patients were evaluated according to sex, age, pre- and postoperative reflux grades, laterality, type and volume of bulking agent and presence of OAB. Results Both groups were similar in terms of sex, age, lower urinary tract dysfunction, reflux grade and success rates. Surgical technique, score of pediatric lower urinary tract symptom questionnaire, age, sex, laterality of reflux and type of the bulking agent found to have no effect on the overall success rates (p>0.05. Presence of OAB and/or a high grade reflux were identified as statistically significant predictive factors that could affect the treatment results. Conclusion The short-term surgical success of the double-HIT and STING techniques showed no difference in children with OAB. The presence of a high grade reflux and/or OAB seemed to be the main factors for overall success in endoscopic VUR surgery.

  15. Prognostic Factors Affecting Union After Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy in Ulnar Impaction Syndrome: A Retrospective Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Soo Min; Shin, Hyun Dae; Ahn, Ki Jun

    2017-04-19

    Ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) is a widely adopted procedure with excellent outcomes. However, delayed union or nonunion has occasionally been observed. The purpose of this retrospective case-control study was to identify variables affecting osseous consolidation after USO in patients with ulnar impaction syndrome. The study included 325 patients who had undergone USO between March 2008 and March 2014. We evaluated the association between union and basic demographic factors as well as preoperative pain (assessed on a visual analog scale [VAS]), range of wrist motion, grip strength, and modified Mayo wrist score. We also assessed the association of union with radiographic variables such as the degree of dorsal subluxation of the ulna, preoperative and postoperative ulnar variance, morphological type of the distal radioulnar joint, gap at the osteotomy site, and presence of newly developed arthritic changes during the follow-up period. Finally, variables associated with operative conditions, such as degeneration of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, use of a parallel double-blade saw, type of plate used for fixation, number of screws, and plate position on the volar or dorsal ulnar surface were investigated. Ulnar union was achieved in 294 patients (group 1), and 31 patients had delayed union or nonunion (group 2). On univariate and multivariate analyses, smoking, low bone mineral density (BMD), a decreased range of motion of the wrist, and use of a double-blade saw were found to be significant factors for an adverse radiographic outcome (nonunion or delayed union). Delayed union or nonunion occurred in about 10% of patients treated with USO. We suggest that it may be preferable to perform USO in nonsmokers, patients with normal bone density, and those without restricted wrist motion. Also, we recommend the use of a single-blade saw when performing the osteotomy. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of

  16. Comparative cardiac pathological changes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) affected with heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yousaf, Muhammad Naveed; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Skjødt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    muscle, liver and pancreas. The main findings of these diseases are necrosis and inflammatory cells infiltrates affecting different regions of the heart. In order to better characterize the cardiac pathology, study of the inflammatory cell characteristics and cell cycle protein expression was undertaken......The heart is considered the powerhouse of the cardiovascular system. Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD) are cardiac diseases of marine farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which commonly affect the heart in addition to the skeletal...

  17. What Is Marfan Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Outreach Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Marfan Syndrome Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Marfan Syndrome Marfan syndrome affects connective tissue, which is the “ ...

  18. Winter Activity of Coastal Plain Populations of Bat Species Affected by White-Nose Syndrome and Wind Energy Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grider, John F; Larsen, Angela L; Homyack, Jessica A; Kalcounis-Rueppell, Matina C

    2016-01-01

    Across the entire distribution of a species, populations may have variable responses to environmental perturbations. Many bat species experience mortality in large portions of their range during hibernation and along migratory paths to and from wintering grounds, from White-nose syndrome (WNS) and wind energy development, respectively. In some areas, warm temperatures may allow bats to remain active through winter, thus decreasing their susceptibility to WNS and/or mortality associated with migration to wintering grounds. These areas could act as a refugia and be important for the persistence of local populations. To determine if warmer temperatures affect bat activity, we compared year-round activity of bat populations in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont of North Carolina, USA, two regions that differ in winter temperature. We established six recording stations, four along a 295-kilometer north-south transect in the Coastal Plain, and two in the Piedmont of North Carolina. We recorded bat activity over two years. We supplemented our recordings with mist-net data. Although bat activity was lower during winter at all sites, the odds of recording a bat during winter were higher at Coastal Plain sites when compared with Piedmont sites. Further, bats in the Piedmont had a lower level of winter activity compared to summer activity than bats in the Coastal Plain that had more similar levels of activity in the winter and summer. We found high bat species richness on the Coastal Plain in winter, with winter-active species including those known to hibernate throughout most of their range and others known to be long distance migrants. In particular, two species impacted by WNS, the northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis) and tricolored bat (Perimyotis subflavus), were present year round in the Coastal Plain. The tricolored bat was also present year-round in the Piedmont. In the Coastal Plain, the long distance migratory hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) was active in the

  19. Relationship between vagal tone, cortisol, TNF-alpha, epinephrine and negative affects in Crohn's disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Pellissier

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS involve brain-gut dysfunctions where vagus nerve is an important component. The aim of this work was to study the association between vagal tone and markers of stress and inflammation in patients with CD or IBS compared to healthy subjects (controls. The study was performed in 73 subjects (26 controls, 21 CD in remission and 26 IBS patients. The day prior to the experiment, salivary cortisol was measured at 8:00 AM and 10:00 PM. The day of the experiment, subjects completed questionnaires for anxiety (STAI and depressive symptoms (CES-D. After 30 min of rest, ECG was recorded for heart rate variability (HRV analysis. Plasma cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, TNF-alpha and IL-6 were measured in blood samples taken at the end of ECG recording. Compared with controls, CD and IBS patients had higher scores of state-anxiety and depressive symptomatology. A subgroup classification based on HRV-normalized high frequency band (HFnu as a marker of vagal tone, showed that control subjects with high vagal tone had significantly lower evening salivary cortisol levels than subjects with low vagal tone. Such an effect was not observed in CD and IBS patients. Moreover, an inverse association (r =  -0.48; p<0.05 was observed between the vagal tone and TNF-alpha level in CD patients exclusively. In contrast, in IBS patients, vagal tone was inversely correlated with plasma epinephrine (r =  -0.39; p<0.05. No relationship was observed between vagal tone and IL-6, norepinephrine or negative affects (anxiety and depressive symptomatology in any group. In conclusion, these data argue for an imbalance between the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and the vagal tone in CD and IBS patients. Furthermore, they highlight the specific homeostatic link between vagal tone and TNF-alpha in CD and epinephrine in IBS and argue for the relevance of vagus nerve reinforcement interventions in those diseases.

  20. Winter Activity of Coastal Plain Populations of Bat Species Affected by White-Nose Syndrome and Wind Energy Facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Grider

    Full Text Available Across the entire distribution of a species, populations may have variable responses to environmental perturbations. Many bat species experience mortality in large portions of their range during hibernation and along migratory paths to and from wintering grounds, from White-nose syndrome (WNS and wind energy development, respectively. In some areas, warm temperatures may allow bats to remain active through winter, thus decreasing their susceptibility to WNS and/or mortality associated with migration to wintering grounds. These areas could act as a refugia and be important for the persistence of local populations. To determine if warmer temperatures affect bat activity, we compared year-round activity of bat populations in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont of North Carolina, USA, two regions that differ in winter temperature. We established six recording stations, four along a 295-kilometer north-south transect in the Coastal Plain, and two in the Piedmont of North Carolina. We recorded bat activity over two years. We supplemented our recordings with mist-net data. Although bat activity was lower during winter at all sites, the odds of recording a bat during winter were higher at Coastal Plain sites when compared with Piedmont sites. Further, bats in the Piedmont had a lower level of winter activity compared to summer activity than bats in the Coastal Plain that had more similar levels of activity in the winter and summer. We found high bat species richness on the Coastal Plain in winter, with winter-active species including those known to hibernate throughout most of their range and others known to be long distance migrants. In particular, two species impacted by WNS, the northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis and tricolored bat (Perimyotis subflavus, were present year round in the Coastal Plain. The tricolored bat was also present year-round in the Piedmont. In the Coastal Plain, the long distance migratory hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus

  1. Postweaning multisystematic wasting syndrome in Danish pig herds: productivity, clinical signs and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm Nielsen, Elisabeth; Enøe, Claes; Jorsal, Sven Erik Lind

    2008-01-01

    . The prevalence of PMWS-positive pigs among illthriven weaner pigs was 45 per cent (101/222) in the case herds, and 12 per cent (27/222) in the control herds. Specific gross pathological findings were associated with a positive PMWS diagnosis; pigs with heavy, rubber-like lungs, atonic intestines, and enlarged...

  2. Surto de Circovirose (Síndrome Definhante Multissistêmica de Suínos Desmamados no estado do Rio de Janeiro Outbreak of Circovirosis (Porcine Postweaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ticiana do Nascimento França

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se o primeiro surto de Síndrome Definhante Multissistêmica de Suínos Desmamados (SDMSD na Região Sudeste do Brasil, no estado do Rio de Janeiro. A enfermidade que afetou principalmente suínos desmamados com idade em torno de 4 meses, levou a morte pelo menos 14 animais. A granja onde o surto ocorreu, tinha péssimas condições sanitárias e de manejo. Clinicamente, a doença caracterizou-se por má condição corporal, pouco desenvolvimento, tosse, taquipnéia, dispnéia, diarréia, ataxia, tremores após estímulo, decúbito e convulsões, com evolução aguda a subaguda. À necropsia, os achados mais importantes foram um aumento de volume de linfonodos e pulmões não-colapsados, com áreas consolidadas, principalmente nos lobos craniais e porção anterior dos lobos médios. O exame histológico revelou, com maior freqüência, infiltração linfo-histiocítica com células sinciciais em linfonodos, baço, placas de Peyer, rim, pulmão e fígado, depleção ou hiperplasia linfóide, bem como pneumonia bronco-intersticial linfo-histiocitária e áreas de broncopneumonia secundária. O diagnóstico firmou-se pela observação dos sintomas e das lesões histológicas típicas e foi confirmado por exame imunohistoquímico e PCR. O estudo teve por objetivo caracterizar os aspectos epidemiológico e clínico-patológico desse surto, já que a mesma tem causado grandes perdas econômicas, diretas ou indiretas, à suinocultura mundial.The first outbreak of Postweaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS in swine, which occurred in southeastern Brazil, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, is described. The disease, which affects mainly weaned about 4 month-old pigs, caused the death of at least 14 animals. The property, where the outbreak occurred, had inadequate sanitary and management conditions. Clinically the disease was characterized by wasting, poor development, cough, tachypnoea, dispnoea, diarrhoea, ataxia, tremors after stimulation

  3. Reduction of Nipbl impairs cohesin loading locally and affects transcription but not cohesion-dependent functions in a mouse model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remeseiro, Silvia; Cuadrado, Ana; Kawauchi, Shimako; Calof, Anne L; Lander, Arthur D; Losada, Ana

    2013-12-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a genetic disorder linked to mutations in cohesin and its regulators. To date, it is unclear which function of cohesin is more relevant to the pathology of the syndrome. A mouse heterozygous for the gene encoding the cohesin loader Nipbl recapitulates many features of CdLS. We have carefully examined Nipbl deficient cells and here report that they have robust cohesion all along the chromosome. DNA replication, DNA repair and chromosome segregation are carried out efficiently in these cells. While bulk cohesin loading is unperturbed, binding to certain promoters such as the Protocadherin genes in brain is notably affected and alters gene expression. These results provide further support for the idea that developmental defects in CdLS are caused by deregulated transcription and not by malfunction of cohesion-related processes. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. What it is said versus how it is said : Comprehension of affective prosody in men with Klinefelter (47,XXY) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Sophie; Aleman, Andr; Swaab, Hanna; Krijn, Tessel; Vingerhoets, Guy; Kahn, Rene S.

    2007-01-01

    Difficulties in social communication in individuals with Klinefelter syndrome (XXY chromosomal pattern) have largely been attributed to deficits in left hemisphere-mediated, language functions. This study examined the ability of XXY men to decode emotions from tone of voice, a pragmatic aspect of

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of the glucocorticoid receptor may affect the phenotype of women with anovulatory polycystic ovary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, O.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; Themmen, A. P.; de Jong, F. H.; Hofman, A.; Fauser, B. C. J. M.; Laven, J. S. E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by ovarian dysfunction. The association with obesity and insulin resistance is well established. Steroid hormones play a central role in the regulation of both ovarian function and body composition. This study aims to assess the influence

  6. Managing hytrosavirus infections in Glossina pallidipes colonies: Feeding regime affects the prevalence of the salivary gland hypertrophy syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kariithi, H.M.; Abd-Alla, A.M.M.; Mohamed, H.A.; Lapiz, E.; Parker, A.G.; Vreysen, M.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Many species of tsetse flies are infected by a virus that causes salivary gland hypertrophy (SGH) syndrome and the virus isolated from Glossina pallidipes (GpSGHV) has recently been sequenced. Flies with SGH have a reduced fecundity and fertility. Due to the deleterious impact of SGHV on G.

  7. Specific mosaic KRAS mutations affecting codon 146 cause oculoectodermal syndrome and encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boppudi, S; Bögershausen, N; Hove, H B

    2016-01-01

    Oculoectodermal syndrome (OES) and encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) are rare disorders that share many common features, such as epibulbar dermoids, aplasia cutis congenita, pigmentary changes following Blaschko lines, bony tumor-like lesions, and others. About 20 cases with OES and more...

  8. Do dopaminergic gene polymorphisms affect mesolimbic reward activation of music listening response? Therapeutic impact on Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Chen, Thomas J H; Chen, Amanda L H; Madigan, Margaret; Downs, B William; Waite, Roger L; Braverman, Eric R; Kerner, Mallory; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Giordano, John; Henshaw, Harry; Gold, Mark S

    2010-03-01

    affected by an individual's D2 density in the VTA mediated interaction of the NAc. It is therefore hypothesized that carriers of DRD2 A1 allele may respond significantly differently to carriers of the DRD2 A2 genotype. In this regard, carriers of the D2 A1 allele have a blunted response to glucose and monetary rewards. In contrast powerful D2 agonists like bromocryptine show a heightened activation of the reward circuitry only in DRD2 A1 allele carriers. If music causes a powerful activation in spite of the DRD2 A1 allele due to a strong DA neuronal release which subsequently impinges on existing D2 receptors, then it is reasonable to assume that music is a strong indirect D2 agonist (by virtue of DA neuronal release in the NAc) and may have important therapeutic applicability in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) related behaviors including Substance Use Disorder (SUD). Ross et al. [18] found that music therapy appears to be a novel motivational tool in a severely impaired inpatient sample of patients with co-occurring mental illness and addiction. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Physiotherapy with and without Superficial Dry Needling Affects Pain and Muscle Strength in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Miri Abyaneh

    2016-03-01

    Discussion: Physiotherapy with and without superficial dry needling were seen to reduce pain and increase muscle strength of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. However, performing physiotherapy with superficial dry needling had a more significant effect on reducing knee pain. Superficial needling can cause many physiological and neurophysiological effects. Through stimulation of pain control mechanisms, it can help in further reduction of pain.

  10. White-nose syndrome-affected little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) increase grooming and other active behaviors during arousals from hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee-Bouboulis, Sarah A; Reeder, DeeAnn M

    2013-10-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emerging infectious disease of hibernating bats linked to the death of an estimated 5.7 million or more bats in the northeastern United States and Canada. White-nose syndrome is caused by the cold-loving fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), which invades the skin of the muzzles, ears, and wings of hibernating bats. Previous work has shown that WNS-affected bats arouse to euthermic or near euthermic temperatures during hibernation significantly more frequently than normal and that these too-frequent arousals are tied to severity of infection and death date. We quantified the behavior of bats during these arousal bouts to understand better the causes and consequences of these arousals. We hypothesized that WNS-affected bats would display increased levels of activity (especially grooming) during their arousal bouts from hibernation compared to WNS-unaffected bats. Behavior of both affected and unaffected hibernating bats in captivity was monitored from December 2010 to March 2011 using temperature-sensitive dataloggers attached to the backs of bats and infrared motion-sensitive cameras. The WNS-affected bats exhibited significantly higher rates of grooming, relative to unaffected bats, at the expense of time that would otherwise be spent inactive. Increased self-grooming may be related to the presence of the fungus. Elevated activity levels in affected bats likely increase energetic stress, whereas the loss of rest (inactive periods when aroused from torpor) may jeopardize the ability of a bat to reestablish homeostasis in a number of physiologic systems.

  11. The Brugada syndrome mutation A39V does not affect surface expression of neuronal rat Cav1.2 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simms Brett A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A loss of function of the L-type calcium channel, Cav1.2, results in a cardiac specific disease known as Brugada syndrome. Although many Brugada syndrome channelopathies reduce channel function, one point mutation in the N-terminus of Cav1.2 (A39V has been shown to elicit disease a phenotype because of a loss of surface trafficking of the channel. This lack of cell membrane expression could not be rescued by the trafficking chaperone Cavβ. Findings We report that despite the striking loss of trafficking described previously in the cardiac Cav1.2 channel, the A39V mutation while in the background of the brain isoform traffics and functions normally. We detected no differences in biophysical properties between wild type Cav1.2 and A39V-Cav1.2 in the presence of either a cardiac (Cavβ2b, or a neuronal beta subunit (Cavβ1b. In addition, the A39V-Cav1.2 mutant showed a normal Cavβ2b mediated increase in surface expression in tsA-201 cells. Conclusions The Brugada syndrome mutation A39V when introduced into rat brain Cav1.2 does not trigger the loss-of-trafficking phenotype seen in a previous study on the human heart isoform of the channel.

  12. Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanti Devi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  13. Do Pregnancy and Parenthood Affect the Course of PCO Syndrome? Initial Results from the LIPCOS Study (Lifestyle Intervention for Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome [PCOS]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassek, J; Ohnolz, F; Hanusch, Y; Schmidmayr, M; Berg, D; Kiechle, M; Seifert-Klauss, V R

    2015-11-01

    Introduction: The impact of pregnancy and parenthood on the long-term course of PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome is still not known. The LIPCOS study (Lifestyle Intervention for Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome [PCOS] - using the example of pregnancy and parenthood) systematically investigates long-term changes in PCOS symptoms. Method and Patients: The LIPCOS pilot study sent out a questionnaire to 403 patients who had presented with oligomenorrhea between 1991 and 2002. The prospective LIPCOS main study systematically investigated 64 women using structured interviews about lifestyle changes in the last 10 years, created a detailed hormone profile of these women and carried out vaginal ultrasound to calculate ovarian score. Results: Ovarian volume and ovarian score were not significantly lower for women with children (n = 25) compared to women with PCOS who had not had children (n = 39; p = 0.226). More women with children than women who did not have children currently reported a regular daily lifestyle, and the difference was statistically significant (92 % [n = 23/25] vs. 61.5 % [n = 24/39]; p = 0.009). Ten years ago or before the birth of their first child, respectively, no such difference was found between both groups (52 vs. 51.3 %). Over the last 10 years, women with children were more likely to have shorter cycles compared to women without children (p = 0.441). 88 % of women with children compared to 69.2 % of women without children reported that currently they had a "healthy diet" (p = 0.130). Serum testosterone levels were slightly lower for women with children (67.6 % of the upper limits of normal ranges) compared to women without children (80 % of the upper limits of normal ranges), but because of the small subgroup sizes the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.106). Conclusion: The LIPCOS study shows for the first time that pregnancy and parenthood may have an impact on the long

  14. Novel and recurrent mutations in the TAT gene in Tunisian families affected with Richner-Hanhart syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyacoub, Yosra; Zribi, Hela; Azzouz, Hatem; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Abdelaziz, Rim Ben; Kacem, Monia; Rekaya, Ben; Messaoud, Olfa; Romdhane, Lilia; Charfeddine, Cherine; Bouziri, Mustapha; Bouziri, Sonia; Tebib, Neji; Mokni, Mourad; Kaabachi, Naziha; Boubaker, Samir; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2013-10-15

    Tyrosinemia type II, also designated as oculocutaneous tyrosinemia or Richner-Hanhart syndrome (RHS), is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder. In the present study, we report clinical features and molecular genetic investigation of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in two young patients, both born to consanguineous unions between first-degree cousins. These two unrelated families originated from Northern and Southern Tunisia. The clinical diagnosis was based on the observation of several complications related to Richner-Hanhart syndrome: recurrent eye redness, tearing and burning pain, photophobia, bilateral pseudodendritic keratitis, an erythematous and painful focal palmo-plantar hyperkeratosis and a mild delay of mental development. The diagnosis was confirmed by biochemical analysis. Sequencing of the TAT gene revealed the presence of a previously reported missense mutation (c.452G>A, p.Cys151Tyr) in a Tunisian family, and a novel G duplication (c.869dupG, p.Trp291Leufs 6). Early diagnosis of RHS and protein-restricted diet are crucial to reduce the risk and the severity of long-term complications of hypertyrosinemia such as intellectual disability. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A clinical case study of a Wolfram syndrome-affected family: pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials and electroretinography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langwińska-Wośko, Ewa; Broniek-Kowalik, Karina; Szulborski, Kamil

    2012-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS), or DIDMOAD, is a rare (1/100 000 to 1/770 000), progressive neurodegenerative disorder. In its early stages, it is characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and loss of sensorineural hearing-this is followed by diabetes insipidus, progressive neurological abnormalities and other endocrine abnormalities, which occur in later years. The aim of this study was to report on the clinical and electrophysiological findings from a family with the WFS1 mutation. The five family members were subjected to a complete ophthalmic examination, which included a flash full-field electroretinogram and pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) performed according to ISCEV standards. Optic atrophy was confirmed in two homozygotic patients, where P100 latencies were significantly delayed-up to 146 ms in PVEP. P100 latencies were normal in the three heterozygotic patients we examined. Curve morphology abnormalities were observed in all five patients we examined. No literature describing the morphology of PVEP in Wolfram syndrome patients was found. In flash electroretinography, scotopic and photopic responses appeared in normal morphology and value. Diabetic retinopathy was not observed in the diabetes mellitus patients.

  16. Compound heterozygosity for two GHR missense mutations in a patient affected by Laron Syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moia, Stefania; Tessaris, Daniele; Einaudi, Silvia; de Sanctis, Luisa; Bona, Gianni; Bellone, Simonetta; Prodam, Flavia

    2017-10-12

    Mutations localized in the Growth Hormone Receptor (GHR) gene are often associated with the pathogenesis of Laron Syndrome, an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder characterized by severe growth retardation. Biochemically, patients present normal to high circulating GH levels, in presence of very low or undetectable IGF-I levels, which do not rise after rhGH treatment. We describe the case of a 3.8 years old girl with symmetrical short stature (-3.76 SDS), low IGF-1 and IGFBP-3, in presence of normal GH levels. Parents were not relatives and there was no family history of short stature. During the second day of birth, she developed severe hypoglycaemia that required glucose infusion. She presented frontal bossing and depressed nasal bridge. IGF-1 generation test showed no response, suggesting a GH resistance evidence. In the hypothesis of Laron Syndrome, we decided to perform a molecular analysis of Growth Hormone Receptor (GHR) gene. This analysis demonstrated that the patient was compound heterozygote for two missense mutations. GHR gene mutations are a well demonstrated cause of GH insensitivity. In heterozygous patients, probably the normal stature may be achieved by a compensatory mechanism of GH secretion or signalling. On the contrary, in homozygous or compound heterozygous patients these compensatory mechanisms are inadequate, and short stature may be the consequence.

  17. Gerstmann's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drawings. Frequently, there is also an impairment in reading. Children with a high level of intellectual functioning as well as those with brain damage may be affected with the disorder. × Definition Gerstmann's syndrome is a cognitive impairment that results ...

  18. Cell and gene therapy for genetic diseases: inherited disorders affecting the lung and those mimicking sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Allison M; Flotte, Terence R

    2012-06-01

    Some of the first human gene therapy trials targeted diseases of the lung and provided important information that will continue to help shape future trials. Here we describe both cell and gene therapies for lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin disorder as well as fatty acid oxidation disorders that mimic sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Human clinical gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin have been performed using a variety of vectors including adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and nonviral vectors. No human clinical gene therapy trials have been performed for disorders of fatty acid oxidation; however, important proof-of-principle studies have been completed for multiple fatty acid oxidation disorders. Important achievements have been made and have yet to come for cell and gene therapies for disorders of the lung and those mimicking SIDS.

  19. Multiple chromophobe and clear cell renal cancer in a patient affected by Birt-Hogg-Dubè syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Roberto; Marchioni, Michele; Valenti, Sergio; Sortino, Giuseppe; Borgonovo, Giulio; Pesenti, Nicola; Vismara, Alberto C A; Circo, Maria C; Sessa, Barbara; Micheli, Emanuele; Lembo, Antonino

    2017-04-28

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is a rare autosomal dominant characterized by the presence of fibrofolliculomas and/or trichodiscomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal tumors. The syndrome is linked to mutations in the FLCN gene, which is preferentially expressed in the skin, kidney, and lung. The aim of our paper is to describe a case of multiple bilateral renal cancer in a patient affected by BHDS. Patient subjected to enucleoresection seven kidney tumors discovered right after ultrasound performed for other reasons. Definitive histologic examination were as follows: multifocal type chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and clear cell. After 1 month, the patient was readmitted for spontaneous pneumothorax. After about a year, the patient was again subjected to resection of multiple renal tumors left. Histological examination proved that it was multifocal renal cell carcinoma, clear cell varieties. The genome analysis highlighted positive for mutation c. 1379_1380 of FLCN gene, BHDS gene. Currently, the patient is under close follow-up. After 1 year, the chest computed tomography (CT) confirmed the presence of minute air bubbles scattered on both sides. Instead, the abdominal CT was positive for a small round lesion 6 mm exophytic. The BHDS is a rare syndrome whose management is extremely complex both in terms of oncological and functional. Kidney tumors associated with BHDS usually have a favorable clinical course. Present evidence suggests a close follow-up of the carriers of the genetic mutation patients whether or not they have expressed the lesions of disease given the high rate of recurrence of renal lesions.

  20. Differential expression profiles of microRNA in the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) associated with white nose syndrome affected and unaffected individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, D.D.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Hitt, N.P.; King, T.L.

    2013-01-01

    First documented in New York State in 2006, white nose syndrome (WNS) quickly became the leading cause of mortality in hibernating bat species in the United States. WNS is caused by a psychrophilic fungus, Geomyces destructans. Clinical signs of this pathogen are expressed as a dusty white fungus predominately around the nose and on the wings of affected bats. Relatively new biomarkers, such as microRNAs (miRNAs) are being targeted as markers to predict the syndrome prior to the clinical manifestation. The primary objective of this study was to identify miRNAs that could serve as biomarkers and proxies of little brown bat health. Bats were collected from hibernacula that had tested positive and negative for WNS. Genetic sequencing was completed using the Ion Torrent platform. A number of miRNAs were identified from the liver as putative biomarkers of WNS. However, given the small sample size for each treatment, this data set has only coarsely identified miRNAs indicative of WNS, and further validation is required.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Poland syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Poland syndrome Poland syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Poland syndrome is a disorder in which affected individuals ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Marfan syndrome Marfan syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects the connective tissue ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Wolfram syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Wolfram syndrome Wolfram syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Wolfram syndrome is a condition that affects many of the ...

  4. Germline mutations affecting the histone H4 core cause a developmental syndrome by altering DNA damage response and cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessadori, Federico; Giltay, Jacques C; Hurst, Jane A; Massink, Maarten P; Duran, Karen; Vos, Harmjan R; van Es, Robert M; Scott, Richard H; van Gassen, Koen L I; Bakkers, Jeroen; van Haaften, Gijs

    2017-11-01

    Covalent modifications of histones have an established role as chromatin effectors, as they control processes such as DNA replication and transcription, and repair or regulate nucleosomal structure. Loss of modifications on histone N tails, whether due to mutations in genes belonging to histone-modifying complexes or mutations directly affecting the histone tails, causes developmental disorders or has a role in tumorigenesis. More recently, modifications affecting the globular histone core have been uncovered as being crucial for DNA repair, pluripotency and oncogenesis. Here we report monoallelic missense mutations affecting lysine 91 in the histone H4 core (H4K91) in three individuals with a syndrome of growth delay, microcephaly and intellectual disability. Expression of the histone H4 mutants in zebrafish embryos recapitulates the developmental anomalies seen in the patients. We show that the histone H4 alterations cause genomic instability, resulting in increased apoptosis and cell cycle progression anomalies during early development. Mechanistically, our findings indicate an important role for the ubiquitination of H4K91 in genomic stability during embryonic development.

  5. Ghrelin and measures of satiety are altered in polycystic ovary syndrome but not differentially affected by diet composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, L J; Noakes, M; Clifton, P M; Wittert, G A; Tomlinson, L; Galletly, C; Luscombe, N D; Norman, R J

    2004-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine condition in women of reproductive age associated with obesity. It may involve dysregulation of ghrelin, a hormone implicated in appetite regulation. The effect of diet composition on ghrelin is unclear. Overweight women with and without PCOS were randomized to a high-protein (40% carbohydrate, 30% protein; 10 PCOS, six non-PCOS) or standard protein diet (55% carbohydrate, 15% protein; 10 PCOS, six non-PCOS) for 12 wk of energy restriction and 4 wk of weight maintenance. Diet composition had no effect on fasting or postprandial ghrelin or measures of satiety. Non-PCOS subjects had a 70% higher fasting baseline ghrelin (P = 0.011), greater increase in fasting ghrelin (57.5 vs. 34.0%, P = 0.033), and greater maximal decrease in postprandial ghrelin after weight loss (-144.1 +/- 58.4 vs. -28.9 +/- 14.2 pg/ml, P = 0.02) than subjects with PCOS. Subjects with PCOS were less satiated (P = 0.001) and more hungry (P = 0.007) after a test meal at wk 0 and 16 than subjects without PCOS. Appetite regulation, as measured by subjective short-term hunger and satiety and ghrelin homeostasis, may be impaired in PCOS.

  6. Age-related cognitive decline and vision impairment affecting the detection of dementia syndrome in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reischies, F M; Geiselmann, B

    1997-11-01

    Currently the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) is widely used as a screening instrument for dementia syndrome. Diagnostic validity may be lowered in old age by normal age-related cognitive decline. Furthermore, visual impairment, occurring frequently in old age, leads to missing values which prevent an interpretation of the test result. In the Berlin Ageing Study (n = 516, age range 70-103 years) MMSE and clinical dementia diagnosis, made by a psychiatrist investigating all subjects by the Geriatric Mental State-A and History and Aetiology Schedule interviews, were investigated independently. The MMblind was analysed, an MMSE version for vision impairment in which all items requiring image processing are omitted. The study sample is population-based; dementia cases (DSM-III-R) were excluded on the basis of the clinical diagnosis. Norms are reported for very old age regarding MMSE as well as MMblind. There is a considerable age effect on MMSE scores. In contrast to MMSE, sensitivity and specificity of the shorter MMblind version are not reduced. The considerable age effect requires the adaptation of cut-off values for old age. The blind version of the MMSE seems to be a valid instrument improving the applicability of the MMSE in old age.

  7. Proline and COMT status affect visual connectivity in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice J C M Magnée

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individuals with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS are at increased risk for schizophrenia and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs. Given the prevalence of visual processing deficits in these three disorders, a causal relationship between genes in the deleted region of chromosome 22 and visual processing is likely. Therefore, 22q11DS may represent a unique model to understand the neurobiology of visual processing deficits related with ASD and psychosis. METHODOLOGY: We measured Event-Related Potentials (ERPs during a texture segregation task in 58 children with 22q11DS and 100 age-matched controls. The C1 component was used to index afferent activity of visual cortex area V1; the texture negativity wave provided a measure for the integrity of recurrent connections in the visual cortical system. COMT genotype and plasma proline levels were assessed in 22q11DS individuals. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Children with 22q11DS showed enhanced feedforward activity starting from 70 ms after visual presentation. ERP activity related to visual feedback activity was reduced in the 22q11DS group, which was seen as less texture negativity around 150 ms post presentation. Within the 22q11DS group we further demonstrated an association between high plasma proline levels and aberrant feedback/feedforward ratios, which was moderated by the COMT(158 genotype. CONCLUSIONS: These findings confirm the presence of early visual processing deficits in 22q11DS. We discuss these in terms of dysfunctional synaptic plasticity in early visual processing areas, possibly associated with deviant dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission. As such, our findings may serve as a promising biomarker related to the development of schizophrenia among 22q11DS individuals.

  8. Evidence for chromosome 2p16.3 polycystic ovary syndrome susceptibility locus in affected women of European ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutharasan, Priscilla; Galdones, Eugene; Peñalver Bernabé, Beatriz; Garcia, Obed A; Jafari, Nadereh; Shea, Lonnie D; Woodruff, Teresa K; Legro, Richard S; Dunaif, Andrea; Urbanek, Margrit

    2013-01-01

    A previous genome-wide association study in Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) identified a region on chromosome 2p16.3 encoding the LH/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) and FSH receptor (FSHR) genes as a reproducible PCOS susceptibility locus. The objective of the study was to determine the role of the LHCGR and/or FSHR gene in the etiology of PCOS in women of European ancestry. This was a genetic association study in a European ancestry cohort of women with PCOS. The study was conducted at an academic medical center. Participants in the study included 905 women with PCOS diagnosed by National Institutes of Health criteria and 956 control women. We genotyped 94 haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms and two coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms mapping to the coding region of LHCGR and FSHR plus 20 kb upstream and downstream of the genes and test for association in the case control cohort and for association with nine quantitative traits in the women with PCOS. We found strong evidence for an association of PCOS with rs7562215 (P = 0.0037) and rs10495960 (P = 0.0046). Although the marker with the strongest association in the Chinese PCOS genome-wide association study (rs13405728) was not informative in the European populations, we identified and genotyped three markers (rs35960650, rs2956355, and rs7562879) within 5 kb of rs13405728. Of these, rs7562879 was nominally associated with PCOS (P = 0.020). The strongest evidence for association mapping to FSHR was observed with rs1922476 (P = 0.0053). Furthermore, markers with the FSHR gene region were associated with FSH levels in women with PCOS. Fine mapping of the chromosome 2p16.3 Chinese PCOS susceptibility locus in a European ancestry cohort provides evidence for association with two independent loci and PCOS. The gene products LHCGR and FSHR therefore are likely to be important in the etiology of PCOS, regardless of ethnicity.

  9. Experience of exclusion: A framework analysis of socioeconomic factors affecting cardiac rehabilitation participation among patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Maria; Overgaard, Dorthe; Andersen, Ingelise; Baastrup, Marie; Egerod, Ingrid

    2017-12-01

    The Danish public healthcare system provides comprehensive care based on the principle of equal access. However, it is well documented that patients with low socioeconomic position are less likely to participate in cardiac rehabilitation. More knowledge is needed to understand this phenomenon. The aim of the study was to explore the patient experience of barriers to completion of phase II cardiac rehabilitation, and to investigate the impact of socioeconomic factors on completion of cardiac rehabilitation. The study had a qualitative explorative design using semi-structured individual or dyadic interviews with patients ( n = 24) and close relatives ( n = 12). Informants were sampled from a quantitative prospective study of 302 patients with acute coronary syndrome and data were analyzed using the framework method. Patients in different socioeconomic groups were challenged by a rigid and non-individualized rehabilitation program. A total of five themes were identified that might explain non-participation in cardiac rehabilitation: exclusion by time and place, exclusion by health beliefs, exclusion from counseling, exclusion by alienation, and exclusion of relatives. The themes were described in a matrix of socioeconomic factors of age, sex, education and employment. Patients in various socioeconomic subgroups felt excluded from cardiac rehabilitation for different reasons. This study supports earlier findings and provides examples of real-life issues that need to be addressed to prevent attrition and encourage participation. Equal access to cardiac rehabilitation can only be reached if the physical and psychological needs of patient and family are met by tailoring therapy to consider age, sex, education and employment groups.

  10. Overexpression of Chromosome 21 miRNAs May Affect Mitochondrial Function in the Hearts of Down Syndrome Fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Izzo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dosage-dependent upregulation of most of chromosome 21 (Hsa21 genes has been demonstrated in heart tissues of fetuses with Down syndrome (DS. Also miRNAs might play important roles in the cardiac phenotype as they are highly expressed in the heart and regulate cardiac development. Five Hsa21 miRNAs have been well studied in the past: miR-99a-5p, miR-125b-2-5p, let-7c-5p, miR-155-5p, and miR-802-5p but few information is available about their expression in trisomic tissues. In this study, we evaluated the expression of these miRNAs in heart tissues from DS fetuses, showing that miR-99a-5p, miR-155-5p, and let-7c-5p were overexpressed in trisomic hearts. To investigate their role, predicted targets were obtained from different databases and cross-validated using the gene expression profiling dataset we previously generated for fetal hearts. Eighty-five targets of let-7c-5p, 33 of miR-155-5p, and 10 of miR-99a-5p were expressed in fetal heart and downregulated in trisomic hearts. As nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes were found downregulated in trisomic hearts and mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of DS phenotypes, we put special attention to let-7c-5p and miR-155-5p targets downregulated in DS fetal hearts and involved in mitochondrial function. The let-7c-5p predicted target SLC25A4/ANT1 was identified as a possible candidate for both mitochondrial and cardiac anomalies.

  11. Sjogren syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Baldini, Chiara; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bowman, Simon J.; Jonsson, Roland; Mariette, Xavier; Sivils, Kathy; Theander, Elke; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Sjogren syndrome (SjS) is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects the exocrine glands (mainly the salivary and lacrimal glands) and results in the severe dryness of mucosal surfaces, principally in the mouth and eyes. This disease predominantly affects middle-aged women, but can also be

  12. Spectrum of p63 mutations in a selected patient cohort affected with ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome (AEC).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinne, T.K.; Bolat, E.; Meijer, R.; Scheffer, H.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2009-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the p63 gene underlie a group of at least seven allelic syndromes, including ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome (AEC) and Rapp Hodgkin syndrome (RHS), which involves varying degrees of ectodermal dysplasia, orofacial clefting and limb

  13. Factors Affecting Gender Differences in the Association between Health-Related Quality of Life and Metabolic Syndrome Components: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Amiri

    Full Text Available Using structural equation modeling, this study is one of the first efforts aimed at assessing influential factors causing gender differences in the association between health-related quality of life (HRQoL and metabolic syndrome.A sample of 950 adults, from Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study were recruited for this cross sectional study in 2005-2007. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the Iranian version of SF-36. Metabolic syndrome components (MetSCs and physical and mental HRQoL were considered as continuous latent constructs explaining the variances of their observed components. Structural equation modeling was performed to examine the association between the constructs of MetSCs and the physical and mental HRQoL within the two gender groups.Based on the primary hypothesis, MetSCs and HRQoL were fitted in a model. The negative effect of MetSCs on HRQoL was found to be significant only in the physical domain and only in women. The proportion of all the cardio-metabolic risk factors as well as subscales of physical HRQoL that have been explained via the two constructs of MetSCs and HRQoL, respectively, were significantly higher in women. Physical activity in both men (β = 3.19, p<0.05 and women (β = 3.94, p<0.05, age (β = -3.28, p<0.05, education (β = 2.63, p<0.05 only in women and smoking (β = 2.28, p<0.05 just in men, directly affected physical HRQoL. Regarding the mental domain, physical activity (β = 3.37, p<0.05 and marital status (β = 3.44, p<0.05 in women and age (β = 2.01, p<0.05 in men were direct effective factors. Age and education in women as well as smoking in men indirectly affected physical HRQoL via MetSCs.Gender differences in the association between MetSCs and physical HRQoL could mostly be attributed to the different structures of both MetSCs and physical HRQoL constructs in men and women. Age and smoking are the most important socio-behavioral factors which could affect this gender-specific association in

  14. Identification of a mutation in the CHAT gene of Old Danish Pointing Dogs affected with congenital myasthenic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proschowsky, Helle Friis; Flagstad, Annette; Cirera, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    The presence of a recessive inherited muscle disease in Old Danish Pointing Dogs has been well known for years. Comparisons of this disease with myasthenic diseases of other dog breeds and humans have pointed toward a defect in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine possibly due...... to decreased activity of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase. We sequenced exons 5-18 of the gene encoding choline acetyltransferase (CHAT) in 2 affected and 2 unaffected dogs and identified a G to A missense mutation in exon 6. The mutation causes a valine to methionine substitution and segregates...... in agreement with the inheritance of the disease. The mutation was not detected in 50 dogs representing 25 other dog breeds. A DNA test has been developed and is now available to the breeders of Old Danish Pointing Dogs....

  15. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  16. Rapid detection of de novo P253R mutation in FGFR2 using uncultured amniocytes in a pregnancy affected by polyhydramnios, Blake's pouch cyst, and Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Prenatal diagnosis of polyhydramnios, frontal bossing, and midface hypoplasia associated with brain and digital abnormalities should include a differential diagnosis of Apert syndrome. A molecular analysis of FGFR2 using uncultured amniocytes is useful for rapid confirmation of Apert syndrome at prenatal diagnosis.

  17. Syndromes with supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinsky, Mark; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-10-01

    While most supernumerary teeth are idiopathic, they can be associated with a number of Mendelian syndromes. However, this can also be a coincidental finding, since supernumerary teeth occur in 6% or more of the normal population. To better define this relationship, we analyzed the evidence for specific associations. We excluded conditions with a single affected patient reported, supernumerary teeth adjacent to clefts or other forms of alveolar disruption (as secondary rather than primary findings), and natal teeth, which can involve premature eruption of a normal tooth. Since, the cause of supernumerary teeth shows considerable heterogeneity, certain findings are less likely to be coincidental, such as five or more supernumerary teeth in a single patient, or locations outside of the premaxilla. We found only eight genetic syndromes with strong evidence for an association: cleidocranial dysplasia; familial adenomatous polyposis; trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; Nance-Horan syndrome; Opitz BBB/G syndrome; oculofaciocardiodental syndrome; and autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome. There is also suggestive evidence of an association with two uncommon disorders, Kreiborg-Pakistani syndrome (craniosynostosis and dental anomalies), and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosisnigricans. An association of a Mendelian disorder with a low frequency manifestation of supernumerary teeth is difficult to exclude without large numbers, but several commonly cited syndromes lacked evidence for clear association, including Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Fabry disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Apert and Crouzon syndromes, Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  19. "Developing culturally sensitive affect scales for global mental health research and practice: Emotional balance, not named syndromes, in Indian Adivasi subjective well-being".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Jeffrey G; Lacy, Michael G; Upadhyay, Chakrapani

    2017-08-01

    We present a perspective to analyze mental health without either a) imposing Western illness categories or b) adopting local or "native" categories of mental distress. Our approach takes as axiomatic only that locals within any culture share a cognitive and verbal lexicon of salient positive and negative emotional experiences, which an appropriate and repeatable set of ethnographic procedures can elicit. Our approach is provisionally agnostic with respect to either Western or native nosological categories, and instead focuses on persons' relative frequency of experiencing emotions. Putting this perspective into practice in India, our ethnographic fieldwork (2006-2014) and survey analysis (N = 219) resulted in a 40-item Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), which we used to assess the mental well-being of Indigenous persons (the tribal Sahariya) in the Indian states of Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. Generated via standard cognitive anthropological procedures that can be replicated elsewhere, measures such as this possess features of psychiatric scales favored by leaders in global mental health initiatives. Though not capturing locally named distress syndromes, our scale is nonetheless sensitive to local emotional experiences, frames of meaning, and "idioms of distress." By sharing traits of both global and also locally-derived diagnoses, approaches like ours can help identify synergies between them. For example, employing data reduction techniques such as factor analysis-where diagnostic and screening categories emerge inductively ex post facto from emotional symptom clusters, rather than being deduced or assigned a priori by either global mental health experts or locals themselves-reveals hidden overlaps between local wellness idioms and global ones. Practically speaking, our perspective, which assesses both emotional frailty and also potential sources of emotional resilience and balance, while eschewing all named illness categories, can be deployed in

  20. Android fat distribution affects some hemostatic parameters in women with polycystic ovary syndrome compared with healthy control subjects matched for age and body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mendonça-Louzeiro, Maria Raquel Marques Furtado; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce Maria; Benetti-Pinto, Cristina Laguna

    2015-08-01

    To correlate hemostatic parameters with clinical markers of fat distribution and laboratory variables in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared with healthy control subjects. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary teaching hospital. Forty-five women with PCOS and 45 control women matched for age and body mass index (BMI). Clinical evaluation and venipuncture. Age, BMI, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), waist-hip ratio (WHR), Ferriman-Gallwey index, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, total testosterone, free testosterone (FT), thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), D-dimer, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) 1, and the parameters of thrombin generation test (TGT), including the lag time (Tlag), time to peak thrombin generation (Tmax), peak concentration (Cmax), and the area under the thrombin generation curve (TAUC). In the PCOS group, BMI and WC correlated positively with TAFI, D-dimer, PAI-1, Cmax, and TAUC; HC with D-dimer and PAI-1; WHR with TAFI, D-dimer, and PAI-1; glucose with TAFI; insulin and homeostasis-model assessment of insulin resistance with PAI-1; and FT with Cmax and TAUC. Age correlated positively with D-dimer and PAI-1, and negatively with Tlag and Tmax. In the control group, there were no correlations between clinical markers of fat distribution and hemostatic parameters, but age and fasting glucose correlated positively with PAI-1, and FT with Tmax and TAUC. In PCOS, android body fat distribution may directly affect hemostatic parameters, particularly in young and overweight women. Further studies are needed to establish a correlation between these results and an increase in thromboembolic risk. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of low-intensity narrow-band blue-light treatment compared to bright white-light treatment in sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Ybe; Winthorst, Wim H; Duijzer, Wianne B; Hommes, Vanja

    2016-02-18

    The discovery of a novel photoreceptor in the retinal ganglion cells with a highest sensitivity of 470-490 nm blue light has led to research on the effects of short-wavelength light in humans. Several studies have explored the efficacy of monochromatic blue or blue-enriched light in the treatment of SAD. In this study, a comparison has been made between the effects of broad-wavelength light without ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths compared to narrow-band blue light in the treatment of sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder (Sub-SAD). In a 15-day design, 48 participants suffering from Sub-SAD completed 20-minute sessions of light treatment on five consecutive days. 22 participants were given bright white-light treatment (BLT, broad-wavelength light without UV 10 000 lux, irradiance 31.7 Watt/m(2)) and 26 participants received narrow-band blue light (BLUE, 100 lux, irradiance 1.0 Watt/m(2)). All participants completed daily and weekly questionnaires concerning mood, activation, sleep quality, sleepiness and energy. Also, mood and energy levels were assessed by means of the SIGH-SAD, the primary outcome measure. On day 15, SIGH-SAD ratings were significantly lower than on day 1 (BLT 54.8 %, effect size 1.7 and BLUE 50.7 %, effect size 1.9). No statistically significant differences were found on the main outcome measures. Light treatment is an effective treatment for Sub-SAD. The use of narrow-band blue-light treatment is equally effective as bright white-light treatment. This study was registered in the Dutch Trial Register (Nederlands Trial Register TC =  4342 ) (20-12-2013).

  2. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  3. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Bowen-Conradi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Bowen-Conradi syndrome Bowen-Conradi syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Bowen-Conradi syndrome is a disorder that affects many ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Coffin-Siris syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Coffin-Siris syndrome Coffin-Siris syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Coffin-Siris syndrome is a condition that affects several body ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Polycystic ovary syndrome is a condition that affects women in ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Aarskog-Scott syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Aarskog-Scott syndrome Aarskog-Scott syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Aarskog-Scott syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects the ...

  8. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  9. Joubert syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanua, J.A.; Lopez, J.M.; Recondo, J.A.; Garcia, J.M.; Gaztanaga, R.

    1998-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a rare malformation of the posterior fossa, mainly affecting the cerebellar vermis, which generally appears as a dysplastic lesion. Other structures of the cervico medullary junction may be involved, with accompanying brainstem hypoplasia according to neuroimaging studies. The diagnosis is usually reached during, childhood, based on a constellation of changes in the child's neurological development that are supported by the results of imaging studied. Respiratory problems are the most common signs in newborns,leading to the suspicion of the presence of this syndrome. (Author) 11 refs

  10. Insights from the use in clinical practice of eculizumab in adult patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome affecting the native kidneys: an analysis of 19 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhouri, Fadi; Delmas, Yahsou; Provot, François; Barbet, Christelle; Karras, Alexandre; Makdassi, Raifah; Courivaud, Cécile; Rifard, Khair; Servais, Aude; Allard, Catherine; Besson, Virginie; Cousin, Maud; Châtelet, Valérie; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Coindre, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Guillaume; Loirat, Chantal; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a devastating form of renal thrombotic microangiopathy. Despite plasma exchange, the standard treatment of aHUS for decades, the renal prognosis for patients with aHUS has remained poor. We assessed the off-trial use of eculizumab in adult patients with aHUS affecting the native kidneys. A retrospective study was conducted. aHUS was defined as the presence of 3 or more of the following: acute kidney injury (serum creatinine >1.4 mg/dL [120 μmol/L]), mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and the presence of thrombotic microangiopathy features in a kidney biopsy specimen. Patients who had received 4 or more weekly 900-mg infusions of eculizumab were included. 19 patients were identified through a query sent to all French nephrology centers. Evolution of kidney function, hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia after the initiation of eculizumab therapy. All patients had acute kidney injury (serum creatinine range, 2.2-17.0 mg/dL) and 12 required hemodialysis. Thirteen patients carried a mutation in 1 complement gene and 1 had anti-factor H antibodies. For first-line therapy, 16 patients underwent plasma exchange and 3 patients received eculizumab. Median time between aHUS onset and eculizumab therapy initiation was 6 (range, 1-60) days and median time to platelet count normalization after eculizumab therapy initiation was 6 (range, 2-42) days. At the 3-month follow-up, 4 patients still required dialysis, 8 had non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease, and 7 had normalized kidney function. At last follow-up (range, 4-22 months), 3 patients remained dialysis dependent, 7 had non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 17-55 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), and 9 had normal kidney function. Risks of reaching end-stage renal disease within 3 months and 1 year of aHUS onset were reduced by half in eculizumab-treated patients compared with recent historical controls. Retrospective study and use

  11. Prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child affected by rituximab-resistant autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beretta Chiara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children younger than 2 years of age is usually characterized by a severe course, with a mortality rate of approximately 10%. The prolonged immunosuppression following specific treatment may be associated with a high risk of developing severe infections. Recently, the use of monoclonal antibodies (rituximab has allowed sustained remissions to be obtained in the majority of pediatric patients with refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Case presentation We describe the case of an 8-month-old Caucasian girl affected by a severe form of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which required continuous steroid treatment for 16 months. Thereafter, she received 4 weekly doses of rituximab (375 mg/m2/dose associated with steroid therapy, which was then tapered over the subsequent 2 weeks. One month after the last dose of rrituximab, she presented with recurrence of severe hemolysis and received two more doses of rrituximab. The patient remained in clinical remission for 7 months, before presenting with a further relapse. An alternative heavy immunosuppressive therapy was administered combining cyclophosphamide 10 mg/kg/day for 10 days with methylprednisolone 40 mg/kg/day for 5 days, which was then tapered down over 3 weeks. While still on steroid therapy, the patient developed an interstitial pneumonia with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, which required immediate admission to the intensive care unit where extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy was administered continuously for 37 days. At 16-month follow-up, the patient is alive and in good clinical condition, with no organ dysfunction, free from any immunosuppressive treatment and with a normal Hb level. Conclusions This case shows that aggressive combined immunosuppressive therapy may lead to a sustained complete remission in children with refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia. However, the severe life-threatening complication presented by our

  12. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet affects inflammation in childhood metabolic syndrome: a randomized cross-over clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saneei, Parvane; Hashemipour, Mahin; Kelishadi, Roya; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet on inflammation in childhood metabolic syndrome (MetS) have still to be identified. To examine the effects of the DASH diet on markers of systemic inflammation in adolescents with MetS. In this randomized, cross-over clinical trial, 60 postpubescent girls with MetS were randomly assigned to receive either the DASH diet menu cycles or usual dietary advice (UDA) for 6 weeks. After a 4-week washout period, participants were crossed over to the alternate arm. The DASH diet was designed to maintain the current body weight. This diet contained high amounts of fruit, vegetables and low-fat dairy products and was low in saturated fats and cholesterol. UDA consisted of general oral advice and written information about healthy food choices based on the Healthy Eating Plate. Compliance to the DASH diet was assessed through quantification of plasma vitamin C levels. Fasting venous blood samples were taken 4 times from each participant: at baseline and at the end of each study arm. Circulating levels of biomarkers of systemic inflammation were quantified according to standard protocols. Mean (SD) age and weight of participants was 14.2 years (1.7) and 69 kg (14.5), respectively. Serum vitamin C levels tended to increase during the DASH phase compared with the UDA phase (16.8 ± 12.9 vs. -13.8 ± 9.7 ng/dl, respectively, p = 0.06) indicating a relatively good compliance to the DASH diet. Adherence to the DASH diet, compared to the UDA, had a significant effect on serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (p = 0.002). This effect remained significant even after adjustment for weight changes and after further controlling for changes in lipid profiles. We did not observe any significant effect of intervention on levels of serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6 and adiponectin, in either the crude or adjusted models. There were no significant group*time interactions for any dependent

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Kuskokwim syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... region of southwest Alaska known as the Kuskokwim River Delta. In Kuskokwim syndrome , contractures most commonly affect ... syndrome 1 General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery ...

  14. [The Othello syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, R

    1980-12-01

    A case is described and 7 others are discussed of the Othello Syndrome, characterized by cognitive, affective and conative manifestations plus non-specific psychosomatic accesory symptoms. The nuclear symptom is the delusional or delusion-like idea of jealousy. The syndrome is seen in both sexes, as part of a number of clinical entities (paranoia, psychoses, organic brain syndromes, neuroses and personality disorders). Premorbid personality and family history are always abnormal. Cases of cocaine abuse, involutional melancholia and borderline syndrome are remarkers. The management of this syndrome and of its social sequelae is emphasized.

  15. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  16. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  17. The murine homologue of HIRA, a DiGeorge syndrome candidate gene, is expressed in embryonic structures affected in human CATCH22 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Wilming (Laurens); C.A. Snoeren; A.L. Rijswijk (Angelique); C. Meijers (Carel); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA wide spectrum of birth defects is caused by deletions of the DiGeorge syndrome chromosomal region at 22q11. Characteristic features include cranio-facial, cardiac and thymic malformations, which are thought to arise form disturbances in the interactions

  18. Dietary cranberry, blueberry, and black raspberry affects the development of dyslipidemia and insulin insensitivity associated with metabolic syndrome in high fructose fed rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of feeding cranberry, blueberry, and black raspberry powder on selected parameters of metabolic syndrome were investigated in 40 growing male Sprague Dawley rats. Animals were divided into five dietary treatments of 1) control AIN93G diet, 2) high fructose (65% by weight, HF) diet, and 3-5) ...

  19. Consequences of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade on medicinal plant selection: plant use for cultural boud syndromes affecting children in Suriname and Western Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, T.; Towns, A.M.; Ruysschaert, S.; Quiroz Villarreal, D.K.; Andel, van T.

    2014-01-01

    Folk perceptions of health and illness include cultural bound syndromes (CBS), ailments generally confined to certain cultural groups or geographic regions and often treated with medicinal plants. Our aim was to compare definitions and plant use for CBS regarding child health in the context of the

  20. Comparative study on the turnover of quinic- and shikimic acid and of its derivatives in needles of Norway spruce, Picea abies (L.) Karst., affected by 'Waldsterben' syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, P.; Senser, M.; Frielinghaus, J.

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study on the incorporation of 14 C into quinic- and shikimic acid in spruce needles was carried out with four different syndroms of Picea abies (L.) Karst: a tree from high altitudes of the Bayerischer Wald with the syndrom of 'acute yellowing', a light-sensitive mutant with yellowish needles (Picea abies Karst. finedonensis), a tree exhibiting 'Lametta' syndrome with a translucent crown and twigs hanging down like tinsel, and a healthy tree for control. The needles of these trees were labelled via photosynthetic fixation of 14 CO 2 in June, and the fate of labelled compounds was monitored over 125 days. In the youngest needles incorporation rates of quinic and shikimic acid reached a dominating level of about 60% of the label of soluble metabolites, which underlines the decisive role of both acids during needle development. The yellow mutant 'finedonensis' and the tree with 'Lametta' syndrome, which exhibit rather identical turnover kinetics of quinate and shikimate, show lower rates and reach, in particular in one- and two-year-old needles, only about 50% of the incorporation rates of the control spruce. The tree with the syndrome of 'acute yellowing' exhibits a significant reduction of incorporation already in the youngest needles; the older needles of this tree virtually suspend metabolism of both acids all together, though apparently high but dormant pools of shikimate and quinate are present. The degree of label incorporation into shikimate and quinate may possibly serve as a measure of needle damage. Exclusively in the yellow mutant a novel spruce constituent, 3-0-p-coumaroylquinic acid, could be detected; a related compound, 3-0-p-caffeoylshikimic acid was identified in the needles of the 'acute yellowing' tree. (orig./MG) [de

  1. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  2. Surface Rendering of External Genitalia of a Fetus at the 32nd Week of Gestation Affected by Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Mazza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To demonstrate the feasibility of the prenatal diagnosis of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome by 3D-4D ultrasound. Methods. To report prenatal diagnosis of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome at 32nd week of gestation by 3D-4D ultrasound in a fetus with a 46XY karyotype, testing negative to the mutation analysis of SRY gene and the 5α-reductase 2 gene (SRD5A2. Results. 3D-4D surface rendering allows the detection of external and internal genital malformations and can address the prenatal diagnosis of PAIS and can exclude associated complications. Conclusions. Prenatal diagnosis of PAIS allows an adequate parental counseling and an early optimal management of the condition, not only for the psychological and social reflections but also for the avoidance of complications and postnatal morbidity due to misdiagnosis or delays in the treatment of the genital ambiguity.

  3. Android Fat Distribution Affects Some Hemostatic Parameters In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Compared With Healthy Control Subjects Matched For Age And Body Mass Index.

    OpenAIRE

    de Mendonça-Louzeiro, Maria Raquel Marques Furtado; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce Maria; Benetti-Pinto, Cristina Laguna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To correlate hemostatic parameters with clinical markers of fat distribution and laboratory variables in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared with healthy control subjects. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Tertiary teaching hospital. Patient(s): Forty-five women with PCOS and 45 control women matched for age and body mass index (BMI). Intervention(s): Clinical evaluation and venipuncture. Main Outcome Measure(s): Age, BMI, waist circumference (WC), hip circum...

  4. Rapid detection of de novo P253R mutation in FGFR2 using uncultured amniocytes in a pregnancy affected by polyhydramnios, Blake's pouch cyst, and Apert syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Su, Yi-Ning; Chang, Tung-Yao; Chern, Schu-Rern; Chen, Chen-Yu; Su, Jun-Wei; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-06-01

    To present prenatal ultrasound and molecular genetic diagnosis of Apert syndrome. A 30-year-old, gravida 3, para 2 woman was referred for genetic counseling at 32 weeks of gestation because of polyhydramnios and craniofacial and digital abnormalities in the fetus. She had undergone amniocentesis at 18 weeks of gestation because of maternal anxiety. Results of amniocentesis revealed a karyotype of 46,XX. A prenatal ultrasound at 32 weeks of gestation revealed a female fetus with a fetal biometry equivalent to 32 weeks, polyhydramnios with an increased amniotic fluid index of 26.1 cm, frontal bossing, midface hypoplasia, hypertelorism, Blake's pouch cyst with an apparent posterior fossa cyst in communication with the fourth ventricle on axial images, digital fusion, and bilateral syndactyly of the hands and feet. A DNA testing for the FGFR2 gene was immediately performed using uncultured amniocytes obtained by repeated amniocentesis, which revealed a heterozygous c.758C>G, CCT>CGT transversion leading to a p.Pro253Arg (P253R) mutation in the FGFR2 gene. Subsequently, a diagnosis of Apert syndrome was made. Molecular analysis of the FGFR2 gene in the parents did not reveal such a mutation. The fetus postnatally manifested frontal bossing, midface hypoplasia, and bilateral syndactyly of the hands (mitten hands) and feet. Prenatal diagnosis of polyhydramnios, frontal bossing, and midface hypoplasia associated with brain and digital abnormalities should include a differential diagnosis of Apert syndrome. A molecular analysis of FGFR2 using uncultured amniocytes is useful for rapid confirmation of Apert syndrome at prenatal diagnosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [2,3] Tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a terminology used to describe a specific acute symptom complex found in diabetic patients in the tropics.[1-4] The syndrome comprises can rapidly progress to synergistic gangrene (Meleney's gangrene), affecting the entire limb and extending to the superficial fascia that can result in ...

  6. Churg Strauss syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Rengifo, Diana Milena; Contreras Zuniga, Eduardo; Osio, Luis Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The Churg-Strauss syndrome, also called allergic granulomatosis and angiitis, is a multisystem disorder characterized by allergic rhinitis, asthma, and prominent peripheral blood eosinophilia. The most common organ involved is the lung, followed by the skin. The Churg-Strauss syndrome, however, can affect any organ system, including the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, renal, and central nervous systems

  7. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  8. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  9. Hunter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in girls. There's no cure for Hunter syndrome. Treatment of Hunter syndrome involves management of symptoms and complications. Symptoms Hunter syndrome is one type of a group of inherited metabolic disorders called mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs), and Hunter syndrome is ...

  10. Vitamin D3 Adjuvant Treatment Stimulate Interleukin-10 Expression in Children with Nephrotic Syndrome Without Affecting to Clinical Outcome and Glucocorticoid Receptor Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husnul Asariati

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS is the most glomerular disease that occurred in childhood with high rate morbidity. Glucocorticoid is drug of choice for INS and responsiveness to this drug determined prognosis.Glucocorticoid upregulate transcription of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-10. IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine and has multiple role in immune response include modulate Th1/Th2 response. Vitamin D3 interact with glucocorticoid signaling. Administered active form of vitamin D3 increase dexamethasone-induced IL-10 expression by regulatory T cells in steroid resistant asthmatic patient. Here we showed increase of CD4+ IL10+ expression after treatment both prednisone only and combination prednison with vitamin D3. Both in new-onset NS or rare relaps NS, combination treatment prednisone + vitamin D3 increase CD4+ IL10+ expression significantly compared to prednisone-only treated group (p= 0.003, which first group (new-onset nephrotic syndrome + prednisone and vitamin D3 treatment showed the most CD4+ IL10+ expression enhancement (9.53±3.89. However this study failed to show a correlation between CD4+ IL-10+ expression after prednisone and vitamin D3 treatment with clinical outcome (linear regression test, p= 0,125. This study also showed that there was a no correlation between CD4+ IL-10+ expression and CD3+ GR expression after prednison + vitamin D3 treatment (p= 0.088. CD4+ IL-10+ expression in new-onset and rarely relapsing nephrotic syndrome patients higher in prednisone + vitamin D3 treated group than prednisone-only treated group. There is no correlation between CD4+ IL-10+ expression and CD3+ GR expression nor CD4+ IL-10+ expression and clinical outcome.

  11. Fragile X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of puberty Subtle differences in face features In females, excess shyness may be the only sign of ... X syndrome. Instead, training and education have been developed to help affected children function ...

  12. Vertebral Artery Stump Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masato; Dembo, Tomohisa; Hara, Wataru; Tajima, Takashi; Yamashita, Minako; Oji, Satoru; Nomura, Kyoichi

    2018-03-01

    Carotid stump syndrome is a well-documented embolic source for ischemic stroke. However, few cases have been reported of a similar condition - termed vertebral artery stump syndrome - which affects the posterior circulation after vertebral artery origin occlusion. We herein report a case of infarction of the right superior cerebellar artery and left posterior inferior cerebellar artery territories due to vertebral artery stump syndrome. In this interesting case, a turbulent flow at the distal side of the vertebral artery occlusion was captured on ultrasonography, and was identified as the probable mechanism of vertebral artery stump syndrome.

  13. Butyrylcholinesterase and γ-glutamyltransferase activities and oxidative stress markers are altered in metabolic syndrome, but are not affected by body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bona, Karine S; Bonfanti, Gabriela; Bitencourt, Paula E R; Cargnelutti, Lariane O; da Silva, Priscila S; De Lucca, Leidiane; Pimentel, Victor C; Tatsch, Etiane; Gonçalves, Thissiane L; Premaor, Melissa; Moresco, Rafael N; Moretto, Maria Beatriz

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) leads to changes in enzymatic activities, oxidative and inflammatory parameters. Adenosine deaminase (ADA), dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV), butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and γ-glutamyltransferase (γ-GT) activities, C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and nitric oxide levels (NOx), as well as oxidative stress markers were analyzed in 39 subjects with MetS and 48 controls. Also, the influence of body mass index (BMI) and anthropometric measurements were evaluated. Disturbances in antioxidant defenses and higher γ-GT and BuChE activities, NOx and hsCRP levels were observed in subjects with MetS. These findings remained associated with MetS after adjustment for BMI, except for hsCRP. ADA was correlated with age, insulin levels and HOMA-IR index in MetS. DPP-IV and total cholesterol (TC), BuChE activity and TC, and VIT C and hsCRP levels also were correlated. The analyzed parameters may reflect the inflammatory state of the MetS, and could contribute to prevention and control of various aspects of this syndrome.

  14. [ The new 2010 Ghent criteria for the indication to surgical treatment of patients affected by Marfan syndrome. Experience of a single cardiac surgery center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grego, Susanna; Nardi, Paolo; Gislao, Valentina; Nicolò, Francesca; D'Annolfo, Antonella; Marcucci, Rosaria; Bovio, Emanuele; Versaci, Francesco; Chiariello, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis and surgical treatment of patients with Marfan syndrome remain controversial. It is of utmost importance to identify patients at risk for acute aortic events to establish the correct surgical timing and the appropriate surgical treatment. From May 2008 to December 2012, 500 patients were screened at the Marfan Presidium of the Tor Vergata University Hospital of Rome (Italy). Patients were evaluated by a cardiac surgeon, including echocardiographic, orthopedic, ophthalmologic and dental examinations. All patients received genetic counseling, and genetic sampling was performed if appropriate. The diagnosis of Marfan syndrome was confirmed in 146 patients (29.2%). Fifty-four patients (37%) underwent cardiac surgery on the aortic root, 4 patients had surgery on the mitral valve, 13 patients had combined surgery; 11 cases were emergent surgery for acute aortic dissection. Twenty-eight patients (52%) were operated on at our Division: 13 underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement (David procedure), 1 underwent Yacoub remodeling procedure and 14 underwent Bentall procedure. Following the establishment of the Marfan Center, the David aortic valve-sparing operation was the most frequently performed procedure compared to the previous period of surgical activity (63 vs 22%, psyndromes. Early surgical treatment is recommended in these patients to achieve optimal results of valve-sparing procedures and life-saving management, especially for patients who live far away from a cardiac surgery center.

  15. Otodental syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloch-Zupan Agnès

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The otodental syndrome also named otodental dysplasia, is characterised by a striking dental phenotype known as globodontia, associated with sensorineural high frequency hearing loss and eye coloboma. Globodontia occurs in both primary and permanent dentition, affecting canine and molar teeth (i.e. enlarged bulbous malformed posterior teeth with almost no discernable cusps or grooves. The condition appears to be inherited in an autosomal dominant mode, although sporadic cases have been reported. It is a rare disease, a few families have been described in the literature. In the British family, the locus for oculo-oto-dental syndrome was mapped to 20q13.1 within a 12-cM critical chromosomal region. Dental management is complex, interdisciplinary and will include regular follow up, scheduled teeth extraction and orthodontic treatment. Hearing checks and, if necessary, hearing aids are mandatory, as well as eye examination and ad hoc treatment if necessary.

  16. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: FG syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic condition that affects many parts of the body and occurs almost exclusively in males. "FG" represents the surname initials of the first family diagnosed with the disorder. FG syndrome affects intelligence and behavior. Almost everyone with the condition has ...

  18. Gender-related association between uric acid, homocysteine, γ-glutamyltransferase, inflammatory biomarkers and metabolic syndrome in subjects affected by obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigna, Luisella; Vassalle, Cristina; Tirelli, Amedea Silvia; Gori, Francesca; Tomaino, Laura; Sabatino, Laura; Bamonti, Fabrizia

    2017-10-26

    Evaluation of gender-related differences in uric acid (UA), homocysteine and inflammatory biomarkers as metabolic syndrome (MetS) determinants. Anthropometric and routine data were obtained from 825 obese subjects (591 F, mean age 54 ± 14 years). Hyperuricemia was 24% in both genders. Waist circumference, creatinine, triglycerides, C-reactive protein and γ-glutamyltransferase were identified as UA-independent determinants in females and creatinine and insulin in males. Hyperuricemia increased MetS risk in both genders (2.8-fold and 1.5-fold in males and females). UA and γ-glutamyltransferase positively relate to MetS in both genders, although inflammatory abnormalities are closer related to UA and MetS in females. These differences in gender physiology may account for epidemiologic gender disparities and help to develop gender-targeted clinical strategies.

  19. Psychosis risk syndrome comorbid with panic attack disorder in a cannabis-abusing patient affected by Arnold-Chiari malformation type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Casale, Antonio; Serata, Daniele; Rapinesi, Chiara; Simonetti, Alessio; Tamorri, Stefano Maria; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Savoja, Valeria; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Sani, Gabriele; Tatarelli, Roberto; Girardi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    An 18-year-old man with Arnold-Chiari malformation (ACM) type I developed sudden panic attacks. He also manifested sleep disorder, cannabis abuse, and psychosis-risk syndrome (PRS). Although with average-superior intelligence, he had executive dysfunction. This prompted us to explore the relation between ACM, cannabis abuse, PRS and panic disorder. We report the case and briefly review the literature focusing on ACM and psychiatric disorders. Behavior therapy led to gradual abstinence from cannabis with disappearance of anxiety symptoms. The patient is currently well and maintained on omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Locus coeruleus compression and cannabis abuse may have triggered the symptoms, and the latter might also be PRS-related. PRS and anxiety symptoms should be explored in ACM patients to allow better prevention of psychosis and anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A complex rearrangement on chromosome 22 affecting both homologues; haplo-insufficiency of the Cat eye syndrome region may have no clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriek, Marjolein; Szuhai, Karoly; Kant, Sarina G; White, Stefan J; Dauwerse, Hans; Fiegler, Heike; Carter, Nigel P; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; den Dunnen, Johan T; Tanke, Hans J; Breuning, Martijn H; Rosenberg, Carla

    2006-08-01

    The presence of highly homologous sequences, known as low copy repeats, predisposes for unequal recombination within the 22q11 region. This can lead to genomic imbalances associated with several known genetic disorders. We report here a developmentally delayed patient carrying different rearrangements on both chromosome 22 homologues, including a previously unreported rearrangement within the 22q11 region. One homologue carries a deletion of the proximal part of chromosome band 22q11. To our knowledge, a 'pure' deletion of this region has not been described previously. Four copies of this 22q11 region, however, are associated with Cat eye syndrome (CES). While the phenotypic impact of this deletion is unclear, familial investigation revealed five normal relatives carrying this deletion, suggesting that haplo-insufficiency of the CES region has little clinical relevance. The other chromosome 22 homologue carries a duplication of the Velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS) region. In addition, a previously undescribed deletion of 22q12.1, located in a relatively gene-poor region, was identified. As the clinical features of patients suffering from a duplication of the VCFS/DGS region have proven to be extremely variable, it is impossible to postulate as to the contribution of the 22q12.1 deletion to the phenotype of the patient. Additional patients with a deletion within this region are needed to establish the consequences of this copy number alteration. This study highlights the value of using different genomic approaches to unravel chromosomal alterations in order to study their phenotypic impact.

  1. Consequences of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade on Medicinal Plant Selection: Plant Use for Cultural Bound Syndromes Affecting Children in Suriname and Western Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossen, Tessa; Towns, Alexandra; Ruysschaert, Sofie; Quiroz, Diana; van Andel, Tinde

    2014-01-01

    Folk perceptions of health and illness include cultural bound syndromes (CBS), ailments generally confined to certain cultural groups or geographic regions and often treated with medicinal plants. Our aim was to compare definitions and plant use for CBS regarding child health in the context of the largest migration in recent human history: the trans-Atlantic slave trade. We compared definitions of four CBS (walk early, evil eye, atita and fontanels) and associated plant use among three Afro-Surinamese populations and their African ancestor groups in Ghana, Bénin and Gabon. We expected plant use to be similar on species level, and assumed the majority to be weedy or domesticated species, as these occur on both continents and were probably recognized by enslaved Africans. Data were obtained by identifying plants mentioned during interviews with local women from the six different populations. To analyse differences and similarities in plant use we used Detrended Component Analysis (DCA) and a Wald Chi-square test. Definitions of the four cultural bound syndromes were roughly the same on both continents. In total, 324 plant species were used. There was little overlap between Suriname and Africa: 15 species were used on two continents, of which seven species were used for the same CBS. Correspondence on family level was much higher. Surinamese populations used significantly more weedy species than Africans, but equal percentages of domesticated plants. Our data indicate that Afro-Surinamers have searched for similar plants to treat their CBS as they remembered from Africa. In some cases, they have found the same species, but they had to reinvent the largest part of their herbal pharmacopeia to treat their CBS using known plant families or trying out new species. Ideas on health and illness appear to be more resilient than the use of plants to treat them. PMID:25372485

  2. Consequences of the trans-Atlantic slave trade on medicinal plant selection: plant use for cultural bound syndromes affecting children in Suriname and Western Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Vossen

    Full Text Available Folk perceptions of health and illness include cultural bound syndromes (CBS, ailments generally confined to certain cultural groups or geographic regions and often treated with medicinal plants. Our aim was to compare definitions and plant use for CBS regarding child health in the context of the largest migration in recent human history: the trans-Atlantic slave trade. We compared definitions of four CBS (walk early, evil eye, atita and fontanels and associated plant use among three Afro-Surinamese populations and their African ancestor groups in Ghana, Bénin and Gabon. We expected plant use to be similar on species level, and assumed the majority to be weedy or domesticated species, as these occur on both continents and were probably recognized by enslaved Africans. Data were obtained by identifying plants mentioned during interviews with local women from the six different populations. To analyse differences and similarities in plant use we used Detrended Component Analysis (DCA and a Wald Chi-square test. Definitions of the four cultural bound syndromes were roughly the same on both continents. In total, 324 plant species were used. There was little overlap between Suriname and Africa: 15 species were used on two continents, of which seven species were used for the same CBS. Correspondence on family level was much higher. Surinamese populations used significantly more weedy species than Africans, but equal percentages of domesticated plants. Our data indicate that Afro-Surinamers have searched for similar plants to treat their CBS as they remembered from Africa. In some cases, they have found the same species, but they had to reinvent the largest part of their herbal pharmacopeia to treat their CBS using known plant families or trying out new species. Ideas on health and illness appear to be more resilient than the use of plants to treat them.

  3. Effect of Bumble Bee Venom in the Treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, the Relationship Between Tissue Factor Affecting the Level of TNFα in the Wistar Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nabiuni

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is an endocrine failure leading to anovulation. TNFα is an effective factor in the regulation of normal functioning of the ovaries. High levels of TNFα causes PCOS is further. In this study, the effects of bumble bee venom (HBV on TNFα and other symptoms of ovarian PCOS were studied. Methods: In this experimental study, 60 female Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control, sham and experimental groups. The experimental group was injected with estradiol valerate-induced PCOS direction. Induced rats (PCOS were divided into two groups and treated with HBV. The treatment Group received 0.2mg of HBV for 10 consecutive days. Serum and ovarian tissue was collected from each of the four groups to compare the histological and changes in blood sugar levels. Results: A significant increase in ovarian PCOS weight was observed in the control group , whereas in the treated group with HBV rate fell (15.5 mg Glucose levels in PCOS was 256.5, the control group138, and the treatment group 158. Thickness of the theca layer of antral follicles in the treated group compared with PCOS showed a significant decrease (110 μm and 150 μm respectively. Immunohistochemical results showed increased TNFα factor in PCOS group than in the control group, whereas these levels in samples treated with HBV Reduced. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the beneficial effects of HBV in PCOS may be due to the inhibitory effect on factor TNFα. Key words: Polycystic ovary syndrome, Bumble bee venom, Tumor necrosis factor, Immunohistochemistry

  4. How does acupuncture affect insulin sensitivity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and insulin resistance? Study protocol of a prospective pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanhua; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Ng, Ernest H Y; Li, Juan; Wu, Xiaoke; Ma, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance (IR) are key features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and metabolic syndrome. The effect of 5 weeks of acupuncture treatment has been investigated in a completed prospective pilot trial (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01457209), and acupuncture with electrical stimulation applied to insulin-resistant rats with dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS was shown to improve insulin sensitivity. Therefore, we now aim to conduct a prospective pilot study to evaluate whether using the same acupuncture treatment protocol given over a longer period of time (6 months) than in the previous pilot trial will improve insulin sensitivity in women with PCOS and IR. Our hypothesis is that acupuncture with combined manual and low-frequency electrical stimulation of the needles will improve insulin sensitivity in women with PCOS and IR. Methods/analysis This is a prospective pilot trial. A total of 112 women with PCOS and IR will be recruited and categorised according to their body mass index (BMI) as normal weight (BMI=18.5−23 kg/m2) or as overweight/obese (BMI>23 kg/m2). Acupuncture will be applied three times per week for 6 months at 30 min per treatment. The primary outcome will be the change in insulin sensitivity before and after 6 months of acupuncture treatment, as measured by an oral glucose tolerance test. Ethics/dissemination Ethical approval of this study has been granted from the ethics committee of the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (No. 2013039). Written and informed consent will be obtained from each patient before any study procedure is performed, according to good clinical practice. The results of this trial will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. Trial registration numbers NCT02026323 and ChiCTR-OCH-13003921. PMID:25941189

  5. Pregnancy and live birth after follicle-stimulating hormone treatment for an infertile couple including a male affected by Sertoli cell-only syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulis G

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gianni Paulis,1,2 Luca Paulis,3 Gennaro Romano,4 Carmen Concas,5 Marika Di Sarno,5 Renata Pagano,5 Antonio Di Filippo,5 Maria Luisa Di Petrillo5 1Andrology Center, Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Uro-Andrology, Castelfidardo Medical Team, Peyronie’s Disease Care Center, Rome, Italy; 3Section of Pharmacology and Research, Department of Uro-Andrology, Castelfidardo Medical Team, Peyronie’s Disease Care Center, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Urologic Oncology, Italian League Against Cancer, Avellino, Italy; 5Department of Reproductive Medicine and Biology, Caran Center, Caserta, Italy Abstract: In males with nonobstructive azoospermia, one of the main histopathologic patterns of the testis is Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS, in which no germ cells are present and only Sertoli cells are contained in the seminiferous tubules. There is not any formal treatment for this pathological condition. However, several studies reported the possibility to perform testicular sperm extraction in patients with SCOS, although, according to some authors, sperm retrieval is possible only in the presence of focal spermatogenesis. We report the case of an infertile couple in whom the 30-year-old male was azoospermic. After the diagnosis, the patient underwent multiple bilateral testicular biopsies, which showed a histological pattern corresponding to SCOS. We administered a cycle of hormone stimulation followed by medically assisted procreation procedures to the male patient. Therefore, the male patient was treated with follicle-stimulating hormone gonadotropin for a total of 7 months (150 IU recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone three times per week. After carrying out a new multiple testicular sperm extraction, several spermatozoa were microscopically observed, and it was then possible to perform an intracytoplasmic sperm injection with subsequent embryo transfer of the blastocyst into the wife’s uterus, and so pregnancy was

  6. Positive Correlation of Serum Adiponectin with Lipid Profile in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is Affected by Metabolic Syndrome Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Mohammad; Mohammadinejad, Payam; Aryan, Zahra; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Esteghamati, Alireza

    2016-04-01

    Type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and Metabolic syndrome (MetS) are both associated with dyslipidemia which may lead to development of vascular complications. Adiponectin is an anti-inflammatory protein synthesized by the adipose tissue. There is controversy regarding the association of adiponectin with lipid profile. To evaluate the correlation between serum adiponectin concentration and metabolic profile in patients with type-2 DM. A single center cross-sectional study was conducted on 173 patients with type-2 DM (82 males and 91 females). Plasma adiponectin concentration, lipid profile, glucose profile, and anthropometric features were investigated. Insulin resistance was determined using Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Correlation of serum adiponectin with lipid profile of patients with type-2 DM was assessed. Adiponectin was negatively correlated with waist circumference (r = -0.16, P = 0.06) and positively with HbA1c (r = 0.19, P = 0.032), total cholesterol (r = 0.23, P = 0.017), LDL (r = 0.30, P = 0.001), SD-LDL (r = 0.41, P < 0.001), and SD-LDL/LDL (r = 0.22, P = 0.023). We found a positive correlation between adiponectin and total cholesterol (r = 0.27, P = 0.055), LDL (r = 0.34, P = 0.026) and SD-LDL (r = 0.41, P = 0.006) in patients with at least 3 components of MetS criteria. Correlation of adiponectin with LDL and SD-LDL remained positively significant with increasing the number of MetS components. In patients with 5 components of MetS, serum adiponectin was significantly correlated with serum triglyceride (r = 0.89). Significant interaction was observed between adiponectin and metabolic syndrome in relation to serum lipid profile. The results of the present study suggest that in patients with type-2 DM and MetS, lipid profile is strongly correlated with blood concentration of adiponectin. The strongest association was observed between serum adiponectin and LDL.

  7. Treacher Collins syndrome: clinical implications for the paediatrician--a new mutation in a severely affected newborn and comparison with three further patients with the same mutation, and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlump, Jan-Ulrich; Stein, Anja; Hehr, Ute; Karen, Tanja; Möller-Hartmann, Claudia; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Bogdanova, Nadja; Woike, Hartmut Fritz; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Linz, Annette; Wieczorek, Dagmar

    2012-11-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is the most common and well-known mandibulofacial dysostosis caused by mutations in at least three genes involved in pre-rRNA transcription, the TCOF1, POLR1D and POLR1C genes. We present a severely affected male individual with TCS with a heterozygous de novo frameshift mutation within the TCOF1 gene (c.790_791delAG,p.Ser264GlnfsX7) and compare the clinical findings with three previously unpublished, milder affected individuals from two families with the same mutation. We elucidate typical clinical features of TCS and its clinical implications for the paediatrician and mandibulofacial surgeon, especially in severely affected individuals and give a short review of the literature. The clinical data of these three families illustrate that the phenotype associated with this specific mutation has a wide intra- and interfamilial variability, which confirms that variable expressivity in carriers of TCOF1 mutations is not a simple consequence of the mutation but might be modified by the combination of genetic, environmental and stochastic factors. Being such a highly complex disease treatment of individuals with TCS should be tailored to the specific needs of each individual, preferably by a multidisciplinary team consisting of paediatricians, craniofacial surgeons and geneticists.

  8. High intake of regular-fat cheese compared with reduced-fat cheese does not affect LDL cholesterol or risk markers of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raziani, Farinaz; Tholstrup, Tine; Kristensen, Marlene Dahlwad

    2016-01-01

    was to compare the effects of regular-fat cheese with an equal amount of reduced-fat cheese and an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate-rich foods on LDL cholesterol and risk factors for the metabolic syndrome (MetS). DESIGN: The study was a 12-wk randomized parallel intervention preceded by a 2-wk run-in period...... MJ, whereas subjects in the CHO group did the same with bread and jam corresponding to 90 g and 25 g/10 MJ, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 139 subjects completed the intervention. The primary outcome, LDL cholesterol, was not significantly different between the REG and RED diets or between the REG...... circumference did not differ significantly between the 3 diets. CONCLUSION: A high daily intake of regular-fat cheese for 12 wk did not alter LDL cholesterol or MetS risk factors differently than an equal intake of reduced-fat cheese or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate-rich foods. This trial was registered...

  9. Weight Loss and Medication in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoi, Linda G.; Josimovich, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome, which is a complex syndrome, affects approximately 6% of reproductive-age women. Many abnormalities are associated with polycystic ovary syndrome, but confusion still exists about their causation. Diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome is by exclusion. Management of the metabolic aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome focuses on minimizing insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia with diet therapy or insulin-lowering drugs.

  10. Arterial thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, R.T

    2008-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a non-inflammatory autoimmune disease that mainly affects young women. The syndrome is characterized by recurrent thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity in association with the persistent serological presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Antiphospholipid

  11. WIEDEMANN SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    BILATERAL BENIGN HAEMORRHAGIC ADRENAL CYSTS IN BECKWITH - WIEDEMANN. SYNDROME: CASE REPORT. P. ANOOP and M. A. ANJAY. SUMMARY. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is the most common overgrowth malformation syndrome. The classical features include macrosomia, macroglossia, ...

  12. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  13. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  14. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Piriformis Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Piriformis syndrome ...

  15. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Affecting Factors among Individuals Aged 30 and over in Balçova District of İzmir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Soysal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The studies have shown that metabolic syndrome (MetS leads to an increase twice as much in cardiovascular diseases (CVD and four times as much in diabetes mellitus (DM prevalence since the second half of the 20th century. Aims: This study aims to determine and discuss the prevalence of the MetS and co- factors among individuals at the age of 30 and over in Balcova district of İzmir province according to the American National Cholesterol Education Program - Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III and InternationalDiabetes Federation (IDF criteria. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Data obtained from the Balcova Heart Project in İzmir were used in the study. The dependent variable of the study is MetS existence. The independent variables were socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender, education level, and marital status, self-perceived economic status, physical activity, smoking status, healthy nutrition and body mass index (BMI. Results: The prevalence of MetS was 36.9% according to the diagnostic criteria of IDF, while it was 27.4% according to ATP III criteria. According to the both criteria, increasing age, low education, poor economic status perception, physical inactivity, and obesity increase the risk of MetS. Apart from the IDF criteria, being female and a current smoker increase the risk of the MetS in the NCEP-ATP III. Conclusion: Compared to educational studies of MetS as of today, which are community and health-oriented studies, it is challenging that the prevalence of MetS was found to be high for both criteria in our study. Therefore, in particular, primary health care doctors must be prompted to protect the public against DM and CVD in particular.

  16. Autonomic components of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) are favourably affected by Electrical Twitch-Obtaining Intramuscular Stimulation (ETOIMS): effects on blood pressure and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jennifer; Bruyninckx, Frans; Neuhauser, Duncan V

    2017-07-01

    Favourable pain relief results on evoking autonomous twitches at myofascial trigger points with Electrical Twitch Obtaining Intramuscular Stimulation (ETOIMS). To document autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) from blood pressure (BP) and pulse/heart rate changes with ETOIMS. A patient with persistent pain regularly received serial ETOIMS sessions of 60, 90, 120 or ≥150 min over 24 months. Outcome measures include BP: systolic, diastolic, pulse pressure and pulse/heart rate, pre-session/immediate-post-session summed differences (SDPPP index), and pain reduction. His results were compared with that of two other patients and one normal control. Each individual represented the following maximal elicitable twitch forces (TWF) graded 1-5: maximum TWF2: control subject; maximum TWF3: CRPS patient with suspected ANS dysfunction; and maximum TWF4 and TWF5: two patients with respective slow-fatigue and fast-fatigue twitches who during ETOIMS had autonomous twitching at local and remote myotomes simultaneously from denervation supersensitivity. ETOIMS results between TWFs were compared using one-way analysis of variance test. The patients showed immediate significant pain reduction, BP and pulse/heart rate changes/reduction(s) except for diastolic BP in the TWF5 patient. TWF2 control subject had diastolic BP reduction with ETOIMS but not with rest. Linear regression showed TWF grade to be the most significant variable in pain reduction, more so than the number of treatments, session duration and treatment interval. TWF grade was the most important variable in significantly reducing outcome measures, especially pulse/heart rate. Unlike others, the TWF3 patient had distinctive reductions in SDPPP index. Measuring BP and pulse/heart rate is clinically practical for alerting ANS dysfunction maintained CRPS. SDPPP index (≥26) and pulse/heart rate (≥8) reductions with almost every ETOIMS treatment, plus inability to evoke

  17. Mycobiome of the bat white nose syndrome affected caves and mines reveals diversity of fungi and local adaptation by the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Victor, Tanya R; Rajkumar, Sunanda S; Li, Xiaojiang; Okoniewski, Joseph C; Hicks, Alan C; Davis, April D; Broussard, Kelly; LaDeau, Shannon L; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    Current investigations of bat White Nose Syndrome (WNS) and the causative fungus Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans (Pd) are intensely focused on the reasons for the appearance of the disease in the Northeast and its rapid spread in the US and Canada. Urgent steps are still needed for the mitigation or control of Pd to save bats. We hypothesized that a focus on fungal community would advance the understanding of ecology and ecosystem processes that are crucial in the disease transmission cycle. This study was conducted in 2010-2011 in New York and Vermont using 90 samples from four mines and two caves situated within the epicenter of WNS. We used culture-dependent (CD) and culture-independent (CI) methods to catalogue all fungi ('mycobiome'). CD methods included fungal isolations followed by phenotypic and molecular identifications. CI methods included amplification of DNA extracted from environmental samples with universal fungal primers followed by cloning and sequencing. CD methods yielded 675 fungal isolates and CI method yielded 594 fungal environmental nucleic acid sequences (FENAS). The core mycobiome of WNS comprised of 136 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) recovered in culture and 248 OTUs recovered in clone libraries. The fungal community was diverse across the sites, although a subgroup of dominant cosmopolitan fungi was present. The frequent recovery of Pd (18% of samples positive by culture) even in the presence of dominant, cosmopolitan fungal genera suggests some level of local adaptation in WNS-afflicted habitats, while the extensive distribution of Pd (48% of samples positive by real-time PCR) suggests an active reservoir of the pathogen at these sites. These findings underscore the need for integrated disease control measures that target both bats and Pd in the hibernacula for the control of WNS.

  18. Simultaneous analysis of the expression of 14 genes with individual prognostic value in myelodysplastic syndrome patients at diagnosis: WT1 detection in peripheral blood adversely affects survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Carlos; Ramos, Fernando; Puig, Noemi; Barragán, Eva; de Paz, Raquel; Pedro, Carme; Insunza, Andrés; Tormo, Mar; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; Diez-Campelo, María; Xicoy, Blanca; Salido, Eduardo; Sánchez del Real, Javier; Hernández, Montserrat; Chillón, Carmen; Sanz, Guillermo F; García-Sanz, Ramón; San Miguel, Jesús F; González, Marcos

    2012-12-01

    Several studies have evaluated the prognostic value of the individual expression of certain genes in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, none of them includes their simultaneous analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We evaluated relative expression levels of 14 molecular markers in 193 peripheral blood samples from untreated MDS patients using real-time PCR. Detectable WT1 expression levels, low TET2, and low IER3 gene expression were the only markers showing in univariate analysis a poor prognostic value for all treatment-free (TFS), progression-free (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In multivariate analysis, molecular parameters associated with a shorter TFS were: WT1 detection (p = 0.014), low TET2 (p = 0.002), and low IER3 expression (p = 0.025). WT1 detection (p = 0.006) and low TET2 (p = 0.006) expression were associated with a shorter PFS when multivariate analysis was carried out by including only molecular markers. Molecular values with an independent value in OS were: WT1 detection (p = 0.003), high EVI1 expression (p = 0.001), and undetectatable p15-CDKN2B (p = 0.037). WT1 expressers were associated with adverse clinical-biological features, high IPSS and WPSS scoring, and unfavorable molecular expression profile. In summary, detectable WT1 expression levels, and low TET2 and low IER3 expression in peripheral blood showed a strong association with adverse prognosis in MDS patients at diagnosis. However, WT1 was the only molecular marker displaying an independent prognostic value in both OS and TFS.

  19. Swallow–Breath Interaction and Phase of Respiration with Swallow during Non-Nutritive Suck in Infants Affected by Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W. Reynolds

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe development of suck–swallow–breath rhythms during non-nutritive suck (NNS may be an indicator of neurologic integrity. We have described swallow–breath (SwBr interaction and phase of respiration (POR with swallow during NNS in low-risk preterm (LRP infants. NNS in infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS has not been described with our method.MethodSuckle, swallow, thoracic motion, and nasal airflow were measured during NNS in 10 infants with NAS and 12 unaffected infants (control. Logistic regression models were fit to describe the three types of SwBr and five types of POR in terms of the independent variables (gender, gestational age, birth weight, postmenstrual age, weeks postfirst nipple feed and swallows per study. We also compared the NAS group to 16 LRP infants.ResultsIn the NAS group, there were 94 swallows in 18 studies. In the control group, there were 94 swallows in 12 studies. There were statistical differences between groups for all three types of SwBr. The distribution of SwBr in NAS was similar to LRP infants with NAS having fewer swallows with attenuated respiration and more with central apnea. For POR, there were few differences. Over time, the distribution of SwBr in NAS infants approaches that of control infants.DiscussionVariability in SwBr and POR during NNS may represent neurologic dysfunction in infants with NAS. Specifically, term infants with NAS display an immature pattern of SwBr making them more similar to preterm infants, rather than a unique pathology. The distribution of SwBr and POR in NAS infants becomes more like term infants, possibly representing catch-up development as the NAS symptoms resolve.ConclusionSwBr in babies with NAS is different from that of unaffected term infants, actually being similar to preterm infants. Infants with NAS exhibit a dysmature pattern of NNS development which resolves over time.

  20. Overexpression of retinal degeneration slow (RDS protein adversely affects rods in the rd7 model of enhanced S-cone syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibyendu Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The nuclear receptor NR2E3 promotes expression of rod photoreceptor genes while repressing cone genes. Mice lacking NR2E3 (Nr2e3(rd7/rd7 referred to here as rd7 are a model for enhanced S-cone syndrome, a disease associated with increased sensitivity to blue light and night blindness. Rd7 retinas have reduced levels of the outer segment (OS structural protein retinal degeneration slow (RDS. We test the hypothesis that increasing RDS levels would improve the Rd7 phenotype. Transgenic mice over-expressing normal mouse peripherin/RDS (NMP in rods and cones were crossed onto the rd7 background. Disease phenotypes were assessed in NMP/rd7 eyes and compared to wild-type (WT and rd7 eyes at postnatal day 30. NMP/rd7 retinas expressed total RDS (transgenic and endogenous message at WT levels, and NMP protein was correctly localized to the OS. NMP/rd7 retinas have shorter OSs compared to rd7 and WT and significantly reduced number of rosettes. NMP/rd7 mice also exhibited significant deficits in scotopic ERG amplitudes compared to rd7 while photopic amplitudes remained unaffected. Protein levels of rhodopsin, RDS, and the RDS homologue ROM-1 were significantly reduced in the NMP/rd7 retinas compared to rd7. We show that correcting the levels of RDS gene expression does not improve the phenotype of the rd7 suggesting that RDS deficiency is not responsible for the defect in this model. We suggest that the specific rod defect in the NMP/rd7 is likely associated with ongoing problems in the rd7 that are related to the expression of cone genes in rod cells, a characteristic of the model.

  1. Down Syndrome: Cognitive Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most prevalent cause of intellectual impairment associated with a genetic anomaly, in this case, trisomy of chromosome 21. It affects both physical and cognitive development and produces a characteristic phenotype, although affected individuals vary considerably with respect to severity of specific impairments. Studies…

  2. Molecular evidence for a bacterium of the family Midichloriaceae (order Rickettsiales in skin and organs of the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss affected by red mark syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Cafiso

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we present a novel specific method for absolute quantification of the midichloriacea associated with RMS in O. mykiss, based on a quantitative PCR approach. The qPCR method was tested on healthy skin, on lesions when present and on organ samples (heart, liver, spleen, intestine, kidney from ten fish. Our work shows, for the first time, that the midichloriacea is present not only in skin lesions but also in organs of affected fish. Further studies are needed to prove whether this bacterium is actually involved in the pathology.

  3. KCNQ1 p.L353L affects splicing and modifies the phenotype in a founder population with long QT syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapplinger, Jamie D; Erickson, Anders; Asuri, Sirisha; Tester, David J; McIntosh, Sarah; Kerr, Charles R; Morrison, Julie; Tang, Anthony; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Arbour, Laura; Ackerman, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance between individuals with identical long QT syndrome (LQTS) causative mutations largely remain unexplained. Founder populations provide a unique opportunity to explore modifying genetic effects. We examined the role of a novel synonymous KCNQ1 p.L353L variant on the splicing of exon 8 and on heart rate corrected QT interval (QTc) in a population known to have a pathogenic LQTS type 1 (LQTS1) causative mutation, p.V205M, in KCNQ1 -encoded Kv7.1. 419 adults were genotyped for p.V205M, p.L353L and a previously described QTc modifier ( KCNH2- p.K897T). Adjusted linear regression determined the effect of each variant on QTc, alone and in combination. In addition, peripheral blood RNA was extracted from three controls and three p.L353L-positive individuals. The mutant transcript levels were assessed via qPCR and normalised to overall KCNQ1 transcript levels to assess the effect on splicing. For women and men, respectively, p.L353L alone conferred a 10.0 (p=0.064) ms and 14.0 (p=0.014) ms increase in QTc and in men only a significant interaction effect in combination with the p.V205M (34.6 ms, p=0.003) resulting in a QTc of ∼500 ms. The mechanism of p.L353L's effect was attributed to approximately threefold increase in exon 8 exclusion resulting in ∼25% mutant transcripts of the total KCNQ1 transcript levels. Our results provide the first evidence that synonymous variants outside the canonical splice sites in KCNQ1 can alter splicing and clinically impact phenotype. Through this mechanism, we identified that p.L353L can precipitate QT prolongation by itself and produce a clinically relevant interactive effect in conjunction with other LQTS variants. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. L-Arginine Affects Aerobic Capacity and Muscle Metabolism in MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes) Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodan, Lance H.; Wells, Greg D.; Banks, Laura; Thompson, Sara; Schneiderman, Jane E.; Tein, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of L-arginine (L-Arg) on total body aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism as assessed by 31Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS) in patients with MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy with Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes) syndrome. Methods We performed a case control study in 3 MELAS siblings (m.3243A>G tRNAleu(UUR) in MTTL1 gene) with different % blood mutant mtDNA to evaluate total body maximal aerobic capacity (VO2peak) using graded cycle ergometry and muscle metabolism using 31P-MRS. We then ran a clinical trial pilot study in MELAS sibs to assess response of these parameters to single dose and a 6-week steady-state trial of oral L-Arginine. Results At baseline (no L-Arg), MELAS had lower serum Arg (p = 0.001). On 31P-MRS muscle at rest, MELAS subjects had increased phosphocreatine (PCr) (p = 0.05), decreased ATP (p = 0.018), and decreased intracellular Mg2+ (p = 0.0002) when compared to matched controls. With L-arginine therapy, the following trends were noted in MELAS siblings on cycle ergometry: (1) increase in mean % maximum work at anaerobic threshold (AT) (2) increase in % maximum heart rate at AT (3) small increase in VO2peak. On 31P-MRS the following mean trends were noted: (1) A blunted decrease in pH after exercise (less acidosis) (2) increase in Pi/PCr ratio (ADP) suggesting increased work capacity (3) a faster half time of PCr recovery (marker of mitochondrial activity) following 5 minutes of moderate intensity exercise (4) increase in torque. Significance These results suggest an improvement in aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects in response to supplementation with L-Arg. Intramyocellular hypomagnesemia is a novel finding that warrants further study. Classification of Evidence Class III evidence that L-arginine improves aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01603446. PMID:25993630

  5. L-Arginine Affects Aerobic Capacity and Muscle Metabolism in MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance H Rodan

    Full Text Available To study the effects of L-arginine (L-Arg on total body aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism as assessed by (31Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((31P-MRS in patients with MELAS (Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy with Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes syndrome.We performed a case control study in 3 MELAS siblings (m.3243A>G tRNA(leu(UUR in MTTL1 gene with different % blood mutant mtDNA to evaluate total body maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2peak using graded cycle ergometry and muscle metabolism using 31P-MRS. We then ran a clinical trial pilot study in MELAS sibs to assess response of these parameters to single dose and a 6-week steady-state trial of oral L-Arginine.At baseline (no L-Arg, MELAS had lower serum Arg (p = 0.001. On 3(1P-MRS muscle at rest, MELAS subjects had increased phosphocreatine (PCr (p = 0.05, decreased ATP (p = 0.018, and decreased intracellular Mg(2+ (p = 0.0002 when compared to matched controls. With L-arginine therapy, the following trends were noted in MELAS siblings on cycle ergometry: (1 increase in mean % maximum work at anaerobic threshold (AT (2 increase in % maximum heart rate at AT (3 small increase in VO(2peak. On (31P-MRS the following mean trends were noted: (1 A blunted decrease in pH after exercise (less acidosis (2 increase in Pi/PCr ratio (ADP suggesting increased work capacity (3 a faster half time of PCr recovery (marker of mitochondrial activity following 5 minutes of moderate intensity exercise (4 increase in torque.These results suggest an improvement in aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects in response to supplementation with L-Arg. Intramyocellular hypomagnesemia is a novel finding that warrants further study.Class III evidence that L-arginine improves aerobic capacity and muscle metabolism in MELAS subjects.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01603446.

  6. Degos' syndrome. Detection of intestinal lesion by digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, J.I.; Garcia Delgado, F.; Idoate, M.; Arejola, J.M.; Aquerreta, D.; Otero, M.

    1986-01-01

    Degos' syndrom consists in a generalized vasculitis with frequent affectation of the gut and the skin. The arteriographic findings in a patient with the diagnosis of Degos' syndroms and severe affectation of the gut are reported [fr

  7. Somatoform dissociation and posttraumatic stress syndrome - two sides of the same medal? A comparison of symptom profiles, trauma history and altered affect regulation between patients with functional neurological symptoms and patients with PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Johanna; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Bohus, Martin; Fiess, Johanna; Huffziger, Silke; Steffen-Klatt, Astrid

    2017-07-11

    History of traumatic experience is common in dissociative disorder (DD), and similarity of symptoms and characteristics between DD and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) encouraged to consider DD as trauma-related disorder. However, conceptualization of DD as a trauma-related syndrome would critically affect diagnosis and treatment strategies. The present study addressed overlap and disparity of DD and PTSD by directly comparing correspondence of symptoms, adverse/traumatic experience, and altered affect regulation between patients diagnosed with dissociative disorder (characterized by negative functional neurological symptoms) and patients diagnosed with PTSD. Somatoform and psychoform dissociation, symptoms of posttraumatic stress, general childhood adversities and lifetime traumata, and alexithymia as index of altered affect regulation were screened with standardized questionnaires and semi-structured interviews in 60 patients with DD (ICD-codes F44.4, F44.6, F44.7), 39 patients with PTSD (ICD-code F43.1), and 40 healthy comparison participants (HC). DD and PTSD patients scored higher than HC on somatoform and psychoform dissociative symptom scales and alexithymia, and reported more childhood adversities and higher trauma load. PTSD patients reported higher symptom severity and more traumata than DD patients. Those 20 DD patients who met criteria of co-occuring PTSD did not differ from PTSD patients in the amount of reported symptoms of somatoform dissociation, physical and emotional childhood adversities and lifetime traumata, while emotional neglect/abuse in childhood distinguished DD patients with and without co-occuring PTSD (DD patients with co-occuring PTSD reporting more emotional maltreatment). The pattern of distinctive somatoform and psychoform dissociative symptom severity, type of childhood and lifetime traumata, and amount of alexithymia suggests that DD and PTSD are distinctive syndromes and, therefore, challenges the conceptualization of DD as

  8. Enhanced pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelin Diana Goldenberg Meirelles Mariano da Costa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced pain syndromes have their prevalence increased withold age. Fibromyalgia, among them deserves special attention. Itscauses are still unknown. Fibromyalgia syndrome affects mainlyfemales and is characterized by generalized musculoskeletal pain,fatigue, sleep disturbances, diffuse stiffness and other psychic signsand symptoms. Diagnosis is essentially based on the 1990 AmericanCollege of Rheumatology Classifi cative Criteria. In this chapteraspects related to its treatment and prognosis are also discussed.

  9. West syndrome in a patient with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Fuyu; Kuroda, Yukiko; Naruto, Takuya; Ohashi, Ikuko; Takano, Kyoko; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome is a rare recognizable malformation syndrome defined by characteristic facial features, profound developmental delay, severe growth failure, and multiple congenital anomalies. The causative gene of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome, SETBP1, has been identified, but limited cases have been confirmed by molecular analysis. We present a 9-month-old girl affected by West syndrome with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Congenital severe hydronephrosis, typical facial features, and multiple anomalies suggested a clinical diagnosis of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Hypsarrhythmia occurred at 7 months of age and was temporarily controlled by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy during 5 weeks. SETBP1 mutational analysis showed the presence of a recurrent mutation, p.Ile871Thr. The implications in management of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. A Comparative Study of Educational Provision for Children with Neurogenetic Syndromes: Parent and Teacher Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, C.; Senior, J.; Murtagh, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of neurogenetic syndromes have a high association with special educational needs including fragile X syndrome (FXS), Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), Williams syndrome (WS) and Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome (VCFS). There is a paucity of research on educational provision for children affected by these syndromes. Method: Parents…

  11. Cardiorenal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease.  Heart failure may lead to acute kidney injury and vice versa. Chronic kidney disease may affect the clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Renal impairment with any degree of albuminuria has been increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and heart failure hospitalizations, while chronic heart failure may cause chronic kidney disease. The bidirectional nature of these disorders contributes to the complexity and the composite definitions of cardiorenal syndromes. However, the most important clinical trials in heart failure tend to exclude patients with significant renal dysfunction. The mechanisms whereby renal insufficiency worsens the outcome in heart failure are not known, and several pathways could contribute to the ‘‘vicious heart/kidney circle.’’ Traditionally, renal impairment has been attributed to the renal hypoperfusion due to reduced cardiac output and decreased systemic pressure. The hypovolemia leads to sympathetic activity, increased renin-angiotensin aldosterone pathway, and arginine-vasopressin release. These mechanisms cause fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, and volume overload. Therapy to improve renal dysfunction, reduce neurohormonal activation and ameliorate renal blood flow could lead to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with cardiorenal syndrome.

  12. Hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, P A

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, with overall mortality exceeding 40% even with treatment. Effective efforts for screening and prevention are most likely to succeed in patient groups identified as high risk for colorectal cancer, most notably the hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes. In these syndromes, benign polyps develop throughout the intestinal tract prior to the development of colorectal cancer, marking the patient and associated family for precancer diagnosis followed by either close surveillance or preventive treatment. This review article was undertaken to discuss the most recent developments in the knowledge of hereditary intestinal polyposis syndromes, emphasizing the clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment relative to preventing the development of cancer. The most common of the hereditary polyposis syndromes is familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), which is characterized by the development of hundreds to thousands of adenomatous polyps in the colon followed at an early age by colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer can be prevented in this autosomal dominant condition by prophylactic colectomy, though a risk for other tumors, including periampullary cancers, remains throughout life. Variant of FAP associated with fewer and smaller polyps (hereditary flat adenoma syndrome), or even CNS tumors (Turcot's syndrome) also carry this high risk of colorectal cancer. Hereditary hamartomatous polyposis syndromes such as juvenile polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (also autosomal dominant) are characterized by less frequent polyps. Though these are generally benign polyps, they are also associated with a significant risk of colorectal and other cancers. Other polyposis syndromes, including neurofibromatosis and Cowden's disease, do not carry this increased risk of colorectal cancer, and therefore affect different treatment strategies. Analysis of genetic factors responsible for these and other hereditary syndromes with

  13. Down syndrome, RASopathies, and other rare syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Christian P; Izraeli, Shai

    2017-04-01

    In this article we discuss the occurrence of myeloid neoplasms in patients with a range of syndromes that are due to germline defects of the RAS signaling pathway and in patients with trisomy 21. Both RAS mutations and trisomy 21 are common somatic events contributing to leukemogenis. Thus, the increased leukemia risk observed in children affected by these conditions is biologically highly plausible. Children with myeloid neoplasms in the context of these syndromes require different treatments than children with sporadic myeloid neoplasms and provide an opportunity to study the role of trisomy 21 and RAS signaling during leukemogenesis and development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Proteus syndrome : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seon Young [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare congenital hamartomatous condition with a variety of abnormalities affecting all three germ layers including overgrowth of various parts of the body, hemihypertrophy, unusual skeletal malformation, skin lesions, and various tumors. I describe the radiologic findings in a 12 year-old boy with Proteus syndrome. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are very useful for the specific diagnosis.

  15. mRNA Quantification of NIPBL Isoforms A and B in Adult and Fetal Human Tissues, and a Potentially Pathological Variant Affecting Only Isoform A in Two Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Puisac

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a congenital developmental disorder characterized by craniofacial dysmorphia, growth retardation, limb malformations, and intellectual disability. Approximately 60% of patients with CdLS carry a recognizable pathological variant in the NIPBL gene, of which two isoforms, A and B, have been identified, and which only differ in the C-terminal segment. In this work, we describe the distribution pattern of the isoforms A and B mRNAs in tissues of adult and fetal origin, by qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Our results show a higher gene expression of the isoform A, even though both seem to have the same tissue distribution. Interestingly, the expression in fetal tissues is higher than that of adults, especially in brain and skeletal muscle. Curiously, the study of fibroblasts of two siblings with a mild CdLS phenotype and a pathological variant specific of the isoform A of NIPBL (c.8387A > G; P.Tyr2796Cys, showed a similar reduction in both isoforms, and a normal sensitivity to DNA damage. Overall, these results suggest that the position of the pathological variant at the 3´ end of the NIPBL gene affecting only isoform A, is likely to be the cause of the atypical mild phenotype of the two brothers.

  16. mRNA Quantification of NIPBL Isoforms A and B in Adult and Fetal Human Tissues, and a Potentially Pathological Variant Affecting Only Isoform A in Two Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puisac, Beatriz; Teresa-Rodrigo, María-Esperanza; Hernández-Marcos, María; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Gil-Rodríguez, María-Concepción; Visnes, Torkild; Bot, Christopher; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Kaiser, Frank J; Ramos, Feliciano J; Ström, Lena; Pié, Juan

    2017-02-23

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a congenital developmental disorder characterized by craniofacial dysmorphia, growth retardation, limb malformations, and intellectual disability. Approximately 60% of patients with CdLS carry a recognizable pathological variant in the NIPBL gene, of which two isoforms, A and B, have been identified, and which only differ in the C-terminal segment. In this work, we describe the distribution pattern of the isoforms A and B mRNAs in tissues of adult and fetal origin, by qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction). Our results show a higher gene expression of the isoform A, even though both seem to have the same tissue distribution. Interestingly, the expression in fetal tissues is higher than that of adults, especially in brain and skeletal muscle. Curiously, the study of fibroblasts of two siblings with a mild CdLS phenotype and a pathological variant specific of the isoform A of NIPBL (c.8387A > G; P.Tyr2796Cys), showed a similar reduction in both isoforms, and a normal sensitivity to DNA damage. Overall, these results suggest that the position of the pathological variant at the 3´ end of the NIPBL gene affecting only isoform A, is likely to be the cause of the atypical mild phenotype of the two brothers.

  17. Equine Metabolic Syndrome Affects Viability, Senescence, and Stress Factors of Equine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells: New Insight into EqASCs Isolated from EMS Horses in the Context of Their Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marycz, Krzysztof; Kornicka, Katarzyna; Basinska, Katarzyna; Czyrek, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Currently, equine metabolic syndrome (EMS), an endocrine disease linked to insulin resistance, affects an increasing number of horses. However, little is known about the effect of EMS on mesenchymal stem cells that reside in adipose tissue (ASC). Thus it is crucial to evaluate the viability and growth kinetics of these cells, particularly in terms of their application in regenerative medicine. In this study, we investigated the proliferative capacity, morphological features, and accumulation of oxidative stress factors in mesenchymal stem cells isolated from healthy animals (ASCN) and horses suffering from EMS (ASCEMS). ASCEMS displayed senescent phenotype associated with β-galactosidase accumulation, enlarged cell bodies and nuclei, increased apoptosis, and reduced heterochromatin architecture. Moreover, we observed increased amounts of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells, accompanied by reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. We also found in ASCEMS an elevated number of impaired mitochondria, characterized by membrane raptures, disarrayed cristae, and vacuole formation. Our results suggest that the toxic compounds, accumulating in the mitochondria under oxidative stress, lead to alternations in their morphology and may be partially responsible for the senescent phenotype and decreased proliferation potential of ASCEMS.

  18. Equine Metabolic Syndrome Affects Viability, Senescence, and Stress Factors of Equine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells: New Insight into EqASCs Isolated from EMS Horses in the Context of Their Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, equine metabolic syndrome (EMS, an endocrine disease linked to insulin resistance, affects an increasing number of horses. However, little is known about the effect of EMS on mesenchymal stem cells that reside in adipose tissue (ASC. Thus it is crucial to evaluate the viability and growth kinetics of these cells, particularly in terms of their application in regenerative medicine. In this study, we investigated the proliferative capacity, morphological features, and accumulation of oxidative stress factors in mesenchymal stem cells isolated from healthy animals (ASCN and horses suffering from EMS (ASCEMS. ASCEMS displayed senescent phenotype associated with β-galactosidase accumulation, enlarged cell bodies and nuclei, increased apoptosis, and reduced heterochromatin architecture. Moreover, we observed increased amounts of nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS in these cells, accompanied by reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD activity. We also found in ASCEMS an elevated number of impaired mitochondria, characterized by membrane raptures, disarrayed cristae, and vacuole formation. Our results suggest that the toxic compounds, accumulating in the mitochondria under oxidative stress, lead to alternations in their morphology and may be partially responsible for the senescent phenotype and decreased proliferation potential of ASCEMS.

  19. 47,XXY Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Link, Katarina; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    to 75% of the patients left undetected. Typically, diagnosis is delayed with the majority of patients identified during fertility workup in adulthood, and only 10% of patients diagnosed prior to puberty. Early detection of this syndrome is recommended in order to offer treatment and intervention...... at the appropriate ages and stages of development for the purpose of preventing osteopenia/osteoporosis, metabolic syndrome, and other medical conditions related to hypogonadism and to the XXY as well as minimizing potential learning and psychosocial problems. The aim of this review is to present the clinical......47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) is the most frequent sex chromosomal disorder and affects approximately one in 660 newborn boys. The syndrome is characterized by varying degrees of cognitive, social, behavioral, and learning difficulties and in adulthood additionally primary testicular failure...

  20. Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tingling sensation in the affected areas, fatigue, and dry mouth. LEMS is closely associated with cancer, in particular small cell lung ... myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is a disorder of the neuromuscular junction- ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Roberts syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nose. They may have a small head size ( microcephaly ), and in severe cases affected individuals have a ... Roberts Syndrome MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Contracture deformity MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Microcephaly General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  2. Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A A Share Plus on Google Plus Alzheimer's & Dementia alz.org | IHaveAlz Overview What Is Dementia ... chapter Join our online community Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease As they age, those affected by Down ...

  3. Jugular thrombophlebitis complicating bacterial pharyngitis (Lemierre's syndrome)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, S.De; Rosenfeld, D.L.; Santos, S.; Keller, I.

    1996-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a rare syndrome caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, a gram-negative anaerobic organism that normally inhabits the oropharynx. The syndrome follows primary oropharyngeal infection and affects previously healthy adolescents in a characteristic manner with fatal results if left untreated. The authors present two cases seen at their institution and discuss the clinical and radiologic features of the syndrome, along with considerations for patient management. (orig.). With 5 figs

  4. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood cells, and the cells have a specific mutation in their DNA. Myelodysplastic syndrome with excess blasts — ... Chemicals linked to myelodysplastic syndromes include tobacco smoke, pesticides and industrial chemicals, such as benzene. Exposure to ...

  5. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and supports a broad range of research on neurogenetic disorders, including Moebius syndrome. The goals of these ... and supports a broad range of research on neurogenetic disorders, including Moebius syndrome. The goals of these ...

  6. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan) to look for two characteristics of Pendred syndrome. One characteristic might be a cochlea with too few turns. ... Inner Ear Credit: NIH Medical Arts A second characteristic of Pendred syndrome is an enlarged vestibular aqueduct (see figure). The ...

  7. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and ...

  8. Ohtahara Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but be profoundly handicapped. As they grow, some children will progress into other epileptic disorders such as West syndrome and Lennox-Gestaut syndrome. What research is being done? The NINDS conducts and supports an extensive research program on seizures ...

  9. Gardner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrado Junior, C.W.; Bresser, A.; Cerri, G.G.; Habr-Gama, A.; Pinotti, H.W.; Magalhaes, A.

    1988-01-01

    A case of familiar poliposis of colon related to a right mandibular osteoma is reported (this association is usually called Gardner's syndrome). Radiologic pictures ae shown and some commentaries about this syndrome concerning the treatment are made. (author) [pt

  10. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  11. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  12. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that ... your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  13. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  14. Piriformis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudosciatica; Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... Sciatica is the main symptom of piriformis syndrome. Other symptoms include: Tenderness or a dull ache in ...

  15. Dressler's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome Overview Dressler's syndrome is a type of pericarditis — inflammation of the sac surrounding the heart (pericardium). ... reducing its ability to pump blood efficiently. Constrictive pericarditis. Recurring or chronic inflammation can cause the pericardium ...

  16. Brachman de lange syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Verma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachman de Lange syndrome or Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a genetic disorder which can lead to severe developmental anomalies. It affects both the physical and intellectual development of a child. It is characterized by skeletal, craniofacial deformities, gastrointestinal and cardiac malformations. This syndrome is of rare occurrence and affects between 1/10,000 and 1/60,000 neonates. Diagnosis is based on the characteristic phenotype, in particular, a striking facial appearance, prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, various skeletal abnormalities, hypertrichosis, and developmental delay. Here, we present the case of a 13-year-old patient, with micrognathia, delayed eruption, multiple carious teeth, missing teeth and periodontal problems together, which had never been reported before. The father was also found to have the same missing teeth as the girl child.

  17. Prune-Belly Syndrome: A Case Report from Rwanda | Ngendahayo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prune-Belly syndrome, Eagle-Barret syndrome and triad syndrome, all refer to congenital anomalies involving abdominal musculature, urinary tract and testicles. The syndrome consists of a triad of abdominal muscle aplasia, massive ureteral and bladder dilatation and cryptorchidism. Kidneys are often affected ...

  18. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ...

  19. [Capgras syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoverro Fortuny, O; Sierra Acín, A C

    2001-01-01

    The authors report a case of Capgras' syndrome in a 16-years-old child, who had been hospitalized for psychotic disorder. A review of the literature is performed. Most authors state that Capgras' syndrome would represent a symptom of underlying medical o functional disorders, although the term syndrome is used. The main etiopathogenic hypothesis of this syndrome are put forward (psychodynamic, disconnection, neuropsychological and medical).

  20. Marfan Syndrome: A Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterman, Adam D; Sponseller, Paul D

    2017-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that can affect many organ systems. Affected patients present with orthopaedic manifestations of the syndrome during all phases of life. Pain caused by musculoskeletal abnormalities often requires definitive orthopaedic treatment. Orthopaedic surgeons must understand the phenotypes of Marfan syndrome so they can recognize when screening is warranted and can appropriately address the skeletal manifestations. Through medical advancements, patients with Marfan syndrome are living longer and more active lives. Knowledge of the latest diagnostic criteria for the disorder, as well as of advances in understanding the skeletal phenotype, clinical trials of medication therapy, and lifestyle considerations is important for orthopaedic surgeons who treat these patients because these clinicians often are the first to suspect Marfan syndrome and recommend screening.

  1. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  2. Churg-Strauss Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... failure. Kidney (renal) damage. If Churg-Strauss syndrome affects your kidneys, you may develop glomerulonephritis. This is a kidney disease that hampers your kidneys' filtering ability, leading to a buildup of waste products in your bloodstream (uremia). Kidney failure is ...

  3. Morquio syndrome. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonne Alejandra Meza

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a Morquio syndrome, it is a disease transmitted by inheritance autosomic recessive, is systemic disease, mainly affects cartilage, clinically there is deficiency of Galactose-6-sulfatase and beta-galactosidase enzymes, clinically is observed disharmonic growth of bones and coarse fascies.

  4. Cirrhotic Multiorgan Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    complications such as hepatorenal syndrome. In patients with chronic organ dysfunction, various precipitating events may induce an acute-on-chronic renal failure and acute-on-chronic liver failure that negatively affect the prognosis. Future research on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the complications...

  5. Chronic fatigue syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, Steven F; Chalder, Trudie; Cleare, Anthony; Hotopf, Matthew; Wessely, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterised by severe, disabling fatigue, and other symptoms including musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbance, impaired concentration, and headaches. CFS affects between 0.006% and 3% of the population depending on the criteria used, with women being at higher risk than men.

  6. Chronic fatigue syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, Steven; Chalder, Trudie; Cleare, Anthony; Hotopf, Matthew; Wessely, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is characterised by severe, disabling fatigue, and other symptoms including musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbance, impaired concentration, and headaches. CFS affects between 0.006% and 3% of the population depending on the criteria used, with women being at higher risk than men.

  7. Chronic fatigue syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cleare, Anthony J.; Reid, Steven; Chalder, Trudie; Hotopf, Matthew; Wessely, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterised by severe, disabling fatigue, and other symptoms, including musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbance, impaired concentration, and headaches. CFS affects between 0.006% and 3% of the population depending on the criteria used, with women being at higher risk than men.

  8. Morquio syndrome. Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ivonne Alejandra Meza; Jaime Álvarez-Soler

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a Morquio syndrome, it is a disease transmitted by inheritance autosomic recessive, is systemic disease, mainly affects cartilage, clinically there is deficiency of Galactose-6-sulfatase and beta-galactosidase enzymes, clinically is observed disharmonic growth of bones and coarse fascies.

  9. Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, M I; Jespersgaard, C; Brøndum-Nielsen, K

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS; MIM #122470, 300590, 610759, 614701, 300882) is a rare and clinically variable disorder that affects multiple organs. It is characterized by intellectual disability (mild to severe), distinctive facial features, prenatal and postnatal growth retardation...

  10. Drug treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altabas, Velimir

    2013-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases including: abdominal obesity, a decreased ability to metabolize glucose (increased blood glucose levels and/or presence of insulin resistance), dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Patients who have developed this syndrome have been shown to be at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Genetic factors and the environment both are important in the development of the metabolic syndrome, influencing all single components of this syndrome. The goals of therapy are to treat the underlying cause of the syndrome, to reduce morbidity, and to prevent complications, including premature death. Lifestyle modification is the preferred first-step treatment of the metabolic syndrome. There is no single effective drug treatment affecting all components of the syndrome equally known yet. However, each component of metabolic syndrome has independent goals to be achieved, so miscellaneous types of drugs are used in the treatment of this syndrome, including weight losing drugs, antidiabetics, antihypertensives, antilipemic and anticlothing drugs etc. This article provides a brief insight into contemporary drug treatment of components the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... linked intellectual disability syndrome Alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Alpha thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability syndrome is an inherited disorder that affects many ...

  12. Marfan's syndrome: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    Full Text Available Marfan's syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with an estimated prevalence of one in 10,000 to 20,000 individuals. This rare hereditary connective tissue disorder affects many parts of the body. The diagnosis of Marfan's syndrome is established in accordance with a review of the diagnostic criteria, known as the Ghent nosology, through a comprehensive assessment largely based on a combination of major and minor clinical manifestations in various organ systems and the family history. Aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse are the main presentations among the cardiovascular malformations of Marfan's syndrome. The pathogenesis of Marfan's syndrome has not been fully elucidated. However, fibrillin-1 gene mutations are believed to exert a dominant negative effect. Therefore, Marfan's syndrome is termed a fibrillinopathy, along with other connective tissue disorders with subtle differences in clinical manifestations. The treatment may include prophylactic β-blockers and angiotensin II-receptor blockers in order to slow down the dilation of the ascending aorta, and prophylactic aortic surgery. Importantly, β-blocker therapy may reduce TGF-β activation, which has been recognized as a contributory factor in Marfan's syndrome. The present article aims to provide an overview of this rare hereditary disorder.

  13. Knowledge, attitude and practices regarding swine flu among para-medical workers in a tertiary care hospital in Pondicherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S S; Kuppuraman, D; Boratne, A V; Abraham, S B; Singh, Z

    2011-03-01

    Para-medical workers (PMWs) are first contacts for suspected Swine flu patients and also the media to spread key messages regarding its prevention and control strategies. Present study was conducted to ascertain knowledge, attitude and practices regarding Swine flu among para-medical workers in a tertiary care hospital. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among PMWs during May-July, 2010. KAP regarding Swine flu was collected through pre-designed questionnaire and information on attitude towards Swine flu was also collected through FGD-free list analysis. Data was analysed using Epi_Info and Anthropac software. A total of 237 PMWs responded. Majority of the PMWs knew about signs and symptoms (89.03%), mode of transmission (91.56%) and route of transmission (91.98%) of Swine flu. Television (67.51%) was the major source of information. 75.53% and 58.65% PMWs respectively knew about organ of the body chiefly affected and type of specimen to be collected during Swine flu. 196 (82.7%) and 191 (80.59%) PMWs respectively knew about availability of vaccine and treatment against Swine flu. 94.09% PMWs stated that extra precautions such as use of face mask, frequent handwashing, use of gloves etc. should be taken while handling any suspected Swine flu case and 73.84% PMWs do take such precautions. 80.17% PMWs opined that epidemic of Swine flu can be halted at current stage. In the present study, PMWs possessed good knowledge, attitude and practices regarding Swine flu and this fact should be utilized while designing and guiding containment strategies against existing Swine flu epidemic.

  14. Divorce in families of children with Down Syndrome or Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Renne Gerber Lederman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the impact in the stability and management of the marriage of parents of a child with Down or Rett Syndrome. Morbidity of the syndromes and the marital status of the couples before and after the birth of the affected children were considered variables. The divorce rate in families with Down syndrome was 10%, similar to the Brazilian rate population. In Rett Syndrome, the divorce rate was significantly higher, 23.5%. The higher morbidity of Rett Syndrome, and the moment of diagnosis could be relevant factors for the increased divorce rate related to this syndrome.

  15. Divorce in families of children with Down Syndrome or Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Vivian Renne Gerber; Alves, Bianca dos Santos; Negrão, Juliana; Maria, Juliana Negrão; Schwartzman, José Salomão; D'Antino, Maria Eloisa Famá; Brunoni, Decio

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the impact in the stability and management of the marriage of parents of a child with Down or Rett Syndrome. Morbidity of the syndromes and the marital status of the couples before and after the birth of the affected children were considered variables. The divorce rate in families with Down syndrome was 10%, similar to the Brazilian rate population. In Rett Syndrome, the divorce rate was significantly higher, 23.5%. The higher morbidity of Rett Syndrome, and the moment of diagnosis could be relevant factors for the increased divorce rate related to this syndrome.

  16. Treacher Collins Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Treacher Collins syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition, predominantly affecting the orofacial structures. The incidence varies between 1 in 40,000 to 1 in 70,000 per live births. 40% of the cases have a hereditary factor while 60% are due to genetic mutations. The features include antimongloid slanting of the eyes, deformed or underdeveloped pinna of the ear, retrognathic mandible, microgenia, hypoplasia of the facial bones. In some patients the retrognathic mandible may cause difficulty in breathing and swallowing and may require surgical interventions. The present article describes the clinical features of Treacher Collins syndrome as seen in 3 cases.

  17. Sturge Weber syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravala Siddeswari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sturge–Weber syndrome (SWS is a rare congenital disorder belongs to a group of disorders collectively known as the phakomatoses (“mother-spot” diseases. It consists of congenital hamartomatous malformations that may affect the eye, skin, and central nervous system (CNS at different times, characterized by the combination of venous angiomas of leptomeninges, face, jaws and oral soft tissues. We hereby report a 14 year old female presented with port wine stain and seizures and was diagnosed as Sturge-Weber syndrome after investigation (MRI. The co-occurrence of Sturge-Weber with facial nevus is 8% only.

  18. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes.

  19. Prevalence of porcine circovirus 2 infection in pig population in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, T; Pistl, J; Polláková, J; Holoda, E; Harvan, M

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of porcine circovirus 2 (PCV-2) infection in the pig population in Slovakia was investigated. Sera from pigs suspected for post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) as well as clinically healthy pigs were tested for viral DNA and specific IgM and IgG antibodies. Pigs (n = 198) were categorized to weaning, grower and fattening ones and sows. The results showed that PCV-2 antibodies were present in 53.4% of PMWS-suspects, in 50.0% of healthy pigs and in 69.0% of sows. In PMWS-suspect grower pigs, 40.7% were positive for IgM+IgG antibodies and 22.2% for viral DNA. In PMWS-suspect fattening pigs, 50.0% were positive for IgM+IgG antibodies and 25.0% for viral DNA. In healthy fattening pigs, almost 90.0% were positive for IgG antibodies and 38.5% for viral DNA. The highest proportion of PMWS-suspects was in grower pigs and specific antibodies were increasing with the age of pigs. A combination of positivities for IgG+IgM antibodies and viral DNA was a highly significant marker of PMWS. Viral DNA was detected in seropositive as well as seronegative PMWS-suspects. Overall, in all categories of pigs tested, specific antibodies and viral DNA were detected in 54.0% and 35.5%, respectively.

  20. Sjogren′s Syndrome: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Somani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren′s syndrome, also known as "Mikulicz disease" or "Sicca syndrome" is a systemic autoimmune disease in which immune cells attack and destroy the exocrine glands that produce tears and saliva. It can exist by itself (primary Sjogren syndrome or develop in association with another disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, primary biliary cirrhosis or Hashimoto thyroiditis (associated Sjogren syndrome. Hallmarks are the dry mouth and dry eyes known as the Sicca syndrome. Sjogren syndrome affects t million to 4 million people in the United States- Most are over 40 years old at the time of diagnosis. As there is no known cure for Sjogren syndrome, treatment focuses on relieving symptoms and preventing complications. The most serious complication associated with primary Sjogren syndrome is the development of a lymphoproliferative disease. primarily non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  1. Clinical update on metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Diego Hernández-Camacho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome has been defined as a global issue since it affects a lot of people. Numerous factors are involved in metabolic syndrome development. It has been described that metabolic syndrome has negative consequences on health. Consequently, a lot of treatments have been proposed to palliate it such as drugs, surgery or life style changes where nutritional habits have shown to be an important point in its management. The current study reviews the literature existing about the actual epidemiology of metabolic syndrome, the components involucrate in its appearance and progression, the clinical consequences of metabolic syndrome and the nutritional strategies reported in its remission. A bibliographic search in PubMed and Medline was performed to identify eligible studies. Authors obtained that metabolic syndrome is present in population from developed and undeveloped areas in a huge scale. Environmental and genetic elements are involucrate in metabolic syndrome development. Metabolic syndrome exponentially increased risk of cardiovascular disease, some types of cancers, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleep disturbances, etc. Nutritional treatments play a crucial role in metabolic syndrome prevention, treatment and recovery.

  2. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  3. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  4. Joubert Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner (meaning both parents must have a copy of ... physical, occupational, and speech therapy may benefit some children. Infants with abnormal ...

  5. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that contain aspirin. Some hospitals and medical facilities conduct newborn screenings for fatty acid oxidation disorders to determine which children are at greater risk of developing Reye's syndrome. ...

  6. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See More About Research The NINDS supports and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Angelman syndrome, to develop techniques to diagnose, treat, ... Publications Definition Angelman ...

  7. Wolfram Syndrome. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarała, Wojciech; Drachal, Elzbieta; Mazur, Artur; Korczowski, Bartosz; Szadkowska, Agnieszka; Zmysłowska, Agnieszka; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative and genetic disorder, characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, caused by non-autoimmune loss of β cells, as well as optic atrophy; the disease is also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). Patients that demonstrate diabetes mellitus are also affected by: optic atrophy in the first decade of their life, diabetes insipidus and sensorineural deafness in the second decade, and urinary tract and neurological abnormalities in the third decade of their life. Patients with Wolfram syndrome usually die due to central respiratory failures caused by brain stem atrophy in their third or at the beginning of their fourth decade of life. The authors present a case of two female siblings with diagnosed Wolfram syndrome that have been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and urological abnormalities. Early diagnosis and adequate hormonal supplementation can improve their quality of life. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  8. Reproductive Issues in Women with Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, Lisal J; Fuqua, John S

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities affecting female infants. The severity of clinical manifestations varies and it affects multiple organ systems. Women with Turner syndrome have a 3-fold increase in mortality, which becomes even more pronounced in pregnancy. Reproductive options include adoption or surrogacy, assisted reproductive techniques, and in rare cases spontaneous pregnancy. Risks for women with Turner syndrome during pregnancy include aortic disorders, hepatic disease, thyroid disease, type 2 diabetes, and cesarean section delivery. Providers must be familiar with the risks and recommendations in caring for women with Turner syndrome of reproductive age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Ballantyne syndrome or mirror syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Silva-González, María Eugenia; González-Hernández, Rigoberto

    2010-11-01

    Ballantyne syndrome or mirror syndrome is a triad consisting of the presence of fetal hydrops, generalized edema placentomegaly mother. May be related to any cause of fetal hydrops. The fetal prognosis is poor in untreated cases, the mother has reference to be the cause or the termination of pregnancy. Present the case of a 26-year-old who developed mirror syndrome secondary to non-immune fetal hydrops of unknown origin, accompanied by preeclampsia.

  10. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  11. Alport's Syndrome in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchita Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alport's syndrome is an X-linked hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane associated with ocular and hearing defects. In women, the disease is much less severe compared to that in men. However, women with Alport's syndrome can have an accelerated form of their disease during pregnancy with worsening of kidney function and can also develop preeclampsia. There are only four described cases of Alport's syndrome in pregnancy. Case Presentation. 20-year-old woman with a history of Alport's syndrome, which during pregnancy worsened resulting in hypertension, proteinuria, and acute kidney injury. Fortunately, there was complete resolution of the proteinuria and kidney injury with delivery, and the patient did not require any renal replacement therapy. Conclusion. One of the four reported cases had an accelerated form of the disease during pregnancy with rapid progression of kidney injury and end-stage renal disease. There are no definite guidelines to monitor these patients during pregnancy. Further studies are required to understand the exact pathophysiology of kidney damage that occurs in pregnant women with Alport's syndrome. This may give us some insight into the prognostic predictors, so that we can monitor these women more thoroughly and prevent adverse outcomes.

  12. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  13. Ascher syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Zhai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ascher syndrome is a rare, benign skin disorder characterized by a double upper lip, blepharochalasis, and nontoxic enlargement of the thyroid gland. The exact cause is unknown, but it is considered to be a hereditary disease with an autosomal dominant trait. We report here a case of forme fruste Ascher syndrome in a 29-year-old man.

  14. Passwell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available There is an expanding list of syndromes that combine ichthyosis with neuroectodermal and mesodermal defects. We report a syndrome of congenital ichthyosis with atrophy, mental retardation, dwarfism, aminoaciduria, primary amenorrhoea and underdeveloped secondary sexual characters in a 38-year-old woman of non consanguinous parentage.

  15. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  16. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causing...

  17. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  18. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. × Definition Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. View Full Definition Treatment There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, ...

  19. Locomotive Syndrome: Definition and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kozo; Ogata, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Locomotive syndrome is a condition of reduced mobility due to impairment of locomotive organs. Since upright bipedal walking involves minutely controlled movement patterns, impairment of any aspect of the locomotive organs has the potential to adversely affect it. In addition to trauma, chronic diseases of the locomotive organs, which progress with repeated bouts of acute exacerbations, are common causes of the locomotive syndrome. In Japan?s super-aging society, many people are likely to exp...

  20. Interstitial cystitis: painful bladder syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    R F Sholan; G Sh Garaev; G M Nasrullaeva

    2018-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis, or painful bladder syndrome, is a chronic inflammatory disease of a bladder of unknown etiology. It negatively affects the quality of life, causes depressive disorders, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. Despite numerous studies, the etiology of interstitial cystitis is still unclear and it’s considered as painful bladder syndrome with multifactorial origin. According to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 470/100 000 people (60/100 000 men, 850/100 0...

  1. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development. (orig.)

  2. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-06-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development.

  3. Update on antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Michelle Remião Ugolini; Danowski, Adriana; Funke, Andreas; Rêgo, Jozelia; Levy, Roger; Andrade, Danieli Castro Oliveira de

    2017-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. Most APS events are directly related to thrombotic events, which may affect small, medium or large vessels. Other clinical features like thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, cardiac valve disease, cognitive dysfunction and skin ulcers (called non-criteria manifestations) add significant morbidity to this syndrome and represent clinical situations that are challenging. APS was initially described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but it can occur in patients without any other autoimmune disease. Despite the autoimmune nature of this syndrome, APS treatment is still based on anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.

  4. Restless legs syndrome: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Symvoulakis

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome is a distressing condition, with negative effects on sleep and daytime activities that affect personal, family and occupational life. The overall impact of restless legs syndrome on quality of life is comparable to that of chronic and frustrating conditions such as depression and diabetes. Misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment may increase patients' suffering in terms of uncertainty, overuse or misuse of care services and lack of trust. Presenting a synthesis of the main topics in the literature on restless legs syndrome facilitates for a better understanding and its management in primary care settings.

  5. TAFRO Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Waardenburg′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amladi Sangeeta

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2 ½ year old female child presented with heterochromia irides and a depigmented macule on the hand with central hyperpigmentation. There was presence of medial eyebrow hyperplasia, broad nasal root and dystopia canthorum. The fundus on the affected side was albinotic. There was no white forelock or deafness. Biopsy from the depigmented area showed an absence of melancocytes. A diagnosis of Waardenburg′s syndrome type 1 was made.

  7. Cotard and Capgras syndrome after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottile, Fabrizio; Bonanno, Lilla; Finzi, Giuseppina; Ascenti, Giorgio; Marino, Silvia; Bramanti, Placido; Corallo, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Capgras and Cotard are delusional misidentification syndromes characterized by delusions about oneself, others, places, and objects. To date, there are few cases of comorbidity of both syndromes. We describe a case of aphasic stroke patient affected by cerebral ischemia localized in right temporoparietal region. The patient showed a typical clinical picture of delusional disorder attributable, through psychological assessment, to comorbidity of both Capgras and Cotard syndromes. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bouveret's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, A.; Hasan, Z.; Saeed, A.; Abdullah, K.

    2008-01-01

    Gastric Outlet Obstruction (GOO) due to impaction of a gallstone in the duodenum after migration through a bilioduodenal fistula is known as Bouveret's syndrome. Its clinical symptoms are entirely vague and nonspecific. Because of its rarity, insidiousness and unpredictable symptomatology. Bouveret's syndrome is never thought of in the differential diagnosis as aetiology of gastric outlet obstruction. Recent advances in fiberoptics technology, advent of modern imaging modalities and minimally-invasive techniques like endoscopy and laparoscopy has brought a great revolution in the management of Bouveret's syndrome and have tremendously decreased morbidity and mortality associated with this rare clinical entity. (author)

  9. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  10. Cowden syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Prakash S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with variable expressions that result mainly from mutation in the PTEN gene on arm 10q. It is characterized by multiple hamartomatous neoplasms of the skin, oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, bones, CNS, eyes, and genitourinary tract. Mucocutaneous features include trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomatosis, acral keratosis, and palmoplantar keratosis. Here we present a case of Cowden syndrome in a 14-year-old female patient with the chief complaint of multiple oral papillomatous lesions.

  11. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search FAQs Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Patient Education FAQs Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish ...

  12. Affective Urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    Urban design and architecture are increasingly used as material and affective strategies for setting the scene, for manipulation and the production of urban life: The orchestration of atmospheres, the framing and staging of urban actions, the programming for contemplation, involvement, play......, experience and consumption are all strategic design tools applied by planners and architects. Whereas urban design in former modernist planning served merely functional or political means, urban design has increasingly become an aesthetical mediator of ideologies embedded in the urban field of life forces....... Under these circumstances affective aesthetics operate strategically within the urban field of interests, capital flows and desires of the social. This ‘affective urbanism’ (Anderson & Holden 2008) is linked to a society influenced by new kinds of information flows, where culture is mediated and enacted...

  13. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    . In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human made disasters has become one of the focal point of affective knowledge production. These ‘more-than-humangeographies’ practices include notions of species, space and territory, and movement towards a new political ecology. This type...... of digital cartographies has been highlighted as the ‘processual turn’ in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This paper looks at computer-assisted cartography as part...... of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia is defined as a digitally created affective (map)space within...

  14. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vomiting Diarrhea Reye's syndrome Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  15. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... girls and women with TS may have low self- esteem, anxiety, or depression. How is Turner syndrome diagnosed? ... to active partners in their health care. This fact sheet is also available in Spanish at www. ...

  16. Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have equally severe disease. Autosomal dominant Alport syndrome (ADAS) -- This is the rarest type. Males and females ... and girls have hearing loss during childhood. With ADAS, it occurs later in life. Hearing loss usually ...

  17. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and social development; hypotonia (low muscle tone), and speech impairments. Clumsiness, an awkward gait, and unusual aggressiveness or irritability may also occur. Although most cases of Sotos syndrome occur sporadically (meaning they are not known to be inherited), familial ...

  18. Potter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter phenotype ... In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is ... kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine). Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that ...

  19. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... signs and symptoms may differ, based on age, gender and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, ... prevention and treatment of kidney disease. The Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Charity Seal provides the ...

  20. Gilbert's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor before taking new medications. Also, having certain types of Gilbert's syndrome may increase your risk of ... of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  1. Compartment syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... term (chronic) compartment syndrome can be caused by repetitive activities, such as running. The pressure in a compartment ... or loosened to relieve the pressure Stopping the repetitive activity or exercise, or changing the way it's done ...

  2. Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See More About Research The NINDS supports and conducts research on neurogenetic disorders such as Aicardi syndrome. The goals of this research are to locate and understand ... Publications Definition Aicardi ...

  3. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... swallow. Some babies will be born with glaucoma, retinal degeneration, and impaired hearing. Jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding also may occur. Treatment There is no cure for Zellweger syndrome, nor ...

  4. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with age. Decline in hearing and vision varies. Children with type 3 Usher syndrome often develop hearing loss by adolescence, requiring hearing aids by mid-to-late adulthood. Night blindness also usually begins during adolescence. Blind spots appear ...

  5. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may order additional tests. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans cannot diagnose piriformis syndrome, ... you are sitting, driving or standing. Don’t lift by bending over. Lift an object by bending ...

  6. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have an increased risk of an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) due to the autoimmune disorder Hashimoto's thyroiditis. They also have an increased risk of diabetes. Some women with Turner syndrome have gluten intolerance (celiac disease) or inflammatory bowel disease. Skeletal ...

  7. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now What Is Reye’s Syndrome? ...

  8. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Alagille Syndrome Back Alagille ...

  9. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mellitus High blood pressure (hypertension) Increased cholesterol and triglycerides (hyperlipidemia) Women with Cushing syndrome may have: Excess ... Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine, ...

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome is positively related to metabolic syndrome: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinting Guo

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome is a common gastrointestinal disorder that may affect dietary pattern, food digestion, and nutrient absorption. The nutrition-related factors are closely related to metabolic syndrome, implying that irritable bowel syndrome may be a potential risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, few epidemiological studies are available which are related to this potential link. The purpose of this study is to determine whether irritable bowel syndrome is related to metabolic syndrome among middle-aged people. We designed a cross-sectional study of 1,096 subjects to evaluate the relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and metabolic syndrome and its components. Diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome was based on the Japanese version of the Rome III Questionnaire. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of the American Heart Association scientific statements of 2009. Dietary consumption was assessed via a validated food frequency questionnaire. Principal-components analysis was used to derive 3 major dietary patterns: "Japanese", "sweets-fruits", and "Izakaya (Japanese Pub "from 39 food groups. The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome and metabolic syndrome were 19.4% and 14.6%, respectively. No significant relationship was found between the dietary pattern factor score tertiles and irritable bowel syndrome. After adjustment for potential confounders (including dietary pattern, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval of having metabolic syndrome and elevated triglycerides for subjects with irritable bowel syndrome as compared with non-irritable bowel syndrome are 2.01(1.13-3.55 and 1.50(1.03-2.18, respectively. Irritable bowel syndrome is significantly related to metabolic syndrome and it components. This study is the first to show that irritable bowel syndrome was significantly related to a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome and elevated triglycerides among an adult population. The findings suggest that

  11. Familial clustering of a rare syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Jayashree; Ganesh, Hari; Dwivedi, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft palate syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with variable expressivity and reduced penetration. The cardinal features are cleft palate/lip, lobster hand deformity, sparse hypopigmented hair, dry scaly skin, and lacrimal and urogenital anomalies. A neonate presented to us with typical features, his mother and other two siblings were also affected. PMID:21814340

  12. Questions & Answers about...Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This fact sheet answers general questions about Marfan syndrome, a heritable condition that affects the connective tissue. It describes the characteristics of the disorder, the diagnostic process, and ways to manage symptoms. Characteristics include: (1) people with Marfan syndrome are typically very tall, slender, and loose jointed; (2) more than…

  13. The Marfan Syndrome [and] Fact Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyeritz, Reed E.; Conant, Julia

    This introduction to the Marfan syndrome, a heritable disorder of connective tissue primarily affecting the bones and ligaments, eyes, cardiovascular system, and lungs, is intended for a general audience. The question-and-answer format was chosen by individuals with the syndrome to reflect their major questions and concerns. It incorporates the…

  14. The Marfan Syndrome: A Booklet for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Barbara A.

    This booklet explains characteristics of Marfan Syndrome, an inherited disorder of connective tissue which can be life-threatening if untreated. Medical problems affecting various parts of the body such as the heart, the skeleton, the eyes and the skin associated with Marfan Syndrome are discussed. Possible medical emergencies are identified.…

  15. What is new in the Marfan syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nollen, G. J.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue, caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene on chromosome 15. More than 500 mutations have been identified and almost all are unique to an affected individual or family. Genotype-phenotype correlations in the Marfan syndrome have

  16. Genetics Home Reference: short QT syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and can lead to the abnormal heart rhythms characteristic of short QT syndrome . Some affected individuals do not have an identified ... C, Giustetto C, Gaita F, Borggrefe M. Clinical characteristics and treatment of short QT syndrome. Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther. 2005 Jul;3(4): ...

  17. The spectrum of lower motor neuron syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg-Vos, R. M.; van den Berg, L. H.; Visser, J.; de Visser, M.; Franssen, H.; Wokke, J. H. J.

    2003-01-01

    This review discusses the most important lower motor neuron syndromes. This relatively rare group of syndromes has not been well described clinically. Two subgroups can be distinguished: patients in whom motor neurons (lower motor neuron disease (LMND)) are primarily affected or motor axons and

  18. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in Surgical Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE SERIES. Abstract. Background: The deleterious effects of intra- abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome, affect almost every system ..... 148(1), 81–4. 14. Nacev TV. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome. In Multiple Trauma Patients With Concomitant. Abdominal and Head Lesions --Mechanisms.

  19. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome misdiagnosed as chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After 6 months of rehabilitation he started playing rugby again, but the pain and discomfort in his ... machine equipped with a 5 - 7.5 MHz linear-array transducer. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome ... The syndrome usually affects young athletes who undertake vigorous exercise leading to muscle hypertrophy of the.

  20. Nevus sebaceous syndrome with facial hemihypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbiyi, A O; Lagunju, Ike

    2007-01-01

    Nevus sebaceous syndrome is a member of the epidermal nevus syndromes group, and is characterized by extensive nevus sebaceous, seizures, and mental retardation. We present an affected 5-month-old boy who had facial hemi-hypertrophy and recurrent seizures.

  1. Waardenburg syndrome and myelomeningocele in a family.

    OpenAIRE

    Chatkupt, S; Chatkupt, S; Johnson, W G

    1993-01-01

    We report the first family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and myelomeningocele in which more than one subject was affected with both disorders. The possible association is discussed. Prenatal screening for myelomeningocele is suggested for a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

  2. Waardenburg syndrome and myelomeningocele in a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatkupt, S; Chatkupt, S; Johnson, W G

    1993-01-01

    We report the first family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and myelomeningocele in which more than one subject was affected with both disorders. The possible association is discussed. Prenatal screening for myelomeningocele is suggested for a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Images PMID:8423616

  3. NEPHROTIC SYNDROME steroid sensitive renal condition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nephrotic syndrome is primarily a paediatric disorder and is 15 times more common in children than adults. The incidence is 2–3/100,000 children per year, and the majority of affected children will have steroid- sensitive minimal change disease. The characteristic features of nephrotic syndrome are heavy proteinuria.

  4. Rett syndrome: a study of the face

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allanson, Judith E.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Moog, Ute; Smeets, Eric E.

    2011-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a unique disorder of neurodevelopment that is characterized by an evolving behavioral and developmental phenotype, which emerges after an apparently normal early infantile period. It almost exclusively affects females. The face of Rett syndrome is said to resemble that of Angelman

  5. The Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes and pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Lind (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Marfan and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes have always received great public interest and fascination. Individuals with the Marfan syndrome impress with their tall statlls, long extremities, hands and feet, and patients affected with the EhlersDanlos syndrome are known for their agility in

  6. Genetics Home Reference: 2q37 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions 2q37 deletion syndrome 2q37 deletion syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description 2q37 deletion syndrome is a condition that can affect many ...

  7. Oral abnormalities in the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babaji Prashant

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder, mainly affecting the ectodermal components such as, enamel, nail, and hair. The gene for EvC syndrome is located on chromosome 4p16. Patients with EvC syndrome characteristically presents with congenitally missing teeth, abnormal frenal attachment, microdontia, and hexadactyly.

  8. CHARGE syndrome : a review of the immunological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, Monica T. Y.; Scholvinck, Elisabeth H.; Lambeck, Annechien J. A.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.

    2015-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is caused by a dominant variant in the CHD7 gene. Multiple organ systems can be affected because of haploinsufficiency of CHD7 during embryonic development. CHARGE syndrome shares many clinical features with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Immunological abnormalities have been

  9. Affect Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Gergely and colleagues’ state that their Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring” can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parenta...

  10. The Syndrome of Catatonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Allen Wilcox

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome which has historically been associated with schizophrenia. Many clinicians have thought that the prevalence of this condition has been decreasing over the past few decades. This review reminds clinicians that catatonia is not exclusively associated with schizophrenia, and is still common in clinical practice. Many cases are related to affective disorders or are of an idiopathic nature. The illusion of reduced prevalence has been due to evolving diagnostic systems that failed to capture catatonic syndromes. This systemic error has remained unchallenged, and potentiated by the failure to perform adequate neurological evaluations and catatonia screening exams on psychiatric patients. We find that current data supports catatonic syndromes are still common, often severe and of modern clinical importance. Effective treatment is relatively easy and can greatly reduce organ failure associated with prolonged psychomotor symptoms. Prompt identification and treatment can produce a robust improvement in most cases. The ongoing prevalence of this syndrome requires that psychiatrists recognize catatonia and its presentations, the range of associated etiologies, and the import of timely treatment.

  11. The Syndrome of Catatonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, James Allen; Reid Duffy, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome which has historically been associated with schizophrenia. Many clinicians have thought that the prevalence of this condition has been decreasing over the past few decades. This review reminds clinicians that catatonia is not exclusively associated with schizophrenia, and is still common in clinical practice. Many cases are related to affective disorders or are of an idiopathic nature. The illusion of reduced prevalence has been due to evolving diagnostic systems that failed to capture catatonic syndromes. This systemic error has remained unchallenged, and potentiated by the failure to perform adequate neurological evaluations and catatonia screening exams on psychiatric patients. We find that current data supports catatonic syndromes are still common, often severe and of modern clinical importance. Effective treatment is relatively easy and can greatly reduce organ failure associated with prolonged psychomotor symptoms. Prompt identification and treatment can produce a robust improvement in most cases. The ongoing prevalence of this syndrome requires that psychiatrists recognize catatonia and its presentations, the range of associated etiologies, and the import of timely treatment. PMID:26690229

  12. Turner syndrome and anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Marcius Vinícius M

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a frequent and complex genetic abnormality affecting women, being associated with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological changes, especially related with the airways and cardiovascular system. The objective of this report was to review the anatomopathologic changes of this syndrome that concern the anesthesiologist the most, discuss the perioperative management and review the literature regarding the anesthetic conduct in those patients. Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by an abnormality in the number or morphology of the sex chromosome. The most frequent abnormality is the absence of a sex chromosome, resulting in the 45X karyotype and a phenotype composed of gonadal dysgenesis. The main anatomo-physiological changes pertaining the anesthesiologist include a short neck, and maxillary and mandibular hipoplasia, which might be responsible for difficult airways. The shorter length of the trachea, as well as the higher location of its bifurcation, can predispose to bronchial intubation and accidental endotracheal extubation when the tracheal cannula is under traction. The presence of cardiopathies, endocrine and gastrointestinal disorders, liver and kidney changes, as well as osteoarticular involvement, besides ophthalmologic and hearing impairments, are very frequent, and should be detected during the pre-anesthetic evaluation. General or regional anesthesia seems to be safe for those patients. Turner syndrome is a genetic abnormality with important anatomo-physiological abnormalities important to the anesthesiologist. The knowledge of this disorder allows for a safer anesthetic management with low perioperative morbimortality.

  13. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome What Is Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk ... three metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A large waistline. This also is called abdominal ...

  14. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome Also known as Pickwickian Syndrome What ... your neck is larger than normal. Complications of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome When left untreated, OHS can cause ...

  15. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children who have WAGR syndrome may have normal intelligence. Other symptoms of WAGR syndrome may also include: ... mild. Some individuals with WAGR syndrome have normal intelligence. Children with WAGR syndrome should be referred for ...

  16. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may also be caused by toxins produced by group A streptococcus (strep) bacteria. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated ... syndrome. The syndrome can also be caused by group A streptococcus (strep) bacteria. Risk factors Toxic shock syndrome can ...

  17. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium ...

  18. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it? Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a random error ... The Down Syndrome Registry . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  19. Locomotive Syndrome: Definition and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kozo; Ogata, Toru

    Locomotive syndrome is a condition of reduced mobility due to impairment of locomotive organs. Since upright bipedal walking involves minutely controlled movement patterns, impairment of any aspect of the locomotive organs has the potential to adversely affect it. In addition to trauma, chronic diseases of the locomotive organs, which progress with repeated bouts of acute exacerbations, are common causes of the locomotive syndrome. In Japan's super-aging society, many people are likely to experience locomotive syndrome in the later part of their lives. Exercise intervention is effective in improving motor function, but because the subjects are elderly people with significant degenerative diseases of the locomotor organs, caution should be taken in choosing the type and intensity of exercise. The present review discusses the definition, current burden, diagnosis and interventions pertaining to the locomotive syndrome. The concept and measures are spreading throughout Japan as one of the national health policy targets.

  20. ACYCLOVIR INDUCED STEVEN JOHNSON SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveena

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acyclovir, anti - viral drug rarely causes Stevens - Johnson syndrome (SJS. Steven Johnson syndrome is a rare, life threatening disorder characterized by skin condition with bullous formation, ocular lesions, genital and anal lesions/ulcers. It’s usually a reaction to a medication or an infection. Often Steven Johnson syndrome begins with flu - like symptoms followed by a painful red or purplish rash that spreads and blisters. Then the top layer of the affected skin dies and sheds. This case report is about a 40 year old male patient who came to the medicine out p atient department with blisters on palms and soles and characteristic hemorrhagic crusting of mouth and lips. Initial diagnosis of Steven Johnson Syndrome was made and treated with steroids. Eruption usually healed without sequelae

  1. Behavior in the Lesch--Nyhan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyhan, William L.

    1976-01-01

    The Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (which only affects males) is a heritable disorder of the metabolism of uric acid in which behavioral manifestations are prominent and among the most provocative. (Author/SBH)

  2. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranecky, V.; Hoischen, A.; Hartmannova, H.; Zaki, M.S.; Chaudhary, A.; Zudaire, E.; Noskova, L.; Baresova, V.; Pristoupilova, A.; Hodanova, K.; Sovova, J.; Hulkova, H.; Piherova, L.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Silva, D. De; Senanayake, M.P.; Farrag, S.; Zeman, J.; Martasek, P.; Baxova, A.; Afifi, H.H.; Croix, B. St.; Brunner, H.G.; Temtamy, S.; Kmoch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T

  3. Women's Health Implications of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman-Verhulst, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine disorder of unknown etiology which affects approximately 12% of women. Principal features of PCOS are anovulation resulting in irregular or absent menstruation, excessive androgens (male sex hormones) and ovaries with multiple follicles

  4. Proteus syndrome: craniofacial and cerebral MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLone, D.R.; Brown, W.D.; Gentry, L.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Proteus syndrome is a rare hamartoneoplastic syndrome that may affect the brain, skull, and extracranial head and neck. We present a case with severe, characteristic findings. Brain abnormalities are not common in Proteus syndrome; when present, hemimegalencephaly and migrational disorders are typically seen, commonly with an associated seizure disorder. Maxillary and mandibular dysmorphism may occur, including unilateral condylar hyperplasia. Subcutaneous fatty, fibrous, lymphangiomatous masses commonly seen in this syndrome may involve the neck and face, leading to disfigurement and potential airway compromise. (orig.)

  5. Poland syndrome: rare presentation in two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocmen, Hayrettin; Akkas, Yucel; Doganay, Selim

    2010-08-27

    Poland syndrome was first described in 1840 by Alfred Poland while still a medical student and the other components of the syndrome were described at London Guy's Hospital following the dissection of a cadaver's hand, which had hypoplasia and syndactyly. The incidence of Poland syndrome has been reported to be 1 in 30,000 live births. In the present case report, two Poland syndrome patients with ipsilateral hypomastia and a reduction in the axillary/pectoral hairs diagnosed during adulthood are presented; one patient was affected on the left side and had widespread cafe au lait spots, and the other patient had respiratory dysfunction due to multiple rib anomalies.

  6. Renal-skin syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Has, Cristina; He, Yinghong

    2017-07-01

    Renal-skin syndroms are a group of genetic disorders with renal and cutaneous manifestations that target molecular components present in both organs. Inherited renal-skin syndromes are mainly associated with defects of cell-matrix adhesion. We provide a non-exhaustive overview of the main molecular players at cell-matrix adhesions in mouse models and in human genetic disorders affecting kidney and skin. Renal and urinary tract involvement is described in all four major epidermolysis bullosa types and, in particular, in junctional subtypes and in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Here, we describe in detail those subtypes for which reno-urinary involvement is a constant and primary feature. Furthermore, complex multiorgan disorders with a predisposition to malignancies or attributable to metabolic defects that involve both kidney and skin are briefly summarized.

  7. Autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of a Coffin-Siris like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonioli, E; Palmieri, A; Bertola, A; Bellini, C

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of a Coffin-Siris like syndrome: Coffin-Siris syndrome is a rare mental retardation/multiple congenital anomalies syndrome; so far its pattern of inheritance is under debate. We report a child affected by this syndrome, the pedigree of which is consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance.

  8. Churg-Strauss syndrome and hemorragic vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Moreira Marques

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS is a rare syndrome characterized by sinusitis, asthma and peripheral eosinophilia. This vasculitic syndrome affects medium and small-sized vessels, the lung being the most commonly affected organ, followed by the skin. The authors report a case of a 59-year-old male with a past history of asthma and allergic rhinitis. He presented necrohemorragic lesions in the distal phalanx of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers of the lefthand and petechial lesions in the plant of both feet, accompanied by asthenia, anorexia and weight loss. The analytical study revealed leukocytosis with eosinophilia, elevated inflammatory parameters and p-ANCA positive antibodies. The diagnosis of CSS was established based on clinical and histopathological data. Cutaneous manifestations of hemorragic vasculitis are rare in CSS syndrome but can be the first manifestation of the disease. The recognition of this presentation is important for the early diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome.

  9. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  10. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network...... of birth defect registries. Between January 1990 and December 2008, we identified 26 cases of Fraser syndrome in the monitored population of 12,886,464 births (minimal estimated prevalence of 0.20 per 100,000 or 1:495,633 births). Most cases (18/26; 69%) were registered in the western part of Europe, where...... was particularly high (42%). Most cases of Fraser syndrome (85%) are suspected prenatally, often due to the presence of the association of renal agenesis and cryptophthalmos. In the European population, a high proportion (82%) of pregnancies is terminated, thus reducing the live birth prevalence to a third...

  11. Dressler Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Ceylan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dressler Syndrome (DS is a febrile illness secondary to an inflammatory reaction involving the pleura and pericardium. It is more common in patients who have undergone surgery that involves opening the pericardium. However, DS has also been described following myocardial infarction and as an unusual complication after percutaneous procedures such as coronary stent implantation, after implantation of epicardial pacemaker leads and transvenous pacemaker leads, and following blunt trauma, stab wounds, and heart puncture. Pericardial effusions often accompany the syndrome and may develop into early or late postoperative cardiac tamponade and even recurrent cardiac tamponade. The syndrome is also characterized by pericardial or pleuritic pain, pleural effusions, pneumonitis, and abnormal ECG and radiography findings.

  12. BRUGADA SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Kostić

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1992, Brugada syndrom was introduced as a new clinical entity linking typical but variable ST segment changes in the right precordial leads to an increased vulnerability for lethal ventricular arrhythmias. The diagnosis of Brugada syndrome is based on clinical and electrocardiographic features. Recent studies illustrate the dynamic character of these ECG patterns. Whenever a large number of baseline ECGs was available during a follow-up, the diagnostic pattern could be documented only in approximately 25% of the tracings. Because the presence of the spontaneous coved type I ECG pattern is thought to be a useful predictor of future arrhythmic events in asymptomatic patients, these findings are of great clinical importance. ICD implantation is an option for the patients with Brugada syndrome and ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Extensive research is ongoing to find alternative pharmacological options for these patients, especially for patients in whom ICD implantation is contraindicated for various reasons.

  13. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    . In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human made disasters has become one of the focal point of affective knowledge production. These ‘more-than-humangeographies’ practices include notions of species, space and territory, and movement towards a new political ecology. This type...... of digital cartographies has been highlighted as the ‘processual turn’ in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism it can be seen as an interactive and iterative process of mapping complex and fragile ecological developments. This paper looks at computer-assisted cartography as part...

  14. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  15. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  16. Joubert Syndrome - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandichhode S. T.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Joubert syndrome is a very rare malformation.It is estimated to affect between 1 in 80,000and 1 in 100,000 newborns.Joubert syndromeis an autosomal recessive disorder marked byagenesis of cerebellar vermis, ataxia, hypoto-nia, oculomotor apraxia, neonatal breathingproblems and mental retardation.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Werner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States. This syndrome occurs more often in Japan, affecting 1 in 20,000 to 1 in ... Reviewed : December 2012 Published : March 6, 2018 The resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for ... of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  18. The Eaton-Lambert syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-02-26

    Feb 26, 1983 ... The Eaton-Lambert syndrome is a non-metastatic manifestation of oat-cell carcinoma of the bron- chus, although it has been reported in patients with carcinoma at other sites. The clinical picture is usually on~ of subacute muscular fatiguability with weakness and wasting affecting the proximal parts.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Laron syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feet. Adults with this condition tend to develop obesity. However, the signs and symptoms of Laron syndrome vary, even among affected members of the same family. Studies suggest that people with Laron ... relatives, despite having obesity (a risk factor for both cancer and type ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Yao syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than half of affected individuals. Dry eyes and dry mouth (described as "sicca-like" symptoms, which refers to dryness) are reported in about half of people with this disease. Other potential signs and symptoms of Yao syndrome include mouth sores, chest pain, and enlargement of ...

  1. Overweight in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Haugen, A G; Glintborg, D

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in premenopausal women affecting 5-10%. Nearly 50% are overweight or obese, which result in a more severe phenotype of PCOS. Weight loss is therefore considered the first line treatment in overweight women with PCOS...

  2. Eagle syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, Deepika; Gothi, Rajesh; Rajan, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Eagle syndrome occurs due to elongation of the styloid process or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which then may produce a pain sensation due the pressure exerted on various structures in the head and neck. When suspected, imaging helps in identifying the abnormally elongated styloid process or the calcified ligament. In recent years, three-dimensional CT (3DCT) has proved to be valuable in these cases. We report the case of a 62-year-old man with this syndrome in whom imaging with 3DCT conclusively established the diagnosis

  3. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  4. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  5. Rapunzel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Wadan, Ali H.; Al-Saai, Azan S.; Abdoulgafour, Mohamed; Al-Absi, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    An 18-year-old single female patient, presented with non specific gastrointestinal symptoms of anorexia, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habit. Clinically she was anemic, cachectic, and depressed. Abdominal examination revealed mobile epigastric mass. The scalp alopecia and endoscopy coupled by computed tomography scan, confirmed the diagnoses of trichobezoar, but it was not diagnosed as Rapunzel syndrome except after laparotomy, gastrotomy, and enterotomy. There are less than 16 cases of Rapunzel syndrome described worldwide, and this is the first case to be described in the middle east. (author)

  6. Fenton's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimondi, E.; Albasini, V.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report two recent cases of Fenton's syndrome, a very rare carpal fracture-dislocation. After some anatomophysiopathological considerations and a review of the literature, a wider nosographic frame is proposed in which the entity of the dislocation of the head of capitate bone is not essential. According to both the literature and personal findings, the authors remark that this syndrome is always found in the presence of two morphological variants of the distal radioulnar joint. Finally, the authors stress the importance of a corect diagnosis of this lesion to avoid unnecessary attempts of reduction

  7. Morbihan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  8. Lemierre's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, J.; Garcia, J.

    1999-01-01

    Postanginal sepsis, or Lemierre's syndrome, is rare but with life-threatening potential involving mainly infants and adolescents. The morbidity or mortality is caused mainly by lack of knowledge of the syndrome. The 18-year-old boy described here developed a jugular thrombosis 7 days after an angina. Fusobacterium necrophorum was isolated from the culture of the excised jugular vein. Secondary embolism involved the lungs, associated with an iliac osteomyelitis and sacroiliitis. Computed tomography was used for diagnosis and follow-up. (orig.)

  9. Pregnancy outcome in a woman with prune belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, R Tyler; Garabedian, Matthew James; Wallerstein, Robert J

    2012-11-30

    Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital syndrome that primarily affects male fetuses. Affected men are universally infertile; however, there is a paucity of information published on the reproductive potential of affected women. Pregnancy outcomes in affected women have not been described in the literature. We describe the case of pregnancy in an affected woman. Her pregnancy progressed without complication. Her fetus had no stigmata of the syndrome. Her labour and delivery were, however, complicated by a prolonged second stage of labour and need for vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery.

  10. Autosomal dominant syndrome resembling Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Maureen A; Milunsky, Jeff M

    2006-06-15

    Coffin-Siris syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome with phenotypic variability [OMIM 135900]. The diagnosis is based solely on clinical findings, as there is currently no molecular, biochemical, or cytogenetic analysis available to confirm a diagnosis. Although typically described as an autosomal recessive disorder, autosomal dominant inheritance has also been infrequently reported. We describe a mother and her two daughters who all have features that resemble Coffin-Siris syndrome. However, this is not a completely convincing diagnosis given that hypertelorism is not a feature of Coffin-Siris syndrome and the family is relatively mildly affected. Yet, this family provides further evidence of an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance for a likely variant of Coffin-Siris syndrome (at least in some families). In addition, Sibling 1 had premature thelarche. She is the second reported individual within the spectrum of Coffin-Siris syndrome to have premature thelarche, indicating that it may be a rare clinical feature. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  12. Mediators of the Association of Major Depressive Syndrome and Anxiety Syndrome with Postpartum Smoking Relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Fernandez, Virmarie; Ji, Lingyun; Castro, Yessenia; Heppner, Whitney L.; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin; Costello, Tracy J.; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Velasquez, Mary M.; Greisinger, Anthony; Cinciripini, Paul M.; Wetter, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Based on conceptual models of addiction and affect regulation, this study examined the mechanisms linking current major depressive syndrome (MDS) and anxiety syndrome (AS) to postpartum smoking relapse. Method: Data were collected in a randomized clinical trial from 251 women who quit smoking during pregnancy. Simple and multiple…

  13. Dilemmas in counselling females with the fragile X syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.B.A. de Vries (Bert); H.M. van den Boer-van den Berg; M.F. Niermeijer (Martinus); A. Tibben (Arend)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe dilemmas in counselling a mildly retarded female with the fragile X syndrome and her retarded partner are presented. The fragile X syndrome is an X linked mental retardation disorder that affects males and, often less severely, females. Affected females

  14. Obstetric aspects of the Prader-Willi syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fong, B.F.; de Vries, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex, multisystem disorder. The syndrome affects the central nervous system, with a predilection for the hypothalamus. The clinical picture in PWS is very variable, and depends on the age of the affected child. Frequently, the most prominent features such as

  15. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  16. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  17. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but can be reduced by anticonvulsant drugs. A ketogenic diet, high in fats and low in carbohydrates, also may be beneficial. View Full Treatment Information Definition Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  18. Kartagener's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, D K; Ganguly, K C; Alam, S; Hossain, A; Sarker, U K; Das, B K; Haque, M J

    2009-01-01

    Kartagener's Syndrome or Immotile Cilia Syndrome, a variant of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by defect in the tiny hair like structure, the cilia lining the respiratory tract (upper and lower), sinuses, eustachian tubes, middle ear and fallopian tubes. Here electron microscopy shows abnormal arrangement of ciliary tubules and patients with Kartagener's syndrome has an absence of dynein arms at the base of the cilia. The inability of cilia to move results in inadequate clearance of bacteria from the air passages, resulting in an increased risk of infection and causing bronchiectasis. Another result of ciliary immobility is infertility. A 60 years old lady was diagnosed as a case of Kartagener's syndrome. She had history of chronic cough for 20 years, irregular fever for 20 years and occasional shortness of breath for 5 years. Relevant investigations revealed dextrocardia, situs inversus, bilateral maxillary sinusitis with non pneumatised frontal sinus and bronchiectasis. She was treated with low concentration oxygen inhalation, antibiotic, bronchodilator, chest physiotherapy including postural drainage, vitamins and other supportive treatment.

  19. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    , liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated...

  20. Goldenhar syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operational on the derivatives of the first and second bran- chial arches and clefts before the end of the organogenetic period (7'h or 8'h week of embryonic life)? ..... Marshman WE, Schalit G, Jones RB, Lee JP, Mathews TD and McCabe S: Congenital anomalies in patients with Duane retraction syndrome and their relatives.

  1. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  2. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  3. Metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/pubmed/26718656 . Ruderman NB, Shulman GI. Metabolic syndrome. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 43. Review ... NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more Health ...

  4. Stickler Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tongue to drop back toward the throat. Blindness. Blindness can occur if retinal detachments aren't repaired promptly. Ear infections. Children with facial structure abnormalities associated with Stickler syndrome are more likely to develop ear infections than are children with normal facial ...

  5. Gorlin syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    develop medulloblastomas and are treated with radiation, it is mandatory that they be monitored for the development of BCCs in the radiation field. Management of a patient or family with this syndrome should include genetic counselling and neurological evaluations to detect medulloblastoma until the age of 7, after which ...

  6. Kartagener's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    presenting with recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections, sinusitis or bronchiectasis. Inability to diagnose this condition may subject the patient to unnecessary and repeated hospital admissions, investigations and treatment failure. KEY WORDS: Kartagener's syndrome, primary cilliary dyskinesia, situs inversus, ...

  7. Kounis syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kounis syndrome is charac terised by a group of symp toms that manifest as unsta ble vasospastic or nonvaso spastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction.[1] It was first described by. Kounis and Zavras in 1991[2] as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and ...

  8. Burnout syndrome among dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Juliana Alvares Duarte Bonini; Jordani, Paula Cristina; Zucoloto, Miriane Lucindo; Bonafé, Fernanda Salloume Sampaio; Maroco, João

    2012-03-01

    The burnout syndrome is characterized by professional exhaustion and has been reported in college students. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of Burnout Syndrome among dentistry students from a public university, and its relationship to socio-demographic characteristics. All students (n = 300) were invited to participate. We used the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Version (MBI-SS). We carried out an analysis of the MBI-SS' psychometric properties. Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was performed, followed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post-hoc tests to compare the mean scores of burnout dimensions. Of the 235 participants, 72.8% were women and the mean age was 21.0 ± 1.8 years. The MBI-SS was reliable and valid. Of the students, 17.0% had Burnout Syndrome. There was a significant relation between Burnout Syndrome and a student's performance during the course (F = 4.433, p students most affected were those with poor performance, those who took medication because of studies, and those with thoughts of dropping the course. We concluded that the prevalence of the syndrome among dentistry students was high, with a significant relation between the syndrome and a student's academic performance, use of medication because of studies, and thoughts of dropping the course.

  9. Neurologic manifestations of Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibert, Ronald L; Larson, Anna M; Hsieh, David T; Raby, Annabel R; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2013-04-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by the loss or reduction of the ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A enzyme. Angelman syndrome results from a deletion or mutation of the maternally inherited 15q11.2-13.1 region, paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15, or an imprinting error. Epilepsy is common and may present with multiple seizure types, including nonconvulsive status epilepticus. Seizures are often intractable and typically require broad-spectrum antiepileptic medications. Dietary therapy has also proved successful in Angelman syndrome. Electroencephalographic patterns include notched δ and rhythmic θ activity and epileptiform discharges. Sleep disorders are also common, often characterized by abnormal sleep-wake cycles. Movement disorders are nearly universal in Angelman syndrome, most frequently presenting with ataxia and tremor. Neurocognitive impairment is always present to varying degrees, and expressive speech is typically severely affected. Individuals with Angelman syndrome often manifest psychiatric comorbidities including hyperactivity, anxiety, and challenging behaviors such as aggression and self-injury. We focus on a comprehensive whole-child approach to the diagnosis and long-term clinical care of individuals with Angelman syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome type IV: a multi-exon deletion in one of the two COL3A1 alleles affecting structure, stability, and processing of type III procollagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Superti-Furga, A.; Gugler, E.; Gitzelmann, R.; Steinmann, B.

    1988-05-05

    The authors have studied a patient with severe, dominantly inherited Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. The results indicate that this patient carries a deletion of 3.3 kilobase pairs in the triple helical coding domain of one of the two alleles for the pro-..cap alpha..-chains of type III collagen (COL3A1). His cultured skin fibroblasts contain equal amounts of normal length mRNA and of mRNA shortened by approximately 600 bases, and synthesize both normal and shortened pro-..cap alpha..1(III)-chains. In procollagen molecules containing one or more shortened chains, a triple helix is formed with a length of only about 780 amino acids. The mutant procollagen molecules have decreased thermal stability, are less efficiently secreted, and are not processed as their normal counterpart. The deletion in this family is the first mutation to be described in COL3A1.

  11. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...... experienced the symptoms for at least 6 weeks in the absence of any confusable diseases that may give rise to the symptoms. Symptoms compatible with the diagnosis are now thought to affect up to 3% of the female population in the United States with a 5:1 female-to-male preponderance. Diagnosis and treatment...

  12. Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome in an Adult Woman: A Hidden Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Spinelli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers–Danlos syndrome is a rare disease and a diagnostic challenge. This case report serves to remind the clinician that it is important to identify all affected patients in order to prevent complications.

  13. Hepatorenal syndrome: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tércio Genzini

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is the development of renal failure in patients with chronic previous liver disease, without clinical or laboratory evidence of previous kidney disease. It affects up to 18% of cirrhotic patients with ascites during the first year of follow-up, reaching 39% in five years and presenting a survival of about two weeks after its establishment. HRS diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory data. The occurrence of this syndrome is related to the mechanism for ascites development, involving vasoconstriction, low renal perfusion, water and sodium retention, increased plasma volume, and consequent overflow at the splanchnic level. Renal vasoactive mediators like endothelin 1, thromboxane A2, and leukotrienes are also involved in the genesis of this syndrome, which culminates in functional renal insufficiency. The treatment of choice can be pharmacological or surgical, although liver transplantation is the only permanent and effective treatment, with a four-year survival rate of up to 60%. Liver function recovery is usually followed by renal failure reversion. Early diagnosis and timely therapeutics can increase life expectancy for these patients while they are waiting for liver transplantation as a definitive treatment.

  14. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Marfan Syndrome KidsHealth / For Teens / Marfan Syndrome What's in this ... a genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, the ...

  15. The Source for Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  16. A survey of metabolic syndrome in first-degree relatives (fathers) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-01

    fathers). 98. 2013 Volume 18 No 2. JEMDSA. Introduction. One of the most common disorders that affects women is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). The classic form of this syndrome includes amenorrhoea, anovulation,.

  17. Mycosis Fungoides (Including Sézary Syndrome) Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome are neoplasias of malignant T lymphocytes that affect the skin. Learn about the clinical presentation, prognosis, staging, and treatment for mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome in this expert-reviewed summary.

  18. Alexithymia, Emotion Perception, and Social Assertiveness in Adult Women with Noonan and Turner Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, R.L.; Wingbermühle, P.A.M.; Freriks, K.; Verhaak, C.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and Turner syndrome (TS) are associated with cognitive problems and difficulties in affective information processing. While both phenotypes include short stature, facial dysmorphisms, and a webbed neck, genetic etiology and neuropsychological phenotype differ significantly. The

  19. Alexithymia, emotion perception, and social assertiveness in adult women with Noonan and Turner syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, R.L.; Wingbermühle, P.A.M.; Freriks, K.; Verhaak, C.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and Turner syndrome (TS) are associated with cognitive problems and difficulties in affective information processing. While both phenotypes include short stature, facial dysmorphisms, and a webbed neck, genetic etiology and neuropsychological phenotype differ significantly. The

  20. Genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis in Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicardi syndrome is characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum, chorioretinal lacunae, severe seizures (starting as infantile spasms), neuronal migration defects, mental retardation, costovertebral defects, and typical facial features. Because Aicardi syndrome is sporadic and affects only fem...

  1. Phantom breast syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom breast syndrome is a type of condition in which patients have a sensation of residual breast tissue and can include both non-painful sensations as well as phantom breast pain. The incidence varies in different studies, ranging from approximately 30% to as high as 80% of patients after mastectomy. It seriously affects quality of life through the combined impact of physical disability and emotional distress. The breast cancer incidence rate in India as well as Western countries has risen in recent years while survival rates have improved; this has effectively increased the number of women for whom post-treatment quality of life is important. In this context, chronic pain following treatment for breast cancer surgery is a significantly under-recognized and under-treated problem. Various types of chronic neuropathic pain may arise following breast cancer surgery due to surgical trauma. The cause of these syndromes is damage to various nerves during surgery. There are a number of assumed factors causing or perpetuating persistent neuropathic pain after breast cancer surgery. Most well-established risk factors for developing phantom breast pain and other related neuropathic pain syndromes are severe acute postoperative pain and greater postoperative use of analgesics. Based upon current evidence, the goals of prophylactic strategies could first target optimal peri-operative pain control and minimizing damage to nerves during surgery. There is some evidence that chronic pain and sensory abnormalities do decrease over time. The main group of oral medications studied includes anti-depressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, N-methyl-D-asparate receptor antagonists, mexilitine, topical lidocaine, cannabinoids, topical capsaicin and glysine antagonists. Neuromodulation techniques such as motor cortex stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and intrathecal drug therapies have been used to treat various neuropathic pain syndromes.

  2. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  3. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is functional renal failure that occurs with advanced liver failure. HRS is considered the most severe complication of cirrhosis. Type 1 HRS develops due to severe reduction of effective circulating volume results in hemodynamic dysfunction. Type 1 HRS is characterized by acute renal failure and rapid deterioration in the function of other organs. It can ocur spontaneously or in the setting of a precipitating event. Type 2 hepatorenal syndrome (HRS, which is characterized by slowly progressive renal failure and refractory ascites. Liver transplantation is the only definitive treatment for both type. The most suitable and ldquo;bridge treatments and rdquo; or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 106-113

  4. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  5. Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farruggia, Piero; Di Marco, Floriana; Dufour, Carlo

    2018-03-01

    Pearson syndrome (PS) is a sporadic and very rare syndrome classically associated with single large-scale deletions of mitochondrial DNA and characterized by refractory sideroblastic anemia during infancy. Areas covered: This review presents an analysis and interpretation of the published data that forms the basis for our understanding of PS. PubMed, Google Scholarand Thompson ISI Web of Knowledge were searched for relevant data. Expert commentary: PS is a very rare mitochodrial disease that involves different organs and systems. Clinical phenotype is extremely variable and may change over the course of disease itself with the possibility both of worsenings and improvements. Outcome is invariably lethal and at the moment no cure is available. Accurate supportive treatment and follow up program in centres with experience in mitochondrial diseases and marrow failure may positively influence quality and duration of life.

  6. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Ricard

    2017-03-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the development of venous and/or arterial thromboses, often multiple, and pregnancy morbidity (mainly, recurrent fetal losses), in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Some estimates indicate that the incidence of the APS is around 5 new cases per 100,000 persons per year and the prevalence around 40-50 cases per 100,000 persons. The aPL are positive in approximately 13% of patients with stroke, 11% with myocardial infarction, 9.5% of patients with deep vein thrombosis and 6% of patients with pregnancy morbidity. Currently, there is consensus in treating APS patients with thrombosis with long-term oral anticoagulation and to prevent obstetric manifestations with the use of aspirin and heparin. This review summarizes the main knowledge on the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  8. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  9. Asperger Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Friedlander, Robin

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Asperger syndrome (AS) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder of social interaction, communication, and a restricted range of behaviors or interests. Although not generally associated with intellectual disability, the severe social disability and, in many cases, associated mental health and other medical problems, result in disability throughout life. The diagnosis is often delayed, sometimes into adulthood, which is unfortunate because there are now a range...

  10. Brain fag syndrome: a culture-bound syndrome that may be approaching extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayonrinde, Oyedeji A; Obuaya, Chiedu; Adeyemi, Solomon Olusola

    2015-08-01

    Aims and method To explore the current salience of 'brain fag' as a nosological, diagnostic and clinical construct in modern West African psychiatry. A semi-structured questionnaire and vignette based on classical symptoms of brain fag syndrome were used to explore current knowledge, explanatory models and practice among Nigerian psychiatrists. Results Of 102 psychiatrists who responded, 98% recognised the term 'brain fag syndrome' and most recognised the scenario presented. However, only 22% made a diagnosis of brain fag syndrome in their practice preferring diagnoses of anxiety, affective and somatic disorders. Clinical implications A decreasing number of Nigerian psychiatrists are making a diagnosis of 'brain fag syndrome'. We found strong evidence of nosological and diagnostic decline in the syndrome in its place of birth. This may signal the early extinction of this disorder or nosological metamorphosis from a 'culture-bound' syndrome in West African psychiatric practice.

  11. Hybrid management of Paget-Schroetter syndrome due to thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Villari, Simona; Squillaci, Domenico; Spinelli, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Paget-Schroetter syndrome due to thoracic outlet syndrome is a rare but potentially disabling condition that generally affects young patients otherwise healthy. The prompt diagnosis and treatment of Paget-Schroetter syndrome is necessary to avoid major morbidity and long-term disability. The more modern treatment paradigm reported in the current literature consists of hybrid procedures with surgical decompression of the thoracic outlet and endovascular techniques to potentially improve long-term vein patency. However, there seems to be no consensus in the literature with regard to the timing and precise nature of active management, and there is presently no agreed protocol for the optimum management of Paget-Schroetter syndrome. Controversy exists partly because no randomised controlled studies are present in literature. We present a case of Paget-Schroetter syndrome due to thoracic outlet syndrome in a young male patient submitted to a multimodal procedure.

  12. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... celiac disease. 5 Is Turner syndrome considered a disability? Turner syndrome is not considered a disability, although ... girls with Turner syndrome have difficulty with arithmetic, visual memory, and visio-spatial skills (such as determining ...

  13. Basal cell nevus syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nevus syndrome Basal cell nevus syndrome - face References Evans DG, Farndon PA. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. ... A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among ...

  14. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it? Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Rett syndrome? Most cases of Rett syndrome are ... in the MECP2 gene represent the most prevalent causes of Rett syndrome. The development and severity of ...

  15. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  16. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  17. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Syndrome identification based on 2D analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Stefan; Vollmar, Tobias; Tasse, Christiane; Wurtz, Rolf P; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Wieczorek, Dagmar

    2006-10-01

    Clinical evaluation of children with developmental delay continues to present a challenge to the clinicians. In many cases, the face provides important information to diagnose a condition. However, database support with respect to facial traits is limited at present. Computer-based analyses of 2D and 3D representations of faces have been developed, but it is unclear how well a larger number of conditions can be handled by such systems. We have therefore analysed 2D pictures of patients each being affected with one of 10 syndromes (fragile X syndrome; Cornelia de Lange syndrome; Williams-Beuren syndrome; Prader-Willi syndrome; Mucopolysaccharidosis type III; Cri-du-chat syndrome; Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome; Sotos syndrome; Microdeletion 22q11.2; Noonan syndrome). We can show that a classification accuracy of >75% can be achieved for a computer-based diagnosis among the 10 syndromes, which is about the same accuracy achieved for five syndromes in a previous study. Pairwise discrimination of syndromes ranges from 80 to 99%. Furthermore, we can demonstrate that the criteria used by the computer decisions match clinical observations in many cases. These findings indicate that computer-based picture analysis might be a helpful addition to existing database systems, which are meant to assist in syndrome diagnosis, especially as data acquisition is straightforward and involves off-the-shelf digital camera equipment.

  19. Juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome. Interdisciplinary treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Siuchnińska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM belongs to soft tissue pain syndromes of unknown cause, also referred to as “soft tissue rheumatism”. It is characterized by chronic widespread pain as well as additional symptoms such as fatigue, sleep and mood disturbance and cognitive problems. There is more and more data showing that this condition may start at a young age or even in childhood, adversely affecting development processes and resulting in dysfunctional social and family relationships. Because of the multifaceted character of fibromyalgia the efficient treatment of this disorder can be difficult and requires comprehensive care. This work reviews most recommended procedures used in integrated treatment programmes for juvenile fibromyalgia syndrome (JFM.

  20. Update on antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Remião Ugolini Lopes

    Full Text Available Summary Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. Most APS events are directly related to thrombotic events, which may affect small, medium or large vessels. Other clinical features like thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, cardiac valve disease, cognitive dysfunction and skin ulcers (called non-criteria manifestations add significant morbidity to this syndrome and represent clinical situations that are challenging. APS was initially described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE but it can occur in patients without any other autoimmune disease. Despite the autoimmune nature of this syndrome, APS treatment is still based on anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.

  1. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellis-van Creveld syndrome also known as chondroectodermal dysplasia is a rare genetic disorder of the skeletal dysplasia type, first described by Richard WS Ellis and Simon van Creveld in 1940. The syndrome manifests with several skeletal anomalies, oral mucosal and dental anomalies, congenital cardiac defects, nail dysplasia and polydactyly of one or both limbs. It is caused by mutation of EVC1 and EVC2 genes located in a head-to-head configuration on chromosome 4p16, which has been identified as the causative. The EVC phenotype is variable and affects multiple organs. The presence of oral mucosal and dental alterations, like the presence of numerous frenulum, oligodontia, bellshaped anterior teeth, hypoplastic erupted teeth with high-caries index, will confirm the diagnosis of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and hence its importance to dentists.

  2. Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Daleth

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The blue rubber nevus syndrome consists of multiple venous malformations in the skin and gastrointestinal tract associated with intestinal hemorrhage and iron deficiency anemia. Other organs may be involved. The causes of this syndrome are unknown. Its most common presentation is in the form of sporadic cases, but dominant autosomal inheritance has been described. It is a condition that affects both sexes equally, and its occurrence is rare in the black race. We present a case of this syndrome diagnosed in a 11-year-old patient. He had severe anemia and a venous swelling on the trunk. Similar lesions were found in the stomach, bowel, and on his foot. We emphasize the main clinical aspects: intestine, eyes, nasopharynx, parotids, lungs, liver, spleen, heart, brain, pleura, peritoneum, pericardium, skeletal muscles, bladder, and penis lesions, systemic complications that may occur to these patients which are thrombosis and calcification, as well as consumptive coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia that may occur within the nevi.

  3. McCune-Albright syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Payer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is a very rare disease characterizedby the triad of bone defects, skin hyperpigmentation, andvarious types of endocrine and non-endocrine manifestations. Itfalls into the category of sporadic genetic disorders and its exactincidence is unknown. In its more severe forms, the disease manifestsitself already in early childhood and can gradually affectmore and more organs throughout life. The extent and degree ofinvolvement of affected tissues are heterogeneous due to themosaicism of the genetic mutation. The disease is the subject ofextensive research and new pathogenetic mechanisms are beingelucidated, leading to new diagnostic and therapeutic choices. Inaddition, the authors present a case report of an adult femalepatient with McCune-Albright syndrome. The clinical picture isdominated by bone involvement, thyroid hyperfunction and persistenthyperestrogenism. The case report underlines the fact thatmanagement of patients with McCune-Albright syndrome continuesto be a challenge.

  4. Congenital Leukemia in Down's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, W.; Khan, F.; Muzaffar, M.; Khan, U. A.; Rehman, M. U.; Khan, M. A.; Bari, A.

    2006-01-01

    Congenital Leukemia is a condition and often associated with fatal outcome/sup 1/. Most of the neonatal cases reported have acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia, in contrast to the predominance of acute lymphoblastic leukemia found in later childhood. congenital leukemia is occasionally associated with number of congenital anomalies and with chromosomal disorders such as Down's syndrome. Subtle cytogenetic abnormalities may occur more commonly in the affected infants and their parents, when studied with newer cytogenetic techniques/sup 2/. Inherent unstable hematopoieses resulting from chromosomal aberration in children with Downs's syndrome can present with transient myeloproliferative disorder, mimicking leukemia which undergoes spontaneous recovery/sup 3/. Only few cases of congenital leukemia with Downs syndrome, presented as congenital leukemia. (author)

  5. 76 FR 66006 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Congenital Disorders That Affect Multiple Body Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... catastrophic congenital disorders, such as anencephaly, cyclopia, chromosome 13 trisomy (Patau syndrome or... existence of non-mosaic Down syndrome and other congenital disorders that affect multiple body systems under... and childhood listing 110.06 for non-mosaic Down syndrome; and Make editorial changes in childhood...

  6. [Platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Gaston, Osvaldo D

    2005-01-01

    Platypnea-orthodeoxia is an uncommon syndrome of dyspnea and hypoxemia induced by upright posture, which is subsequently relieved by recumbency. Traditionally, this condition has been reported in association with pulmonary, hepatic and cardiac diseases, but the mechanism is different in each situation. In presence of an atrial septal defect, a right to left cardiac shunt resulting as a consequence of redirection of the inferior vena cava flow towards the atrial septum and results in postural hypoxemia. In pulmonary shunts, as in hepatopulmonary syndrome and a-v pulmonary fistulas, the mechanism of hypoxemia is related to the preferential circulation to basal areas of both lungs in the upright position. On the other hand, lung diseases affecting basal areas and increasing the alveolar pressure are related to the development of parenchimal pulmonary shunts with hypoxemia during postural changes, since the dead space, the functional shunt and the hypoxic vascular pulmonary constriction are affected. The autonomic neuropathy may attenuate normal sympathetic vasoconstrictor responses during postural changes, resulting in ventilation-perfusion mismatching and hypoxemia. Clinical and therapeutic aspects of this sindrome are provided.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Antiphospholipid syndrome Antiphospholipid syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... area? Other Names for This Condition anti-phospholipid syndrome antiphospholipid antibody syndrome Hughes syndrome Related Information How are ...

  8. Rumination Syndrome and Dental Erosions in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monagas, Javier; Ritwik, Priyanshi; Kolomensky, Andrew; Acosta, Julio; Kay, Danielle; Clendaniel, Lindsey; Hyman, Paul E

    2017-06-01

    Rumination syndrome is the effortless regurgitation of recently ingested food with subsequent reswallowing or spitting out. Dental erosion (DE) affects 2% to 5% of the population. DE is defined as loss of tooth structure by a chemical process that does not involve bacteria. Our objective was to compare the frequency of DE among children with rumination syndrome with healthy controls. We enrolled 30 patients 4 to 21 years of age diagnosed with rumination syndrome, and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. Patients were evaluated by pediatric dentists for presence of DE with Taji et al a validated grading system. Patients with rumination were more likely to have DE (P syndrome, 23 (77%) had DE, compared with 4 (13%) control subjects. DEs are more frequent in patients with rumination syndrome.

  9. Burnout Syndrome among Social Workers Working with Handicapped People

    OpenAIRE

    ŠVÁBKOVÁ, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    In my bachelor work I focus on the burnout syndrome among medics who work with disabled people. The aim of my work is to find out the amount of medics affected by this syndrome. I concentrate on this amount and try to answer whether the burnout syndrome affected more medics or people who work in the social care. My work is divided into two parts theoretical and practical. In the theoretical part I give basic introduction to the problematic of the burnout syndrome, its causes, history and stag...

  10. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  11. Higher Total Protein Intake and Change in Total Protein Intake Affect Body Composition but Not Metabolic Syndrome Indexes in Middle-Aged Overweight and Obese Adults Who Perform Resistance and Aerobic Exercise for 36 Weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Wayne W; Kim, Jung Eun; Amankwaah, Akua F; Gordon, Susannah L; Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M

    2015-09-01

    Studies assessing the effects of protein supplementation on changes in body composition (BC) and health rarely consider the impact of total protein intake (TPro) or the change in TPro (CTPro) from participants' usual diets. This secondary data analysis assessed the impact of TPro and CTPro on changes in BC and metabolic syndrome (MetS) indexes in overweight and obese middle-aged adults who participated in an exercise training program. Men and women [n = 117; age: 50 ± 0.7 y, body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)): 30.1 ± 0.3; means ± SEs] performed resistance exercise 2 d/wk and aerobic exercise 1 d/wk and consumed an unrestricted diet along with 200-kcal supplements (0, 10, 20, or 30 g whey protein) twice daily for 36 wk. Protein intake was assessed via 4-d food records. Multiple linear regression model and stratified analysis were applied for data analyses. Among all subjects, TPro and CTPro were inversely associated (P changes in body mass, fat mass (FM), and BMI. Changes in BC were different (P changes in FM, %FM, and %LM. The gain in LM was not different among groups. In addition, MetS indexes were not influenced by TPro and CTPro. In conjunction with exercise training, higher TPro promoted positive changes in BC but not in MetS indexes in overweight and obese middle-aged adults. Changes in TPro from before to during the intervention also influenced BC responses and should be considered in future research when different TPro is achieved via diet or supplements. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00812409. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Bone health in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hoyos, Marta; Riancho, José Antonio; Valero, Carmen

    2017-07-21

    Patients with Down syndrome have a number of risk factors that theoretically could predispose them to osteoporosis, such as early aging, development disorders, reduced physical activity, limited sun exposure, frequent comorbidities and use of drug therapies which could affect bone metabolism. In addition, the bone mass of these people may be affected by their anthropometric and body composition peculiarities. In general terms, studies in adults with Down syndrome reported that these people have lower areal bone mineral density (g/cm 2 ) than the general population. However, most of them have not taken the smaller bone size of people with Down syndrome into account. In fact, when body mineral density is adjusted by bone size and we obtain volumetric body mineral density (g/cm 3 ), the difference between both populations disappears. On the other hand, although people with Down syndrome have risk factor of hypovitaminosis D, the results of studies regarding 25(OH)D in this population are not clear. Likewise, the studies about biochemical bone markers or the prevalence of fractures are not conclusive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Susan K; Gaarder, Stephen M

    2005-12-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome affects 10 to 15 percent of the U.S. population to some degree. This condition is defined as abdominal pain and discomfort with altered bowel habits in the absence of any other mechanical, inflammatory, or biochemical explanation for these symptoms. Irritable bowel syndrome is more likely to affect women than men and is most common in patients 30 to 50 years of age. Symptoms are improved equally by diets supplemented with fiber or hydrolyzed guar gum, but more patients prefer hydrolyzed guar gum. Antispasmodic agents may be used as needed, but anticholinergic and other side effects limit their use in some patients. Loperamide is an option for treatment of moderately severe diarrhea. Antidepressants have been shown to relieve pain and may be effective in low doses. Trials using alosetron showed a clinically significant, although modest, gain over placebo, but it is indicated only for women with severe diarrhea-predominant symptoms or for those in whom conventional treatment has failed. Tegaserod has an advantage over placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome; it is indicated for up to 12 weeks of treatment in women. However, postmarketing reports of severe diarrhea and ischemic colitis further limit its use. Herbal therapies such as peppermint oil also may be effective in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Therapies should focus on specific gastrointestinal dysfunctions (e.g., constipation, diarrhea, pain), and medications only should be used when nonprescription remedies do not work or when symptoms are severe.

  14. Living with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Berglund, Britta

    2003-01-01

    This thesis focuses on how individuals with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), an inherited connective-tissue disorder, experience and describe their daily lives with focus on physical and psychosocial problems. The syndrome primarily affects the skin, ligaments, joints and blood vessels and the symptoms in EDS vary from mild to more severe forms. Individuals with EDS were recruited via the Swedish National EDS Association. Paper (I). The aim was to explore how individuals wi...

  15. Case series on tropical diabetic hand syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeani, I U; Edo, A E

    2014-01-01

    Tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a term used to describe diabetes complication of the hand affecting people in the tropics. It consists of localized cellulitis with variable swelling and ulceration of the hands, progressive, fulminant hand sepsis and gangrene in extreme cases. This syndrome is not well-recognized and is therefore less frequently reported. The authors describe three different female patients who were known diabetics of varying duration presenting with this syndrome at our tertiary health center and who were successfully managed by both the surgical and medical units. The need for early diagnosis and aggressive management is emphasized.

  16. Confounders of vasovagal syncope: postural tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwazue, Victor C; Raj, Satish R

    2013-02-01

    Most patients who present to a cardiologist with syncope have vasovagal (reflex) syncope. A busy syncope practice often also sees patients with postural tachycardia syndrome, often presenting with severe recurrent presyncope. Recognition of this syncope confounder might be difficult without adequate knowledge of their presentation, and this can adversely affect optimal management. Postural tachycardia syndrome can often be differentiated from vasovagal syncope by its hemodynamic pattern during tilt table test and differing clinical characteristics. This article reviews the presentation of postural tachycardia syndrome and its putative pathophysiology and presents an approach to nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties......, leading to death by 12 years of age on average. It is an autosomal recessive disorder, with a prevalence of approximately 2.5 per million. There are several phenotypes (1-3) and two complementation groups (CSA and CSB), and CS overlaps with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). It has been considered a progeria...

  18. [Dependency syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorisalo, Sailaritta

    2013-01-01

    The most common causes of lower limb edema include cardiac insufficiency, venous insufficiency, insufficiency of lymph flow, and side effects of drugs. It can also be due to dependency syndrome, in which the edema and skin changes can only be explained by a passive calf muscle pump and the resulting venous hypertension. Underlying the drop foot is always immobilization for one reason or other. The patient must be given an explanation about the situation, activated to move if possible, and in any case guided to the use of support stockings and postural therapy.

  19. Eagle Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beytholahi JM

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Eagle's syndrome is characterized by an elongated styloid process and (or calcification of"nstylohyoid ligament besides clinical symptoms. The symptoms are those related to pain when"nswallowing or rotating the neck, headacke, earache, dizziness, intermittent glossitis, sensation of"nforeign body in pharynx and transient syncope. The case which is presented can be considered a very"nrare form of the disease in which complete calcification of the ligament and it's thickening has"noccured. Also there is little relationship between the severity of calcification and severity of symptoms."nA careful and thorough evaluation of each panoramic radiography is emphasized.

  20. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be