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Sample records for syndecan proteoglycan contributions

  1. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  2. Syndecan heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Angélica Maciel; Sinkeviciute, Dovile; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.

    2016-01-01

    discuss how, in partial catabolic processes, new roles for HSPGs emerge that affect cell behavior. Examples from tumor studies are emphasized, since HSPGs may be altered in composition and distribution and may also represent targets for the development of new therapeutics....... signaling can therefore be complex, but it is now known that syndecans are capable of independent signaling. This review is divided in two sections, and will first discuss how the assembly of heparan sulfate, the anabolic process, encodes information related to ligand binding and signaling. Second, we...

  3. Wnt Signaling Cascades and the Roles of Syndecan Proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pataki, Csilla A; Couchman, John R; Brábek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    /planar cell polarity and Wnt/calcium signaling. Syndecans are type I transmembrane proteoglycans with a long evolutionary history, being expressed in all Bilateria and in almost all cell types. Both Wnt pathways have been extensively studied over the past 30 years and shown to have roles during development...... and in a multitude of diseases. Although the first evidence for interactions between syndecans and Wnts dates back to 1997, the number of studies connecting these pathways is low, and many open questions remained unanswered. In this review, syndecan's involvement in Wnt signaling pathways as well as some...

  4. Molecular characterization of chicken syndecan-2 proteoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ligong; Couchman, John R; Smith, Jacqueline

    2002-01-01

    A partial syndecan-2 sequence (147 bp) was obtained from chicken embryonic fibroblast poly(A)+ RNA by reverse transcription-PCR. This partial sequence was used to produce a 5'-end-labelled probe. A chicken liver cDNA library was screened with this probe, and overlapping clones were obtained......Da. Western blotting of chicken embryonic fibroblast cell lysates with species-specific monoclonal antibody mAb 8.1 showed that chicken syndecan-2 is substituted with heparan sulphate, and that the major form of chicken syndecan-2 isolated from chicken fibroblasts is consistent with the formation of SDS......-resistant dimers, which is common for syndecans. A 5'-end-labelled probe hybridized to two mRNA species in chicken embryonic fibroblasts, while Northern analysis with poly(A)+ RNAs from different tissues of chicken embryos showed wide and distinct distributions of chicken syndecan-2 during embryonic development...

  5. Control of extracellular matrix assembly by syndecan-2 proteoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klass, C M; Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    2000-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and organization is maintained by transmembrane signaling and integrins play major roles. We now show that a second transmembrane component, syndecan-2 heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is pivotal in matrix assembly. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were stably...... to rearrange laminin or fibronectin substrates into fibrils and to bind exogenous fibronectin. Transfection of activated alphaIIbalphaLdeltabeta3 integrin into alpha(5)-deficient CHO B2 cells resulted in reestablishment of the previously lost fibronectin matrix. However, cotransfection of this cell line with S...

  6. Proteoglycans in health and disease: the multiple roles of syndecan shedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manon-Jensen, Tina; Itoh, Yoshifumi; Couchman, John R

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic processes in the extracellular matrix are a major influence on cell adhesion, migration, survival, differentiation and proliferation. The syndecan cell-surface proteoglycans are important mediators of cell spreading on extracellular matrix and respond to growth factors and other...

  7. Regulation of cytoskeletal organization by syndecan transmembrane proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    have recently suggested that signaling through core protein of syndecans can regulate cytoskeletal organization through their clustering, association with cytoskeletal structures, binding to cytoplasmic binding proteins, and intracellular phosphorylation. Here we will review current understanding...... of signaling through syndecans in cytoskeletal organization....

  8. Expression of the cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-2 in developing rat anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Syaidah, Rahimi; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Ramadhani, Dini; Jindatip, Depicha; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    In the anterior pituitary gland, folliculo-stellate cells and five types of hormone-producing cells are surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM) essential for these cells to perform their respective roles. Syndecans-type I transmembrane cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans act as major ECM coreceptors via their respective heparan sulfate chains and efficiently transduce intracellular signals through the convergent action of their transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The syndecans comprise four family members in vertebrates: syndecan-1, -2, -3 and -4. However, whether syndecans are produced in the pituitary gland or whether they have a role as a coreceptor is not known. We therefore used (1) reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction to analyze the expression of syndecan genes and (2) immunohistochemical techniques to identify the cells that produce the syndecans in the anterior pituitary gland of adult rat. Syndecan-2 mRNA expression was clearly detected in the corticotropes of the anterior pituitary gland. Moreover, the expression of syndecan-2 in the developing pituitary gland had a distinct temporospatial pattern. To identify the cells expressing syndecan-2 in the developing pituitary gland, we used double-immunohistochemistry for syndecan-2 and the cell markers E-cadherin (immature cells) and Ki-67 (proliferating cells). Some E-cadherin- and Ki-67-immunopositive cells expressed syndecan-2. Therefore, syndecan-2 expression occurs in developmentally regulated patterns and syndecan-2 probably has different roles in adult and developing anterior pituitary glands.

  9. Localization of the transmembrane proteoglycan syndecan-4 and its regulatory kinases in costameres of rat cardiomyocytes: a deconvolution microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanWinkle, W Barry; Snuggs, Mark B; De Hostos, Eugenio L

    2002-01-01

    Syndecan-4 (syn-4), a transmembrane heparan sulfate-containing proteoglycan, is unique among the four members of the syndecan family in its specific cellular localization to complex cytoskeletal adhesion sites, i.e., focal adhesions. During early phenotypic redifferentiation of neonatal cardiomyo...

  10. Syndecans in heart fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde, Ida G; Herum, Kate M; Carlson, Cathrine C; Christensen, Geir

    2016-09-01

    Heart disease is a deadly syndrome affecting millions worldwide. It reflects an unmet clinical need, and the disease mechanisms are poorly understood. Cardiac fibrosis is central to heart disease. The four-membered family of transmembrane proteoglycans, syndecan-1 to -4, is believed to regulate fibrosis. We review the current literature concerning syndecans in cardiac fibrosis. Syndecan expression is up-regulated in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli in various forms of heart disease with fibrosis. Mice lacking syndecan-1 and -4 show reduced activation of pro-fibrotic signaling and increased cardiac rupture upon infarction indicating an important role for these molecules. Whereas the short cytoplasmic tail of syndecans regulates signaling, their extracellular part, substituted with heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains, binds a plethora of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules involved in fibrosis, e.g., collagens, growth factors, cytokines, and immune cell adhesion proteins. Full-length syndecans induce pro-fibrotic signaling, increasing the expression of collagens, myofibroblast differentiation factors, ECM enzymes, growth factors, and immune cell adhesion molecules, thereby also increasing cardiac stiffness and preventing cardiac rupture. Upon pro-inflammatory stimuli, syndecan ectodomains are enzymatically released from heart cells (syndecan shedding). Shed ectodomains affect the expression of ECM molecules, promoting ECM degradation and cardiac rupture upon myocardial infarction. Blood levels of shed syndecan-1 and -4 ectodomains are associated with hospitalization, mortality, and heart remodeling in patients with heart failure. Improved understanding of syndecans and their modifying enzymes in cardiac fibrosis might contribute to the development of compounds with therapeutic potential, and enzymatically shed syndecan ectodomains might constitute a future prognostic tool for heart diseases with fibrosis. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract summarizing

  11. Transforming growth factor (type beta) promotes the addition of chondroitin sulfate chains to the cell surface proteoglycan (syndecan) of mouse mammary epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Cultured monolayers of NMuMG mouse mammary epithelial cells have augmented amounts of cell surface chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) when cultured in transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), presumably because of increased synthesis on their cell surface proteoglycan (named syndecan), previously shown to contain chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate GAG. This increase occurs throughout the monolayer as shown using soluble thrombospondin as a binding probe. However, comparison o...

  12. Expression of the proteoglycan syndecan-4 and the mechanism by which it mediates stress fiber formation in folliculostellate cells in the rat anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Kouki, Tom; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Ly, Floren; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Folliculostellate (FS) cells in the anterior pituitary gland appear to have multifunctional properties. FS cells connect to each other at gap junctions and thereby form a histological and functional network. We have performed a series of studies on network formation in FS cells and recently reported that FS cells markedly prolong their cytoplasmic processes and form numerous interconnections with neighboring FS cells in the presence of laminin, an extracellular matrix (ECM) component of the basement membrane. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of this extension of FS cell cytoplasmic processes under the influence of laminin and found that laminin promoted stress fiber formation within FS cells. Next, we noted that formation of stress fibers in FS cells was mediated by syndecan-4, a transmembrane proteoglycan that binds ECM and soluble factors via their extracellular glycosaminoglycan chain. We then observed that expressions of syndecan-4 and α-actinin (a microfilament bundling protein that cross-links actin stress fibers in FS cells) were upregulated by laminin. Using specific siRNA of syndecan-4, actin polymerization of FS cells was inhibited. Our findings suggest that FS cells received a signal from laminin-syndecan-4 interaction, which resulted in morphological changes, and that the formation of a morphological and functional network in FS cells was transduced by a syndecan-4-dependent mechanism in the presence of ECM.

  13. Syndecan proteoglycan contributions to cytoskeletal organization and contractility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okina, E; Manon-Jensen, T; Whiteford, J R

    2009-01-01

    Cells exert tension on the extracellular matrix through specific receptors that link to the actin cytoskeleton. The best characterized are the integrins, which, when activated and clustered, can link to the extracellular matrix at specialized adhesion zones, known as focal contacts or focal...

  14. Glycosaminoglycans and Proteoglycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor H. Pomin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this editorial to MDPI Pharmaceuticals special issue “Glycosaminoglycans and Proteoglycans” we describe in outline the common structural features of glycosaminoglycans and the characteristics of proteoglycans, including the intracellular proteoglycan, serglycin, cell-surface proteoglycans, like syndecans and glypicans, and the extracellular matrix proteoglycans, like aggrecan, perlecan, and small leucine-rich proteoglycans. The context in which the pharmaceutical uses of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans are presented in this special issue is given at the very end.

  15. The Proteoglycan Syndecan 4 Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 6 Channels via RhoA/ROCK Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Echtermeyer, Frank; Thilo, Florian

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Syndecan 4 (Sdc4) modulates signal transduction and regulates activity of protein channels. Sdc4 is essential for the regulation of cellular permeability. We hypothesized that Sdc4 may regulate transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) channels, a determinant of glomerular perme...... permeability, in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. METHODS AND RESULTS: Sdc4 knockout (Sdc4(-/-)) mice showed increased glomerular filtration rate and ameliorated albuminuria under baseline conditions and after bovine serum albumin overload (each P...

  16. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  17. Hair follicle proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R

    1993-01-01

    that are present in the epithelial and stromal compartments of hair follicles. However, the transmembrane proteoglycan syndecan may be important in follicle morphogenesis, both with respect to the epithelium and dermal papilla cells. Syndecan may possess both heparan and chondroitin sulfate chains, interacts...... basement membranes, including those surrounding the epithelial compartment of hair follicles. Additionally, and quite unlike the dermis, the dermal papilla is enriched in basement-membrane components, especially a chondroitin 6-sulfate-containing proteoglycan, BM-CSPG. The function of this proteoglycan...... is not known, but developmental studies indicate that it may have a role in stabilizing basement membranes. In the hair cycle, BM-CSPG decreases through catagen and is virtually absent from the telogen papilla. One or more heparan sulfate proteoglycans, including perlecan, are also present in papilla...

  18. Novel genes and pathways modulated by syndecan-1: implications for the proliferation and cell-cycle regulation of malignant mesothelioma cells.

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    Tünde Szatmári

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a highly malignant tumor, originating from mesothelial cells of the serous cavities. In mesothelioma the expression of syndecan-1 correlates to epithelioid morphology and inhibition of growth and migration. Our previous data suggest a complex role of syndecan-1 in mesothelioma cell proliferation although the exact underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely elucidated. The aim of this study is therefore to disclose critical genes and pathways affected by syndecan-1 in mesothelioma; in order to better understand its importance for tumor cell growth and proliferation. We modulated the expression of syndecan-1 in a human mesothelioma cell line via both overexpression and silencing, and followed the transcriptomic responses with microarray analysis. To project the transcriptome analysis on the full-dimensional picture of cellular regulation, we applied pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA and a novel method of network enrichment analysis (NEA which elucidated signaling relations between differentially expressed genes and pathways acting via various molecular mechanisms. Syndecan-1 overexpression had profound effects on genes involved in regulation of cell growth, cell cycle progression, adhesion, migration and extracellular matrix organization. In particular, expression of several growth factors, interleukins, and enzymes of importance for heparan sulfate sulfation pattern, extracellular matrix proteins and proteoglycans were significantly altered. Syndecan-1 silencing had less powerful effect on the transcriptome compared to overexpression, which can be explained by the already low initial syndecan-1 level of these cells. Nevertheless, 14 genes showed response to both up- and downregulation of syndecan-1. The "cytokine - cytokine-receptor interaction", the TGF-β, EGF, VEGF and ERK/MAPK pathways were enriched in both experimental settings. Most strikingly, nearly all analyzed pathways

  19. Syndecan-2 is a novel ligand for the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor CD148

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whiteford, James R; Xian, Xiaojie; Chaussade, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Syndecan-2 is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan that has a cell adhesion regulatory domain contained within its extracellular core protein. Cell adhesion to the syndecan-2 extracellular domain (S2ED) is ß1 integrin dependent; however, syndecan-2 is not an integrin ligand. Here the protein tyrosine...

  20. Transmembrane Signaling Proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, John R

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all metazoan cells contain at least one and usually several types of transmembrane proteoglycans. These are varied in protein structure and type of polysaccharide, but the total number of vertebrate genes encoding transmembrane proteoglycan core proteins is less than 10. Some core prote...... proteins, including those of the syndecans, always possess covalently coupled glycosaminoglycans; others do not. Syndecan has a long evolutionary history, as it is present in invertebrates, but many other transmembrane proteoglycans are vertebrate inventions. The variety of proteins...... proteins has been obtained in mouse knockout experiments. Here some of the latest developments in the field are examined in hopes of stimulating further interest in this fascinating group of molecules. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology Volume 26...

  1. Control of morphology, cytoskeleton and migration by syndecan-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longley, R L; Woods, A; Fleetwood, A

    1999-01-01

    Syndecan-4 is a widely expressed transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan which localizes to focal adhesions. Previous studies showed that the syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain can associate with and potentiate the activity of protein kinase C, which is required for focal adhesion formation. To exa...

  2. Differential expression of syndecan isoforms during mouse incisor amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Taro; Miyoshi, Keiko; Munesue, Seiichi; Nakada, Hiroshi; Okayama, Minoru; Matsuo, Takashi; Noma, Takafumi

    2007-08-01

    Syndecans are transmembranous heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with covalently attached glycosaminoglycan side-chains located on the cell surface. The mammalian syndecan family is composed of four types of syndecans (syndecan-1 to -4). Syndecans interact with the intracellular cytoskeleton through the cytoplasmic domains of their core proteins and membrane proteins, extracellular enzymes, growth factors, and matrix components, through their heparan-sulfate chains, to regulate developmental processes.Here, as a first step to assess the possible roles of syndecan proteins in amelogenesis, we examined the expression patterns of all syndecan isoforms in continuously growing mouse incisors, in which we can overview major differentiation stages of amelogenesis at a glance. Understanding the expression domain of each syndecan isoform during specific developmental stages seems useful for investigating their physiological roles in amelogenesis. Immunohistochemical analysis of syndecan core proteins in the lower incisors from postnatal day 1 mice revealed spatially and temporally specific expression patterns, with syndecan-1 expressed in undifferentiated epithelial and mesenchymal cells, and syndecan-2, -3, and -4 in more differentiated cells. These findings suggest that each syndecan isoform functions distinctly during the amelogenesis of the incisors of mice.

  3. EphB/syndecan-2 signaling in dendritic spine morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethell, I M; Irie, F; Kalo, M S

    2001-01-01

    We previously reported that the cell surface proteoglycan syndecan-2 can induce dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons. We demonstrate here that the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylates syndecan-2 and that this phosphorylation event is crucial for syndecan-2 clustering and spine...... formation. Syndecan-2 is tyrosine phosphorylated and forms a complex with EphB2 in mouse brain. Dominant-negative inhibition of endogenous EphB receptor activities blocks clustering of endogenous syndecan-2 and normal spine formation in cultured hippocampal neurons. This is the first evidence that Eph...... receptors play a physiological role in dendritic spine morphogenesis. Our observations suggest that spine morphogenesis is triggered by the activation of Eph receptors, which causes tyrosine phosphorylation of target molecules, such as syndecan-2, in presumptive spines....

  4. Distribution of syndecan-1 protein in developing mouse teeth

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    Anna eFilatova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Syndecan-1 is a cell surface proteoglycan involved in the regulation of various biological processes such as proliferation, migration, condensation and differentiation of cells, intercellular communication and morphogenesis. The extracellular domain of syndecan-1 can bind to extracellular matrix components and signalling molecules, while its intracellular domain interacts with cytoskeletal proteins, thus allowing the transfer of information about extracellular environment changes into the cell that consequently affect cellular behaviour. Although previous studies have shown syndecan-1 expression during precise stages of tooth development, there is no equivalent study regrouping the expression patterns of syndecan-1 during all stages of odontogenesis. Here we examined the distribution of syndecan-1 protein in embryonic and postnatal developing mouse molars and incisors. Syndecan-1 distribution in mesenchymal tissues such as dental papilla and dental follicle was correlated with proliferating events and its expression was often linked to stem cell niche territories. Syndecan-1 was also expressed in mesenchymal cells that will differentiate into the dentin producing odontoblasts, but not in differentiated functional odontoblasts. In the epithelium, syndecan-1 was detected in all cell layers, by the exception of differentiated ameloblasts that form the enamel. Furthermore, syndecan-1 was expressed in osteoblast precursors and osteoclasts of the alveolar bone that surrounds the developing tooth germs. Taken together these results show the dynamic nature of syndecan-1 expression during odontogenesis and suggest its implication in various processes of tooth development and homeostasis.

  5. Mapping of matrix metalloproteinase cleavage sites on syndecan-1 and syndecan-4 ectodomains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manon-Jensen, Tina; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R

    2013-01-01

    Syndecans are transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans with roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. They have been associated with multiple functions in tumour progression, through their ability to interact with a wide range of ligands as well as other receptors,...

  6. Structural basis of syndecan-4 phosphorylation as a molecular switch to regulate signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koo, Bon-Kyung; Jung, Young Sang; Shin, Joon

    2005-01-01

    The syndecan transmembrane proteoglycans are involved in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and have important roles as cell surface receptors during cell-matrix interactions. We have shown that the syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain (4L) forms oligomeric complexes that bind to and stimulate...

  7. The role of syndecan-1 in cellular signaling and its effects on heparan sulfate biosynthesis in mesenchymal tumors

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    Tünde eSzatmári

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteoglycans and in particular the syndecans are involved in the differentiation process across the epithelial-mesenchymal axis, principally through their ability to bind growth factors and modulate their downstream signalling. Malignant tumors have individual proteoglycan profiles, which are closely associated with their differentiation and biological behavior, mesenchymal tumors showing a different profile from that of epithelial tumors. Syndecan-1 is the main syndecan of epithelial malignancies, whereas in sarcomas its expression level is generally low, in accordance with their mesenchymal phenotype and highly malignant behaviour. This proteoglycan is often overexpressed in adenocarcinoma cells, whereas mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma cells express syndecan-2 and syndecan-4 more abundantly. Increased expression of syndecan-1 in mesenchymal tumors changes the tumor cell morphology to an epithelioid direction whereas downregulation results in a change in shape from polygonal to spindle-like morphology. Although syndecan-1 plays major roles on the cell surface, there are also intracellular functions, which are not very well studied. On the functional level, syndecan-1 affects mesenchymal tumor cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and motility, and the effect varies with the different domains of the core protein. Syndecan-1 may exert stimulatory or inhibitory effects, depending on the concentration of various mitogens, enzymes and signalling molecules, the ratio between the shed and membrane-associated syndecan-1 and histological grade of the tumour. Growth factor signaling seems to be delicately controlled by regulatory loops involving the syndecan expression levels and their sulfation patterns. Overexpression of syndecan-1 modulates the biosynthesis and sulfation of heparan sulfate and it also affects the expression of other proteoglycans. On transcriptomic level, syndecan-1 modulation results in profound effects on genes involved in

  8. Syndecan-1 in the mouse parietal peritoneum microcirculation in inflammation.

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    Paulina M Kowalewska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-1 (CD138 was shown to regulate inflammatory responses by binding chemokines and cytokines and interacting with adhesion molecules, thereby modulating leukocyte trafficking to tissues. The objectives of this study were to examine the expression of syndecan-1 and its role in leukocyte recruitment and chemokine presentation in the microcirculation underlying the parietal peritoneum. METHODS: Wild-type BALB/c and syndecan-1 null mice were stimulated with an intraperitoneal injection of Staphylococcus aureus LTA, Escherichia coli LPS or TNFα and the microcirculation of the parietal peritoneum was examined by intravital microscopy after 4 hours. Fluorescence confocal microscopy was used to examine syndecan-1 expression in the peritoneal microcirculation using fluorescent antibodies. Blocking antibodies to adhesion molecules were used to examine the role of these molecules in leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in response to LTA. To determine whether syndecan-1 co-localizes with chemokines in vivo, fluorescent antibodies to syndecan-1 were co-injected intravenously with anti-MIP-2 (CXCL2, anti-KC (CXCL1 or anti-MCP-1 (CCL2. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Syndecan-1 was localized to the subendothelial region of peritoneal venules and the mesothelial layer. Leukocyte rolling was significantly decreased with LPS treatment while LTA and TNFα significantly increased leukocyte adhesion compared with saline control. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions were not different in syndecan-1 null mice. Antibody blockade of β2 integrin (CD18, ICAM-1 (CD54 and VCAM-1 (CD106 did not decrease leukocyte adhesion in response to LTA challenge while blockade of P-selectin (CD62P abrogated leukocyte rolling. Lastly, MIP-2 expression in the peritoneal venules was not dependent on syndecan-1 in vivo. Our data suggest that syndecan-1 is expressed in the parietal peritoneum microvasculature but does not regulate leukocyte

  9. Syndecan-4 Regulates Muscle Differentiation and Is Internalized from the Plasma Membrane during Myogenesis.

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    Rønning, Sissel B; Carlson, Cathrine R; Stang, Espen; Kolset, Svein O; Hollung, Kristin; Pedersen, Mona E

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface proteoglycan syndecan-4 has been reported to be crucial for muscle differentiation, but the molecular mechanisms still remain to be fully understood. During in vitro differentiation of bovine muscle cells immunocytochemical analyses showed strong labelling of syndecan-4 intracellularly, in close proximity with Golgi structures, in membranes of intracellular vesicles and finally, in the nuclear area including the nuclear envelope. Chase experiments showed that syndecan-4 was internalized from the plasma membrane during this process. Furthermore, when syndecan-4 was knocked down by siRNA more myotubes were formed, and the expression of myogenic transcription factors, β1-integrin and actin was influenced. However, when bovine muscle cells were treated with a cell-penetrating peptide containing the cytoplasmic region of syndecan-4, myoblast fusion and thus myotube formation was blocked, both in normal cells and in syndecan-4 knock down cells. Altogether this suggests that the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4 is important in regulation of myogenesis. The internalization of syndecan-4 from the plasma membrane during muscle differentiation and the nuclear localization of syndecan-4 in differentiated muscle cells may be part of this regulation, and is a novel aspect of syndecan biology which merits further studies.

  10. Syndecan-4 Regulates Muscle Differentiation and Is Internalized from the Plasma Membrane during Myogenesis.

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    Sissel B Rønning

    Full Text Available The cell surface proteoglycan syndecan-4 has been reported to be crucial for muscle differentiation, but the molecular mechanisms still remain to be fully understood. During in vitro differentiation of bovine muscle cells immunocytochemical analyses showed strong labelling of syndecan-4 intracellularly, in close proximity with Golgi structures, in membranes of intracellular vesicles and finally, in the nuclear area including the nuclear envelope. Chase experiments showed that syndecan-4 was internalized from the plasma membrane during this process. Furthermore, when syndecan-4 was knocked down by siRNA more myotubes were formed, and the expression of myogenic transcription factors, β1-integrin and actin was influenced. However, when bovine muscle cells were treated with a cell-penetrating peptide containing the cytoplasmic region of syndecan-4, myoblast fusion and thus myotube formation was blocked, both in normal cells and in syndecan-4 knock down cells. Altogether this suggests that the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4 is important in regulation of myogenesis. The internalization of syndecan-4 from the plasma membrane during muscle differentiation and the nuclear localization of syndecan-4 in differentiated muscle cells may be part of this regulation, and is a novel aspect of syndecan biology which merits further studies.

  11. The expression of syndecan-1, syndecan-4 and decorin in healthy human breast tissue during the menstrual cycle

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    Naessén Tord

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to unravel the interactions between the epithelium and the extra cellular matrix (ECM in breast tissue progressing to cancer, it is necessary to understand the relevant interactions in healthy tissue under normal physiologic settings. Proteoglycans in the ECM play an important role in the signaling between the different tissue compartments. The proteoglycan decorin is abundant in the breast stroma. Decreased expression in breast cancer tissue is a sign of a poor tumor prognosis. The heparane sulphate proteoglycans syndecan-1 and syndecan-4 promote the integration of cellular adhesion and proliferation. The aim of this study was to investigate the gene expression and location of decorin, syndecan-1 and syndecan-4 in the healthy breast during the menstrual cycle. Methods Tissue from healthy women undergoing breast reduction plastic surgery was examined using immunohistochemistry (n = 38 and Real-Time RT-PCR (n = 20. Both parous and nulliparous women were eligible and the mean age of the women was 34(+/- 10 years with regular menstrual cycles (28 +/- 7 days. None of the women had used hormonal treatment the last three months. The women were randomized to needle biopsy two months before the operation in the follicular or luteal menstrual phase and for another biopsy at the operation in the opposite phase. Serum samples were obtained to characterize the menstrual phase. The Wilcoxon signed rank test and Mann Whitney test were used for statistical analyses. Results By real time-RT-PCR the gene signal for all three proteoglycans; decorin (p = 0.02 and syndecan-1 (p = 0.03 and syndecan-4 (p = 0.02 was significantly lower among parous women in the luteal phase than in the follicular phase. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the identification of the proteins but no significant difference between menstrual phases was observed. Serum samples verified the menstrual phase. Conclusions Our study shows, for the first time in the

  12. Proteoglycans, ion channels and cell-matrix adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsou, Ioli; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.; Couchman, John R.

    2017-01-01

    , maintenance, repair and disease.The cytoplasmic domains of syndecans, while having no intrinsic kinase activity, can nevertheless signal through binding proteins.All syndecans appear to be connected to the actin cytoskeleton and can therefore contribute to cell adhesion, notably to the ECM and migration.......Recent data now suggest that syndecans can regulate stretchactivated ion channels.The structure and function of the syndecans and the ion channels are reviewed here, along with an analysis of ion channel functions in cell-matrix adhesion.This area sheds new light on the syndecans, not least since evidence...

  13. Syndecan-2 regulates melanin synthesis via protein kinase C βII-mediated tyrosinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyejung; Chung, Heesung; Chang, Sung Eun; Choi, Sora; Han, Inn-Oc; Kang, Duk-Hee; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2014-05-01

    Syndecan-2, a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is highly expressed in melanoma cells, regulates melanoma cell functions (e.g. migration). Since melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes, which largely function to synthesize melanin, we investigated the possible involvement of syndecan-2 in melanogenesis. Syndecan-2 expression was increased in human skin melanoma tissues compared with normal skin. In both mouse and human melanoma cells, siRNA-mediated knockdown of syndecan-2 was associated with reduced melanin synthesis, whereas overexpression of syndecan-2 increased melanin synthesis. Similar effects were also detected in human primary epidermal melanocytes. Syndecan-2 expression did not affect the expression of tyrosinase, a key enzyme in melanin synthesis, but instead enhanced the enzymatic activity of tyrosinase by increasing the membrane and melanosome localization of its regulator, protein kinase CβII. Furthermore, UVB caused increased syndecan-2 expression, and this up-regulation of syndecan-2 was required for UVB-induced melanin synthesis. Taken together, these data suggest that syndecan-2 regulates melanin synthesis and could be a potential therapeutic target for treating melanin-associated diseases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Contribution of proteoglycan osmotic swelling pressure to the compressive properties of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, EunHee; Chen, Silvia S; Klisch, Stephen M; Sah, Robert L

    2011-08-17

    The negatively charged proteoglycans (PG) provide compressive resistance to articular cartilage by means of their fixed charge density (FCD) and high osmotic pressure (π(PG)), and the collagen network (CN) provides the restraining forces to counterbalance π(PG). Our objectives in this work were to: 1), account for collagen intrafibrillar water when transforming biochemical measurements into a FCD-π(PG) relationship; 2), compute π(PG) and CN contributions to the compressive behavior of full-thickness cartilage during bovine growth (fetal, calf, and adult) and human adult aging (young and old); and 3), predict the effect of depth from the articular surface on π(PG) in human aging. Extrafibrillar FCD (FCD(EF)) and π(PG) increased with bovine growth due to an increase in CN concentration, whereas PG concentration was steady. This maturation-related increase was amplified by compression. With normal human aging, FCD(EF) and π(PG) decreased. The π(PG)-values were close to equilibrium stress (σ(EQ)) in all bovine and young human cartilage, but were only approximately half of σ(EQ) in old human cartilage. Depth-related variations in the strain, FCD(EF), π(PG), and CN stress profiles in human cartilage suggested a functional deterioration of the superficial layer with aging. These results suggest the utility of the FCD-π(PG) relationship for elucidating the contribution of matrix macromolecules to the biomechanical properties of cartilage. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. PKCbeta-dependent activation of RhoA by syndecan-4 during focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovas, Athanassios; Yoneda, Atsuko; Couchman, John R

    2006-01-01

    Syndecan-4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycan acting in concert with integrins in the formation of focal adhesions and stress fibres. Signalling events studied thus far suggest the formation of a ternary complex between syndecan-4, phosphatidylinositol 4...... necessary for the formation and maintenance of stress fibres in primary rat embryo fibroblasts. Inhibition of PKCalpha activity through the use of specific pharmacological inhibitors, a dominant-negative construct, or siRNA downregulation of protein levels, attenuated focal adhesion formation...

  16. Structural and cell adhesion properties of zebrafish syndecan-4 are shared with higher vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whiteford, James; Ko, Sunggeon; Lee, Weontae

    2008-01-01

    , but no molecular and cellular studies have been reported. Here it is demonstrated that key functional attributes of syndecan-4 are common to both zebrafish and mammalian homologues. These include glycosaminoglycan substitution, a NXIP motif in the extracellular domain that promotes integrin-mediated cell adhesion......The syndecan proteoglycans are an ancient class of receptor, bearing heparan sulfate chains that interact with numerous potential ligands including growth factors, morphogens, and extracellular matrix molecules. The single syndecan of invertebrates appears not to have cell adhesion roles......, but these have been described for mammalian paralogues, especially syndecan-4. This member is best understood in terms of interactions, signaling, and structure of its cytoplasmic domain. The zebrafish homologue of syndecan-4 has been genetically linked to cell adhesion and migration in zebrafish embryos...

  17. Solution structure of the dimeric cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, J; Lee, W; Lee, D

    2001-01-01

    The syndecans, transmembrane proteoglycans which are involved in the organization of cytoskeleton and/or actin microfilaments, have important roles as cell surface receptors during cell-cell and/or cell-matrix interactions. Since previous studies indicate that the function of the syndecan-4...... between peptides at physiological pH. Commensurately, the NMR structures demonstrate that syndecan-4L is a compact intertwined dimer with a symmetric clamp shape in the central variable V region with a root-mean-square deviation between backbone atom coordinates of 0.95 A for residues Leu(186)-Ala(195...... in the center of the dimeric twist similar to our previously reported 4V structure. The overall topology of the central variable region within the 4L structure is very similar to that of 4V complexed with the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate; however, the intersubunit interaction mode is affected...

  18. Syndecan-4 and integrins: combinatorial signaling in cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1999-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that additional transmembrane components can modify integrin-mediated adhesion. Syndecan-4 is a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan whose external glycosaminoglycan chains can bind extracellular matrix ligands and whose core protein cytoplasmic domain can signal...... during adhesion. Two papers in this issue of JCS demonstrate, through transfection studies, that syndecan-4 plays roles in the formation of focal adhesions and stress fibers. Overexpression of syndecan-4 increases focal adhesion formation, whereas a partially truncated core protein that lacks the binding...... site for protein kinase C(&agr;) and phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of focal adhesion formation. Focal adhesion induction does not require interaction between heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan and ligand but can occur when non-glycanated core protein...

  19. Loss of niche-satellite cell interactions in syndecan-3 null mice alters muscle progenitor cell homeostasis improving muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisconti, Addolorata; Banks, Glen B; Babaeijandaghi, Farshad; Betta, Nicole Dalla; Rossi, Fabio M V; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Olwin, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    The skeletal muscle stem cell niche provides an environment that maintains quiescent satellite cells, required for skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration. Syndecan-3, a transmembrane proteoglycan expressed in satellite cells, supports communication with the niche, providing cell interactions and signals to maintain quiescent satellite cells. Syndecan-3 ablation unexpectedly improves regeneration in repeatedly injured muscle and in dystrophic mice, accompanied by the persistence of sublaminar and interstitial, proliferating myoblasts. Additionally, muscle aging is improved in syndecan-3 null mice. Since syndecan-3 null myofiber-associated satellite cells downregulate Pax7 and migrate away from the niche more readily than wild type cells, syxndecan-3 appears to regulate satellite cell homeostasis and satellite cell homing to the niche. Manipulating syndecan-3 provides a promising target for development of therapies to enhance muscle regeneration in muscular dystrophies and in aged muscle.

  20. Syndecans as cell surface receptors: Unique structure equates with functional diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Youngsil; Chung, Heesung; Jung, Heyjung

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of functions for syndecan cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been proposed over the last decade. Moreover, aberrant syndecan regulation has been found to play a critical role in multiple pathologies, including cancers, as well as wound healing and inflammation....... As receptors, they have much in common with other molecules on the cell surface. Syndecans are type I transmembrane molecules with cytoplasmic domains that link to the actin cytoskeleton and can interact with a number of regulators. However, they are also highly complex by virtue of their external...... glycosaminoglycan chains, especially heparan sulfate. This heterodisperse polysaccharide has the potential to interact with many ligands from diverse protein families. Here, we relate the structural features of syndecans to some of their known functions....

  1. Syndecans as modulators and potential pharmacological targets in cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despoina eBarbouri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM components form a dynamic network of key importance for cell function and properties. Key macromolecules in this interplay are syndecans (SDCs, a family of transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. Specifically, heparan sulfate (HS chains with their different sulfation pattern have the ability to interact with growth factors and their receptors in tumor microenvironment, promoting the activation of different signaling cascades that regulate tumor cell behavior. The affinity of HS chains with ligands is altered during malignant conditions because of the modification of chain sequence/sulfation pattern. Furthermore, matrix degradation enzymes derived from the tumor itself or the tumor microenvironment, like heparanase and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, ADAM as well as ADΑMTS are involved in the cleavage of SDCs ectodomain at the HS and protein core level, respectively. Such released soluble syndecans shed syndecans in the extracellular matrix interact in an autocrine or paracrine manner with the tumor or/and stromal cells. Shed syndecans, upon binding to several matrix effectors, such as growth factors, chemokines and cytokines, have the ability to act as competitive inhibitors for membrane PGs, and modulate the inflammatory microenvironment of cancer cells. It is notable that syndecans and their soluble counterparts may affect either the behavior of cancer cells and/or their microenvironment during cancer progression. The importance of these molecules has been highlighted since HSPGs have been proposed as prognostic markers of solid tumors and hematopoietic malignancies. Going a step further down the line, the multi-actions of syndecans in many levels make them appealing as potential pharmacological targets, either by targeting directly the tumor or indirectly the adjacent stroma.

  2. Syndecan-4 Phosphorylation Is a Control Point for Integrin Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Mark R.; Hamidi, Hellyeh; Bass, Mark D.; Warwood, Stacey; Ballestrem, Christoph; Humphries, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Precise spatiotemporal coordination of integrin adhesion complex dynamics is essential for efficient cell migration. For cells adherent to fibronectin, differential engagement of α5β1 and αVβ3 integrins is used to elicit changes in adhesion complex stability, mechanosensation, matrix assembly, and migration, but the mechanisms responsible for receptor regulation have remained largely obscure. We identify phosphorylation of the membrane-intercalated proteoglycan syndecan-4 as an essential switch controlling integrin recycling. Src phosphorylates syndecan-4 and, by driving syntenin binding, leads to suppression of Arf6 activity and recycling of αVβ3 to the plasma membrane at the expense of α5β1. The resultant elevation in αVβ3 engagement promotes stabilization of focal adhesions. Conversely, abrogation of syndecan-4 phosphorylation drives surface expression of α5β1, destabilizes adhesion complexes, and disrupts cell migration. These data identify the dynamic spatiotemporal regulation of Src-mediated syndecan-4 phosphorylation as an essential switch controlling integrin trafficking and adhesion dynamics to promote efficient cell migration. PMID:23453597

  3. Proteoglycan-based diversification of disease outcome in head and neck cancer patients identifies NG2/CSPG4 and syndecan-2 as unique relapse and overall survival predicting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnedi, Anna; Rossi, Silvia; Bertani, Nicoletta; Gulli, Mariolina; Silini, Enrico Maria; Mucignat, Maria Teresa; Poli, Tito; Sesenna, Enrico; Lanfranco, Davide; Montebugnoli, Lucio; Leonardi, Elisa; Marchetti, Claudio; Cocchi, Renato; Ambrosini-Spaltro, Andrea; Foschini, Maria Pia; Perris, Roberto

    2015-05-03

    Tumour relapse is recognized to be the prime fatal burden in patients affected by head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), but no discrete molecular trait has yet been identified to make reliable early predictions of tumour recurrence. Expression of cell surface proteoglycans (PGs) is frequently altered in carcinomas and several of them are gradually emerging as key prognostic factors. A PG expression analysis at both mRNA and protein level, was pursued on primary lesions derived from 173 HNSCC patients from whom full clinical history and 2 years post-surgical follow-up was accessible. Gene and protein expression data were correlated with clinical traits and previously proposed tumour relapse markers to stratify high-risk patient subgroups. HNSCC lesions were indeed found to exhibit a widely aberrant PG expression pattern characterized by a variable expression of all PGs and a characteristic de novo transcription/translation of GPC2, GPC5 and NG2/CSPG4 respectively in 36%, 72% and 71% on 119 cases. Importantly, expression of NG2/CSPG4, on neoplastic cells and in the intralesional stroma (Hazard Ratio [HR], 6.76, p = 0.017) was strongly associated with loco-regional relapse, whereas stromal enrichment of SDC2 (HR, 7.652, p = 0.007) was independently tied to lymphnodal infiltration and disease-related death. Conversely, down-regulated SDC1 transcript (HR, 0.232, p = 0.013) uniquely correlated with formation of distant metastases. Altered expression of PGs significantly correlated with the above disease outcomes when either considered alone or in association with well-established predictors of poor prognosis (i.e. T classification, previous occurrence of precancerous lesions and lymphnodal metastasis). Combined alteration of all three PGs was found to be a reliable predictor of shorter survival. An unprecedented PG-based prognostic portrait is unveiled that incisively diversifies disease course in HNSCC patients beyond the currently known clinical and molecular

  4. Proteoglycan-based diversification of disease outcome in head and neck cancer patients identifies NG2/CSPG4 and syndecan-2 as unique relapse and overall survival predicting factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnedi, Anna; Rossi, Silvia; Bertani, Nicoletta; Gulli, Mariolina; Silini, Enrico Maria; Mucignat, Maria Teresa; Poli, Tito; Sesenna, Enrico; Lanfranco, Davide; Montebugnoli, Lucio; Leonardi, Elisa; Marchetti, Claudio; Cocchi, Renato; Ambrosini-Spaltro, Andrea; Foschini, Maria Pia; Perris, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Tumour relapse is recognized to be the prime fatal burden in patients affected by head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), but no discrete molecular trait has yet been identified to make reliable early predictions of tumour recurrence. Expression of cell surface proteoglycans (PGs) is frequently altered in carcinomas and several of them are gradually emerging as key prognostic factors. A PG expression analysis at both mRNA and protein level, was pursued on primary lesions derived from 173 HNSCC patients from whom full clinical history and 2 years post-surgical follow-up was accessible. Gene and protein expression data were correlated with clinical traits and previously proposed tumour relapse markers to stratify high-risk patient subgroups. HNSCC lesions were indeed found to exhibit a widely aberrant PG expression pattern characterized by a variable expression of all PGs and a characteristic de novo transcription/translation of GPC2, GPC5 and NG2/CSPG4 respectively in 36%, 72% and 71% on 119 cases. Importantly, expression of NG2/CSPG4, on neoplastic cells and in the intralesional stroma (Hazard Ratio [HR], 6.76, p = 0.017) was strongly associated with loco-regional relapse, whereas stromal enrichment of SDC2 (HR, 7.652, p = 0.007) was independently tied to lymphnodal infiltration and disease-related death. Conversely, down-regulated SDC1 transcript (HR, 0.232, p = 0.013) uniquely correlated with formation of distant metastases. Altered expression of PGs significantly correlated with the above disease outcomes when either considered alone or in association with well-established predictors of poor prognosis (i.e. T classification, previous occurrence of precancerous lesions and lymphnodal metastasis). Combined alteration of all three PGs was found to be a reliable predictor of shorter survival. An unprecedented PG-based prognostic portrait is unveiled that incisively diversifies disease course in HNSCC patients beyond the currently known clinical and molecular

  5. Resveratrol Improves Tube Formation in AGE-Induced Late Endothelial Progenitor Cells by Suppressing Syndecan-4 Shedding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs contributes to cardiovascular complications in diabetes, and resveratrol has been shown to improve EPC functions. Syndecan-4 (Synd4, a cell surface heparin sulfate proteoglycan, has been shown to promote neovascularization. Thus, the present study was performed to determine whether resveratrol promoted angiogenesis of EPCs by regulating Synd4. Late EPCs were isolated from human peripheral blood and stimulated with AGEs. Western blot showed that AGEs induced Synd4 shedding in a dose- and time-dependent manner. AGE-induced Synd4 shedding was partly reversed by NAC or resveratrol, along with normalized ROS production. Overexpression of Synd4 or pretreatment of resveratrol reversed AGE-impaired tube formation of EPCs and regulated the Akt/eNOS pathway. Furthermore, resveratrol suppressed Synd4 shedding via the inhibition of oxidative stress and improved tube formation of late EPCs via the regulation of the Synd4/Akt/eNOS pathway.

  6. Solution structure of a syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain and its interaction with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, D; Oh, E S; Woods, A

    1998-01-01

    Syndecan-4, a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is a coreceptor with integrins in cell adhesion. It has been suggested to form a ternary signaling complex with protein kinase Calpha and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Syndecans each have a unique, central, and variable (V......) region in their cytoplasmic domains, and that of syndecan-4 is critical to its interaction with protein kinase C and PIP2. Two oligopeptides corresponding to the variable region (4V) and whole domain (4L) of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain were synthesized for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Data...... and dynamical simulated annealing calculations. The 4V peptide in the presence of PIP2 formed a compact dimer with two twisted strands packed parallel to each other and the exposed surface of the dimer consisted of highly charged and polar residues. The overall three-dimensional structure in solution exhibits...

  7. Prolonged labour associated with lower expression of syndecan 3 and connexin 43 in human uterine tissue

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    Malmström Anders

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolonged labour is associated with greater morbidity and mortality for mother and child. Connexin 43 is a major myometrial gap junction protein found in human myometrium. Syndecan 3 seems to prevail in the human uterus among heparan sulphate proteoglycans, showing the most significant increase during labour. The aims of the present study were to investigate syndecan 3 and connexin 43 mRNA expressions and protein distributions in human uterine tissue during normal and prolonged labour. Methods Uterine isthmic biopsies were collected from non-pregnant (n = 7, term pregnant women not in labour (n = 14, in normal labour (n = 7 and in prolonged labour (n = 7. mRNA levels of syndecan 3 and connexin 43 were determined by real time RT-PCR. The localization and expression were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Results In women with prolonged labour, the mRNA expressions of syndecan 3 and Connexin 43 were considerably lower than the expression level at normal labour (p Conclusion The high expression of syndecan 3 and connexin 43 and their co-localization to the smooth muscle bundles during normal labour, together with the significant reduction in prolonged labour, may indicate a role for these proteins in the co-ordination of myometrial contractility.

  8. Matrix expansion and syncytial aggregation of syndecan-1+ cells underpin villous atrophy in coeliac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Salvestrini

    Full Text Available We studied the expression of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs in coeliac disease (CD mucosa, as they are critical determinants of tissue volume, which increases in active disease. We also examined mucosal expression of IL-6, which stimulates excess GAG synthesis in disorders such as Grave's ophthalmopathy.We stained archival jejunal biopsies from 5 children with CD at diagnosis, on gluten-free diet and challenge for sulphated GAGs. We then examined duodenal biopsies from 9 children with CD compared to 9 histological normal controls, staining for sulphated GAGs, heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG, short-chain HSPG (Δ-HSPG and the proteoglycan syndecan-1 (CD138, which is expressed on epithelium and plasma cells. We confirmed findings with a second monoclonal in another 12 coeliac children. We determined mucosal IL-6 expression by immunohistochemistry and PCR in 9 further cases and controls, and used quantitative real time PCR for other Th17 pathway cytokines in an additional 10 cases and controls.In CD, HSPG expression was lost in the epithelial compartment but contrastingly maintained within an expanded lamina propria. Within the upper lamina propria, clusters of syndecan-1(+ plasma cells formed extensive syncytial sheets, comprising adherent plasma cells, lysed cells with punctate cytoplasmic staining and shed syndecan ectodomains. A dense infiltrate of IL-6(+ mononuclear cells was detected in active coeliac disease, also localised to the upper lamina propria, with significantly increased mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-17A but not IL-23 p19.Matrix expansion, through syndecan-1(+ cell recruitment and lamina propria GAG increase, underpins villous atrophy in coeliac disease. The syndecan-1(+ cell syncytia and excess GAG production recapitulate elements of the invertebrate encapsulation reaction, itself dependent on insect transglutaminase and glutaminated early response proteins. As in other matrix expansion disorders, IL-6 is upregulated and

  9. Matrix Expansion and Syncytial Aggregation of Syndecan-1+ Cells Underpin Villous Atrophy in Coeliac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvestrini, Camilla; Lucas, Mark; Lionetti, Paolo; Torrente, Franco; James, Sean; Phillips, Alan D.; Murch, Simon H.

    2014-01-01

    Background We studied the expression of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in coeliac disease (CD) mucosa, as they are critical determinants of tissue volume, which increases in active disease. We also examined mucosal expression of IL-6, which stimulates excess GAG synthesis in disorders such as Grave's ophthalmopathy. Methods We stained archival jejunal biopsies from 5 children with CD at diagnosis, on gluten-free diet and challenge for sulphated GAGs. We then examined duodenal biopsies from 9 children with CD compared to 9 histological normal controls, staining for sulphated GAGs, heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG), short-chain HSPG (Δ-HSPG) and the proteoglycan syndecan-1 (CD138), which is expressed on epithelium and plasma cells. We confirmed findings with a second monoclonal in another 12 coeliac children. We determined mucosal IL-6 expression by immunohistochemistry and PCR in 9 further cases and controls, and used quantitative real time PCR for other Th17 pathway cytokines in an additional 10 cases and controls. Results In CD, HSPG expression was lost in the epithelial compartment but contrastingly maintained within an expanded lamina propria. Within the upper lamina propria, clusters of syndecan-1+ plasma cells formed extensive syncytial sheets, comprising adherent plasma cells, lysed cells with punctate cytoplasmic staining and shed syndecan ectodomains. A dense infiltrate of IL-6+ mononuclear cells was detected in active coeliac disease, also localised to the upper lamina propria, with significantly increased mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-17A but not IL-23 p19. Conclusions Matrix expansion, through syndecan-1+ cell recruitment and lamina propria GAG increase, underpins villous atrophy in coeliac disease. The syndecan-1+ cell syncytia and excess GAG production recapitulate elements of the invertebrate encapsulation reaction, itself dependent on insect transglutaminase and glutaminated early response proteins. As in other matrix expansion disorders

  10. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...... transmembrane signaling from matrix to cytoskeleton, as proposed for other classes of adhesion receptors....

  11. Heparanase-2 and syndecan-1 in colon cancer: the ugly ducklings or the beautiful swans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Ricardo José

    2008-08-01

    Syndecan expression, or the lack thereof by tumor cells, has been associated with poor prognosis in several types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. Syndecan is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan involved in tumor adhesion, invasion, and metastasis. In addition, the expression of the enzyme heparanase by cancer cells correlates with malignant transformation and metastasis. Given the prominent role of syndecan and heparanase in physiological and pathological processes, they are promising molecular targets in the development of diagnostic methods and drugs for cancer and other diseases. A study in this issue of the European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology reports the expression of syndecan-1 (Syn-1) and HPA2 in human colorectal cancer samples. These results confirm earlier observations that Syn-1 is downregulated by colorectal carcinoma cells but raise questions about its prognostic value. This study is also the first report on the upregulation of HPA2 in human cancer samples. HPA2 and Syn-1 expression by colorectal cancer tumor cells and the possible implications in disease progression are discussed.

  12. Molecular polymorphism of a cell surface proteoglycan: distinct structures on simple and stratified epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, R D; Bernfield, M

    1988-12-01

    Epithelial cells are organized into either a single layer (simple epithelia) or multiple layers (stratified epithelia). Maintenance of these cellular organizations requires distinct adhesive mechanisms involving many cell surface molecules. One such molecule is a cell surface proteoglycan, named syndecan, that contains both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains. This proteoglycan binds cells to fibrillar collagens and fibronectin and thus acts as a receptor for interstitial matrix. The proteoglycan is restricted to the basolateral surface of simple epithelial cells, but is located over the entire surface of stratified epithelial cells, even those surfaces not contacting matrix. We now show that the distinct localization in simple and stratified epithelia correlates with a distinct proteoglycan structure. The proteoglycan from simple epithelia (modal molecular size, 160 kDa) is larger than that from stratified epithelia (modal molecular size, 92 kDa), but their core proteins are identical in size and immunoreactivity. The proteoglycan from simple epithelia has more and larger heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains than the proteoglycan from stratified epithelia. Thus, the cell surface proteoglycan shows a tissue-specific structural polymorphism due to distinct posttranslational modifications. This polymorphism likely reflects distinct proteoglycan functions in simple and stratified epithelia, potentially meeting the different adhesive requirements of the cells in these different organizations.

  13. Syndecan-4 and focal adhesion function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Two groups have now reported the viability of mice that lack syndecan-4. These mice have wound healing/angiogenesis problems, and fibroblasts from these animals differ in adhesion and migration from normal. This is consistent with recent in vitro data indicating a need for signaling via syndecan-4...... for focal adhesion formation, and reports that overexpression of proteins that bind syndecan-4 can modify cell adhesion and migration....

  14. Syndecan-4 associates with alpha-actinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greene, Daniel K; Tumova, Sarka; Couchman, John R

    2002-01-01

    during the formation of focal adhesions. To date, a direct link between syndecan-4 and the cytoskeleton has remained elusive. We now demonstrate by Triton X-100 extraction immunoprecipitation and in vitro binding assays that the focal adhesion component alpha-actinin interacts with syndecan-4 in a beta...

  15. Proteoglycan isolation and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Proteoglycans can be difficult molecules to isolate and analyze due to large mass, charge, and tendency to aggregate or form macromolecular complexes. This unit describes detailed methods for purification of matrix, cell surface, and cytoskeleton-linked proteoglycans. Methods for analysis...

  16. Syndecan expressions in the human amnion and chorionic plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lorenzi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The syndecan family consists of four distinct membrane glycoproteins in mammals. Syndecans control cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration through participation in cell-cell interactions, anchorage of cells to the extracellular environment, and modulation of multiple growth factors. Therefore, syndecans may play a pivotal role in the regulation of cell behaviour depending on the cellular microenvironment. Here, we demonstrate that syndecan-1, syndecan-2 and syndecan-4 are expressed in fetal membrane tissue with different immunolocalizations. Syndecan-1 is expressed in the amniotic epithelium, localizing at basolateral cell surfaces. Syndecan-2 and syndecan-4, in contrast, are mostly localized in intracellular compartments, in the extravillous cytotrophoblastic cells and in some fibroblasts of the chorionic plate as well as in the amniotic epithelial cells. In the latter, syndecan-4 is mainly localized in the apical part of the cells. Our results strongly suggest a key role of syndecan-1, syndecan-2 and syndecan-4 in the determination of structural and functional characteristics of human amnion and chorionic plate. Since the solute exchanges between fetus and mother take place in fetal membranes, our data suggest that syndecans are important players in the placenta for the establishment of the fetal-maternal inter-communication.

  17. Syndecan-1 is required to maintain intradermal fat and prevent cold stress.

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    Ildiko Kasza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic temperature regulation is fundamental to mammalian physiology and is controlled by acute and chronic responses of local, endocrine and nervous regulators. Here, we report that loss of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-1, causes a profoundly depleted intradermal fat layer, which provides crucial thermogenic insulation for mammals. Mice without syndecan-1 enter torpor upon fasting and show multiple indicators of cold stress, including activation of the stress checkpoint p38α in brown adipose tissue, liver and lung. The metabolic phenotype in mutant mice, including reduced liver glycogen, is rescued by housing at thermoneutrality, suggesting that reduced insulation in cool temperatures underlies the observed phenotypes. We find that syndecan-1, which functions as a facultative lipoprotein uptake receptor, is required for adipocyte differentiation in vitro. Intradermal fat shows highly dynamic differentiation, continuously expanding and involuting in response to hair cycle and ambient temperature. This physiology probably confers a unique role for Sdc1 in this adipocyte sub-type. The PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone rescues Sdc1-/- intradermal adipose tissue, placing PPARγ downstream of Sdc1 in triggering adipocyte differentiation. Our study indicates that disruption of intradermal adipose tissue development results in cold stress and complex metabolic pathology.

  18. THYROID HORMONE TREATED ASTROCYTES INDUCE MATURATION OF CEREBRAL CORTICAL NEURONS THROUGH MODULATION OF PROTEOGLYCAN LEVELS

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    Romulo Sperduto Dezonne

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Proper brain neuronal circuitry formation and synapse development is dependent on specific cues, either genetic or epigenetic, provided by the surrounding neural environment. Within these signals, thyroid hormones (T3 and T4 play crucial role in several steps of brain morphogenesis including proliferation of progenitor cells, neuronal differentiation, maturation, migration, and synapse formation. The lack of thyroid hormones during childhood is associated with several impair neuronal connections, cognitive deficits, and mental disorders. Many of the thyroid hormones effects are mediated by astrocytes, although the mechanisms underlying these events are still unknown. In this work, we investigated the effect of 3, 5, 3’-triiodothyronine-treated (T3-treated astrocytes on cerebral cortex neuronal differentiation. Culture of neural progenitors from embryonic cerebral cortex mice onto T3-treated astrocyte monolayers yielded an increment in neuronal population, followed by enhancement of neuronal maturation, arborization and neurite outgrowth. In addition, real time PCR assays revealed an increase in the levels of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans, Glypican 1 (GPC-1 and Syndecans 3 e 4 (SDC-3 e SDC-4, followed by a decrease in the levels of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, Versican. Disruption of glycosaminoglycan chains by chondroitinase AC or heparanase III completely abolished the effects of T3-treated astrocytes on neuronal morphogenesis. Our work provides evidence that astrocytes are key mediators of T3 actions on cerebral cortex neuronal development and identified potential molecules and pathways involved in neurite extension; which might eventually contribute to a better understanding of axonal regeneration, synapse formation and neuronal circuitry recover.

  19. Syndecan-1 and syndecan-4 are independent indicators in breast carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lendorf, Maria E; Manon-Jensen, Tina; Kronqvist, Pauliina

    2011-01-01

    . Duplicate samples of 114 benign and malignant breast disease cases were stained for the two syndecans. Clinicopathological information was available for all cases. Syndecan-1 was detected in 72.8% of cases, with significant association between its expression and histological tumor type (p...

  20. Syndecan-1/CD147 association is essential for cyclophilin B-induced activation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases and promotion of cell adhesion and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakula, Rachel; Melchior, Aurélie; Denys, Agnès; Vanpouille, Christophe; Mazurier, Joël; Allain, Fabrice

    2007-05-01

    Many of the biological functions attributed to cell surface proteoglycans are dependent on the interaction with extracellular mediators through their heparan sulphate (HS) moieties and the participation of their core proteins in signaling events. A class of recently identified inflammatory mediators is secreted cyclophilins, which are mostly known as cyclosporin A-binding proteins. We previously demonstrated that cyclophilin B (CyPB) triggers chemotaxis and integrin-mediated adhesion of T lymphocytes mainly of the CD4+/CD45RO+ phenotype. These activities are related to interactions with two types of binding sites, CD147 and cell surface HS. Here, we demonstrate that CyPB-mediated adhesion of CD4+/CD45RO+ T cells is related to p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation by a mechanism involving CD147 and HS proteoglycans (HSPG). Although HSPG core proteins are represented by syndecan-1, -2, -4, CD44v3 and betaglycan in CD4+/CD45RO+ T cells, we found that only syndecan-1 is physically associated with CD147. The intensity of the heterocomplex increased in response to CyPB, suggesting a transient enhancement and/or stabilization in the association of CD147 to syndecan-1. Pretreatment with anti-syndecan-1 antibodies or knockdown of syndecan-1 expression by RNA interference dramatically reduced CyPB-induced p44/p42 MAPK activation and consequent migration and adhesion, supporting the model in which syndecan-1 serves as a binding subunit to form the fully active receptor of CyPB. Altogether, our findings provide a novel example of a soluble mediator in which a member of the syndecan family plays a critical role in efficient interaction with signaling receptors and initiation of cellular responses.

  1. Changes in cardiac heparan sulfate proteoglycan expression and streptozotocin-induced diastolic dysfunction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cestari Ismar N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in the proteoglycans glypican and syndecan-4 have been reported in several pathological conditions, but little is known about their expression in the heart during diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo heart function changes and alterations in mRNA expression and protein levels of glypican-1 and syndecan-4 in cardiac and skeletal muscles during streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes. Methods Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by STZ administration. The rats were assigned to one of the following groups: control (sham injection, after 24 hours, 10 days, or 30 days of STZ administration. Echocardiography was performed in the control and STZ 10-day groups. Western and Northern blots were used to quantify protein and mRNA levels in all groups. Immunohistochemistry was performed in the control and 30-day groups to correlate the observed mRNA changes to the protein expression. Results In vivo cardiac functional analysis performed using echocardiography in the 10-day group showed diastolic dysfunction with alterations in the peak velocity of early (E diastolic filling and isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT indices. These functional alterations observed in the STZ 10-day group correlated with the concomitant increase in syndecan-4 and glypican-1 protein expression. Cardiac glypican-1 mRNA and skeletal syndecan-4 mRNA and protein levels increased in the STZ 30-day group. On the other hand, the amount of glypican in skeletal muscle was lower than that in the control group. The same results were obtained from immunohistochemistry analysis. Conclusion Our data suggest that membrane proteoglycans participate in the sequence of events triggered by diabetes and inflicted on cardiac and skeletal muscles.

  2. Glycoprotein and proteoglycan techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeley, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this book is to describe techniques which can be used to answer some of the basic questions about glycosylated proteins. Methods are discussed for isolation, compositional analysis, and for determination of the primary structure of carbohydrate units and the nature of protein-carbohydrate linkages of glycoproteins and proteoglycans. High resolution NMR is considered, as well as radioactive labelling techniques. (Auth.)

  3. Placental Sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Parasites Is Mediated by the Interaction Between VAR2CSA and Chondroitin Sulfate A on Syndecan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yang; Resende, Mafalda; Daugaard, Mads; Riis Kristensen, Anders; Damm, Peter; G. Theander, Thor; R. Hansson, Stefan; Salanti, Ali

    2016-01-01

    During placental malaria, Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta, causing health problems for both the mother and fetus. The specific adherence is mediated by the VAR2CSA protein, which binds to placental chondroitin sulfate (CS) on chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in the placental syncytium. However, the identity of the CSPG core protein and the cellular impact of the interaction have remain elusive. In this study we identified the specific CSPG core protein to which the CS is attached, and characterized its exact placental location. VAR2CSA pull-down experiments using placental extracts from whole placenta or syncytiotrophoblast microvillous cell membranes showed three distinct CSPGs available for VAR2CSA adherence. Further examination of these three CSPGs by immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assays showed that syndecan-1 is the main receptor for VAR2CSA mediated placental adherence. We further show that the commonly used placental choriocarcinoma cell line, BeWo, express a different set of proteoglycans than those present on placental syncytiotrophoblast and may not be the most biologically relevant model to study placental malaria. Syncytial fusion of the BeWo cells, triggered by forskolin treatment, caused an increased expression of placental CS-modified syndecan-1. In line with this, we show that rVAR2 binding to placental CS impairs syndecan-1-related Src signaling in forskolin treated BeWo cells, but not in untreated cells. PMID:27556547

  4. Syndecans as receptors and organizers of the extracellular matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Gopal, Sandeep; Couchman, John

    2009-01-01

    , the collagens and glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix are prominent. Frequently, they do so in conjunction with other receptors, most notably the integrins. For this reason, they are often referred to as "co-receptors". However, just as with integrins, syndecans can interact with actin-associated proteins...... and signalling molecules, such as protein kinases. Some aspects of syndecan signalling are understood but much remains to be learned. The functions of syndecans in regulating cell adhesion and extracellular matrix assembly are described here. Evidence from null mice suggests that syndecans have roles...

  5. Syndecans reside in sphingomyelin-enriched low-density fractions of the plasma membrane isolated from a parathyroid cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna A Podyma-Inoue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs are one of the basic constituents of plasma membranes. Specific molecular interactions between HSPGs and a number of extracellular ligands have been reported. Mechanisms involved in controlling the localization and abundance of HSPG on specific domains on the cell surface, such as membrane rafts, could play important regulatory roles in signal transduction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using metabolic radiolabeling and sucrose-density gradient ultracentrifugation techniques, we identified [(35S]sulfate-labeled macromolecules associated with detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs isolated from a rat parathyroid cell line. DRM fractions showed high specific radioactivity ([(35S]sulfate/mg protein, implying the specific recruitment of HSPGs to the membrane rafts. Identity of DRM-associated [(35S]sulfate-labeled molecules as HSPGs was confirmed by Western blotting with antibodies that recognize heparan sulfate (HS-derived epitope. Analyses of core proteins by SDS-PAGE revealed bands with an apparent MW of syndecan-4 (30-33 kDa and syndecan-1 (70 kDa suggesting the presence of rafts with various HSPG species. DRM fractions enriched with HSPGs were characterized by high sphingomyelin content and found to only partially overlap with the fractions enriched in ganglioside GM1. HSPGs could be also detected in DRMs even after prior treatment of cells with heparitinase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both syndecan-1 and syndecan-4 have been found to specifically associate with membrane rafts and their association seemed independent of intact HS chains. Membrane rafts in which HSPGs reside were also enriched with sphingomyelin, suggesting their possible involvement in FGF signaling. Further studies, involving proteomic characterization of membrane domains containing HSPGs might improve our knowledge on the nature of HSPG-ligand interactions and their role in different signaling platforms.

  6. Syndecan-4 shedding impairs macrovascular angiogenesis in diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ran; Xie, Jun; Wu, Han; Li, Guannan; Chen, Jianzhou; Chen, Qinhua; Wang, Lian; Xu, Biao, E-mail: xubiao@medmail.com.cn

    2016-05-20

    Purpose: Syndecan-4 (synd4) is a ubiquitous heparan sulfate proteoglycan cell surface receptor that modulates cell proliferation, migration, mechanotransduction, and endocytosis. The extracellular domain of synd4 sheds heavily in acute inflammation, but the shedding of synd4 in chronic inflammation, such as diabetes mellitus (DM), is still undefined. We investigated the alterations of synd4 endothelial expression in DM and the influence of impaired synd4 signaling on angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), diabetic rats, synd4 null mice, and db/db mice. Material and methods: HUVECs were incubated with advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Western blot analysis was used to determine synd4 protein expression and ELISA was used to detect soluble synd4 fragments. The concentration of synd4 in the aortic endothelia of diabetic rats was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Aortic ring assays were performed to study the process of angiogenesis in the diabetic rats and in synd4 null and db/db mice. Recombinant adenoviruses containing the synd4 gene or null were constructed to enhance synd4 aortic expression in db/db mice. Results: Western blot analysis showed decreased expression of the synd4 extracellular domain in HUVECs, and ELISA detected increased soluble fragments of synd4 in the media. Synd4 endothelial expression in the aortas of diabetic rats was decreased. Aortic ring assay indicated impaired angiogenesis in synd4 null and db/db mice, which was partially reversed by synd4 overexpression in db/db mice. Conclusion: Synd4 shedding from vascular endothelial cells played an important role in the diabetes-related impairment of angiogenesis. -- Highlights: •Synd4 shedding from endothelial cells is accelerated under the stimulation of AGEs. •Extracellular domain of synd4 is diminished in the endothelium of DM rats. •Aortic rings of synd4 null mice showed impaired angiogenesis. •Overexpression of synd4 partly rescues macrovascular

  7. Characterisation of stromal-cellular mechanotransduction through syndecan-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollosi, Peter; Grossi, Alberto; Couchman, John Robert

    phenotype and rate of cell migration. We map the binding site for syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain in a-actinin to spectrin repeat4, utilising solid phase binding assays and recombinant peptides. Moreover, phosphorylation of syndecan-4 on its sole serine residue, known to influence cytoplasmic domain...

  8. Redefining the role of syndecans in C. elegans biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopal, Sandeep; Couchman, John; Pocock, Roger

    2016-01-01

    in the activation of several downstream signaling pathways. We identified a previously unappreciated role of syndecans in cytosolic calcium regulation in mammals that is conserved in C. elegans. We concluded that calcium regulation is the basic, evolutionarily conserved role for syndecans, which enables them...

  9. Loss of Syndecan-1 Abrogates the Pulmonary Protective Phenotype Induced by Plasma After Hemorrhagic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng; Peng, Zhanglong; Park, Pyong Woo; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2017-09-01

    Syndecan-1 (Sdc1) is considered a biomarker of injury to the endothelial glycocalyx following hemorrhagic shock, with shedding of Sdc1 deleterious. Resuscitation with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) has been correlated with restitution of pulmonary Sdc1 and reduction of lung injury, but the precise contribution of Sdc1 to FFPs protection in the lung remains unclear. Human lung endothelial cells were used to assess the time and dose-dependent effect of FFP on Sdc1 expression and the effect of Sdc1 silencing on in vitro endothelial cell permeability and actin stress fiber formation. Wild-type and Sdc1 mice were subjected to hemorrhagic shock followed by resuscitation with lactated Ringers (LR) or FFP and compared with shock alone and shams. Lungs were harvested after 3 h for analysis of permeability, histology, and inflammation and for measurement of syndecan- 2 and 4 expression. In vitro, FFP enhanced pulmonary endothelial Sdc1 expression in time- and dose-dependent manners and loss of Sdc1 in pulmonary endothelial cells worsened permeability and stress fiber formation by FFP. Loss of Sdc1 in vivo led to equivalency between LR and FFP in restoring pulmonary injury, inflammation, and permeability after shock. Lastly, Sdc1 mice demonstrated a significant increase in pulmonary syndecan 4 expression after hemorrhagic shock and FFP-based resuscitation. Taken together, our findings support a key role for Sdc1 in modulating pulmonary protection by FFP after hemorrhagic shock. Our results also suggest that other members of the syndecan family may at least be contributing to FFP's effects on the endothelium, an area that warrants further investigation.

  10. Placental sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites is mediated by the interaction between VAR2CSA and chondroitin sulfate A on syndecan-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres Pereira, Marina; Mandel Clausen, Thomas; Pehrson, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    During placental malaria, Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta, causing health problems for both the mother and fetus. The specific adherence is mediated by the VAR2CSA protein, which binds to placental chondroitin sulfate (CS) on chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans......-down experiments using placental extracts from whole placenta or syncytiotrophoblast microvillous cell membranes showed three distinct CSPGs available for VAR2CSA adherence. Further examination of these three CSPGs by immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assays showed that syndecan-1 is the main receptor...... for VAR2CSA mediated placental adherence. We further show that the commonly used placental choriocarcinoma cell line, BeWo, express a different set of proteoglycans than those present on placental syncytiotrophoblast and may not be the most biologically relevant model to study placental malaria. Syncytial...

  11. Quantitative evaluation of experimental choroidal neovascularization by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy: fluorescein angiogram parallels heparan sulfate proteoglycan expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.V. Regatieri

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop a quantitative method to evaluate laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV in a rat model using Heidelberg Retina Angiograph 2 (HRA2 imaging. The expression of two heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG related to inflammation and angiogenesis was also investigated. CNV lesions were induced with argon laser in 21 heterozygous Zucker rats and after three weeks a fluorescein angiogram and autofluorescence exams were performed using HRA2. The area and greatest linear dimension were measured by two observers not aware of the protocol. Bland-Altman plots showed agreement between the observers, suggesting that the technique was reproducible. After fluorescein angiogram, HSPG (perlecan and syndecan-4 were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. There was a significant increase in the expression of perlecan and syndecan-4 (P < 0.0001 in retinas bearing CNV lesions compared to control retinas. The expression of these two HSPG increased with increasing CNV area. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the rat retina damaged with laser shots presented increased expression of perlecan and syndecan-4. Moreover, we observed that the overexpression occurred in the outer layer of the retina, which is related to choroidal damage. It was possible to develop a standardized quantitative method to evaluate CNV in a rat model using HRA2. In addition, we presented data indicating that the expression of HSPG parallels the area of CNV lesion. The understanding of these events offers opportunities for studies of new therapeutic interventions targeting these HSPG.

  12. Syndecans – key regulators of cell signaling and biological functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afratis, Nikolaos A.; Nikitovic, Dragana; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.

    2017-01-01

    molecules during cancer initiation and progression. Particularly syndecans interact with other cell surface receptors, such as growth factor receptors and integrins, which lead to activation of downstream signaling pathways, which are critical for the cellular behavior. Moreover, this review describes...

  13. Syndecans as receptors and organizers of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Gopal, Sandeep; Couchman, John R

    2010-01-01

    Syndecans are type I transmembrane proteins having a core protein modified with glycosaminoglycan chains, most commonly heparan sulphate. They are an ancient group of molecules, present in invertebrates and vertebrates. Among the plethora of molecules that can interact with heparan sulphate, the collagens and glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix are prominent. Frequently, they do so in conjunction with other receptors, most notably the integrins. For this reason, they are often referred to as "co-receptors". However, just as with integrins, syndecans can interact with actin-associated proteins and signalling molecules, such as protein kinases. Some aspects of syndecan signalling are understood but much remains to be learned. The functions of syndecans in regulating cell adhesion and extracellular matrix assembly are described here. Evidence from null mice suggests that syndecans have roles in postnatal tissue repair, inflammation and tumour progression. Developmental deficits in lower vertebrates in which syndecans are eliminated are also informative and suggest that, in mammals, redundancy is a key issue.

  14. Syndecans: synergistic activators of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    Cell-surface proteoglycans participate in cell adhesion, growth-factor signalling, lipase activity and anticoagulation. Until recently, only the roles of the glycosaminoglycan chains were investigated. Now, with molecular characterization of several core proteins, the roles of each individual...... molecules modulating integrin-based adhesion....

  15. Human glomerular epithelial cell proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.J.; Jenner, L.; Mason, R.M.; Davies, M.

    1990-01-01

    Proteoglycans synthesized by cultures of human glomerular epithelial cells have been isolated and characterized. Three types of heparan sulfate were detected. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan I (HSPG-I; Kav 6B 0.04) was found in the cell layer and medium and accounted for 12% of the total proteoglycans synthesized. HSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.25) accounted for 18% of the proteoglycans and was located in the medium and cell layer. A third population (9% of the proteoglycan population), heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan (HS-GAG; Kav 6B 0.4-0.8), had properties consistent with single glycosaminoglycan chains or their fragments and was found only in the cell layer. HSPG-I and HSPG-II from the cell layer had hydrophobic properties; they were released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. HS-GAG lacked these properties, consisted of low-molecular-mass heparan sulfate oligosaccharides, and were intracellular. HSPG-I and -II released to the medium lacked hydrophobic properties. The cells also produced three distinct types of chondroitin sulfates. The major species, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan I (CSPG-I) eluted in the excluded volume of a Sepharose CL-6B column, accounted for 30% of the proteoglycans detected, and was found in both the cell layer and medium. Cell layer CSPG-I bound to octyl-Sepharose. It was released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. CSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.1-0.23) accounted for 10% of the total 35S-labeled macromolecules and was found predominantly in the culture medium. A small amount of CS-GAG (Kav 6B 0.25-0.6) is present in the cell extract and like HS-GAG is intracellular. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that HSPG-I and -II and CSPG-I and -II are lost from the cell layer either by direct release into the medium or by internalization where they are metabolized to single glycosaminoglycan chains and subsequently to inorganic sulfate

  16. Heparanase facilitates cell adhesion and spreading by clustering of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flonia Levy-Adam

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Heparanase is a heparan sulfate (HS degrading endoglycosidase participating in extracellular matrix degradation and remodeling. Apart of its well characterized enzymatic activity, heparanase was noted to exert also enzymatic-independent functions. Non-enzymatic activities of heparanase include enhanced adhesion of tumor-derived cells and primary T-cells. Attempting to identify functional domains of heparanase that would serve as targets for drug development, we have identified heparin binding domains of heparanase. A corresponding peptide (residues Lys(158-Asp(171, termed KKDC was demonstrated to physically associate with heparin and HS, and to inhibit heparanase enzymatic activity. We hypothesized that the pro-adhesive properties of heparanase are mediated by its interaction with cell surface HS proteoglycans, and utilized the KKDC peptide to examine this possibility. We provide evidence that the KKDC peptide interacts with cell membrane HS, resulting in clustering of syndecan-1 and syndecan-4. We applied classical analysis of cell morphology, fluorescent and time-lapse microscopy and demonstrated that the KKDC peptide efficiently stimulates the adhesion and spreading of various cell types, mediated by PKC, Src, and the small GTPase Rac1. These results support, and further substantiate the notion that heparanase function is not limited to its enzymatic activity.

  17. microRNA-145 promotes differentiation in human urothelial carcinoma through down-regulation of syndecan-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tomomi; Shimada, Keiji; Tatsumi, Yoshihiro; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Obayashi, Chiho; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Konishi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    A new molecular marker of carcinoma in the urinary bladder is needed as a diagnostic tool or as a therapeutic target. Potential markers include microRNAs (miRNAs), which are short, low molecular weight RNAs 19–24 nt long that regulate genes associated with cell proliferation, differentiation, and development in various cancers. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which miR-145 promotes survival of urothelial carcinoma cells and differentiation into multiple lineages. We found miR-145 to regulate expression of syndecan-1, a heparin sulfate proteoglycan. Cell proliferation in the human urothelial carcinoma cell lines T24 and KU7 was assessed by MTS assay. Cellular senescence and apoptosis were measured by senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) and TUNEL assay, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of various genes, including syndecan-1, stem cell factors, and markers of differentiation into squamous, glandular, or neuroendocrine cells. Overexpression of miR-145 induced cell senescence, and thus significantly inhibited cell proliferation in T24 and KU7 cells. Syndecan-1 expression diminished, whereas stem cell markers such as SOX2, NANOG, OCT4, and E2F3 increased. miR-145 also up-regulated markers of differentiation into squamous (p63, TP63, and CK5), glandular (MUC-1, MUC-2, and MUC-5 AC), and neuroendocrine cells (NSE and UCHL-1). Finally, expression of miR-145 was down-regulated in high-grade urothelial carcinomas, but not in low-grade tumors. Results indicate that miR-145 suppresses syndecan-1 and, by this mechanism, up-regulates stem cell factors and induces cell senescence and differentiation. We propose that miR-145 may confer stem cell-like properties on urothelial carcinoma cells and thus facilitate differentiation into multiple cell types. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1846-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  18. Syndecans promote integrin-mediated adhesion of mesenchymal cells in two distinct pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whiteford, James; Behrends, Volker; Kirby, Hishani

    2007-01-01

    and signaling through the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4. Here an alternate pathway mediated by the extracellular domains of syndecans-2 and -4 is characterized that is independent of both heparan sulphate and syndecan signaling. This pathway is restricted to mesenchymal cells and was not seen in any...... epithelial cell line tested, apart from vascular endothelia. The syndecan ectodomains coated as substrates promoted integrin-dependent attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation. Syndecan-4 null cells were competent, as were fibroblasts compromised in heparan sulphate synthesis that were unable...

  19. Sugar Antennae for Guidance Signals: Syndecans and Glypicans Integrate Directional Cues for Navigating Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Rhiner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Attractive and repulsive signals guide migrating nerve cells in all directions when the nervous system starts to form. The neurons extend thin processes, axons, that connect over wide distances with other brain cells to form a complicated neuronal network. One of the most fascinating questions in neuroscience is how the correct wiring of billions of nerve cells in our brain is controlled. Several protein families are known to serve as guidance cues for navigating neurons and axons. Nevertheless, the combinatorial potential of these proteins seems to be insufficient to sculpt the entire neuronal network and the appropriate formation of connections. Recently, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs, which are present on the cell surface of neurons and in the extracellular matrix through which neurons and axons migrate, have been found to play a role in regulating cell migration and axon guidance. Intriguingly, the large number of distinct modifications that can be put onto the sugar side chains of these PGs would in principle allow for an enormous diversity of HSPGs, which could help in regulating the vast number of guidance choices taken by individual neurons. In this review, we will focus on the role of the cell surface HSPGs syndecan and glypican and specific HS modifications in promoting neuronal migration, axon guidance, and synapse formation.

  20. Proteoglycans in Leiomyoma and Normal Myometrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Nichole M.; Carrino, David A.; Caplan, Arnold I.; Hurd, William W.; Liu, James H.; Tan, Huiqing; Mesiano, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Uterine leiomyoma are a common benign pelvic tumors composed of modified smooth muscle cells and a large amount of extracellular matrix (ECM). The proteoglycan composition of the leiomyoma ECM is thought to affect pathophysiology of the disease. To test this hypothesis, we examined the abundance (by immunoblotting) and expression (by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction) of the proteoglycans biglycan, decorin, and versican in leiomyoma and normal myometrium and determined whether expression is affected by steroid hormones and menstrual phase. Leiomyoma and normal myometrium were collected from women (n = 17) undergoing hysterectomy or myomectomy. In vitro studies were performed on immortalized leiomyoma (UtLM) and normal myometrial (hTERT-HM) cells with and without exposure to estradiol and progesterone. In leiomyoma tissue, abundance of decorin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were 2.6-fold and 1.4-fold lower, respectively, compared with normal myometrium. Abundance of versican mRNA was not different between matched samples, whereas versican protein was increased 1.8-fold in leiomyoma compared with myometrium. Decorin mRNA was 2.4-fold lower in secretory phase leiomyoma compared with proliferative phase tissue. In UtLM cells, progesterone decreased the abundance of decorin mRNA by 1.3-fold. Lower decorin expression in leiomyoma compared with myometrium may contribute to disease growth and progression. As decorin inhibits the activity of specific growth factors, its reduced level in the leiomyoma cell microenvironment may promote cell proliferation and ECM deposition. Our data suggest that decorin expression in leiomyoma is inhibited by progesterone, which may be a mechanism by which the ovarian steroids affect leiomyoma growth and disease progression. PMID:26423601

  1. Irradiation-induced angiogenesis is associated with an MMP-9-miR-494-syndecan-1 regulatory loop in medulloblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuthkar, S; Velpula, K K; Nalla, A K; Gogineni, V R; Gondi, C S; Rao, J S

    2014-04-10

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) represents one of the most prominent proteins associated with tumorigenesis and is a modulator of the tumor microenvironment during angiogenesis. Recently, syndecan-1 (SDC1), a transmembrane heparan sulfate-bearing proteoglycan, was also speculated to have a critical role in contributing to angiogenesis when associated with MMP-9. However, the mechanism behind their synergistic regulation is not fully understood. In the current study, we report for the first time that ionizing radiation (IR)-induced MMP-9 enhances SDC1 shedding, corroborating to tube-inducing ability of medulloblastoma (MB) cells. Furthermore, we observed that the tumor angiogenesis is associated with higher MMP-9-SDC1 interactions on both the cell surface and extracellular medium. Our results also revealed the existence of a novel regulatory mechanism where MMP-9 drives the suppression of miR-494, resulting in enhanced SDC1 shedding and angiogenesis. From the in situ hybridization analysis, we found that MMP-9-specific shRNA (shMMP-9) treatment of mouse intracranial tumors resulted in elevated expression of miR-494. This negative correlation between MMP-9 and miR-494 levels was observed to be dependent on the methylation status of a miR-494 promoter-associated CpG island region (-186 to -20), which was confirmed by bisulfite-sequencing and methylation-specific PCR (MSP) analysis. Further, validation of MMP-9 and SDC1 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) targets with luciferase reporter assay provided a more favorable result for miR-494-mediated regulation of SDC1 but not of MMP-9, suggesting that the 3'-UTR of SDC1 mRNA is a direct target of miR-494. Overall, our results indicate that angiogenesis induced by radiotherapy is associated with an MMP-9-miR-494-SDC1 regulatory loop and that MMP-9-SDC1 activity creates a negative feedback loop by regulating the expression of miR-494.

  2. Heparan sulfate chain valency controls syndecan-4 function in cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopal, Sandeep; Bober, Adam; Whiteford, James R

    2010-01-01

    , clustering of one-chain syndecan-4 forms with antibodies overcame the block, indicating that valency of interactions with ligands is a key component of syndecan-4 function. Measurements of focal contact/adhesion size and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation correlated with syndecan-4 status and alpha...... of the core protein cytoplasmic domain, though not interactions with PDZ proteins. A second key requirement is multiple heparan sulfate chains. Mutant syndecan-4 with no chains, or only one chain, failed to restore the wild type phenotype, while those expressing two or three were competent. However......-smooth muscle actin organization, being reduced where syndecan-4 function was compromised by a lack of multiple heparan sulfate chains....

  3. Brain heparan sulphate proteoglycans are altered in developing foetus when exposed to in-utero hyperglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, M S; Nandini, C D

    2017-08-01

    In-utero exposure of foetus to hyperglycaemic condition affects the growth and development of the organism. The brain is one of the first organs that start to develop during embryonic period and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and proteoglycans (PGs) are one of the key molecules involved in its development. But studies on the effect of hyperglycaemic conditions on brain GAGs/PGs are few and far between. We, therefore, looked into the changes in brain GAGs and PGs at various developmental stages of pre- and post-natal rats from non-diabetic and diabetic mothers as well as in adult rats induced with diabetes using a diabetogenic agent, Streptozotocin. Increased expression of GAGs especially that of heparan sulphate class in various developmental stages were observed in the brain as a result of in-utero hyperglycaemic condition but not in that of adult rats. Changes in disaccharides of heparan sulphate (HS) were observed in various developmental stages. Furthermore, various HSPGs namely, syndecans-1 and -3 and glypican-1 were overexpressed in offspring from diabetic mother. However, in adult diabetic rats, only glypican-1 was overexpressed. The offsprings from diabetic mothers became hyperphagic at the end of 8 weeks after birth which can have implications in the long run. Our results highlight the likely impact of the in-utero exposure of foetus to hyperglycaemic condition on brain GAGs/PGs compared to diabetic adult rats.

  4. An introduction to proteoglycans and their localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, John R; Pataki, Andreea Csilla

    2012-01-01

    and in vivo location, and have important roles in invertebrate and vertebrate development, maintenance, and tissue repair. Many biologically potent small proteins can bind glycosaminoglycan chains as a key part of their function in the extracellular matrix, at the cell surface, and also in some intracellular...... locations. Therefore, the participation of proteoglycans in disease is receiving increased attention. In this short review, proteoglycan structure, function, and localizations are summarized, with reference to accompanying reviews in this issue as well as other recent literature. Included are some remarks...

  5. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans undergo differential expression alterations in right sided colorectal cancer, depending on their metastatic character

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Vega, Iván; García-Suárez, Olivia; García, Beatriz; Crespo, Ainara; Astudillo, Aurora; Quirós, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are complex molecules involved in the growth, invasion and metastatic properties of cancerous cells. This study analyses the alterations in the expression patterns of these molecules in right sided colorectal cancer (CRC), both metastatic and non-metastatic. Twenty right sided CRCs were studied. A transcriptomic approach was used, employing qPCR to analyze both the expression of the enzymes involved in heparan sulfate (HS) chains biosynthesis, as well as the proteoglycan core proteins. Since some of these proteoglycans can also carry chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains, we include the study of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of these glycosaminoglycans. Immunohistochemical techniques were also used to analyze tissue expression of particular genes showing significant expression differences, of potential interest. Changes in proteoglycan core proteins differ depending on their location; those located intracellularly or in the extracellular matrix show very similar alteration patterns, while those located on the cell surface vary greatly depending on the nature of the tumor: glypicans 1, 3, 6 and betaglycan are affected in the non-metastatic tumors, whereas in the metastatic, only glypican-1 and syndecan-1 are modified, the latter showing opposing alterations in levels of RNA and of protein, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation in these tumors. Furthermore, in non-metastatic tumors, polymerization of glycosaminoglycan chains is modified, particularly affecting the synthesis of the tetrasaccharide linker and the initiation and elongation of CS chains, HS chains being less affected. Regarding the enzymes responsible for the modificaton of the HS chains, alterations were only found in non-metastatic tumors, affecting N-sulfation and the isoforms HS6ST1, HS3ST3B and HS3ST5. In contrast, synthesis of the CS chains suggests changes in epimerization and sulfation of the C4 and C2 in both types of tumor. Right sided CRCs show

  6. Presynaptic proteoglycans: sweet organizers of synapse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yoo Sung; Kim, Eunjoon

    2013-08-21

    Synaptic adhesion molecules control neuronal synapse development. In this issue of Neuron, Siddiqui et al. (2013) and de Wit et al. (2013) demonstrate that LRRTM4, a postsynaptic adhesion molecule, trans-synaptically interacts with presynaptic heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) to promote synapse development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Down-regulation of fibroblast growth factor 2 and its co-receptors heparan sulfate proteoglycans by resveratrol underlies the improvement of cardiac dysfunction in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunz, Célia Maria Cássaro; Roggerio, Alessandra; Cruz, Paula Lázara; Pacanaro, Ana Paula; Salemi, Vera Maria Cury; Benvenuti, Luiz Alberto; Mansur, Antonio de Pádua; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac remodeling in diabetes involves cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is an important mediator of this process. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic antioxidant, reportedly promotes the improvement of cardiac dysfunction in diabetic rats. However, little information exists linking the amelioration of the cardiac function promoted by resveratrol and the expression of FGF2 and its co-receptors, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs: Glypican-1 and Syndecan-4), in cardiac muscle of Type 2 diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced experimentally by the injection of streptozotocin and nicotinamide, and the rats were treated with resveratrol for 6 weeks. According to our results, there is an up-regulation of the expression of genes and/or proteins of Glypican-1, Syndecan-4, FGF2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and AMP-activated protein kinase in diabetic rats. On the other hand, resveratrol treatment promoted the attenuation of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and the down-regulation of the expression of all proteins under study. The trigger for the changes in gene expression and protein synthesis promoted by resveratrol was the presence of diabetes. The negative modulation conducted by resveratrol on FGF2 and HSPGs expression, which are involved in cardiac remodeling, underlies the amelioration of cardiac function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. DcR3 binds to ovarian cancer via heparan sulfate proteoglycans and modulates tumor cells response to platinum with corresponding alteration in the expression of BRCA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor Joseph P

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overcoming platinum resistance is a major obstacle in the treatment of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC. In our previous work Decoy Receptor 3 (DcR3 was found to be related to platinum resistance. The major objective of this work was to define the cellular interaction of DcR3 with EOC and to explore its effects on platinum responsiveness. Methods We studied cell lines and primary cultures for the expression of and the cells ability to bind DcR3. Cells were cultured with DcR3 and then exposed to platinum. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Finally, the cells molecular response to DcR3 was studied using real time RT-PCR based differential expression arrays, standard RT-PCR, and Western blot. Results High DcR3 in the peritoneal cavity of women with EOC is associated with significantly shorter time to first recurrence after platinum based therapy (p = 0.02. None-malignant cells contribute DcR3 in the peritoneal cavity. The cell lines studied do not secrete DcR3; however they all bind exogenous DcR3 to their surface implying that they can be effected by DcR3 from other sources. DcR3s protein binding partners are minimally expressed or negative, however, all cells expressed the DcR3 binding Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans (HSPGs Syndecans-2, and CD44v3. DcR3 binding was inhibited by heparin and heparinase. After DcR3 exposure both SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 became more resistant to platinum with 15% more cells surviving at high doses. On the contrary CaOV3 became more sensitive to platinum with 20–25% more cell death. PCR array analysis showed increase expression of BRCA1 mRNA in SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 and decreased BRCA1 expression in CaOV-3 after exposure to DcR3. This was confirmed by gene specific real time PCR and Western blot analysis. Conclusions Non-malignant cells contribute to the high levels of DcR3 in ovarian cancer. DcR3 binds readily to EOC cells via HSPGs and alter their responsiveness to platinum chemotherapy. The

  9. Cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell adhesion are linked by syndecan-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakideeri Karat, Sandeep Gopal; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Pocock, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-cell junctions that employ microfilaments are sites of tension. They are important for tissue repair, morphogenetic movements and can be emblematic of matrix contraction in fibrotic disease and the stroma of solid tumors. One cell surface receptor, syndecan...... calcium. While it is known that cell-ECM and cell-cell junctions may be linked, possible roles for syndecans in this process are not understood. Here we show that wild type primary fibroblasts and those lacking syndecan-4 utilize different cadherins in their adherens junctions and that tension is a major...... factor in this differential response. This corresponds to the reduced ability of fibroblasts lacking syndecan-4 to exert tension on the ECM and we now show that this may extend to reduced tension in cell-cell adhesion....

  10. Differences in E-Cadherin and Syndecan-1 Expression in Different Types of Ameloblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Verdín, Sandra; Pereira-Prado, Vanesa

    2018-01-01

    Ameloblastomas are a group of benign, locally aggressive, recurrent tumors characterized by their slow and infiltrative growth. E-Cadherin and syndecan-1 are cell adhesion molecules related to the behavior of various tumors, including ameloblastomas. Ninety-nine ameloblastoma samples were studied; the expression of E-cadherin and syndecan-1 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. E-Cadherin and epithelial syndecan-1 were more highly expressed in intraluminal/luminal unicystic ameloblastoma than in mural unicystic ameloblastoma and solid/multicystic ameloblastoma, whereas the stromal expression of syndecan-1 was higher in mural unicystic ameloblastoma and solid/multicystic ameloblastoma. Synchronicity was observed between E-cadherin and epithelial syndecan-1; the expression was correlated with intensity in all cases. There was a strong association between expression and tumor size and recurrence. The evaluation of the expression of E-cadherin and syndecan-1 are important for determining the potential aggressiveness of ameloblastoma variants. Future studies are required to understand how the expression of these markers is related to tumor aggressiveness.

  11. Digestion of proteoglycan by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuritza, A P; Salyers, A A

    1983-01-01

    It has been shown previously that Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a human colonic anaerobe, can utilize the tissue mucopolysaccharide chondroitin sulfate as a source of carbon and energy and that the enzymes involved in this utilization are all cell associated (A. A. Salyers and M. B. O'Brien, J. Bacteriol. 143:772-780, 1980). Since chondroitin sulfate does not generally occur in isolated form in tissue, but rather is bound covalently in proteoglycan, we investigated the extent to which chondro...

  12. Specific genes involved in synthesis and editing of heparan sulfate proteoglycans show altered expression patterns in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Vega, Iván; García, Olivia; Crespo, Ainara; Castañón, Sonia; Menéndez, Primitiva; Astudillo, Aurora; Quirós, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    The expression of a specific set of genes controls the different structures of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), which are involved in the growth, invasion and metastatic properties of cancerous cells. The purpose of this study is to increase knowledge of HSPG alterations in breast cancer. Twenty-three infiltrating ductal adenocarcinomas (IDCs), both metastatic and non-metastatic were studied. A transcriptomic approach to the structure of heparan sulfate (HS) chains was used, employing qPCR to analyze both the expression of the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and editing, as well as the proteoglycan core proteins. Since some of these proteoglycans can also carry chondroitin sulfate chains, we extended the study to include the genes involved in the biosynthesis of these glycosaminoglycans. Histochemical techniques were also used to analyze tissular expression of particular genes showing significant expression differences, of potential interest. No significant change in transcription was detected in approximately 70% of analyzed genes. However, 13 demonstrated changes in both tumor types (40% showing more intense deregulation in the metastatic), while 5 genes showed changes only in non-metastatic tumors. Changes were related to 3 core proteins: overexpression of syndecan-1 and underexpression of glypican-3 and perlecan. HS synthesis was affected by lower levels of some 3-O-sulfotransferase transcripts, the expression of NDST4 and, only in non metastatic tumors, higher levels of extracellular sulfatases. Furthermore, the expression of chondroitin sulfate also was considerably affected, involving both the synthesis of the saccharidic chains and sulfations at all locations. However, the pro-metastatic enzyme heparanase did not exhibit significant changes in mRNA expression, although in metastatic tumors it appeared related to increased levels of the most stable form of mRNA. Finally, the expression of heparanase 2, which displays anti-metastatic features

  13. Basement membrane proteoglycans in glomerular morphogenesis: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan is temporally and spatially restricted during development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, K J; Bynum, K; St John, P L

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported the presence of a basement membrane-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (BM-CSPG) in basement membranes of almost all adult tissues. However, an exception to this ubiquitous distribution was found in the kidney, where BM-CSPG was absent from the glomerular capillary......, the present study used light and electron microscopic immunohistochemistry to examine the distribution of BM-CSPG and basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan (BM-HSPG) during prenatal and postnatal renal development in the rat. Our results show that the temporal and spatial pattern of expression of BM...

  14. Heparan sulfate chains from glypican and syndecans bind the Hep II domain of fibronectin similarly despite minor structural differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tumova, S; Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2000-01-01

    syndecan-4. Despite distinct molecular masses of glypican and syndecan glycosaminoglycans and minor differences in disaccharide composition and sulfation pattern, the overall proportion and distribution of sulfated regions and the affinity for the Hep II domain were similar. Therefore, adhesion regulation...

  15. Exploiting Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Human Neurogenesis—Controlling Lineage Specification and Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh Yu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Unspecialized, self-renewing stem cells have extraordinary application to regenerative medicine due to their multilineage differentiation potential. Stem cell therapies through replenishing damaged or lost cells in the injured area is an attractive treatment of brain trauma and neurodegenerative neurological disorders. Several stem cell types have neurogenic potential including neural stem cells (NSCs, embryonic stem cells (ESCs, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Currently, effective use of these cells is limited by our lack of understanding and ability to direct lineage commitment and differentiation of neural lineages. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs are ubiquitous proteins within the stem cell microenvironment or niche and are found localized on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix (ECM, where they interact with numerous signaling molecules. The glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains carried by HSPGs are heterogeneous carbohydrates comprised of repeating disaccharides with specific sulfation patterns that govern ligand interactions to numerous factors including the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and wingless-type MMTV integration site family (Wnts. As such, HSPGs are plausible targets for guiding and controlling neural stem cell lineage fate. In this review, we provide an overview of HSPG family members syndecans and glypicans, and perlecan and their role in neurogenesis. We summarize the structural changes and subsequent functional implications of heparan sulfate as cells undergo neural lineage differentiation as well as outline the role of HSPG core protein expression throughout mammalian neural development and their function as cell receptors and co-receptors. Finally, we highlight suitable biomimetic approaches for exploiting the role of HSPGs in mammalian neurogenesis to control and tailor cell differentiation into specific lineages. An improved ability to control stem cell specific neural

  16. Occurrence and structural characterization of versican-like proteoglycan in human vitreous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Papageorgakopoulou, Nickoletta; Feretis, Elias; Theocharis, Dimitrios A

    2002-12-01

    Human vitreous gel is a special type of extracellular matrix, in which interpenetrating networks of collagen fibrils and hyaluronan are found. In this study, we report that apart from significant amounts of collagen, hyaluronan and sialylated glycoproteins, it was found that the human vitreous gel also contained low amounts of versican-like proteoglycan. The concentration of versican-like proteoglycan in the whole vitreous is 0.06 mg protein/ml of vitreous gel and represents a small percentage (about 5%) of the total protein content. The versican-like proteoglycan has a molecular mass of 380 kDa, as estimated by gel chromatography. Its core protein is substituted by chondroitin sulphate side chains (average molecular weight 37 kDa), in which 6-sulphated disaccharides predominated. According to the physicochemical data, the number of chondroitin sulphate chains is likely to be 5-7 per molecule. These proteoglycan monomers form large aggregates with endogenous hyaluronan. Versican, which is able to bind lectins via its C-terminal region, may bridge or interconnect various constituents of the extracellular matrix via its terminal domains in order to stabilize large supramolecular complexes at the vitreous, contributing towards the integrity and specific properties of the tissue.

  17. Cartilage proteoglycans inhibit fibronectin-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, A. M.; Pearlstein, E.; Weissmann, G.; Hoffstein, S. T.

    1981-09-01

    Normal tissues and organs show, on histological examination, a pattern of cellular and acellular zones that is characteristic and unique for each organ or tissue. This pattern is maintained in health but is sometimes destroyed by disease. For example, in mobile joints, the articular surfaces consist of relatively acellular hyaline cartilage, and the joint space is enclosed by a capsule of loose connective tissue with a lining of fibroblasts and macrophages. In the normal joint these cells are confined to the synovial lining and the articular surface remains acellular. In in vitro culture, macrophages and their precursor monocytes are very adhesive, and fibroblasts can migrate and overgrow surfaces such as collagen or plastic used for tissue culture. The fibroblasts adhere to collagen by means of fibronectin, which they synthesize and secrete1. Because the collagen of cartilage is capable of binding serum fibronectin2 and fibronectin is present in cartilage during its development3, these cells should, in theory, slowly migrate from the synovial lining to the articular surface. It is their absence from the articular cartilage in normal circumstances, and then presence in such pathological states as rheumatoid arthritis, that is striking. We therefore set out to determine whether a component of cartilage could prevent fibroblast adherence in a defined adhesion assay. As normal cartilage is composed of 50% proteoglycans and 50% collagen by dry weight4, we tested the possibility that the proteoglycans in cartilage inhibit fibroblast adhesion to collagen. We present here evidence that fibroblast spreading and adhesion to collagenous substrates is inhibited by cartilage proteoglycans.

  18. Identification of chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycans and heparin proteoglycans in the secretory granules of human lung mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.; Fox, C.C.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    The predominant subclasses of mast cells in both the rat and the mouse can be distinguished from one another by their preferential synthesis of 35 S-labeled proteoglycans that contain either heparin or oversulfated chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Although [ 35 S]heparin proteoglycans have been isolated from human lung mast cells of 40-70% purity and from a skin biopsy specimen of a patient with urticaria pigmentosa, no highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan has been isolated from any enriched or highly purified population of human mast cells. The authors demonstrate that human lung mast cells of 96% purity incorporate [ 35 S]sulfate into separate heparin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in an ∼2:1 ratio. As assessed by HPLC of the chondroitinase ABC digests, the chondroitin [ 35 S]sulfate proteoglycans isolated from these human lung mast cells contain the same unusual chondroitin sulfate E disaccharide that is present in proteoglycans produced by interleukin 3-dependent mucosal-like mouse mast cells. Both the chondroitin [ 35 S]sulfate E proteoglycans and the [ 35 S]heparin proteoglycans were exocytosed from the [ 35 S]sulfate-labeled cells via perturbation of the IgE receptor, indicating that both types of 35 S-labeled proteoglycans reside in the secretory granules of these human lung mast cells

  19. P120-GAP associated with syndecan-2 to function as an active switch signal for Src upon transformation with oncogenic ras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.-W.; Chen, C.-L.; Chuang, N.-N.

    2005-01-01

    BALB/3T3 cells transfected with plasmids pcDNA3.1-[S-ras(Q 61 K)] of shrimp Penaeus japonicus were applied to reveal a complex of p120-GAP/syndecan-2 being highly expressed upon transformation. Of interest, most of the p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex was localized at caveolae, a membrane microdomain enriched with caveolin-1. To confirm the molecular interaction between syndecan-2 and p120-GAP, we further purified p120-GAP protein from mouse brains by using an affinity column of HiTrap-RACK1 and expressed mouse RACK1-encoded fusion protein and mouse syndecan-2-encoded fusion protein in bacteria. We report molecular affinities exist between p120-GAP and RACK1, syndecan-2 and RACK1 as well as p120-GAP and syndecan-2. The selective affinity between p120-GAP and syndecan-2 was found to be sufficient to detach RACK1. The p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex was demonstrated to keep Src tyrosine kinase in an activated form. On the other hand, the syndecan-2/RACK1 complex was found to have Src in an inactivated form. These data indicate that the p120-GAP/syndecan-2 complex at caveolae could provide a docking site for Src to transmit tyrosine signaling, implying that syndecan-2/p120-GAP functions as a tumor promoter upon transformation with oncogenic ras of shrimp P. japonicus

  20. A targeted glycan-related gene screen reveals heparan sulfate proteoglycan sulfation regulates WNT and BMP trans-synaptic signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Dani

    Full Text Available A Drosophila transgenic RNAi screen targeting the glycan genome, including all N/O/GAG-glycan biosynthesis/modification enzymes and glycan-binding lectins, was conducted to discover novel glycan functions in synaptogenesis. As proof-of-product, we characterized functionally paired heparan sulfate (HS 6-O-sulfotransferase (hs6st and sulfatase (sulf1, which bidirectionally control HS proteoglycan (HSPG sulfation. RNAi knockdown of hs6st and sulf1 causes opposite effects on functional synapse development, with decreased (hs6st and increased (sulf1 neurotransmission strength confirmed in null mutants. HSPG co-receptors for WNT and BMP intercellular signaling, Dally-like Protein and Syndecan, are differentially misregulated in the synaptomatrix of these mutants. Consistently, hs6st and sulf1 nulls differentially elevate both WNT (Wingless; Wg and BMP (Glass Bottom Boat; Gbb ligand abundance in the synaptomatrix. Anterograde Wg signaling via Wg receptor dFrizzled2 C-terminus nuclear import and retrograde Gbb signaling via synaptic MAD phosphorylation and nuclear import are differentially activated in hs6st and sulf1 mutants. Consequently, transcriptional control of presynaptic glutamate release machinery and postsynaptic glutamate receptors is bidirectionally altered in hs6st and sulf1 mutants, explaining the bidirectional change in synaptic functional strength. Genetic correction of the altered WNT/BMP signaling restores normal synaptic development in both mutant conditions, proving that altered trans-synaptic signaling causes functional differentiation defects.

  1. Therapeutic Ultrasound Bypasses Canonical Syndecan-4 Signaling to Activate Rac1*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Claire M.; Morgan, Mark R.; Harrison, Andrew; Humphries, Martin J.; Bass, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    The application of pulsed, low intensity ultrasound is emerging as a potent therapy for the treatment of complex bone fractures and tissue damage. Ultrasonic stimuli accelerate fracture healing by up to 40% and enhance tendon and ligament healing by promoting cell proliferation, migration, and matrix synthesis through an unresolved mechanism. Ultrasound treatment also induces closure of nonunion fractures, at a success rate (85% of cases) similar to that of surgical intervention (68-96%) while avoiding the complications associated with surgery. The regulation of cell adhesion necessary for wound healing depends on cooperative engagement of the extracellular matrix receptors, integrin and syndecan, as exemplified by the wound healing defects observed in syndecan- and integrin-knock-out mice. This report distinguishes the influence of ultrasound on signals downstream of the prototypic fibronectin receptors, α5β1 integrin and syndecan-4, which cooperate to regulate Rac1 and RhoA. Ultrasonic stimulation fails to activate integrins or induce cell spreading on poor, electrostatic ligands. By contrast, ultrasound treatment overcomes the necessity of engagement or expression of syndecan-4 during the process of focal adhesion formation, which normally requires simultaneous engagement of both receptors. Ultrasound exerts an influence downstream of syndecan-4 and PKCα to specifically activate Rac1, itself a critical regulator of tissue repair, and to a lesser extent RhoA. The ability of ultrasound to bypass syndecan-4 signaling, which is known to facilitate efficient tissue repair, explains the reduction in healing times observed in ultrasound-treated patients. By substituting for one of the key axes of adhesion-dependent signaling, ultrasound therapy has considerable potential as a clinical technique. PMID:19147498

  2. Syndecan-4 Is an Independent Predictor of All-Cause as Well as Cardiovascular Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej J Jaroszyński

    Full Text Available Left ventricular hypertrophy is associated withincreased mortality in hemodialysis (HD patients.Syndecan-4 plays a role in many processes that are involved in the heart fibrosis and hypertrophy.We designed this study to prospectively determine whether syndecan-4 was predictive of mortality in a group of HD patients.In total, 191 HD patients were included. Clinical, biochemical and echocardiographic parameters were recorded. HD patients were followed-up for 23.18 ± 4.02 months.Syndecan-4 levels correlated strongly with geometrical echocardiographic parameters and ejection fraction. Relations with pressure-related parameters were weak and only marginally significant. Using the receiver operating characteristics the optimal cut-off points in predicting all-cause as well as cardiovascular (CV mortality were evaluated and patients were divided into low and high syndecan-4 groups. A Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the cumulative incidences of all-cause as well as CV mortality were higher in high serum syndecan-4 group compared with those with low serum syndecan-4 (p<0.001 in both cases.A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed syndecan-4 concentration to be an independent and significant predictor of all-cause (hazard ratio, 2.99; confidence interval, 2.34 to 3.113; p<0.001as well as CV mortality (hazard ratio, 2.81;confidence interval, 2.28to3.02; p<0.001.Serum syndecan-4 concentration reflects predominantly geometrical echocardiographic parameters. In HD patients serum syndecan-4 concentration is independently associated with all-cause as well as CV mortality.

  3. Proteoglycans as potential biomarkers in odontogenic tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Herrera, Zaira; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Damián-Matsumura, Pablo; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2018-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are essential for normal cellular development; however, alterations of their concentrations can promote tumor growth. To date, a limited number of studies report the presence of PGs in odontogenic tumors (OTs); therefore, the main purpose of this work is to gather the information published on the study of PGs. The search reported 26 articles referring to the presence of different PGs in distinct OTs from 1999 to May 2017. PGs seem to play an important role during OTs’ development as they are involved in several tumor processes; however, the number of reports on the study of these molecules is low. Thus, more studies are necessary in order to gain a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of OTs. PMID:29731564

  4. Specificity of the human proteoglycan radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gysen, P.; Heynen, G.; Franchimont, P.

    1981-01-01

    The human articular cartilagineous proteoglycans (PG) R.I.A. is highly specific. The PG used as the standard and the 125 I labelled molecule appear to be pure. Under these conditions, all the potential interfering substances which have been tested show no cross reaction. For instance, the Ag-Ab equilibrium is not affected by adding human IgG, human albumin, hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, rat type II collagen or total human serum proteins. This R.I.A. also exhibits a species spcificity since there is no cross reaction with rat PG and negligible cross section with dog PG. The results obtained after addition of enzymes to the antigen demonstrate that the antigenic sites are localized on the protein region and not on the glycosaminoglycan region of the molecule [fr

  5. Specificity of the human proteoglycan radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gysen, P.; Heynen, G.; Franchimont, P. (Liege Univ. (Belgium))

    1981-01-01

    The human articular cartilagineous proteoglycans (PG) R.I.A. is highly specific. The PG used as the standard and the /sup 125/I labelled molecule appear to be pure. Under these conditions, all the potential interfering substances which have been tested show no cross reaction. For instance, the Ag-Ab equilibrium is not affected by adding human IgG, human albumin, hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, rat type II collagen or total human serum proteins. This R.I.A. also exhibits a species spcificity since there is no cross reaction with rat PG and negligible cross section with dog PG. The results obtained after addition of enzymes to the antigen demonstrate that the antigenic sites are localized on the protein region and not on the glycosaminoglycan region of the molecule.

  6. Deglycosylation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and derived peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, S.C.; Krueger, R.C.; Schwartz, N.B.

    1990-01-01

    In order to define the domain structure of proteoglycans as well as identify primary amino acid sequences specific for attachment of the various carbohydrate substituents, reliable techniques for deglycosylating proteoglycans are required. In this study, deglycosylation of cartilage chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) with minimal core protein cleavage was accomplished by digestion with chondroitinase ABC and keratanase, followed by treatment with anhydrous HF in pyridine. Nearly complete deglycosylation of secreted proteoglycan was verified within 45 min of HF treatment by loss of incorporated [ 3 H]glucosamine label from the proteoglycan as a function of time of treatment, as well as by direct analysis of carbohydrate content and xylosyltransferase acceptor activity of unlabeled core protein preparations. The deglycosylated CSPG preparations were homogeneous and of high molecular weight. Comparison of the intact deglycosylated core protein preparations with newly synthesized unprocessed precursors suggested that extensive proteolytic cleavage of the core protein did not occur during normal intracellular processing. Furthermore, peptide patterns generated after clostripain digestion of core protein precursor and of deglycosylated secreted proteoglycan were comparable. With the use of the clostripain digestion procedure, peptides were produced from unlabeled proteoglycan, and two predominant peptides from the most highly glycosylated regions were isolated, characterized, and deglycosylated. These peptides were found to follow similar kinetics of deglycosylation and to acquire xylose activity comparable to the intact core protein

  7. Immunological methods for the detection and determination of connective tissue proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caterson, B; Baker, J R; Christner, J E

    1982-01-01

    In this paper we report the use of immunological methods for specifically detecting and determining proteoglycan in cartilage and other connective tissues. Antibodies (polyclonal and monoclonal) have been raised against specific components of cartilage proteoglycan aggregates (i.e., proteoglycan...... surrounding invaginating hair follicles. These immunological procedures are currently being used to complement conventional biochemical analyses of proteoglycans found in different connective tissue matrices....

  8. Analysis on the expression and function of syndecan in the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Li, Shihao; Li, Fuhua; Wen, Rong; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-08-01

    Syndecan is considered to be a multifunctional protein which functions as a cell surface receptor involved in cell adhesion, migration, cytoskeleton organization and differentiation. Previous bioinformatic analysis has revealed that syndecan in shrimp might interact with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). In the present study, we experimentally studied the function of syndecan in shrimp immunity. The syndecan from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvSDC) was cloned and analyzed. The full-length cDNA of LvSDC was 1005 bp, consisting of 59 bp 5'-UTR, 253 bp 3'-UTR, and 693 bp open reading frame encoding 230 amino acids. LvSDC consisted of an extracellular domain (ED), a transmembrane domain (TM) and a cytoplasmic domain (CD). TM and CD shared high similarities with those of syndecan proteins from other species. LvSDC was ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues, with the highest level in Oka. After WSSV challenge, the transcription level of LvSDC in Oka was apparently up-regulated. Recombinant LvSDC protein and its rabbit polyclonal antibody were prepared for detecting the location of LvSDC in hemocytes using immunocytochemistry approach. Data showed that LvSDC mainly located at the cell membrane and the cytoplasm of hemocytes. After silencing of LvSDC with siRNA, the WSSV copy numbers and mortality of shrimp after WSSV infection were both significantly decreased. These data provide useful information for understanding the immune mechanism of shrimp to WSSV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mycobacterial antigens stimulate rheumatoid mononuclear cells to cartilage proteoglycan depletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbrink, B.; Bijlsma, J. W.; Huber-Bruning, O.; van Roy, J. L.; den Otter, W.; van Eden, W.

    1990-01-01

    In a coculture with porcine articular cartilage explants unstimulated blood mononuclear cells (BMC) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but not from healthy controls, induced proteoglycan depletion of dead cartilage. Specific stimulation of the RA BMC with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT),

  10. Transmembrane proteoglycans control stretch-activated channels to set cytosolic calcium levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopal, Sandeep; Søgaard, Pernille; Multhaupt, Hinke A B

    2015-01-01

    show that syndecans regulate transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels to control cytosolic calcium equilibria and consequent cell behavior. In fibroblasts, ligand interactions with heparan sulfate of syndecan-4 recruit cytoplasmic protein kinase C to target serine714 of TRPC7...... with subsequent control of the cytoskeleton and the myofibroblast phenotype. In epidermal keratinocytes a syndecan-TRPC4 complex controls adhesion, adherens junction composition, and early differentiation in vivo and in vitro. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the TRPC orthologues TRP-1 and -2 genetically complement...

  11. Th1 cytokine-induced syndecan-4 shedding by airway smooth muscle cells is dependent on mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiahui; Khalil, Najwa; Tesarik, Candice; Vanapalli, Karunasri; Yaputra, Viki; Alkhouri, Hatem; Oliver, Brian G G; Armour, Carol L; Hughes, J Margaret

    2012-04-01

    In asthma, airway smooth muscle (ASM) chemokine secretion can induce mast cell recruitment into the airways. The functions of the mast cell chemoattractant CXCL10, and other chemokines, are regulated by binding to heparan sulphates such as syndecan-4. This study is the first demonstration that airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) from people with and without asthma express and shed syndecan-4 under basal conditions. Syndecan-4 shedding was enhanced by stimulation for 24 h with the Th1 cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), but not interferon-γ (IFNγ), nor the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. ASMC stimulation with IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFNγ (cytomix) induced the highest level of syndecan-4 shedding. Nonasthmatic and asthmatic ASM cell-associated syndecan-4 protein expression was also increased by TNF-α or cytomix at 4-8 h, with the highest levels detected in cytomix-stimulated asthmatic cells. Cell-associated syndecan-4 levels were decreased by 24 h, whereas shedding remained elevated at 24 h, consistent with newly synthesized syndecan-4 being shed. Inhibition of ASMC matrix metalloproteinase-2 did not prevent syndecan-4 shedding, whereas inhibition of ERK MAPK activation reduced shedding from cytomix-stimulated ASMC. Although ERK inhibition had no effect on syndecan-4 mRNA levels stimulated by cytomix, it did cause an increase in cell-associated syndecan-4 levels, consistent with the shedding being inhibited. In conclusion, ASMC produce and shed syndecan-4 and although this is increased by the Th1 cytokines, the MAPK ERK only regulates shedding. ASMC syndecan-4 production during Th1 inflammatory conditions may regulate chemokine activity and mast cell recruitment to the ASM in asthma.

  12. The phosphomimetic mutation of syndecan-4 binds and inhibits Tiam1 modulating Rac1 activity in PDZ interaction-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniko Keller-Pinter

    Full Text Available The small GTPases of the Rho family comprising RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 function as molecular switches controlling several essential biochemical pathways in eukaryotic cells. Their activity is cycling between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound conformation. The exchange of GDP to GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs. Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rac1 activity, which is controlled by a phosphomimetic (Ser179Glu mutant of syndecan-4 (SDC4. SDC4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane, heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In this study we show that the Ser179Glu mutant binds strongly Tiam1, a Rac1-GEF reducing Rac1-GTP by 3-fold in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Mutational analysis unravels the PDZ interaction between SDC4 and Tiam1 is indispensable for the suppression of the Rac1 activity. Neither of the SDC4 interactions is effective alone to block the Rac1 activity, on the contrary, lack of either of interactions can increase the activity of Rac1, therefore the Rac1 activity is the resultant of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects. In addition, SDC4 can bind and tether RhoGDI1 (GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 to the membrane. Expression of the phosphomimetic SDC4 results in the accumulation of the Rac1-RhoGDI1 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assays (co-IP-s reveal that SDC4 can form complexes with RhoGDI1. Together, the regulation of the basal activity of Rac1 is fine tuned and SDC4 is implicated in multiple ways.

  13. The phosphomimetic mutation of syndecan-4 binds and inhibits Tiam1 modulating Rac1 activity in PDZ interaction–dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Pinter, Aniko; Ughy, Bettina; Domoki, Monika; Pettko-Szandtner, Aladar; Letoha, Tamas; Tovari, Jozsef; Timar, Jozsef

    2017-01-01

    The small GTPases of the Rho family comprising RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 function as molecular switches controlling several essential biochemical pathways in eukaryotic cells. Their activity is cycling between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound conformation. The exchange of GDP to GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rac1 activity, which is controlled by a phosphomimetic (Ser179Glu) mutant of syndecan-4 (SDC4). SDC4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane, heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In this study we show that the Ser179Glu mutant binds strongly Tiam1, a Rac1-GEF reducing Rac1-GTP by 3-fold in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Mutational analysis unravels the PDZ interaction between SDC4 and Tiam1 is indispensable for the suppression of the Rac1 activity. Neither of the SDC4 interactions is effective alone to block the Rac1 activity, on the contrary, lack of either of interactions can increase the activity of Rac1, therefore the Rac1 activity is the resultant of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects. In addition, SDC4 can bind and tether RhoGDI1 (GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1) to the membrane. Expression of the phosphomimetic SDC4 results in the accumulation of the Rac1–RhoGDI1 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assays (co-IP-s) reveal that SDC4 can form complexes with RhoGDI1. Together, the regulation of the basal activity of Rac1 is fine tuned and SDC4 is implicated in multiple ways. PMID:29121646

  14. The phosphomimetic mutation of syndecan-4 binds and inhibits Tiam1 modulating Rac1 activity in PDZ interaction-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Pinter, Aniko; Ughy, Bettina; Domoki, Monika; Pettko-Szandtner, Aladar; Letoha, Tamas; Tovari, Jozsef; Timar, Jozsef; Szilak, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    The small GTPases of the Rho family comprising RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 function as molecular switches controlling several essential biochemical pathways in eukaryotic cells. Their activity is cycling between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound conformation. The exchange of GDP to GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rac1 activity, which is controlled by a phosphomimetic (Ser179Glu) mutant of syndecan-4 (SDC4). SDC4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane, heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In this study we show that the Ser179Glu mutant binds strongly Tiam1, a Rac1-GEF reducing Rac1-GTP by 3-fold in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Mutational analysis unravels the PDZ interaction between SDC4 and Tiam1 is indispensable for the suppression of the Rac1 activity. Neither of the SDC4 interactions is effective alone to block the Rac1 activity, on the contrary, lack of either of interactions can increase the activity of Rac1, therefore the Rac1 activity is the resultant of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects. In addition, SDC4 can bind and tether RhoGDI1 (GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1) to the membrane. Expression of the phosphomimetic SDC4 results in the accumulation of the Rac1-RhoGDI1 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assays (co-IP-s) reveal that SDC4 can form complexes with RhoGDI1. Together, the regulation of the basal activity of Rac1 is fine tuned and SDC4 is implicated in multiple ways.

  15. Coordination of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans with Wnt Signaling To Control Cellular Migrations and Positioning in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saied-Santiago, Kristian; Townley, Robert A; Attonito, John D; da Cunha, Dayse S; Díaz-Balzac, Carlos A; Tecle, Eillen; Bülow, Hannes E

    2017-08-01

    Heparan sulfates (HS) are linear polysaccharides with complex modification patterns, which are covalently bound via conserved attachment sites to core proteins to form heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). HSPGs regulate many aspects of the development and function of the nervous system, including cell migration, morphology, and network connectivity. HSPGs function as cofactors for multiple signaling pathways, including the Wnt-signaling molecules and their Frizzled receptors. To investigate the functional interactions among the HSPG and Wnt networks, we conducted genetic analyses of each, and also between these networks using five cellular migrations in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans We find that HSPG core proteins act genetically in a combinatorial fashion dependent on the cellular contexts. Double mutant analyses reveal distinct redundancies among HSPGs for different migration events, and different cellular migrations require distinct heparan sulfate modification patterns. Our studies reveal that the transmembrane HSPG SDN-1/Syndecan functions within the migrating cell to promote cellular migrations, while the GPI-linked LON-2/Glypican functions cell nonautonomously to establish the final cellular position. Genetic analyses with the Wnt-signaling system show that (1) a given HSPG can act with different Wnts and Frizzled receptors, and that (2) a given Wnt/Frizzled pair acts with different HSPGs in a context-dependent manner. Lastly, we find that distinct HSPG and Wnt/Frizzled combinations serve separate functions to promote cellular migration and establish position of specific neurons. Our studies suggest that HSPGs use structurally diverse glycans in coordination with Wnt-signaling pathways to control multiple cellular behaviors, including cellular and axonal migrations and, cellular positioning. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of cartilage proteoglycans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, L.

    1985-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a composite material whose major function is to withstand compression while retaining flexibility. Its mechanical properties are affected by tissue hydration and ionic composition. Models of the mechanical behavior of cartilage have incorporated certain assumptions about the interactions of the major components of cartilage: collagen, proteoglycans, water, and cations. To determine the validity of these assumption, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two approaches have been used: (a) natural abundance carbon-13 NMR; and (b) NMR of sodium-23, potassium-39, magnesium-25, and calcium-43. Evidence from studies in intact tissues are reinforced by extensive measurements on solutions of proteoglycans and other relevant macromolecules. Based on the measurements of NMR relaxation rates and lineshapes reported here, it is concluded that neither sodium nor potassium interact strongly with bovine nasal proteoglycan aggregates or their substituent glycosaminoglycan chains in solution. Proteoglycans do bind magnesium and calcium. Therefore there is a qualitative difference between monovalent and divalent cations, which is not taken into account by polyelectrolyte models or models for the ionic dependence of mechanical properties. Cation binding to heparin, which has a higher charge density than cartilage proteoglycans, was also studied. The results presented here establish that heparin binds sodium, magnesium, and calcium.

  17. The Tiam1 PDZ Domain Couples to Syndecan1 and Promotes Cell-Matrix Adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, Tyson R; Klaus, Suzi M; Liu, Xu; Ramaswamy, S; DeMali, Kris A; Fuentes, Ernesto J [Iowa

    2010-08-12

    The T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis gene 1 (Tiam1) is a guanine exchange factor (GEF) for the Rho-family GTPase Rac1 that is crucial for the integrity of adherens junctions, tight junctions, and cell-matrix interactions. This GEF contains several protein-protein interaction domains, including a PDZ domain. Earlier studies identified a consensus PDZ-binding motif and a synthetic peptide capable of binding to the Tiam1 PDZ domain, but little is known about its ligand specificity and physiological role in cells. Here, we investigated the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. We determined the crystal structures of the Tiam1 PDZ domain free and in complex with a 'model' peptide, which revealed the structural basis for ligand specificity. Protein database searches using the consensus PDZ-binding motif identified two eukaryotic cell adhesion proteins, Syndecan1 and Caspr4, as potential Tiam1 PDZ domain binding proteins. Equilibrium binding experiments confirmed that C-terminal peptides derived from Syndecan1 and Caspr4 bound the Tiam1 PDZ domain. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments indicated that the Tiam1 PDZ/Syndecan1 and PDZ/Caspr4 complexes were structurally distinct and identified key residues likely to be responsible for ligand selectivity. Moreover, cell biological analysis established that Syndecan1 is a physiological binding partner of Tiam1 and that the PDZ domain has a function in cell-matrix adhesion and cell migration. Collectively, our data provide insight into the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. Importantly, our data report on a physiological role for the Tiam1 PDZ domain and establish a novel link between two previously unrelated signal transduction pathways, both of which are implicated in cancer.

  18. Syndecan-1 Acts as an Important Regulator of CXCL1 Expression and Cellular Interaction of Human Endometrial Stromal and Trophoblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunja Maria Baston-Buest

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful implantation of the embryo into the human receptive endometrium is substantial for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. This study focusses on the role of Syndecan-1 at the embryo-maternal interface, the multitasking coreceptor influencing ligand concentration, release and receptor presentation, and cellular morphology. CXC motif ligand 1, being involved in chemotaxis and angiogenesis during implantation, is of special interest as a ligand of Syndecan-1. Human endometrial stromal cells with and without Syndecan-1 knock-down were decidualized and treated with specific inhibitors to evaluate signaling pathways regulating CXC ligand 1 expression. Western blot analyses of MAPK and Wnt members were performed, followed by analysis of spheroid interactions between human endometrial cells and extravillous trophoblast cells. By mimicking embryo contact using IL-1β, we showed less ERK and c-Jun activation by depletion of Syndecan-1 and less Frizzled 4 production as part of the canonical Wnt pathway. Additionally, more beta-catenin was phosphorylated and therefore degraded after depletion of Syndecan-1. Secretion of CXC motif ligand 1 depends on MEK-1 with respect to Syndecan-1. Regarding the interaction of endometrial and trophoblast cells, the spheroid center-to-center distances were smaller after depletion of Syndecan-1. Therefore, Syndecan-1 seems to affect signaling processes relevant to signaling and intercellular interaction at the trophoblast-decidual interface.

  19. Basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans: localization in adult rat tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, K J; Couchman, J R

    1990-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been described as the major proteoglycan component of basement membranes. However, previous investigators have also provided evidence for the presence of chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan in these structures. Recently we described the production...... and characterization of core protein-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAb) against a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) present in Reichert's membrane, a transient extra-embryonic structure of rodents. This CSPG was also demonstrated to be present in adult rat kidney. We report here the tissue distribution...... of epitopes recognized by these MAb. The ubiquitous presence of these epitopes in the basement membranes of nearly all adult rat tissues demonstrates that at least one CSPG is a constituent of most basement membranes, and by virtue of its unique distribution is distinct from other chondroitin and dermatan...

  20. Metabolism of Cartilage Proteoglycans in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demitrios H. Vynios

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage proteoglycans are extracellular macromolecules with complex structure, composed of a core protein onto which a variable number of glycosaminoglycan chains are attached. Their biosynthesis at the glycosaminoglycan level involves a great number of sugar transferases well-orchestrated in Golgi apparatus. Similarly, their degradation, either extracellular or intracellular in lysosomes, involves a large number of hydrolases. A deficiency or malfunction of any of the enzymes participating in cartilage proteoglycan metabolism may lead to severe disease state. This review summarizes the findings regarding this topic.

  1. Intermittent hydrostatic compressive force stimulates exclusively the proteoglycan synthesis of osteoarthritic human cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber, F.; Veldhuijzen, J. P.; Vanroy, J. L.; Huber-Bruning, O.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    In paired observations the in vitro proteoglycan turnover was studied of human normal and osteoarthritic cartilage in the absence and presence of intermittent hydrostatic compressive force. Shortly after collection, osteoarthritic cartilage showed a higher proteoglycan synthesis rate than normal

  2. Local changes in proteoglycan synthesis during culture are different for normal and osteoarthritic cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber, F. P.; van der Kraan, P. M.; van Roy, H. L.; Vitters, E. L.; Huber-Bruning, O.; van den Berg, W. B.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    Proteoglycan synthesis of mild-to-moderate osteoarthritic human knee cartilage was compared with that of normal cartilage of the same donor. Immediately after cartilage was obtained, the synthesis rate of proteoglycans was higher for osteoarthritic cartilage than for normal cartilage. Proteoglycan

  3. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-01

    behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole...

  4. Three distinct molecular species of proteoglycan synthesized by the rat limb bud at the prechondrogenic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, F.; Oohira, A.; Shoji, R.; Nogami, H.

    1989-01-01

    To characterize proteoglycans in the prechondrogenic limb bud, proteoglycans were extracted with 4 M guanidine HCl containing a detergent and protease inhibitors from Day 13 fetal rat limb buds which had been labeled with [35S]sulfate for 3 h in vitro. About 90% of 35S-labeled proteoglycans was solubilized under the conditions used. The proteoglycan preparation was separated by DEAE-Sephacel column chromatography into three peaks; peak I eluted at 0.45 M NaCl concentration, peak II at 0.52 M, and peak III at 1.4 M. Peaks I and III were identified as proteoglycans bearing heparan sulfate side chains. The heparan sulfate proteoglycan in peak III was larger in hydrodynamic size than the proteoglycan in peak I. The heparan sulfate side chains of peak III proteoglycan were smaller in the size and more abundant in N-sulfated glucosamine than those of peak I proteoglycan. Peak II contained a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan with a core protein of a doublet of Mr 550,000 and 500,000. The chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan was easily solubilized with a physiological salt solution and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan in peak I was partially solubilized with the physiological salt solution. The remainder of the proteoglycan in peak I and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan in peak III could be solubilized effectively only with a solution containing a detergent, such as nonanoyl-N-methylglucamide. This observation indicates the difference in the localization among these three proteoglycans in the developing rat limb bud

  5. Axonal transport of proteoglycans to the goldfish optic tectum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripellino, J.A.; Elam, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The study addressed the question of whether 35 SO 4 labeled molecules that have been delivered to the goldfish optic nerve terminals by rapid axonal transport include soluble proteoglycans. For analysis, tectal homogenates were subfractionated into a soluble fraction (soluble after centrifugation at 105,000 g), a lysis fraction (soluble after treatment with hypotonic buffer followed by centrifugation at 105,000 g) and a final 105,000 g pellet fraction. The soluble fraction contained 25.7% of incorporated radioactivity and upon DEAE chromatography was resolved into a fraction of sulfated glycoproteins eluting at 0-0.32 M NaCl and containing 39.5% of total soluble label and a fraction eluting at 0.32-0.60 M NaCl containing 53.9% of soluble label. This latter fraction was included on columns of Sepharose CL-6B with or without 4 M guanidine and after pronase digestion was found to have 51% of its radioactivity contained in the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) heparan sulfate and chondroitin (4 or 6) sulfate in the ratio of 70% to 30%. Mobility of both intact proteoglycans and constituent GAGs on Sepharose CL-6B indicated a size distribution that is smaller than has been observed for proteoglycans and GAGs from cultured neuronal cell lines. Similar analysis of lysis fraction, containing 11.5% of incorporated 35 SO 4 , showed a mixture of heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate containing proteoglycans, apparent free heparan sulfate and few, if any, sulfated glycoproteins. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that soluble proteoglycans are among the molecules axonally transported in the visual system

  6. Multimerization of the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4 is required for its ability to activate protein kinase C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oh, E S; Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    of syndecan-4 (4L) containing a membrane-proximal basic sequence did not form higher order oligomers and could not regulate the activity of PKCalphabetagamma unless induced to aggregate by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Oligomerization and PKC regulatory activity of the 4V peptide were both increased...... by addition of N-terminal cysteine and reduced by phosphorylation of the cysteine thiol group. Concentration of syndecan-4 at sites of focal adhesion formation may enhance multimerization and both localize PKC and potentiate its activity to induce stable complex formation....

  7. Human mast cell neutral proteases generate modified LDL particles with increased proteoglycan binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaninka, Katariina; Nguyen, Su Duy; Mäyränpää, Mikko I; Plihtari, Riia; Rajamäki, Kristiina; Lindsberg, Perttu J; Kovanen, Petri T; Öörni, Katariina

    2018-04-13

    Subendothelial interaction of LDL with extracellular matrix drives atherogenesis. This interaction can be strengthened by proteolytic modification of LDL. Mast cells (MCs) are present in atherosclerotic lesions, and upon activation, they degranulate and release a variety of neutral proteases. Here we studied the ability of MC proteases to cleave apoB-100 of LDL and affect the binding of LDL to proteoglycans. Mature human MCs were differentiated from human peripheral blood-derived CD34 + progenitors in vitro and activated with calcium ionophore to generate MC-conditioned medium. LDL was incubated in the MC-conditioned medium or with individual MC proteases, and the binding of native and modified LDL to isolated human aortic proteoglycans or to human atherosclerotic plaques ex vivo was determined. MC proteases in atherosclerotic human coronary artery lesions were detected by immunofluorescence and qPCR. Activated human MCs released the neutral proteases tryptase, chymase, carboxypeptidase A3, cathepsin G, and granzyme B. Of these, cathepsin G degraded most efficiently apoB-100, induced LDL fusion, and enhanced binding of LDL to isolated human aortic proteoglycans and human atherosclerotic lesions ex vivo. Double immunofluoresence staining of human atherosclerotic coronary arteries for tryptase and cathepsin G indicated that lesional MCs contain cathepsin G. In the lesions, expression of cathepsin G correlated with the expression of tryptase and chymase, but not with that of neutrophil proteinase 3. The present study suggests that cathepsin G in human atherosclerotic lesions is largely derived from MCs and that activated MCs may contribute to atherogenesis by enhancing LDL retention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A conserved role for syndecan family members in the regulation of whole-body energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria De Luca

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Syndecans are a family of type-I transmembrane proteins that are involved in cell-matrix adhesion, migration, neuronal development, and inflammation. Previous quantitative genetic studies pinpointed Drosophila Syndecan (dSdc as a positional candidate gene affecting variation in fat storage between two Drosophila melanogaster strains. Here, we first used quantitative complementation tests with dSdc mutants to confirm that natural variation in this gene affects variability in Drosophila fat storage. Next, we examined the effects of a viable dSdc mutant on Drosophila whole-body energy metabolism and associated traits. We observed that young flies homozygous for the dSdc mutation had reduced fat storage and slept longer than homozygous wild-type flies. They also displayed significantly reduced metabolic rate, lower expression of spargel (the Drosophila homologue of PGC-1, and reduced mitochondrial respiration. Compared to control flies, dSdc mutants had lower expression of brain insulin-like peptides, were less fecund, more sensitive to starvation, and had reduced life span. Finally, we tested for association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the human SDC4 gene and variation in body composition, metabolism, glucose homeostasis, and sleep traits in a cohort of healthy early pubertal children. We found that SNP rs4599 was significantly associated with resting energy expenditure (P = 0.001 after Bonferroni correction and nominally associated with fasting glucose levels (P = 0.01 and sleep duration (P = 0.044. On average, children homozygous for the minor allele had lower levels of glucose, higher resting energy expenditure, and slept shorter than children homozygous for the common allele. We also observed that SNP rs1981429 was nominally associated with lean tissue mass (P = 0.035 and intra-abdominal fat (P = 0.049, and SNP rs2267871 with insulin sensitivity (P = 0.037. Collectively, our results in Drosophila and humans argue that

  9. Decidualization and syndecan-1 knock down sensitize endometrial stromal cells to apoptosis induced by embryonic stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jean Boeddeker

    Full Text Available Human embryo invasion and implantation into the inner wall of the maternal uterus, the endometrium, is the pivotal process for a successful pregnancy. Whereas disruption of the endometrial epithelial layer was already correlated with the programmed cell death, the role of apoptosis of the subjacent endometrial stromal cells during implantation is indistinct. The aim was to clarify whether apoptosis plays a role in the stromal invasion and to characterize if the apoptotic susceptibility of endometrial stromal cells to embryonic stimuli is influenced by decidualization and Syndecan-1. Therefore, the immortalized human endometrial stromal cell line St-T1 was used to first generate a new cell line with a stable Syndecan-1 knock down (KdS1, and second to further decidualize the cells with progesterone. As a replacement for the ethically inapplicable embryo all cells were treated with the embryonic factors and secretion products interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor-β1 and anti-Fas antibody to mimic the embryo contact. Detection of apoptosis was verified via Caspase ELISAs, PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Apoptosis-related proteins were investigated via antibody arrays and underlying signaling pathways were analyzed by Western blot. Non-decidualized endometrial stromal cells showed a resistance towards apoptosis which was rescinded by decidualization and Syndecan-1 knock down independent of decidualization. This was correlated with an altered expression of several pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and connected to a higher activation of pro-survival Akt in non-differentiated St-T1 as an upstream mediator of apoptotis-related proteins. This study provides insight into the largely elusive process of implantation, proposing an important role for stromal cell apoptosis to successfully establish a pregnancy. The impact of Syndecan-1 in attenuating the apoptotic signal is particularly interesting in the

  10. Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans control adhesion and invasion of breast carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Hooi Ching; Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Couchman, John R.

    2015-01-01

    breast carcinoma. This may derive from their regulation of cell adhesion, but roles for specific syndecans are unresolved. Methods: The MDA-MB231 human breast carcinoma cell line was exposed to exogenous glycosaminoglycans and changes in cell behavior monitored by western blotting, immunocytochemistry......, invasion and collagen degradation assays. Selected receptors including PAR-1 and syndecans were depleted by siRNA treatments to assess cell morphology and behavior. Immunohistochemistry for syndecan-2 and its interacting partner, caveolin-2 was performed on human breast tumor tissue arrays. Two......-tailed paired t-test and one-way ANOVA with Tukey¿s post-hoc test were used in the analysis of data. Results: MDA-MB231 cells were shown to be highly sensitive to exogenous heparan sulfate or heparin, promoting increased spreading, focal adhesion and adherens junction formation with concomitantly reduced...

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of chondroitin sulfate, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, heparan sulfate proteoglycan, entactin, and laminin in basement membranes of postnatal developing and adult rat lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannes, P L; Burch, K K; Khosla, J

    1993-01-01

    Histologic preparations of lungs from 1-, 5-, 10-, 18-, and 25-day-old postnatal and adult rats were examined immunohistochemically with antibodies specific against chondroitin sulfate (CS), basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (BM-CSPG), heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), entactin...

  12. Effects of glucosamine on proteoglycan loss by tendon, ligament and joint capsule explant cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, M Z; Martinac, B; Samiric, T; Handley, C J

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the effect of glucosamine on the loss of newly synthesized radiolabeled large and small proteoglycans by bovine tendon, ligament and joint capsule. The kinetics of loss of (35)S-labeled large and small proteoglycans from explant cultures of tendon, ligament and joint capsule treated with 10mM glucosamine was investigated over a 10-day culture period. The kinetics of loss of (35)S-labeled small proteoglycans and the formation of free [(35)S]sulfate were determined for the last 10 days of a 15-day culture period. The proteoglycan core proteins were analyzed by gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography. The metabolism of tendon, ligament and joint capsule explants exposed to 10mM glucosamine was evaluated by incorporation of [(3)H]serine and [(35)S]sulfate into protein and glycosaminoglycans, respectively. Glucosamine at 10mM stimulated the loss of small proteoglycans from ligament explant cultures. This was due to the increased loss of both macromolecular and free [(35)S]sulfate to the medium indicating that glucosamine affected the release of small proteoglycans as well as their intracellular degradation. The degradation pattern of small proteoglycans in ligament was not affected by glucosamine. In contrast, glucosamine did not have an effect on the loss of large or small proteoglycans from tendon and joint capsule or large proteoglycans from ligament explant cultures. The metabolism of cells in tendon, ligament and joint capsule was not impaired by the presence of 10mM glucosamine. Glucosamine stimulated the loss of small proteoglycans from ligament but did not have an effect on small proteoglycan catabolism in joint capsule and tendon or large proteoglycan catabolism in ligament, tendon or synovial capsule. The consequences of glucosamine therapy at clinically relevant concentrations on proteoglycan catabolism in joint fibrous connective tissues need to be further assessed in an animal model.

  13. The cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 supports cell adhesion through syndecans and triggers signaling events that lead to beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B

    2000-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family of proteins is involved in a variety of cellular interactions, including cell adhesion and ecto- domain shedding. Here we show that ADAM 12 binds to cell surface syndecans. Three forms of recombinant ADAM 12 were used in these experiments......-dependent manner attach to ADAM 12 via members of the syndecan family. After binding to syndecans, mesenchymal cells spread and form focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. Integrin beta1 was responsible for cell spreading because function-blocking monoclonal antibodies completely inhibited cell spreading......, and chondroblasts lacking beta1 integrin attached but did not spread. These data suggest that mesenchymal cells use syndecans as the initial receptor for the ADAM 12 cysteine-rich domain-mediated cell adhesion, and then the beta1 integrin to induce cell spreading. Interestingly, carcinoma cells attached but did...

  14. Syndecan-1 knock-down in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells leads to significant changes in cytokine and angiogenic factor expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krüssel Jan-Steffen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful embryonic implantation depends on a synchronized embryo-maternal dialogue. Chemokines, such as chemokine ligand 1 (CXCL1, play essential roles in the maternal reproductive tract leading to morphological changes during decidualization, mediating maternal acceptance towards the semi-allograft embryo and induction of angiogenesis. Chemokine binding to their classical G-protein coupled receptors is essentially supported by the syndecan (Sdc family of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. The aim of this study was to identify the involvement of Sdc-1 at the embryo-maternal interface regarding changes of the chemokine and angiogenic profile of the decidua during the process of decidualization and implantation in human endometrium. Methods A stable Sdc-1 knock-down was generated in the immortalized human endometrial stromal cell line St-T1 and was named KdS1. The ability of KdS1 to decidualize was proven by Insulin-like growth factor binding 1 (IGFBP1 and prolactin (PRL confirmation on mRNA level before further experiments were carried out. Dot blot protein analyses of decidualized knock-down cells vs non-transfected controls were performed. In order to imitate embryonic implantation, decidualized KdS1 were then incubated with IL-1beta, an embryo secretion product, vs controls. Statistical analyses were performed applying the Student's t-test with p Results The induction of the Sdc-1 knock-down revealed significant changes in cytokine and angiogenic factor expression profiles of dKdS1 vs decidualized controls. Incubation with embryonic IL-1beta altered the expression patterns of KdS1 chemokines and angiogenic factors towards inflammatory-associated molecules and factors involved in matrix regulation. Conclusions Sdc-1 knock-down in human endometrial stroma cells led to fulminant changes regarding cytokine and angiogenic factor expression profiles upon decidualization and imitation of embryonic contact. Sdc-1 appears to play an

  15. Insights into the key roles of proteoglycans in breast cancer biology and translational medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D.; Skandalis, Spyros S.; Neill, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    of proteoglycans on tumor and stromal cell membranes affects cancer cell signaling, growth and survival, cell adhesion, migration and angiogenesis. Despite the high complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the rapid evolution in our knowledge that proteoglycans are among the key players in the breast tumor...... in the proteoglycans that will be presented herein provides the potential for multiple layers of regulation of breast tumor behavior. This review summarizes recent developments concerning the biology of selected proteoglycans in breast cancer, and presents potential targeted therapeutic approaches based on their novel...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging reflects cartilage proteoglycan degradation in the rabbit knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, P.K.; O'Byrne, E.; Blancuzzi, V.; Wilson, D.; Gunson, D.; Douglas, F.L.; Wang Jinzhao; Mezrich, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    Cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis is initiated by a loss of proteoglycan. Intra-articular injection of papain causes a reversible loss of proteoglycan in rabbit knees. Rabbits were scanned with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using a 1.5T Signa superconducting magnet with 3 inch surface coil. Spin echo sequences were performed in the coronal and sagittal planes at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after intra-articular injection of papain to abtain T 1 , proton density, and T 2 -weighted images. Cartilage proteoglycan content was measured biochemically and histochemically. Reduced articular cartilage thickness in the MR images of papain-treated knees corresponded to changes in cartilage proteoglycan content. (orig.)

  17. Perlecan and basement membrane-chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (bamacan) are two basement membrane chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans in the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm tumor matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Kapoor, R; Sthanam, M

    1996-01-01

    heparan sulfate proteoglycan, widespread in many basement membranes and connective tissues. We now identify two distinct proteoglycan species from this tumor source, which are substituted with galactosaminoglycans and which show basement membrane localization by immunohistochemistry. One species......The presence of proteoglycans bearing galactosaminoglycan chains has been reported, but none has been identified previously in the matrix of the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm tumor, which is a source of several basement membrane components. This tumor matrix contains perlecan, a large, low buoyant density......-CSPG are distinct in core protein structure. Both are, however, basement membrane components, although there are tissue-specific differences in their distribution....

  18. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, I.J.; Wagner, W.D.; Owens, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion

  19. Brain ageing changes proteoglycan sulfation, rendering perineuronal nets more inhibitory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foscarin, Simona; Raha-Chowdhury, Ruma; Fawcett, James W; Kwok, Jessica C F

    2017-06-28

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycans in perineuronal nets (PNNs) from the central nervous system (CNS) are involved in the control of plasticity and memory. Removing PNNs reactivates plasticity and restores memory in models of Alzheimer's disease and ageing. Their actions depend on the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains of CS proteoglycans, which are mainly sulfated in the 4 (C4S) or 6 (C6S) positions. While C4S is inhibitory, C6S is more permissive to axon growth, regeneration and plasticity. C6S decreases during critical period closure. We asked whether there is a late change in CS-GAG sulfation associated with memory loss in aged rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed a progressive increase in C4S and decrease in C6S from 3 to 18 months. GAGs extracted from brain PNNs showed a large reduction in C6S at 12 and 18 months, increasing the C4S/C6S ratio. There was no significant change in mRNA levels of the chondroitin sulfotransferases. PNN GAGs were more inhibitory to axon growth than those from the diffuse extracellular matrix. The 18-month PNN GAGs were more inhibitory than 3-month PNN GAGs. We suggest that the change in PNN GAG sulfation in aged brains renders the PNNs more inhibitory, which lead to a decrease in plasticity and adversely affect memory.

  20. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies directed against connective tissue proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caterson, B; Christner, J E; Baker, J R

    1985-01-01

    distribution of 4- and 6-sulfated and unsulfated proteoglycans in tissue sections of cartilage and other noncartilaginous tissues. Digestion with chondroitinase ABC or ACII can be used to differentiate between chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in different connective tissues. In addition...

  1. Structural characterization of proteoglycans produced by testicular peritubular cells and Sertoli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, M.K.; Fritz, I.B.

    1985-01-01

    The structural characteristics of proteoglycans produced by seminiferous peritubular cells and by Sertoli cells are defined. Peritubular cells secrete two proteoglycans designated PC I and PC II. PC I is a high molecular mass protein containing chondroitin glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains (maximum 70 kDa). PC II has a protein core of 45 kDa and also contains chondroitin GAG chains (maximum 70 kDa). Preliminary results imply that PC II may be a degraded or processed form of PC I. Sertoli cells secrete two different proteoglycans, designated SC I and SC II. SC I is a large protein containing both chondroitin (maximum 62 kDa) and heparin (maximum 15 kDa) GAG chains. Results obtained suggest that this novel proteoglycan contains both chondroitin and heparin GAG chains bound to the same core protein. SC II has a 50-kDa protein core and contains chondroitin (maximum 25 kDa) GAG chains. A proteoglycan obtained from extracts of Sertoli cells is described which contains heparin (maximum 48 kDa) GAG chains. In addition, Sertoli cells secrete a sulfoprotein, SC III, which is not a proteoglycan. The stimulation by follicle-stimulating hormone of the incorporation of [ 35 S]SO 2 ) -4 ) into moieties secreted by Sertoli cells is shown to represent an increased production or sulfation of SC III, and not an increased production or sulfation of proteoglycans. Results are discussed in relation to the possible functions of proteoglycans in the seminiferous tubule

  2. Characterization of a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan synthesized by murine parietal yolk sac (PYS-2) cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A; Höök, M

    1985-01-01

    -polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of chondroitinase ABC-treated 125I-labeled proteoglycan reveals two polypeptides with molecular weights of 34,000 and 27,000. Results from papain digestion of the proteoglycan suggest that most of the polysaccharide chains are clustered at a papain-resistant segment of the core...

  3. Immunological characterization of a basement membrane-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, K J; Accavitti, M A; Couchman, J R

    1989-01-01

    with the proteoglycan preparation and four mAbs recognizing the core protein of a high-density, buoyant chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were raised. Confirmation of antibody specificity was carried out by the preparation of affinity columns made from each of the mAbs. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) were...... (Mr = 5-6 x 10(5)), with a core protein of Mr = approximately 1.5-1.6 x 10(5) and composed exclusively of chondroitin sulfate chains with an average Mr = 1.6-1.8 x 10(4). In addition, a CSPG was purified from adult rat kidney, whose core protein was also Mr = 1.6 x 10(5). The proteoglycan and its core...... sulfate proteoglycans, it therefore appears that at least one CSPG is a widespread basement membrane component....

  4. Proteoglycans in Leiomyoma and Normal Myometrium: Abundance, Steroid Hormone Control, and Implications for Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Nichole M; Carrino, David A; Caplan, Arnold I; Hurd, William W; Liu, James H; Tan, Huiqing; Mesiano, Sam

    2016-03-01

    Uterine leiomyoma are a common benign pelvic tumors composed of modified smooth muscle cells and a large amount of extracellular matrix (ECM). The proteoglycan composition of the leiomyoma ECM is thought to affect pathophysiology of the disease. To test this hypothesis, we examined the abundance (by immunoblotting) and expression (by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction) of the proteoglycans biglycan, decorin, and versican in leiomyoma and normal myometrium and determined whether expression is affected by steroid hormones and menstrual phase. Leiomyoma and normal myometrium were collected from women (n = 17) undergoing hysterectomy or myomectomy. In vitro studies were performed on immortalized leiomyoma (UtLM) and normal myometrial (hTERT-HM) cells with and without exposure to estradiol and progesterone. In leiomyoma tissue, abundance of decorin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were 2.6-fold and 1.4-fold lower, respectively, compared with normal myometrium. Abundance of versican mRNA was not different between matched samples, whereas versican protein was increased 1.8-fold in leiomyoma compared with myometrium. Decorin mRNA was 2.4-fold lower in secretory phase leiomyoma compared with proliferative phase tissue. In UtLM cells, progesterone decreased the abundance of decorin mRNA by 1.3-fold. Lower decorin expression in leiomyoma compared with myometrium may contribute to disease growth and progression. As decorin inhibits the activity of specific growth factors, its reduced level in the leiomyoma cell microenvironment may promote cell proliferation and ECM deposition. Our data suggest that decorin expression in leiomyoma is inhibited by progesterone, which may be a mechanism by which the ovarian steroids affect leiomyoma growth and disease progression. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans: structure, protein interactions and cell signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana L. Dreyfuss

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are ubiquitously found at the cell surface and extracellular matrix in all the animal species. This review will focus on the structural characteristics of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans related to protein interactions leading to cell signaling. The heparan sulfate chains due to their vast structural diversity are able to bind and interact with a wide variety of proteins, such as growth factors, chemokines, morphogens, extracellular matrix components, enzymes, among others. There is a specificity directing the interactions of heparan sulfates and target proteins, regarding both the fine structure of the polysaccharide chain as well precise protein motifs. Heparan sulfates play a role in cellular signaling either as receptor or co-receptor for different ligands, and the activation of downstream pathways is related to phosphorylation of different cytosolic proteins either directly or involving cytoskeleton interactions leading to gene regulation. The role of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cellular signaling and endocytic uptake pathways is also discussed.Proteoglicanos de heparam sulfato são encontrados tanto superfície celular quanto na matriz extracelular em todas as espécies animais. Esta revisão tem enfoque nas características estruturais dos proteoglicanos de heparam sulfato e nas interações destes proteoglicanos com proteínas que levam à sinalização celular. As cadeias de heparam sulfato, devido a sua variedade estrutural, são capazes de se ligar e interagir com ampla gama de proteínas, como fatores de crescimento, quimiocinas, morfógenos, componentes da matriz extracelular, enzimas, entreoutros. Existe uma especificidade estrutural que direciona as interações dos heparam sulfatos e proteínas alvo. Esta especificidade está relacionada com a estrutura da cadeia do polissacarídeo e os motivos conservados da cadeia polipeptídica das proteínas envolvidas nesta interação. Os heparam

  6. Evaluation of influence of proteoglycans on hydration of articular cartilage with the use of ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-yi YANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To monitor the changes in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage induced by degradation of proteoglycans, and to explore the effect of proteoglycans on hydration behaviour of articular cartilage by using high-frequency ultrasound. Methods Twelve porcine patellae with smooth cartilage surface were prepared and equally divided into two groups: normal group without any enzyme treatment, and trypsin group they were treated with 0.25% trypsin for 8h to digest proteoglycan in the cartilage. The hydration behaviour of the cartilage tissue was scanned by high-frequency ultrasound system with a central frequency of 25MHz. Parameters including cartilage hydration strain and cartilage thickness were measured. The histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were observed under a light microscope. Results It took approximately 20min to reach equilibrium during the hydration process in the normal cartilages, while proteoglycan-degraded cartilage took only about 5min to achieve equilibrium. The equilibrium strain of normal cartilage was 3.5%±0.5%. The degradation of proteoglycans induced a significant decrease in equilibrium strain (1.8%±0.2%, P0.05. Conclusion Proteoglycans play an important role in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage. The degradation of proteoglycans could induce degeneration of cartilage structure and decrease in hydration behaviour after dehydration. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.03

  7. The endogenous proteoglycan-degrading enzyme ADAMTS-4 promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauchi Ryoji

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are major inhibitory molecules for neural plasticity under both physiological and pathological conditions. The chondroitin sulfate degrading enzyme chondroitinase ABC promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury, and restores experience-dependent plasticity, such as ocular dominance plasticity and fear erasure plasticity, in adult rodents. These data suggest that the sugar chain in a proteoglycan moiety is essential for the inhibitory activity of proteoglycans. However, the significance of the core protein has not been studied extensively. Furthermore, considering that chondroitinase ABC is derived from bacteria, a mammalian endogenous enzyme which can inactivate the proteoglycans' activity is desirable for clinical use. Methods The degradation activity of ADAMTS-4 was estimated for the core proteins of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, that is, brevican, neurocan and phosphacan. To evaluate the biological significance of ADMATS-4 activity, an in vitro neurite growth assay and an in vivo neuronal injury model, spinal cord contusion injury, were employed. Results ADAMTS-4 digested proteoglycans, and reversed their inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Local administration of ADAMTS-4 significantly promoted motor function recovery after spinal cord injury. Supporting these findings, the ADAMTS-4-treated spinal cord exhibited enhanced axonal regeneration/sprouting after spinal cord injury. Conclusions Our data suggest that the core protein in a proteoglycan moiety is also important for the inhibition of neural plasticity, and provides a potentially safer tool for the treatment of neuronal injuries.

  8. Proteoglycan metabolism associated with mouse metanephric development: morphologic and biochemical effects of beta-D-xyloside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, J.L.; Brown, D.M.; Granlund, K.; Oegema, T.R.; Klein, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Morphology and de novo incorporation of [ 35 S]sulfate into proteoglycans were studied in fetal mouse kidneys at the onset of organogenesis. Branching morphogenesis and nephron development in organ culture and in vivo were associated with de novo synthesis of chondroitin-SO 4 and heparan-SO 4 proteoglycans. The role of proteoglycan metabolism in metanephrogenesis was then studied by analysis of the effects of p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-xylopyranoside (beta-D-xyloside) on renal development and proteoglycan metabolism. Incubation of fetal kidneys in beta-D-xyloside at concentrations of 1.0 and 0.5 mM, but not at 0.1 mM, caused inhibition of ureteric branching and markedly diminished synthesis of a large Mr 2.0 X 10(6) Da chondroitin-SO 4 proteoglycan. Incorporation of [ 35 S]sulfate was stimulated at all beta-D-xyloside concentrations, reflecting synthesis of xyloside initiated dermatan- 35 SO 4 chains. In contrast to dramatic effects on chondroitin-SO 4 synthesis and ureteric branching, beta-D-xyloside had no effect on heparan-SO 4 synthesis or on development of the glomerulus and glomerular basement membrane. We thus characterize the proteoglycans synthesized early in the course of renal organogenesis and describe observations which suggest an association between metabolism of chondroitin-SO 4 proteoglycan and development of the ureter

  9. In vivo turnover of the basement membrane and other heparan sulfate proteoglycans of rat glomerulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavan, L.A.; Davies, M.; Couchman, J.R.; Williams, M.A.; Mason, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    The metabolic turnover of rat glomerular proteoglycans in vivo was investigated. Newly synthesized proteoglycans were labeled during a 7-h period after injecting sodium [35S]sulfate intraperitoneally. At the end of the labeling period a chase dose of sodium sulfate was given. Subsequently at defined times (0-163 h) the kidneys were perfused in situ with 0.01% cetylpyridinium chloride in phosphate-buffered saline to maximize the recovery of 35S-proteoglycans. Glomeruli were isolated from the renal cortex and analyzed for 35S-proteoglycans by autoradiographic, biochemical, and immunochemical methods. Grain counting of autoradiographs revealed a complex turnover pattern of 35S-labeled macromolecules, commencing with a rapid phase followed by a slower phase. Biochemical analysis confirmed the biphasic pattern and showed that the total population of [35S]heparan sulfate proteoglycans had a metabolic half-life (t1/2) of 20 and 60 h in the early and late phases, respectively. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans accounted for 80% of total 35S-proteoglycans, the remainder being chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans. Whole glomeruli were extracted with 4% 3-[(cholamidopropyl)dimethy-lammonio]-1-propanesulfonate-4 M guanidine hydrochloride, a procedure which solubilized greater than 95% of the 35S-labeled macromolecules. Of these 11-13% was immunoprecipitated by an antiserum against heparan sulfate proteoglycan which, in immunolocalization experiments, showed specificity for staining the basement membrane of rat glomeruli. Autoradiographic analysis showed that 18% of total radioactivity present at the end of the labeling period was associated with the glomerular basement membrane

  10. Proteoglycan biosynthesis in murine monocytic leukemic (M1) cells before and after differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuillan, D.J.; Yanagishita, M.; Hascall, V.C.; Bickel, M.

    1989-01-01

    Murine monocytic leukemic (M1) cells were cultured in the presence of [ 3 H]glucosamine and [ 35 S]sulfate. Labeled proteoglycans were purified by anion exchange chromatography and characterized by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in combination with chemical and enzymatic degradation. M1 cells synthesize a single predominant species of proteoglycan which distributes almost equally between the cell and medium after 17 h labeling. The cell-associated proteoglycan has an overall size of about 135 kDa and contains three to five chondroitin sulfate chains (28-31 kDa each) attached to a chondroitinase-generated core protein of 28 kDa. The synthesis and subsequent secretion of this proteoglycan was enhanced 4-5-fold in cells induced to differentiate into macrophages. This was not a phenomenon of arrest in the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle, since density inhibited undifferentiated cells arrested at this stage did not increase proteoglycan synthesis. The chondroitin sulfate chains contained exclusively chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfate; however, the ratio of these two disaccharides differed between the medium- and cell-associated proteoglycans, and changed during progression of the cells into a fully differentiated phenotype. Pulse-chase kinetics indicate the presence of two distinct pools of proteoglycan; one that is secreted very rapidly from the cell after a approximately 1-h lag, and a second pool that is turned over in the cell with a half-time of approximately 3.5 h. Subtle differences in the glycosylation patterns of the medium- and cell-associated species are consistent with synthesis of two pools. Papain digestion suggests that the chondroitin sulfate chains are clustered on a small protease resistant peptide. The data suggest that this proteoglycan is similar to the serglycin proteoglycan family

  11. Heparan sulfate-chondroitin sulfate hybrid proteoglycan of the cell surface and basement membrane of mouse mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, G.; Van den Berghe, H.

    1985-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate represents approximately 15% of the 35 SO 4 -labeled glycosaminoglycans carried by the proteoglycans of the cell surface and of the basolateral secretions of normal mouse mammary epithelial cells in culture. Evidence is provided that these chondroitin sulfate-carrying proteoglycans are hybrid proteoglycans, carrying both chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate chains. Complete N-desulfation but limited O-desulfation, by treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide, of the proteoglycans decreased the anionic charge of the chondroitin sulfate-carrying proteoglycans to a greater extent than it decreased the charge of their constituent chondroitin sulfate chains. Partial depolymerization of the heparan sulfate residues of the proteoglycans with nitrous acid or with heparin lyase also reduced the effective molecular radius of the chondroitin sulfate-carrying proteoglycans. The effect of heparin lyase on the chondroitin sulfate-carrying proteoglycans was prevented by treating the proteoglycan fractions with dimethyl sulfoxide, while the effect of nitrous acid on the dimethyl sulfoxide-treated proteoglycans was prevented by acetylation. This occurrence of heparan sulfate-chondroitin sulfate hybrid proteoglycans suggests that the substitution of core proteins by heparan sulfate or chondroitin sulfate chains may not solely be determined by the specific routing of these proteins through distinct chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate synthesizing mechanisms. Moreover, regional and temporal changes in pericellular glycosaminoglycan compositions might be due to variable postsynthetic modification of a single gene product

  12. Basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan from the L2 rat yolk sac carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Wewer, U; Albrechtsen, R

    1984-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycan from the L2 rat yolk sac carcinoma has been purified and partially characterized. The proteoglycan has an apparent Mr of 750 000, 35% of which represents the core protein. The core protein seems to be homogeneous, whereas the heparan sulfate chains are heterogeneous...... with an Mr of about 50 000-70 000, with 30% of the glucosamine being N-sulfated. Antibodies raised against the core protein of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan reacted with basement membranes of various rat and human tissue....

  13. Effect of retinoic acid on proteoglycan turnover in bovine articular cartilage cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, M.A.; Handley, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes proteoglycan catabolism by adult bovine articular cartilage treated with retinoic acid as a means of stimulating the loss of this macromolecule from the extracellular matrix of cartilage. Addition of retinoic acid (10(-12)-10(-6) M) to adult bovine articular cartilage which had been labeled with [ 35 S]sulfate for 6 h after 5 days in culture, resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the rate of loss of 35 S-labeled proteoglycans from the matrix of the tissue. Concomitant with this loss was a decrease in the proteoglycan content of the tissue. Incubation of cultures treated with 1 microM retinoic acid, at 4 degrees C, or with 0.5 mM cycloheximide, resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of retinoic acid-induced loss of proteoglycans and demonstrated cellular involvement in this process. Analysis of the 35 S-labeled proteoglycans remaining in the matrix showed that the percentage of radioactivity associated with the small proteoglycan species extracted from the matrix of articular cartilage explants labeled with [ 35 S]sulfate after 5 days in culture was 15% and this increased to 22% in tissue maintained in medium alone. In tissue treated with 1 microM retinoic acid for 6 days, the percentage of radioactivity associated with the small proteoglycan was 58%. Approximately 93% of the 35 S-labeled proteoglycans released into the medium of control and retinoic acid-treated cultures was recovered in high density fractions after CsCl gradient centrifugation and eluted on Sepharose CL-2B as a broad peak with a Kav of 0.30-0.37. Less than 17% of these proteoglycans was capable of aggregating with hyaluronate. These results indicate that in both control and retinoic acid-treated cultures the larger proteoglycan species is lost to the medium at a greater rate than the small proteoglycan species. The effect of retinoic acid on proteoglycan turnover was shown to be reversible

  14. In vivo turnover of the basement membrane and other heparan sulfate proteoglycans of rat glomerulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beavan, L A; Davies, M; Couchman, J R

    1989-01-01

    The metabolic turnover of rat glomerular proteoglycans in vivo was investigated. Newly synthesized proteoglycans were labeled during a 7-h period after injecting sodium [35S]sulfate intraperitoneally. At the end of the labeling period a chase dose of sodium sulfate was given. Subsequently......-propanesulfonate-4 M guanidine hydrochloride, a procedure which solubilized greater than 95% of the 35S-labeled macromolecules. Of these 11-13% was immunoprecipitated by an antiserum against heparan sulfate proteoglycan which, in immunolocalization experiments, showed specificity for staining the basement membrane...

  15. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface: versatile coordinators of cellular functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tumova, S; Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2000-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are complex molecules composed of a core protein with covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. While the protein part determines localization of the proteoglycan on the cell surfaces or in the extracellular matrix, the glycosaminoglycan component, heparan sulfate......, mediates interactions with a variety of extracellular ligands such as growth factors and adhesion molecules. Through these interactions, heparan sulfate proteoglycans participate in many events during cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation. We are determining the multitude...... of proteoglycan functions, as their intricate roles in many pathways are revealed. They act as coreceptors for growth factors, participate in signalling during cell adhesion, modulate the activity of a broad range of molecules, and partake in many developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis...

  16. Differential expression of proteoglycans in tissue remodeling and lymphangiogenesis after experimental renal transplantation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleen Rienstra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic transplant dysfunction explains the majority of late renal allograft loss and is accompanied by extensive tissue remodeling leading to transplant vasculopathy, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. Matrix proteoglycans mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and play key roles in tissue remodeling. The aim of this study was to characterize differential heparan sulfate proteoglycan and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expression in transplant vasculopathy, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis in renal allografts with chronic transplant dysfunction. METHODS: Renal allografts were transplanted in the Dark Agouti-to-Wistar Furth rat strain combination. Dark Agouti-to-Dark Agouti isografts and non-transplanted Dark Agouti kidneys served as controls. Allograft and isograft recipients were sacrificed 66 and 81 days (mean after transplantation, respectively. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan (collXVIII, perlecan and agrin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (versican expression, as well as CD31 and LYVE-1 (vascular and lymphatic endothelium, respectively expression were (semi- quantitatively analyzed using immunofluorescence. FINDINGS: Arteries with transplant vasculopathy and sclerotic glomeruli in allografts displayed pronounced neo-expression of collXVIII and perlecan. In contrast, in interstitial fibrosis expression of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan versican dominated. In the cortical tubular basement membranes in both iso- and allografts, induction of collXVIII was detected. Allografts presented extensive lymphangiogenesis (p<0.01 compared to isografts and non-transplanted controls, which was associated with induced perlecan expression underneath the lymphatic endothelium (p<0.05 and p<0.01 compared to isografts and non-transplanted controls, respectively. Both the magnitude of lymphangiogenesis and perlecan expression correlated with severity of interstitial fibrosis and impaired graft function

  17. Stimulation of proteoglycans by IGF I and II in microvessel and large vessel endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar, R.S.; Dake, B.L.; Stueck, S.

    1987-01-01

    Endothelial cells were cultured from bovine capillaries and pulmonary arteries, and the effect of insulinlike growth factor (IGF) I and II (multiplication-stimulating activity) and insulin on the synthesis of proteoglycans was determined. IGF I and II stimulated 35 SO 4 incorporation into proteoglycans in a dose-dependent manner in both microvessel and pulmonary artery endothelial cells with maximum threefold increases. In pulmonary artery cells, the IGFs caused a general stimulation of all classes of glycosaminoglycan-containing proteoglycans. In microvessel endothelial cells, the IGFs appeared to preferentially increase heparan sulfate-containing proteoglycans. Insulin, at concentrations up to 10 -6 M, had no effect on the synthesis of proteoglycans in either microvessel or pulmonary arterial endothelial cells. Thus, the IGFs stimulate the synthesis of proteoglycans in both microvessel and large vessel endothelial cells, a property that is not mimicked by insulin. Because vascular endothelial cells are bathed by IGFs in vivo, such IGF-mediated functions are likely to be significant in both the normal physiology of vascular endothelium and in disease states such as diabetes mellitus

  18. New SPECT tracers: Example of tracers of proteoglycans and melanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachin, F.; Mestas, D.; Kelly, A.; Merlin, C.; Veyre, A.; Maublant, J.; Cachin, F.; Chezal, J.M.; Miot-Noirault, E.; Moins, N.; Auzeloux, P.; Vidal, A.; Bonnet-Duquennoy, M.; Boisgard, S.; D'Incan, M.; Madelmont, J.C.; Maublant, J.; Boisgard, S.; D'Incan, M.; Redini, F.; Filaire, M.

    2009-01-01

    The majority of research program on new radiopharmaceuticals turn to tracers used for positron emission tomography (PET). Only a few teams work on new non fluorine labeled tracers. However, the coming of SPECT/CT gamma cameras, the arrival of semi-conductors gamma cameras should boost the development of non-PET tracers. We exhibit in this article the experience acquired by our laboratory in the conception and design of two new non fluorine labelled compounds. The 99m Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 (N.T.P. 15-5 for N-[tri-ethyl-ammonium]-3-propyl-[15]ane-N5) which binds to proteoglycans could be used for the diagnosis and staging of osteoarthritis and chondrosarcoma. The iodo benzamides, specific to the melanin, are nowadays compared to 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose in a phase III clinical trial for the diagnosis and detection of melanoma metastasis. Our last development focus on N-[2-(diethyl-amino)ethyl]-4 and 2-iodo benzamides respectively B.Z.A. and B.Z.A.2 hetero-aromatic analogues usable for melanoma treatment. (authors)

  19. Somite chrondrogenesis: alterations in cyclic AMP levels and proteoglycan synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasan, Nagaswamistri; Lamb, K.M.; Heick, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels have been shown to have a positive influence on chondrogenesis in limb buds and pelvic cartilage. In the present study the level of cAMP was measured during somite chondrogenesis in vitro and found to decrease from 1.38 pmol/μg DNA on day 0 to 0.9 pmol/μg DNA on day 6. Inclusion of notochord with somites caused a marked recution, with levels decreasing from 1.41 pmol/μg DNA on day 0 to 0.36 pmol/μg DNA on day 6. Concurrently, the incorporation of radioactive sulfate into sulfated glycosaminoglycans increased from day 3 to day 6 by 38% in somite and 77% in somite-notochord explants. The aggregation of proteoglycans was analyzed by gel chromatography and found to increase with a corresponding decrease in cAMP levels. The result indicate that a decrease in cAMP levels may be necessary for chondrogenic expression in somites. (author)

  20. Aortic smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis in relation to atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PG) are implicated in atherogenesis by their effects on tissue permeability and cell proliferation and their interaction with plasma low density lipoproteins. Using the pigeon model in which an atherosclerosis-susceptible (WC) and -resistant (SR) breed can be compared, PG synthesis by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells was examined by the use of [ 35 S]-sodium sulfate and [ 3 H]-serine or [ 3 H]-glucosamine as labeling precursors. In both SR and WC cells, the majority of newly synthesized PG were secreted into the media. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) PG and dermatan sulfate (DS) PG were the major PG produced. Total PG production was consistently lower in WC compared to SR cultures due in part to reduce PG synthesis but also to degradation of newly synthesized PG. Since increased DS-PG accompanines atherosclerosis progression, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that macrophages modulate smooth muscle cell metabolism to cause increase DS-PG production. Cultured WC aortic smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1 and the production of PG examined. Increasing concentration of conditioned media from both types of macrophages caused increased incorporation of 35 S-sulfate into secreted PG, but no change in cell-associated PG. Lipopolysaccharide activation of P388D1 cells enhanced the effect

  1. Ultrastructure Organization of Collagen Fibrils and Proteoglycans of Stingray and Shark Corneal Stroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saud A. Alanazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here the ultrastructural organization of collagen fibrils (CF and proteoglycans (PGs of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark. Three corneas from three stingrays and three corneas from three sharks were processed for electron microscopy. Tissues were embedded in TAAB 031 resin. The corneal stroma of both the stingray and shark consisted of parallel running lamellae of CFs which were decorated with PGs. In the stingray, the mean area of PGs in the posterior stroma was significantly larger than the PGs of the anterior and middle stroma, whereas, in the shark, the mean area of PGs was similar throughout the stroma. The mean area of PGs of the stingray was significantly larger compared to the PGs, mean area of the shark corneal stroma. The CF diameter of the stingray was significantly smaller compared to the CF diameter in the shark. The ultrastructural features of the corneal stroma of both the stingray and the shark were similar to each other except for the CFs and PGs. The PGs in the stingray and shark might be composed of chondroitin sulfate (CS/dermatan sulfate (DS PGs and these PGs with sutures might contribute to the nonswelling properties of the cornea of the stingray and shark.

  2. Age-related changes in the incorporation of [35S]sulfate into two proteoglycan populations from human cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triphaus, G.F.; Schmidt, A.; Buddecke, E.

    1980-01-01

    From human hyaline cartilage (processus xyphoid) preincubated in the presence of [ 35 S] sulfate, proteoglycans were extracted by 4M guanidinium chloride and divided into 6 age groups. Fractionation of proteoglycans by gel filtration under dissociative conditions resulted in two proteoglycan fractions (a and b) with different hydrodynamic volumes. The higher molecular weight fraction a contained chondroitin sulfate, the fraction b keratan sulfate as predominant glycosaminoglycan, the chondroitin sulfate/keratan sulfate ratio decreasing with increasing age in either fraction. The relative portion of proteoglycan fraction b and its 35 S-labelling increased with increasing age. From the specific 35 S radioactivities of the chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate preparations, the occurrence of two independent proteoglycan populations is suggested. A precursorproduct relationship between proteoglycan fraction a and b could be excluded. (orig.)

  3. Age-related changes in the incorporation of (/sup 35/S)sulfate into two proteoglycan populations from human cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triphaus, G.F.; Schmidt, A.; Buddecke, E.

    1980-12-01

    From human hyaline cartilage (processus xyphoid) preincubated in the presence of (/sup 35/S) sulfate, proteoglycans were extracted by 4M guanidinium chloride and divided into 6 age groups. Fractionation of proteoglycans by gel filtration under dissociative conditions resulted in two proteoglycan fractions (a and b) with different hydrodynamic volumes. The higher molecular weight fraction a contained chondroitin sulfate, the fraction b keratan sulfate as predominant glycosaminoglycan, the chondroitin sulfate/keratan sulfate ratio decreasing with increasing age in either fraction. The relative portion of proteoglycan fraction b and its /sup 35/S-labelling increased with increasing age. From the specific /sup 35/S radioactivities of the chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate preparations, the occurrence of two independent proteoglycan populations is suggested. A precursorproduct relationship between proteoglycan fraction a and b could be excluded.

  4. ADAM12/syndecan-4 signaling promotes beta 1 integrin-dependent cell spreading through protein kinase Calpha and RhoA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Grauslund, Morten

    2002-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) comprise a large family of multidomain proteins with cell-binding and metalloprotease activities. The ADAM12 cysteine-rich domain (rADAM12-cys) supports cell attachment using syndecan-4 as a primary cell surface receptor that subsequently triggers beta...

  5. Heparanase-1-induced shedding of heparan sulfate from syndecan-1 in hepatocarcinoma cell facilitates lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation via VEGF-C/ERK pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shengjin; Lv, Huiming; Zhang, He; Jiang, Yu; Hong, Yu; Xia, Rongjun; Zhang, Qifang; Ju, Weiwei; Jiang, Lili; Ou, Geng; Zhang, Jinhui; Wang, Shujing; Zhang, Jianing

    2017-01-01

    Heparanase-1/syndecan-1 axis plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and development. The main mechanism includes heparanase-1 (HPA-1) degrades the heparan sulfate chain of syndecan-1 (SDC-1), and the following shedding of heparan sulfate from tumor cell releases and activates SDC-1 sequestered growth factors. However, the significance of Heparanase-1/syndecan-1 axis and its effects on the microenvironment of lymphatic metastasis in hepatocellular carcinogenesis (HCC) procession have not been reported. Herein, we found that HPA-1 could degrade the heparan sulfate on hepatocarcinoma cell surface. Importantly, HPA-1-induced shedding of heparan sulfate chain from SDC-1 facilitated the release of vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) from SDC-1/VEGF-C complex into the medium of hepatocarcinoma cell. Further studies indicated that VEGF-C secretion from hepatocarcinoma cell promoted lymphatic endothelial cell growth through activating extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Taken together, this study reveals a novel existence of Heparanase-1/syndecan-1 axis in hepatocarcinoma cell and its roles in the cross-talking with the microenvironment of lymphatic metastasis. - Highlights: • SDC-1 anchors VEGF-C via its HS chains. • Secreted HPA-1 from hepatocarcinoma cell cleaves HS chains of SDC-1. • The shedding of SDC-1 HS chains releases VEGF-C from SDC-1/VEGF-C complex. • LMWH inhibits VEGF-C secretion through stabilizing SDC-1/VEGF-C complex. • VEGF-C secretion from hepatocarcinoma cell facilitates LEC growth via ERK signaling.

  6. Syndecan-2 promotes perineural invasion and cooperates with K-ras to induce an invasive pancreatic cancer cell phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Oliveira Tiago

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have identified syndecan-2 as a protein potentially involved in perineural invasion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Methods Syndecan-2 (SDC-2 expression was analyzed in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC tissues. Functional in vitro assays were carried out to determine its role in invasion, migration and signaling. Results SDC-2 was expressed in the majority of the tested pancreatic cancer cell lines while it was upregulated in nerve-invasive PDAC cell clones. There were 2 distinct expression patterns of SDC-2 in PDAC tissue samples: SDC-2 positivity in the cancer cell cytoplasm and a peritumoral expression. Though SDC-2 silencing (using specific siRNA oligonucleotides did not affect anchorage-dependent growth, it significantly reduced cell motility and invasiveness in the pancreatic cancer cell lines T3M4 and Su8686. On the transcriptional level, migration-and invasion-associated genes were down-regulated following SDC-2 RNAi. Furthermore, SDC-2 silencing reduced K-ras activity, phosphorylation of Src and - further downstream - phosphorylation of ERK2 while levels of the putative SDC-2 signal transducer p120GAP remained unaltered. Conclusion SDC-2 is a novel (perineural invasion-associated gene in PDAC which cooperates with K-ras to induce a more invasive phenotype.

  7. Overexpression of TGF-β Inducible microRNA-143 in Zebrafish Leads to Impairment of the Glomerular Filtration Barrier by Targeting Proteoglycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Müller-Deile

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: TGF-β is known as an important stress factor of podocytes in glomerular diseases. Apart from activation of direct pro-apoptotic pathways we wanted to analyze micro-RNA (miRs driven regulation of components involved in the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier induced by TGF-β. Since miR-143-3p (miR-143 is described as a TGF-β inducible miR in other cell types, we examined this specific miR and its ability to induce glomerular pathology. Methods: We analyzed miR-143 expression in cultured human podocytes after stimulation with TGF-β. We also microinjected zebrafish eggs with a miR-143 mimic or with morpholinos specific for its targets syndecan and versican and compared phenotype and proteinuria development. Results: We detected a time dependent, TGF-β inducible expression of miR-143 in human podocytes. Targets of miR-143 relevant in glomerular biology are syndecans and versican, which are known components of the glycocalyx. We found that syndecan 1 and 4 were predominantly expressed in podocytes while syndecan 3 was largely expressed in glomerular endothelial cells. Versican could be detected in both cell types. After injection of a miR-143 mimic in zebrafish larvae, syndecan 3, 4 and versican were significantly downregulated. Moreover, miR-143 overexpression or versican knockdown by morpholino caused loss of plasma proteins, edema, podocyte effacement and endothelial damage. In contrast, knockdown of syndecan 3 and syndecan 4 had no effects on glomerular filtration barrier. Conclusion: Expression of versican and syndecan isoforms is indispensable for proper barrier function. Podocyte-derived miR-143 is a mediator for paracrine and autocrine cross talk between podocytes and glomerular endothelial cells and can alter expression of glomerular glycocalyx proteins.

  8. Polymorphisms in the bovine ghrelin precursor (GHRL) and Syndecan-1 (SDC1) genes that are associated with growth traits in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiajie; Jin, Qijiang; Zhang, Chunlei; Fang, Xingtang; Gu, Chuanwen; Lei, Chuzhao; Wang, Juqiang; Chen, Hong

    2011-06-01

    Transgenically expressed Syndecan-1 was found in the hypothalamic nuclei that control energy balance, and was associated with maturity-onset obesity, while ghrelin has been shown to play important roles in the control of food intake, gastric acid secretion, energy homeostasis, and glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the roles of genetic variations of Syndecan-1 and ghrelin on growth trait have few been reported in cattle. Herein, five Chinese cattle breeds were analyzed by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing methods. The bovine ghrelin gene showed eleven SNPs g.[267G>A, 271G>A, 290C>T, 326A>G, 327T>C, 420C>A, 569A>G, 945C>T, 993C>T, 4491A>G, 4644G>A] and three SNPs g.[420C>A, 569 A>G, 945C>T] were firstly detected in cattle. The bovine Syndecan-1 gene showed two SNPs. One SNP showed a transition C>G at position 21514, resulting in a synonymous mutation p.G(GGC)169G(GGG) and another showed a transversion C>T at position 22591, resulting in a synonymous mutation p.D(GAC)283D(GAT). In ghrelin gene, no significant associations were revealed between any variant sites and body weight, average daily gain, body sizes for different growth periods (6, 12, 18, and 24 months old), as well as for the milk yield at 305 days, milk protein rate and milk fat percentage. However, the polymorphism of Syndecan-1 gene was significantly associated with bovine birth weight and body length. Hence, we first suggested that Syndecan-1 gene could be regarded as molecular marker for superior birth weight and body length.

  9. Basement membrane and interstitial proteoglycans produced by MDCK cells correspond to those expressed in the kidney cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erickson, A C; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Multiple proteoglycans (PGs) are present in all basement membranes (BM) and may contribute to their structure and function, but their effects on cell behavior are not well understood. Their postulated functions include: a structural role in maintaining tissue histoarchitecture, or aid in selective...... filtration processes; sequestration of growth factors; and regulation of cellular differentiation. Furthermore, expression PGs has been found to vary in several disease states. In order to elucidate the role of PGs in the BM, a well-characterized model of polarized epithelium, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK...... core proteins or CS stubs generated by cABC treatment, revealed that both basement membrane and interstitial PGs are secreted by MDCK cells. HSPGs expressed by MDCK cells are perlecan, agrin, and collagen XVIII. Various CSPG core proteins are made by MDCK cells and have been identified as biglycan...

  10. Macromolecular basis for homocystein-induced changes in proteoglycan structure in growth and arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, K S

    1972-01-01

    Cell culture monolayers deficient in cystathionine synthetase bound more inorganic sulfate than normal cell monolayers during growth to confluence; this was correlated with the production of granular proteoglycan by the abnormal cells and fibrillar proteoglycan by normal cells. Homocysteine was demonstrated to be an active precursor of esterified sulfate, confirming our previous finding of this sulfation pathway in liver. The cell cultures deficient in cystathionine synthetase were found to assume an abnormal cellular distribution on the surface of the culture dish, resembling the distribution assumed by neoplastic cells with loss of contact inhibition; the degree of abnormality of the cellular distribution was correlated with the amount of granular proteoglycan produced by the cells and the amount of inorganic sulfate binding by the cell monolayers. Pyridoxine was found to increase the growth rate of cell cultures from a patient with pyridoxineresponsive homocystinuria and to increase the production of fibrillar proteoglycan by the cells; no effect of pyridoxine was observed in the cell cultures from a patient who failed to respond to pyridoxine therapy. The findings suggest that the change in macromolecular conformation of cellular proteoglycans from fibrillar to granular is due to increased sulfation of the carbohydrate envelope of the molecule. The significance of the findings is related to the pathogenesis of homocystinuria, the phenomenon of contact inhibition, the action of growth hormone and initiation of arteriosclerotic plaques.

  11. Purification and partial characterization of glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans from cultured rabbit smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatino, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans synthesized by cultured rabbit smooth muscle cells were isolated after incorporation of [ 3 H]-glucosamine into glycosaminoglycans in the presence or absence of 10% fetal bovine serum. Glycosaminoglycans were quantitated by two-dimensional electrophoresis after proteolytic digestion of the cell layers and media. The results show that the presence of serum has no effect on the chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate content of the cell layers. The incorporation of [ 3 H]-glucosamine into hyaluronic acid of the cell layers was three times higher in the presence of serum. In the medium , the quantity of hyaluronic was two times higher in the presence of serum while the other glycosaminoglycans remained unchanged. The incorporation of [ 3 H]-glucosamine into hyaluronic acid was unaffected by the presence of serum. Specific proteoglycans were isolated from medium after with [ 35 S]-sulfate and [ 3 H]-serine by isopycnic ultracentrifugation and chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B and DEAE-cellulose. Preparations contained a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, a condroitin sulfate-dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans synthesized by rabbit aorta smooth muscle cells are similar to those from human aorta

  12. Decorin is one of the proteoglycans expressed in Walker 256 rat mammary carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Oba-Shinjo

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan content was analyzed in a model of rat mammary carcinoma to study the roles of these compounds in tumorigenesis. Hyaluronic acid and proteoglycans bearing chondroitin and/or dermatan sulfate chains were detected in solid tumors obtained after subcutaneous inoculation of Walker 256 rat carcinoma cells. About 10% of sulfated glycosaminoglycan chains corresponded to heparan sulfate. The small leucine-rich proteoglycan, decorin, was identified as one of the proteoglycans, in addition to others of higher molecular weight, by cross-reaction with an antiserum raised against pig laryngeal decorin and by N-terminal amino acid sequencing. Decorin was separated from other proteoglycans by hydrophobic chromatography and its complete structure was determined. It has a molecular weight of about 85 kDa and a dermatan chain of 45 kDa with 4-sulfated disaccharides. After degradation of the glycosaminoglycan chain, three core proteins of different molecular weight (36, 46 and 56 kDa were identified. The presence of hyaluronic acid and decorin has been reported in a variety of tumors and tumor cells. In the Walker 256 mammary carcinoma model, hyaluronic acid may play an important role in tumor progression, since it provides a more hydrated extracellular matrix. On the other hand, decorin, which is expressed by stromal cells, represents a host defense response to tumor growth.

  13. Low buoyant density proteoglycans from saline and dissociative extracts of embryonic chicken retinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.E.; Ting, Y.P.; Birkholz-Lambrecht, A.

    1984-03-01

    Retinas were labeled in culture with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine or (/sup 3/H)leucine and (/sup 35/S)sulfate and extracted sequentially with physiologically balanced saline and 4 M guanidine HCl. They were dialyzed into associative conditions (0.5 M NaCl) and chromatographed on agarose columns. Under these conditions, some of the proteoglycans were associated in massive complexes that showed low buoyant densities when centrifuged in CsCl density gradients under dissociative conditions (4 M guanidine HCl). Much of the label in these complexes was in molecules other than proteoglycans. Most of the proteoglycans, however, were included on the agarose columns, where they appeared to be constitutionally of low buoyant density. They resisted attempts to separate potential low buoyant density contaminants from the major proteoglycans by direct CsCl density gradient centrifugation or by the fractionation of saline or 8 M urea extracts on diethylaminoethyl-Sephacel. The diethylaminoethyl-Sephacel fractions were either subjected to CsCl density gradient centrifugation or were chromatographed on Sephacryl S-300, in both cases before and after alkaline cleavage, to confirm the presence of typical O-linked glycosaminoglycans. The medium and balanced salt extracts were enriched in chondroitin sulfate and other sulfated macromolecules, possibly highly sulfated oligosaccharides, that resisted digestion by chondroitinase ABC but were electrophoretically less mobile than heparan sulfate. Guanidine HCl or urea extracts of the residues were mixtures of high and low density proteoglycans that were enriched in heparan sulfate.

  14. N-sulfation of heparan sulfate is critical for syndecan-4-mediated podocyte cell-matrix interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugar, T.; Wassenhove-McCarthy, D.J.; Orr, A.W.; Green, J.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; McCarthy, K.J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that podocytes unable to assemble heparan sulfate on cell surface proteoglycan core proteins have compromised cell-matrix interactions. This report further explores the role of N-sulfation of intact heparan chains in podocyte-matrix interactions. For the purposes of this

  15. Chondroitin-6-sulfate-containing proteoglycan: a new component of human skin dermoepidermal junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fine, J D; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan is present in adult, neonatal, and/or fetal skin, and if present, its ultrastructural localization. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed on human adult, neonatal, and fetal skin. To detect the antigen, specimens were pretreated with chondroitinase ABC; absence of enzyme...... treatment served as negative control. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan was detectable in linear homogeneous array along the dermoepidermal junction and within vascular (and when present, adnexal) basement membranes in both adult and neonatal skin. In fetal skin, basement membrane staining was noted as early...... as 54 gestational days. Indirect immunoelectron microscopy and NaCl-split skin studies were performed to ultrastructurally localize the antigen; immune deposits were detectable within the lamina densa in chondroitinase-treated skin. These findings demonstrate that chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan...

  16. Mammalian tissue distribution of a large heparan sulfate proteoglycan detected by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Ljubimov, A V

    1989-01-01

    muscle, endothelia, peripheral nerve fibers and epithelia so far examined. In addition, two of the monoclonal antibodies show cross-species reactivity, staining bovine and human basement membranes, and immunoprecipitating proteoglycans from human endothelial cell cultures. These antibodies do not......A panel of nine monoclonal antibodies has been characterized, all of which have reactivity with the core protein of a large heparan sulfate proteoglycan derived from the murine EHS tumor matrix. These rat monoclonal antibodies stained mouse basement membranes intensely, including those of all...

  17. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans made by different basement-membrane-producing tumors have immunological and structural similarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R; Hassell, J R

    1985-01-01

    in the native basement membrane of surrounding normal murine tissues. Blocking and ELISA assays demonstrated that the antibodies recognized both antigens. Using techniques involving the chemical and enzymatic degradation of 35S-sulfate-labeled glycosaminoglycans, the mouse EHS tumor cells were found to produce...... proteoglycans obtained from these two sources immunoprecipitated the same precursor protein with a molecular mass of 400,000 daltons from 35S-methionine pulse-labeled cells of both tumors. Immunohistochemistry showed the heparan sulfate proteoglycan to be distributed in the extracellular matrix and also...

  18. Rat mesangial cells in vitro synthesize a spectrum of proteoglycan species including those of the basement membrane and interstitium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, G J; Shewring, L; McCarthy, K J

    1995-01-01

    is localized in the mesangium but is not found in the pericapillary glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Further characterization of the proteoglycans synthesized by RMC in vitro revealed: (i) a second large CSPG, identified as versican; (ii) two small dermatan sulphate proteoglycans identified as biglycan...

  19. Distribution of two basement membrane proteoglycans through hair follicle development and the hair growth cycle in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; King, J L; McCarthy, K J

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of two distinct populations of basement membrane proteoglycans has been monitored through hair growth development in the rat embryo and subsequent hair growth cycle. An antiserum against a small heparan sulfate proteoglycan uniformly stained the dermal-epidermal junction...... of embryonic rats throughout the period of hair follicle formation. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies recognizing a basement membrane-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan only weakly stained 16-d embryo dermal-epidermal junction, but strong staining was associated with hair follicle buds...... as they developed. Through the hair growth cycle, it was found that the heparan sulfate proteoglycan persisted around the follicles, while the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan decreased in amount through catagen until it was undetectable at the base and dermal papilla of the telogen follicle. As anagen commenced...

  20. Biosynthesis of promatrix metalloproteinase-9/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan heteromer involves a Rottlerin-sensitive pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabin Malla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previously we have shown that a fraction of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 synthesized by the macrophage cell line THP-1 was bound to a chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG core protein as a reduction sensitive heteromer. Several biochemical properties of the enzyme were changed when it was bound to the CSPG. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By use of affinity chromatography, zymography, and radioactive labelling, various macrophage stimulators were tested for their effect on the synthesis of the proMMP-9/CSPG heteromer and its components by THP-1 cells. Of the stimulators, only PMA largely increased the biosynthesis of the heteromer. As PMA is an activator of PKC, we determined which PKC isoenzymes were expressed by performing RT-PCR and Western Blotting. Subsequently specific inhibitors were used to investigate their involvement in the biosynthesis of the heteromer. Of the inhibitors, only Rottlerin repressed the biosynthesis of proMMP-9/CSPG and its two components. Much lower concentrations of Rottlerin were needed to reduce the amount of CSPG than what was needed to repress the synthesis of the heteromer and MMP-9. Furthermore, Rottlerin caused a minor reduction in the activation of the PKC isoenzymes δ, ε, θ and υ (PKD3 in both control and PMA exposed cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The biosynthesis of the proMMP-9/CSPG heteromer and proMMP-9 in THP-1 cells involves a Rottlerin-sensitive pathway that is different from the Rottlerin sensitive pathway involved in the CSPG biosynthesis. MMP-9 and CSPGs are known to be involved in various physiological and pathological processes. Formation of complexes may influence both the specificity and localization of the enzyme. Therefore, knowledge about biosynthetic pathways and factors involved in the formation of the MMP-9/CSPG heteromer may contribute to insight in the heteromers biological function as well as pointing to future targets for therapeutic agents.

  1. High glucose modifies transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channels via increased oxidative stress and syndecan-4 in human podocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Lee, Marlene; Xia, Shengqiang

    2014-01-01

    oxidative stress and syndecan-4 (SDC-4) in human podocytes. Human podocytes were exposed to control conditions (5.6 mmol/L D-glucose), high glucose (30 mmol/L D-glucose or L-glucose), 100 μmol/L peroxynitrite, or high glucose and the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol (100 μmol/L). TRPC6 and SDC-4...... transcripts and protein expression were measured using RT-PCR and in-cell Western assay. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytosolic calcium were measured using fluorescent dye techniques. High D-glucose increased TRPC6 transcripts to 8.66±4.08 (p....44±0.07 (poxidative stress using peroxynitrite significantly increased TRPC6 transcripts to 4.29±1.26 (p

  2. Agrin is a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan in the human glomerular basement membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groffen, Alexander J.; Ruegg, Markus A.; Dijkman, Henri; Van De Velden, Thea J.; Buskens, Carin A.; Van Den Born, Jacob; Assmann, Karel J.; Monnens, Leo A.; Veerkamp, Jacques H.; Van Den Heuvel, Lambert P.

    Agrin is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) that is highly concentrated in the synaptic basal lamina at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Agrin-like immunoreactivity is also detected outside the NMJ. Here we show that agrin is a major HSPG component of the human glomerular basement membrane

  3. Extracellular matrix in canine mammary tumors with special focus on versican, a versatile extracellular proteoglycan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdélyi, Ildikó

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) research has become fundamental to understand cancer. This thesis focuses on the exploration of ECM composition and organization in canine mammary tumors, with a special interest in the large chondroitin-sulfate proteoglycan (PG), versican. Chapter 1 gives an

  4. Salmon cartilage proteoglycan suppresses mouse experimental colitis through induction of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Toshihito; Sashinami, Hiroshi; Sato, Fuyuki; Kijima, Hiroshi; Ishiguro, Yoh; Fukuda, Shinsaku; Yoshihara, Shuichi; Hakamada, Ken-Ichi; Nakane, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Salmon proteoglycan suppresses IL-10 -/- cell transfer-induced colitis progression. → Salmon proteoglycan suppresses Th1- and Th17-related factors in colitis mice. → Salmon proteoglycan enhances Foxp3 expression. -- Abstract: Proteoglycans (PGs) are complex glycohydrates which are widely distributed in extracellular matrix (ECM). PGs are involved in the construction of ECM, cell proliferation and differentiation. ECM components are involved in transduction of proinflammatory responses, but it is still unknown whether PGs are involved in inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effect of PG extracted from salmon cartilage on the progression of experimental colitis-induced in severe combined immunodeficiency mice by cell transfer from interleukin-10 (IL-10) -/- mice. IL-10 -/- cell-transferred mice showed weight loss, colon shortening and histological appearance of mild colitis. Daily oral administration of PG attenuated the clinical progression of colitis in a dose-dependent manner. Colitis-induced mice showed the elevated expression of IFN-γ, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-21, IL-23p19, IL-6, IL-17A and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) in lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) and oral administration of PG suppressed the expression of these factors. Conversely, expression of Foxp3 that induces CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells in LPMCs was enhanced by PG administration. These findings suggested that salmon PG attenuated the progression of colitis due to suppression of inflammatory response by enhancement of regulatory T cell induction.

  5. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical localization of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in Bruch's membrane of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, W L; Essner, E; McCarthy, K J

    1992-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (Mab 4D5 and 2D6) raised against the core protein of a basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan from Reichert's membrane of the rat, were used for ultrastructural immunoperoxidase localization of this protein in Bruch's membrane of the rat. Immunoreactivity...

  6. Evaluation of maternal serum hypoxia inducible factor-1α, progranulin and syndecan-1 levels in pregnancies with early- and late-onset preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alici Davutoğlu, Ebru; Akkaya Firat, Asuman; Ozel, Ayşegül; Yılmaz, Nevin; Uzun, Isil; Temel Yuksel, Ilkbal; Madazlı, Riza

    2018-08-01

    To determine the serum levels of HIF-1 α, progranulin, and syndecan-1 in preeclampsia (PE) and normal pregnancy, and to compare whether these markers demonstrate any difference between early-onset PE (EO-PE) and late-onset PE (LO-PE). This cross-sectional study was conducted on 27 women with EO-PE, 27 women with LO-PE, and 26 healthy normotensive pregnant controls matched for gestational age. Maternal levels of serum HIF-1 α, progranulin, and syndecan-1 were measured with the use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between the control and the PE groups in progranulin (p progranulin levels were significantly higher in LO-PE compared with the other two groups (EO-PE versus LO-PE and LO-PE versus controls p = .000). Control group presented significantly higher syndecan-1 levels, than EO and LO-PE (p progranulin levels (r = .439, p= .000). Serum progranulin may have potential to be used as a biomarker for the differentiation of EO-PE and LO-PE. The co-operative action between HIF-1 α and progranulin might play a key role in the pathogenesis of LO-PE. The predominant feature of LO-PE seems to be an inflammatory process, whereas in EO-PE placentation problem seems to be the main pathology.

  7. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan aggregates in calf articular cartilage organ cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, T.I.

    1991-01-01

    Previous work showed that transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1), added alone to bovine cartilage organ cultures, stimulated [35S]sulfate incorporation into macromolecular material but did not investigate the fidelity of the stimulated system to maintain synthesis of cartilage-type proteoglycans. This paper provides evidence that chondrocytes synthesize the appropriate proteoglycan matrix under TGF-beta 1 stimulation: (1) there is a coordinated increase in hyaluronic acid and proteoglycan monomer synthesis, (2) link-stable proteoglycan aggregates are assembled, (3) the hybrid chondroitin sulfate/keratan sulfate monomeric species is synthesized, and (4) there is an increase in protein core synthesis. Some variation in glycosylation patterns was observed when proteoglycans synthesized under TGF-beta 1 stimulation were compared to those synthesized under basal conditions. Thus comparing TGF-beta 1 to basal samples respectively, the monomers were larger (Kav on Sepharose CL-2B = 0.29 vs 0.41), the chondroitin sulfate chains were longer by approximately 3.5 kDa, the percentage of total glycosaminoglycan in keratan sulfate increased slightly from approximately 4% (basal) to approximately 6%, and the unsulfated disaccharide decreased from 28% (basal) to 12%. All of these variations are in the direction of a more anionic proteoglycan. Since the ability of proteoglycans to confer resiliency to the cartilage matrix is directly related to their anionic nature, these changes would presumably have a beneficial effect on tissue function

  8. Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.L.; Lee, T.D.G.; Seldin, D.C.; Austen, K.F.; Befus, A.D.; Bienenstock, J.

    1986-01-01

    Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of [ 35 S] sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the 35 S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approx. 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched populations of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leumekia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans

  9. Age-related changes in the proteoglycans of human skin. Specific cleavage of decorin to yield a major catabolic fragment in adult skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrino, David A; Onnerfjord, Patrik; Sandy, John D; Cs-Szabo, Gabriella; Scott, Paul G; Sorrell, J Michael; Heinegård, Dick; Caplan, Arnold I

    2003-05-09

    Dramatic changes occur in skin as a function of age, including changes in morphology, physiology, and mechanical properties. Changes in extracellular matrix molecules also occur, and these changes likely contribute to the overall age-related changes in the physical properties of skin. The major proteoglycans detected in extracts of human skin are decorin and versican. In addition, adult human skin contains a truncated form of decorin, whereas fetal skin contains virtually undetectable levels of this truncated decorin. Analysis of this molecule, herein referred to as decorunt, indicates that it is a catabolic fragment of decorin rather than a splice variant. With antibody probes to the core protein, decorunt is found to lack the carboxyl-terminal portion of decorin. Further analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry shows that the carboxyl terminus of decorunt is at Phe(170) of decorin. This result indicates that decorunt represents the amino-terminal 43% of the mature decorin molecule. Such a structure is inconsistent with alternative splicing of decorin and suggests that decorunt is a catabolic fragment of decorin. A neoepitope antiserum, anti-VRKVTF, was generated against the carboxyl terminus of decorunt. This antiserum does not recognize intact decorin in any skin proteoglycan sample tested on immunoblots but recognizes every sample of decorunt tested. The results with anti-VRKVTF confirm the identification of the carboxyl terminus of decorunt. Analysis of collagen binding by surface plasmon resonance indicates that the affinity of decorunt for type I collagen is 100-fold less than that of decorin. This observation correlates with the structural analysis of decorunt, in that it lacks regions of decorin previously shown to be important for interaction with type I collagen. The detection of a catabolic fragment of decorin suggests the existence of a specific catabolic pathway for this proteoglycan. Because of the

  10. Cell surface binding and uptake of arginine- and lysine-rich penetratin peptides in absence and presence of proteoglycans

    KAUST Repository

    Å mand, Helene L.; Rydberg, Hanna A.; Fornander, Louise H.; Lincoln, Per; Nordé n, Bengt; Esbjö rner, Elin K.

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface proteoglycans (PGs) appear to promote uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), but their exact functions are unclear. To address if there is specificity in the interactions of arginines and PGs leading to improved

  11. Utilization of Glycosaminoglycans/Proteoglycans as Carriers for Targeted Therapy Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Suniti; Hascall, Vincent C.; Atanelishvili, Ilia; Moreno Rodriguez, Ricardo; Markwald, Roger R.; Ghatak, Shibnath

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of patients with cancer has improved significantly in the past decade with the incorporation of drugs targeting cell surface adhesive receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, and modulation of several molecules of extracellular matrices (ECMs), the complex composite of collagens, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and glycosaminoglycans that dictates tissue architecture. Cancer tissue invasive processes progress by various oncogenic strategies, including interfering with ECM molecules and their interactions with invasive cells. In this review, we describe how the ECM components, proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans, influence tumor cell signaling. In particular this review describes how the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) and its major receptor CD44 impact invasive behavior of tumor cells, and provides useful insight when designing new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of cancer. PMID:26448753

  12. Basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan alterations in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehara, T; Carone, F A; McCarthy, K J

    1994-01-01

    of distal tubules and collecting ducts was observed by 4 days with phenol II treatment, but the morphology returned to normal after 7 days of subsequent normal diet. Staining of tissue sections with two mouse monoclonal antibodies to a recently described basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan...... to chondroitin sulfate chains confirmed these changes in cystic tubule basement membranes. During the recovery stage, interstitial chondroitin sulfate (representing a CSPG other than BM-CSPG) was greatly increased around these tubules, along with the glycoprotein fibronectin. Staining with antibody to a basement...... membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan core protein related to perlecan did not diminish but rather stained affected tubules intensely, whereas laminin, on the other hand, was apparently diminished in the basement membranes of the cystic tubules. Type IV collagen staining did not change through disease...

  13. Vascular wall proteoglycan synthesis and structure as a target for the prevention of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Little

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Peter J Little1, 2, 3, Mandy L. Ballinger1, Narin Osman1,31Cell Biology of Diabetes Laboratory, Baker Heart Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia; Monash University, Departments of 2Medicine and 3Immunology, Central and Eastern Clinical School, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology of most cardiovascular disease and it represents the major cause of premature death in modern societies. Current therapies target risk factors being hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia when diabetes is present however the maximum efficacy of these strategies is often 30% or less. Areas of vascular biology that may lead to the development of a complementary vascular wall directed therapy are: inflammation, oxidation, endothelial dysfunction, diabetes-specific factors —hyperglycemia and advanced glycation endproducts and lipid retention by vascular matrix specifically proteoglycans. The major structural features of proteoglycans that determine low-density lipoprotein (LDL binding are the length and sulfation pattern on the glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains. Emerging data discussed in this review indicates that these structural properties are subject to considerable regulation by vasoactive substances possibly using novel signaling pathways. For example, GAG elongation stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor is not blocked by the receptor tyrosine kinase antagonist, genistein suggesting that there may be a previously unknown signaling pathway involved in this response. Thus, modifying proteoglycan synthesis and structure may represent a prime target to prevent LDL binding and entrapment in the vessel wall and thus prevent the development and progression of atherosclerosis.Keywords: proteoglycans, signaling, lipoproteins, atherosclerosis

  14. Modulation of the Plasma Kallikrein-Kinin System Proteins Performed by Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans

    OpenAIRE

    Motta, Guacyara; Tersariol, Ivarne L. S.

    2017-01-01

    Human plasma kallikrein-kinin system proteins are related to inflammation through bradykinin. In the proximity of its target cells, high molecular weight kininogen (H-kininogen) is the substrate of plasma kallikrein, which releases bradykinin from H-kininogen. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play a critical role in either recruiting kinin precursors from the plasma, or in the assembly of kallikrein-kinin system components on the cell surface. Furthermore, HSPGs mediate the endocytosis a...

  15. Salmon cartilage proteoglycan suppresses mouse experimental colitis through induction of Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, Toshihito [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Zaifu-cho 5, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Department of Digestive Surgery, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Sashinami, Hiroshi [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Zaifu-cho 5, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Sato, Fuyuki; Kijima, Hiroshi [Department of Pathology and Bioscience, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Ishiguro, Yoh; Fukuda, Shinsaku [Department of Digestive Internal Medicine, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Yoshihara, Shuichi [Department of Glycomedicine, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Hakamada, Ken-Ichi [Department of Digestive Surgery, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan); Nakane, Akio, E-mail: a27k03n0@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Zaifu-cho 5, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8562 (Japan)

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} Salmon proteoglycan suppresses IL-10{sup -/-} cell transfer-induced colitis progression. {yields} Salmon proteoglycan suppresses Th1- and Th17-related factors in colitis mice. {yields} Salmon proteoglycan enhances Foxp3 expression. -- Abstract: Proteoglycans (PGs) are complex glycohydrates which are widely distributed in extracellular matrix (ECM). PGs are involved in the construction of ECM, cell proliferation and differentiation. ECM components are involved in transduction of proinflammatory responses, but it is still unknown whether PGs are involved in inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effect of PG extracted from salmon cartilage on the progression of experimental colitis-induced in severe combined immunodeficiency mice by cell transfer from interleukin-10 (IL-10){sup -/-} mice. IL-10{sup -/-} cell-transferred mice showed weight loss, colon shortening and histological appearance of mild colitis. Daily oral administration of PG attenuated the clinical progression of colitis in a dose-dependent manner. Colitis-induced mice showed the elevated expression of IFN-{gamma}, IL-12, TNF-{alpha}, IL-21, IL-23p19, IL-6, IL-17A and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor {gamma}t (ROR{gamma}t) in lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) and oral administration of PG suppressed the expression of these factors. Conversely, expression of Foxp3 that induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells in LPMCs was enhanced by PG administration. These findings suggested that salmon PG attenuated the progression of colitis due to suppression of inflammatory response by enhancement of regulatory T cell induction.

  16. Molecular characterization and transcriptional analysis of the female-enriched chondroitin proteoglycan 2 of Toxocara canis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, G X; Zhou, R Q; Hu, L; Luo, Y L; Luo, Y F; Zhu, H H

    2018-03-01

    Toxocara canis is an important but neglected zoonotic parasite, and is the causative agent of human toxocariasis. Chondroitin proteoglycans are biological macromolecules, widely distributed in extracellular matrices, with a great diversity of functions in mammals. However, there is limited information regarding chondroitin proteoglycans in nematode parasites. In the present study, a female-enriched chondroitin proteoglycan 2 gene of T. canis (Tc-cpg-2) was cloned and characterized. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was employed to measure the transcription levels of Tc-cpg-2 among tissues of male and female adult worms. A 485-amino-acid (aa) polypeptide was predicted from a continuous 1458-nuleotide open reading frame and designated as TcCPG2, which contains a 21-aa signal peptide. Conserved domain searching indicated three chitin-binding peritrophin-A (CBM_14) domains in the amino acid sequence of TcCPG2. Multiple alignment with the inferred amino acid sequences of Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum showed that CBM_14 domains were well conserved among these species. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that TcCPG2 was closely related to the sequence of chondroitin proteoglycan 2 of A. suum. Interestingly, a high level of Tc-cpg-2 was detected in female germline tissues, particularly in the oviduct, suggesting potential roles of this gene in reproduction (e.g. oogenesis and embryogenesis) of adult T. canis. The functional roles of Tc-cpg-2 in reproduction and development in this parasite and related parasitic nematodes warrant further functional studies.

  17. Rabbit chondrocytes maintained in serum-free medium. I. Synthesis and secretion of hydrodynamically-small proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malemud, C.J.; Papay, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The biosynthesis of sulfated proteoglycan in vitro by rabbit articular chondrocytes in first passage monolayer culture maintained in fetal bovine serum (FBS) or in serum-free conditions was compared. Neosynthesized proteoglycan in the culture medium in the most dense fraction of an associative CsCl density gradient (fraction dAl) declined with increasing time under serum-free conditions, but not when cells were maintained in the presence of serum. After one day, the major peak of incorporated 35 SO 4 in medium fraction dAl eluted as a retarded peak on Sepharose CL-2B, whether cells were maintained under serum-free or serum-containing conditions. The hydrodynamic size of proteoglycan monomer fraction dAlDl obtained after one day of exposure to serum-free culture media was smaller than dAlDl from serum-containing cultures. The hydrodynamic size of dAlDl obtained from serum-free culture media became even progressively smaller after 2 and 3 days' exposure to these conditions. Hydrodynamically small sulfated proteoglycans were identified in the cell-associated dAlDl fraction as early as one day after switching chondrocytes from serum-containing to serum-free medium. Proteoglycan monomer from serum-containing medium reaggregated more efficiently under both conditions. No change in the size of glycosaminoglycan chains was seen in the smaller proteoglycan subpopulations, nor was there any indication of marked changes in the glycosaminoglycan types

  18. Undersulfation of proteoglycans and proteins alter C6 glioma cells proliferation, adhesion and extracellular matrix organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes de Aguiar, Claudia B N; Garcez, Ricardo Castilho; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Trentin, Andréa Gonçalves

    2002-11-01

    Proteoglycans are considered to be important molecule in cell-microenvironment interactions. They are overexpressed in neoplastic cells modifying their growth and migration in hosts. In this work we verified that undersulfation of proteoglycans and other sulfated molecules, induced by sodium chlorate treatment, inhibited C6 glioma cells proliferation in a dose-dependent way. This effect was restored by the addition of exogenous heparin. We could not detect significant cell mortality in our culture condition. The treatment also impaired in a dose-dependent manner, C6 cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (collagen IV, laminin and fibronectin). In addition, sodium chlorate treatment altered C6 glioma cell morphology, from the fibroblast-like to a more rounded one. This effect was accompanied by increased synthesis of fibronectin and alterations in its extracellular network organization. However, we could not observe modifications on laminin organization and synthesis. The results suggest an important connection between sulfation degree with important tumor functions, such as proliferation and adhesion. We suggest that proteoglycans may modulate the glioma microenvironment network during tumor cell progression and invasion.

  19. SRPX2 is a novel chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Tanaka

    Full Text Available SRPX2 (Sushi repeat-containing protein, X-linked 2 has recently emerged as a multifunctional protein that is involved in seizure disorders, angiogenesis and cellular adhesion. Here, we analyzed this protein biochemically. SRPX2 protein was secreted with a highly posttranslational modification. Chondroitinase ABC treatment completely decreased the molecular mass of purified SRPX2 protein to its predicted size, whereas heparitinase, keratanase and hyaluroinidase did not. Secreted SRPX2 protein was also detected using an anti-chondroitin sulfate antibody. These results indicate that SRPX2 is a novel chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG. Furthermore, a binding assay revealed that hepatocyte growth factor dose-dependently binds to SRPX2 protein, and a ligand-glycosaminoglycans interaction was speculated to be likely in proteoglycans. Regarding its molecular architecture, SRPX2 has sushi repeat modules similar to four other CSPGs/lecticans; however, the molecular architecture of SRPX2 seems to be quite different from that of the lecticans. Taken together, we found that SRPX2 is a novel CSPG that is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancer cells. Our findings provide key glycobiological insight into SRPX2 in cancer cells and demonstrate that SRPX2 is a new member of the cancer-related proteoglycan family.

  20. Prognostic value of baseline seric Syndecan-1 in initially unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer patients: a simple biological score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jary, Marine; Lecomte, Thierry; Bouché, Olivier; Kim, Stefano; Dobi, Erion; Queiroz, Lise; Ghiringhelli, Francois; Etienne, Hélène; Léger, Julie; Godet, Yann; Balland, Jérémy; Lakkis, Zaher; Adotevi, Olivier; Bonnetain, Franck; Borg, Christophe; Vernerey, Dewi

    2016-11-15

    In first-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), baseline prognostic factors allowing death risk and treatment strategy stratification are lacking. Syndecan-1 (CD138) soluble form was never described as a prognostic biomarker in mCRC. We investigated its additional prognostic value for overall survival (OS). mCRC patients with unresectable disease at diagnosis were treated with bevacizumab-based chemotherapy in two independent prospective clinical trials (development set: n = 126, validation set: n = 51, study NCT00489697 and study NCT00544011, respectively). Serums were collected at baseline for CD138 measurement. OS determinants were assessed and, based on the final multivariate model, a prognostic score was proposed. Two independent OS prognostic factors were identified: Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) high level (p = 0.0066) and log-CD138 high level (p = 0.0190). The determination of CD138 binary information (cutoff: 75 ng/mL) allowed the assessment of a biological prognostic score with CD138 and LDH values, identifying three risk groups for death (median OS= 38.9, 30.1 and 19.8 months for the low, intermediate and high risk groups, respectively; p value for OS, in mCRC patients. A simple biological scoring system is proposed including LDH and CD138 binary status values. © 2016 UICC.

  1. Clinical implications in the shift of syndecan-1 expression from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Makito; Lawton, Adrienne; Dai, Yunfeng; Chang, Myron; Mengual, Lourdes; Alcaraz, Antonio; Goodison, Steve; Rosser, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic and prognostic capability of urinary and tumoral syndecan-1 (SDC-1) levels in patients with cancer of the urinary bladder. SDC-1 levels were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 308 subjects (102 cancer subjects and 206 non-cancer subjects) to assess its diagnostic capabilities in voided urine. The performance of SDC-1 was evaluated using the area under the curve of a receiver operating characteristic curve. In addition, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining assessed SDC-1 protein expression in 193 bladder specimens (185 cancer subjects and 8 non-cancer subjects). Outcomes were correlated to SDC-1 levels. Mean urinary levels of SDC-1 did not differ between the cancer subjects and the non-cancer subjects, however, the mean urinary levels of SDC-1 were reduced in high-grade compared to low-grade disease (p < 0.0001), and in muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) compared to non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (p = 0.005). Correspondingly, preliminary data note a shift from a membranous cellular localization of SDC-1 in normal tissue, low-grade tumors and NMIBC, to a distinctly cytoplasmic localization in high-grade tumors and MIBC was observed in tissue specimens. Alone urinary SDC-1 may not be a diagnostic biomarker for bladder cancer, but its urinary levels and cellular localization were associated with the differentiation status of patients with bladder tumors. Further studies are warranted to define the potential role for SDC-1 in bladder cancer progression

  2. Reactivating the extracellular matrix synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans to improve the human skin aspect and its mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chajra H

    2016-12-01

    , and versican and a stimulation of their respective sGAGs, such as chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate, were found on skin explants. The biosynthesis of macromolecules seems to be correlated at the microscopic level to a better organization and quality of the dermis, with collagen fibrils having homogenous diameters. The dermis seems to be compacted as observed on images obtained by two-photon microscopy and ultrasound imaging. At the macroscopic level, this dermis organization shows a smoothed profile similar to a younger skin, with improved mechanical properties such as firmess. Conclusion: The obtained results demonstrate that the defined cosmetic composition induces the synthesis of sGAGs and proteoglycans, which contributes to the overall dermal reorganization. This activity in the dermis in turn impacts the surface and mechanical properties of the skin. Keywords: cosmetic composition, decorin, dermis, polysaccharide

  3. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan synthesis and reutilization of beta-D-xyloside-initiated chondroitin/dermatan sulfate glycosaminoglycans in fetal kidney branching morphogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, D.J.; Brown, D.M.; Moran, A.; Oegema, T.R. Jr.; Platt, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan synthesis by explanted fetal mouse kidneys were previously shown to be inhibited by p-nitrophenyl beta-D-xylopyranoside (beta-D-xyloside) while glomerular development and heparan sulfate proteoglycan synthesis were unaffected. The metabolic fate of fetal kidney explant proteoglycans was investigated to determine whether or not recovery of proteoglycan synthesis and morphogenesis occur after exposure to beta-D-xyloside. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan synthesis resumed within 4 hr of removal of beta-D-xyloside and was enhanced once beta-D-xyloside-initiated chondroitin/dermatan- 35 SO 4 glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were released from the tissue. Radioactivity incorporated into beta-D-xyloside-initiated chondroitin/dermatan- 35 SO 4 GAGs during labeling in the presence of beta-D-xyloside was reutilized in the synthesis of chondroitin- 35 SO 4 proteoglycan during a 24-hr chase in nonradioactive medium without beta-D-xyloside. Further, highly purified beta-D-xyloside-initiated chondroitin/dermatan- 35 SO 4 GAGs were taken up by kidneys more avidly than was free [ 35 S]sulfate. These 35 S-GAGs were degraded and reutilized in the synthesis of chondroitin- 35 SO 4 proteoglycan. Ureteric bud branching resumed 48 hr after beta-D-xyloside was removed from the incubation medium. These findings support the idea that both chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan synthesis and proteoglycan processing may be involved in branching morphogenesis

  4. Expression of small leucine-rich proteoglycans in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Syaidah, Rahimi; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Ramadhani, Dini; Jindatip, Depicha; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix and comprise a specific core protein substituted with covalently linked glycosaminoglycan chains. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are a major family of proteoglycans and have key roles as potent effectors in cellular signaling pathways. Research during the last two decades has shown that SLRPs regulate biological functions in many tissues such as skin, tendon, kidney, liver, and heart. However, little is known of the expression of SLRPs, or the characteristics of the cells that produce them, in the anterior pituitary gland. Therefore, we have determined whether SLRPs are present in rat anterior pituitary gland. We have used real-time reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction to analyze the expression of SLRP genes and have identified the cells that produce SLRPs by using in situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probe. We have clearly detected the mRNA expression of SLRP genes, and cells expressing decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, lumican, proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP), and osteoglycin are located in the anterior pituitary gland. We have also investigated the possible double-staining of SLRP mRNA and pituitary hormones, S100 protein (a marker of folliculostellate cells), desmin (a marker of capillary pericytes), and isolectin B4 (a marker of endothelial cells). Decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, lumican, PRELP, and osteoglycin mRNA have been identified in S100-protein-positive and desmin-positive cells. Thus, we conclude that folliculostellate cells and pericytes produce SLRPs in rat anterior pituitary gland.

  5. Cell-surface proteoglycan in sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the development of the sea urchin embryo, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) migrate along the basal lamina of the blastocoel. Migration is inhibited in L. pictus embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in S. purpuratus embryos exposed to exogenous β-D-xylosides. An in vitro assay was developed to test the migratory capacity of normal PMC on normal and treated blastocoelic matrix. Sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous xyloside render PMC nonmotile on either matrix. Materials removed from the surface of normal PMC by treatment with 1 M urea restored migratory ability to defective cells, whereas a similar preparation isolated from the surface of epithelial cells at the same stage did not. Migration also resumed when cells were removed from the xyloside or returned to normal seawater. The urea extract was partially purified and characterized by radiolabeling, gel electrophoresis, fluorography, ion exchange chromatography, and western blotting. The PMC synthesize a large chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is present in an active fraction isolated by chromatography. Chondroitinase ABC digestion of live cells blocked migration reversibly, further supporting the identification of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan as the active component in the urea extract. Much of the incorporated sulfate was distributed along the filopodia in 35 SO 4 -labelled PMC by autoradiography. The morphology of normal and treated S. purpuratus PMC was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and differences in spreading, particularly of the extensive filopodia present on the cells, was observed. A model for the role of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in cell detachment during migration is proposed

  6. Developmental and functional significance of the CSF-1 proteoglycan chondroitin sulfate chain

    OpenAIRE

    Nandi, Sayan; Akhter, Mohammed P.; Seifert, Mark F.; Dai, Xu-Ming; Stanley, E. Richard

    2006-01-01

    The primary macrophage growth factor, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1), is homodimeric and exists in 3 biologically active isoforms: a membrane-spanning, cell-surface glycoprotein (csCSF-1) and secreted glycoprotein (sgCSF-1) and proteoglycan (spCSF-1) isoforms. To investigate the in vivo role of the chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain of spCSF-1, we created mice that exclusively express, in a normal tissue-specific and developmental manner, either the secreted precursor of s...

  7. EGFR Activation Mediates Inhibition of Axon Regeneration by Myelin and Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprivica, Vuk; Cho, Kin-Sang; Park, Jong Bae; Yiu, Glenn; Atwal, Jasvinder; Gore, Bryan; Kim, Jieun A.; Lin, Estelle; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Chen, Dong Feng; He, Zhigang

    2005-10-01

    Inhibitory molecules associated with myelin and the glial scar limit axon regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS), but the underlying signaling mechanisms of regeneration inhibition are not fully understood. Here, we show that suppressing the kinase function of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blocks the activities of both myelin inhibitors and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in inhibiting neurite outgrowth. In addition, regeneration inhibitors trigger the phosphorylation of EGFR in a calcium-dependent manner. Local administration of EGFR inhibitors promotes significant regeneration of injured optic nerve fibers, pointing to a promising therapeutic avenue for enhancing axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  8. Transforming growth factor β-induced expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans is mediated through non-Smad signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, Naima; Hannila, Sari S

    2015-01-01

    The expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) by reactive astrocytes is a major factor contributing to glial scarring and regenerative failure after spinal cord injury, but the molecular mechanisms underlying CSPG expression remain largely undefined. One contributing factor is transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), which is upregulated after injury and has been shown to induce expression of CSPGs in vitro. TGFβ typically mediates its effects through the Smad2/3 signaling pathway, and it has been suggested that this pathway is responsible for CSPG expression. However, there is evidence that TGFβ can also activate non-Smad signaling pathways. In this study, we report that TGFβ-induced expression of three different CSPGs--neurocan, brevican, and aggrecan--is mediated through non-Smad signaling pathways. We observed significant increases in TGFβ-induced expression of neurocan, brevican, and aggrecan following siRNA knockdown of Smad2 or Smad4, which indicates that Smad signaling is not required for the expression of these CSPGs. In addition, we show that neurocan, aggrecan, and brevican levels are significantly reduced when TGFβ is administered in the presence of either the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, but not the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. This suggests that TGFβ mediates this effect through non-Smad-dependent activation of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway, and targeting this pathway may therefore be an effective means of reducing CSPG expression in the injured CNS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Proteoglycan protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iozzo, Renato V

    2001-01-01

    ... Press Inc. The content and opinions expressed in this book are the sole work of the authors and editors, who have warranted due diligence in the creation and issuance of their work. The publisher, editors, and authors are not responsible for errors or omissions or for any consequences arising from the information or opinions presented in this bo...

  10. Perlecan (basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan and its role in oral malignancies: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithilesh Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Perlecan means pearl-like structures. Perlecan is a large proteoglycan (400-500 kDa present in virtually all vascularized tissues with a distribution that is primarily confined to basement membranes including those of oral mucosa. It is a basement membrane-type heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Perlecan is synthesized by basal cells and fibroblasts adjacent to the basal lamina . Perlecan is also synthesized by vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells present in the extracellular matrix. It has been demonstrated in recent years that perlecan is distributed in the stromal space of various pathophysiological conditions. The complex pleiotropy of perlecan suggests that this gene product is involved in several developmental processes, at both early and late stages of embryogenesis, as well as in cancer and diabetes. In the oral cavity, perlecan expression is reported to basal cells in normal mucosa and its expression increases in precancer and cancerous conditions. It is also expressed in various odontogenic tumors such as ameloblastoma, keratocyst odontogenic tumor, and also salivary gland tumors such as adenoid cystic carcinoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma, etc.

  11. Biomimetic Proteoglycan Interactions with Type I Collagen Investigated via 2D and 3D TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorehead, Carli

    Collagen is one of the leading components in extracellular matrix (ECM), providing durability, structural integrity, and functionality for many tissues. Regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and degradation is important in the treatment of a number of diseases from orthopedic injuries to genetic deficiencies. Recently, novel, biocompatible, semi-synthetic biomimetic proteoglycans (BPGs) were developed, which consist of an enzymatically resistant synthetic polymer core and natural chondroitin sulfate bristles. It was demonstrated that BPGs affect type I collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro, as reflected by their impact delaying the kinetic formation of gels similar to native PGs. This indicates that the morphology of collagen scaffolds as well as endogenous ECM could also be modulated by these proteoglycan mimics. However, the imaging modality used previously, reflectance confocal microscopy, did not yield the resolution necessary to spatially localize BPGs within the collagen network or investigate the effect of BPGs on the quality of collagen fibrils produced in an in vitro fibrillogenesis model which is important for understanding the method of interaction. Consequently, a histological technique, electron tomography, was adapted and utilized to 3D image the nano-scale structures within this simplified tissue model. BPGs were found to aid in lateral growth and enhance fibril banding periodicity resulting in structures more closely resembling those in tissue, in addition to attaching to the collagen surface despite the lack of a protein core.

  12. Extracellular matrix of smooth muscle cells: interaction of collagen type V with heparan sulfate proteoglycan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, S.; Hoeoek, M.; Gay, R.E.; Magargal, W.W.; Reynertson, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Alteration in the extracellular matrix produced by smooth muscle cells may play a role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Consequently the authors have initiated studies on the structural organization of the extracellular matrix produced by cultured smooth muscle cells. Immunohisotological examination of this matrix using well-characterized mono- and polyclonal antibodies showed a partial codistribution of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans with a number of different matrix components including collagen types I, III, IV, V and VI, laminin and fibronectin. Subsequent binding studies between isolated matrix proteins and HS showed that the polysaccharide interacts strongly with type V collagen and to a lesser extent with fibronectin as well as collagen types III and VI. The interaction between type V and HS was readily inhibited by heparin and highly sulfated HS but not be dermatan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate or HS with a low sulfate content. Furthermore, [ 35 S]-HS proteoglycans isolated from cultured smooth muscle cells could be adsorbed on a column of sepharose conjugated with native type V collagen and eluted in a salt gradient. Hence, the interaction between type V and HS may play a major part in stabilizing the extracellular matrix of the vessel wall

  13. Proteoglycan Aggrecan Conducting T Cell Activation and Apoptosis in a Murine Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hanyecz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune disease and its targeting of the joints indicates the presence of a candidate autoantigen(s in synovial joints. Patients with RA show immune responses in their peripheral blood to proteoglycan (PG aggrecan. One of the most relevant animal models of RA appears to be proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PGIA, and CD4+ T cells seem to play a crucial role in the initiation of the disease. In this review, the role of various T cell epitopes of aggrecan in the induction of autoreactive T cell activation and arthritis is discussed. We pay special attention to two critically important arthritogenic epitopes, 5/4E8 and P135H, found in the G1 and G3 domains of PG aggrecan, respectively, in the induction of autoimmune arthritis. Finally, results obtained with the recently developed PG-specific TCR transgenic mice system showed that altered T cell apoptosis, the balance of activation, and apoptosis of autoreactive T cells are critical factors in the development of autoimmunity.

  14. Modulation of the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in stimulated human monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlin-Hansen, L.; Eskeland, T.; Kolset, S.O.

    1989-01-01

    Proteoglycan biosynthesis was studied in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) after exposure to typical activators of the monocyte/macrophage system: interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). By morphological examination, both monocytes and MDM were stimulated by these activators. Treatment with IFN-gamma resulted in a slight decrease in the expression of [35S]chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) in both monocytes and MDM, whereas LPS treatment increased the [35S]CSPG expression 1.8 and 2.2 times, respectively. PMA, in contrast, decreased the CSPG expression 0.4 times in monocytes, whereas MDM were stimulated to increase the biosynthesis 1.9 times. An increase in the sulfate density of the chondroitin sulfate chains was evident following differentiation of monocytes into MDM due to the expression of disulfated disaccharide units of the chondroitin sulfate E type (CS-E). However, monocytes exposed to PMA did also express disaccharides of the chondroitin sulfate E type. Furthermore, the expression of CS-E in MDM was increased 2 times following PMA treatment. An inactive phorbol ester, phorbol 12,13-diacetate, did not affect the expression of CS-E in either monocytes or MDM when compared with control cultures, suggesting that protein kinase C-dependent signal pathways may be involved in the regulation of sulfation of CSPG. Exposure to LPS or IFN-gamma did not lead to any changes in the sulfation of the chondroitin sulfate chains

  15. Site-specific identification of heparan and chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans in hybrid proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noborn, Fredrik; Gomez Toledo, Alejandro; Green, Anders; Nasir, Waqas; Sihlbom, Carina; Nilsson, Jonas; Larson, Göran

    2016-10-03

    Heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) are complex polysaccharides that regulate important biological pathways in virtually all metazoan organisms. The polysaccharides often display opposite effects on cell functions with HS and CS structural motifs presenting unique binding sites for specific ligands. Still, the mechanisms by which glycan biosynthesis generates complex HS and CS polysaccharides required for the regulation of mammalian physiology remain elusive. Here we present a glycoproteomic approach that identifies and differentiates between HS and CS attachment sites and provides identity to the core proteins. Glycopeptides were prepared from perlecan, a complex proteoglycan known to be substituted with both HS and CS chains, further digested with heparinase or chondroitinase ABC to reduce the HS and CS chain lengths respectively, and thereafter analyzed by nLC-MS/MS. This protocol enabled the identification of three consensus HS sites and one hybrid site, carrying either a HS or a CS chain. Inspection of the amino acid sequence at the hybrid attachment locus indicates that certain peptide motifs may encode for the chain type selection process. This analytical approach will become useful when addressing fundamental questions in basic biology specifically in elucidating the functional roles of site-specific glycosylations of proteoglycans.

  16. New SPECT tracers: Example of tracers of proteoglycans and melanin; Nouveaux traceurs TEMP: exemple des traceurs des proteoglycanes et de la melanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachin, F.; Mestas, D.; Kelly, A.; Merlin, C.; Veyre, A.; Maublant, J. [CRLCC Jean-Perrin, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Cachin, F.; Chezal, J.M.; Miot-Noirault, E.; Moins, N.; Auzeloux, P.; Vidal, A.; Bonnet-Duquennoy, M.; Boisgard, S.; D' Incan, M.; Madelmont, J.C.; Maublant, J. [Universite d' Auvergne, EA 4231, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Boisgard, S. [CHRU Gabriel-Montpied, Service d' Orthopedie, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); D' Incan, M. [CHRU Gabriel-Montpied, Service de Dermatologie, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Redini, F. [Inserm, U957-EA3822, Faculte de Medecine, 44 - Nantes (France); Filaire, M. [Universite d' Auvergne, Lab. d' Anatomie, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2009-02-15

    The majority of research program on new radiopharmaceuticals turn to tracers used for positron emission tomography (PET). Only a few teams work on new non fluorine labeled tracers. However, the coming of SPECT/CT gamma cameras, the arrival of semi-conductors gamma cameras should boost the development of non-PET tracers. We exhibit in this article the experience acquired by our laboratory in the conception and design of two new non fluorine labelled compounds. The {sup 99m}Tc-N.T.P. 15-5 (N.T.P. 15-5 for N-[tri-ethyl-ammonium]-3-propyl-[15]ane-N5) which binds to proteoglycans could be used for the diagnosis and staging of osteoarthritis and chondrosarcoma. The iodo benzamides, specific to the melanin, are nowadays compared to {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose in a phase III clinical trial for the diagnosis and detection of melanoma metastasis. Our last development focus on N-[2-(diethyl-amino)ethyl]-4 and 2-iodo benzamides respectively B.Z.A. and B.Z.A.2 hetero-aromatic analogues usable for melanoma treatment. (authors)

  17. The involvement of proteoglycans in the human plasma prekallikrein interaction with the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Lopes Veronez

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The aim of this work was to evaluate the role of human plasma prekallikrein assembly and processing in cells and to determine whether proteoglycans, along with high molecular weight kininogen (H-kininogen, influence this interaction. METHODS: We used the endothelial cell line ECV304 and the epithelial cell lines CHO-K1 (wild type and CHO-745 (deficient in proteoglycans. Prekallikrein endocytosis was studied using confocal microscopy, and prekallikrein cleavage/activation was determined by immunoblotting using an antibody directed to the prekallikrein sequence C364TTKTSTR371 and an antibody directed to the entire H-kininogen molecule. RESULTS: At 37°C, prekallikrein endocytosis was assessed in the absence and presence of exogenously applied H-kininogen and found to be 1,418.4±0.010 and 1,070.3±0.001 pixels/cell, respectively, for ECV304 and 1,319.1±0.003 and 631.3±0.001 pixels/cell, respectively, for CHO-K1. No prekallikrein internalization was observed in CHO-745 in either condition. Prekallikrein colocalized with LysoTracker in the absence and presence of exogenous H-kininogen at levels of 76.0% and 88.5%, respectively, for ECV304 and at levels of 40.7% and 57.0%, respectively, for CHO-K1. After assembly on the cell surface, a plasma kallikrein fragment of 53 kDa was predominant in the incubation buffer of all the cell lines studied, indicating specific proteolysis; plasma kallikrein fragments of 48-44 kDa and 34-32 kDa were also detected in the incubation buffer, indicating non-specific cleavage. Bradykinin free H-kininogen internalization was not detected in CHO-K1 or CHO-745 cells at 37°C. CONCLUSION: The prekallikrein interaction with the cell surface is temperature-dependent and independent of exogenously applied H-kininogen, which results in prekallikrein endocytosis promoted by proteoglycans. Prekallikrein proteolysis/activation is influenced by H-kininogen/glycosaminoglycans assembly and controls plasma kallikrein

  18. DISTRIBUTION OF GBM HEPARAN-SULFATE PROTEOGLYCAN CORE PROTEIN AND SIDE-CHAINS IN HUMAN GLOMERULAR-DISEASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBORN, J; VANDENHEUVEL, LPWJ; BAKKER, MAH; VEERKAMP, JH; ASSMANN, KJM; WEENING, JJ; BERDEN, JHM

    Using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing either the core protein or the heparan sulfate (HS) side chain of human GBM heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), we investigated their glomerular distribution on cryostat sections of human kidney tissues. The study involved 95 biopsies comprising twelve

  19. Deletion of the basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan type XVIII collagen causes hypertriglyceridemia in mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Bishop

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein lipase (Lpl acts on triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the peripheral circulation, liberating free fatty acids for energy metabolism or storage. This essential enzyme is synthesized in parenchymal cells of adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscle and migrates to the luminal side of the vascular endothelium where it acts upon circulating lipoproteins. Prior studies suggested that Lpl is immobilized by way of heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the endothelium, but genetically altering endothelial cell heparan sulfate had no effect on Lpl localization or lipolysis. The objective of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix proteoglycans affect Lpl distribution and triglyceride metabolism.We examined mutant mice defective in collagen XVIII (Col18, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan present in vascular basement membranes. Loss of Col18 reduces plasma levels of Lpl enzyme and activity, which results in mild fasting hypertriglyceridemia and diet-induced hyperchylomicronemia. Humans with Knobloch Syndrome caused by a null mutation in the vascular form of Col18 also present lower than normal plasma Lpl mass and activity and exhibit fasting hypertriglyceridemia.This is the first report demonstrating that Lpl presentation on the lumenal side of the endothelium depends on a basement membrane proteoglycan and demonstrates a previously unrecognized phenotype in patients lacking Col18.

  20. Ultrastructural localization of the core protein of a basement membrane-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in adult rat skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCarthy, K J; Horiguchi, Y; Couchman, J R

    1990-01-01

    Basement membranes are complex extracellular matrices present at epithelial/mesenchymal interfaces of tissues. The dermal-epidermal junction has been shown to contain numerous components, some of the most well known being laminin, types IV and VII collagens, heparan sulfate proteoglycan, fibronec...

  1. Evidence for the existence of multiple heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the human glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groffen, Alexander J A; Hop, Frank W H; Tryggvason, Karl; Dijkman, Henri; Assmann, Karel J M; Veerkamp, Jacques H.; Monnens, Leo A H; Van Den Heuvel, Lambert P W J

    1997-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are essential components of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) carrying a strong anionic charge. A well- characterized extracellular HSPG is perlecan, ubiquitously expressed in basement membranes. A cDNA construct encoding domains I and II of human perlecan

  2. High-oleic canola oil consumption enriches LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content and reduces LDL proteoglycan binding in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter J H; MacKay, Dylan S; Senanayake, Vijitha K; Pu, Shuaihua; Jenkins, David J A; Connelly, Philip W; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; West, Sheila G; Liu, Xiaoran; Fleming, Jennifer A; Hantgan, Roy R; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2015-02-01

    Oleic acid consumption is considered cardio-protective according to studies conducted examining effects of the Mediterranean diet. However, animal models have shown that oleic acid consumption increases LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content which is associated with increased LDL-proteoglycan binding and atherosclerosis. The objective was to examine effects of varying oleic, linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid consumption on human LDL-proteoglycan binding in a non-random subset of the Canola Oil Multi-center Intervention Trial (COMIT) participants. COMIT employed a randomized, double-blind, five-period, cross-over trial design. Three of the treatment oil diets: 1) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75); 2) high oleic canola oil; and 3) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil were selected for analysis of LDL-proteoglycan binding in 50 participants exhibiting good compliance. LDL particles were isolated from frozen plasma by gel filtration chromatography and LDL cholesteryl esters quantified by mass-spectrometry. LDL-proteoglycan binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance. LDL particle cholesterol ester fatty acid composition was sensitive to the treatment fatty acid compositions, with the main fatty acids in the treatments increasing in the LDL cholesterol esters. The corn/safflower oil and high-oleic canola oil diets lowered LDL-proteoglycan binding relative to their baseline values (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.0012, respectively). At endpoint, high-oleic canola oil feeding resulted in lower LDL-proteoglycan binding than corn/safflower oil (p = 0.0243) and DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (p = 0.0249), although high-oleic canola oil had the lowest binding at baseline (p = 0.0344). Our findings suggest that high-oleic canola oil consumption in humans increases cholesteryl oleate percentage in LDL, but in a manner not associated with a rise in LDL-proteoglycan binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Carrier of Wingless (Cow), a Secreted Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan, Promotes Extracellular Transport of Wingless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yung-Heng; Sun, Yi Henry

    2014-01-01

    Morphogens are signaling molecules that regulate growth and patterning during development by forming a gradient and activating different target genes at different concentrations. The extracellular distribution of morphogens is tightly regulated, with the Drosophila morphogen Wingless (Wg) relying on Dally-like (Dlp) and transcytosis for its distribution. However, in the absence of Dlp or endocytic activity, Wg can still move across cells along the apical (Ap) surface. We identified a novel secreted heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) that binds to Wg and promotes its extracellular distribution by increasing Wg mobility, which was thus named Carrier of Wg (Cow). Cow promotes the Ap transport of Wg, independent of Dlp and endocytosis, and this function addresses a previous gap in the understanding of Wg movement. This is the first example of a diffusible HSPG acting as a carrier to promote the extracellular movement of a morphogen. PMID:25360738

  4. NG2 proteoglycan increases mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Jing; Wang Yang; Zhu, Zhonghua; Liu Jianshe; Wang Yumei; Zhang Chun; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Lang, Florian; Feng Yuxi

    2007-01-01

    As a membrane-spanning protein, NG2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan interacts with molecules on both sides of plasma membrane. The present study explored the role of NG2 in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In the normal kidneys, NG2 was observed predominantly in glomerular mesangium, Bowman's capsule and interstitial vessels. Both mRNA and protein expression in kidneys was significantly higher in strepozotocin-induced diabetic rats than that in normal rats. In the cultured rat mesangial cell line HBZY-1, overexpression of NG2 promoted mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) production, such as type VI collagen and laminin. Furthermore, target knockdown of NG2 resulted in decreased cell proliferation and ECM formation. The observations suggest that NG2 is up-regulated in diabetic nephropathy. It actively participates in the development and progression of glomerulosclerosis by stimulating proliferation of mesangial cells and deposition of ECM

  5. Adhesion defective BHK cell mutant has cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan of altered properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, R; Woods, A

    1988-01-01

    In the light of accumulating data that implicate cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with a role in cell interactions with extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin, we have compared the properties of these molecules in wild-type BHK cells and an adhesion-defective ricin......-resistant mutant (RicR14). Our results showed that the mutant, unlike BHK cells, cannot form focal adhesions when adherent to planar substrates in the presence of serum. Furthermore, while both cell lines possess similar amounts of cell surface HSPG with hydrophobic properties, that of RicR14 cells had decreased...... sulfation, reduced affinity for fibronectin and decreased half-life on the cell surface when compared to the normal counterpart. Our conclusions based on this data are that these altered properties may, in part, account for the adhesion defect in the ricin-resistant mutant. Whether this results from...

  6. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan 4 and Its Potential As an Antibody Immunotherapy Target across Different Tumor Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Ilieva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4 has been associated with the pathology of multiple types of such as melanoma, breast cancer, squamous cell carcinoma, mesothelioma, neuroblastoma, adult and pediatric sarcomas, and some hematological cancers. CSPG4 has been reported to exhibit a role in the growth and survival as well as in the spreading and metastasis of tumor cells. CSPG4 is overexpressed in several malignant diseases, while it is thought to have restricted and low expression in normal tissues. Thus, CSPG4 has become the target of numerous anticancer treatment approaches, including monoclonal antibody-based therapies. This study reviews key potential anti-CSPG4 antibody and immune-based therapies and examines their direct antiproliferative/metastatic and immune activating mechanisms of action.

  7. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography of radioactively labeled carbohydrate components of proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmander, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    Methods were developed for the separation of radioactively labeled carbohydrate components of proteoglycans by isocratic ion-moderated partition HPLC. Neutral sugars were separated after hydrolysis in trifluoroacetic acid with baseline separation between glucose, xylose, galactose, fucose, and mannose. N-Acetylneuraminic acid, N-acetylated hexosamines, glucose, galactose, and xylitol were likewise well separated from each other under isocratic elution conditions. Glucuronic acid, iduronic acid, and their lactones were separated after hydrolysis in formic acid and sulfuric acid. Glucosamine, galactosamine, galactosaminitol, and glucosaminitol were separated by HPLC on a cation exchanger with neutral buffer after hydrolysis in hydrochloric acid. THe separation techniques also proved useful in fractionation of exoglycosidase digests of O- and N-linked oligosaccharides. Separations of aldoses, hexosamines, and uronic acids were adapted to sensitive photometric detection

  8. Breast and ovarian cancers: a survey and possible roles for the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Lendorf, Maria E; Couchman, John R

    2012-01-01

    . Occurrence of breast and ovarian cancer is high in older women. Common known risk factors of developing these cancers in addition to age are not having children or having children at a later age, the use of hormone replacement therapy, and mutations in certain genes. In addition, women with a history......Tumor markers are widely used in pathology not only for diagnostic purposes but also to assess the prognosis and to predict the treatment of the tumor. Because tumor marker levels may change over time, it is important to get a better understanding of the molecular changes during tumor progression...... of breast cancer may also develop ovarian cancer. Here, the authors review the different tumor markers of breast and ovarian carcinoma and discuss the expression, mutations, and possible roles of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans during tumorigenesis of these carcinomas. The focus is on two groups...

  9. Serglycin proteoglycan is not implicated in localizing exocrine pancreas enzymes to zymogen granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Carsten U; Cowland, Jack B; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Storage and release of proteins from granules forms the basis of cellular functions as diverse as cell mediated cytotoxicity, neuronal communication, activation of muscle fibres, and release of hormones or digestive enzymes from endocrine and exocrine glands, such as the pancreas. Serglycin...... is the major intracellular proteoglycan of haematopoietic cells. Serglycin is important for localization of proteins in granules of different haematopoietic cell types. Previous reports have indicated a role for serglycin in granule formation and localization of zymogens in granules of the exocrine pancreas...... in rat. We here present data showing that serglycin is not present at the protein level in human or murine pancreas. Furthermore, the amount and localization of three exocrine pancreas zymogens (amylase, trypsinogen, and carboxypeptidase A) is not affected by the absence of serglycin in a serglycin knock...

  10. MR imaging reflects cartilage proteoglycan degradation in the rabbit knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, P.K.; O'Byrne, E.M.; Blancuzzi, V.; Wilson, D.; Douglas, F.L.; Mezrich, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Depletion of proteoglycan (PG) from articular cartilage is an early feature of osteoarthritis (OA). Noninvasive assessment of joint morphology corresponding to changes in cartilage PG is crucial for early diagnosis of OA and for demonstration of efficacy of drugs for OA. Intraarticular injection of papain causes a reversible loss of cartilage PG in intact joints. Both knees of NZW rabbits were scanned with a 1.5-T Signa MR imager with a 3-inch surface coil. A spin-echo technique was used, and coronal and sagittal MR images were obtained at 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours after injection of 5 U papain. An 8-cm field of view, a 3-mm section thickness, and a 128 x 256 matrix was used to obtain T1-, proton density-, and T2-weighted images. Cartilage was dissected from the femur for measurement of PG with 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue. Results are presented

  11. Purification and characterization of a small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan implicated in the dilatation of the rat uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokenyesi, R; Woessner, J F

    1989-06-01

    A small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan (DSPG) was extracted from rat cervices and was purified by using DEAE-Sephacel ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration on Sepharose CL-2B and CsCl-density-gradient centrifugation. Sedimentation-equilibrium centrifugation gave a weight-average Mr of 95,000. Amino acid analysis showed a high content of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine and leucine. The glycosaminoglycan chains had Mr 50,000 as determined by gel filtration. Chondroitin AC lyase and chondroitin ABC lyase digestions of these chains showed that they were composed of 75% dermatan sulphate and 25% chondroitin sulphate. Chondroitin ABC lyase digestion produced a core protein of Mr 45,000. The core protein, after treatment with HF, had Mr 37,000. Amino acid sequences of the N-terminus and a CNBr-cleavage peptide showed similarity to the sequences of core proteins of small proteoglycans of bovine and human origin, but the N-terminal glycosaminoglycan-attachment site (Ser-Gly-Ile-Ile) differed from the consensus sequence (Ser-Gly-Xaa-Gly) [Bourdon, Krusius, Campbell, Schwartz & Ruoslahti (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 3194-3198]. A polyclonal antibody against the rat cervical DSPG reacted with small proteoglycans from cervices of human, mouse, dog, cow and sheep. DSPG is the major proteoglycan species present in the cervix. The amount of DSPG per cervix increases 4-fold during pregnancy, then falls precipitously within 1 day post partum. A role in cervical dilatation is postulated for this proteoglycan.

  12. Quaternary ammonium as vector of radioisotopes toward cartilage proteoglycans: in vivo imaging and monitoring of chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrode, C.; Weber, V.; Vidal, A.; Auzeloux, P.; Besse, S.; Chezal, J.M.; Miot-Noirault, E.; Dauplat, M.M.; Gouin, F.; Redini, F.

    2013-01-01

    The full text of the publication follows. AIM: Our strategy consists in using the quaternary ammonium function, that exhibits a high affinity for proteoglycans, as a selective carrier to cartilage of (i) drugs for improving the selectivity or (ii) radioisotopes for imaging and evaluating response to treatment. For diagnosis, a radiotracer radiolabeled with 99m Tc ( 99m Tc-NTP 15-5) was selected and for therapeutic application, a quaternary ammonium derivative of melphalan (Mel-AQ) was synthesized. This study demonstrates the interest of this strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of chondrosarcoma. Methods: 99m Tc-NTP 15-5 imaging was performed at regular intervals in rats bearing ortho-topic swarm chondrosarcoma, controls or treated (Mel-AQ: three intravenous doses of 10 mg/kg). 99m Tc-HMDP imaging (the only radiotracer available for nuclear medicine diagnosis of chondrosarcoma) was also performed. Results: All rats exhibited a significant tumoral uptake of 99m Tc-NTP 15-5 at very early stage of pathology while no palpable nor measurable tumour could be assessed. Furthermore, tumoral uptake increased as pathology progressed over time. When animals were treated with Mel-AQ, a significant tumor growth inhibition was observed with 99m Tc-NTP 15-5 tumoral uptake being significantly decreased as compared to controls. 99m Tc-HMDP bone scans were negative during the whole study. Conclusion: These experimental results underline (i) the potential of the proteoglycan targeting strategy for the early and specific diagnosis imaging of chondrosarcoma and its response to therapy and (ii) the efficiency of the targeted anti-tumoral therapy. In future, we could plan to substitute technetium atom for copper atom for radionuclide therapy application. Grants: INCa, CPER, Ligue contre le cancer, FRI/OSEO. (authors)

  13. Syndecan-1 suppresses epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migration in human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; He, Jinting; Zhao, Xiaoming; Qi, Tianyang; Zhang, Tianfu; Kong, Chenfei

    2018-04-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is one of the major processes that contribute to the occurrence of cancer metastasis. EMT has been associated with the development of oral cancer. Syndecan‑1 (SDC1) is a key cell‑surface adhesion molecule and its expression level inversely correlates with tumor differentiation and prognosis. In the present study, we aimed to determine the role of SDC1 in oral cancer progression and investigate the molecular mechanisms through which SDC1 regulates the EMT and invasiveness of oral cancer cells. We demonstrated that basal SDC1 expression levels were lower in four oral cancer cell lines (KB, Tca8113, ACC2 and CAL‑27), than in normal human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Ectopic overexpression of SDC1 resulted in morphological transformation, decreased expression of EMT‑associated markers, as well as decreased migration, invasiveness and proliferation of oral cancer cells. In contrast, downregulation of the expression of SDC1 caused the opposite results. Furthermore, the knockdown of endogenous SDC1 activated the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) cascade, upregulated the expression of Snail and inhibited the expression of E‑cadherin. In conclusion, our findings revealed that SDC1 suppressed EMT via the modulation of the ERK signaling pathway that, in turn, negatively affected the invasiveness of human oral cancer cells. Our results provided useful evidence about the potential use of SDC1 as a molecular target for therapeutic interventions in human oral cancer.

  14. Contribution of collagen fibers to the compressive stiffness of cartilaginous tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römgens, A.M.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Ito, K.

    2013-01-01

    Cartilaginous tissues such as the intervertebral disk are predominantly loaded under compression. Yet, they contain abundant collagen fibers, which are generally assumed to contribute to tensile loading only. Fiber tension is thought to originate from swelling of the proteoglycan-rich nucleus.

  15. Perlecan domain 1 recombinant proteoglycan augments BMP-2 activity and osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeCarlo Arthur A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many growth factors, such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2, have been shown to interact with polymers of sulfated disacharrides known as heparan sulfate (HS glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, which are found on matrix and cell-surface proteoglycans throughout the body. HS GAGs, and some more highly sulfated forms of chondroitin sulfate (CS, regulate cell function by serving as co-factors, or co-receptors, in GF interactions with their receptors, and HS or CS GAGs have been shown to be necessary for inducing signaling and GF activity, even in the osteogenic lineage. Unlike recombinant proteins, however, HS and CS GAGs are quite heterogenous due, in large part, to post-translational addition, then removal, of sulfate groups to various positions along the GAG polymer. We have, therefore, investigated whether it would be feasible to deliver a DNA pro-drug to generate a soluble HS/CS proteoglycan in situ that would augment the activity of growth-factors, including BMP-2, in vivo. Results Utilizing a purified recombinant human perlecan domain 1 (rhPln.D1 expressed from HEK 293 cells with HS and CS GAGs, tight binding and dose-enhancement of rhBMP-2 activity was demonstrated in vitro. In vitro, the expressed rhPln.D1 was characterized by modification with sulfated HS and CS GAGs. Dose-enhancement of rhBMP-2 by a pln.D1 expression plasmid delivered together as a lyophilized single-phase on a particulate tricalcium phosphate scaffold for 6 or more weeks generated up to 9 fold more bone volume de novo on the maxillary ridge in a rat model than in control sites without the pln.D1 plasmid. Using a significantly lower BMP-2 dose, this combination provided more than 5 times as much maxillary ridge augmentation and greater density than rhBMP-2 delivered on a collagen sponge (InFuse™. Conclusions A recombinant HS/CS PG interacted strongly and functionally with BMP-2 in binding and cell-based assays, and, in vivo, the pln.247 expression plasmid

  16. Altered Liver Proteoglycan/Glycosaminoglycan Structure as a Manifestation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling upon BCG-induced Granulomatosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, L B; Shkurupy, V A; Putyatina, A N

    2017-01-01

    Experimental BCG-induced granulomatosis in mice was used to study changes in the dynamics of individual liver proteoglycan components reflecting phasic extracellular matrix remodeling, determined by the host-parasite interaction and associated with granuloma development. In the early BCG-granulomatosis period, the increase in individual proteoglycan components promotes granuloma formation, providing conditions for mycobacteria adhesion to host cells, migration of phagocytic cells from circulation, and cell-cell interaction leading to granuloma development and fibrosis. Later, reduced reserve capacity of the extracellular matrix, development of interstitial fibrosis and granuloma fibrosis can lead to trophic shortage for cells within the granulomas, migration of macrophages out of them, and development of spontaneous necrosis and apoptosis typical of tuberculosis.

  17. Purification and characterization of a small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan implicated in the dilatation of the rat uterine cervix.

    OpenAIRE

    Kokenyesi, R; Woessner, J F

    1989-01-01

    A small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan (DSPG) was extracted from rat cervices and was purified by using DEAE-Sephacel ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration on Sepharose CL-2B and CsCl-density-gradient centrifugation. Sedimentation-equilibrium centrifugation gave a weight-average Mr of 95,000. Amino acid analysis showed a high content of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine and leucine. The glycosaminoglycan chains had Mr 50,000 as determined by gel filtration. Chondroitin AC lyase and ...

  18. Proteoglycans from Boswellia serrata Roxb. and B. carteri Birdw. and identification of a proteolytic plant basic secretory protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Andreas; König, Simone; Lechtenberg, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Water-soluble high molecular weight compounds were isolated in yields of 21-22% from the oleogum of Boswellia serrata and B. carteri. Using anion exchange chromatography and gel permeation chromatography, different proteoglycans were purified and characterized, leading to four principally different...... for analytical quality control. The data also offer an insight into the plant response towards wound-closing by the formation of extensin and AGP-containing gum....

  19. Homoserine as an Aspartic Acid Precursor for Synthesis of Proteoglycan Glycopeptide Containing Aspartic Acid and Sulfated Glycan Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Weizhun; Ramadan, Sherif; Yang, Bo; Yoshida, Keisuke; Huang, Xuefei

    2016-01-01

    Among many hurdles in synthesizing proteoglycan glycopeptides, one challenge is the incorporation of aspartic acid in the peptide backbone and acid sensitive O-sulfated glycan chains. To overcome this, a new strategy was developed utilizing homoserine as an aspartic acid precursor. The conversion of homoserine to aspartic acid in the glycopeptide was successfully accomplished by late stage oxidation using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) and bis(acetoxy)iodobenzene (BAIB). This is...

  20. Molecular alterations of tropoelastin and proteoglycans induced by tobacco smoke extracts and ultraviolet A in cultured skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Lei; Morita, Akimichi; Tsuji, Takuo

    2002-01-01

    Functional integrity of normal skin is dependent on the balance between the biosynthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix, primarily composed of collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. In our previous studies, we found that tobacco smoke extracts decreased expressions of type I and III procollagen and induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and MMP-3 in the cultured skin fibroblasts. We here further investigated the effects of tobacco smoke extracts or ultraviolet A (UVA) treatments on the expression of tropoelastin (soluble elastin protein), and versican and decorin (proteoglycans) in cultured skin fibroblasts. The mRNA of tropoelastin increased by tobacco smoke extracts or UVA irradiation. Versican was markedly shown to decrease after these treatments by using western blotting and the mRNA of versican V0 also significantly decreased. UVA treatment did not show remarkable change in decorin protein, but resulted in marked decrease of decorin D1 mRNA. In contrast to UVA irradiation, the treatments of tobacco smoke extracts resulted in significant increase in decorin, while mRNA of decorin D1 decreased as compared to the control. MMP-7 increased after the treatment of tobacco smoke extracts or UVA. These results indicated that common molecular features might underlie the skin premature aging induced by tobacco smoke extracts and UVA, including abnormal regulation of extracellular matrix deposition through elevated MMPs, reduced collagen production, abnormal tropoelastin accumulation, and altered proteoglycans. (author)

  1. Molecular alterations of tropoelastin and proteoglycans induced by tobacco smoke extracts and ultraviolet A in cultured skin fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Lei; Morita, Akimichi; Tsuji, Takuo [Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Medical School

    2002-02-01

    Functional integrity of normal skin is dependent on the balance between the biosynthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix, primarily composed of collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. In our previous studies, we found that tobacco smoke extracts decreased expressions of type I and III procollagen and induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and MMP-3 in the cultured skin fibroblasts. We here further investigated the effects of tobacco smoke extracts or ultraviolet A (UVA) treatments on the expression of tropoelastin (soluble elastin protein), and versican and decorin (proteoglycans) in cultured skin fibroblasts. The mRNA of tropoelastin increased by tobacco smoke extracts or UVA irradiation. Versican was markedly shown to decrease after these treatments by using western blotting and the mRNA of versican V0 also significantly decreased. UVA treatment did not show remarkable change in decorin protein, but resulted in marked decrease of decorin D1 mRNA. In contrast to UVA irradiation, the treatments of tobacco smoke extracts resulted in significant increase in decorin, while mRNA of decorin D1 decreased as compared to the control. MMP-7 increased after the treatment of tobacco smoke extracts or UVA. These results indicated that common molecular features might underlie the skin premature aging induced by tobacco smoke extracts and UVA, including abnormal regulation of extracellular matrix deposition through elevated MMPs, reduced collagen production, abnormal tropoelastin accumulation, and altered proteoglycans. (author)

  2. Influence of cytochalasin D-induced changes in cell shape on proteoglycan synthesis by cultured articular chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, P.; Watt, F.M.

    1988-01-01

    There is growing evidence that cell shape regulates both proliferation and differentiated gene expression in a variety of cell types. The authors have explored the relationship between the morphology of articular chondrocytes in culture and the amount and type of proteoglycan they synthesize, using cytochalasin D to induce reversible cell rounding. When chondrocytes were prevented from spreading or when spread cells were induced to round up, 35 SO 4 incorporation into proteoglycan was stimulated. Incorporation into the cell layer was stimulated more than into the medium. When the cells were allowed to respread by removing cytochalasin D, proteoglycan synthesis returned to control levels. Cytochalasin D-induced stimulation of 35 SO 4 incorporation reflected an increase in core protein synthesis rather than lengthening of glycosaminoglycan chains, because [ 3 H]serine incorporation into core protein was also stimulated. Cytochalasm D-treatment of cells in suspension caused no further stimulation of 35 SO 4 incorporation, suggesting that the observed effects were due to cell rounding rather than exposure to cytochalasin D per se

  3. Antiaging effects of a novel facial serum containing L-ascorbic acid, proteoglycans, and proteoglycan-stimulating tripeptide: ex vivo skin explant studies and in vivo clinical studies in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garre A

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aurora Garre,1 Mridvika Narda,1 Palmira Valderas-Martinez,1 Jaime Piquero,2 Corinne Granger1 1Innovation and Development, ISDIN SA, Barcelona, Spain; 2Dermik Clinic, Barcelona, Spain Background: With age, decreasing dermal levels of proteoglycans, collagen, and elastin lead to the appearance of aged skin. Oxidation, largely driven by environmental factors, plays a central role.Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the antiaging efficacy of a topical serum containing l-ascorbic acid, soluble proteoglycans, low molecular weight hyaluronic acid, and a tripeptide in ex vivo and in vivo clinical studies.Methods: Photoaging and photo-oxidative damage were induced in human skin explants by artificial solar radiation. Markers of oxidative stress – reactive oxygen species (ROS, total glutathione (GSH, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs – were measured in serum-treated explants and untreated controls. Chronological aging was simulated using hydrocortisone. In both ex vivo studies, collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans were determined as measures of dermal matrix degradation. In women aged 21–67 years, hydration was measured up to 24 hours after a single application of serum, using Corneometer and hygrometer. Subjects’ perceptions of efficacy and acceptability were assessed via questionnaire after once-daily serum application for 4 weeks. Studies were performed under the supervision of a dermatologist.Results: In the photoaging study, irradiation induced changes in ROS, CPD, GSH, collagen, and elastin levels; these changes were reversed by topical serum application. The serum also protected against hydrocortisone-induced reduction in collagen, elastin, and proteoglycan levels, which were significantly higher in the serum-treated group vs untreated hydrocortisone-control explants. In clinical studies, serum application significantly increased skin moisture for 6 hours. Healthy volunteers perceived the product as efficient in making the

  4. Small Leucine-Rich Proteoglycans in Renal Inflammation: Two Sides of the Coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastase, Madalina V; Janicova, Andrea; Roedig, Heiko; Hsieh, Louise Tzung-Harn; Wygrecka, Malgorzata; Schaefer, Liliana

    2018-04-01

    It is now well-established that members of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family act in their soluble form, released proteolytically from the extracellular matrix (ECM), as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). By interacting with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and the inflammasome, the two SLRPs, biglycan and decorin, autonomously trigger sterile inflammation. Recent data indicate that these SLRPs, besides their conventional role as pro-inflammatory DAMPs, additionally trigger anti-inflammatory signaling pathways to tightly control inflammation. This is brought about by selective employment of TLRs, their co-receptors, various adaptor molecules, and through crosstalk between SLRP-, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-, and sphingolipid-signaling. In this review, the complexity of SLRP signaling in immune and kidney resident cells and its relevance for renal inflammation is discussed. We propose that the dichotomy in SLRP signaling (pro- and anti-inflammatory) allows for fine-tuning the inflammatory response, which is decisive for the outcome of inflammatory kidney diseases.

  5. Mast cells limit extracellular levels of IL-13 via a serglycin proteoglycan-serine protease axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waern, Ida; Karlsson, Iulia; Thorpe, Michael; Schlenner, Susan M; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Åbrink, Magnus; Hellman, Lars; Pejler, Gunnar; Wernersson, Sara

    2012-12-01

    Mast cell (MC) granules contain large amounts of proteases of the chymase, tryptase and carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) type that are stored in complex with serglycin,a proteoglycan with heparin side chains. Hence, serglycinprotease complexes are released upon MC degranulation and may influence local inflammation. Here we explored the possibility that a serglycin-protease axis may regulate levels of IL-13, a cytokine involved in allergic asthma. Indeed, we found that wild-type MCs efficiently degraded exogenous or endogenously produced IL-13 upon degranulation,whereas serglycin −/− MCs completely lacked this ability.Moreover, MC-mediated IL-13 degradation was blocked both by a serine protease inhibitor and by a heparin antagonist,which suggests that IL-13 degradation is catalyzed by serglycin-dependent serine proteases and that optimal IL-13 degradation is dependent on both the serglycin and the protease component of the serglycin-protease complex.Moreover, IL-13 degradation was abrogated in MC-CPA −/−MC cultures, but was normal in cultures of MCs with an inactivating mutation of MC-CPA, which suggests that the IL-13-degrading serine proteases rely on MC-CPA protein.Together, our data implicate a serglycin-serine protease axis in the regulation of extracellular levels of IL-13. Reduction of IL-13 levels through this mechanism possibly can provide a protective function in the context of allergic inflammation.

  6. The identification of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans in archaeological human bones and teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Norton, Andrew L; Gesteira, Tarsis F; Cavalheiro, Renan P; Meneghetti, Maria Cecília Z; Martins, João R; Dixon, Ronald A; Nader, Helena B

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue is mineralized dense connective tissue consisting mainly of a mineral component (hydroxyapatite) and an organic matrix comprised of collagens, non-collagenous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs). Extracellular matrix proteins and PGs bind tightly to hydroxyapatite which would protect these molecules from the destructive effects of temperature and chemical agents after death. DNA and proteins have been successfully extracted from archaeological skeletons from which valuable information has been obtained; however, to date neither PGs nor glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains have been studied in archaeological skeletons. PGs and GAGs play a major role in bone morphogenesis, homeostasis and degenerative bone disease. The ability to isolate and characterize PG and GAG content from archaeological skeletons would unveil valuable paleontological information. We therefore optimized methods for the extraction of both PGs and GAGs from archaeological human skeletons. PGs and GAGs were successfully extracted from both archaeological human bones and teeth, and characterized by their electrophoretic mobility in agarose gel, degradation by specific enzymes and HPLC. The GAG populations isolated were chondroitin sulfate (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA). In addition, a CSPG was detected. The localization of CS, HA, three small leucine rich PGs (biglycan, decorin and fibromodulin) and glypican was analyzed in archaeological human bone slices. Staining patterns were different for juvenile and adult bones, whilst adolescent bones had a similar staining pattern to adult bones. The finding that significant quantities of PGs and GAGs persist in archaeological bones and teeth opens novel venues for the field of Paleontology.

  7. Agrin is a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan in the human glomerular basement membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groffen, A J; Ruegg, M A; Dijkman, H; van de Velden, T J; Buskens, C A; van den Born, J; Assmann, K J; Monnens, L A; Veerkamp, J H; van den Heuvel, L P

    1998-01-01

    Agrin is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) that is highly concentrated in the synaptic basal lamina at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Agrin-like immunoreactivity is also detected outside the NMJ. Here we show that agrin is a major HSPG component of the human glomerular basement membrane (GBM). This is in addition to perlecan, a previously characterized HSPG of basement membranes. Antibodies against agrin and against an unidentified GBM HSPG produced a strong staining of the GBM and the NMJ, different from that observed with anti-perlecan antibodies. In addition, anti-agrin antisera recognized purified GBM HSPG and competed with an anti-GBM HSPG monoclonal antibody in ELISA. Furthermore, both antibodies recognized a molecule that migrated in SDS-PAGE as a smear and had a molecular mass of approximately 200-210 kD after deglycosylation. In immunoelectron microscopy, agrin showed a linear distribution along the GBM and was present throughout the width of the GBM. This was again different from perlecan, which was exclusively present on the endothelial side of the GBM and was distributed in a nonlinear manner. Quantitative ELISA showed that, compared with perlecan, the agrin-like GBM HSPG showed a sixfold higher molarity in crude glomerular extract. These results show that agrin is a major component of the GBM, indicating that it may play a role in renal ultrafiltration and cell matrix interaction. (J Histochem Cytochem 46:19-27, 1998)

  8. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans in the developing vertebral column of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannesson, Kirsten O; Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Takle, Harald; Enersen, Grethe; Bæverfjord, Grete; Pedersen, Mona E

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, the distribution of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the developing vertebral column of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) at 700, 900, 1100 and 1400 d° was examined by light microscopy. The mineralization pattern was outlined by Alizarin red S and soft structures by Alcian blue. The temporal and spatial distribution patterns of different types of GAGs: chondroitin-4-sulphate/dermatan sulphate, chondroitin-6-sulphate, chondroitin-0-sulphate and keratan sulphate were addressed by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against the different GAGs. The specific pattern obtained with the different antibodies suggests a unique role of the different GAG types in pattern formation and mineralization. In addition, the distribution of the different GAG types in normal and malformed vertebral columns from 15 g salmon was compared. A changed expression pattern of GAGs was found in the malformed vertebrae, indicating the involvement of these molecules during the pathogenesis. The molecular size of proteoglycans (PGs) in the vertebrae carrying GAGs was analysed with western blotting, and mRNA transcription of the PGs aggrecan, decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin and lumican by real-time qPCR. Our study reveals the importance of GAGs in development of vertebral column also in Atlantic salmon and indicates that a more comprehensive approach is necessary to completely understand the processes involved.

  9. Perineuronal Nets in Spinal Motoneurones: Chondroitin Sulphate Proteoglycan around Alpha Motoneurones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian F. Irvine

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Perineuronal nets (PNNs are extracellular matrix structures surrounding neuronal sub-populations throughout the central nervous system, regulating plasticity. Enzymatically removing PNNs successfully enhances plasticity and thus functional recovery, particularly in spinal cord injury models. While PNNs within various brain regions are well studied, much of the composition and associated populations in the spinal cord is yet unknown. We aim to investigate the populations of PNN neurones involved in this functional motor recovery. Immunohistochemistry for choline acetyltransferase (labelling motoneurones, PNNs using Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA and chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs, including aggrecan, was performed to characterise the molecular heterogeneity of PNNs in rat spinal motoneurones (Mns. CSPG-positive PNNs surrounded ~70–80% of Mns. Using WFA, only ~60% of the CSPG-positive PNNs co-localised with WFA in the spinal Mns, while ~15–30% of Mns showed CSPG-positive but WFA-negative PNNs. Selective labelling revealed that aggrecan encircled ~90% of alpha Mns. The results indicate that (1 aggrecan labels spinal PNNs better than WFA, and (2 there are differences in PNN composition and their associated neuronal populations between the spinal cord and cortex. Insights into the role of PNNs and their molecular heterogeneity in the spinal motor pools could aid in designing targeted strategies to enhance functional recovery post-injury.

  10. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging and multivariate regression for prediction of proteoglycan content of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassi Rieppo

    Full Text Available Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging has been earlier applied for the spatial estimation of the collagen and the proteoglycan (PG contents of articular cartilage (AC. However, earlier studies have been limited to the use of univariate analysis techniques. Current analysis methods lack the needed specificity for collagen and PGs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of partial least squares regression (PLSR and principal component regression (PCR methods for the analysis of the PG content of AC. Multivariate regression models were compared with earlier used univariate methods and tested with a sample material consisting of healthy and enzymatically degraded steer AC. Chondroitinase ABC enzyme was used to increase the variation in PG content levels as compared to intact AC. Digital densitometric measurements of Safranin O-stained sections provided the reference for PG content. The results showed that multivariate regression models predict PG content of AC significantly better than earlier used absorbance spectrum (i.e. the area of carbohydrate region with or without amide I normalization or second derivative spectrum univariate parameters. Increased molecular specificity favours the use of multivariate regression models, but they require more knowledge of chemometric analysis and extended laboratory resources for gathering reference data for establishing the models. When true molecular specificity is required, the multivariate models should be used.

  11. Alteration of intestinal microbiota in mice orally administered with salmon cartilage proteoglycan, a prophylactic agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisana Asano

    Full Text Available Proteoglycan (PG extracted from salmon nasal cartilage has potential to be a prophylactic agent. Daily oral administration of the PG attenuates systemic inflammatory response in the experimental mouse models. In this study, we applied the culture-independent approach to investigate an alteration of intestinal microbiota composition in PG-administered mice. The results indicated that the population level of bacilli increased in the small and large intestine upon PG administration. On the other hand, the population level of clostridia decreased in the large intestine. The proportion of bacteria that are able to ferment saccharides and produce short-chain fatty acids increased in the small intestine and decreased in the large intestine. Importantly, population level of probiotic lactobacilli and bacteria exhibiting the immunomodulatory effect increased in the PG-administered mice. In addition, several disease-associated bacteria decreased upon PG administration. These results provided an understanding of the specific role of PG involved in host immune modulation and supported our hypothesis that daily oral administration of PG improves the overall balance in composition of the intestinal microbial community.

  12. Effect of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans on neuronal cell adhesion, spreading and neurite growth in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Jin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As one major component of extracellular matrix (ECM in the central nervous system, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs have long been known as inhibitors enriched in the glial scar that prevent axon regeneration after injury. Although many studies have shown that CSPGs inhibited neurite outgrowth in vitro using different types of neurons, the mechanism by which CSPGs inhibit axonal growth remains poorly understood. Using cerebellar granule neuron (CGN culture, in this study, we evaluated the effects of different concentrations of both immobilized and soluble CSPGs on neuronal growth, including cell adhesion, spreading and neurite growth. Neurite length decreased while CSPGs concentration arised, meanwhile, a decrease in cell density accompanied by an increase in cell aggregates formation was observed. Soluble CSPGs also showed an inhibition on neurite outgrowth, but it required a higher concentration to induce cell aggregates formation than coated CSPGs. We also found that growth cone size was significantly reduced on CSPGs and neuronal cell spreading was restrained by CSPGs, attributing to an inhibition on lamellipodial extension. The effect of CSPGs on neuron adhesion was further evidenced by interference reflection microscopy (IRM which directly demonstrated that both CGNs and cerebral cortical neurons were more loosely adherent to a CSPG substrate. These data demonstrate that CSPGs have an effect on cell adhesion and spreading in addition to neurite outgrowth.

  13. The identification of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans in archaeological human bones and teeth.

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    Yvette M Coulson-Thomas

    Full Text Available Bone tissue is mineralized dense connective tissue consisting mainly of a mineral component (hydroxyapatite and an organic matrix comprised of collagens, non-collagenous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs. Extracellular matrix proteins and PGs bind tightly to hydroxyapatite which would protect these molecules from the destructive effects of temperature and chemical agents after death. DNA and proteins have been successfully extracted from archaeological skeletons from which valuable information has been obtained; however, to date neither PGs nor glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains have been studied in archaeological skeletons. PGs and GAGs play a major role in bone morphogenesis, homeostasis and degenerative bone disease. The ability to isolate and characterize PG and GAG content from archaeological skeletons would unveil valuable paleontological information. We therefore optimized methods for the extraction of both PGs and GAGs from archaeological human skeletons. PGs and GAGs were successfully extracted from both archaeological human bones and teeth, and characterized by their electrophoretic mobility in agarose gel, degradation by specific enzymes and HPLC. The GAG populations isolated were chondroitin sulfate (CS and hyaluronic acid (HA. In addition, a CSPG was detected. The localization of CS, HA, three small leucine rich PGs (biglycan, decorin and fibromodulin and glypican was analyzed in archaeological human bone slices. Staining patterns were different for juvenile and adult bones, whilst adolescent bones had a similar staining pattern to adult bones. The finding that significant quantities of PGs and GAGs persist in archaeological bones and teeth opens novel venues for the field of Paleontology.

  14. Pathophysiological Significance of Dermatan Sulfate Proteoglycans Revealed by Human Genetic Disorders

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    Shuji Mizumoto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The indispensable roles of dermatan sulfate-proteoglycans (DS-PGs have been demonstrated in various biological events including construction of the extracellular matrix and cell signaling through interactions with collagen and transforming growth factor-β, respectively. Defects in the core proteins of DS-PGs such as decorin and biglycan cause congenital stromal dystrophy of the cornea, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, and Meester-Loeys syndrome. Furthermore, mutations in human genes encoding the glycosyltransferases, epimerases, and sulfotransferases responsible for the biosynthesis of DS chains cause connective tissue disorders including Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity characterized by skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility, and tissue fragility, and by severe skeletal disorders such as kyphoscoliosis, short trunk, dislocation, and joint laxity. Glycobiological approaches revealed that mutations in DS-biosynthetic enzymes cause reductions in enzymatic activities and in the amount of synthesized DS and also disrupt the formation of collagen bundles. This review focused on the growing number of glycobiological studies on recently reported genetic diseases caused by defects in the biosynthesis of DS and DS-PGs.

  15. Increased proteoglycan synthesis by the cardiovascular system of coarctation hypertensive rats

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    Lipke, D.W.; Couchman, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Proteoglycan (PG) synthesis in the cardiovascular system of coarctation hypertensive rats was examined by in vivo and in vitro labeling of glycosaminoglycans with 35SO4 in rats made hypertensive for short (4 days) and longer (14 days) durations. With in vivo labeling, only tissues directly exposed to elevated pressure (left ventricle, LV and aorta above the clip, AOR increases) exhibited elevated PG synthesis after 4 days of hypertension. By 14 days, tissues both exposed to (LV and AOR increases) and protected from elevated pressure (right ventricle and kidney) exhibited elevated PG synthetic rates. Slight elevations in the proportion of galactosaminoglycans were observed with a concurrent proportional decrease in heparan sulfate PGs. Using the in vitro labeling procedure, no significant increases in PG synthesis were observed in any tissue at either 4 days or 14 days of hypertension. These data indicate that: (1) coarctation hypertension stimulates PG production that is dependent initially on increased pressure and later, on additional non-pressure related factors, (2) these other factors are responsible for enhanced PG production in tissues not directly exposed to pressure overload, (3) pressure and/or these other factors are essential for enhanced PG production in coarctation hypertension, and (4) synthesis of all GAG types appears to be affected

  16. Small leucine rich proteoglycan family regulates multiple signalling pathways in neural development and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellett, Margaret; Hu, Wanzhou; Papadaki, Vasiliki; Ohnuma, Shin-ichi

    2012-04-01

    The small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan (SLRPs) family of proteins currently consists of five classes, based on their structural composition and chromosomal location. As biologically active components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), SLRPs were known to bind to various collagens, having a role in regulating fibril assembly, organization and degradation. More recently, as a function of their diverse proteins cores and glycosaminoglycan side chains, SLRPs have been shown to be able to bind various cell surface receptors, growth factors, cytokines and other ECM components resulting in the ability to influence various cellular functions. Their involvement in several signaling pathways such as Wnt, transforming growth factor-β and epidermal growth factor receptor also highlights their role as matricellular proteins. SLRP family members are expressed during neural development and in adult neural tissues, including ocular tissues. This review focuses on describing SLRP family members involvement in neural development with a brief summary of their role in non-neural ocular tissues and in response to neural injury. © 2012 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2012 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  17. Proteoglycan depletion and size reduction in lesions of early grade chondromalacia of the patella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väätäinen, U; Häkkinen, T; Kiviranta, I; Jaroma, H; Inkinen, R; Tammi, M

    1995-10-01

    To determine the content and molecular size of proteoglycans (PGs) in patellar chondromalacia (CM) and control cartilages as a first step in investigating the role of matrix alterations in the pathogenesis of this disease. Chondromalacia tissue from 10 patients was removed with a surgical knife. Using identical techniques, apparently healthy cartilage of the same site was obtained from 10 age matched cadavers (mean age 31 years in both groups). Additional pathological cartilage was collected from 67 patients with grades II-IV CM (classified according to Outerbridge) using a motorised shaver under arthroscopic control. The shaved cartilage chips were collected with a dense net from the irrigation fluid of the shaver. The content of tissue PGs was determined by Safranin O precipitation or uronic acid content, and the molecular size by mobility on agarose gel electrophoresis. The mean PG content of the CM tissue samples with a knife was dramatically reduced, being only 15% of that in controls. The cartilage chips collected from shaving operations of grades II, III, and IV CM showed a decreasing PG content: 9%, 5%, and 1% of controls, respectively. Electrophoretic analysis of PGs extracted with guanidium chloride from the shaved tissue samples suggested a significantly reduced size of aggrecans in the mild (grade II) lesions. These data show that there is already a dramatic and progressive depletion of PGs in CM grade II lesions. This explains the softening of cartilage, a typical finding in the arthroscopic examination of CM. The PG size reduction observed in grade II implicates proteolytic attack as a factor in the pathogenesis of CM.

  18. Role of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans in infection of human adenovirus serotype 3 and 35.

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    Sebastian Tuve

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Species B human adenoviruses (Ads are increasingly associated with outbreaks of acute respiratory disease in U.S. military personnel and civil population. The initial interaction of Ads with cellular attachment receptors on host cells is via Ad fiber knob protein. Our previous studies showed that one species B Ad receptor is the complement receptor CD46 that is used by serotypes 11, 16, 21, 35, and 50 but not by serotypes 3, 7, and 14. In this study, we attempted to identify yet-unknown species B cellular receptors. For this purpose we used recombinant Ad3 and Ad35 fiber knobs in high-throughput receptor screening methods including mass spectrometry analysis and glycan arrays. Surprisingly, we found that the main interacting surface molecules of Ad3 fiber knob are cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. We subsequently found that HSPGs acted as low-affinity co-receptors for Ad3 but did not represent the main receptor of this serotype. Our study also revealed a new CD46-independent infection pathway of Ad35. This Ad35 infection mechanism is mediated by cellular HSPGs. The interaction of Ad35 with HSPGs is not via fiber knob, whereas Ad3 interacts with HSPGs via fiber knob. Both Ad3 and Ad35 interacted specifically with the sulfated regions within HSPGs that have also been implicated in binding physiologic ligands. In conclusion, our findings show that Ad3 and Ad35 directly utilize HSPGs as co-receptors for infection. Our data suggest that adenoviruses evolved to simulate the presence of physiologic HSPG ligands in order to increase infection.

  19. Proteoglycans as Target for an Innovative Therapeutic Approach in Chondrosarcoma: Preclinical Proof of Concept.

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    Peyrode, Caroline; Weber, Valérie; Voissière, Aurélien; Maisonial-Besset, Aurélie; Vidal, Aurélien; Auzeloux, Philippe; Gaumet, Vincent; Borel, Michèle; Dauplat, Marie-Mélanie; Quintana, Mercedes; Degoul, Françoise; Rédini, Françoise; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    To date, surgery remains the only option for the treatment of chondrosarcoma, which is radio- and chemoresistant due in part to its large extracellular matrix (ECM) and poor vascularity. In case of unresectable locally advanced or metastatic diseases with a poor prognosis, improving the management of chondrosarcoma still remains a challenge. Our team developed an attractive approach of improvement of the therapeutic index of chemotherapy by targeting proteoglycan (PG)-rich tissues using a quaternary ammonium (QA) function conjugated to melphalan (Mel). First of all, we demonstrated the crucial role of the QA carrier for binding to aggrecan by surface plasmon resonance. In the orthotopic model of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma, an in vivo biodistribution study of Mel and its QA derivative (Mel-QA), radiolabeled with tritium, showed rapid radioactivity accumulation in healthy cartilaginous tissues and tumor after [ 3 H]-Mel-QA injection. The higher T/M ratio of the QA derivative suggests some advantage of QA-active targeting of chondrosarcoma. The antitumoral effects were characterized by tumor volume assessment, in vivo 99m Tc-NTP 15-5 scintigraphic imaging of PGs, 1 H-HRMAS NMR spectroscopy, and histology. The conjugation of a QA function to Mel did not hamper its in vivo efficiency and strongly improved the tolerability of Mel leading to a significant decrease of side effects (hematologic analyses and body weight monitoring). Thus, QA conjugation leads to a significant improvement of the therapeutic index, which is essential in oncology and enable repeated cycles of chemotherapy in patients with chondrosarcoma. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(11); 2575-85. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. TOTAL NUMBER, DISTRIBUTION, AND PHENOTYPE OF CELLS EXPRESSING CHONDROITIN SULPHATE PROTEOGLYCANS IN THE NORMAL HUMAN AMYGDALA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazopoulos, Harry; Murray, Elisabeth A.; Berretta, Sabina

    2009-01-01

    Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are a key structural component of the brain extracellular matrix. They are involved in critical neurodevelopmental functions and are one of the main components of pericellular aggregates known as perineuronal nets. As a step toward investigating their functional and pathophysiological roles in the human amygdala, we assessed the pattern of CSPG expression in the normal human amygdala using wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA) lectin-histochemistry. Total numbers of WFA-labeled elements were measured in the lateral (LN), basal (BN), accessory basal (ABN) and cortical (CO) nuclei of the amygdala from 15 normal adult human subjects. For interspecies qualitative comparison, we also investigated the pattern of WFA labeling in the amygdala of naïve rats (n=32) and rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; n=6). In human amygdala, WFA lectin-histochemistry resulted in labeling of perineuronal nets and cells with clear glial morphology, while neurons did not show WFA-labeling. Total numbers of WFA-labeled glial cells showed high interindividual variability. These cells aggregated in clusters with a consistent between-subjects spatial distribution. In a subset of human subjects (n=5), dual color fluorescence using an antibody raised against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and WFA showed that the majority (93.7%) of WFA-labeled glial cells correspond to astrocytes. In rat and monkey amygdala, WFA histochemistry labeled perineuronal nets, but not glial cells. These results suggest that astrocytes are the main cell type expressing CSPGs in the adult human amygdala. Their highly segregated distribution pattern suggests that these cells serve specialized functions within human amygdalar nuclei. PMID:18374308

  1. Differences in gene expression of human xylosyltransferases and determination of acceptor specificities for various proteoglycans

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    Roch, Christina; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut [Institut fuer Laboratoriums- und Transfusionsmedizin, Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 32545 Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Goetting, Christian, E-mail: cgoetting@hdz-nrw.de [Institut fuer Laboratoriums- und Transfusionsmedizin, Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 32545 Bad Oeynhausen (Germany)

    2010-01-01

    The xylosyltransferase (XT) isoforms XT-I and XT-II initiate the posttranslational glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis. Here, we determined the relative expression of both isoforms in 33 human cell lines. The majority of tested cell lines showed dominant XYLT2 gene expression, while only in 23132/87, JAR, NCI-H510A and THP-1 was the XT-I mRNA expression higher. Nearly equal expression levels were detected in six cell lines. Additionally, to shed light on putative differences in acceptor specificities the acceptor properties of potential acceptor sequences were determined. Peptides were expressed as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing putative or known GAG attachment sites of in vivo proteoglycans. Kinetic analysis showed that K{sub m} and V{sub max} values for XT-I mediated xylosylation were slightly higher than those for XT-II, and that XT-I showed a lesser stringency concerning the acceptor sequence. Mutagenesis of the bikunin peptide sequence in the G-S-G attachment site and flanking regions generated potential acceptor molecules. Here, mutations on the N-terminal side and the attachment site were found to be more susceptible to a loss of acceptor function than mutations in the C-terminus. Altogether the known consensus sequence a-a-a-a-G-S-G-a-a/G-a ('a' representing Asp or Glu) for XT-I mediated xylosylation could be approved and additionally extended to apply to XT-II as well.

  2. Mediolateral Differences of Proteoglycans Distribution at the ACL Tibial Footprint: Experimental Study of 16 Cadaveric Knees

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    Joon Ho Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the staining pattern of ACL attachment blended with cartilage of the medial tibial plateau at the tibial insertion and histologically characterize the tibial footprint. Sixteen fresh frozen cadaveric knees (mean age: 52.0±6.2 years were used for this study. The specimens were bisected in the coronal plane, in accordance with the fiber orientation of the ACL tibial attachment. Adjacent sections were then stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E to observe the morphology of the ACL insertion and with fast green and Safranin-O protocols to evaluate for collagen and proteoglycans (PG. The insertion area on the tibial footprint was divided into five zones in the medial to lateral direction, which was determined by division of the section from most prominent medial tibial spine to most lateral margin of ACL attachment. Then rectangular area with a vertical length that is twice the width of respective five zones was set. Stained areas of all images were quantified positively by using ImageJ software, and the value for staining area measured was defined in percentage by multiplying whole image area by 100. The mean proportion of Safranin-O staining is significantly greater nearer to the medial tibial spine (59% in zone 1, 32% in zone 2, 13% in zone 3, 13% in zone 4, and 4% in zone 5, P<0.001. The medial section of the tibial insertion area grew in size and increased in PG staining with more densely organized collagen arrangement with more fibrocartilage cells. The ACL tibial insertion showed a medially eccentric staining pattern by histological evaluation of the ACL attachment to cartilage. Our histological results of the eccentric biomaterial property in the medial tibial spine of ACL insertion area can be considered in making a more functional anatomic tibial tunnel placement.

  3. Changes in glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans of normal breast and fibroadenoma during the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Cilene Rebouças; de Arimatéa dos Santos Junior, José; Nazário, Afonso Celso Pinto; Michelacci, Yara M

    2012-07-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most common breast tumor in young women, and its growth and metabolism may be under hormonal control. In the present paper we described the proteoglycan (PG) composition and synthesis rate of normal breast and fibroadenoma during the menstrual cycle. Samples of fibroadenoma and adjacent normal breast tissue were obtained at surgery. PGs were characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis and enzymatic degradation with glycosaminoglycan (GAG) lyases, and immunolocalized by confocal microscopy. To assess the synthesis rate, PGs were metabolic labeled by 35S-sulfate. The concentration of PGs in normal breast was higher during the secretory phase. Fibroadenoma contained and synthesized more PGs than their paired controls, but the PG concentrations varied less with the menstrual cycle and, in contrast to normal tissue, peaked in the proliferative phase. The main mammary GAGs are heparan sulfate (HS, 71%-74%) and dermatan sulfate (DS, 26%-29%). The concentrations of both increased in fibroadenoma, but DS increased more, becoming 35%-37% of total. The DS chains contained more β-d-glucuronic acid (IdoUA/GlcUA ratios were >10 in normal breast and 2-7 in fibroadenoma). The 35S-sulfate incorporation rate revealed that the in vitro synthesis rate of DS was higher than HS. Decorin was present in both tissues, while versican was found only in fibroadenoma. In normal breast, the PG concentration varied with the menstrual cycle. It was increased in fibroadenoma, especially DS. PGs are increased in fibroadenoma, but their concentrations may be less sensitive to hormonal control. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modulation of the Plasma Kallikrein-Kinin System Proteins Performed by Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans

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    Guacyara Motta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Human plasma kallikrein-kinin system proteins are related to inflammation through bradykinin. In the proximity of its target cells, high molecular weight kininogen (H-kininogen is the substrate of plasma kallikrein, which releases bradykinin from H-kininogen. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs play a critical role in either recruiting kinin precursors from the plasma, or in the assembly of kallikrein-kinin system components on the cell surface. Furthermore, HSPGs mediate the endocytosis and activation of H-kininogen and plasma prekallikrein. In the presence of HSPGs (Chinese hamster ovary cell, CHO-K1, wild type cells both heparin and heparan sulfate strongly inhibit the H-kininogen interaction with the cell membrane. H-kininogen is internalized in endosomal acidic vesicles in CHO-K1 but not in CHO-745 cells (mutant cells deficient in glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis. The endocytosis process is lipid raft-mediated and is dependent on caveolae. Both types of CHO cells do not internalize bradykinin-free H-kininogen. At pH 7.35, bradykinin is released from H-kininogen on the surface of CHO-745 cells only by serine proteases; however, in CHO-K1 cells either serine or cysteine proteases are found to be involved. The CHO-K1 cell lysate contains different kininogenases. Plasma prekallikrein endocytosis in CHO-K1 cells is independent of H-kininogen, and also prekallikrein is not internalized by CHO-745 cells. Plasma prekallikrein cleavage/activation is independent of glycosaminoglycans but plasma kallikrein formation is more specific on H-kininogen assembled on the cell surface through glycosaminoglycans. In this mini-review, the importance of HSPGs in the regulation of plasma kallikrein-kinin system proteins is shown.

  5. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans as Drivers of Neural Progenitors Derived From Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolicsanyi, Rachel K; Oikari, Lotta E; Yu, Chieh; Griffiths, Lyn R; Haupt, Larisa M

    2018-01-01

    Background: Due to their relative ease of isolation and their high ex vivo and in vitro expansive potential, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are an attractive candidate for therapeutic applications in the treatment of brain injury and neurological diseases. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are a family of ubiquitous proteins involved in a number of vital cellular processes including proliferation and stem cell lineage differentiation. Methods: Following the determination that hMSCs maintain neural potential throughout extended in vitro expansion, we examined the role of HSPGs in mediating the neural potential of hMSCs. hMSCs cultured in basal conditions (undifferentiated monolayer cultures) were found to co-express neural markers and HSPGs throughout expansion with modulation of the in vitro niche through the addition of exogenous HS influencing cellular HSPG and neural marker expression. Results: Conversion of hMSCs into hMSC Induced Neurospheres (hMSC IN) identified distinctly localized HSPG staining within the spheres along with altered gene expression of HSPG core protein and biosynthetic enzymes when compared to undifferentiated hMSCs. Conclusion: Comparison of markers of pluripotency, neural self-renewal and neural lineage specification between hMSC IN, hMSC and human neural stem cell (hNSC H9) cultures suggest that in vitro generated hMSC IN may represent an intermediary neurogenic cell type, similar to a common neural progenitor cell. In addition, this data demonstrates HSPGs and their biosynthesis machinery, are associated with hMSC IN formation. The identification of specific HSPGs driving hMSC lineage-specification will likely provide new markers to allow better use of hMSCs in therapeutic applications and improve our understanding of human neurogenesis.

  6. Glucosamine exposure reduces proteoglycan synthesis in primary human endothelial cells in vitro

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    Trine M. Reine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Glucosamine (GlcN supplements are promoted for medical reasons, for example, for patients with arthritis and other joint-related diseases. Oral intake of GlcN is followed by uptake in the intestine, transport in the circulation and thereafter delivery to chondrocytes. Here, it is postulated to have an effect on synthesis and turnover of extracellular matrix constituents expressed by these cells. Following uptake in the intestine, serum levels are transiently increased, and the endothelium is exposed to increased levels of GlcN. We investigated the possible effects of GlcN on synthesis of proteoglycans (PGs, an important matrix component, in primary human endothelial cells. Methods: Primary human endothelial cells were cultured in vitro in medium with 5 mM glucose and 0–10 mM GlcN. PGs were recovered and analysed by western blotting, or by SDS-PAGE, gel chromatography or ion-exchange chromatography of 35S-PGs after 35S-sulphate labelling of the cells. Results: The synthesis and secretion of 35S-PGs from cultured endothelial cells were reduced in a dose- and time-dependent manner after exposure to GlcN. PGs are substituted with sulphated glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains, vital for PG function. The reduction in 35S-PGs was not related to an effect on GAG chain length, number or sulphation, but rather to the total expression of PGs. Conclusion: Exposure of endothelial cells to GlcN leads to a general decrease in 35S-PG synthesis. These results suggest that exposure to high levels of GlcN can lead to decreased matrix synthesis, contrary to what has been claimed by supporters of such supplements.

  7. Expression of cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, syndecan-1 and connective tissue growth factor in benign and malignant breast tissue from premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlén, M; Zhang, H; Löfgren, L; Masironi, B; von Schoultz, E; von Schoultz, B; Sahlin, L

    2017-05-01

    Stromal factors have been identified as important for tumorigenesis and metastases of breast cancer. From 49 premenopausal women, samples were collected from benign or malignant tumors and the seemingly normal tissue adjacent to the tumor. The factors studied, with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry, were cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-1 and COX-2), syndecan-1 (S-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). COX-1 and S-1 mRNA levels were higher in the malignant tumors than in normal and benign tissues. The COX-2 mRNA level was lower in the malignant tumor than in the normal tissue, while CTGF mRNA did not differ between the groups. COX-1 immunostaining was higher in stroma from malignant tumors than in benign tissues, whereas COX-2 immunostaining was higher in the malignant tissue. Glandular S-1 immunostaining was lower in malignant tumors compared to benign and normal tissues, and the opposite was found in stroma. Conclusively, mRNA levels of COX-1 and COX-2 were oppositely regulated, with COX-1 being increased in the malignant tumor while COX-2 was decreased. S-1 protein localization switched from glandular to stromal cells in malignant tissues. Thus, these markers are, in premenopausal women, localized and regulated differently in normal/benign breast tissue as compared to the malignant tumor.

  8. The dermatan sulfate proteoglycan decorin modulates α2β1 integrin and the vimentin intermediate filament system during collagen synthesis.

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    Oliver Jungmann

    Full Text Available Decorin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan harboring a dermatan sulfate chain at its N-terminus, is involved in regulating matrix organization and cell signaling. Loss of the dermatan sulfate of decorin leads to an Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by delayed wound healing. Decorin-null (Dcn(-/- mice display a phenotype similar to that of EDS patients. The fibrillar collagen phenotype of Dcn(-/- mice could be rescued in vitro by decorin but not with decorin lacking the glycosaminoglycan chain. We utilized a 3D cell culture model to investigate the impact of the altered extracellular matrix on Dcn(-/- fibroblasts. Using 2D gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry, we identified vimentin as one of the proteins that was differentially upregulated by the presence of decorin. We discovered that a decorin-deficient matrix leads to abnormal nuclear morphology in the Dcn(-/- fibroblasts. This phenotype could be rescued by the decorin proteoglycan but less efficiently by the decorin protein core. Decorin treatment led to a significant reduction of the α2β1 integrin at day 6 in Dcn(-/- fibroblasts, whereas the protein core had no effect on β1. Interestingly, only the decorin core induced mRNA synthesis, phosphorylation and de novo synthesis of vimentin indicating that the proteoglycan decorin in the extracellular matrix stabilizes the vimentin intermediate filament system. We could support these results in vivo, because the dermis of wild-type mice have more vimentin and less β1 integrin compared to Dcn(-/-. Furthermore, the α2β1 null fibroblasts also showed a reduced amount of vimentin compared to wild-type. These data show for the first time that decorin has an impact on the biology of α2β1 integrin and the vimentin intermediate filament system. Moreover, our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the reported defects in wound healing associated with the Dcn(-/- phenotype.

  9. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan from the extracellular matrix of human lung fibroblasts. Isolation, purification, and core protein characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heremans, A.; Cassiman, J.J.; Van den Berghe, H.; David, G.

    1988-01-01

    Confluent cultured human lung fibroblasts were labeled with 35SO4(2-). After 48 h of labeling, the pericellular matrix was prepared by Triton X-100 and deoxycholate extraction of the monolayers. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) accounted for nearly 80% of the total matrix [35S]proteoglycans. After solubilization in 6 M guanidinium HCl and cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation, the majority (78%) of these [35S] HSPG equilibrated at an average buoyant density of 1.35 g/ml. This major HSPG fraction was purified by ion-exchange chromatography on Mono Q and by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-4B, and further characterized by gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Intact [35S]HSPG eluted with Kav 0.1 from Sepharose CL-4B, whereas the protein-free [35S]heparan sulfate chains, obtained by alkaline borohydride treatment of the proteoglycan fractions, eluted with Kav 0.45 (Mr approximately 72,000). When analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography, core (protein) preparations, obtained by heparitinase digestion of 125I-labeled HSPG fractions, yielded one major labeled band with apparent molecular mass of approximately 300 kDa. Reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol slightly increased the apparent Mr of the labeled band, suggesting a single polypeptide structure and the presence of intrachain disulfide bonds. Immunoadsorption experiments and immunostaining of electrophoretically separated heparitinase-digested core proteins with monoclonal antibodies raised against matrix and cell surface-associated HSPG suggested that the major matrix-associated HSPG of cultured human lung fibroblasts is distinct from the HSPG that are anchored in the membranes of these cells. Binding studies suggested that this matrix HSPG interacts with several matrix components, both through its glycosaminoglycan chains and through its heparitinase-resistant core. (Abstract Truncated)

  10. Border patrol: insights into the unique role of perlecan/heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 at cell and tissue borders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farach-Carson, Mary C; Warren, Curtis R; Harrington, Daniel A; Carson, Daniel D

    2014-02-01

    The extracellular matrix proteoglycan (ECM) perlecan, also known as heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 or HSPG2, is one of the largest (>200 nm) and oldest (>550 M years) extracellular matrix molecules. In vertebrates, perlecan's five-domain structure contains numerous independently folding modules with sequence similarities to other ECM proteins, all connected like cars into one long, diverse complex train following a unique N-terminal domain I decorated with three long glycosaminoglycan chains, and an additional glycosaminoglycan attachment site in the C-terminal domain V. In lower invertebrates, perlecan is not typically a proteoglycan, possessing the majority of the core protein modules, but lacking domain I where the attachment sites for glycosaminoglycan chains are located. This suggests that uniting the heparan sulfate binding growth factor functions of domain I and the core protein functions of the rest of the molecule in domains II-V occurred later in evolution for a new functional purpose. In this review, we surveyed several decades of pertinent literature to ask a fundamental question: Why did nature design this protein uniquely as an extraordinarily long multifunctional proteoglycan with a single promoter regulating expression, rather than separating these functions into individual proteins that could be independently regulated? We arrived at the conclusion that the concentration of perlecan at functional borders separating tissues and tissue layers is an ancient key function of the core protein. The addition of the heparan sulfate chains in domain I likely occurred as an additional means of binding the core protein to other ECM proteins in territorial matrices and basement membranes, and as a means to reserve growth factors in an on-site depot to assist with rapid repair of those borders when compromised, such as would occur during wounding. We propose a function for perlecan that extends its role from that of an extracellular scaffold, as we previously

  11. Homoserine as an Aspartic Acid Precursor for Synthesis of Proteoglycan Glycopeptide Containing Aspartic Acid and a Sulfated Glycan Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weizhun; Ramadan, Sherif; Yang, Bo; Yoshida, Keisuke; Huang, Xuefei

    2016-12-02

    Among many hurdles in synthesizing proteoglycan glycopeptides, one challenge is the incorporation of aspartic acid in the peptide backbone and acid sensitive O-sulfated glycan chains. To overcome this, a new strategy was developed utilizing homoserine as an aspartic acid precursor. The conversion of homoserine to aspartic acid in the glycopeptide was successfully accomplished by late stage oxidation using (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) and bis(acetoxy)iodobenzene (BAIB). This is the first time that a glycopeptide containing aspartic acid and an O-sulfated glycan was synthesized.

  12. Differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and dexamethasone stimulates cell-associated and soluble chondroitin 4-sulfate proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, J.C.; Rodbard, D.; Katki, A.; Chernick, S.; Yanagishita, M.

    1991-01-01

    The proteoglycans (cell-associated and culture media) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in culture were analyzed before and during differentiation into adipocytes. Cells were metabolically labeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H] glucosamine for 24 h and then extracted and analyzed. There was a 1.68 ± 0.07-fold increase in the 35S in medium proteoglycan during differentiation, whereas cell-associated proteoglycan radioactivity showed no increase. Analyses of radiolabeled molecules using ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and high performance liquid chromatography after enzymatic or alkaline digestion indicated that all of the 35S label was recovered as two major species of chondroitin 4-sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG-I and CSPG-II) and 7% as heparan sulfate proteoglycan. CSPG-I has a mass of ∼ 970 kDa with multiple chondroitin sulfate chains (average of 50 kDa each) and a core protein of ∼ 370 kDa including oligosaccharides. CSPG-II has a mass of 140 kDa with one or two chondroitin sulfate chains (average of 68 kDa each) and a core protein of 41 kDa including oligosaccharides. CSPG-I appears to be similar to versican, whereas CSPG-II is similar to decorin and/or biglycan, found in other fibroblastic cells. Cell differentiation was associated with a specific increase in CSPG-I (4.0 ± 0.2-fold in media and 3.2 ± 0.5-fold in the cell-associated form). This system should facilitate study of the functional roles of proteoglycans during growth and differentiation

  13. Laminin and collagen modulate expression of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan fibromodulin in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syaidah, Rahimi; Horiguchi, Kotaro; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    The anterior pituitary is a complex organ consisting of five types of hormone-producing cells, non–hormone-producing cells such as folliculostellate (FS) cells and vascular cells (endothelial cells and pericytes). We have previously shown that FS cells and pericytes produce fibromodulin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP). SLRPs are major proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and are important in regulating cell signaling pathways and ECM assembly. However, the mechanism regulating fibromodulin expression in the anterior pituitary has not been elucidated. Here, we investigate whether fibromodulin expression is modulated by major anterior pituitary ECM components such as laminin and type I collagen. Using transgenic rats expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) specifically in FS cells, we examine fibromodulin expression in GFP-positive (FS cells) and GFP-negative cells (e.g., pericytes, endocrine cells and endothelial cells). Immunostaining and Western blot analysis were used to assess protein expression in the presence and absence of laminin or type I collagen. We confirmed fibromodulin expression in the pituitary and observed the up-regulation of fibromodulin in FS cells in the presence of ECM components. However, neither laminin nor type I collagen affected expression in GFP-negative cells. This suggests that laminin and type I collagen support the function of FS cells by increasing fibromodulin protein expression in the anterior pituitary.

  14. A Role for Serglycin Proteoglycan in Mast Cell Apoptosis Induced by a Secretory Granule-mediated Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Fabio Rabelo; Waern, Ida; Rönnberg, Elin; Åbrink, Magnus; Lee, David M.; Schlenner, Susan M.; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Turk, Boris; Wernersson, Sara; Pejler, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Mast cell secretory granules (secretory lysosomes) contain large amounts of fully active proteases bound to serglycin proteoglycan. Damage to the granule membrane will thus lead to the release of serglycin and serglycin-bound proteases into the cytosol, which potentially could lead to proteolytic activation of cytosolic pro-apoptotic compounds. We therefore hypothesized that mast cells are susceptible to apoptosis induced by permeabilization of the granule membrane and that this process is serglycin-dependent. Indeed, we show that wild-type mast cells are highly sensitive to apoptosis induced by granule permeabilization, whereas serglycin-deficient cells are largely resistant. The reduced sensitivity of serglycin−/− cells to apoptosis was accompanied by reduced granule damage, reduced release of proteases into the cytosol, and defective caspase-3 activation. Mechanistically, the apoptosis-promoting effect of serglycin involved serglycin-dependent proteases, as indicated by reduced sensitivity to apoptosis and reduced caspase-3 activation in cells lacking individual mast cell-specific proteases. Together, these findings implicate serglycin proteoglycan as a novel player in mast cell apoptosis. PMID:21123167

  15. Small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans associated with mature insoluble elastin serve as binding sites for galectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Aiko; Nonaka, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Takashi; Nakamura, Takanori; Nishi, Nozomu

    2017-11-01

    We previously reported that galectin-9 (Gal-9), an immunomodulatory animal lectin, could bind to insoluble collagen preparations and exerted direct cytocidal effects on immune cells. In the present study, we found that mature insoluble elastin is capable of binding Gal-9 and other members of the human galectin family. Lectin blot analysis of a series of commercial water-soluble elastin preparations, PES-(A) ~ PES-(E), revealed that only PES-(E) contained substances recognized by Gal-9. Gal-9-interacting substances in PES-(E) were affinity-purified, digested with trypsin and then analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC. Peptide fragments derived from five members of the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan family, versican, lumican, osteoglycin/mimecan, prolargin, and fibromodulin, were identified by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The results indicate that Gal-9 and possibly other galectins recognize glycans attached to small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans associated with insoluble elastin and also indicate the possibility that mature insoluble elastin serves as an extracellular reservoir for galectins.

  16. Pattern of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expression after ablation of the sensorimotor cortex of the neonatal and adult rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacić Sanja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system has a limited capacity for self-repair after damage. However, the neonatal brain has agreater capacity for recovery than the adult brain. These differences in the regenerative capability depend on local environmental factors and the maturational stage of growing axons. Among molecules which have both growth-promoting and growth-inhibiting activities is the heterogeneous class of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs. In this paper, we investigated the chondroitin-4 and chondroitin-6 sulfate proteoglycan expression profile after left sensorimotor cortex ablation of the neonatal and adult rat brain. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that compared to the normal uninjured cortex, lesion provoked up regulation of CSPGs showing a different pattern of expression in the neonatal vs. the adult brain. Punctuate and membrane-bound labeling was predominate after neonatal lesion, where as heavy deposition of staining in the extracellular matrix was observed after adult lesion. Heavy deposition of CSPG immunoreactivity around the lesionsite in adult rats, in contrast to a less CSPG-rich environment in neonatal rats, indicated that enhancement of the recovery process after neonatal injury is due to amore permissive environment.

  17. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan is associated with amyloid plaques and neuroanatomically targeted PrP pathology throughout the incubation period of scrapie-infected mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McBride, P. A.; Wilson, M. I.; Eikelenboom, P.; Tunstall, A.; Bruce, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) has been found to be associated with amyloid deposits in a number of diseases including the cerebral amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease and the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The role of HSPG in amyloid formation and the neurodegenerative

  18. Large-scale chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan digestion with chondroitinase gene therapy leads to reduced pathology and modulates macrophage phenotype following spinal cord contusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartus, Katalin; James, Nicholas D; Didangelos, Athanasios; Bosch, Karen D; Verhaagen, J.; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J; Rogers, John H; Schneider, Bernard L; Muir, Elizabeth M; Bradbury, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) inhibit repair following spinal cord injury. Here we use mammalian-compatible engineered chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) delivered via lentiviral vector (LV-ChABC) to explore the consequences of large-scale CSPG digestion for spinal cord repair. We demonstrate

  19. Human skin basement membrane-associated heparan sulphate proteoglycan: distinctive differences in ultrastructural localization as a function of developmental age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horiguchi, Y; Fine, J D; Couchman, J R

    1991-01-01

    was identical to that observed in neonatal and adult human skin. These findings demonstrate that active remodelling of the dermo-epidermal junction occurs during at least the first two trimesters, and affects not only basement membrane-associated structures but also specific antigens.......Recent studies have demonstrated that skin basement membrane components are expressed within the dermo-epidermal junction in an orderly sequence during human foetal development. We have investigated the ultrastructural localization of basement membrane-related antigens in human foetal skin...... at different developmental ages using two monoclonal antibodies to a well-characterized basement membrane-associated heparan sulphate proteoglycan. A series of foetal skin specimens (range, 54-142 gestational days) were examined using an immunoperoxidase immunoelectron microscopic technique. In specimens...

  20. Podocalyxin as a major pluripotent marker and novel keratan sulfate proteoglycan in human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Hidenao; Nagai, Yuko; Kojima, Aya; Kinoshita-Toyoda, Akiko

    2017-04-01

    Podocalyxin (PC) was first identified as a heavily sialylated transmembrane protein of glomerular podocytes. Recent studies suggest that PC is a remarkable glycoconjugate that acts as a universal glyco-carrier. The glycoforms of PC are responsible for multiple functions in normal tissue, human cancer cells, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). PC is employed as a major pluripotent marker of hESCs and hiPSCs. Among the general antibodies for human PC, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81 recognize the keratan sulfate (KS)-related structures. Therefore, It is worthwhile to summarize the outstanding chemical characteristic of PC, including the KS-related structures. Here, we review the glycoforms of PC and discuss the potential of PC as a novel KS proteoglycan in undifferentiated hESCs and hiPSCs.

  1. Proteoglycan from salmon nasal cartridge promotes in vitro wound healing of fibroblast monolayers via the CD44 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Gen; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takeda, Yoshie; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proteoglycan from salmon nasal cartridge (SNC-PG) promoted wound healing in fibroblast monolayers. • SNC-PG stimulated both cell proliferation and cell migration. • Interaction between chondroitin sulfate-units and CD44 is responsible for the effect. - Abstract: Proteoglycans (PGs) are involved in various cellular functions including cell growth, adhesion, and differentiation; however, their physiological roles are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the effect of PG purified from salmon nasal cartilage (SNC-PG) on wound closure using tissue-cultured cell monolayers, an in vitro wound-healing assay. The results indicated that SNC-PG significantly promoted wound closure in NIH/3T3 cell monolayers by stimulating both cell proliferation and cell migration. SNC-PG was effective in concentrations from 0.1 to 10 μg/ml, but showed much less effect at higher concentrations (100–1000 μg/ml). The effect of SNC-PG was abolished by chondroitinase ABC, indicating that chondroitin sulfates (CSs), a major component of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in SNC-PG, are crucial for the SNC-PG effect. Furthermore, chondroitin 6-sulfate (C-6-S), a major CS of SNC-PG GAGs, could partially reproduce the SNC-PG effect and partially inhibit the binding of SNC-PG to cells, suggesting that SNC-PG exerts its effect through an interaction between the GAGs in SNC-PG and the cell surface. Neutralization by anti-CD44 antibodies or CD44 knockdown abolished SNC-PG binding to the cells and the SNC-PG effect on wound closure. These results suggest that interactions between CS-rich GAG-chains of SNC-PG and CD44 on the cell surface are responsible for the SNC-PG effect on wound closure

  2. Proteoglycan from salmon nasal cartridge promotes in vitro wound healing of fibroblast monolayers via the CD44 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Gen; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takeda, Yoshie [Department of Physiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Sokabe, Masahiro, E-mail: msokabe@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Mechanobiology Institute Singapore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117411 (Singapore)

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • Proteoglycan from salmon nasal cartridge (SNC-PG) promoted wound healing in fibroblast monolayers. • SNC-PG stimulated both cell proliferation and cell migration. • Interaction between chondroitin sulfate-units and CD44 is responsible for the effect. - Abstract: Proteoglycans (PGs) are involved in various cellular functions including cell growth, adhesion, and differentiation; however, their physiological roles are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the effect of PG purified from salmon nasal cartilage (SNC-PG) on wound closure using tissue-cultured cell monolayers, an in vitro wound-healing assay. The results indicated that SNC-PG significantly promoted wound closure in NIH/3T3 cell monolayers by stimulating both cell proliferation and cell migration. SNC-PG was effective in concentrations from 0.1 to 10 μg/ml, but showed much less effect at higher concentrations (100–1000 μg/ml). The effect of SNC-PG was abolished by chondroitinase ABC, indicating that chondroitin sulfates (CSs), a major component of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in SNC-PG, are crucial for the SNC-PG effect. Furthermore, chondroitin 6-sulfate (C-6-S), a major CS of SNC-PG GAGs, could partially reproduce the SNC-PG effect and partially inhibit the binding of SNC-PG to cells, suggesting that SNC-PG exerts its effect through an interaction between the GAGs in SNC-PG and the cell surface. Neutralization by anti-CD44 antibodies or CD44 knockdown abolished SNC-PG binding to the cells and the SNC-PG effect on wound closure. These results suggest that interactions between CS-rich GAG-chains of SNC-PG and CD44 on the cell surface are responsible for the SNC-PG effect on wound closure.

  3. Differentiation of EL4 lymphoma cells by tumoral environment is associated with inappropriate expression of the large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan PG-M and the tumor-associated antigen HTgp-175.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottiers, P; Verfaillie, T; Contreras, R; Revets, H; Desmedt, M; Dooms, H; Fiers, W; Grooten, J

    1998-11-09

    Progression to malignancy of transformed cells involves complex genetic alterations and aberrant gene expression patterns. While aberrant gene expression is often caused by alterations in individual genes, the contribution of the tumoral environment to the triggering of this gene expression is less well established. The stable but heterogeneous expression in cultured EL4/13 cells of a novel tumor-associated antigen, designated as HTgp-175, was chosen for the investigation of gene expression during tumor formation. Homogeneously HTgp-175-negative EL4/13 cells, isolated by cell sorting or obtained by subcloning, acquired HTgp-175 expression as a result of tumor formation. The tumorigenicity of HTgp-175-negative vs. HTgp-175-positive EL4 variants was identical, indicating that induction but not selection accounted for the phenotypic switch from HTgp-175-negative to HTgp-175-positive. Although mutagenesis experiments showed that the protein was not essential for tumor establishment, tumor-derived cells showed increased malignancy, linking HTgp-175 expression with genetic changes accompanying tumor progression. This novel gene expression was not an isolated event, since it was accompanied by ectopic expression of the large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan PG-M and of normal differentiation antigens. We conclude that signals derived from the tumoral microenvironment contribute significantly to the aberrant gene expression pattern of malignant cells, apparently by fortuitous activation of differentiation processes and cause expression of novel differentiation antigens as well as of inappropriate tumor-associated and ectopic antigens.

  4. Mixed Fibronectin-Derived Peptides Conjugated to a Chitosan Matrix Effectively Promotes Biological Activities through Integrins, α4β1, α5β1, αvβ3, and Syndecan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hozumi Kentaro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mimicking the biological function of the extracellular matrix is an approach to developing cell adhesive biomaterials. The RGD peptide, derived from fibronectin (Fn, mainly binds to integrin αvβ3 and has been widely used as a cell adhesive peptide on various biomaterials. However, cell adhesion to Fn is thought to be mediated by several integrin subtypes and syndecans. In this study, we synthesized an RGD-containing peptide (FIB1 and four integrin α4β1-binding-related motif-containing peptides (LDV, IDAPS, KLDAPT, and PRARI and constructed peptide-chitosan matrices. The FIB1-chitosan matrix promoted human dermal fibroblast (HDF attachment, and the C-terminal elongated PRARI (ePRARI-C-conjugated chitosan matrix significantly promoted HDF attachment through integrin α4β1 and syndecan binding. Next, we constructed a mixed ePRARI-C- and FIB1-chitosan matrix to develop a Fn mimetic biomaterial. The mixed ePRARI-C/FIB1-chitosan matrix promoted significantly better cell attachment and neurite outgrowth compared to those of either ePRARI-C- or FIB1-chitosan matrices. HDF adhesion to the ePRARI-C/FIB1-chitosan matrix was mediated by integrin, α4β1, α5β1, and αvβ3, similar to HDF adhesion to Fn. These data suggest that an ePRARI-C/FIB1-chitosan matrix can be used as a tool to analyze the multiple functions of Fn and can serve as a Fn-mimetic biomaterial.

  5. The small leucine-rich proteoglycan, biglycan, is highly expressed in adipose tissue of Psammomys obesus and is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolton K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Kristy Bolton1, David Segal1, Ken Walder1,21Metabolic Research Unit, School of Medicine, 2Institute for Technology, Research and Innovation, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: We have previously demonstrated that the small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin may play a role in adipose tissue homeostasis and the pathophysiology of obesity. Biglycan is highly similar in structure to decorin, therefore we hypothesized it would have a similar expression profile and role to decorin in adipose tissue. Real time polymerase chain reaction was used to measure biglycan mRNA levels in adipose tissue from normal glucose tolerant and impaired glucose tolerant and type 2 diabetic (T2D Psammomys obesus. Biglycan mRNA was found to be highly expressed in adipose tissue, and gene expression was significantly higher in visceral compared to subcutaneous adipose tissue, with elevated levels in obese, T2D compared to lean normal glucose tolerant P. obesus (P < 0.04. Biglycan mRNA was predominantly expressed by stromal/vascular cells of fractionated adipose tissue (P = 0.023. Biglycan expression in adipose tissue, particularly in the obese state, was markedly upregulated. Collectively, our data suggest that the small leucine-rich proteoglycan family proteins biglycan and decorin may play a role in the development of obesity and T2D, possibly by facilitating expansion of adipose tissue mass.Keywords: biglycan, small leucine-rich proteoglycan, Psammomys obesus, adipose tissue, obesity, type 2 diabetes

  6. A “Proteoglycan Targeting Strategy” for the Scintigraphic Imaging and Monitoring of the Swarm Rat Chondrosarcoma Orthotopic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Peyrode

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our lab developed 99mTc-NTP 15-5 radiotracer as targeting proteoglycans (PGs for the scintigraphic imaging of joint. This paper reports preclinical results of 99mTc-NTP 15-5 imaging of an orthotopic model of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma (SRC. 99mTc-NTP 15-5 imaging of SRC-bearing and sham-operated animals was performed and quantified at regular intervals after surgery and compared to bone scintigraphy and tumoural volume. Tumours were characterized by histology and PG assay. SRC exhibited a significant 99mTc-NTP 15-5 uptake at very early stage after implant (with tumour/muscle ratio of 1.61 ± 0.14, whereas no measurable tumour was evidenced. As tumour grew, mean tumour/muscle ratio was increased by 2.4, between the early and late stage of pathology. Bone scintigraphy failed to image chondrosarcoma, even at the later stage of study. 99mTc-NTP 15-5 imaging provided a suitable set of quantitative criteria for the in vivo characterization of chondrosarcoma behaviour in bone environment, useful for achieving a greater understanding of the pathology.

  7. “On-The-Spot” Arresting of Chondroitin Sulphate Proteoglycans: Implications for Ovarian Adenocarcinoma Recognition and Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyamvada Pradeep

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian Cancer (OC is one of the leading causes of cancer-associated death among women. The underlying biochemical cause of OC proliferation is usually attributed to the over-expression of Chondroitin Sulphate Proteoglycans (CSPGs wherein the CS-E subgroup plays a major role in tumor cell proliferation by over-expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. We hereby hypothesize that by targeting the OC extracellular matrix using a CS-E-specific antibody, GD3G7, we could provide spatial delivery of crosslinkers and anti-VEGF agents to firstly induce in vivo crosslinking and complexation (arresting of CS-E into a “biogel mass” for efficient and effective detection, detachment and reduction of tumorous tissue, and secondly inhibit angiogenesis in OC. It is further proposed that the antibody-assisted targeted delivery of CS-E crosslinkers can bind to highly anionic CS-E to form a polyelectrolyte complex to inhibit the formation of ovarian tumor spheroids that are responsible for spheroid-induced mesothelial clearance and progression of OC. The hypothesis also describes the potential in vivo “On-The-Spot” CSPG crosslinkers such as sodium trimetaphosphate (physical crosslinker, 1,12-diaminododecane (chemical crosslinker, poly(ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (synthetic polymer, and chitosan (natural polyelectrolyte-forming agent. In conclusion, this hypothesis proposes in vivo spatial crosslinking of CSPGs as a potential theranostic intervention strategy for OC—a first in the field of cancer research.

  8. Accumulation of neurocan, a brain chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, in association with the retinal vasculature in RCS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqin; Rauch, Uwe; Perez, Maria-Thereza R

    2003-03-01

    To examine whether and how the retinal distribution of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan neurocan is affected after photoreceptor cell loss and whether it correlates with the multiple secondary cellular changes that accompany the photoreceptor degeneration. Retinas from normal rats (Sprague-Dawley; postnatal days [P]0-P70), RCS rats with dystrophic retinas (P0-P300), RCS-rdy(+) congenic rats with nondystrophic retinas (P0-202), and rhodopsin mutant rats, P23H (P0-P257) and S334ter (P0-P220), were processed for immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal antibody to rat neurocan. The overall distribution of neurocan was similar in all retinas examined. Neurocan immunostaining was detected over the nerve fiber layer, the plexiform layers, the photoreceptor outer segments region, and the ciliary epithelium. With age, labeling throughout the plexiform layers decreased continuously. In RCS rats however, conspicuous labeling was also seen in association with retinal vessels, from P15 onward. Accumulation of neurocan in association with the retinal vasculature does not correlate with photoreceptor cell loss, because it was not observed in the rhodopsin mutant rats. During the earliest stages of the disease, accumulation of debris in the subretinal space in RCS rats may be sufficient per se to initiate a cascade of metabolic changes that result in accumulation of neurocan. With time, the neurocan accumulated perivascularly may, by interaction with other matrix molecules, modulate at least some of the vascular alterations observed in this animal model.

  9. Expression of small leucine-rich extracellular matrix proteoglycans biglycan and lumican reveals oral lichen planus malignant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lončar-Brzak, Božana; Klobučar, Marko; Veliki-Dalić, Irena; Sabol, Ivan; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra; Krušlin, Božo; Mravak-Stipetić, Marinka

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine molecular alterations on the protein level in lesions of oral lichen planus (OLP), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and healthy mucosa. Global protein profiling methods based on liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were used, with a special emphasis on evaluation of deregulated extracellular matrix molecules expression, as well as on analyses of IG2F and IGFR2 expression in healthy mucosa, OLP and OSCC tissues by comparative semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics profiling of healthy mucosa, OLP and OSCC tissues (and accompanied histologically unaltered tissues, respectively) identified 55 extracellular matrix proteins. Twenty among identified proteins were common to all groups of samples. Expression of small leucine-rich extracellular matrix proteoglycans lumican and biglycan was found both in OSCC and OLP and they were validated by Western blot analysis as putative biomarkers. A significant increase (p < 0.05) of biglycan expression in OLP-AT group was determined in comparison with OLP-T group, while lumican showed significant up-regulation (p < 0.05) in OLP-T and OSCC-T groups vs. adjacent and control tissue groups. Biglycan expression was only determined in OSCC-AT group. Immunohistochemical analysis of IGF2 and IG2FR expression revealed no significant difference among groups of samples. Biglycan and lumican were identified as important pathogenesis biomarkers of OLP that point to its malignant potential.

  10. Histamine and chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycan released by cultured human colonic mucosa: indication for possible presence of E mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliakim, R.; Gilead, L.; Ligumsky, M; Okon, E.; Rachmilewitz, D.; Razin, E.

    1986-01-01

    An association between the release of histamine and chondroitin sulfate E proteoglycan (PG) was demonstrates in human colonic mucosa (HCM). Colonic biopsy samples incorporated [ 35 S]sulfate into PG, which was partially released into the culture medium during the incubation period. Ascending thin-layer chromatography of the released 35 S-labeled PG after its digestion by chondroitin ABC lyase (chondroitinase, EC 4.2.2.4) followed by autoradiography yielded three products that migrated in the position of monosulfated disaccharides of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfate and N-acetylgalactosoamine 6-sulfate and of an oversulfated disaccharide possessing N-acetylgalatosamine 4,6-disulfate. Cultured colonic mucosa released 23.6 +/- 3.7ng of histamine per mg of wet tissue without any special trigger. Comparison by linear regression analysis of the release of histamine and chondroitin [ 35 S]sulfate E PG revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.7. Histological examination of the colonic biopsies revealed the presence of many mast cells in various degrees of degranulation in the mucosa and submucosa. The above correlation, the observation that most of the mast cells showed various degrees of degranulation, and the lack of heparin synthesis as opposed to the synthesis and immunological release of chondroitin sulfate E strongly suggest that the E mast cell exists in the human colon

  11. Modulators of axonal growth and guidance at the brain midline with special reference to glial heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAVALCANTE LENY A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilaterally symmetric organisms need to exchange information between the left and right sides of their bodies to integrate sensory input and to coordinate motor control. Thus, an important choice point for developing axons is the Central Nervous System (CNS midline. Crossing of this choice point is influenced by highly conserved, soluble or membrane-bound molecules such as the L1 subfamily, laminin, netrins, slits, semaphorins, Eph-receptors and ephrins, etc. Furthermore, there is much circumstantial evidence for a role of proteoglycans (PGs or their glycosaminoglycan (GAG moieties on axonal growth and guidance, most of which was derived from simplified models. A model of intermediate complexity is that of cocultures of young neurons and astroglial carpets (confluent cultures obtained from medial and lateral sectors of the embryonic rodent midbrain soon after formation of its commissures. Neurite production in these cocultures reveals that, irrespective of the previous location of neurons in the midbrain, medial astrocytes exerted an inhibitory or non-permissive effect on neuritic growth that was correlated to a higher content of both heparan and chondroitin sulfates (HS and CS. Treatment with GAG lyases shows minor effects of CS and discloses a major inhibitory or non-permissive role for HS. The results are discussed in terms of available knowledge on the binding of HSPGs to interative proteins and underscore the importance of understanding glial polysaccharide arrays in addition to its protein complement for a better understanding of neuron-glial interactions.

  12. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans regulate the growth, differentiation and migration of multipotent neural precursor cells through the integrin signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lü He-Zuo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural precursor cells (NPCs are defined by their ability to proliferate, self-renew, and retain the potential to differentiate into neurons and glia. Deciphering the factors that regulate their behaviors will greatly aid in their use as potential therapeutic agents or targets. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs are prominent components of the extracellular matrix (ECM in the central nervous system (CNS and are assumed to play important roles in controlling neuronal differentiation and development. Results In the present study, we demonstrated that CSPGs were constitutively expressed on the NPCs isolated from the E16 rat embryonic brain. When chondroitinase ABC was used to abolish the function of endogenous CSPGs on NPCs, it induced a series of biological responses including the proliferation, differentiation and migration of NPCs, indicating that CSPGs may play a critical role in NPC development and differentiation. Finally, we provided evidence suggesting that integrin signaling pathway may be involved in the effects of CSPGs on NPCs. Conclusion The present study investigating the influence and mechanisms of CSPGs on the differentiation and migration of NPCs should help us to understand the basic biology of NPCs during CNS development and provide new insights into developing new strategies for the treatment of the neurological disorders in the CNS.

  13. Changes in content and synthesis of collagen types and proteoglycans in osteoarthritis of the knee joint and comparison of quantitative analysis with Photoshop-based image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahm, Andreas; Mrosek, Eike; Spank, Heiko; Erggelet, Christoph; Kasch, Richard; Esser, Jan; Merk, Harry

    2010-04-01

    The different cartilage layers vary in synthesis of proteoglycan and of the distinct types of collagen with the predominant collagen Type II with its associated collagens, e.g. types IX and XI, produced by normal chondrocytes. It was demonstrated that proteoglycan decreases in degenerative tissue and a switch from collagen type II to type I occurs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of real-time (RT)-PCR and Photoshop-based image analysis in detecting such lesions and find new aspects about their distribution. We performed immunohistochemistry and histology with cartilage tissue samples from 20 patients suffering from osteoarthritis compared with 20 healthy biopsies. Furthermore, we quantified our results on the gene expression of collagen type I and II and aggrecan with the help of real-time (RT)-PCR. Proteoglycan content was measured colorimetrically. Using Adobe Photoshop the digitized images of histology and immunohistochemistry stains of collagen type I and II were stored on an external data storage device. The area occupied by any specific colour range can be specified and compared in a relative manner directly from the histogram using the "magic wand tool" in the select similar menu. In the image grow menu gray levels or luminosity (colour) of all pixels within the selected area, including mean, median and standard deviation, etc. are depicted. Statistical Analysis was performed using the t test. With the help of immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and quantitative RT- PCR we found that not only collagen type II, but also collagen type I is synthesized by the cells of the diseased cartilage tissue, shown by increasing amounts of collagen type I mRNA especially in the later stages of osteoarthritis. A decrease of collagen type II is visible especially in the upper fibrillated area of the advanced osteoarthritic samples, which leads to an overall decrease. Analysis of proteoglycan showed a loss of the overall content and a quite uniform staining in

  14. Syndecan-1 and Metastasis Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Sdc1 WT vs Sdc1 KO mice (p = 0.36). - 5 - Major Task 2: Optimize 3D lung microenvironment assay Subtask 1: Transduce HMVEC-L with E4ORF1 and mCherry...micro-channel devices (see below) but have not yet transduced them with E4ORF1 nor labeled them. If we succeed in generating defined vascular

  15. Expression of the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan molecular complex in six human melanoma xenograft lines studied by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelhus, T A; Rofstad, E K

    1993-06-01

    The expression of the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSP) molecular complex in six human melanoma xenograft lines (BEX-t, COX-t, HUX-t, ROX-t, SAX-t, WIX-t) was studied by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry using the monoclonal antibodies 9.2.27, ME31.3, G7A5, and NKI.M6. The two methods and the four antibodies gave consistent results. The six melanoma lines could be divided into three distinct groups of two lines each; expression was high in the HUX-t and ROX-t lines and intermediate in the BEX-t and SAX-t lines, whereas the COX-t and WIX-t lines were negative. The mean number of epitopes per cell for 9.2.27 was approximately twice as high as for ME31.3, G7A5, and NKI.M6 and was estimated to range from 0.8 +/- 0.1 x 10(5) to 1.9 +/- 0.2 x 10(5) in the positive xenograft lines. The expression of the CSP complex was heterogeneous. The immunofluorescence histograms measured by flow cytometry were therefore broad for all tumour lines. A significant fraction of the HUX-t cells was negative or weakly stained. These cells appeared as clear negative patches in the immunohistochemical preparations. Moreover, most morphologically intact tumour cells adjacent to necrotic areas did not show significant expression of the CSP complex, irrespective of tumour line. These cells were probably hypoxic and thus resistant to radiation therapy. The expression of the CSP complex in the xenograft lines was similar to that reported for melanoma in man.

  16. Cell surface binding and uptake of arginine- and lysine-rich penetratin peptides in absence and presence of proteoglycans

    KAUST Repository

    Åmand, Helene L.

    2012-11-01

    Cell surface proteoglycans (PGs) appear to promote uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), but their exact functions are unclear. To address if there is specificity in the interactions of arginines and PGs leading to improved internalization, we used flow cytometry to examine uptake in relation to cell surface binding for penetratin and two arginine/lysine substituted variants (PenArg and PenLys) in wildtype CHO-K1 and PG-deficient A745 cells. All peptides were more efficiently internalized into CHO-K1 than into A745, but their cell surface binding was independent of cell type. Thus, PGs promote internalization of cationic peptides, irrespective of the chemical nature of their positive charges. Uptake of each peptide was linearly dependent on its cell surface binding, and affinity is thus important for efficiency. However, the gradients of these linear dependencies varied significantly. Thus each peptide\\'s ability to stimulate uptake once bound to the cell surface is reliant on formation of specific uptake-promoting interactions. Heparin affinity chromatography and clustering experiments showed that penetratin and PenArg binding to sulfated sugars is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and result in clustering, whereas PenLys only interacts through electrostatic attraction. This may have implications for the molecular mechanisms behind arginine-specific uptake stimulation as penetratin and PenArg are more efficiently internalized than PenLys upon interaction with PGs. However, PenArg is also least affected by removal of PGs. This indicates that an increased arginine content not only improve PG-dependent uptake but also that PenArg is more adaptable as it can use several portals of entry into the cell. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Large proteoglycan complexes and disturbed collagen architecture in the corneal extracellular matrix of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (Sly syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert D; Liskova, Petra; Pinali, Christian; Palka, Barbara P; Palos, Michalis; Jirsova, Katerina; Hrdlickova, Enkela; Tesarova, Marketa; Elleder, Milan; Zeman, Jiri; Meek, Keith M; Knupp, Carlo; Quantock, Andrew J

    2011-08-24

    Deficiencies in enzymes involved in proteoglycan (PG) turnover underlie a number of rare mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), investigations of which can considerably aid understanding of the roles of PGs in corneal matrix biology. Here, the authors analyze novel pathologic changes in MPS VII (Sly syndrome) to determine the nature of PG-collagen associations in stromal ultrastructure. Transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography were used to investigate PG-collagen architectures and interactions in a cornea obtained at keratoplasty from a 22-year-old man with MPS VII, which was caused by a compound heterozygous mutation in the GUSB gene. Transmission electron microscopy showed atypical morphology of the epithelial basement membrane and Bowman's layer in MPS VII. Keratocytes were packed with cytoplasmic vacuoles containing abnormal glycosaminoglycan (GAG) material, and collagen fibrils were thinner than in normal cornea and varied considerably throughout anterior (14-32 nm), mid (13-42 nm), and posterior (17-39 nm) regions of the MPS VII stroma. PGs viewed in three dimensions were striking in appearance in that they were significantly larger than PGs in normal cornea and formed highly extended linkages with multiple collagen fibrils. Cellular changes in the MPS VII cornea resemble those in other MPS. However, the wide range of collagen fibril diameters throughout the stroma and the extensive matrix presence of supranormal-sized PG structures appear to be unique features of this disorder. The findings suggest that the accumulation of stromal chondroitin-, dermatan-, and heparan-sulfate glycosaminoglycans in the absence of β-glucuronidase-mediated degradation can modulate collagen fibrillogenesis.

  18. An affinity adsorption media that mimics heparan sulfate proteoglycans for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Keith R.; Ward, Robert S.

    2016-06-01

    Removal of several drug-resistant bacteria from blood by affinity adsorption onto a heparin-functional media is reported. Heparin is a chemical analogue of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans, found on transmembrane proteins of endothelial cells. Many blood-borne human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi have been reported to target HS as an initial step in their pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrate the binding and removal of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Extended-Spectrum Betalactamase Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL), and two Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (both CRE Escherichia coli and CRE K. pneumoniae) using 300 μm polyethylene beads surface modified with end-point-attached heparin. Depending on the specific bacteria, the amount removed ranged between 39% (ESBL) and 99.9% (CRE). The total amount of bacteria adsorbed ranged between 2.8 × 105 and 8.6 × 105 colony forming units (CFU) per gram of adsorption media. Based on a polymicrobial challenge which showed no competitive binding, MRSA and CRE apparently utilize different binding sequences on the immobilized heparin ligand. Since the total circulating bacterial load during bacteremia seldom exceeds 5 × 105 CFUs, it appears possible to significantly reduce bacterial concentration in infected patients by multi-pass recirculation of their blood through a small extracorporeal affinity filter containing the heparin-functional adsorption media. This 'dialysis-like therapy' is expected to improve patient outcomes and reduce the cost of care, particularly when there are no anti-infective drugs available to treat the infection.

  19. A high molecular weight proteoglycan is differentially expressed during development of the mollusc Concholepas concholepas (Mollusca; Gastropoda; Muricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandan, E; González, M; Inestrosa, N C; Tremblay, C; Urrea, R

    1992-12-15

    Incorporation of radioactive sulfate to hatched veliger larvae of the gastropod muricid Concholepas concholepas indicated that over 87% of the sulfated macromolecules were found in the detergent insoluble fraction, rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The sulfated material was solubilized with guanidine salt followed by urea dialysis and fractionated by DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. Three sulfated compounds eluting at 0.7, 1.1, and 3.0 M NaCl, called peaks I, II, and III, respectively, were obtained. The sulfated compound present in peak I was degraded by pronase or sodium alkaline treatment to a small sulfated resistant material, suggesting the presence of a proteoglycan (PG). Filtration analysis on Sephacryl S-500 and SDS-PAGE of the intact PG indicates that it has a high molecular weight (360,000 to over 1 x 10(6)). Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against this PG were produced. The specificity of one mAb, the 6H2, was demonstrated by size chromatography and ELISA analysis. The epitope recognized by this mAb seems to be present in the core protein of the PG. Both the extent of sulfation and the presence of different sulfated species of PGs were evaluated during the development of this mollusc. A twelvefold increase in the incorporation of sulfate to PGs per milligram of protein was found in veliger larvae compared to blastula-glastula stages. This change correlated well with the differential expression of the sulfated PG present in peak I. Biochemical and immunological analysis indicate that high levels of this PG are found in veliger and trocophore larvae in comparison with blastula-gastrula and early juveniles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Clinical high-resolution mapping of the proteoglycan-bound water fraction in articular cartilage of the human knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhrara, Mustapha; Reiter, David A; Sexton, Kyle W; Bergeron, Christopher M; Zukley, Linda M; Spencer, Richard G

    2017-11-01

    We applied our recently introduced Bayesian analytic method to achieve clinically-feasible in-vivo mapping of the proteoglycan water fraction (PgWF) of human knee cartilage with improved spatial resolution and stability as compared to existing methods. Multicomponent driven equilibrium single-pulse observation of T 1 and T 2 (mcDESPOT) datasets were acquired from the knees of two healthy young subjects and one older subject with previous knee injury. Each dataset was processed using Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) analysis incorporating a two-component tissue model. We assessed the performance and reproducibility of BMC and of the conventional analysis of stochastic region contraction (SRC) in the estimation of PgWF. Stability of the BMC analysis of PgWF was tested by comparing independent high-resolution (HR) datasets from each of the two young subjects. Unlike SRC, the BMC-derived maps from the two HR datasets were essentially identical. Furthermore, SRC maps showed substantial random variation in estimated PgWF, and mean values that differed from those obtained using BMC. In addition, PgWF maps derived from conventional low-resolution (LR) datasets exhibited partial volume and magnetic susceptibility effects. These artifacts were absent in HR PgWF images. Finally, our analysis showed regional variation in PgWF estimates, and substantially higher values in the younger subjects as compared to the older subject. BMC-mcDESPOT permits HR in-vivo mapping of PgWF in human knee cartilage in a clinically-feasible acquisition time. HR mapping reduces the impact of partial volume and magnetic susceptibility artifacts compared to LR mapping. Finally, BMC-mcDESPOT demonstrated excellent reproducibility in the determination of PgWF. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. The Effect of Intra-articular Injection of Autologous Microfragmented Fat Tissue on Proteoglycan Synthesis in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Hudetz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the leading musculoskeletal disorders in the adult population. It is associated with cartilage damage triggered by the deterioration of the extracellular matrix tissue. The present study explores the effect of intra-articular injection of autologous microfragmented adipose tissue to host chondrocytes and cartilage proteoglycans in patients with knee OA. A prospective, non-randomized, interventional, single-center, open-label clinical trial was conducted from January 2016 to April 2017. A total of 17 patients were enrolled in the study, and 32 knees with osteoarthritis were assessed. Surgical intervention (lipoaspiration followed by tissue processing and intra-articular injection of the final microfragmented adipose tissue product into the affected knee(s was performed in all patients. Patients were assessed for visual analogue scale (VAS, delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC and immunoglobulin G (IgG glycans at the baseline, three, six and 12 months after the treatment. Magnetic resonance sequence in dGEMRIC due to infiltration of the anionic, negatively charged contrast gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA2− into the cartilage indicated that the contents of cartilage glycosaminoglycans significantly increased in specific areas of the treated knee joint. In addition, dGEMRIC consequently reflected subsequent changes in the mechanical axis of the lower extremities. The results of our study indicate that the use of autologous and microfragmented adipose tissue in patients with knee OA (measured by dGEMRIC MRI increased glycosaminoglycan (GAG content in hyaline cartilage, which is in line with observed VAS and clinical results.

  2. ELISA for the core protein of the cartilage large aggregating proteoglycan, aggrecan: comparison with the concentrations of immunogenic keratan sulphate in synovial fluid, serum and urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J; Larsen, F S; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    1994-01-01

    ELISA. The within-assay and between-assay coefficients of variation were 4.9-8.9% and 11.1-13.0%, respectively. The mean concentrations of core protein in synovial fluid, serum and urine were 76.4 micrograms/ml, 104.0 ng/ml and 81.0 ng/ml, respectively. In synovial fluids the concentrations were closely......Immunological assays for fragments of the cartilage large aggregating proteoglycan, aggrecan, have been widely used to monitor cartilage turnover. These assays have commonly employed the monoclonal keratan sulphate antibody, 5D4. Keratan sulphate, however, is present in many tissues and 5D4...

  3. cDNA cloning of the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein, bamacan: a five domain structure including coiled-coil motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, R R; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    Basement membranes contain several proteoglycans, and those bearing heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans such as perlecan and agrin usually predominate. Most mammalian basement membranes also contain chondroitin sulfate, and a core protein, bamacan, has been partially characterized. We have now....... The protein sequence has low overall homology, apart from very small NH2- and COOH-terminal motifs. At the junctions between the distal globular domains and the coiled-coil regions lie glycosylation sites, with up to three N-linked oligosaccharides and probably three chondroitin chains. Three other Ser...

  4. Two faces of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in spinal cord repair: a role in microglia/macrophage activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asya Rolls

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG is a major component of the glial scar. It is considered to be a major obstacle for central nervous system (CNS recovery after injury, especially in light of its well-known activity in limiting axonal growth. Therefore, its degradation has become a key therapeutic goal in the field of CNS regeneration. Yet, the abundant de novo synthesis of CSPG in response to CNS injury is puzzling. This apparent dichotomy led us to hypothesize that CSPG plays a beneficial role in the repair process, which might have been previously overlooked because of nonoptimal regulation of its levels. This hypothesis is tested in the present study. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We inflicted spinal cord injury in adult mice and examined the effects of CSPG on the recovery process. We used xyloside to inhibit CSPG formation at different time points after the injury and analyzed the phenotype acquired by the microglia/macrophages in the lesion site. To distinguish between the resident microglia and infiltrating monocytes, we used chimeric mice whose bone marrow-derived myeloid cells expressed GFP. We found that CSPG plays a key role during the acute recovery stage after spinal cord injury in mice. Inhibition of CSPG synthesis immediately after injury impaired functional motor recovery and increased tissue loss. Using the chimeric mice we found that the immediate inhibition of CSPG production caused a dramatic effect on the spatial organization of the infiltrating myeloid cells around the lesion site, decreased insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 production by microglia/macrophages, and increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha levels. In contrast, delayed inhibition, allowing CSPG synthesis during the first 2 d following injury, with subsequent inhibition, improved recovery. Using in vitro studies, we showed that CSPG directly activated microglia/macrophages via the CD44 receptor and modulated neurotrophic factor secretion by

  5. The effect of insulin-like growth factor I on proteoglycan metabolism in immature and adult bovine articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barone-Varelas, J.

    1989-01-01

    Explants of articular cartilage from calf (15 weeks old) and steer (18-24 months old) were cultured for up to 19 days in medium containing either insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) or 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Explants cultured in medium alone were controls. 35 S-proteoglycans (PGs) synthesized on day 7 of culture during a 5-hour pulse with 35 S-sulfate were isolated, quantified and characterized. Lower concentrations of IGF-I were required for maximal stimulation of PG synthesis in calf than in steer (10 vs 20 ng/ml). In calf, IGF-I was as effective as 20% FABS in stimulating PG synthesis. In steer, PG synthesis in the presence of IGF-I reached its maximum at a rate that was half that obtained with 20% FBS. The stimulation by IGF-I or FBS was not accompanied at either age by alterations in the size and composition of the aggregating PGs nor by changes in the relative proportions of the CS-rich and CS-poor PG subpopulations. Importantly, the newly synthesized calf and steer PGs retained marked age-related differences in composition regardless of the culture conditions. The effects of exogenously added IGF-I and FBS on the rate of turnover of cartilage PGs was also studied. In calf, IGF-I and FBS did not significantly alter the rate of turnover of either the 35 S-PGs synthesized in vitro or of the unlabeled PGs representing mostly molecules synthesize and organized into the matrix in vivo. In steer, explants cultured in the absence of IGF-I or FBS exhibited very fast rates of turnover which resulted in severe depletion of matrix PG with time. Importantly, IGF-I and FBS were equally effective in reducing the turnover rate of 35 S-PGs and unlabeled PGs and in preventing PG depletion. These results demonstrate age-related differences in the effect of IGF-I on PG synthesis by articular chondrocytes

  6. Ablation of NG2 proteoglycan leads to deficits in brown fat function and to adult onset obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunchao Chang

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major health problem worldwide. We are studying the causes and effects of obesity in C57Bl/6 mice following genetic ablation of NG2, a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan widely expressed in progenitor cells and also in adipocytes. Although global NG2 ablation delays early postnatal adipogenesis in mouse skin, adult NG2 null mice are paradoxically heavier than wild-type mice, exhibiting larger white fat deposits. This adult onset obesity is not due to NG2-dependent effects on CNS function, since specific ablation of NG2 in oligodendrocyte progenitors yields the opposite phenotype; i.e. abnormally lean mice. Metabolic analysis reveals that, while activity and food intake are unchanged in global NG2 null mice, O(2 consumption and CO(2 production are decreased, suggesting a decrease in energy expenditure. Since brown fat plays important roles in regulating energy expenditure, we have investigated brown fat function via cold challenge and high fat diet feeding, both of which induce the adaptive thermogenesis that normally occurs in brown fat. In both tests, body temperatures in NG2 null mice are reduced compared to wild-type mice, indicating a deficit in brown fat function in the absence of NG2. In addition, adipogenesis in NG2 null brown pre-adipocytes is dramatically impaired compared to wild-type counterparts. Moreover, mRNA levels for PR domain containing 16 (PRDM16 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC1-α, proteins important for brown adipocyte differentiation, are decreased in NG2 null brown fat deposits in vivo and NG2 null brown pre-adipocytes in vitro. Altogether, these results indicate that brown fat dysfunction in NG2 null mice results from deficits in the recruitment and/or development of brown pre-adipocytes. As a consequence, obesity in NG2 null mice may occur due to disruptions in brown fat-dependent energy homeostasis, with resulting effects on lipid storage in white adipocytes.

  7. ScFv Anti-Heparan Sulfate Antibodies Unexpectedly Activate Endothelial and Cancer Cells through p38 MAPK: Implications for Antibody-Based Targeting of Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christianson, H.C.; Kuppevelt, A.H. van; Belting, M.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor development requires angiogenesis and anti-angiogenic therapies have been introduced in the treatment of cancer. In this context, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) emerge as interesting targets, owing to their function as co-receptors of major, pro-angiogenic factors. Accordingly, previous

  8. Structural studies on sulfated oligosaccharides derived from the carbohydrate-protein linkage region of chondroitin 6-sulfate proteoglycans of shark cartilage. (II.) Seven compounds containing 2 or 3 sulfate residues.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Waard, P. de; Harada, T.; Sugahara, K.

    1992-01-01

    Shark cartilage proteoglycans bear predominantly chondroitin 6-sulfate. After exhaustive protease digestion, reductive beta-elimination and subsequent chondroitinase ABC digestion, 13 hexasaccharide alditols were obtained from the carbohydrate-protein linkage region and six of them contain 0 or 1

  9. Contributions: SAGE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Contributions: SAGE. Space Alternating Generalized Expectation (SAGE) Maximization algorithm provides an iterative approach to parameter estimation when direct maximization of the likelihood function may be infeasible. Complexity is less in those applications ...

  10. Various Contributions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Various Contributions. Developed an Off –Diagonal MIMO Canceller to mitigate Upstream Crosstalk in VDSL. Developed a low complexity, Expectation Maximization based iterative Crosstalk cancellation. Developed an optimal way of computational complexity ...

  11. Original contributions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hefere

    Original contributions ... Results suggest that there is a significant positive ... psychological abuse, including economic abuse, intimidation, harassment, stalking, damage ... or maintaining the structure and function of the African home (Alio et al., 2011; Jewkes,. Levin ... Revictimisation occurs due to emotional violence and.

  12. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate interstitial flow mechanotransduction regulating MMP-13 expression and cell motility via FAK-ERK in 3D collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Dong Shi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial flow directly affects cells that reside in tissues and regulates tissue physiology and pathology by modulating important cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and migration. However, the structures that cells utilize to sense interstitial flow in a 3-dimensional (3D environment have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have shown that interstitial flow upregulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts/myofibroblasts via activation of an ERK1/2-c-Jun pathway, which in turn promotes cell migration in collagen. Herein, we focused on uncovering the flow-induced mechanotransduction mechanism in 3D.Cleavage of rat vascular SMC surface glycocalyx heparan sulfate (HS chains from proteoglycan (PG core proteins by heparinase or disruption of HS biosynthesis by silencing N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase 1 (NDST1 suppressed interstitial flow-induced ERK1/2 activation, interstitial collagenase (MMP-13 expression, and SMC motility in 3D collagen. Inhibition or knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK also attenuated or blocked flow-induced ERK1/2 activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility. Interstitial flow induced FAK phosphorylation at Tyr925, and this activation was blocked when heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs were disrupted. These data suggest that HSPGs mediate interstitial flow-induced mechanotransduction through FAK-ERK. In addition, we show that integrins are crucial for mechanotransduction through HSPGs as they mediate cell spreading and maintain cytoskeletal rigidity.We propose a conceptual mechanotransduction model wherein cell surface glycocalyx HSPGs, in the presence of integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions and cytoskeleton organization, sense interstitial flow and activate the FAK-ERK signaling axis, leading to upregulation of MMP expression and cell motility in 3D. This is the first study to describe a flow-induced mechanotransduction

  13. Formation of proteoglycan and collagen-rich scaffold-free stiff cartilaginous tissue using two-step culture methods with combinations of growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Miyauchi, Satoshi; Matsuzaka, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Chie; Kobayashi, Kohei

    2010-05-01

    Tissue-engineered cartilage may be expected to serve as an alternative to autologous chondrocyte transplantation treatment. Several methods for producing cartilaginous tissue have been reported. In this study, we describe the production of scaffold-free stiff cartilaginous tissue of pig and human, using allogeneic serum and growth factors. The tissue was formed in a mold using chondrocytes recovered from alginate bead culture and maintained in a medium with transforming growth factor-beta and several other additives. In the case of porcine tissue, the tear strength of the tissue and the contents of proteoglycan (PG) and collagen per unit of DNA increased dose-dependently with transforming growth factor-beta. The length of culture was significantly and positively correlated with thickness, tear strength, and PG and collagen contents. Tear strength showed positive high correlations with both PG and collagen contents. A positive correlation was also seen between PG content and collagen content. Similar results were obtained with human cartilaginous tissue formed from chondrocytes expanded in monolayer culture. Further, an in vivo pilot study using pig articular cartilage defect model demonstrated that the cartilaginous tissue was well integrated with surrounding tissue at 13 weeks after the implantation. In conclusion, we successfully produced implantable scaffold-free stiff cartilaginous tissue, which characterized high PG and collagen contents.

  14. The effect of a slightly acidic somatomedin peptide (ILAs) on the sulphation of proteoglycans from articular and growth plate chondrocytes in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corvol, M.-T.; Dumontier, M.-F.; Rappaport, R.; Guyda, H.; Posner, B.I.

    1978-01-01

    Chondrocyte cultures were prepared from rabbit growth plate (GPC) and articular (ARC) chondrocytes. These two cell types have distinct morphological characteristics. The cells reached maximum numbers by days 10 and 21 for ARC and GPC, respectively. The proteoglycans (PG) contained in the cellular pool were extracted and purified by DEAE cellulose chromatography. The effect of a partially purified somatomedin peptide with insulin-like activity on [ 35 S]sulphate incorporation into PG was evaluated. In both ARC and GPC a significant stimulation of [ 35 S]sulphate uptake into PG subunits was obtained with 1 ng Eq./ml of somatomedin peptide. In order to obtain the same stimulatory effect with porcine insulin, a 1000-fold greater concentration was required. The electrophoretic patterns of the PG subunits on acrylamide-agarose electrophoresis were identical on control incubations and after stimulation with the somatomedin peptide. These data demonstrate in vitro biological activity of this peptide on well differentiated articular and epiphyseal growth plate chondrocytes in culture. These cultures appear to provide a sensitive biological assay for somatomedin peptides. (author)

  15. Stem/Progenitor Cell Proteoglycans Decorated with 7-D-4, 4-C-3 and 3-B-3(-) Chondroitin Sulphate Motifs Are Morphogenetic Markers Of Tissue Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Anthony J; Smith, Susan M; Caterson, Bruce; Melrose, James

    2018-06-11

    This study reviewed the occurrence of chondroitin sulphate (CS) motifs 4-C-3, 7-D-4 and 3-B-3(-) which are expressed by progenitor cells in tissues undergoing morphogenesis. These motifs have a transient early expression pattern during tissue development and also appear in mature tissues during pathological remodeling and attempted repair processes by activated adult stem cells. The CS motifs are information and recognition modules, which may regulate cellular behavior and delineate stem cell niches in developmental tissues. One of the difficulties in determining the precise role of stem cells in tissue development and repair processes is their short engraftment period and the lack of specific markers, which differentiate the activated stem cell lineages from the resident cells. The CS sulphation motifs 7-D-4, 4-C-3 and 3-B-3 (-) decorate cell surface proteoglycans on activated stem/progenitor cells and appear to identify these cells in transitional areas of tissue development and in tissue repair and may be applicable to determining a more precise role for stem cells in tissue morphogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 AlphaMed Press.

  16. The spatiotemporal relationships between chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and terminations of calcitonin gene related peptide and parvalbumin immunoreactive afferents in the spinal cord of mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqing; Yu, Chao; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Hui; Chan, Sun-On

    2017-08-10

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycans (PGs) are a family of complex molecules in the extracellular matrix and cell surface that regulate axon growth and guidance during development of the central nervous system. In this study, the expression of CSPGs was investigated in the mouse spinal cord at late embryonic and neonatal stages using CS-56 antibody. CS immunoreactivity was observed abundantly in ventral regions of spinal cord of embryonic day (E) 15 embryos. At E16 to E18, CS expression spread dorsally, but never reached the superficial layers of the dorsal horn. This pattern was maintained until postnatal day 4, the latest stage examined. Antibodies against calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and parvalbumin (PV) were employed to label primary afferents from nociceptors and proprioceptors, respectively. CGRP-immunoreactive fibers terminated in the superficial regions of the dorsal horn where CSPGs were weakly expressed, whereas PV-immunoreactive fibers were found in CSPG-rich regions in the ventral horn. Therefore, we conclude that CS expression is spatiotemporally regulated in the spinal cord, which correlates to the termination of sensory afferents. This pattern suggests a role of CSPGs on patterning afferents in the spinal cord, probably through a differential response of axons to these growth inhibitory molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Peritoneum from Trypanosoma cruzi-infected mice is a homing site of Syndecan-1 neg plasma cells which mainly provide non-parasite-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Maria C; Montes, Carolina L; Acosta-Rodriguez, Eva V; Bermejo, Daniela A; Amezcua-Vesely, Maria C; Gruppi, Adriana

    2010-05-01

    Humoral immunity during experimental Chagas disease has been considered a double-edge sword, critical to control Trypanosoma cruzi spreading but also associated to tissue damage. Peritoneal B-1 cells have been linked to the pathogenesis of Chagas disease; however, they may also help to control the infection by providing a fast wave of antibodies. In the present work, we determined that peritoneal B-cell response to T. cruzi is characterized by a marked reduction of CD19(+) B cells due to plasma cell differentiation rather than to cell death. Both peritoneal B-2 and B-1 cells decrease after parasite infection, but with different kinetics. Thus, the reduction in B-2 cell number can be detected from day 4 postinfection while the number of B-1 cells decreases only after 15 days of infection. Differentiation of peritoneal B-1 and B-2 cells into IgM-secreting cells was triggered by parasites but not by cytokines produced by peritoneal cells. Electron microscopy studies showed that peritoneum of infected mice lodges plasma cells with typical morphology as well as atypical plasma cells named 'Mott-like cells' containing high number of cytoplasmatic Ig(+) granules. The plasma cells induced during the infection showed a phenotype that may allow their persistence in peritoneum and they may contribute to the high levels of antibodies exhibited at the chronic phase of infection. We also showed that the peritoneal B-cell response is scarcely specific for the invading pathogen and rather constitute an important source of non-parasite-specific IgM and IgG in the infected host.

  18. Contribution of collagen fibers to the compressive stiffness of cartilaginous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römgens, Anne M; van Donkelaar, Corrinus C; Ito, Keita

    2013-11-01

    Cartilaginous tissues such as the intervertebral disk are predominantly loaded under compression. Yet, they contain abundant collagen fibers, which are generally assumed to contribute to tensile loading only. Fiber tension is thought to originate from swelling of the proteoglycan-rich nucleus. However, in aged or degenerate disk, proteoglycans are depleted, whereas collagen content changes little. The question then rises to which extend the collagen may contribute to the compressive stiffness of the tissue. We hypothesized that this contribution is significant at high strain magnitudes and that the effect depends on fiber orientation. In addition, we aimed to determine the compression of the matrix. Bovine inner and outer annulus fibrosus specimens were subjected to incremental confined compression tests up to 60 % strain in radial and circumferential direction. The compressive aggregate modulus was determined per 10 % strain increment. The biochemical composition of the compressed specimens and uncompressed adjacent tissue was determined to compute solid matrix compression. The stiffness of all specimens increased nonlinearly with strain. The collagen-rich outer annulus was significantly stiffer than the inner annulus above 20 % compressive strain. Orientation influenced the modulus in the collagen-rich outer annulus. Finally, it was shown that the solid matrix was significantly compressed above 30 % strain. Therefore, we concluded that collagen fibers significantly contribute to the compressive stiffness of the intervertebral disk at high strains. This is valuable for understanding the compressive behavior of collagen-reinforced tissues in general, and may be particularly relevant for aging or degenerate disks, which become more fibrous and less hydrated.

  19. Human recombinant Fab fragment from combinatorial libraries of a B-cell lymphoma patient recognizes core protein of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Yoko; Narushima, Yuta; Ohshima, Motohiro; Yoshida, Akira; Yoneta, Naruki; Masaki, Yasufumi; Itoh, Kunihiko

    2018-01-01

    CD antigens are well known as therapeutic targets of B-cell lymphoma. To isolate therapeutic antibodies that recognize novel targets other than CD antigens, we constructed a phage display combinatorial antibody Fab library from bone marrow lymphocytes of B-cell lymphoma patient. To eliminate antibodies reactive with known B-cell lymphoma antigen, non-hematopoietic and patient's sera reactive HeLaS3 cells was selected as a target of whole cell panning. Five rounds of panning against live HeLaS3 cells retrieved single Fab clone, termed AHSA (Antibody to HeLa Surface Antigen). Using phage display random peptide library, LSYLEP was identified as an epitope sequence of AHSA. LC-MS/MS analysis of AHSA-precipitated HeLaS3 cell lysates detected several fragments corresponding to the sequence of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) core protein. Since LSYLEP sequence was at the position of 313-318 of CSPG4, we considered that CSPG4 was AHSA-associated antigen. Double staining of CSPG4-postive MDA-MB-435S cells with AHSA and anti-CSPG4 rabbit antibody showed identical staining position, and reduced AHSA reactivity was observed in CSPG4-siRNA treated MDA-MB-435S cells. In conclusion, we retrieved a human Fab from antibody library of B-cell lymphoma patient, and identified CSPG4 as a recognizing antigen. AHSA may have potential benefits for development of CSPG4-targeting theranostics for B-cell lymphoma. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulates cell proliferation, proteoglycan synthesis and expression of growth factor-related genes in human nucleus pulposus cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Kobayashi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS stimulation has been shown to effect differentiation and activation of human chondrocytes. A study involving stimulation of rabbit disc cells with LIPUS revealed upregulation of cell proliferation and proteoglycan (PG synthesis. However, the effect of LIPUS on human nucleus pulposus cells has not been investigated. In the present study, therefore, we investigated whether LIPUS stimulation of a human nucleus pulposus cell line (HNPSV-1 exerted a positive effect on cellular activity. HNPSV-1 cells were encapsulated in 1.2% sodium alginate solution at 1x105 cells/ml and cultured at 10 beads/well in 6-well plates. The cells were stimulated for 20 min each day using a LIPUS generator, and the effects of LIPUS were evaluated by measuring DNA and PG synthesis. Furthermore, mRNA expression was analyzed by cDNA microarray using total RNA extracted from the cultured cells. Our study revealed no significant difference in cell proliferation between the control and the ultrasound treated groups. However, PG production was significantly upregulated in HNPSV cells stimulated at intensities of 15, 30, 60, and 120 mW/cm2 compared with the control. The results of cDNA array showed that LIPUS significantly stimulated the gene expression of growth factors and their receptors (BMP2, FGF7, TGFbetaR1 EGFRF1, VEGF. These findings suggest that LIPUS stimulation upregulates PG production in human nucleus pulposus cells by the enhancement of several matrix-related genes including growth factor-related genes. Safe and non-invasive stimulation using LIPUS may be a useful treatment for delaying the progression of disc degeneration.

  1. Biomimetic sulfated polyethylene glycol hydrogel inhibits proteoglycan loss and tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression pattern in an osteoarthritis in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati-Sadeghi, Shabnam; Dey, Pradip; Ringe, Jochen; Haag, Rainer; Sittinger, Michael; Dehne, Tilo

    2018-04-16

    This study aimed to evaluate the potential of an anti-inflammatory polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel for osteoarthritis (OA) management in an OA in vitro model. Freshly isolated porcine chondrocytes were maintained in high-density cultures to form cartilage-like three-dimensional micromasses. Recombinant porcine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) was used to induce OA-like changes. Normal and OA-like micromasses were treated with dendritic polyglycerol sulfate-based PEG hydrogel. Live/dead staining showed that all micromasses remained vital and presented similar morphological characteristics. Safranin-O staining demonstrated a typical depletion of glycosaminoglycans in TNF-α-treated micromasses but not in the presence of the hydrogel. There was no distinct difference in immunohistochemical detection of type II collagen. Microarray data showed that rheumatoid arthritis and TNF signaling pathways were down regulated in hydrogel-treated OA-like micromasses compared to nontreated OA-like micromasses. The hydrogel alone did not affect genes related to OA such as ANPEP, COMP, CXCL12, PTGS2, and TNFSF10, but it prevented their regulation caused by TNF-α. This study provides valuable insights toward a fully synthetic hydrogel for the intra-articular treatment of OA. The findings proved the potential of this hydrogel to prevent the development of TNF-α-induced OA with regard to proteoglycan loss and TNF-α-induced expression pattern without additional signs of differentiation and inflammation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Consortium for Osteogenesis Imperfecta Mutations in the Helical Domain of Type I Collagen: Regions Rich in Lethal Mutations Align With Collagen Binding Sites for Integrins and Proteoglycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Joan C.; Forlino, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; San Antonio, James D.; Milgrom, Sarah; Hyland, James C.; Körkkö, Jarmo; Prockop, Darwin J.; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul; Symoens, Sofie; Glorieux, Francis H.; Roughley, Peter J.; Lund, Alan M.; Kuurila-Svahn, Kaija; Hartikka, Heini; Cohn, Daniel H.; Krakow, Deborah; Mottes, Monica; Schwarze, Ulrike; Chen, Diana; Yang, Kathleen; Kuslich, Christine; Troendle, James; Dalgleish, Raymond; Byers, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a generalized disorder of connective tissue characterized by fragile bones and easy susceptibility to fracture. Most cases of OI are caused by mutations in type I collagen. We have identified and assembled structural mutations in type I collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2, encoding the proα1(I) and proα2(I) chains, respectively) that result in OI. Quantitative defects causing type I OI were not included. Of these 832 independent mutations, 682 result in substitution for glycine residues in the triple helical domain of the encoded protein and 150 alter splice sites. Distinct genotype–phenotype relationships emerge for each chain. One-third of the mutations that result in glycine substitutions in α1(I) are lethal, especially when the substituting residues are charged or have a branched side chain. Substitutions in the first 200 residues are nonlethal and have variable outcome thereafter, unrelated to folding or helix stability domains. Two exclusively lethal regions (helix positions 691–823 and 910–964) align with major ligand binding regions (MLBRs), suggesting crucial interactions of collagen monomers or fibrils with integrins, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), fibronectin, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Mutations in COL1A2 are predominantly nonlethal (80%). Lethal substitutions are located in eight regularly spaced clusters along the chain, supporting a regional model. The lethal regions align with proteoglycan binding sites along the fibril, suggesting a role in fibril–matrix interactions. Recurrences at the same site in α2(I) are generally concordant for outcome, unlike α1(I). Splice site mutations comprise 20% of helical mutations identified in OI patients, and may lead to exon skipping, intron inclusion, or the activation of cryptic splice sites. Splice site mutations in COL1A1 are rarely lethal; they often lead to frameshifts and the mild type I phenotype. In α2(I), lethal exon skipping events are

  3. Basement membrane proteoglycans and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Abrahamson, D R; McCarthy, K J

    1993-01-01

    -CSPG was only strongly expressed in the vasculature invading late comma stage glomeruli, and later in presumptive and mature Bowman's capsule. Over the first six to eight weeks, the capillary basement membranes contained BM-CSPG, but in gradually decreasing amounts until it became completely undetectable...

  4. 212Pb-Labeled Antibody 225.28 Targeted to Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan 4 for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Therapy in Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B. Kasten

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with a poor prognosis. There is a clinical need for effective, targeted therapy strategies that destroy both differentiated TNBC cells and TNBC cancer initiating cells (CICs, as the latter are implicated in the metastasis and recurrence of TNBC. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4 is overexpressed on differentiated tumor cells and CICs obtained from TNBC patient specimens, suggesting that CSPG4 may be a clinically relevant target for the imaging and therapy of TNBC. The purpose of this study was to determine whether α-particle radioimmunotherapy (RIT targeting TNBC cells using the CSPG4-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 225.28 as a carrier was effective at eliminating TNBC tumors in preclinical models. To this end, mAb 225.28 labeled with 212Pb (212Pb-225.28 as a source of α-particles for RIT was used for in vitro Scatchard assays and clonogenic survival assays with human TNBC cells (SUM159 and 2LMP grown as adherent cells or non-adherent CIC-enriched mammospheres. Immune-deficient mice bearing orthotopic SUM159 or 2LMP xenografts were injected i.v. with the targeted (225.28 or irrelevant isotype-matched control (F3-C25 mAbs, labeled with 99mTc, 125I, or 212Pb for in vivo imaging, biodistribution, or tumor growth inhibition studies. 212Pb-225.28 bound to adherent SUM159 and 2LMP cells and to CICs from SUM159 and 2LMP mammospheres with a mean affinity of 0.5 nM. Nearly ten times more binding sites per cell were present on SUM159 cells and CICs compared with 2LMP cells. 212Pb-225.28 was six to seven times more effective than 212Pb-F3-C25 at inhibiting SUM159 cell and CIC clonogenic survival (p < 0.05. Radiolabeled mAb 225.28 showed significantly higher uptake than radiolabeled mAb F3-C25 in SUM159 and 2LMP xenografts (p < 0.05, and the uptake of 212Pb-225.28 in TNBC xenografts was correlated with target epitope expression. 212Pb-225.28 caused dose

  5. Evaluation of knee-joint cartilage and menisci ten years after isolated and combined ruptures of the medial collateral ligament. Investigation by weight-bearing radiography, MR imaging and analysis of proteoglycan fragments in the joint fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, M. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine (Sweden); Thuomas, K.Aa. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Messner, K. [Univ. Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine (Sweden)

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare radiography, MR imaging, and chemical analysis in posttraumatic knees. Material and Methods: Ten matched pairs with either isolated partial rupture of the medial collateral ligament or combined medial collateral ligament/anterior cruciate ligament rupture were compared with matched controls 10 years after trauma. Weight-bearing radiographys and MR examinations were compared with proteoglycan fragment concentrations in the joint fluid. Results: The chemical analyses were similar in both trauma groups. The radiographs showed mild signs of arthrosis in half the patients with combined injury. MR images showed almost all injuried knees to have degenerative changes of various degrees in the cartilage and menisci. More frequent and more advanced changes were found after combined injury than after isolated injury (p<0.01). There were no changes in the controls. Conclusion: MR imaging is the best method for detecting and differentiating early posttraumatic knee arthrosis. (orig.).

  6. Evaluation of knee-joint cartilage and menisci ten years after isolated and combined ruptures of the medial collateral ligament. Investigation by weight-bearing radiography, MR imaging and analysis of proteoglycan fragments in the joint fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, M.; Thuomas, K.Aa.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To compare radiography, MR imaging, and chemical analysis in posttraumatic knees. Material and Methods: Ten matched pairs with either isolated partial rupture of the medial collateral ligament or combined medial collateral ligament/anterior cruciate ligament rupture were compared with matched controls 10 years after trauma. Weight-bearing radiographys and MR examinations were compared with proteoglycan fragment concentrations in the joint fluid. Results: The chemical analyses were similar in both trauma groups. The radiographs showed mild signs of arthrosis in half the patients with combined injury. MR images showed almost all injuried knees to have degenerative changes of various degrees in the cartilage and menisci. More frequent and more advanced changes were found after combined injury than after isolated injury (p<0.01). There were no changes in the controls. Conclusion: MR imaging is the best method for detecting and differentiating early posttraumatic knee arthrosis. (orig.)

  7. Social Contributions in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Gyorgy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Social contributions have an important impact on payroll policy. Also, social contributions represent a significant budgetary revenue item which can be viewed at the edge between taxation and insurance. Social contributions in Romania experienced many changes which ended in 2008. Nowadays, they are within a long transaction period towards partial externalization of the insurance activity to privately managed funds. The aim of this paper is to analyse the homogeneity of Romanian social security public scheme using annual data extracted from 2002-2009.The main findings reveal that social contributions reached the pinnacle of diversification, being too many, some of them with a small contribution rates; fiscal reforms which reduced contribution rates advantaged employers, and state will be interested to externalize this activity as far private sector will be able to assume this responsibility and the budgetary effects are acceptable for the public finance.

  8. Major contributions to science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Andre

    1991-03-15

    It may look difficult to describe the scientific contributions of Léon Van Hove, who started his career as a pure mathematician, and then a mathematical physicist, and ended it as a phenomenologist and an adseveral of Léon's students, in particular N. Hugenholtz. In this domain, his contributions were numerous and fundamental.

  9. Major contributions to science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Andre

    1991-01-01

    It may look difficult to describe the scientific contributions of Léon Van Hove, who started his career as a pure mathematician, and then a mathematical physicist, and ended it as a phenomenologist and an adseveral of Léon's students, in particular N. Hugenholtz. In this domain, his contributions were numerous and fundamental

  10. Summaries of poster contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The 10. meeting covered subjects on the application of electron microscopy in numerous fields such as biology and medicine, solid state physics, semiconductor research and production, crystallography, materials science, and chemistry of polymers. 174 summaries of poster contributions are included

  11. [The Role of Membrane-Bound Heat Shock Proteins Hsp90 in Migration of Tumor Cells in vitro and Involvement of Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Protein Binding to Plasma Membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigireva, A V; Vrublevskaya, V V; Skarga, Y Y; Morenkov, O S

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein Hsp90, detected in the extracellular space and on the membrane of cells, plays an important role in cell motility, migration, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. At present, the functional role and molecular mechanisms of Hsp90 binding to plasma membrane are not elucidated. Using isoform-specific antibodies against Hsp90, Hsp9α and Hsp90β, we showed that membrane-bound Hsp90α and Hsp90β play a significant role in migration of human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) and glioblastoma (A-172) cells in vitro. Disorders of sulfonation of cell heparan sulfates, cleavage of cell heparan. sulfates by heparinase I/III as well as treatment of cells with heparin lead to an abrupt reduction in the expression level of Hsp90 isoforms. Furthermore, heparin significantly inhibits tumor cell migration. The results obtained demonstrate that two isoforms of membrane-bound Hsp90 are involved in migration of tumor cells in vitro and that cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans play a pivotal role in the "anchoring" of Hsp90α and Hsp90β to the plasma membrane.

  12. Panel acoustic contribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sean F; Natarajan, Logesh Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Formulations are derived to analyze the relative panel acoustic contributions of a vibrating structure. The essence of this analysis is to correlate the acoustic power flow from each panel to the radiated acoustic pressure at any field point. The acoustic power is obtained by integrating the normal component of the surface acoustic intensity, which is the product of the surface acoustic pressure and normal surface velocity reconstructed by using the Helmholtz equation least squares based nearfield acoustical holography, over each panel. The significance of this methodology is that it enables one to analyze and rank relative acoustic contributions of individual panels of a complex vibrating structure to acoustic radiation anywhere in the field based on a single set of the acoustic pressures measured in the near field. Moreover, this approach is valid for both interior and exterior regions. Examples of using this method to analyze and rank the relative acoustic contributions of a scaled vehicle cabin are demonstrated.

  13. A cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, immunologically related to CD44, is involved in type I collagen-mediated melanoma cell motility and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faassen, A E; Schrager, J A; Klein, D J

    1992-01-01

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells occurs through a complex series of events, one of which involves the adhesion of tumor cells to extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Multiple interactions between cell surface receptors of an adherent tumor cell and the surrounding ECM contribute to cell...... collagen could also be inhibited by removing cell surface chondroitin sulfate with chondroitinase. In contrast, type I collagen-mediated melanoma cell adhesion and spreading were not affected by either beta-D-xyloside or chondroitinase treatments. These results suggest that mouse melanoma CSPG...... was shown to be mediated, at least in part, by chondroitin sulfate. Additionally we have determined that mouse melanoma CSPG is composed of a 110-kD core protein that is recognized by anti-CD44 antibodies on Western blots. Collectively, our data suggests that interactions between a cell surface CD44-related...

  14. Fisher's Contributions to Statistics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 9. Fisher's Contributions to Statistics. T Krishnan. General Article Volume 2 Issue 9 September 1997 pp 32-37. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/09/0032-0037. Author Affiliations.

  15. Newton's Contributions to Optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 12. Newton's Contributions to Optics. Arvind Kumar. General Article Volume 11 Issue 12 December 2006 pp 10-20. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/12/0010-0020. Keywords.

  16. The contribution of epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, P. van den; Voorrips, L.; Hertz-Picciotto, I.; Shuker, D.; Boeing, H.; Speijers, G.; Guittard, C.; Kleiner, J.; Knowles, M.; Wolk, A.; Goldbohm, A.

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies directly contribute data on risk (or benefit) in humans as the investigated species, and in the full food intake range normally encountered by humans. This paper starts with introducing the epidemiologic approach, followed by a discussion of perceived differences between

  17. Abstracts of contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  18. Contributions to statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Mahalanobis, P C

    1965-01-01

    Contributions to Statistics focuses on the processes, methodologies, and approaches involved in statistics. The book is presented to Professor P. C. Mahalanobis on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The selection first offers information on the recovery of ancillary information and combinatorial properties of partially balanced designs and association schemes. Discussions focus on combinatorial applications of the algebra of association matrices, sample size analogy, association matrices and the algebra of association schemes, and conceptual statistical experiments. The book then examines latt

  19. Contributions to sampling statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Pier; Ranalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a selection of the papers presented at the ITACOSM 2013 Conference, held in Milan in June 2013. ITACOSM is the bi-annual meeting of the Survey Sampling Group S2G of the Italian Statistical Society, intended as an international  forum of scientific discussion on the developments of theory and application of survey sampling methodologies and applications in human and natural sciences. The book gathers research papers carefully selected from both invited and contributed sessions of the conference. The whole book appears to be a relevant contribution to various key aspects of sampling methodology and techniques; it deals with some hot topics in sampling theory, such as calibration, quantile-regression and multiple frame surveys, and with innovative methodologies in important topics of both sampling theory and applications. Contributions cut across current sampling methodologies such as interval estimation for complex samples, randomized responses, bootstrap, weighting, modeling, imputati...

  20. ScFv anti-heparan sulfate antibodies unexpectedly activate endothelial and cancer cells through p38 MAPK: implications for antibody-based targeting of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena C Christianson

    Full Text Available Tumor development requires angiogenesis and anti-angiogenic therapies have been introduced in the treatment of cancer. In this context, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs emerge as interesting targets, owing to their function as co-receptors of major, pro-angiogenic factors. Accordingly, previous studies have suggested anti-tumor effects of heparin, i.e. over-sulfated HS, and various heparin mimetics; however, a significant drawback is their unspecific mechanism of action and potentially serious side-effects related to their anticoagulant properties. Here, we have explored the use of human ScFv anti-HS antibodies (αHS as a more rational approach to target HSPG function in endothelial cells (ECs. αHS were initially selected for their recognition of HS epitopes localized preferentially to the vasculature of patient glioblastoma tumors, i.e. highly angiogenic brain tumors. Unexpectedly, we found that these αHS exhibited potent pro-angiogenic effects in primary human ECs. αHS were shown to stimulate EC differentiation, which was associated with increased EC tube formation and proliferation. Moreover, αHS supported EC survival under hypoxia and starvation, i.e. conditions typical of the tumor microenvironment. Importantly, αHS-mediated proliferation was efficiently counter-acted by heparin and was absent in HSPG-deficient mutant cells, confirming HS-specific effects. On a mechanistic level, binding of αHS to HSPGs of ECs as well as glioblastoma cells was found to trigger p38 MAPK-dependent signaling resulting in increased proliferation. We conclude that several αHS that recognize HS epitopes abundant in the tumor vasculature may elicit a pro-angiogenic response, which has implications for the development of antibody-based targeting of HSPGs in cancer.

  1. Ethanolic extracts of babandotan leaves (Ageratum conyzoides L.) prevents inflammation and proteoglycan degradation by inhibiting TNF-α andMMP-9 on osteoarthritis rats induced by monosodium iodoacetate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anton Bahtiar; Mutiara Nurazizah; Tirza Roselina; Anita Paulina Tambunan; Ade Arsianti

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the effects of Ageratum conyzoides L. on the monosodium iodoacetate induced osteoarthritis rats. Methods: Thin layer chromatography was performed to analyze the constituents of the babandotan extract leaves. White male Sprague-Dawley rats used in this study were divided into 6 groups: normal control and negative control groups, both given 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose; the positive control group that was given glucosamine and chondroitin suspension (486 mg/200 g B.W.); the 3 dose variation extract groups including dose 1, 2, and 3 that were given 40, 80, and 160 mg/200 g B.W. respectively on day 29 until 50. All the groups were induced with 0.05 mL monosodium iodoacetate (20 mg/mL) on day 1, except normal control induced by saline. Measurement of edema volume of rat knees was performed on day 0, 8, 15, 22, 29, 43, and 50. Hematology data was measured at day 1, 29 and 50. Serum was collected at day 50 to evaluate TNF-α and MMP-9 by ELISA. Cartilagehistopathology was evaluated by staining with H&E and Safranin-o-fast green staining on day 50. Results: The babandotan leaves extract dose 2 (80 mg/200 g B.W.) and dose 3 (160 mg/200 g B.W.) could decrease the edema volume, increase the area and thickness of articular cartilage, and increase proteoglycan level. Particularly, dose 3 (160 mg/200 g B.W.) of extract babandotan leaves were able to significantly decrease the number of leukocytes, lymphocytes and udem volume, and decrease TNF alpha and MMP-9 levels. Conclusions: Babandotan leaves extract can recover inflammation and cartilages degradation by inhibiting TNF-α ininflammation processes and MMP-9 in the collagenase reaction in the cartilages.

  2. Curcumin reduces prostaglandin E2, matrix metalloproteinase-3 and proteoglycan release in the secretome of interleukin 1β-treated articular cartilage [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1cl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Clutterbuck

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Curcumin (diferuloylmethane is a phytochemical with potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, and has therapeutic potential for the treatment of a range of inflammatory diseases, including osteoarthritis (OA. The aim of this study was to determine whether non-toxic concentrations of curcumin can reduce interleukin-1beta (IL-1β-stimulated inflammation and catabolism in an explant model of cartilage inflammation. Methods: Articular cartilage explants and primary chondrocytes were obtained from equine metacarpophalangeal joints. Curcumin was added to monolayer cultured primary chondrocytes and cartilage explants in concentrations ranging from 3μM-100μM. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3 release into the secretome of IL-1β-stimulated explants was measured using a competitive ELISA and western blotting respectively. Proteoglycan (PG release in the secretome was measured using the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB assay. Cytotoxicity was assessed with a live/dead assay in monolayer cultures after 24 hours, 48 hours and five days, and in explants after five days. Results: Curcumin induced chondrocyte death in primary cultures (50μM p<0.001 and 100μM p<0.001 after 24 hours. After 48 hours and five days, curcumin (≥25μM significantly increased cell death (p<0.001 both time points. In explants, curcumin toxicity was not observed at concentrations up to and including 25μM after five days. Curcumin (≥3μM significantly reduced IL-1β-stimulated PG (p<0.05 and PGE2 release (p<0.001 from explants, whilst curcumin (≥12μM significantly reduced MMP-3 release (p<0.01. Conclusion: Non-cytotoxic concentrations of curcumin exert anti-catabolic and anti-inflammatory effects in cartilage explants.

  3. Jesuits' Contribution to Meteorology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udías, Agustín

    1996-10-01

    Starting in the middle of the nineteenth century, as part of their scientific tradition, Jesuits founded a considerable number of meteorological observatories throughout the world. In many countries, Jesuits established and maintained the first meteorological stations during the period from 1860 to 1950. The Jesuits' most important contribution to atmospheric science was their pioneer work related to the study and forecast of tropical hurricanes. That research was carried out at observatories of Belén (Cuba), Manila (Philippines), and Zikawei (China). B. Viñes, M. Decheyrens, J. Aigué, and C.E. Deppermann stood out in this movement.

  4. Examining suicide: imaging's contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    For many people, the death of hope leads inexorably to the conclusion that the only viable solution, the only way to put an end to unendurable pain, is suicide. What leads a person to commit this final, desperate act, and how might we predict, intervene, and prevent suicide? Health care workers, including radiologic technologists, can play an important role in detecting warning signs in patients and in better understanding what factors may lead to suicide. Although certain forms of suicide such as suicide bombings and assisted suicide are beyond its scope, this article explores medical imaging's contributions to the study of this phenomenon.

  5. Defined contribution health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronstin, P

    2001-03-01

    This Issue Brief discusses the emerging issue of "defined contribution" (DC) health benefits. The term "defined contribution" is used to describe a wide variety of approaches to the provision of health benefits, all of which have in common a shift in the responsibility for payment and selection of health care services from employers to employees. DC health benefits often are mentioned in the context of enabling employers to control their outlay for health benefits by avoiding increases in health care costs. DC health benefits may also shift responsibility for choosing a health plan and the associated risks of choosing a plan from employers to employees. There are three primary reasons why some employers currently are considering some sort of DC approach. First, they are once again looking for ways to keep their health care cost increases in line with overall inflation. Second, some employers are concerned that the public "backlash" against managed care will result in new legislation, regulations, and litigation that will further increase their health care costs if they do not distance themselves from health care decisions. Third, employers have modified not only most employee benefit plans, but labor market practices in general, by giving workers more choice, control, and flexibility. DC-type health benefits have existed as cafeteria plans since the 1980s. A cafeteria plan gives each employee the opportunity to determine the allocation of his or her total compensation (within employer-defined limits) among various employee benefits (primarily retirement or health). Most types of DC health benefits currently being discussed could be provided within the existing employment-based health insurance system, with or without the use of cafeteria plans. They could also allow employees to purchase health insurance directly from insurers, or they could drive new technologies and new forms of risk pooling through which health care services are provided and financed. DC health

  6. Contributing to Functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törpel, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is the design of computer supported joint action spaces. It is argued against a view of functionality as residing in computer applications. In such a view the creation of functionality is equivalent to the creation of computer applications. Functionality, in the view...... advocated in this paper, emerges in the specific dynamic interplay of actors, objectives, structures, practices and means. In this view, functionality is the result of creating, harnessing and inhabiting computer supported joint action spaces. The successful creation and further development of a computer...... supported joint action space comprises a whole range of appropriate design contributions. The approach is illustrated by the example of the creation of the computer supported joint action space "exchange network of voluntary union educators". As part of the effort a group of participants created...

  7. Contributing from the margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    empirical study, I focused on kindergarten children’s first-person perspectives on the electronic media technologies they deemed subjectively relevant for conducting everyday life in the practice of their kindergarten. The concept of the children’s perspectives opens possibilities for transcending...... of the practice researcher when engaging with her/his potential co-researchers and the investigated, socio-materially mediated practice. The paper will argue that making sense of first-person perspectives – here on conducting a life with media technologies – presupposes that the researcher conceptualizes him....../herself as a contributor to an investigated practice, as inextricably entangled with the conducts of life of the others in relation to the conditions in practice. Doing research in the kindergarten thus becomes a mutual and collective endeavor, to which pedagogues, parents, children, and the researcher contribute. Even...

  8. Contribution to postnonclassical psychopathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintino-Aires J.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Any psychological paradigm needs a psychopathological system that helps professionals to describe and explain the behavioral expressions that deviate from “normal” (whether this term is used with the semantic property of statistical or ideal adaptations. In this work, I seek to present the system that I have been developing since 1998 among the psychologists at the Instituto Vegotsky de Lisboa (Vygotsky Institute of Lisbon, Portugal, to understand psychopathology with regard to the vygotskian approach. It was conceived and designed according to the work of Rita Mendes Leal and her contribution to socioemotional development theory, AR Luria’s systemic and dynamic theory of the human brain, the theory of Activity (dyatel’nost of AN Leont’ev, and the psychopathological German school of E Kraepelin, presented and disseminated in Portugal in the early twentieth century by Professor Sobral Cid. It is intended to be a proposal to colleagues who are interested in postnonclassical psychology and a request for arguments.

  9. Ergonomics Contribution in Maintainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymourian, Kiumars; Seneviratne, Dammika; Galar, Diego

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe an ergonomics contribution in maintainability. The economical designs, inputs and training helps to increase the maintainability indicators for industrial devices. This analysis can be helpful, among other cases, to compare systems, to achieve a better design regarding maintainability requirements, to improve this maintainability under specific industrial environment and to foresee maintainability problems due to eventual changes in a device operation conditions. With this purpose, this work first introduces the notion of ergonomics and human factors, maintainability and the implementation of assessment of human postures, including some important postures to perform maintenance activities. A simulation approach is used to identify the critical posture of the maintenance personnel and implements the defined postures with minimal loads on the personnel who use the equipment in a practical scenario. The simulation inputs are given to the designers to improve the workplace/equipment in order to high level of maintainability. Finally, the work concludes summarizing the more significant aspects and suggesting future research.

  10. CONTRIBUTION OF INDIRECT TAXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHIRCULESCU MARIA FELICIA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The work is based on the fact that at any time and in any society, taxation is regarded as undesirable for all taxpayers. The existence and it's manifestation is justified, because the operation of any company involves costs that must be covered by sufficient resources. Since ancient times, each state has adopted its own tax system, more or less perfected, as the state has experienced a greater or lesser economic and military power At the base of this work stays the fact that tax systems are a key factor influencing the overall efficiency of the economy. They determine the size tendency to save, invest and work, influencing the increase in production and employment, which is essential sights integral economic strategy, making tax reform an important component of economic reform. This paper aims to analyze the indirect taxes and their contribution to the public revenues in Romania, the purpose paper contains an analysis based on statistical series as indirect taxation is where tax harmonization was possible. Through analyzes, the paper aims to provide answers to the problem of the contradiction between the growing need for budgetary revenues, which entails a continuous amplification and diversification of taxation, on the one hand, and the need to stimulate economic development, on the other hand. The harmonization of indirect taxation had been achieved since this touches the free movement of goods and the freedom to supply services, not being able to say the same thing about direct taxation, which is why the European Community Treaty does not specify expressly the alignment of direct taxation, considering that direct taxation is a matter of Internal Policies that, for a country free option.

  11. Chlorate: a reversible inhibitor of proteoglycan sulfation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, D.E.; Silbert, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Bovine aorta endothelial cells were cultured in medium containing [ 3 H]glucosamine, [ 35 S]sulfate, and various concentrations of chlorate. Cell growth was not affected by 10 mM chlorate, while 30 mM chlorate had a slight inhibitory effect. Chlorate concentrations greater than 10 mM resulted in significant undersulfation of chondroitin. With 30 mM chlorate, sulfation of chondroitin was reduced to 10% and heparan to 35% of controls, but [ 3 H]glucosamine incorporation on a per cell basis did not appear to be inhibited. Removal of chlorate from the culture medium of cells resulted in the rapid resumption of sulfation

  12. Pericytes and endothelial precursor cells: cellular interactions and contributions to malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Rebecca G; Weber, William; Rouleau, Cecile; Teicher, Beverly A

    2005-11-01

    Tumor vasculature is irregular, abnormal, and essential for tumor growth. Pericytes and endothelial precursor cells (EPC) contribute to the formation of blood vessels under angiogenic conditions. As primary cells in culture, pericytes and EPC share many properties such as tube/network formation and response to kinase inhibitors selective for angiogenic pathways. Expression of cell surface proteins including platelet-derived growth factor receptor, vascular cell adhesion molecule, intercellular adhesion molecule, CD105, desmin, and neural growth proteoglycan 2 was similar between pericytes and EPC, whereas expression of P1H12 and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 clearly differentiates the cell types. Further distinction was observed in the molecular profiles for expression of angiogenic genes. Pericytes or EPC enhanced the invasion of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in a coculture assay system. The s.c. coinjection of live pericytes or EPC along with MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in an increased rate of tumor growth compared with coinjection of irradiated pericytes or EPC. Microvessel density analysis indicated there was no difference in MDA-MB-231 tumors with or without EPC or pericytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of vasculature suggested that EPC and pericytes may stabilize or normalize vasculature rather than initiate vasculogenesis. In addition, tumors arising from the coinjection of EPC and cancer cells were more likely to develop lymphatic vessels. These results support the notion that pericytes and EPC contribute to malignancy and that these cell types can be useful as cell-based models for tumor vascular development and selection of agents that may provide therapeutic benefit.

  13. Introducing and modeling inefficiency contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Mette; Kronborg, Dorte; Matthews, Kent

    2016-01-01

    -called inefficiency contributions, which are defined as the relative contributions from specific variables to the overall levels of inefficiencies. A statistical model for distinguishing the inefficiency contributions between subgroups is proposed and the method is illustrated on a data set on Chinese banks....

  14. 75 FR 34388 - Employee Contribution Elections and Contribution Allocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... contributions equal to 3 percent of the employee's basic pay will be deducted from his or her pay and... employees who are rehired after a separation in service of 31 or more calendar days and who are eligible to participate in the TSP will automatically have 3 percent of their basic pay contributed to the TSP, unless...

  15. COP 21: the national contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouette, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This article comments the content of the national contributions (the so-called Intended Nationally Determined Contributions or INDC) which every country should have transmitted to the UN before the COP 21. In fact, 148 contributions, i.e. 75 per cent of the expected ones, have been transmitted. The author recalls that the content of these contributions had to obey some principles which had been defined in Lima in 2014, and that each country must identify its objectives in terms of mitigation (reduction of greenhouse gas emissions) and adaptation (reduction of the vulnerability of natural and human systems). The author comments some specific commitments regarding climate, emission reduction, adaptation to climate change, and more particularly evokes the Ethiopian contribution which is considered as exemplary

  16. ECN contributions to GLOBAL `95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report contains the 9 contributions of the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN to the international conference on evaluation of emerging nuclear fuel cycle systems, GLOBAL `95, held in Versailles, France, on September 11-14, 1995. (orig./GL).

  17. Uncapacitated facility location problems: contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvão Roberto Diéguez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to review my personal contributions in the field of uncapacitated facility location problems. These contributions took place throughout my academic career, from the time I was a Ph.D. student at Imperial College to the present day. They cover approximately 30 years, from 1973 to 2003; they address: algorithms developed for the p-median problem and for a general formulation of uncapacitated location problems; the study of dynamic location models; covering and hierarchical location problems; queuing-based probabilistic location models. The contributions encompass theoretical developments, computational algorithms and practical applications. All work took place in an academic environment, with the invaluable collaboration of colleagues (both in Brazil and abroad and research students at COPPE. Each section in the paper is dedicated to a topic that involves a personal contribution. Every one of them is placed within the context of the existing literature.

  18. ECN contributions to GLOBAL '95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This report contains the 9 contributions of the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN to the international conference on evaluation of emerging nuclear fuel cycle systems, GLOBAL '95, held in Versailles, France, on September 11-14, 1995. (orig./GL)

  19. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland El Ghazal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1 in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4–deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  20. Financial Network Systemic Risk Contributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hautsch, N.; Schaumburg, J.; Schienle, M.

    2015-01-01

    We propose the realized systemic risk beta as a measure of financial companies' contribution to systemic risk, given network interdependence between firms' tail risk exposures. Conditional on statistically pre-identified network spillover effects and market and balance sheet information, we define

  1. Processed foods: contributions to nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Connie M; Dwyer, Johanna; Fulgoni, Victor L; King, Janet C; Leveille, Gilbert A; MacDonald, Ruth S; Ordovas, Jose; Schnakenberg, David

    2014-06-01

    Both fresh and processed foods make up vital parts of the food supply. Processed food contributes to both food security (ensuring that sufficient food is available) and nutrition security (ensuring that food quality meets human nutrient needs). This ASN scientific statement focuses on one aspect of processed foods: their nutritional impacts. Specifically, this scientific statement 1) provides an introduction to how processed foods contribute to the health of populations, 2) analyzes the contribution of processed foods to "nutrients to encourage" and "constituents to limit" in the American diet as recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 3) identifies the responsibilities of various stakeholders in improving the American diet, and 4) reviews emerging technologies and the research needed for a better understanding of the role of processed foods in a healthy diet. Analyses of the NHANES 2003-2008 show that processed foods provide both nutrients to encourage and constituents to limit as specified in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Of the nutrients to encourage, processed foods contributed 55% of dietary fiber, 48% of calcium, 43% of potassium, 34% of vitamin D, 64% of iron, 65% of folate, and 46% of vitamin B-12. Of the constituents to limit, processed foods contributed 57% of energy, 52% of saturated fat, 75% of added sugars, and 57% of sodium. Diets are more likely to meet food guidance recommendations if nutrient-dense foods, either processed or not, are selected. Nutrition and food science professionals, the food industry, and other stakeholders can help to improve the diets of Americans by providing a nutritious food supply that is safe, enjoyable, affordable, and sustainable by communicating effectively and accurately with each other and by working together to improve the overall knowledge of consumers. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. A contribution Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboughantous, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    A Contribution Monte Carlo method is developed and successfully applied to a sample deep-penetration shielding problem. The random walk is simulated in most of its parts as in conventional Monte Carlo methods. The probability density functions (pdf's) are expressed in terms of spherical harmonics and are continuous functions in direction cosine and azimuthal angle variables as well as in position coordinates; the energy is discretized in the multigroup approximation. The transport pdf is an unusual exponential kernel strongly dependent on the incident and emergent directions and energies and on the position of the collision site. The method produces the same results obtained with the deterministic method with a very small standard deviation, with as little as 1,000 Contribution particles in both analog and nonabsorption biasing modes and with only a few minutes CPU time

  3. QCD contributions to vacuum polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinders, L.J.; Rubinstein, H.R.; Yazaki, S.

    1980-01-01

    We have computed to lowest non-trivial order the perturbative and non-perturbative contributions to the vacuum polarization from all currents up to and including spin 2 ++ . These expressions are important, for example to evaluate QCD sum rules for heavy and light quark systems as shown by Shifman, Vainshtein and Zakharov. Most of the known ones are verified, one slightly changed, and many new ones are displayed. (orig.)

  4. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  5. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male

  6. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  7. Factors contributing to adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kloub, Manal I; Froelicher, Erika S

    2009-06-01

    Obesity in children is a significant public health concern. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in Jordanian children, and adolescents has increased in the last decade. The consequences of obesity to health in childhood and adulthood have both medical, and economic cost to individuals and society. This paper reviews the factors that contribute to adolescent obesity and emphasizes behavioral and environmental factors. An individual's behaviors such as increased consumption of high caloric foods, increased sedentary activity while decreasing physical activity has been identified as key issues in the development of obesity. Additionally, the current environment in homes, schools, and neighborhoods tend to discourage a healthy lifestyle. A comprehensive approach that involves the whole community is the best strategy for preventing adolescent obesity. Nurses are in a unique position to provide leadership in developing programs for healthier lifestyle choices for adolescents' and adoption of these goals into their daily lives.

  8. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    CERN Document Server

    Davier, M; Malaescu, B; Zhang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle–antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e− annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingre...

  9. Essential contribution of tumor-derived perlecan to epidermal tumor growth and angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Multhaupt, Hinke; Chan, En

    2004-01-01

    As a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (PG) in basement membranes, perlecan has been linked to tumor invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Here we produced epidermal tumors in immunocompromised rats by injection of mouse RT101 tumor cells. Tumor sections stained with species-specific perlecan...... factor. In vivo, antisense perlecan-transfected cells generated no tumors, whereas untransfected and vector-transfected cells formed tumors with obvious neovascularization, suggesting that tumor perlecan rather than host perlecan controls tumor growth and angiogenesis....

  10. Uruguay geology contributions no. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preciozzi, F.

    1989-01-01

    This Group is characterized by a volcano-sedimentary sequence of low grade into which are found the main Pb, Zn, Cu, Mo occurrences and vast limestones deposits and a laterally associated sequence of medium metamorphism. From a structural point of view it is characterized by a poly phasic evolution. At low metamorphic sequence is distinguished a volcanic-sedimentary series (s.s.) and a sedimentogenous series. The synchronism between both series is showed by transition by lateral facies changes. There is a pelitic carbonate zone associated to a basic calc o-alkaline and tholeitic volcanism and the another zone represented by a carbonaceous platform subjected lo de tri tic contribution of varied nature. The Iithologic succession permits establishing at the volcano-sedimentary sequence, five levels from base to top: -a phyllitic and meta pelitic level (500 meters thick), with basic volcanic rocks intercalated, -a level of limestones which evolves to the top by detritic contributions to a flisch alternation (300 m. thick) with basic volcanic rocks intercalated, -a level of rit mic alternation of rnetapelites, melasandstones, limes tones and phyllites (200 m. thick), -a basic volcanic unit, with intercalation of acid vulcanite s, at the lop are intercalated volcanoclastic rocks as tuffs and breccia s, 1000 meters thick, -a n el sedimentary unit integrated by limestones and phyllites wich evolve to the top of the series lo levels of dolomites. coarse-grained phyllites and jasper, 300 m. thick. Laterally this level passes lo a set integrated by quartzites, metaarcoses, limestones, acid tuffs and rarely rhyolites. The sedimentogenous series has the following base to top sequence: -150 m. of quartzites and meta sandstones wich lay unconformbly over a qranitic-gneissic set, -100 m. 01 phyllites, coarse-grained phyllites and metaarcoses, -ritmic alternance of calcareous, phyllites, coarse-grained phyllites, 800 m. thick (flisch). The megastructures were formed al the second

  11. What nuclear power can contribute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, D.

    1997-01-01

    The big tasks of mankind are: Development, protection of the environment, peace, and saving of resources on behalf of coming generations. Poverty exerts the greatest stress upon nature, development and protection of the environment are therefore not contradictory. Mankind has enough energy and mineral resources (sources), enough technology to limit detrimental effluents (taking care of sinks), and enough capital to bring about well-being for all mankind. Well-being decelerates population growth; in this way a stable coexistence of man and nature can be achieved. To this goal, nuclear energy can contribute significantly. Even at a considerably higher level of exploitation, it would last for several 100 000 years. Nuclear energy can supply every kind of energy required and, jointly with higher efficiency, it can do so at low cost; as to that, nuclear energy is superior to renewable energies in most cases. Also, nuclear energy can be deployed quickly enough. At the present safety level (including fuel cycle) the risks of deploying nuclear energy are smaller than the risks of non-deployment, by several orders of magnitude, both with respect to risk magnitude and probability. The material basis for a sustainable well-being of man and nature on this earth does exist. To-day's prime issue is to remove mental road blocks. (orig.) [de

  12. ECN contributions to ADTT `96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koning, A.J.

    1996-07-01

    An outline is presented of the status of nuclear data evaluation for accelerator-driven systems. The international effort consists mainly of measuring, compiling and calculating nuclear data for elements and isotopes relevant for transmutation of radioactive waste (ATW), energy amplification and other accelerator-related nuclear applications. We argue that input for global, macroscopic calculation schemes for hybrid nuclear systems basically should consist of three types of nuclear data: (a) High-energy transport codes for energies above about 150 MeV, (b) neutron and proton transport data files for energies below about 150 MeV and (c) neutron and proton transmutation/activation libraries below about 150 MeV. Our specific contribution to the field concerns (b) and (c). The progress of the evaluation of high-energy nuclear data files for the most important materials and the related compilation of nuclear reaction information is reported. The evaluated data are calculated with the computer codes ECIS95, MINGUS and GNASH and are stored in ENDF6-format. We illustrate the library production with a short outline of the employed physical methods. Finally, we briefly discuss the application of the activation/transmutation library ECNAF96. (orig.).

  13. Student Scientific Conference, 2009. Proceedings of reviewed contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The conference included the following sections: (i) Biology (145 contributions); (ii) Chemistry (42 contributions); (iii) Geology (42 contributions); (iv) Environment (40 contributions); (v) Geography (28 contributions); (vi) Didactics (13 contributions). Contributions relevant of INIS interest has been inputted to INIS.

  14. Student Scientific Conference, 2010. Proceedings of reviewed contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The conference included the following sections: (i) Biology (154 contributions); (ii) Chemistry (39 contributions); (iii) Geography; (41 contributions); (iv) Geology (22 contributions); (v) Environment (45 contributions); (vi) Didactics (6 contributions). Contributions relevant of INIS interest has been inputted to INIS.

  15. The GMOS contributions to GEOSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirrone N.

    2013-04-01

    oceans, and in the UTLS will support the validation of regional and global atmospheric mercury models for use in evaluating different policy options for reducing mercury pollution and its impacts on human health and ecosystems. The data sets, the validated models, and the interoperable system that is produced within this program, will support the policymaking process in the framework of UNEP Governing Council activities, and in the UNECE-LRTAP convention. The task builds upon contributions from, among others, the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS project, the UNEP Mercury Programme, the Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollutants Task Force (TF HTAP, the European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP, the MercNet/AMNet initiative in the USA, the CAMNet in Canada, and other international monitoring and modelling efforts.

  16. Quarkonium Contribution to Meson Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cincioglu, E.; Yilmazer, A.U. [Ankara University, Department of Physics Engineering, Ankara (Turkey); Nieves, J. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC) Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Ozpineci, A. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Physics, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-10-15

    Starting from a molecular picture for the X(3872) resonance, this state and its J{sup PC} = 2{sup ++} heavy-quark spin symmetry partner [X{sub 2}(4012)] are analyzed within a model which incorporates possible mixings with 2P charmonium (c anti c) states. Since it is reasonable to expect the bare χ{sub c1}(2P) to be located above the D anti D{sup *} threshold, but relatively close to it, the presence of the charmonium state provides an effective attraction that will contribute to binding the X(3872), but it will not appear in the 2{sup ++} sector. Indeed in the latter sector, the χ{sub c2}(2P) should provide an effective small repulsion, because it is placed well below the D{sup *} anti D{sup *} threshold. We show how the 1{sup ++} and 2{sup ++} bare charmonium poles are modified due to the D{sup (*)} anti D{sup (*)} loop effects, and the first one is moved to the complex plane. The meson loops produce, besides some shifts in the masses of the charmonia, a finite width for the 1{sup ++} dressed charmonium state. On the other hand, X(3872) and X{sub 2}(4012) start developing some charmonium content, which is estimated by means of the compositeness Weinberg sum rule. It turns out that in the heavy-quark limit, there is only one coupling between the 2P charmonia and the D{sup (*)} anti D{sup (*)} pairs. We also show that, for reasonable values of this coupling, leading to X(3872) molecular probabilities of around 70-90 %, the X{sub 2} resonance destabilizes and disappears from the spectrum, becoming either a virtual state or one being located deep into the complex plane, with decreasing influence in the D{sup *} anti D{sup *} scattering line. Moreover, we also discuss how around 10-30 % charmonium probability in the X(3872) might explain the ratio of radiative decays of this resonance into ψ(2S)γ and J/ψγ. Finally, we qualitatively discuss within this scheme, the hidden bottom flavor sector, paying a special attention to the implications for the X{sub b} and X

  17. 7 CFR 966.45 - Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... contributions but these shall only be used for production research, market research and development and marketing and promotion including paid advertising pursuant to § 966.48. Furthermore, such contributions..., 1986] Research and Development ...

  18. Scalar contribution to the BFKL kernel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, R. E.; Fadin, V. S.

    2010-01-01

    The contribution of scalar particles to the kernel of the Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) equation is calculated. A great cancellation between the virtual and real parts of this contribution, analogous to the cancellation in the quark contribution in QCD, is observed. The reason of this cancellation is discovered. This reason has a common nature for particles with any spin. Understanding of this reason permits to obtain the total contribution without the complicated calculations, which are necessary for finding separate pieces.

  19. 45 CFR 1326.9 - Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... INDIAN TRIBES FOR SUPPORT AND NUTRITION SERVICES § 1326.9 Contributions. (a) Each tribal organization... contributions to expand comprehensive and coordinated services systems supported under this part, while using nutrition services contributions only to expand services as provided under section 307(a)(13)(c)(ii) of the...

  20. Contributing Chemistry and Compelling Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2013-04-01

    transplantation for haematological disorders and malignancies. With these two original research articles throwing a light upon the influence of various factors on stem cell proliferation, homing and engraftment, the article by Telpalo-Carpio et al has attempted to provide a general scenario of the state of the art in the Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells generation, giving a glimpse of the most important and promising emerging de-differentiation technologies of the various research groups all over the world who are extensively researching on this ‘most sought after cell type’. Though all ideas and innovations may not turn out to yield successful solutions and all researches may not end up in positive outcome, the article by Terunuma et al which provides an in-sight into the in vitro expansion of patients’ immune cells such as NK cells, and T cells using chemically synthesized culture media without any feeder layers, whose clinical outcome in tackling several tumours with long term follow-up is something really a tonic of encouragement to scientists. Contribution of chemical moieties having been studied and translated to clinical applications, the physical forces' real worth have not yet been explored to the fullest. Time has come to dig, hig or boson them! References: Engler AJ, Sen S, Sweeney HL, Discher DE. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification. Cell. 2006 Aug 25;126(4:677-89. Adams DS. A new tool for tissue engineers: ions as regulators of morphogenesis during development and regeneration. Tissue Eng Part A. 2008 Sep;14(9:1461-8.

  1. Rules regarding voluntary contributions to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    The texts of the following Rules Regarding Voluntary Contributions to the Agency are reproduced: 1. Rules to Govern the Acceptance of Gifts of Services, Equipment and Facilities (adopted by the Board of Governors on 13 June 1989); 2. Rules Regarding the Acceptance of Voluntary Contributions of Money to the Agency (approved by the General Conference on 29 September 1989)

  2. 5 CFR 891.401 - Government contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) RETIRED FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS Contributions and Withholdings § 891.401 Government... receive a Government contribution toward his or her cost of coverage for: (A) A private health insurance... and who has elected to enroll for self and family in the uniform plan. (b) For retired employees and...

  3. 6-quark contribution to nuclear magnetic moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic moments of nuclei with LS closed shell +/-1 particle are calculated. Core polarization and meson exchange current are treated realistically in order to single out the 6-quark contribution. Overall agreement with experimental values is quite good. It is shown that the 6-quark system contributes to the respective iso-vector and iso-scalar moments with reasonable magnitudes

  4. Australian contribution to the science of radioastronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, B.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Australia has made numerous major contributions to the science of radioastronomy and played a leading role in its early development. The history of the Australian effort is reviewed, from this early seminal work until the present day when contributions continue at an important level

  5. Contribution of Renewables to Energy Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The environmental benefits of renewable energy are well known. But the contribution that they can make to energy security is less widely recognised. This report aims to redress the balance, showing how in electricity generation, heat supply, and transport, renewables can enhance energy security and suggesting policies that can optimise this contribution.

  6. National contributions to observed global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, H Damon; Graham, Tanya L; Keverian, Serge; Lamontagne, Cassandra; Seto, Donny; Smith, Trevor J

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in identifying national contributions to global warming as a way of allocating historical responsibility for observed climate change. This task is made difficult by uncertainty associated with national estimates of historical emissions, as well as by difficulty in estimating the climate response to emissions of gases with widely varying atmospheric lifetimes. Here, we present a new estimate of national contributions to observed climate warming, including CO 2 emissions from fossil fuels and land-use change, as well as methane, nitrous oxide and sulfate aerosol emissions While some countries’ warming contributions are reasonably well defined by fossil fuel CO 2 emissions, many countries have dominant contributions from land-use CO 2 and non-CO 2 greenhouse gas emissions, emphasizing the importance of both deforestation and agriculture as components of a country’s contribution to climate warming. Furthermore, because of their short atmospheric lifetime, recent sulfate aerosol emissions have a large impact on a country’s current climate contribution We show also that there are vast disparities in both total and per-capita climate contributions among countries, and that across most developed countries, per-capita contributions are not currently consistent with attempts to restrict global temperature change to less than 2 °C above pre-industrial temperatures. (paper)

  7. HEALTH INSURANCE: FIXED CONTRIBUTION AND REIMBURSEMENT MAXIMA

    CERN Document Server

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    Affected by the salary adjustments on 1 January 2001 and the evolution of the staff members and fellows population, the average reference salary, which is used as an index for fixed contributions and reimbursement maxima, has changed significantly. An adjustment of the amounts of the reimbursement maxima and the fixed contributions is therefore necessary, as from 1 January 2001. Reimbursement maxima The revised reimbursement maxima will appear on the leaflet summarizing the benefits for the year 2001, which will be sent out with the forthcoming issue of the CHIS Bull'. This leaflet will also be available from the divisional secretariats and from the UNIQA office at CERN. Fixed contributions The fixed contributions, applicable to some categories of voluntarily insured persons, are set as follows (amounts in CHF for monthly contributions) : voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with normal health insurance cover : 910.- (was 815.- in 2000) voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with reduced heal...

  8. HEALTH INSURANCE: CONTRIBUTIONS AND REIMBURSEMENT MAXIMAL

    CERN Document Server

    HR Division

    2000-01-01

    Affected by both the salary adjustment index on 1.1.2000 and the evolution of the staff members and fellows population, the average reference salary, which is used as an index for fixed contributions and reimbursement maximal, has changed significantly. An adjustment of the amounts of the reimbursement maximal and the fixed contributions is therefore necessary, as from 1 January 2000.Reimbursement maximalThe revised reimbursement maximal will appear on the leaflet summarising the benefits for the year 2000, which will soon be available from the divisional secretariats and from the AUSTRIA office at CERN.Fixed contributionsThe fixed contributions, applicable to some categories of voluntarily insured persons, are set as follows (amounts in CHF for monthly contributions):voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with complete coverage:815,- (was 803,- in 1999)voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with reduced coverage:407,- (was 402,- in 1999)voluntarily insured no longer dependent child:326,- (was 321...

  9. The contribution of technology to added value

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, António S C

    2013-01-01

    There is a wide consensus that introduction of technology to the production process contributes to an overall economic value, however, confusion between technology, knowledge and capital often makes value calculations ambiguous and non-objective. The Contribution of Technology to Added Value addresses not only this issue of definition but also provides a production model to assess the value contribution of technology within the production process. A clarification  of fundamental semantics  provides a significant taxonomy for technology dependence, and allows understanding and modeling of how knowledge, technology and capital individually contribute to production and to value adding. A new technology dependence taxonomy is proposed and assessed following chapters explaining growth models, the KTC model and technology index values. Balancing theoretical knowledge with real-world data and applications The Contribution of Technology to Added Value clarifies the issue of value adding for a range of different vie...

  10. Formalized Search Strategies for Human Risk Contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Pedersen, O. M.

    For risk management, the results of a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) as well as the underlying assumptions can be used as references in a closed-loop risk control; and the analyses of operational experiences as a means of feedback. In this context, the need for explicit definition...... risk contributions are described on the basis of general plant design features relevant for risk and accident analysis. With this background, search strategies for human risk contributions are treated: Under the designation "work analysis", procedures for the analysis of familiar, well trained, planned...... tasks are proposed. Strategies for identifying human risk contributions outside this category are outlined....

  11. Michael Tomasello: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Scientific Contributions are presented to persons who, in the opinion of the Committee on Scientific Awards, have made distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to basic research in psychology. One of the 2015 award winners is Michael Tomasello, who received this award for "outstanding empirical and theoretical contributions to understanding what makes the human mind unique. Michael Tomasello's pioneering research on the origins of social cognition has led to revolutionary insights in both developmental psychology and primate cognition." Tomasello's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Is human placenta proteoglycan remodeling involved in pre-eclampsia?

    OpenAIRE

    Warda, Mohamad; Zhang, Fuming; Radwan, Moustafa; Zhang, Zhenqing; Kim, Nari; Kim, Young Nam; Linhardt, Robert J.; Han, Jin

    2007-01-01

    Impaired placento-fetal communication is a coherent symptom of exaggerated pre-eclampsia. The impact of the cellular expression of different glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in this event on the placenta in pre-eclampsia is still obscure. This is the first study aimed at discovering the relationship between structural alterations of different sulfated GAGs at the molecular level and the development of pre-eclampsia in inflicted placenta. Sulfated GAGs were isolated and purified from control and pre-...

  13. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans in the aging skeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, M F; Bi, Y; Ameye, L

    2006-01-01

    Small Leucine-Rich Proteoglyans (SLRPs) are major skeletal extracellular matrix (ECM) components that comprise a family of 13 members containing repeats of a leucine-rich motif. To examine SLRP function, we generated mice deficient in one or more member and analyzed them at the tissue, cell...

  14. Role of proteoglycans in renal chronic transplant dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katta, Kirankumar

    2012-01-01

    Proteoglycanen (PG’s) spelen een belangrijke rol bij de weefselveranderingen na niertransplantatie. Het zijn veelbelovende targets voor interventies om chronische dysfunctie van de getranspanteerde nier te vertragen. Dat blijkt uit het promotieonderzoek van Kiran Katta. Niertransplantatie is de

  15. Brain ageing changes proteoglycan sulfation, rendering perineuronal nets more inhibitory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foscarin, S.; Raha-Chowdhury, R.; Fawcett, James; Kwok, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2017), s. 1607-1622 ISSN 1945-4589 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EF15_003/0000419 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : aging * perineuronal net * plasticity * glycosaminoglycans Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 4.867, year: 2016

  16. Human meniscal proteoglycan metabolism in long-term tissue culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen, G.; Verdonk, R.; Veys, E. M.; van Daele, P.; de Smet, P.; van den Abbeele, K.; Claus, B.; Baeten, D.

    1996-01-01

    For the purpose of human meniscal allografting, menisci have been maintained viable in in vitro culture. The influence of long-term tissue culture on the extracellular matrix metabolism of the meniscus has been studied. Fetal calf serum (FCS) was used as a supplement for the growth factors necessary

  17. Basement membrane proteoglycans are of epithelial origin in rodent skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamane, Y; Yaoita, H; Couchman, J R

    1996-01-01

    . For in vivo experiments, pieces of newborn rat epidermis obtained by dispase treatment were grafted onto athymic nude mice. Three and six weeks after grafting, immunofluorescence analysis of the grafted skin was carried out, using monoclonal antibodies specific for rat basement membrane chondroitin sulfate...

  18. Processing DOD Thrift Savings Plan Contributions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    1996-01-01

    .... This part of our audit focused on the processing of individual contributions to the TSP at two DFAS payroll offices at the DFAS Columbus Center, Columbus, Ohio, and Bolling Air Force Base (AFB), Washington, D.C...

  19. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE FUNCTIONAL MORPHOLOGY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE FUNCTIONAL MORPHOLOGY OF FISHES ... The exact phylogeny of the chimaeroids is obscure due to difficulties encountered in ...... species was obtained from the University of Cape Town Ecological Records;.

  20. Quantifying arthropod contributions to wood decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Ulyshen; Terry Wagner

    2013-01-01

    Termites carry large amounts of soil into dead wood, and this behaviour complicates efforts to measure their contributions to wood decay. A novel method for isolating termite soil by burning the wood is described, and some preliminary results are presented.

  1. EU Contribution to Global CBRN Security

    OpenAIRE

    GOULART DE MEDEIROS MARGARIDA; ABOUSAHL SAID; MAIER EDDIE; SIMONART TRISTAN; DUPRE BRUNO

    2016-01-01

    The EU promotes a culture of CBRN safety and security within the EU and internationally. Accordingly, the Instrument Contributing to Stability and Peace (IcSP) contributes to international efforts to mitigate CBRN risks, whether of natural (e.g. pandemics, volcanic eruptions), accidental (Fukushima) or criminal (trafficking, terrorism) origin, following a consistent ‘all hazards’ approach. The aim is twofold: to prevent CBRN incidents and to build partner countries' capacities for emergency r...

  2. Jakob Nielsen and His Contributions to Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1999-01-01

    The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognition as one of the developers of combinatorial group theory and the topology of surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsen with emphasis on his contributions to topology.......The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognition as one of the developers of combinatorial group theory and the topology of surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsen with emphasis on his contributions to topology....

  3. Systemic risk contributions: a credit portfolio approach

    OpenAIRE

    Düllmann, Klaus; Puzanova, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    We put forward a Merton-type multi-factor portfolio model for assessing banks' contributions to systemic risk. This model accounts for the major drivers of banks' systemic relevance: size, default risk and correlation of banks' assets as a proxy for interconnectedness. We measure systemic risk in terms of the portfolio expected shortfall (ES). Banks' (marginal) risk contributions are calculated based on partial derivatives of the ES in order to ensure a full risk allocation among institutions...

  4. Rules regarding voluntary contributions to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The texts of the following Rules Regarding Voluntary Contributions to the Agency are reproduced for the information of all Members of the Agency. Rules to Govern the Acceptance of Gifts of Services, Equipment and Facilities - adopted by the Board of Governors on 10 March 2004; Rules Regarding the Acceptance of Voluntary Contributions of Money to the Agency - approved by the General Conference on 21 September 2001 (GC (45)/RES/9)

  5. How sonochemistry contributes to green chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatel, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Based on the analyses of papers from the literature, and especially those published in Ultrasonics Sonochemistry journal, the contribution of sonochemistry to green chemistry area has been discussed here. Important reminders and insights on the good practices and considerations have been made to understand and demonstrate how sonochemistry can continue to efficiently contribute to green chemistry area in the further studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rules regarding voluntary contributions to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The texts of the following Rules Regarding Voluntary Contributions to the Agency are reproduced for the information of all Members of the Agency. Rules to Govern the Acceptance of Gifts of Services, Equipment and Facilities - adopted by the Board of Governors on 13 June 2001; Rules Regarding the Acceptance of Voluntary Contributions of Money to the Agency - approved by the General Conference on 21 September 2001 (GC(45)/RES/9)

  7. Thomas Young's contributions to geometrical optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, David A; Charman, W Neil

    2011-07-01

    In addition to his work on physical optics, Thomas Young (1773-1829) made several contributions to geometrical optics, most of which received little recognition in his time or since. We describe and assess some of these contributions: Young's construction (the basis for much of his geometric work), paraxial refraction equations, oblique astigmatism and field curvature, and gradient-index optics. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2011 Optometrists Association Australia.

  8. Crystal Structure of the LasA Virulence Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Substrate Specificity and Mechanism of M23 Metallopeptidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, James; Murphy, Loretta M.; Conners, Rebecca; Sessions, Richard B.; Gamblin, Steven J. (Wales); (Bristol Med Sci); (NIMR)

    2010-09-21

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunist Gram-negative bacterial pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections in immunocompromized individuals and is a leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. A number of secreted virulence factors, including various proteolytic enzymes, contribute to the establishment and maintenance of Pseudomonas infection. One such is LasA, an M23 metallopeptidase related to autolytic glycylglycine endopeptidases such as Staphylococcus aureus lysostaphin and LytM, and to DD-endopeptidases involved in entry of bacteriophage to host bacteria. LasA is implicated in a range of processes related to Pseudomonas virulence, including stimulating ectodomain shedding of the cell surface heparan sulphate proteoglycan syndecan-1 and elastin degradation in connective tissue. Here we present crystal structures of active LasA as a complex with tartrate and in the uncomplexed form. While the overall fold resembles that of the other M23 family members, the LasA active site is less constricted and utilizes a different set of metal ligands. The active site of uncomplexed LasA contains a five-coordinate zinc ion with trigonal bipyramidal geometry and two metal-bound water molecules. Using these structures as a starting point, we propose a model for substrate binding by LasA that explains its activity against a wider range of substrates than those used by related lytic enzymes, and offer a catalytic mechanism for M23 metallopeptidases consistent with available structural and mutagenesis data. Our results highlight how LasA is a structurally distinct member of this endopeptidase family, consistent with its activity against a wider range of substrates and with its multiple roles in Pseudomonas virulence.

  9. 76 FR 79714 - Premium Changes Based On Recharacterization of Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... of contributions. Recharacterization of contributions refers to a situation in which contributions..., Legislative and Regulatory Department, Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, 1200 K Street NW., Washington DC...

  10. IVS contribution to the next ITRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Sabine; Messerschmitt, Linda; Thaller, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    Generating the contribution of the International VLBI Service (IVS) to the next ITRF (ITRF2013 or ITRF2014) was the main task of the IVS Combination Center at the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG, Germany) in 2014. Starting with the ITRF2005, the IVS contribution to the ITRF is an intra-technique combined solution using multiple individual contributions from different institutions. For the upcoming ITRF ten international institutions submitted data files for a combined solution. The data files contain 24h VLBI sessions from the late 1970s until the end of 2014 in SINEX file format containing datum free normal equations with station coordinates and Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP). All contributions have to meet the IVS standards for ITRF contribution in order to guarantee a consistent combined solution. In the course of the generation of the intra-technique combined solution, station coordinate time series for each station as well as a Terrestrial Reference Frame based on the contributed VLBI data (VTRF) were generated and analyzed. Preliminary results using data until the end of 2013 show a scaling factor of -0.47 ppb resulting from a 7-parameter Helmert transformation of the VTRF w.r.t. ITRF2008, which is comparable to the scaling factor that was determined in the precedent ITRF generation. An internal comparison of the EOPs between the combined solution and the individual contributions as well as external comparisons of the EOP series were carried out in order to assure a consistent quality of the EOPs. The data analyses, the combination procedure and results of the combined solution for station coordinates and EOP will be presented.

  11. The role for decorin in delayed-type hypersensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Daniela G.; Mohamed, Negia A.; Bocian, Carla; Stadtmann, Anika; Hermann, Sven; Schäfers, Klaus; Schäfers, Michael; Iozzo, Renato V.; Zarbock, Alexander; Götte, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Decorin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan, regulates extracellular matrix organization, growth factor-mediated signaling and cell growth. As decorin may directly modulate immune responses, we investigated its role in a mouse model of contact allergy (oxazolone-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity, DTH) in decorin-deficient (Dcn−/−) and wild-type mice. Dcn−/− mice showed a reduced ear swelling 24 hours after oxazolone treatment with a concurrent attenuation of leukocyte infiltration. These findings were corroborated by reduced glucose metabolism as determined by 18FDG uptake in positron emission tomography scans. Unexpectedly, polymorphonuclear leukocyte numbers in Dcn−/− blood vessels were significantly increased, accompanied by large numbers of flattened leukocytes adherent to the endothelium. Intravital microscopy, flow chamber and static adhesion assays confirmed increased adhesion and reduced transmigration of Dcn−/− leukocytes. Circulating blood neutrophil numbers were significantly increased in Dcn−/− mice 24 hours after DTH elicitation, but only moderately increased in wild-type mice. Expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was reduced, while syndecan-1 and ICAM-1 were overexpressed in inflamed ears of Dcn−/− mice, indicating that these adhesion molecules could be responsible for increased leukocyte adhesion. Decorin treatment of endothelial cells increased tyrosine phosphorylation and reduced syndecan-1 expression. Notably, absence of syndecan-1 in a genetic background lacking decorin rescued the attenuated DTH phenotype of Dcn−/− mice. Collectively, these results implicate a role for decorin in mediating DTH responses by influencing polymorphonuclear leukocyte attachment to the endothelium. This occurs via two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms that involve a direct anti-adhesive effect on polymorphonuclear leukocytes and a negative regulation of ICAM-1 and syndecan-1 expression. PMID:22043007

  12. The ILRS contribution to ITRF2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, E. C.; Luceri, V.; Sciarretta, C.; Kelm, R.

    2009-04-01

    Since over two decades, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data contribute to the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF). Until the development of ITRF2000, the contributions were submitted in the form of a set of normal equations or a covariance matrix of station coordinates and their linear rates at a standard epoch. The development of ITRF2005 ushered a new era with the use of weekly or session contributions, allowing greater flexibility in the relative weighting and the combination of information from various techniques. Moreover, the need of a unique, official, representative solution for each Technique Service, based on the rigorous combination of the various Analysis Centers' contributions, gave the opportunity to all techniques to verify, as a first step, the intra-technique solution consistency and, immediately after, to engage in discussions and comparison of the internal procedures, leading to a harmonization and validation of these procedures and the adopted models in the inter-technique context. In many occasions, the time series approach joint with the intra- and inter-technique comparison steps also highlighted differences that previously went unnoticed, and corrected incompatibilities. During the past year we have been preparing the ILRS contribution to a second TRF developed in the same way, the ITRF2008. The ILRS approach is based strictly on the current IERS Conventions 2003 and our internal standards. The Unified Analysis Workshop in 2007 stressed a number of areas where each technique needed to focus more attention in future analyses. In the case of SLR, the primary areas of concern were tracking station biases, extending the data span used in the analysis, and target characteristics. The present re-analysis extends from 1983 to 2008, covering a 25-year period, the longest for any of the contributing techniques; although the network and data quality for the 1983-1993 period are significantly poorer than for the latter years, the overall

  13. Regional and applied climatology-contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endlicher, W.; Gossmann, H.

    1991-01-01

    The first three articles of this book, which is dedicated to Wolfgang Weischet, are closely related to his work on unban climatology: - A comprehensive research programme on urban climatology for the example of a medium-sized Swiss town; - A wind tunnel test in preparation of a large-scale urban construction project; - Modelling of human thermal comfort in different urban environments on the basis of comprehensive data sets of geofactors. At the same time, they provide a survey of the status and methods of modern urban climate research. The second group of contributions comprises texts which discuss the effects of individual climate elements in the biosphere and pedosphere. The third group consists of two contributions on the stability of tropical environments. Both of them discuss the semiarid regions of northern Kenia. Finally, there is a group of contributions stimulated and influenced by W. Weischet's work in Latin America. (orig./KW) [de

  14. Incentives to Encourage Scientific Web Contribution (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    We suggest improvements to citation standards and creation of remuneration opportunities to encourage career scientist contributions to Web2.0 and social media science channels. At present, agencies want to accomplish better outreach and engagement with no funding, while scientists sacrifice their personal time to contribute to web and social media sites. Securing active participation by scientists requires career recognition of the value scientists provide to web knowledge bases and to the general public. One primary mechanism to encourage participation is citation standards, which let a contributor improve their reputation in a quantifiable way. But such standards must be recognized by their scientific and workplace communities. Using case studies such as the acceptance of web in the workplace and the growth of open access journals, we examine what agencies and individual can do as well as the time scales needed to secure increased active contribution by scientists. We also discuss ways to jumpstart this process.

  15. Japanese contributions to CERN-LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takahiko; Shintomi, Takakazu; Kimura, Yoshitaka

    2001-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at CERN, Geveva, to study frontier researches of particle physics. The LHC is the biggest superconducting accelerator using the most advanced cryogenics and applied superconductivities. The accelerator and large scale detectors for particle physics experiments are being constructed by collaboration with European countries and also by participation with non-CERN countries worldwide. In 1995, the Japanese government decided to take on a share in the LHC project with funding and technological contributions. KEK contributes to the development of low beta insertion superconducting quadrupole magnets and of components of the ATLAS detector by collaboration with university groups. Some Japanese companies have received contracts for technically key elements such as superconducting cable, cold compressor, nonmagnetic steel, polyimide film, and so on. An outline of the LHC project and Japanese contributions are described. (author)

  16. Greenhouse effect contributions of US landfill methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augenstein, D.

    1991-01-01

    The greenhouse effect has recently been receiving a great deal of scientific and popular attention. The term refers to a cause-and-effect relationship in which ''heat blanketing'' of the earth, due to trace gas increases in the atmosphere, is expected to result in global warming. The trace gases are increasing as the result of human activities. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the trace gas contributing most importantly to the ''heat blanketing'' and currently receives the most attention. Less widely recognized has been the high importance of methane (CH 4 ). Methane's contribution to the increased heat blanketing occurring since 1980 is estimated to be over a third as much as that of carbon dioxide. Gas from landfills has in turn been recognized to be a source of methane to the atmospheric buildup. However the magnitude of the landfill methane contribution, and the overall significance of landfill methane to the greenhouse phenomenon has been uncertain and the subject of some debate. (Author)

  17. Formalized search strategies for human risk contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.; Pedersen, O.M.

    1982-07-01

    For risk management, the results of a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) as well as the underlying assumptions can be used as references in a closed-loop risk control; and the analyses of operational experiences as a means of feedback. In this context, the need for explicit definition and documentation of the PRA coverage, including the search strategies applied, is discussed and aids are proposed such as plant description in terms of a formal abstraction hierarchy and use of cause-consequence-charts for the documentation of not only the results of PRA but also of its coverage. Typical human risk contributions are described on the basis of general plant design features relevant for risk and accident analysis. With this background, search strategies for human risk contributions are treated: Under the designation ''work analysis'', procedures for the analysis of familiar, well trained, planned tasks are proposed. Strategies for identifying human risk contributions outside this category are outlined. (author)

  18. Contribution to a Theory of Detailed Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    1999-01-01

    It has been recognised, that literature actually do not propose a theory of detailed design. In this paper a theory contribution is proposed, linking part design to organ design and allowing a type of functional reasoning. The proposed theory satisfies our need for explaining the nature of a part...... structure, for support of synthesis of part structure, i.e. detailed design, and our need for digital modelling of part structures.The aim of this paper is to contribute to a design theory valid for detailed design. The proposal is based upon the theory's ability to explain the nature of machine parts...... and assemblies, to support the synthesis of parts and to allow the modelling, especially digital modelling of a part structure. The contribution is based upon Theory of Technical Systems, Hubka, and the Domain Theory, Andreasen. This paper is based on a paper presented at ICED 99, Mortensen, but focus...

  19. Environmental radioactivity: A perspective on industrial contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    This essay aims to show how many non-nuclear industries contributed significantly to natural radioactivity. The examples given include the release of radon-220 and radon-222, as well as other radioisotopes, from the combustion of fossil fuels. Furthermore, edible mussels in the Irish Sea have been found to concentrate polonium-210 from seawater: the original source of the isotope was found to be the waste from a phosphate processing plant. These contributions should be taken into account when the environmental impacts of different industrial activities are compared. 3 tabs

  20. Jakob Nielsen and his Contributions to Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1996-01-01

    The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognitionas one of the developers of combinatiorial group theory and the topologyof surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsenwith emphasis on his contributions to topology.The biography is to be included in the b......The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognitionas one of the developers of combinatiorial group theory and the topologyof surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsenwith emphasis on his contributions to topology.The biography is to be included...

  1. Environmental radioactivity: A perspective on industrial contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, M S [International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco (Monaco). Marine Environment Lab.

    1993-06-01

    This essay aims to show how many non-nuclear industries contributed significantly to natural radioactivity. The examples given include the release of radon-220 and radon-222, as well as other radioisotopes, from the combustion of fossil fuels. Furthermore, edible mussels in the Irish Sea have been found to concentrate polonium-210 from seawater: the original source of the isotope was found to be the waste from a phosphate processing plant. These contributions should be taken into account when the environmental impacts of different industrial activities are compared. 3 tabs.

  2. ZEUS contributed papers to CHEP92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    At the Computing in High Energy Physics conference, CHEP92 Annecy 21st - 25th September 1992, the ZEUS data acquisition groups contributed a number of papers, as a result of plenary, parallel and poster session contributions. These papers are appended after the index list and a figure which gives a schematic overview of the acquisition system. The papers give up-to-date information concerning the ZEUS data acquisition system and the experience gained during the first HERA running period in 1992. (orig.)

  3. DEDUCTIBILITY OF CONTRIBUTIONS TO VOLUNTARY PRIVATE PENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LILIANA MUNTEAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper approaches the notion of public and private pension in Romania. Pension can be seen in terms of a replacement income to individuals whose age no longer affords to operate in the labour market. Pension reform in Romania has allowed besides the public pension system, called Pillar I, which is a distributive system based on solidarity between generations also a private pension system that records the contributions of participants in individual accounts, based on capitalization, investment and accumulation of these contributions.

  4. Percentage-based Author Contribution Index: a universal measure of author contribution to scientific articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Stéphane; Ikeda, Takayoshi; Lefort, Marie-Caroline; Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba; Schmidt, Jason M

    2017-01-01

    Deciphering the amount of work provided by different co-authors of a scientific paper has been a recurrent problem in science. Despite the myriad of metrics available, the scientific community still largely relies on the position in the list of authors to evaluate contributions, a metric that attributes subjective and unfounded credit to co-authors. We propose an easy to apply, universally comparable and fair metric to measure and report co-authors contribution in the scientific literature. The proposed Author Contribution Index (ACI) is based on contribution percentages provided by the authors, preferably at the time of submission. Researchers can use ACI to compare the contributions of different authors, describe the contribution profile of a particular researcher or analyse how contribution changes through time. We provide such an analysis based on contribution percentages provided by 97 scientists from the field of ecology who voluntarily responded to an online anonymous survey. ACI is simple to understand and to implement because it is based solely on percentage contributions and the number of co-authors. It provides a continuous score that reflects the contribution of one author as compared to the average contribution of all other authors. For example, ACI(i) = 3, means that author i contributed three times more than what the other authors contributed on average. Our analysis comprised 836 papers published in 2014-2016 and revealed patterns of ACI values that relate to career advancement. There are many examples of author contribution indices that have been proposed but none has really been adopted by scientific journals. Many of the proposed solutions are either too complicated, not accurate enough or not comparable across articles, authors and disciplines. The author contribution index presented here addresses these three major issues and has the potential to contribute to more transparency in the science literature. If adopted by scientific journals, it

  5. Slow electron contribution to inelastic reflection anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podsvirov, O.A.; Kuznetsov, Yu.A.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is electron contribution with low energy (up to 1 keV) to the anisotropy of electron inelastic reflection (IRE) from silicon monocrystal (111) within 12-50 keV energy range of primary electrons. Experimental data on IRE anisotropy are presented: delay curves for silicon monocrystal, permitting to separate electrons with the energy up to 1 keV, dependences of IRE anisotropy on the energy of primary electrons for the systems - monocrystalline silicon-amorphous silicon film and delay curves for such systems (film thickness varies from 20 to 2000 A). Suggested is a phenomenologic model, permitting to take into account the contribution of slow electrons to IRE anisotropy: it is supposed, that three groups of electrons take part in the formation of the latter: elastic and inelastic reflected electrons, slow electrons, excited by primary electrons and slow electrons, generated by the reverse flow of the scattered electrons. Contribution of electrons, different by origin, to IRE anisotropy is evaluated in accordance with the experimental data on the basis of this model. It is stated, that slow electrons constitute approximately one half of the IRE anisotropy value, the contribution of both groups of slow electrons being approximately equal

  6. 13 CFR 120.911 - Land contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Land contributions. 120.911 Section 120.911 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development... Project Property) previously acquired by the Borrower. [68 FR 57987, Oct. 7, 2003] ...

  7. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  8. Truancy: How Parents and Teachers Contribute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Linda F.; Thompson, Rock

    1983-01-01

    Compared attitudes and behaviors of parents and teachers toward junior-high habitually truant students (N=94) and regular attenders (N=94). Data from the Little Parenting Valuing Styles Scale and Little Teacher Valuing Styles Scale suggest parents may contribute to truancy by being overprotective and overindulgent. Teachers may reject and…

  9. Protestant ethic: Contributing towards a meaningful workplace ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article also indicates that the Protestant ethic can indeed contribute towards a meaningful experience whilst performing work-related tasks in workspace. The Protestant work ethic is more than a cultural norm that places a positive moral value on doing a good job. Based on a belief that work has intrinsic value for its own ...

  10. Rules Regarding Voluntary Contributions to the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-11-06

    The texts of the following rules are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency: I. Rules to Govern the Acceptance of Gifts of Services, Equipment and Facilities; II. Rules Regarding the Acceptance of Voluntary Contributions of Money to the Agency.

  11. Careers research in Europe: Identity and contribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khapova, S.N.; Vinkenburg, C.J.; Arnold, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This guest editorial introduces the special section of the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology 'Careers research in Europe'. Contributing to the aim of the special section to highlight the value of the European careers research for the benefit of the global community of career

  12. Intergenerational Practice: Contributing to a Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sacha; Sousa, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    The ageing of the European population is creating a new demographic mix, increasing the relevance of intergenerational practice (IGP). To date, however, this field lacks an appropriate conceptual framework. This study aims to contribute to such a framework through an integrative review of peer-reviewed papers reporting on IGPs. Fifteen papers were…

  13. Rules Regarding Voluntary Contributions to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    The texts of the following rules are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency: I. Rules to Govern the Acceptance of Gifts of Services, Equipment and Facilities; II. Rules Regarding the Acceptance of Voluntary Contributions of Money to the Agency

  14. [Job burnout and contributing factors for nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Zhi-ming; Wang, Mian-zhen; Lan, Ya-jia; Wu, Si-ying

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the degree of job burnout and contributing factors for nurses. A total of 495 nurses from three provincial hospitals were randomly selected. The MBI-GS, EPQ-RSC and OSI-R were administered to measure job burnout, personality traits and occupational stress, respectively. The medical and surgical nurses had significant greater scores of job burnout than others (P < 0.05). The poorer educational background was correlated with lower professional efficacy. The younger nurses had stronger feeling of job burnout. The scores of job burnout changed with different personality traits. The main contributing variables to exhaustion were overload, sense of responsibility, role insufficient and self-care (P < 0.05). The main contributing variables to cynicism were role insufficiency, role boundary, sense of responsibility and self-care (P < 0.05). The main contributing variables to professional inefficacy were role insufficiency, social support and rational/cognitive coping (P < 0.05). Job burnout for nurses can be prevented by reducing or keeping moderate professional duties and responsibility, making clearer job descriptions, promoting leisure activities, and enhancing self-care capabilities.

  15. THE CONTRIBUTION OF AGROFORESTRY TREE PRODUCTS TO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    philiph

    contribution of agro-forestry tree products to the livelihood of rural farmers was high and accounted for ... systems in which trees are grown with ... livelihood of farmers in rural areas and .... pulp, the seed are boiled in water and dried .... treatment of fracture/dislocation of bones. Some agroforestry trees that provides the rural ...

  16. Supersymmetric contribution to the electroweak ρ parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drees, M.; Hagiwara, K.

    1990-01-01

    Contributions to the electroweak ρ parameter, the ratio of the neutral- and charged-current strengths at zero-momentum transfer, are studied in the minimal extension of the standard model (SM) with softly broken supersymmetry. The effects of the extended Higgs sector, the gaugino-Higgsino sector, the light-squark--slepton sector and that of the stop-sbottom sector are studied separately, and the role of the custodial SU(2) V symmetry in each sector is clarified. The stop-sbottom sector is found to give potentially a most significant contribution to δρ which can double the standard-model contribution from the top-bottom sector, whereas all the remaining sectors contribute to δρ at the level of at most a few x10 -3 . In the supergravity model with radiative electroweak gauge symmetry breaking there are no extra sources of the SU(2) V breaking at the grand unification scale other than those present already in the SM, and the resulting δρ is found to be significantly smaller than in the general case. Constraints on the allowed range of δρ in the supergravity models are given by taking account of existing and prospective experimental mass limits of additional particles at CERN LEP and Sp bar pS and Fermilab Tevatron

  17. Librarian contributions to clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, Peggy; Protzko, Shandra

    2014-01-01

    Librarians have become more involved in developing high quality systematic reviews. Evidence-based practice guidelines are an extension of systematic reviews and offer another significant area for librarian involvement. This column highlights opportunities and challenges for the librarian working on guideline panels and provides practical considerations for meaningful contributions to the guideline creation process.

  18. Our contributions to the study of carbonatites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Our contributions to the study of carbonatites. Carbonatite magmatism in flood basalt provinces has important implications. Liquid immiscibility is responsible for evolution of carbonate and silicate parental magmas. Crustal contamination of the primary magma is ...

  19. Glyoxal contribution to aerosols over Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies have indicated that glyoxal (chemical formula OCHCHO), an atmospheric oxidation product of isoprene and aromatic compounds, may contribute to secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere, which can block sunlight and affect atmospheric chemistry. Some aerosols are primary aerosols, emitted directly into the atmosphere, while others are secondary, formed through chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Washenfelder et al. describe in situ glyoxal measurements from Pasadena, Calif., near Los Angeles, made during summer 2010. They used three different methods to calculate the contribution of glyoxal to secondary atmospheric aerosol and found that it is responsible for 0-0.2 microgram per cubic meter, or 0-4%, of the secondary organic aerosol mass. The researchers also compared their results to those of a previous study that calculated the glyoxal contribution to aerosol for Mexico City. Mexico City had higher levels of organic aerosol mass from glyoxal. They suggest that the lower contribution of glyoxal to aerosol concentrations for Los Angeles may be due to differences in the composition or water content of the aerosols above the two cities. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, doi:10.1029/2011JD016314, 2011)

  20. Patients who fall in hospital - Contributing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Bright

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective study of the factors which contributed to accidental injuries sustained by those patients who fell in a White provincial hospital in die period 1 January to 30 June 1982. The research study was undertaken by Diploma in Nursing Administration students during their 3-week hospital practice at a White provincial hospital.

  1. Contributions to Analytic Number Theory | Lucht | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on some recent contributions to the theory of multiplicative arithmetic semigroups, which have been initiated by John Knopfmacher's work on analytic number theory. They concern weighted inversion theorems of the. Wiener type, mean-value theorems for multiplicative functions, and, Ramanujan

  2. 13 CFR 120.910 - Borrower contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Borrower contributions. 120.910 Section 120.910 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development... percent, if the Project involves the acquisition, construction, conversion, or expansion of a limited or...

  3. The Manchester contribution to peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, Raymond T.

    2011-01-01

    Two names emerge when considering the contribution of Manchester in the development of peritoneal dialysis (PD). The first is Ram Gokal; the second is icodextrin. As there will be a separate article on icodextrin, this one will focus more on other aspects of the activities performed by the Renal

  4. California Considers Adding Gays' Contributions to Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2006-01-01

    A bill that has been sent to the floor of the California Senate would require textbooks used in public schools to include information on the roles and contributions of gay people throughout history, a move that could affect the content of instructional materials throughout much of the country. The measure would help build tolerance of diverse…

  5. Contributed report: Flavor anarchy for Majorana neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. December 2004 physics pp. 1407–1416. Contributed report: Flavor anarchy for Majorana neutrinos. YOSEF NIR1 and YAEL SHADMI2. 1Department of Particle Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel. 2Physics Department, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel.

  6. Gender Differences among Contributing Leadership Development Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences among contributing student leadership development resources were examined within the context of theory-based perspectives of leadership-related attributes. The findings suggest that students' increased engagement with institutional constituencies cultivates an environment conducive to students' cognitive development toward…

  7. Do School Lunches Contribute to Childhood Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2009-01-01

    This paper assesses whether school lunches contribute to childhood obesity. I employ two methods to isolate the causal impact of school lunches on obesity. First, using panel data, I ?nd that children who consume school lunches are more likely to be obese than those who brown bag their lunches even though they enter kindergarten with the same…

  8. Mapping Academic Library Contributions to Campus Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Steven W.; Kutner, Laurie; Cooper, Liz

    2015-01-01

    This study surveyed academic libraries across the United States to establish baseline data on their contributions to campus internationalization. Supplementing data from the American Council on Education (ACE) on internationalization of higher education, this research measured the level of international activities taking place in academic…

  9. Instanton contributions in reggeon quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciafaloni, M.

    1978-01-01

    The full semiclassical approximation to reggeon field theory without transverse dimensions is derived. By using Polyakov's method in Lagrangian form and paying due attention to the quantum terms of the potential it is shown that instanton contributions are able to explain the tunnel-like energy gap for α(0)-1>>lambda. (Auth.)

  10. Internet and Its Contributions to Library Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Çelik

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the major Internet services such as email, telnet and ftp and describes various information discovery and retrieval tools such as gopher, WAIS, and WWW. It also discusses the contributions of the Internet to library and information services.

  11. Mechanism Design for Incentivizing Social Media Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek K.; Jain, Ramesh; Kankanhalli, Mohan

    Despite recent advancements in user-driven social media platforms, tools for studying user behavior patterns and motivations remain primitive. We highlight the voluntary nature of user contributions and that users can choose when (and when not) to contribute to the common media pool. A Game theoretic framework is proposed to study the dynamics of social media networks where contribution costs are individual but gains are common. We model users as rational selfish agents, and consider domain attributes like voluntary participation, virtual reward structure, network effect, and public-sharing to model the dynamics of this interaction. The created model describes the most appropriate contribution strategy from each user's perspective and also highlights issues like 'free-rider' problem and individual rationality leading to irrational (i.e. sub-optimal) group behavior. We also consider the perspective of the system designer who is interested in finding the best incentive mechanisms to influence the selfish end-users so that the overall system utility is maximized. We propose and compare multiple mechanisms (based on optimal bonus payment, social incentive leveraging, and second price auction) to study how a system designer can exploit the selfishness of its users, to design incentive mechanisms which improve the overall task-completion probability and system performance, while possibly still benefiting the individual users.

  12. Elements that contribute to healthy building design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loftness, V.; Hakkinen, B.; Adan, O.C.G.; Nevalainen, A.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background: The elements that contribute to a healthy building are multifactorial and can be discussed from different perspectives. Objectives: We present three viewpoints of designing a healthy building: the importance of sustainable development, the role of occupants for ensuring indoor

  13. Nilton Hebling's career and contribution to carcinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia Negreiros-Fransozo

    Full Text Available Abstract This is a brief comment on Nilton Hebling's career and contribution to carcinology. Our intention is to show to next generation of carcinologists some insights of his professional life, and to acknowledge his great attitude while teaching and mentoring many Brazilian carcinologists.

  14. The value contribution of strategic foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Schwarz, Jan Oliver

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on exploring the potential and empirically observable value creation of strategic foresight activities in firms. We first review the literature on strategic foresight, innovation management and strategic management in order to identify the potential value contributions. We use ......, (3) influencing other actors, (4) and through an enhanced capacity for organizational learning....

  15. The anomalous contribution to polarized leptoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altarelli, G.; Ross, G.

    1988-01-01

    We show that, due to the anomaly, the gluon contribution to the first moment of the polarized proton structure function, as measured in deep inelastic scattering, is not suppressed by a power of the strong coupling evaluated at a large scale. As a result, the EMC result for the first moment of polarized proton electroproduction is consistent with a large quark spin component. (orig.)

  16. U.S. contributions to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, Ned R.

    2006-01-01

    The United States participates in the ITER project to undertake the study of the science and technology of burning plasmas. The 2003 U.S. decision to enter the ITER negotiations followed an extensive series of community and governmental reviews of the benefits, readiness, and approaches to the study of burning plasmas. This paper describes both the technical and the organizational preparations and plans for U.S. participation in the ITER construction activity: in-kind contributions, staff contributions, and cash contributions as well as supporting physics and technology research. Near-term technical activities focus on the completion of R and D and design and mitigation of risks in the areas of provisionally assigned US contributions. Outside the project, the U.S. is engaged in preparations for the test blanket module program. Organizational activities focus on preparations of the project management arrangements to maximize the overall success of the ITER project: elements include refinement of U.S. positions on the international arrangements, the establishment of the U.S. Domestic Agency, progress along the path of the U.S. Department of Energy's Project Management Order, and overall preparations for commencement of the fabrication of major items of equipment and for provision of staff and cash as specified in the upcoming ITER agreement

  17. In the suppression of regge cut contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, S.P.

    1975-07-01

    It is shown that contributions of reggeon-pomeron cuts are suppressed in amplitudes with opposite natural to the reggeon. This suppression grows logarithmically with energy. The suppression in the πP cut is, however, found to be weak. Consequence on conspiracy is discussed

  18. AACSB Standards and Accounting Faculty's Intellectual Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. Brian; Quddus, Munir

    2008-01-01

    The authors performed a content analysis of intellectual contribution portfolios of accounting faculty at various business schools that Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International recently accredited. The results showed a significant divergence in faculty research (e.g., areas, topics) and their teaching assignments. This…

  19. Elements that contribute to healthy building design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loftness, V.; Hakkinen, B.; Adan, O.; Nevalainen, A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The elements that contribute to a healthy building are multifactorial and can be discussed from different perspectives. Objectives: We present three viewpoints of designing a healthy building: the importance of sustainable development, the role of occupants for ensuring indoor air

  20. Contribution of Bilingualism in Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipra, Muhammad Aslam

    2013-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the contribution of the use of bilingualism as an aid in learning/teaching English as a foreign language and bilingualism in EFL classroom does not reduce students' communicative abilities but in effect can assist in teaching and learning process. The study employed a qualitative, interpretive research design…

  1. The economic contribution of tourism in Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Edward Samuel

    2010-01-01

    of various tourism sub-types. Multiplier analysis is applied to evaluate the strength of backward linkages from tourism to the domestic economy. The results show the sector is moderate in size but has the potential to contribute significantly to aggregate economic development. However, potential weaknesses...... are already evident and careful attention must be paid to the full tourism value chain....

  2. Some feminist contributions to community social psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mayorga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the contributions of feminist debate about intersectionality of social categories for Community Social Psychology in Brazil. This was set up as dedicated to theoretical analyze the social inequalities that characterize contemporary societies and propose methodological processes of intervention for questioning and processing of these realities. We discuss how the emergence of new actors and demands on public space, as distinct from the 60/70, is required to understand the oppression from various power systems such as gender, race and sexuality. We conclude that intersectional analysis should consider different levels of relationships between categories, the history of the same differential and common aspects of different systems of power as naturalization of inequality, the relationship between public and private relationship between equality and difference. Analyses based on intersectionality can contribute to processes of social intervention that considers the complexity of contemporary societies.

  3. Contributions of Public Health to nursing practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Káren Mendes Jorge de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Analyze the perceptions of undergraduate nursing students about the contributions of public health to nursing practice in the Unified Health System. Method: Qualitative Descriptive Study. Data collection was carried out through semi-directed interviews with 15 students. The language material was analyzed according to content and thematic analysis. Results: Thematic categories were established, namely: "Perceptions about Public Health" and "Contribution of Public Health to nursing practice in the Unified Health System". Final considerations: Perceptions about Public Health are diversified, but converge to the recognition of this field as the basis for training nurses qualified to work in the SUS with technical competence, autonomy and focusing on the integrality in health care.

  4. Pionic Contribution to Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Vergados, J D; Toki, H

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that neutrinoless double decay is going to play a crucial role in settling the neutrino properties, which cannot be extracted from the neutrino oscillation data. It is, in particular, expected to settle the absolute scale of neutrino mass and determine whether the neutrinos are Majorana particles, i.e. they coincide with their own antiparticles. In order to extract the average neutrino mass from the data one must be able to estimate the contribution all possible high mass intermediate particles. The latter, which occur in practically all extensions of the standard model, can, in principle, be differentiated from the usual mass term, if data from various targets are available. One, however, must first be able reliably calculate the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. Such calculations are extremely difficult since the effective transition operators are very short ranged. For such operators processes like pionic contributions, which are usually negligible, turn out to be dominant. We study s...

  5. Contributions of Literature to Social Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasio Ovejero

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There are two main kind of psychology: a intuitive psychology, and an academic and professional psychology. These two psychologies are different, but they can make important reciprocals contributions. And the best of the intuitive psychology, that in my opinion is in the literature and overall in the romance, can be very useful for professional psychologists. The main end of this paper is to show how the social psychologists can learn from the intuitive psychology of the great romances. This contribution of the romance to the social psychology is, at least, at these two levels. At the level of construction of the subjectivity and the modern subject and the, therefore, of the psychology’s arise, and at the level of some concrete subjects studied by the psychologists (romantic love, jealousy, infidelity, compunction, emotions, vengeance, human relations…

  6. CONTRIBUTING FACTORS TO THE STUDENTS’ SPEAKING ABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of English in Indonesia has developed quickly in all of the fields. It is affected by many things in many ways. The need of English has also increased quickly in many parts of Indonesian life. To face it, teaching English at young ages or studentseems like the solution. Speaking is one of the skills that should be tough to the student. To get effective learning, it's useful to know what are factors contributing to the student speaking development. This research showed that there are some contributing factors to the students’ speaking development. Those factors are Teacher, Daily Practice, Listening to English Music, Family Support, Watching English Video and Movie, Motivation to Learn, Classroom Environment, Learning Material. Such as a good teacher would provide good learning. Support of the family would also give an effective outcome for the student's development. So, the factors should be known to get a better outcome for the students

  7. Viking lander tracking contributions to Mars mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, W.H. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The major recent advances in planetary mapping have been accomplished through use of photography from orbiting satellites, as is the case for Mars with Mariner and Viking photographs. The requirement for greater precision demands that inputs to the photogrammatic process be more precisely defined. This paper describes how analyses of Doppler and ranging data from the Viking landers are contributing to more precise mapping of Mars in several specific areas. (Auth.)

  8. The Contributions of Immigrants to American Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschman, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The standard account of American immigration focuses on the acculturation and assimilation of immigrants and their children to American society. This analysis typically ignores the significant contributions of immigrants to the creation of American culture through the performing arts, sciences, and other cultural pursuits. Immigrants and their children are not born with more creative talents than native-born citizens, but their selectivity and marginality may have pushed and pulled those with...

  9. Gluonic contributions in the chiral hyperbag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, B.Y.; Vento, V.; Valencia Univ./CSIC, Valencia

    1990-01-01

    We incorporate into a non-perturbative chiral bag model scheme the gluons and the η' in a perturbative fashion. We analyze in this context the proton matrix element for the flavor singlet axial current, where due account is taken of the anomaly, and the delta-nucleon mass difference. Our results show that the contribution due to the gluons is significant for large bag radii and that they are crucial in order to establish the Cheshire cat principle. (orig.)

  10. Assessing ambition of nationally determined contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höhne, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    A key for a successful new international climate agreement by December 2015 will be the collective assessment of ambition of individual proposals by countries on how and how much to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. We conclude that there is nothing right or wrong in choosing one or several of these approaches to assess the level of ambition of contributions. An approach using several of many methods described can take into account the difference in national circumstances.

  11. Contributing to Peace, Health and Prosperity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2013-01-01

    This issue of the IAEA Bulletin edition considers the ideas and innovations that led to the IAEA’s formation and influenced its evolution. In this issue of the IAEA Bulletin, you will learn more about how countries use nuclear technology to improve health and prosperity and protect the environment through the technical cooperation programme. Together, the Member States and the IAEA are making a lasting contribution to achieving the Millennium Development Goals that challenge us to significantly reduce hunger, poverty and disease

  12. WORKING WIVES, THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO FAMILY INCOME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    DATA FROM THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, 1964-66, DESCRIBE THE CONTRIBUTION OF WORKING WIVES TO FAMILY INCOME. NEARLY HALF OF ALL WOMEN 18-64 YEARS OF AGE WORK. ABOUT THREE OF FIVE OF THESE WOMEN ARE MARRIED AND LIVING WITH THEIR HUSBANDS. OF THE 42.1 MILLION HUSBAND-WIFE FAMILIES IN THE UNITED STATES IN MARCH…

  13. Cognitive science contributions to decision science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2015-02-01

    This article briefly reviews the history and interplay between decision theory, behavioral decision-making research, and cognitive psychology. The review reveals the increasingly important impact that psychology and cognitive science have on decision science. One of the main contributions of cognitive science to decision science is the development of dynamic models that describe the cognitive processes that underlay the evolution of preferences during deliberation phase of making a decision. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Human Resource Development's Contribution to Continuous Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Hyland, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Continuous Improvement (CI) is an approach to organizational change that requires active involvement of skilled and motivated employees, which implies an important role for HRD practitioners. The findings from a literature review and a survey of 168 Danish manufacturing companies indicate however...... that HRD is rarely integrated with CI. The paper contributes by offering a model that depicts how HR and HRD functions could be exploited to support successful CI development and implementation....

  15. Worldwide energy prospects and nuclear contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    With a growing up worldwide population and a better standard of living, the global energy consumption will rise. The CO 2 emissions will increase too because of todays share of fossil fuels in the energy sources. This paper analyzes the possible contribution of nuclear energy in this context: economical and environmental aspects, political aspects (distribution of energy resources, energy dependence), energy efficiency, reduction of CO 2 emissions. (J.S.)

  16. MR contribution in surgery of epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiners, L.C.; Valk, J.; Jansen, G.H.; Veelen, C.W.M. van

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of MR imaging in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy considered for surgical therapy is discussed. In this review we focus on: (a) focal abnormalities (mesial temporal sclerosis, focal migration disorders, hamartomatous lesions and low-grade tumours, phakomatosis and vascular malformations) associated with therapy-resistant partial epilepsy, requiring resective surgery; (b) abnormalities leading to generalized seizures that require more drastic surgical procedures, such as callosotomy and functional hemispherectomy; and (c) localisation of implanted depth-electrodes. (orig.)

  17. Sustainable development: the contributions of gas technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappe, D.; Buchet, P.; Muller, T.; Millet, B.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this workshop was to debate the following questions in relation with sustainable development: what are the contributions of gas technology to the short- and medium-term mastery of demand in residential, tertiary and industry markets? What are the efficient applications of gas technology and what are the energy saving potentialities by type of market? Three participants present their experience in this domain. (J.S.)

  18. The contribution of fusion to sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    The world demand for energy is projected to more than double over the next 50 years, indeed this will be essential to bring much of the world out of poverty. At the same time there is increasing pressure to substantially reduce atmospheric pollution, most notably of carbon dioxide. Together, these conflicting goals drive a need to produce enormous amounts of non-carbon energy supply, much greater than our total present energy supply. This presents a huge challenge. As one of very few options for large-scale, non-carbon future supply of energy, fusion has the potential to make an important contribution to sustained energy supplies. Fusion's advantages of large fuel reserves, low atmospheric emissions and high levels of safety make it an important consideration in future energy strategies. Conceptual designs of fusion power plants have been optimised against safety and environmental criteria; the results are described here and the outcomes compared with other energy sources. To make a contribution to sustainable development, fusion must be economically viable in a future energy market. The calculated costs of electricity from fusion show that, particularly in an energy market where environmental constraints are playing an increasing role, fusion can make an important contribution

  19. U.S. Contributions to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, Ned R.

    2005-01-01

    The United States participates in the ITER project and program to enable the study of the science and technology of burning plasmas, a key programmatic element missing from the world fusion program. The 2003 U.S. decision to enter the ITER negotiations followed an extensive series of community and governmental reviews of the benefits, readiness, and approaches to the study of burning plasmas. This paper describes both the technical and the organizational preparations and plans for U.S. participation in the ITER construction activity: in-kind contributions, staff contributions, and cash contributions as well as supporting physics and technology research. Near-term technical activities focus on the completion of R and D and design and mitigation of risks in the areas of the central solenoid magnet, shield/blanket, diagnostics, ion cyclotron system, electron cyclotron system, pellet fueling system, vacuum system, tritium processing system, and conventional systems. Outside the project, the U .S. is engaged in preparations for the test blanket module program. Organizational activities focus on preparations of the project management arrangements to maximize the overall success of the ITER Project; elements include refinement of U.S. directions on the international arrangements, the establishment of the U.S. Domestic Agency, progress along the path of the U.S. Department of Energy's Project Management Order, and overall preparations for commencement of the fabrication of major items of equipment and for provision of staff and cash as specified in the upcoming ITER agreement

  20. Health Care Ergonomics: Contributions of Thomas Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole Wilson, Tiffany; Davis, Kermit G

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the contributions of Thomas Waters's work in the field of health care ergonomics and beyond. Waters's research of safe patient handling with a focus on reducing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in health care workers contributed to current studies and prevention strategies. He worked with several groups to share his research and assist in developing safe patient handling guidelines and curriculum for nursing students and health care workers. The citations of articles that were published by Waters in health care ergonomics were evaluated for quality and themes of conclusions. Quality was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and centrality to original research rating. Themes were documented by the type of population the citing articles were investigating. In total, 266 articles that referenced the top seven cited articles were evaluated. More than 95% of them were rated either medium or high quality. The important themes of these citing articles were as follows: (a) Safe patient handling is effective in reducing MSDs in health care workers. (b) Shift work has negative impact on nurses. (c) There is no safe way to manually lift a patient. (d) Nurse curriculums should contain safe patient handling. The research of Waters has contributed significantly to the health care ergonomics and beyond. His work, in combination with other pioneers in the field, has generated multiple initiatives, such as a standard safe patient-handling curriculum and safe patient-handling programs. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  1. Perturbative QCD contributions to inclusive processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritbergen, T. van.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis treats the calculation of quantum corrections to a number of high energy processes that are measured in current and future accelerator experiments. The main objective of these experiments is to accurately verify the generally accepted theory of electro-weak and strong interactions, known as the Standard model, and to look for possible deviations. Most of the processes that are treated in this thesis are of a type for which the final state of of a highly energetic scattering or decay process is measured inclusively. The higher order quantum corrections discussed in this thesis are due to strong interactions. To the inclusive decay rate of Z 0 bosons into all possible final states consisting of hadrons third order QCD contributions have been obtained. Also in the third order QCD an expansion for the inclusive hadronic decay rate of a τ-lepton was obtained. Then the top-quark-mass effects on the decay channels of a Higgs boson: Higgs→b-quarks and Higgs→gluons, were investigated. Thereafter the calculation of 3-loop contributions to the deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering process is discussed. Finally the 3-loop contributions to the q 2 -dependence of the lower moments ∫ 0 1 x N-1 F(x,q 2 )dx, N=2,4,6,8 of the structure functions F 2 and F L were obtained. (orig./HSI)

  2. Understanding the CDM's contribution to technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Malte; Holzer, Andreas; Hoffmann, Volker H.

    2008-01-01

    Developing countries are increasingly contributing to global greenhouse gas emissions and, consequently, climate change as a result of their rapid economic growth. In order to reduce their impact, the private sector needs to be engaged in the transfer of low-carbon technology to those countries. The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is currently the only market mechanism aimed at triggering changes in the pattern of emissions-intensive activities in developing countries and is likely to play a role in future negotiations. In this paper, we analyse how the CDM contributes to technology transfer. We first develop a framework from the literature that delineates the main factors which characterise technology transfer. Second, we apply this framework to the CDM by assessing existing empirical studies and drawing on additional expert interviews. We find that the CDM does contribute to technology transfer by lowering several technology-transfer barriers and by raising the transfer quality. On the basis of this analysis, we give preliminary policy recommendations

  3. Perturbative QCD contributions to inclusive processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritbergen, T. van

    1996-09-24

    This thesis treats the calculation of quantum corrections to a number of high energy processes that are measured in current and future accelerator experiments. The main objective of these experiments is to accurately verify the generally accepted theory of electro-weak and strong interactions, known as the Standard model, and to look for possible deviations. Most of the processes that are treated in this thesis are of a type for which the final state of of a highly energetic scattering or decay process is measured inclusively. The higher order quantum corrections discussed in this thesis are due to strong interactions. To the inclusive decay rate of Z{sup 0} bosons into all possible final states consisting of hadrons third order QCD contributions have been obtained. Also in the third order QCD an expansion for the inclusive hadronic decay rate of a {tau}-lepton was obtained. Then the top-quark-mass effects on the decay channels of a Higgs boson: Higgs{yields}b-quarks and Higgs{yields}gluons, were investigated. Thereafter the calculation of 3-loop contributions to the deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering process is discussed. Finally the 3-loop contributions to the q{sup 2}-dependence of the lower moments {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1}x{sup N-1}F(x,q{sup 2})dx, N=2,4,6,8 of the structure functions F{sub 2} and F{sub L} were obtained. (orig./HSI).

  4. Contribution of tropical cyclones to global rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouakhi, Abdou; Villarini, Gabriele; Vecchi, Gabriel; Smith, James

    2016-04-01

    Rainfall associated with tropical cyclones (TCs) can have both devastating and beneficial impacts in different parts of the world. In this work, daily precipitation and historical six-hour best track TC datasets are used to quantify the contribution of TCs to global rainfall. We select 18607 rain gauge stations with at least 25 complete (at least 330 measurements per year) years between 1970 and 2014. We consider rainfall associated with TCs if the center of circulation of the storm passed within a given distance from the rain gauge and within a given time window. Spatial and temporal sensitivity analyses are performed with varying time windows (same day, ±1 day) and buffer radii (400 km and 500 km) around each rain gauge. Results highlight regional differences in TC-induced rainfall. The highest TC-induced precipitation totals (400 to 600+ mm/year) are prevalent along eastern Asia, western and northeastern Australia, and in the western Pacific islands. Stations along the southeast of the U.S. coast and surrounding the Gulf of Mexico receive up to 200 mm/year of TC rainfall. The highest annual fractional contributions of TCs to total rainfall (from 35 to 50%) are recorded in stations located in northwestern Australia, southeastern China, the northern Philippines and the southern Mexico peninsula. Seasonally, the highest proportions (40 to 50%) are recorded along eastern Australia and Mauritius in winter, and in eastern Asia and Mexico in summer and autumn. Analyses of the relative contribution of TCs to extreme rainfall using annual maximum (AM) and peaks-over-threshold (POT) approaches indicate notable differences among regions. The highest TC-AM rainfall proportions (45 to 60%) are found in stations located in Japan, eastern China, the Philippines, eastern and western Australia. Substantial contributions (25 to 40% of extreme rainfall) are also recorded in stations located along the U.S. East Coast, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Mexico peninsula. We find similar

  5. Endothelial glycocalyx degradation induces endogenous heparinization in patients with severe injury and early traumatic coagulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Johansson, Pär I

    2012-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that early trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) is mechanistically linked to disruption of the vascular endothelium and its glycocalyx, assessed by thrombomodulin and syndecan 1, respectively. This study evaluated if degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx and ensuing...... release of its heparin-like substances induce autoheparinization and thereby contributes to TIC....

  6. The ILRS Contribution to ITRF2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, Erricos C.; Luceri, Cinzia; Sciarretta, Cecilia; Evans, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data have contributed to the definition of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) over the past three decades. The development of ITRF2005 ushered a new era with the use of weekly or session contributions, allowing greater flexibility in the editing, relative weighting and the combination of information from the four contributing techniques. The new approach allows each Service to generate a solution based on the rigorous combination of the individual Analysis Centers' contributions that provides an opportunity to verify the intra-technique consistency and a comparison of internal procedures and adopted models. The intra- and inter-technique comparisons that the time series approach facilitates are an extremely powerful diagnostic that highlights differences and inconsistencies at the single station level. Over the past year the ILRS Analysis Working Group (AWG) worked on designing an improved ILRS contribution for the development of ITRF2013. The ILRS approach is based on the current IERS Conventions 2010 and our internal ILRS standards, with a few deviations that are documented. Since the Global Geodetic Observing System - GGOS identified the ITRF as its key project, the ILRS has taken a two-pronged approach in order to meet its stringent goals: modernizing the engineering components (ground and space segments), and revising the modeling standards taking advantage of recent improvements in system Earth modeling. The main concern in the case of SLR is monitoring systematic errors at individual stations, accounting for undocumented discontinuities, and improving the target signature models. The latter has been addressed with the adoption of mm-level models for all of our targets. As far as the station systematics, the AWG had already embarked on a major effort to improve the handling of such errors prior to the development of ITRF2008. The results of that effort formed the foundation for the re-examination of the

  7. Knowledge Contribution in Knowledge Networks: Effects of Participants’ Central Positions on Contribution Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Hamedi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge networks play a crucial role in contemporary organisations to improve participation for knowledge sharing. Examining employees’ knowledge contribution play an important role for in success implementing knowledgenetworks. Whereas most part of studies emphasis on the quantity aspect of

  8. The Contribution of Fusion to Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.

    2006-01-01

    The world demand for energy is projected to more than double over the next 50 years, indeed this will be essential to bring much of the world out of poverty. At the same time there is increasing pressure to substantially reduce atmospheric pollution, most notably of carbon dioxide. Together, these conflicting goals drive a need to produce enormous amounts of non-carbon energy supply, much greater than our total present energy supply. This presents an enormous challenge. As one of very few options for large-scale, non-carbon future supply of energy, fusion has the potential to make an important contribution to sustained energy supplies. Fusion's advantages of large fuel reserves, low atmospheric emissions and high levels of safety make it an important consideration in future energy strategies. - Fuel supplies are sufficient for at least thousands of years, and probably up to millions of years, of energy use. - Atmospheric emissions of CO 2 are very low and minor emissions of other pollutants are less harmful than those from most existing energy sources. - Hazards to the public will be very low because of the high levels of passive safety. - Waste materials will require little, or no, use of repository storage. Conceptual designs of fusion power plants have been optimised against safety and environmental criteria. The optimum designs vary both with the assessed progress in the development programme and according to the weight given to different criteria. The impact of this weighting on design, and the comparison of the outcomes with other energy sources, is described. To make a contribution to sustainable development, fusion must also be economically viable to enter the energy market. The calculated cost of electricity from fusion and other technologies, both new and existing, show that, particularly in an energy market where environmental constraints are playing an increasing role, fusion can make an important contribution. (author)

  9. Audits contribute to pride, productivity and profit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Q.

    1984-01-01

    The object of this writing is to demonstrate that audits (in general) when used as a ''management tool' can contribute to pride, productivity, and profit. The goal of ''pride'' achievement is demonstrated through the use of techniques developed from behavioral sciences. Discussed is dealing with people and their basic needs. This is intended to point out the fact that satisfying individual needs and concerns is the first step to achieving the goals of pride, productivity, and profit. Also discussed are the basic needs of safety (security), social, ego/esteem, and self-fulfillment as well as providing some basic techniques of auditing which will help assure general satisfaction of these needs. Also noted are reporting methods. The goal of ''productivity'' is approached by demonstrating that objectives must be clear and workable. Objectives must be translated into specific action and that action must be compatible with the overall company objectives. All objectives must be known and understood by those affected. Consideration must be given to men, money, and machines (present technology). All of the objectives must also be weighed against external constraints. The goal of ''profit'' then becomes the product of a combination of ''pride'' and ''productivity''. Audits must be cost conscious. Value engineer the problem, the cause, and the solution. Discussion continues with quality cost programs briefly indicating that ''Q'' costs could be considered a type of audit. Identifying deficiencies and weaknesses, then correcting them, contributes to profit. Increased pride and productivity contributes to profit. Consider the employee's awareness and commitment for doing a good job when auditing

  10. Neural crest contributions to the lamprey head

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, David W.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    The neural crest is a vertebrate-specific cell population that contributes to the facial skeleton and other derivatives. We have performed focal DiI injection into the cranial neural tube of the developing lamprey in order to follow the migratory pathways of discrete groups of cells from origin to destination and to compare neural crest migratory pathways in a basal vertebrate to those of gnathostomes. The results show that the general pathways of cranial neural crest migration are conserved throughout the vertebrates, with cells migrating in streams analogous to the mandibular and hyoid streams. Caudal branchial neural crest cells migrate ventrally as a sheet of cells from the hindbrain and super-pharyngeal region of the neural tube and form a cylinder surrounding a core of mesoderm in each pharyngeal arch, similar to that seen in zebrafish and axolotl. In addition to these similarities, we also uncovered important differences. Migration into the presumptive caudal branchial arches of the lamprey involves both rostral and caudal movements of neural crest cells that have not been described in gnathostomes, suggesting that barriers that constrain rostrocaudal movement of cranial neural crest cells may have arisen after the agnathan/gnathostome split. Accordingly, neural crest cells from a single axial level contributed to multiple arches and there was extensive mixing between populations. There was no apparent filling of neural crest derivatives in a ventral-to-dorsal order, as has been observed in higher vertebrates, nor did we find evidence of a neural crest contribution to cranial sensory ganglia. These results suggest that migratory constraints and additional neural crest derivatives arose later in gnathostome evolution.

  11. Contribution mapping: a method for mapping the contribution of research to enhance its impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background At a time of growing emphasis on both the use of research and accountability, it is important for research funders, researchers and other stakeholders to monitor and evaluate the extent to which research contributes to better action for health, and find ways to enhance the likelihood that beneficial contributions are realized. Past attempts to assess research 'impact' struggle with operationalizing 'impact', identifying the users of research and attributing impact to research projects as source. In this article we describe Contribution Mapping, a novel approach to research monitoring and evaluation that aims to assess contributions instead of impacts. The approach focuses on processes and actors and systematically assesses anticipatory efforts that aim to enhance contributions, so-called alignment efforts. The approach is designed to be useful for both accountability purposes and for assisting in better employing research to contribute to better action for health. Methods Contribution Mapping is inspired by a perspective from social studies of science on how research and knowledge utilization processes evolve. For each research project that is assessed, a three-phase process map is developed that includes the main actors, activities and alignment efforts during research formulation, production and knowledge extension (e.g. dissemination and utilization). The approach focuses on the actors involved in, or interacting with, a research project (the linked actors) and the most likely influential users, who are referred to as potential key users. In the first stage, the investigators of the assessed project are interviewed to develop a preliminary version of the process map and first estimation of research-related contributions. In the second stage, potential key-users and other informants are interviewed to trace, explore and triangulate possible contributions. In the third stage, the presence and role of alignment efforts is analyzed and the preliminary

  12. French contributions to electron microscopic radioautography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droz, B.

    1994-01-01

    The radio autographic contributions carried out by electron microscopists took a part to improve the methodology and to extend applications to major biological problems. As underlined by CP Leblonc radioautography has clarified the importance of renewing systems; one may truly say that radioautography has introduced the time dimension in histology. The sites of biosynthesis of different substances have been located on the sub cellar scale, and it is now possible to analyse the molecular migrations within cells. The development of in situ hybridization and of receptors binding sites at the ultrastructural level has enlarged the application field of electron microscope radioautography. 64 refs., 2 figs

  13. Adam Smith’s contribution to secularisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrus Simons

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examined several crucial themes in Adam Smith’s philosophy with the purpose of highlighting and assessing his contribution to the secularisation of Western society. The article, written from the perspective of reformational philosophy, begins with a brief biography and sketch of Adam Smith’s influence on modern society, followed by a summary of Ponti Venter’s view on Smith. This sets the scene for a discussion of Adam Smith’s project, his method of tackling it, and his views on systems, philosophy of history and the concept of philosophy.

  14. QED contributions to electron g-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, Stefano

    2018-05-01

    In this paper I briefly describe the results of the numerical evaluation of the mass-independent 4-loop contribution to the electron g-2 in QED with 1100 digits of precision. In particular I also show the semi-analytical fit to the numerical value, which contains harmonic polylogarithms of eiπ/3, e2iπ/3 and eiπ/2 one-dimensional integrals of products of complete elliptic integrals and six finite parts of master integrals, evaluated up to 4800 digits. I give also some information about the methods and the program used.

  15. Factors Contributing to Crashes among Young Drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndel J. Bates

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Young drivers are the group of drivers most likely to crash. There are a number of factors that contribute to the high crash risk experienced by these drivers. While some of these factors are intrinsic to the young driver, such as their age, gender or driving skill, others relate to social factors and when and how often they drive. This article reviews the factors that affect the risk of young drivers crashing to enable a fuller understanding of why this risk is so high in order to assist in developing effective countermeasures.

  16. The Contribution of Bulgaria to CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Following the discussions in the Committee of Council on 14th December 2000, concerning the request by Bulgaria for a reduction of its contribution to CERN for 2000 and 2001, the Bulgarian Minister of Education & Science expressed on 26 January 2001 his readiness to accept the scheme of reductions that emerged from these discussions. The Management considers that this scheme constitutes a reasonable solution and invites the Committee of Council to recommend the Council to take note of this document and to approve the annexed draft Resolution (Annex VI).

  17. Capitalizing the contribution of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnadieu, G.

    1984-01-01

    The main contributions of the French nuclear industry to the country, and ways to make the most of them are presented. The advantages acquired include the nuclear power stations built; mastering of the combustion cycle; a powerful, well structured nuclear construction industry; and a nuclear-industrial complex giving France an important industrial potential. It is recommended that the industrial and research effort be maintained. The proposed strategy consists of defining an electronuclear program and associated economic development program and sticking to them; promoting exports; possibly merging certain industrial capacities; and strengthening the national position and independence concerning the fuel cycle [fr

  18. [Placebo effect: a contribution of social psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balez, R; Leroyer, C; Couturaud, F

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews the psychosocial variables, which are of interest in the relationship between the patient and the physician. According to a classical model of social psychology, such a relationship might contribute to the placebo/nocebo effects. We develop herein various relational and contextual variables, taking into account four dimensions (intra-individual, interpersonal, positional and ideological) and their potential effects on therapeutic responses. This applies both in the setting of daily clinical practice and of clinical trials. The placebo effect offers an opportunity for collaboration and dialogue between social scientists and physicians.

  19. Fermionic NNLO contributions to Bhabha scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actis, S.; Riemann, T.; Czakon, M.; Uniwersytet Slaski, Katowice; Gluza, J.

    2007-10-01

    We derive the two-loop corrections to Bhabha scattering from heavy fermions using dispersion relations. The double-box contributions are expressed by three kernel functions. Convoluting the perturbative kernels with fermionic threshold functions or with hadronic data allows to determine numerical results for small electron mass m e , combined with arbitrary values of the fermion mass m f in the loop, m 2 e 2 f , or with hadronic insertions. We present numerical results for m f =m μ , m τ ,m top at typical small- and large-angle kinematics ranging from 1 GeV to 500 GeV. (orig.)

  20. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javor, Andrija; Koller, Monika; Lee, Nick; Chamberlain, Laura; Ransmayr, Gerhard

    2013-02-06

    'Neuromarketing' is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods 'neuromarketing' and scientific ones 'consumer neuroscience'. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology:First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington's disease.Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom.Third, trust research in the medical context lacks