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Sample records for synchrotron x-ray microtomography

  1. Quantitative X-ray microtomography with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donath, T.

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation-based computed microtomography (SR μ CT) is an established method for the examination of volume structures. It allows to measure the x-ray attenuation coefficient of a specimen three-dimensionally with a spatial resolution of about one micrometer. In contrast to conventional x-ray sources (x-ray tubes), the unique properties of synchrotron radiation enable quantitative measurements that do not suffer from beam-hardening artifacts. During this work the capabilities for quantitative SR μ CT measurements have been further improved by enhancements that were made to the SR μ CT apparatus and to the reconstruction chain. For high-resolution SR μ CT an x-ray camera consisting of luminescent screen (x-ray phosphor), lens system, and CCD camera was used. A significant suppression of blur that is caused by reflections inside the luminescent screen could be achieved by application of an absorbing optical coating to the screen surface. It is shown that blur and ring artifacts in the tomographic reconstructions are thereby drastically reduced. Furthermore, a robust and objective method for the determination of the center of rotation in projection data (sinograms) is presented that achieves sub-pixel precision. By implementation of this method into the reconstruction chain, complete automation of the reconstruction process has been achieved. Examples of quantitative SR μ CT studies conducted at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY are presented and used for the demonstration of the achieved enhancements. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative X-ray microtomography with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, T. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2007-07-01

    Synchrotron-radiation-based computed microtomography (SR{sub {mu}}CT) is an established method for the examination of volume structures. It allows to measure the x-ray attenuation coefficient of a specimen three-dimensionally with a spatial resolution of about one micrometer. In contrast to conventional x-ray sources (x-ray tubes), the unique properties of synchrotron radiation enable quantitative measurements that do not suffer from beam-hardening artifacts. During this work the capabilities for quantitative SR{sub {mu}}CT measurements have been further improved by enhancements that were made to the SR{sub {mu}}CT apparatus and to the reconstruction chain. For high-resolution SR{sub {mu}}CT an x-ray camera consisting of luminescent screen (x-ray phosphor), lens system, and CCD camera was used. A significant suppression of blur that is caused by reflections inside the luminescent screen could be achieved by application of an absorbing optical coating to the screen surface. It is shown that blur and ring artifacts in the tomographic reconstructions are thereby drastically reduced. Furthermore, a robust and objective method for the determination of the center of rotation in projection data (sinograms) is presented that achieves sub-pixel precision. By implementation of this method into the reconstruction chain, complete automation of the reconstruction process has been achieved. Examples of quantitative SR{sub {mu}}CT studies conducted at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY are presented and used for the demonstration of the achieved enhancements. (orig.)

  3. Geoscience Applications of Synchrotron X-ray Computed Microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, M. L.

    2009-05-01

    Computed microtomography is the extension to micron spatial resolution of the CAT scanning technique developed for medical imaging. Synchrotron sources are ideal for the method, since they provide a monochromatic, parallel beam with high intensity. High energy storage rings such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory produce x-rays with high energy, high brilliance, and high coherence. All of these factors combine to produce an extremely powerful imaging tool for earth science research. Techniques that have been developed include: - Absorption and phase contrast computed tomography with spatial resolution approaching one micron - Differential contrast computed tomography, imaging above and below the absorption edge of a particular element - High-pressure tomography, imaging inside a pressure cell at pressures above 10GPa - High speed radiography, with 100 microsecond temporal resolution - Fluorescence tomography, imaging the 3-D distribution of elements present at ppm concentrations. - Radiographic strain measurements during deformation at high confining pressure, combined with precise x- ray diffraction measurements to determine stress. These techniques have been applied to important problems in earth and environmental sciences, including: - The 3-D distribution of aqueous and organic liquids in porous media, with applications in contaminated groundwater and petroleum recovery. - The kinetics of bubble formation in magma chambers, which control explosive volcanism. - Accurate crystal size distributions in volcanic systems, important for understanding the evolution of magma chambers. - The equation-of-state of amorphous materials at high pressure using both direct measurements of volume as a function of pressure and also by measuring the change x-ray absorption coefficient as a function of pressure. - The formation of frost flowers on Arctic sea-ice, which is important in controlling the atmospheric chemistry of mercury. - The distribution of

  4. X-ray diffraction microtomography using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Barroso, R C; Jesus, E F O; Oliveira, L F

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction computed tomography technique is based on the interference phenomena of the coherent scatter. For low-momentum transfer, it is most probable that the scattering interaction will be coherent. A selective discrimination of a given element in a scanned specimen can be realized by fixing the Bragg angle which produces an interference peak and then, to carry out the computed tomography in the standard mode. The image reconstructed exalts the presence of this element with respect to other ones in a sample. This work reports the feasibility of a non-destructive synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction imaging technique. This research was performed at the X-ray Diffraction beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) in Brazil. The coherent scattering properties of different tissue and bone substitute materials were evaluated. Furthermore, diffraction patterns of some polycrystalline solids were studied due to industrial and environmental human exposure to these metals. The obtai...

  5. Phase-contrast computed microtomography with 50 keV synchrotron x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raven, C.; Snigirev, A.; Snigireva, I.; Spanne, P.; Suvorov, A.

    1996-01-01

    The possibilities to determine the internal structure of low density materials by a simple microtomography setup with high energy synchrotron x-rays are demonstrated experimentally. The coherent properties of a 50 keV x-ray beam at the ESRF wiggler beamline are used to observe phase-contrast images of a boron fiber, which has negligible absorption in this energy range. Images of the boron fiber are recorded with a high-resolution x-ray film at various distances up to 2 m. For microtomography studies, 61 images are taken over an angular range of 180 degrees. In the reconstructed cross sections, the hollow, 15-mm-diameter core of the fiber is clearly visible. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  6. DEVELOPMENTS IN SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY AT THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOWD,B.A.

    1999-07-23

    Last year, the X27A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) became dedicated solely to X-Ray Computed Microtomography (XCMT). This is a third-generation instrument capable of producing tomographic volumes of 1-2 micron resolution over a 2-3mm field of view. Recent enhancements will be discussed. These have focused on two issues: the desire for real-time data acquisition and processing and the need for highly monochromatic beam (.1 % energy bandpass). The latter will permit k-edge subtraction studies and will provide improved image contrast from below the Cr (6 keV) up to the Cs (36 keV) k-edge. A range of applications that benefit from these improvements will be discussed as well. These two goals are somewhat counterproductive, however; higher monochromaticity yields a lower flux forcing longer data acquisition times. To balance the two, a more efficient scintillator for X-ray conversion is being developed. Some testing of a prototype scintillator has been performed; preliminary results will be presented here. In the meantime, data reconstruction times have been reduced, and the entire tomographic acquisition, reconstruction and volume rendering process streamlined to make efficient use of synchrotron beam time. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program recently developed helped to reduce the time to reconstruct a volume of 150 x 150 x 250 pixels{sup 3} (over 5 million voxels) from the raw camera data to 1.5 minutes on a dual R10,000 CPU. With these improvements, one can now obtain a ''quick look'' of a small tomographic volume ({approximately}10{sup 6}voxels) in just over 15 minutes from the start of data acquisition.

  7. Development of quantitative x-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deckman, H.W.; Dunsmuir, J.A.; D'Amico, K.L.; Ferguson, S.R.; Flannery, B.P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have developed several x-ray microtomography systems which function as quantitative three dimensional x-ray microscopes. In this paper the authors describe the evolutionary path followed from making the first high resolution experimental microscopes to later generations which can be routinely used for investigating materials. Developing the instrumentation for reliable quantitative x-ray microscopy using synchrotron and laboratory based x-ray sources has led to other imaging modalities for obtaining temporal and spatial two dimensional information

  8. Synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography study on gas hydrate decomposition in a sedimentary matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Falenty, Andrzej; Chaouachi, Marwen; Haberthür, David; Kuhs, Werner F.

    2016-09-01

    In-situ synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography with sub-micrometer voxel size was used to study the decomposition of gas hydrates in a sedimentary matrix. Xenon-hydrate was used instead of methane hydrate to enhance the absorption contrast. The microstructural features of the decomposition process were elucidated indicating that the decomposition starts at the hydrate-gas interface; it does not proceed at the contacts with quartz grains. Melt water accumulates at retreating hydrate surface. The decomposition is not homogeneous and the decomposition rates depend on the distance of the hydrate surface to the gas phase indicating a diffusion-limitation of the gas transport through the water phase. Gas is found to be metastably enriched in the water phase with a concentration decreasing away from the hydrate-water interface. The initial decomposition process facilitates redistribution of fluid phases in the pore space and local reformation of gas hydrates. The observations allow also rationalizing earlier conjectures from experiments with low spatial resolutions and suggest that the hydrate-sediment assemblies remain intact until the hydrate spacers between sediment grains finally collapse; possible effects on mechanical stability and permeability are discussed. The resulting time resolved characteristics of gas hydrate decomposition and the influence of melt water on the reaction rate are of importance for a suggested gas recovery from marine sediments by depressurization.

  9. X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsmuir, J.H.; Ferguson, S.R.; D'Amico, K.L.; Stokes, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the application of a new high-resolution X-ray tomographic microscope to the study of porous media. The microscope was designed to exploit the properties of a synchrotron X-ray source to perform three dimensional tomography on millimeter sized objects with micron resolution and has been used in materials science studies with both synchrotron and conventional and synchrotron sources will be compared. In this work the authors have applied the microscope to measure the three dimensional structure of fused bead packs and berea sandstones with micron resolution and have performed preliminary studies of flow in these media with the microscope operated in a digital subtraction radiography mode. Computer graphics techniques have been applied to the data to visually display the structure of the pore body system. Tomographic imaging after flow experiments should detect the structure of the oil-water interface in the pore network and this work is ongoing

  10. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING FOR THE STUDY OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.; MCGUIGAN,M.; SMITH,G.J.; SPILETIC,J.

    2001-10-12

    Synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) is a non-destructive method for examination of rock, soil, and other types of samples studied in the earth and environmental sciences. The high x-ray intensities of the synchrotron source make possible the acquisition of tomographic volumes at a high rate that requires the application of high-performance computing techniques for data reconstruction to produce the three-dimensional volumes, for their visualization, and for data analysis. These problems are exacerbated by the need to share information between collaborators at widely separated locations over both local and tide-area networks. A summary of the CMT technique and examples of applications are given here together with a discussion of the applications of high-performance computing methods to improve the experimental techniques and analysis of the data.

  11. Quantitative analysis of flow processes in a sand using synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Dorthe; Hopmans, J.W.; Rivers, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    Pore-scale multiphase flow experiments were developed to nondestructively visualize water flow in a sample of porous material using X-ray microtomography. The samples were exposed to similar boundary conditions as in a previous investigation, which examined the effect of initial flow rate...... by qualitative comparison and quantitative analysis in the form of a nearest neighbor analysis, that the dynamic effects seen in previous experiments are likely due to the fast and preferential drainage of large pores in the sample. Once a continuous drained path has been established through the sample, further...... drainage of the remaining pores, which have been disconnected from the main flowing water continuum, is prevented....

  12. Microscopy and elemental analysis in tissue samples using computed microtomography with synchrotron x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The initial development shows that CMT using synchrotron x-rays can be developed to μm spatial resolution and perhaps even better. This creates a new microscopy technique which is of special interest in morphological studies of tissues, since no chemical preparation or slicing of the sample is necessary. The combination of CMT with spatial resolution in the μm range and elemental mapping with sensitivity in the ppM range results in a new tool for elemental mapping at the cellular level. 7 refs., 1 fig

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes

  14. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

  15. High resolution X-ray detector for synchrotron-based microtomography

    CERN Document Server

    Stampanoni, M; Wyss, P; Abela, R; Patterson, B; Hunt, S; Vermeulen, D; Rueegsegger, P

    2002-01-01

    Synchrotron-based microtomographic devices are powerful, non-destructive, high-resolution research tools. Highly brilliant and coherent X-rays extend the traditional absorption imaging techniques and enable edge-enhanced and phase-sensitive measurements. At the Materials Science Beamline MS of the Swiss Light Source (SLS), the X-ray microtomographic device is now operative. A high performance detector based on a scintillating screen optically coupled to a CCD camera has been developed and tested. Different configurations are available, covering a field of view ranging from 715x715 mu m sup 2 to 7.15x7.15 mm sup 2 with magnifications from 4x to 40x. With the highest magnification 480 lp/mm had been achieved at 10% modulation transfer function which corresponds to a spatial resolution of 1.04 mu m. A low-noise fast-readout CCD camera transfers 2048x2048 pixels within 100-250 ms at a dynamic range of 12-14 bit to the file server. A user-friendly graphical interface gives access to the main parameters needed for ...

  16. Analysis of wood microstructure by synchrotron radiation-based x-ray microtomography (SRμCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautner, Silke; Beckmann, Felix

    2012-10-01

    Wood is a versatile tissue complex composed of different cell types such as tracheids, fibers, vessels and parenchyma cells, that each fulfills specific tasks within the woody body of a tree. However, even within a tree genus wood structure can differ significantly due to either biotic or abiotic stress factors occurring during the growth season, or due to cultivar specific growth characteristics. Typical tools for structural analysis of wood so far are scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light microscopy, allowing measurements of sectional planes. However, the detection of boundary surfaces between neighboring cells and interconnectivity can only be observed in a restricted dimension. In our investigations at DESY, Hamburg, we applied SRμCT for characterization of small wood samples of poplar (Populus trichocarpa) to gain a three dimensional image of a small scale sample that allows us to visualize size, volume, form and interconnectivity of the cells in a non-destructive way. Dependent on sample size, high resolution of micro-structure can be gained. This technique is appropriate to calculate volumes, e.g. of water transported in vessel cells. Since it is possible to reconstruct the vessel network within a stem section, effects of wounding or other environmental stresses on the xylem structure in general, and particularly on the water transport system, might be detected and visualized in 3D by synchrotron radiation-based microtomography. Hence this method is a most promising tool for future investigations in the field of plant physiology.

  17. X-ray Synchrotron Microtomography of a silicified Jurassic Cheirolepidiaceae (Conifer cone: histology and morphology of Pararaucaria collinsonae sp. nov.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Steart

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We document a new species of ovulate cone (Pararaucaria collinsonae on the basis of silicified fossils from the Late Jurassic Purbeck Limestone Group of southern England (Tithonian Stage: ca. 145 million years. Our description principally relies on the anatomy of the ovuliferous scales, revealed through X-ray synchrotron microtomography (SRXMT performed at the Diamond Light Source (UK. This study represents the first application of SRXMT to macro-scale silicified plant fossils, and demonstrates the significant advantages of this approach, which can resolve cellular structure over lab-based X-ray computed microtomography (XMT. The method enabled us to characterize tissues and precisely demarcate their boundaries, elucidating organ shape, and thus allowing an accurate assessment of affinities. The cones are broadly spherical (ca. 1.3 cm diameter, and are structured around a central axis with helically arranged bract/scale complexes, each of which bares a single ovule. A three-lobed ovuliferous scale and ovules enclosed within pocket-forming tissue, demonstrate an affinity with Cheirolepidiaceae. Details of vascular sclerenchyma bundles, integument structure, and the number and attachment of the ovules indicate greatest similarity to P. patagonica and P. carrii. This fossil develops our understanding of the dominant tree element of the Purbeck Fossil Forest, providing the first evidence for ovulate cheirolepidiaceous cones in Europe. Alongside recent discoveries in North America, this significantly extends the known palaeogeographic range of Pararaucaria, supporting a mid-palaeolatitudinal distribution in both Gondwana and Laurasia during the Late Jurassic. Palaeoclimatic interpretations derived from contemporaneous floras, climate sensitive sediments, and general circulation climate models indicate that Pararaucaria was a constituent of low diversity floras in semi-arid Mediterranean-type environments.

  18. X-ray Synchrotron Microtomography of a silicified Jurassic Cheirolepidiaceae (Conifer) cone: histology and morphology of Pararaucaria collinsonae sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steart, David C; Spencer, Alan R T; Garwood, Russell J; Hilton, Jason; Munt, Martin C; Needham, John; Kenrick, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We document a new species of ovulate cone (Pararaucaria collinsonae) on the basis of silicified fossils from the Late Jurassic Purbeck Limestone Group of southern England (Tithonian Stage: ca. 145 million years). Our description principally relies on the anatomy of the ovuliferous scales, revealed through X-ray synchrotron microtomography (SRXMT) performed at the Diamond Light Source (UK). This study represents the first application of SRXMT to macro-scale silicified plant fossils, and demonstrates the significant advantages of this approach, which can resolve cellular structure over lab-based X-ray computed microtomography (XMT). The method enabled us to characterize tissues and precisely demarcate their boundaries, elucidating organ shape, and thus allowing an accurate assessment of affinities. The cones are broadly spherical (ca. 1.3 cm diameter), and are structured around a central axis with helically arranged bract/scale complexes, each of which bares a single ovule. A three-lobed ovuliferous scale and ovules enclosed within pocket-forming tissue, demonstrate an affinity with Cheirolepidiaceae. Details of vascular sclerenchyma bundles, integument structure, and the number and attachment of the ovules indicate greatest similarity to P. patagonica and P. carrii. This fossil develops our understanding of the dominant tree element of the Purbeck Fossil Forest, providing the first evidence for ovulate cheirolepidiaceous cones in Europe. Alongside recent discoveries in North America, this significantly extends the known palaeogeographic range of Pararaucaria, supporting a mid-palaeolatitudinal distribution in both Gondwana and Laurasia during the Late Jurassic. Palaeoclimatic interpretations derived from contemporaneous floras, climate sensitive sediments, and general circulation climate models indicate that Pararaucaria was a constituent of low diversity floras in semi-arid Mediterranean-type environments.

  19. Characterization of enamel caries lesions in rat molars using synchrotron X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Free, R.D.; DeRocher, K.; Stock, S.R.; Keane, D.; Scott-Anne, K.; Bowen, W.H.; Joester, D. (Rochester); (NWU)

    2017-08-18

    Dental caries is a ubiquitous infectious disease with a nearly 100% lifetime prevalence. Rodent caries models are widely used to investigate the etiology, progression and potential prevention or treatment of the disease. To explore the suitability of these models for deeper investigations of intact surface zones during enamel caries, the structures of early-stage carious lesions in rats were characterized and compared with previous reports on white spot enamel lesions in humans. Synchrotron X-ray microcomputed tomography non-destructively mapped demineralization in carious rat molar specimens across a range of caries severity, identifying 52 lesions across the 30 teeth imaged. Of these lesions, 13 were shown to have intact surface zones. Depth profiles of fractional mineral density were qualitatively similar to lesions in human teeth. However, the thickness of the surface zone in the rat model ranges from 10 to 58 µm, and is therefore significantly thinner than in human enamel. These results indicate that a fraction of lesions in rat caries possess an intact surface zone and are qualitatively similar to human lesions at the micrometer scale. This suggests that rat caries models may be a suitable analog through which to investigate the structure of surface zone enamel and its role during dental caries.

  20. Synchrotron x-ray microtomography of the interior microstructure of chocolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lügger, Svenja K.; Wilde, Fabian; Dülger, Nihan; Reinke, Lennart M.; Kozhar, Sergii; Beckmann, Felix; Greving, Imke; Vieira, Josélio; Heinrich, Stefan; Palzer, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    The structure of chocolate, a multicomponent food product, was analyzed using microtomography. Chocolate consists of a semi-solid cocoa butter matrix and a dense network of suspended particles. A detailed analysis of the microstructure is needed to understand mass transport phenomena. Transport of lipids from e.g. a filling or liquid cocoa butter is responsible for major problems in the confectionery industry such as formation of chocolate bloom, which is the formation of visible white spots or a grayish haze on the chocolate surface and leads to consumer rejections and thus large sales losses for the confectionery industry. In this study it was possible to visualize the inner structure of chocolate and clearly distinguish the particles from the continuous phase by taking advantage of the high density contrast of synchrotron radiation. Consequently, particle arrangement and cracks within the sample were made visible. The cracks are several micrometers thick and propagate throughout the entire sample. Images of pure cocoa butter, chocolate without any particles, did not show any cracks and thus confirmed that cracks are a result of embedded particles. They arise during the manufacturing process. Thus, the solidification process, a critical manufacturing step, was simulated with finite element methods in order to understand crack formation during this step. The simulation showed that cracks arise because of significant contraction of cocoa butter, the matrix phase, without any major change of volume of the suspended particles. Tempering of the chocolate mass prior to solidification is another critical step for a good product quality. We found that samples which solidified in an uncontrolled manner are less homogeneous than tempered samples. In summary, our study visualized for the first time the inner microstructure of tempered and untempered cocoa butter as well as chocolate without sample destruction and revealed cracks, which might act as transport pathways.

  1. Method for obtaining silver nanoparticle concentrations within a porous medium via synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Ian L; Willson, Clinton S; O'Carroll, Denis M; Rivers, Mark L; Gerhard, Jason I

    2014-01-21

    Attempts at understanding nanoparticle fate and transport in the subsurface environment are currently hindered by an inability to quantify nanoparticle behavior at the pore scale (within and between pores) within realistic pore networks. This paper is the first to present a method for high resolution quantification of silver nanoparticle (nAg) concentrations within porous media under controlled experimental conditions. This method makes it possible to extract silver nanoparticle concentrations within individual pores in static and quasi-dynamic (i.e., transport) systems. Quantification is achieved by employing absorption-edge synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXCMT) and an extension of the Beer-Lambert law. Three-dimensional maps of X-ray mass linear attenuation are converted to SXCMT-determined nAg concentration and are found to closely match the concentrations determined by ICP analysis. In addition, factors affecting the quality of the SXCMT-determined results are investigated: 1) The acquisition of an additional above-edge data set reduced the standard deviation of SXCMT-determined concentrations; 2) X-ray refraction at the grain/water interface artificially depresses the SXCMT-determined concentrations within 18.1 μm of a grain surface; 3) By treating the approximately 20 × 10(6) voxels within each data set statistically (i.e., averaging), a high level of confidence in the SXCMT-determined mean concentrations can be obtained. This novel method provides the means to examine a wide range of properties related to nanoparticle transport in controlled laboratory porous medium experiments.

  2. A novel technique combining high-resolution synchrotron x-ray microtomography and x-ray diffraction for characterization of micro particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrifield, David R; Ramachandran, Vasuki; Roberts, Kevin J; Armour, Wesley; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Evans, Gwyndaf; McAuley, Katherine E; Owen, Robin L; Sandy, James

    2011-01-01

    The processing of solids, such as crystals, is strongly influenced by the surface properties of the material. In recent years the pharmaceutical industry has shown great interest in identifying, or chemically speciating, the molecular components of crystal faces. Formerly, characterization of the molecular identity of crystal faces was restricted to the study of large single crystals. This would have been primarily for structure determination as part of the drug registration process. Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire is a new synchrotron facility in the UK, having 18 operational beamlines with 4 more in the construction phase. Beamlines at this medium energy light source enable the study of micron-sized objects in great detail. It is well known that x-ray microtomography (XMT) can be used to investigate the external morphology of a crystal whereas x-ray diffraction (XRD) is used to study the molecular orientation, structure and packing within the crystal. The objective of this research is to assess the feasibility of, and thereby develop a new methodology for, characterizing the molecular identity of a particular face of a crystalline particle at a scale of scrutiny of 20–50 µm by combining these two powerful techniques. This work demonstrates the application of XMT and XRD to investigate respectively the shape and crystalline phase/orientation of relevant test crystals. This research has applications in the pharmaceutical industry in that when the exact molecular nature of a particular face is known, the important physico-pharmaceutical properties stemming from that can be better understood. Some initial data are presented and discussed

  3. Microstructural investigation using synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography reveals taste-masking mechanism of acetaminophen microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Yin, Xianzhen; Liu, Congbiao; Wu, Li; Zhu, Weifeng; Shao, Qun; York, Peter; Patterson, Laurence; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-02-29

    The structure of solid drug delivery systems has considerable influence on drug release behaviors from particles and granules and also impacts other properties relevant to release characteristics such as taste. In this study, lipid-based microspheres of acetaminophen were prepared to mask the undesirable taste of drug and therefore to identify the optimal formulation for drug release. Synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was used to investigate the fine structural architectures of microspheres non-destructively at different sampling times during drug release test, which were simultaneously determined to quantitatively correlate the structural data with drug release behaviors. The results demonstrated that the polymeric formulation component, namely, cationic polymethacrylate (Eudragit E100), was the key factor to mask the bitter taste of acetaminophen by inhibiting immediate drug release thereby reducing the interaction intensity of the bitter material with the oral cavity taste buds. The structure and morphology of the microspheres were found to be influenced by the shape and particle size of the drug, which was also an important factor for taste-masking performance. The quantitative analysis generated detailed structural information which was correlated well with drug release behaviors. Thus, SR-μCT has been proved as a powerful tool to investigate the fine microstructure of particles and provides a new approach in the design of particles for taste masking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Element specific X-ray fluorescene microtomography

    OpenAIRE

    Günzler, Til Florian

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence is widely known as an element-specific scanning analytic tool. It is used in many fields of science and technology and has given major new insights into different problems. The relatively large penetration depth of x rays into matter makes them ideally suited for tomography. The combination of x-ray fluorescence analysis and scanning microtomography, hereafter called x-ray fluorescence microtomography, has been further developed and improved in this work. Employing the newl...

  5. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging systems with fluorescence techniques was developed for biomedical researches in Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory. An X-ray fluorescence microtomography system was implemented to analyse human prostate and breast samples and an X-ray microfluorescence system was implemented to ...

  6. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence techniques and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging systems with fluorescence techniques was developed for biomedical researches in Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory. An X-ray fluorescence microtomography system was implemented to analyse human prostate and breast samples and an X-ray microfluorescence system was implemented to ...

  7. Spherulites growth in trachytic melts: a textural quantitative study from synchrotron X-ray microtomography and SEM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Mancini, Lucia; Giuli, Gabriele; Cicconi, Maria Rita; Voltolini, Marco; Carroll, Michael R.

    2013-04-01

    This study shows the first textural data on synthetic alkali-feldspar spherulites grown in trachytic melts during cooling and decompression experiments with water-saturated conditions. Previous textural studies have shown the shape evolution and the growth process of spherulites as a function of undercooling (T) and water content, although just in basaltic and rhyolitic melts [1-3]. Spherulites are spherical clusters of polycrystalline aggregates that occur commonly in rhyolitic melts under highly non-equilibrium conditions [3-4]. Cooling and decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic melts in order to investigate crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspars and the implications for magma dynamics during the ascent towards the surface. Experiments have been conducted using cold seal pressure vessel apparatus at pressure range of 30 - 200 MPa, temperature of 750 - 850 °C and time of 2 - 16 hours, thereby reproducing pre- and syn-eruptive conditions of the Campi Flegrei volcanoes. This study presents quantitative data on spherulite morphologies obtained both by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Size, aspect ratio, number and crystallographic misorientation of alkali feldspar crystals will be measured. Furthermore, experiments performed at different durations could allow us to follow the growth and the evolution of spherulites. The shape of spherulites changes as a function of ΔT and experimental durations. Two kind of spherulites occured during experiments: open spherulites and close spherulites. The open spherulites are characterized by an structure with large (generally rectangular prismatic), widely spaced fibers with main axis converging towards a central nucleus, in agreement with previous observations [5-6]. Instead, the close spherulites consist of acicular and tiny fibers radially aggregated around a nucleus and single crystals are hardly distinguishable. First preliminary results show: a

  8. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography and histomorphometry for evaluation of chemotherapy effects in trabecular bone structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessio, R.; Nogueira, L. P.; Almeida, A. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Braz, D.; Andrade, C. B. V.; Salata, C.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; de Almeida, C. E.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional microtomography has the potential to examine complete bones of small laboratory animals with very high resolution in a non-invasive way. One of the side effects caused by some chemotherapy drugs is the induction of amenorrhea, temporary or not, in premenopausal women, with a consequent decrease in estrogen production, which can lead to bone changes. In the present work, the femur heads of rats treated with chemotherapy drugs were evaluated by 3D histomorphometry using synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography. Control animals were also evaluated for comparison. The 3D tomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. Results showed significant differences in morphometric parameters measured from the 3D images of femur heads of rats in both analyzed groups.

  9. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography and histomorphometry for evaluation of chemotherapy effects in trabecular bone structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessio, R; Almeida, A P; Braz, D; Nogueira, L P; Colaço, M V; Barroso, R C; Andrade, C B V; Salata, C; De Almeida, C E; Ferreira-Machado, S C; Tromba, G

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional microtomography has the potential to examine complete bones of small laboratory animals with very high resolution in a non-invasive way. One of the side effects caused by some chemotherapy drugs is the induction of amenorrhea, temporary or not, in premenopausal women, with a consequent decrease in estrogen production, which can lead to bone changes. In the present work, the femur heads of rats treated with chemotherapy drugs were evaluated by 3D histomorphometry using synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography. Control animals were also evaluated for comparison. The 3D tomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. Results showed significant differences in morphometric parameters measured from the 3D images of femur heads of rats in both analyzed groups.

  10. Phase-contrast X-ray microtomography of mouse fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Hoshino

    2012-02-01

    A phase-contrast X-ray microtomography system using the Talbot imaging has been built at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. This system has much higher density resolution than absorption-based X-ray microtomography. The tomographic sections of formalin-fixed mouse fetuses obtained with this method clearly depict various organs without any staining at a pixel resolution of up to 5 µm. Since this technique allows us to obtain three-dimensional structural information without sectioning, it will be particularly useful to examine anomalies that take place during development. It can be also used to quantitatively measure volume and mass of organs during development.

  11. Computational fluid dynamics of cerebral aneurysm coiling using high-resolution and high-energy synchrotron X-ray microtomography: comparison with the homogeneous porous medium approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Michael R; Barbour, Michael C; Rolland du Roscoat, Sabine; Geindreau, Christian; Chivukula, Venkat K; McGah, Patrick M; Nerva, John D; Morton, Ryan P; Kim, Louis J; Aliseda, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    Computational modeling of intracranial aneurysms provides insights into the influence of hemodynamics on aneurysm growth, rupture, and treatment outcome. Standard modeling of coiled aneurysms simplifies the complex geometry of the coil mass into a homogeneous porous medium that fills the aneurysmal sac. We compare hemodynamics of coiled aneurysms modeled from high-resolution imaging with those from the same aneurysms modeled following the standard technique, in an effort to characterize sources of error from the simplified model. Physical models of two unruptured aneurysms were created using three-dimensional printing. The models were treated with coil embolization using the same coils as those used in actual patient treatment and then scanned by synchrotron X-ray microtomography to obtain high-resolution imaging of the coil mass. Computational modeling of each aneurysm was performed using patient-specific boundary conditions. The coils were modeled using the simplified porous medium or by incorporating the X-ray imaged coil surface, and the differences in hemodynamic variables were assessed. X-ray microtomographic imaging of coils and incorporation into computational models were successful for both aneurysms. Porous medium calculations of coiled aneurysm hemodynamics overestimated intra-aneurysmal flow, underestimated oscillatory shear index and viscous dissipation, and over- or underpredicted wall shear stress (WSS) and WSS gradient compared with X-ray-based coiled computational fluid dynamics models. Computational modeling of coiled intracranial aneurysms using the porous medium approach may inaccurately estimate key hemodynamic variables compared with models incorporating high-resolution synchrotron X-ray microtomographic imaging of complex aneurysm coil geometry. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. High density resolution synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) for quantitative 3D-morphometrics in zoological sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Michael; Hammel, Jörg U.; Herzen, Julia; Bullinger, Eric; Beckmann, Felix

    2008-08-01

    Zoological sciences widely rely on morphological data to reconstruct and understand body structures of animals. The best suitable methods like tomography allow for a direct representation of 3D-structures. In recent years, synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) placed high resolutions to the disposal of morphologists. With the development of highly brilliant and collimated third generation synchrotron sources, phase contrast SR μCT became widely available. A number of scientific contributions stressed the superiority of phase contrast over absorption contrast. However, here we demonstrate the power of high density resolution methods based on absorption-contrast SRμCT for quantitative 3D-measurements of tissues and other delicate bio-structures in zoological sciences. We used beamline BW2 at DORIS III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) to perform microtomography on tissue and mineral skeletons of marine sponges (Porifera) which were shock frozen and/or fixed in a glutamate osmium tetroxide solution, followed by critical point drying. High density resolution tomographic reconstructions allowed running quantitative 3D-image analyses in Matlab and ImageJ. By applying contrast and shape rule based algorithms we semi-automatically extracted and measured sponge body structures like mineral spicules, elements of the canal system or tissue structures. This lead to a better understanding of sponge biology: from skeleton functional morphology and internal water flow regimes to body contractility. Our high density resolution based quantitative approach can be applied to a wide variety of biological structures. However, two prerequisites apply: (1) maximum density resolution is necessary; (2) edge effects as seen for example in phase outline contrast SR μCT must not be present. As a consequence, to allow biological sciences to fully exploit the power of SR μCT further increase of density resolution in absorption contrast methods is desirable.

  13. Evaluating the Effect of Processing Parameters on Porosity in Electron Beam Melted Ti-6Al-4V via Synchrotron X-ray Microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Ross; Narra, Sneha P.; Ozturk, Tugce; Beuth, Jack; Rollett, A. D.

    2016-03-01

    Electron beam melting (EBM) is one of the subsets of direct metal additive manufacturing (AM), an emerging manufacturing method that fabricates metallic parts directly from a three-dimensional (3D) computer model by the successive melting of powder layers. This family of technologies has seen significant growth in recent years due to its potential to manufacture complex components with shorter lead times, reduced material waste and minimal post-processing as a "near-net-shape" process, making it of particular interest to the biomedical and aerospace industries. The popular titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V has been the focus of multiple studies due to its importance to these two industries, which can be attributed to its high strength to weight ratio and corrosion resistance. While previous research has found that most tensile properties of EBM Ti-6Al-4V meet or exceed conventional manufacturing standards, fatigue properties have been consistently inferior due to a significant presence of porosity. Studies have shown that adjusting processing parameters can reduce overall porosity; however, they frequently utilize methods that give insufficient information to properly characterize the porosity (e.g., Archimedes' method). A more detailed examination of the result of process parameter adjustments on the size and spatial distribution of gas porosity was performed utilizing synchrotron-based x-ray microtomography with a minimum feature resolution of 1.5 µm. Cross-sectional melt pool area was varied systematically via process mapping. Increasing melt pool area through the speed function variable was observed to significantly reduce porosity in the part.

  14. Quantification of swelling and erosion in the controlled release of a poorly water-soluble drug using synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xianzhen; Li, Haiyan; Guo, Zhen; Wu, Li; Chen, Fangwei; de Matas, Marcel; Shao, Qun; Xiao, Tiqiao; York, Peter; He, You; Zhang, Jiwen

    2013-10-01

    The hydration layer plays a key role in the controlled drug release of gel-forming matrix tablets. For poorly water-soluble drugs, matrix erosion is considered as the rate limiting step for drug release. However, few investigations have reported on the quantification of the relative importance of swelling and erosion in the release of poorly soluble drugs, and three-dimensional (3D) structures of the hydration layer are poorly understood. Here, we employed synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography with 9-μm resolution to investigate the hydration dynamics and to quantify the relative importance of swelling and erosion on felodipine release by a statistical model. The 3D structures of the hydration layer were revealed by the reconstructed 3D rendering of tablets. Twenty-three structural parameters related to the volume, the surface area (SA), and the specific surface area (SSA) for the hydration layer and the tablet core were calculated. Three dominating parameters, including SA and SSA of the hydration layer (SA hydration layer and SSA hydration layer ) and SA of the glassy core (SA glassy core ), were identified to establish the statistical model. The significance order of independent variables was SA hydration layer > SSA hydration layer > SA glassy core , which quantitatively indicated that the release of felodipine was dominated by a combination of erosion and swelling. The 3D reconstruction and structural parameter calculation methods in our study, which are not available from conventional methods, are efficient tools to quantify the relative importance of swelling and erosion in the controlled release of poorly soluble drugs from a structural point of view.

  15. X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental set-up for x-ray fluorescence analysis with synchrotron radiation was built and installed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project. X-ray spectra were taken from numerous and varied samples in order to assess the potential of synchrotron radiation as an excitation source for multielement x-ray fluorescence analysis. For many applications, the synchrotron radiation technique is shown to be superior to other x-ray fluorescence methods, especially those employing electrons and protons as excitation sources

  16. Investigation of the microstructure and mineralogical composition of urinary calculi fragments by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography: a feasibility study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaiser, J.; Holá, M.; Galiová, M.; Novotný, K.; Kanický, V.; Martinec, Petr; Ščučka, Jiří; Brun, F.; Sodini, N.; Tromba, G.; Mancini, L.; Kořistková, T.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 4 (2011), s. 259-267 ISSN 0300-5623 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/1394 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : computed microtomography * synchrotron radiation * urinary calculi Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.233, year: 2011 http://www.springerlink.com/content/y244643574072rk3/fulltext.pdf

  17. Identification of ginseng root using quantitative X-ray microtomography

    OpenAIRE

    Linlin Ye; Yanling Xue; Yudan Wang; Juncheng Qi; Tiqiao Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Background: The use of X-ray phase-contrast microtomography for the investigation of Chinese medicinal materials is advantageous for its nondestructive, in situ, and three-dimensional quantitative imaging properties. Methods: The X-ray phase-contrast microtomography quantitative imaging method was used to investigate the microstructure of ginseng, and the phase-retrieval method is also employed to process the experimental data. Four different ginseng samples were collected and investigated...

  18. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, D. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA)); Anderson, S. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA)); Mattigod, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-07-01

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography.

  19. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, D.; Anderson, S.; Mattigod, S.

    1990-07-01

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography

  20. Recent developments in X-ray projection microscopy and X-ray microtomography applied to materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazaux, J.; Erre, D.; Mouze, D.; Patat, J.M.; Rondot, S.; Sasov, A.; Trebbia, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    1993-01-01

    After a long period of sleeping, there is recently a spectacular revival of X-ray microscopy due to the progress in X-ray sources (synchrotron radiation), X-ray optics, and X-ray detectors. However most of the attempts in this field concern the use of soft X-rays to observe, with an improved resolution, biological specimens in their wet environment. In opposition to these trends, we try to demonstrate in this paper the interest of using X-ray microscopy to materials science by applying the old principle of shadow microscopy (but with modern detectors such as CCD cameras) with harder X-rays. The excellent linearity, speed of acquisition and large dynamic of CCD cameras combined to the intrinsic advantage of X-rays ''to see'' inside thick specimens allows one to obtain digital images (for quantification), to follow dynamic processes (such as solid / solid diffusion) and to perform 3 - dimensional reconstruction of the object by X-ray microtomography. The performance of this renewed technique is indicated and illustrated by various examples. (orig.)

  1. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

  2. An X-ray microprobe facility using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Spanne, P.

    1990-01-01

    An X-ray microprobe for trace elemental analysis at micrometer spatial resolutions, using synchrotron radiation (SR), is under development. The facility consists of two beamlines, one including a 1:1 focusing mirror and the other an 8:1 ellipsoidal mirror. At present, open-quotes white lightclose quotes is used for excitation of the characteristic X-ray fluorescence lines. Sensitivities in thin biological samples are in the range of 2-20 fg in 100 μm 2 areas in 5 min irradiation times. Scanning techniques, as well as microtomography and chemical speciation, are discussed. Application to a specific biomedical study is included

  3. Measurement of fibre-fibre contact in three-dimensional images of fibrous materials obtained from X-ray synchrotron microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmberg, F.; Lindblad, J.; Ostlund, C.; Almgren, K.M.; Gamstedt, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    A series of wood-fibre mats was investigated using high-resolution phase-contrast microtomography at the beamline ID 19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. A method for data reduction to quantify the degree of fibre-fibre contact has been derived. The degree of fibre-fibre contact and bonding plays a fundamental role in the mechanical properties of cellulose-fibre mats, paper materials and cellulose-fibre composites. The proposed computerised automated method consists of two parts. First, fibre lumens are segmented using a watershed based method. This information is then used to identify fibre-fibre contacts in projections along the z-axis of the material. The method is tested on microtomographic images of mats made of wood pulp fibres, and is shown to successfully detect differences in the amount of fibre-fibre contact between samples. The degree of fibre-fibre contact correlates well with measured out-of-plane strength of the fibrous material.

  4. Identification of ginseng root using quantitative X-ray microtomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Ye

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: This study is the first to provide evidence of the distribution characteristics of COCCs to identify four types of ginseng, with regard to species authentication and age identification, by X-ray phase-contrast microtomography quantitative imaging. This method is also expected to reveal important relationships between COCCs and the occurrence of the effective medicinal components of ginseng.

  5. A mesoscale quantification method of cavitation in semicrystalline polymers using X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, E. [IFP Energies nouvelles, 1 et 4 avenue de Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil-Malmaison Cedex (France); Brusselle-Dupend, N., E-mail: nadege.brusselle@ifpen.fr [IFP Energies nouvelles, 1 et 4 avenue de Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil-Malmaison Cedex (France); Epsztein, T. [TECHNIP, rue Jean Hure, 76580 Le Trait (France)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} X-ray microtomography to quantify cavitation in strained semicrystalline polymers. {yields} Method based on correlation of the linear attenuation coefficient with 3-D porosity. {yields} Validation of the mesoscale quantification method. {yields} Application: cavitation process investigation in PVF2 from unloaded specimens. {yields} Effect of the triaxiality ratio and of the stretching degree on cavitation process. - Abstract: The ability of X-ray microtomography to quantify the cavitation in highly strained semicrystalline polymers is investigated on polyvinylidene fluoride. The cavitation phenomenon is studied on Circumferentially Notched Round Bars tested in tension. The tensile deformation induces void formation as attested by the whitening of the notch and SEM observations. The aim of this paper is to highlight the interest of a non destructive method based on X-ray microtomography in order to quantify the developed porosity in the cavited area and to follow step by step after relaxation, or continuously the evolution of the porosity during a tensile test. As voids may have a submicrometric size, as attested by SEM images in PVF2, the X-ray microtomography does not intend to image all the voids but to quantify them as a whole, including the non resolved voids. The method is designed to be used either with a laboratory microtomograph or with a synchrotron microtomography device. The quantification uses the correlation between the attenuation coefficient of the material and the porosity developed in the material. The measure is first validated on synchrotron images. Then the method is adapted to the laboratory microtomography prone to beam hardening artefacts. The results obtained with both devices are compared to each other and compared to the results obtained from local SEM analysis. Finally, the analysis of notched tensile specimens with varying notch root radius is investigated after interrupted tests. The analyses of the in situ tensile

  6. Prospects of x-ray microscopy and x-ray microtomography for interface studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erre, D.; Thomas, X.; Mouze, D.; Patat, J.M.; Trebbia, P.; Cazaux, J.

    1992-01-01

    Microfocal x-ray projection microscopy allows the non-destructive investigation of thick specimens with a lateral resolution in the micrometre range. The minimum detectable thickness lies below 100 nm for strongly absorbing materials. For further investigation, x-ray microtomography leads to three-dimensional reconstruction of the specimen. Some applications of x-ray microscopy are connected with the localization and imaging of solid/solid interfaces deeply buried in a matrix. In the future, solid/liquid interfaces and their motion will be of interest. The performance of x-ray microscopy is discussed and x-ray projection images obtained with a simple modified scanning electron microscope are shown. (author)

  7. Development of real-time x-ray microtomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, H; Morikawa, M; Konishi, S; Azuma, H; Shimomura, S; Tsusaka, Y; Kagoshima, Y; Nakano, S; Kosaka, N; Yamamoto, K

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a four-dimensional (4D) x-ray microcomputed tomography (CT) system that can obtain time-lapse CT volumes in real time. The system consists of a high-speed sample rotation system and a high-frame-rate x-ray imager, which are installed at a synchrotron radiation x-ray beamline. As a result of system optimization and introduction of a 'zoom resolution' procedure, a real-time 4D CT movie with a frame rate of 30 was obtained with a voxel size of 2.5 μm using 10 keV x-rays

  8. Identification of ginseng root using quantitative X-ray microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Linlin; Xue, Yanling; Wang, Yudan; Qi, Juncheng; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2017-07-01

    The use of X-ray phase-contrast microtomography for the investigation of Chinese medicinal materials is advantageous for its nondestructive, in situ , and three-dimensional quantitative imaging properties. The X-ray phase-contrast microtomography quantitative imaging method was used to investigate the microstructure of ginseng, and the phase-retrieval method is also employed to process the experimental data. Four different ginseng samples were collected and investigated; these were classified according to their species, production area, and sample growth pattern. The quantitative internal characteristic microstructures of ginseng were extracted successfully. The size and position distributions of the calcium oxalate cluster crystals (COCCs), important secondary metabolites that accumulate in ginseng, are revealed by the three-dimensional quantitative imaging method. The volume and amount of the COCCs in different species of the ginseng are obtained by a quantitative analysis of the three-dimensional microstructures, which shows obvious difference among the four species of ginseng. This study is the first to provide evidence of the distribution characteristics of COCCs to identify four types of ginseng, with regard to species authentication and age identification, by X-ray phase-contrast microtomography quantitative imaging. This method is also expected to reveal important relationships between COCCs and the occurrence of the effective medicinal components of ginseng.

  9. Synchrotron X-ray magnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Stirling, W G

    2003-01-01

    Research on magnetic materials constitutes an increasingly important part of the programmes of most major synchrotron radiation centres. The extremely high brilliance and small spot size of advanced synchrotron beamlines, combined with element-specific resonant effects at certain absorption edges, provide a powerful probe of magnetic structures and phase transitions, with excellent wavevector resolution. Over the last decade a variety of experimental techniques have been developed, exploiting these effects for the study of thin film, multilayer and bulk magnetic materials. In this paper the basic concepts of X-ray magnetic scattering will be introduced, followed by recent examples taken from work at Daresbury Laboratory (UK), the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France) and the National Synchrotron Light Source (Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA). Investigations of domain patterns in thin magnetic films employing X-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) will be described, followed by a se...

  10. Summary of the satellite workshop on synchrotron computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanne, P.; Jones, K.W.

    1995-01-01

    Synchrotron computed microtomography is a field that has developed rapidly over the last ten years. The next few years should bring about further rapid advances because of the introduction of third-generation synchrotron x-ray sources, rapid improvements in the computer hardware and software used for the reconstructions and display of the data, and improvements in x-ray detector technology. The purpose of the workshop was to look at the status of current technology and applications and to present some ideas about future improvements in the technology. Brief summaries of the presentations are given in the following sections

  11. X-ray microtomography application in pore space reservoir rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, M F S; Lima, I; Borghi, L; Lopes, R T

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of porosity in carbonate rocks is important in the oil and gas industry since a major hydrocarbons field is formed by this lithology and they have a complex media porous. In this context, this research presents a study of the pore space in limestones rocks by x-ray microtomography. Total porosity, type of porosity and pore size distribution were evaluated from 3D high resolution images. Results show that carbonate rocks has a complex pore space system with different pores types at the same facies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. X-ray energy optimisation in computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanne, P.

    1989-01-01

    Expressions describing the absorbed dose and the number of incident photons necessary for the detection of a contrasting detail in x-ray transmission CT imaging of a circular phantom are derived as functions of the linear attenuation coefficients of the materials comprising the object and the detail. A shell of a different material can be included to allow simulation of CT imaging of the skulls of small laboratory animals. The equations are used to estimate the optimum photon energy in x-ray transmission computed microtomography. The optimum energy depends on whether the number of incident photons or the absorbed dose at a point in the object is minimised. For a water object of 300 mm diameter the two optimisation criteria yield optimum photon energies differing by an order of magnitude. (author)

  13. Pore formation during dehydration of a polycrystalline gypsum sample observed and quantified in a time-series synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusseis, F.; Schrank, C.; Liu, J.; Karrech, A.; Llana-Fúnez, S.; Xiao, X.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2012-03-01

    We conducted an in-situ X-ray micro-computed tomography heating experiment at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) to dehydrate an unconfined 2.3 mm diameter cylinder of Volterra Gypsum. We used a purpose-built X-ray transparent furnace to heat the sample to 388 K for a total of 310 min to acquire a three-dimensional time-series tomography dataset comprising nine time steps. The voxel size of 2.2 μm3 proved sufficient to pinpoint reaction initiation and the organization of drainage architecture in space and time. We observed that dehydration commences across a narrow front, which propagates from the margins to the centre of the sample in more than four hours. The advance of this front can be fitted with a square-root function, implying that the initiation of the reaction in the sample can be described as a diffusion process. Novel parallelized computer codes allow quantifying the geometry of the porosity and the drainage architecture from the very large tomographic datasets (20483 voxels) in unprecedented detail. We determined position, volume, shape and orientation of each resolvable pore and tracked these properties over the duration of the experiment. We found that the pore-size distribution follows a power law. Pores tend to be anisotropic but rarely crack-shaped and have a preferred orientation, likely controlled by a pre-existing fabric in the sample. With on-going dehydration, pores coalesce into a single interconnected pore cluster that is connected to the surface of the sample cylinder and provides an effective drainage pathway. Our observations can be summarized in a model in which gypsum is stabilized by thermal expansion stresses and locally increased pore fluid pressures until the dehydration front approaches to within about 100 μm. Then, the internal stresses are released and dehydration happens efficiently, resulting in new pore space. Pressure release, the production of pores and the advance of the front are coupled in a feedback loop.

  14. Pore formation during dehydration of polycrystalline gypsum observed and quantified in a time-series synchrotron radiation based X-ray micro-tomography experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusseis, F.; Schrank, C.; Liu, J.; Karrech, A.; Llana-Fúnez, S.; Xiao, X.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2011-10-01

    We conducted an in-situ X-ray micro-computed tomography heating experiment at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) to dehydrate an unconfined 2.3 mm diameter cylinder of Volterra Gypsum. We used a purpose-built X-ray transparent furnace to heat the sample to 388 K for a total of 310 min to acquire a three-dimensional time-series tomography dataset comprising nine time steps. The voxel size of 2.2 μm3 proved sufficient to pinpoint reaction initiation and the organization of drainage architecture in space and time. We observed that dehydration commences across a narrow front, which propagates from the margins to the centre of the sample in more than four hours. The advance of this front can be fitted with a square-root function, implying that the initiation of the reaction in the sample can be described as a diffusion process. Novel parallelized computer codes allow quantifying the geometry of the porosity and the drainage architecture from the very large tomographic datasets (6.4 × 109 voxel each) in unprecedented detail. We determined position, volume, shape and orientation of each resolvable pore and tracked these properties over the duration of the experiment. We found that the pore-size distribution follows a power law. Pores tend to be anisotropic but rarely crack-shaped and have a preferred orientation, likely controlled by a pre-existing fabric in the sample. With on-going dehydration, pores coalesce into a single interconnected pore cluster that is connected to the surface of the sample cylinder and provides an effective drainage pathway. Our observations can be summarized in a model in which gypsum is stabilized by thermal expansion stresses and locally increased pore fluid pressures until the dehydration front approaches to within about 100 μm. Then, the internal stresses are released and dehydration happens efficiently, resulting in new pore space. Pressure release, the production of pores and the advance of the front are coupled in a feedback loop. We

  15. Pore formation during dehydration of a polycrystalline gypsum sample observed and quantified in a time-series synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fusseis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We conducted an in-situ X-ray micro-computed tomography heating experiment at the Advanced Photon Source (USA to dehydrate an unconfined 2.3 mm diameter cylinder of Volterra Gypsum. We used a purpose-built X-ray transparent furnace to heat the sample to 388 K for a total of 310 min to acquire a three-dimensional time-series tomography dataset comprising nine time steps. The voxel size of 2.2 μm3 proved sufficient to pinpoint reaction initiation and the organization of drainage architecture in space and time.

    We observed that dehydration commences across a narrow front, which propagates from the margins to the centre of the sample in more than four hours. The advance of this front can be fitted with a square-root function, implying that the initiation of the reaction in the sample can be described as a diffusion process.

    Novel parallelized computer codes allow quantifying the geometry of the porosity and the drainage architecture from the very large tomographic datasets (20483 voxels in unprecedented detail. We determined position, volume, shape and orientation of each resolvable pore and tracked these properties over the duration of the experiment. We found that the pore-size distribution follows a power law. Pores tend to be anisotropic but rarely crack-shaped and have a preferred orientation, likely controlled by a pre-existing fabric in the sample. With on-going dehydration, pores coalesce into a single interconnected pore cluster that is connected to the surface of the sample cylinder and provides an effective drainage pathway.

    Our observations can be summarized in a model in which gypsum is stabilized by thermal expansion stresses and locally increased pore fluid pressures until the dehydration front approaches to within about 100 μm. Then, the internal stresses are released and dehydration happens efficiently, resulting in new pore space. Pressure release, the production of pores and the

  16. Microstructural characterization of reservoir rocks by X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Jaquiel Salvi; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation of microstructural parameters from reservoir rocks is of great importance for petroleum industries. This work presents measurements of total porosity and pore size distribution of a sandstone sample from Tumblagooda geological formation, extracted from the Kalbari National Park in Australia. X-ray microtomography technique was used for determining porosity and pore size distribution. Other techniques, such as mercury intrusion porosimetry and Archimedes method have also been applied for those determinations but since they are regarded destructive techniques, samples cannot usually be used for further analyses. X-ray microtomography, besides allowing future analyses of a sample already evaluated, also provides tridimensional images of the sample. The experimental configuration included a SkysCan 1172 from CENPES-PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The spatial resolution of this equipment is 2.9 μm. Images have been reconstructed using NRecon software and analysed with the IMAGO software developed by the Laboratory of Porous Materials and Thermophysical Properties of the Department of Mechanical Engineering / Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil

  17. Characterization of ceramic archaeological by high resolution X ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Alessandra C.; Freitas, Renato; Calza, Cristiane F.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Lima, Inaya; Carvalho, Daniele D.; Gaspar, Maria D.

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of ceramic fragments is a very important area of research in art and archeometry area because it enables a greater understanding of how ancient civilizations behave and what were their traditions and customs. Petrography and chemical analyses are commonly used, but these techniques are destructive, which is not interesting for this type of sample. Through the exchange of multidisciplinary scientific knowledge and new partnerships, high resolution X-ray microtomography has been introduced in archaeological area as a great possibility of 3D inspection in a non-destructive way. The goal of this work is to investigate the internal microstructures of four samples of archeological ceramic, from the Archaeological Site of Macacu - RJ. The X-ray microtomography were performed in a high resolution setup, and can be used to infer the nature of organic temper even with all plant remains completely burnt out during the firing process and also to ensure the homogeneity of samples envisaged for geochemical analyses, especially with respect to the distribution of chemically diverse fabric compounds. In this way this study intends to contribute to our understanding of the archaeological and historical formations of this region. (author)

  18. The strain-dependent spatial evolution of garnet in a high- P ductile shear zone from the Western Gneiss Region (Norway): a synchrotron X-ray microtomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macente, A. [School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Building James Hutton Road Edinburgh EH9 3FE UK; Fusseis, F. [School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Building James Hutton Road Edinburgh EH9 3FE UK; Menegon, L. [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Plymouth University, Fitzroy Drake Circus Plymouth Devon PL4 8AA UK; Xianghui, X. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave Building 431-B003 Argonne IL USA; John, T. [Institut für Geologische Wissenschaften, Freie Universität Berlin, Malteserstr. 74-100 12249 Berlin Germany

    2017-03-27

    Reaction and deformation microfabrics provide key information to understand the thermodynamic and kinetic controls of tectono-metamorphic processes, however they are usually analysed in two dimensions, omitting important information regarding the third spatial dimension. We applied synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography to document the evolution of a pristine olivine gabbro into a deformed omphacite-garnet eclogite in four dimensions, where the 4th dimension is represented by the degree of strain. In the investigated samples, which cover a strain gradient into a shear zone from the Western Gneiss Region (Norway), we focused on the spatial transformation of garnet coronas into elongated clusters of garnets with increasing strain. Our microtomographic data allowed quantification of garnet volume, shape and spatial arrangement evolution with increasing strain. We combined microtomographic observations with light microscope- and backscatter electron images as well as electron microprobe- (EMPA) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis to correlate mineral composition and orientation data with the X-ray absorption signal of the same mineral grains. With increasing deformation, the garnet volume almost triples. In the low strain domain, garnets form a well interconnected large garnet aggregate that develops throughout the entire Page 1 of 52 sample. We also observed that garnet coronas in the gabbros never completely encapsulate olivine grains. In the most highly deformed eclogites, the oblate shapes of garnet clusters reflect a deformational origin of the microfabrics. We interpret the aligned garnet aggregates to direct synkinematic fluid flow and consequently influence the transport of dissolved chemical components. EBSD analyses reveal that garnet show a near-random crystal preferred orientation that testifies no evidence for crystal plasticity. There is, however evidence for minor fracturing, neo-nucleation and overgrowth. Microprobe chemical analysis

  19. Techniques for materials research with synchrotron radiation x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    A brief introductory survey is presented of the properties and generation of synchrotron radiation and the main techniques developed so far for its application to materials problems. Headings are:synchrotron radiation; X-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation (powder diffraction; X-ray scattering; EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure); X-ray fluorescent analysis; microradiography; white radiation topography; double crystal topography); future developments. (U.K.)

  20. Comparing natural and artificial carious lesions in human crowns by means of conventional hard x-ray micro-tomography and two-dimensional x-ray scattering with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Lea Maria; White, Shane N.; Deyhle, Hans; Dziadowiec, Iwona; Schulz, Georg; Thalmann, Peter; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Dental caries, one of the most prevalent infectious bacterial diseases in the world, is caused by specific types of acid-producing bacteria. Caries is a disease continuum resulting from the earliest loss of ions from apatite crystals through gross cavitation. Enamel dissolution starts when the pH-value drops below 5.5. Neutralizing the pH-value in the oral cavity opposes the process of demineralization, and so caries lesions occur in a dynamic cyclic de-mineralizing/remineralizing environment. Unfortunately, biomimetic regeneration of cavitated enamel is not yet possible, although remineralization of small carious lesions occurs under optimal conditions. Therefore, the development of methods that can regenerate carious lesions, and subsequently recover and retain teeth, is highly desirable. For the present proceedings we analyzed one naturally occurring sub-surface and one artificially produced lesion. For the characterization of artificial and natural lesions micro computed tomography is the method of choice when looking to determine three-dimensional mineral distribution and to quantify the degree of mineralization. In this pilot study we elucidate that the de-mineralized enamel in natural and artificially induced lesions shows comparable X-ray attenuation behavior, thereby implying that the study protocol employed herein seems to be appropriate. Once we know that the lesions are comparable, a series of well-reproducible in vitro experiments on enamel regeneration could be performed. In order to quantify further lesion morphology, the anisotropy of the enamel's nanostructure can be characterized by using spatially resolved, small-angle X-ray scattering. We wanted to demonstrate that the artificially induced defect fittingly resembles the natural carious lesion.

  1. Glancing angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernik, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes in basic detail some of the techniques that can be used to study thin films and surfaces. These are all in the X-ray region and cover reflectivity, diffraction form polycrystalline films, textured films and single crystal films. Other effects such as fluorescence and diffuse scattering are mentioned but not discussed in detail. Two examples of the reflectivity from multilayers and the diffraction from iron oxide films are discussed. The advantages of the synchrotron for these studies is stressed and the experimental geometries that can be employed are described i detail. A brief bibliography is provided at the end to accompany this part of the 1996 Frascati school

  2. Glancing angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernik, R.J. [Daresbury Lab., Warrington, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes in basic detail some of the techniques that can be used to study thin films and surfaces. These are all in the X-ray region and cover reflectivity, diffraction form polycrystalline films, textured films and single crystal films. Other effects such as fluorescence and diffuse scattering are mentioned but not discussed in detail. Two examples of the reflectivity from multilayers and the diffraction from iron oxide films are discussed. The advantages of the synchrotron for these studies is stressed and the experimental geometries that can be employed are described i detail. A brief bibliography is provided at the end to accompany this part of the 1996 Frascati school.

  3. 3D imaging of transition metals in the zebrafish embryo by X-ray fluorescence microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Daisy; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Vogt, Stefan; Yi, Hong; Will, Fabian; Richter, Heiko; Shin, Chong Hyun; Fahrni, Christoph J

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microtomography has emerged as a powerful technique for the 3D visualization of the elemental distribution in biological samples. The mechanical stability, both of the instrument and the specimen, is paramount when acquiring tomographic projection series. By combining the progressive lowering of temperature method (PLT) with femtosecond laser sectioning, we were able to embed, excise, and preserve a zebrafish embryo at 24 hours post fertilization in an X-ray compatible, transparent resin for tomographic elemental imaging. Based on a data set comprised of 60 projections, acquired with a step size of 2 μm during 100 hours of beam time, we reconstructed the 3D distribution of zinc, iron, and copper using the iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction algorithm. The volumetric elemental maps, which entail over 124 million individual voxels for each transition metal, revealed distinct elemental distributions that could be correlated with characteristic anatomical features at this stage of embryonic development.

  4. Advances in x-ray computed microtomography at the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, B.A.; Andrews, A.B.; Marr, R.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Jones, K.W.; Peskin, A.M.

    1998-08-01

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the gridding algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel 2 slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method

  5. High temperature x-ray micro-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDowell, Alastair A., E-mail: aamacdowell@lbl.gov; Barnard, Harold; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; Gludovatz, Bernd [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Haboub, Abdel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); current –Lincoln Univ., Jefferson City, Missouri, 65101 (United States); Larson, Natalie; Zok, Frank [University California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara CA 93106 (United States); Panerai, Francesco; Mansour, Nagi N. [NASA Ames Research Centre, Moffett Field, CA, 94035 (United States); Bale, Hrishikesh [University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); current - Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, 4385 Hopyard Rd #100, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Acevedo, Claire [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Liu, Dong [University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TH (United Kingdom); Ritchie, Robert O. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    There is increasing demand for 3D micro-scale time-resolved imaging of samples in realistic - and in many cases extreme environments. The data is used to understand material response, validate and refine computational models which, in turn, can be used to reduce development time for new materials and processes. Here we present the results of high temperature experiments carried out at the x-ray micro-tomography beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The themes involve material failure and processing at temperatures up to 1750°C. The experimental configurations required to achieve the requisite conditions for imaging are described, with examples of ceramic matrix composites, spacecraft ablative heat shields and nuclear reactor core Gilsocarbon graphite.

  6. X-ray spectrometry and X-ray microtomography techniques for soil and geological samples analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Dziadowicz, M.; Kopeć, E. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Majewska, U. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Mazurek, M.; Pajek, M.; Sobisz, M.; Stabrawa, I. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Wudarczyk-Moćko, J. [Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Góźdź, S. [Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Institute of Public Health, Jan Kochanowski University, IX Wieków Kielc 19, 25-317 Kielce (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    A particular subject of X-ray fluorescence analysis is its application in studies of the multielemental sample of composition in a wide range of concentrations, samples with different matrices, also inhomogeneous ones and those characterized with different grain size. Typical examples of these kinds of samples are soil or geological samples for which XRF elemental analysis may be difficult due to XRF disturbing effects. In this paper the WDXRF technique was applied in elemental analysis concerning different soil and geological samples (therapeutic mud, floral soil, brown soil, sandy soil, calcium aluminum cement). The sample morphology was analyzed using X-ray microtomography technique. The paper discusses the differences between the composition of samples, the influence of procedures with respect to the preparation of samples as regards their morphology and, finally, a quantitative analysis. The results of the studies were statistically tested (one-way ANOVA and correlation coefficients). For lead concentration determination in samples of sandy soil and cement-like matrix, the WDXRF spectrometer calibration was performed. The elemental analysis of the samples was complemented with knowledge of chemical composition obtained by X-ray powder diffraction.

  7. Synchrotron x-ray microbeam characteristics for x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Atsuo; Noma, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis using a synchrotron x-ray microprobe has become an indispensable technique for non-destructive micro-analysis. One of the most important parameters that characterize the x-ray microbeam system for x-ray fluorescence analysis is the beam size. For practical analysis, however, the photon flux, the energy resolution and the available energy range are also crucial. Three types of x-ray microbeam systems, including monochromatic and continuum excitation systems, were compared with reference to the sensitivity, the minimum detection limit and the applicability to various types of x-ray spectroscopic analysis. 16 refs., 5 figs

  8. High-contrast x-ray microtomography in dental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Graham; Mills, David

    2017-09-01

    X-ray microtomography (XMT) is a well-established technique in dental research. The technique has been used extensively to explore the complex morphology of the root canal system, and to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate root canal instrumentation and filling efficacy in extracted teeth; enabling different techniques to be compared. Densitometric information can be used to identify and map demineralized tissue resulting from tooth decay (caries) and, in extracted teeth, the method can be used to evaluate different methods of excavation. More recently, high contrast XMT is being used to investigate the relationship between external insults to teeth and the pulpal reaction. When such insults occur, fluid may flow through dentinal tubules as a result of cracking or porosity in enamel. Over time, there is an increase in mineralization along the paths of the tubules from the pulp to the damaged region in enamel and this can be visualized using high contrast XMT. The scanner used for this employs time-delay integration to minimize the effects of detector inhomogeneity in order to greatly increase the upper limit on signal-to-noise ratio that can be achieved with long exposure times. When enamel cracks are present in extracted teeth, the presence of these pathways indicates that the cracking occurred prior to extraction. At high contrast, growth lines are occasionally seen in deciduous teeth which may have resulted from periods of maternal illness. Various other anomalies in mineralization resulting from trauma or genetic abnormalities can also be investigated using this technique.

  9. A versatile x-ray microtomography station for biomedical imaging and materials research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussani, Fernando Cesar; Vescovi, Rafael Ferreira da Costa; de Souza, Thaís Diniz; Leite, Carlos A P; Giles, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    An x-ray microtomography station implemented at the X-ray Applied Crystallography Laboratory of the State University of Campinas is described. The station is based on a propagation based phase contrast imaging setup with a microfocus source and digital x-ray area detectors. Due to its simplicity, this setup is ideal for fast, high resolution imaging and microtomography of small biological specimens and materials research samples. It can also be coupled to gratings to use and develop new techniques as the harmonic spatial coherent imaging, which allow scattering contrast imaging. Details of the experimental setup, equipment, and software integration are described. Test microtomography for setup commissioning and characterization is shown. We conclude that phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging and microtomography with resolution below 5 μm voxel size are possible and data sets as wide as 2000 × 2000 × 2000 voxels are obtained with this instrumentation.

  10. X-ray micro-tomography for investigations of brain tissues on cellular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimchenko, Anna; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Thalmann, Peter; Zanette, Irene; Zdora, Marie-Christine; Bikis, Christos; Hipp, Alexander; Hieber, Simone E.; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Hench, Jürgen; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    X-ray imaging in absorption contrast mode is well established for hard tissue visualization. However, performance for lower density materials is limited due to a reduced contrast. Our aim is three-dimensional (3D) characterization of micro-morphology of human brain tissues down to (sub-)cellular resolution within a laboratory environment. Using the laboratory-based microtomography (μCT) system nanotom m (GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH, Wunstorf, Germany) and synchrotron radiation at the Diamond-Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 (Diamond Light Source, Didcot, UK), we have acquired 3D data with a resolution down to 0.45 μm for visualization of a human cerebellum specimen down to cellular level. We have shown that all selected modalities, namely laboratory-based absorption contrast micro-tomography (LBμCT), synchrotron radiation based in-line single distance phase contrast tomography (SDPR) and synchrotron radiation based single-grating interferometry (GI), can reach cellular resolution for tissue samples with a size in the mm-range. The results are discussed qualitatively in comparison to optical microscopy of haematoxylin and eosin (HE) stained sections. As phase contrast yields to a better data quality for soft tissues and in order to overcome restrictions of limited beamline access for phase contrast measurements, we have equipped the μCT system nanotom m with a double-grating phase contrast set-up. Preliminary experimental results of a knee sample consisting of a bony part and a cartilage demonstrate that phase contrast data exhibits better quality compared to absorption contrast. Currently, the set-up is under adjustment. It is expected that cellular resolution would also be achieved. The questions arise (1) what would be the quality gain of laboratory-based phase contrast in comparison to laboratory-based absorption contrast tomography and (2) could laboratory-based phase contrast data provide comparable results to synchrotron radiation based

  11. Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Stephen M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-08-04

    The goal of this research program was to develop a detector that would measure x-ray time profiles with picosecond resolution. This was specifically aimed for use at x-ray synchrotrons, where x-ray pulse profiles have Gaussian time spreads of 50-100 ps (FWHM), so the successful development of such a detector with picosecond resolution would permit x-ray synchrotron studies to break through the pulse width barrier. That is, synchrotron time-resolved studies are currently limited to pump-probe studies that cannot reveal dynamics faster than ~50 ps, whereas the proposed detector would push this into the physically important 1 ps domain. The results of this research effort, described in detail below, are twofold: 1) the original plan to rely on converting electronic signals from a semiconductor sensor into an optical signal proved to be insufficient for generating signals with the necessary time resolution and sensitivity to be widely applicable; and 2) an all-optical method was discovered whereby the x-rays are directly absorbed in an optoelectronic material, lithium tantalate, which can then be probed by laser pulses with the desired picosecond sensitivity for detection of synchrotron x-rays. This research program has also produced new fundamental understanding of the interaction of x-rays and optical lasers in materials that has now created a viable path for true picosecond detection of synchrotron x-rays.

  12. Testing of x-ray microtomography systems using a traceable geometrical standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmignato, S; Dreossi, D; Mancini, L; Tromba, G; Marinello, F; Savio, E

    2009-01-01

    X-ray computed microtomography is an interesting imaging technique for many applications, and is also very promising in the field of coordinate metrology at the micro scale. The main advantage with respect to traditional tactile-probing or optical coordinate measurement systems is that x-ray tomography can acquire dimensional and geometrical data for both inner and outer surfaces, without accessibility restrictions. However, there are no accepted test procedures available so far and measurement uncertainty is unknown in many cases, due to complex and numerous error sources. The paper presents the first results of a test procedure implemented for determining the errors of indication for length measurements of x-ray microtomography systems, using a new reference standard featuring a regular array of inner and outer cylindrical shapes. The developed test method allows the determination of specific characteristics of x-ray microtomography systems and can be used for the correction of systematic errors

  13. The emerging role of 4D synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography for climate and fossil energy studies: five experiments showing the present capabilities at beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltolini, Marco; Haboub, Abdelmoula; Dou, Shan; Kwon, Tae Hyuk; MacDowell, Alastair A; Parkinson, Dilworth Y; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Continuous improvements at X-ray imaging beamlines at synchrotron light sources have made dynamic synchrotron X-ray micro-computed tomography (SXR-µCT) experiments more routinely available to users, with a rapid increase in demand given its tremendous potential in very diverse areas. In this work a survey of five different four-dimensional SXR-µCT experiments is presented, examining five different parameters linked to the evolution of the investigated system, and tackling problems in different areas in earth sciences. SXR-µCT is used to monitor the microstructural evolution of the investigated sample with the following variables: (i) high temperature, observing in situ oil shale pyrolysis; (ii) low temperature, replicating the generation of permafrost; (iii) high pressure, to study the invasion of supercritical CO 2 in deep aquifers; (iv) uniaxial stress, to monitor the closure of a fracture filled with proppant, in shale; (v) reactive flow, to observe the evolution of the hydraulic properties in a porous rock subject to dissolution. For each of these examples, it is shown how dynamic SXR-µCT was able to provide new answers to questions related to climate and energy studies, highlighting the significant opportunities opened recently by the technique.

  14. Magnetic X-Ray Scattering with Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moncton, D. E.; Gibbs, D.; Bohr, Jakob

    1986-01-01

    With the availability of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation from multiple wigglers, magnetic X-ray scattering has become a powerful new probe of magnetic structure and phase transitions. Similar to the well-established magnetic neutron scattering technique, magnetic X-ray scattering methods have...

  15. Synchrotron X-Ray Radiation and Deformation Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fæster Nielsen, Søren

    In the present thesis two different synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques capable of producing non-destructive information from the bulk of samples, have been investigated. Traditionally depth resolu-tion in diffraction experiments is obtained by inserting pinholes in both the incoming...... machining. The conical slit has six 25µm thick conically shaped openings matching six of the Debye-Scherrer cones from a fcc powder. By combining the conical slit with a micro-focused incoming beam of hard X-rays an embedded gauge volume is defined. Using a 2D detector, fast and complete information can...... boundary morphology. Another X-ray diffraction technique was applied on the three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope at the ESRF synchrotron. The microscope uses a new technique based on ray tracing of diffracted high energy X-rays, providing a fast and non-destructive scheme for mapping...

  16. Application of X-ray computed microtomography to soil craters formed by raindrop splash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beczek, Michał; Ryżak, Magdalena; Lamorski, Krzysztof; Sochan, Agata; Mazur, Rafał; Bieganowski, Andrzej

    2018-02-01

    The creation of craters on the soil surface is part of splash erosion. Due to the small size of these craters, they are difficult to study. The main aim of this paper was to test X-ray computed microtomography to investigate craters formed by raindrop impacts. Measurements were made on soil samples moistened to three different levels corresponding with soil water potentials of 0.1, 3.16 and 16 kPa. Using images obtained by X-ray microtomography, geometric parameters of the craters were recorded and analysed. X-ray computed microtomography proved to be a useful and efficient tool for the investigation of craters formed on the soil surface after the impact of water drops. The parameters of the craters changed with the energy of the water drops and were dependent on the initial moisture content of the soil. Crater depth is more dependent on the increased energy of the water drop than crater diameter.

  17. A synchrotron radiation facility for x-ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, C.J.; Lewis, R.A.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1997-01-01

    A proposal for an x-ray optics test facility based at a synchrotron radiation source is presented. The facility would incorporate a clean preparation area, and a large evacuable test area. The advantages of using a synchrotron as the source of the test radiation are discussed. These include the a...

  18. A New Technique for In Situ X-ray Microtomography Under High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, T.; Wang, Y.; Westferro, F.; Gebhardt, J.; Rivers, M. L.; Sutton, S. R.

    2004-12-01

    We have developed a new technique for in situ synchrotron microtomography to study texture evolution in multi-phase specimens under high pressure and temperature. Two critical issues in performing tomography experiments under pressure are (1) the limited X-ray access to the sample because of the highly absorbing materials, such as tungsten carbide and tool steel, typically used in the pressure vessel and (2) a high pressure compatible rotation mechanism to collect projections of the sample continuously from 0 to 180° . We addressed these issues by (1) employing an opposed-anvil high pressure cell, known as the Drickamer cell, with an X-ray transparent containment ring, to allow panoramic X-ray access, and (2) rotating the Dricakmer cell by Harmonic DriveTM gear reducers, with thrust bearings supporting the hydraulic load. The design of the rotation mechanism benefited from the rotational deformation apparatus developed by Yamazaki and Karato (Rev. Sci. Instrum., 72, 4207, 2001). We report results obtained from a test run performed under pressure with monochromatic synchrotron radiation. A sapphire sphere (1.0 mm dia.) was embedded in a powdered mixture of Fe and 9 wt.% S alloy. The diameter of the sample chamber was 2 mm. Under pressure, the entire Drickamer cell was rotated to collect radiographs of the sample at various angles from 0 to 179.5° in 0.5° step size. Computational reconstruction of these projections provided three dimensional (3D) distribution of linear attenuation coefficient of the sample with a spatial resolution of 6 microns. The shape change in the sapphire sphere during compression was clearly observed. Using the program Blob3d, reconstructed 3D images of the sphere were separated from the surrounding Fe-S alloy. Volumes of the sphere were then accurately determined from the extracted images, by carefully defining the image intensity threshold. The errors in the volume measurement are about 0.3 to 0.7%, mostly due to shadowing by anvil

  19. Determination of polymerization particle morphology using synchrotron computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Lindquist, W.B.; Conner, W.C.; Ferrero, M.

    1991-10-01

    Polymerization of monomers over heterogeneous catalysts results in the fragmentation of the catalysts and subsequent transport in the polymer particles that are produced. Characterization of the process using nondestructive synchrotron computed microtomography techniques makes possible measurement of the distribution of the catalyst fragments in an individual particle and, in addition, gives an estimate of the particle porosity and surface area. The present experiment was carried out using the x-ray microscopy facility at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X26 beam line. The tomographic sections were analyzed using autocorrelation techniques to determine porosity and surface area values. The results are compared to values obtained using conventional methods. This procedure makes possible the extraction of quantitative information about porosity and specific area from the tomograms. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  20. Equally sloped X-ray microtomography of living insects with low radiation dose and improved resolution capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Shengkun; Fan, Jiadong; Zong, Yunbing; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Huaidong, E-mail: hdjiang@sdu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); He, You; Zhou, Guangzhao; Xiao, Tiqiao [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Huang, Qingjie [School of Information Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2016-03-21

    Three-dimensional X-ray imaging of living specimens is challenging due to the limited resolution of conventional absorption contrast X-ray imaging and potential irradiation damage of biological specimens. In this letter, we present microtomography of a living specimen combining phase-contrast imaging and a Fourier-based iterative algorithm termed equally sloped tomography. Non-destructive 3D imaging of an anesthetized living yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor was demonstrated with a relatively low dose using synchrotron generated X-rays. Based on the high-quality 3D images, branching tracheoles and different tissues of the insect in a natural state were identified and analyzed, demonstrating a significant advantage of the technique over conventional X-ray radiography or histotomy. Additionally, the insect survived without problem after a 1.92-s X-ray exposure and subsequent absorbed radiation dose of ∼1.2 Gy. No notable physiological effects were observed after reviving the insect from anesthesia. The improved static tomographic method demonstrated in this letter shows advantage in the non-destructive structural investigation of living insects in three dimensions due to the low radiation dose and high resolution capability, and offers many potential applications in biological science.

  1. Synchrotron X-ray induced solution precipitation of nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H J; Hwu, Y; Tsai, W L

    2003-01-01

    By irradiating a solution in electroless Ni deposition using synchrotron X-rays, Ni composite was found to nucleate homogeneously and eventually precipitate in the form of nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles precipitated is rather uniform (100-300 nm depending on the applied temperature). By the addition of an organic acid, well-dispersed nanoparticles could be effectively deposited on glass substrate. The hydrated electrons (e sub a sub q sup -), products of radiolysis of water molecules by synchrotron X-rays, may be responsible for the effective reduction of the metal ions, resulting in homogeneous nucleation and nanoparticle formation. Our results suggest that synchrotron X-ray can be used to induce solution precipitation of nanoparticles and therefore lead to a new method of producing nanostructured particles and coating.

  2. Micromirror-based manipulation of synchrotron x-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walko, D. A.; Chen, Pice; Jung, I. W.; Lopez, D.; Schwartz, C. P.; Shenoy, G. K.; Wang, Jin

    2017-08-01

    Synchrotron beamlines typically use macroscopic, quasi-static optics to manipulate x-ray beams. We present the use of dynamic microelectromechanical systems-based optics (MEMS) to temporally modulate synchrotron x-ray beams. We demonstrate this concept using single-crystal torsional MEMS micromirrors oscillating at frequencies of 75 kHz. Such a MEMS micromirror, with lateral dimensions of a few hundred micrometers, can interact with x rays by operating in grazing-incidence reflection geometry; x rays are deflected only when an x-ray pulse is incident on the rotating micromirror under appropriate conditions, i.e., at an angle less than the critical angle for reflectivity. The time window for such deflections depends on the frequency and amplitude of the MEMS rotation. We demonstrate that reflection geometry can produce a time window of a few microseconds. We further demonstrate that MEMS optics can isolate x rays from a selected synchrotron bunch or group of bunches. With ray-trace simulations we explain the currently achievable time windows and suggest a path toward improvements.

  3. Light source for synchrotron radiation x-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jiyong; Jiang Jianhua; Tian Yulian

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of the synchrotron radiation source for X-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL) is described, local geometrical resolution of topographies is discussed, and the diffracting intensities of white beam topography is given

  4. [Clinical applications of synchrotron radiation X-ray].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyama, C

    1994-09-01

    Synchrotron Radiation X-ray (SR X-ray) is an extremely strong X-ray source with a photon number more than 10(4) compared with that of the current X-ray tube. X-rays obtained by monochromatizing SR X-ray have been applied to new techniques for medical diagnosis. Several studies are now being conducted at the beam site for medical use at the Accumulation Ring of the High Energy Physics Research Institute, Tsukuba. Applications being studied include (1) energy subtraction coronary angiography. (2) microdetection of metas in samples excised from subjects. (3) monochromatic X-ray computed tomography and so on. Energy subtraction coronary angiography might have a safety advantage over the current selective coronary angiography. Microdetection of mandatory metals and poisonous heavy metals in in vivo samples contributes to the development of pathologic knowledge and clinical treatment of cancer and heavy metal toxications. Monochromatic X-ray CT is expected to detect diseases in the early stage due to increased accuracy in CT values.

  5. High-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-10-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the Laser Synchrotron Light Source (LSLS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power C0 2 laser may be used as prototype LSLS brick stones. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps C0 2 laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 70 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of well-collimated, up to 9.36-keV (∼ Angstrom) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of ∼10 19 photons/sec will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to a variable e-beam energy. A natural short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to a 10 21 -10 22 photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO 2 laser upgrade to 1 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps. The ATF LSLS x-ray beamline, exceeding by orders of magnitude the peak fluxes attained at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) x-ray storage ring, may become attractive for certain users, e.g., for biological x-ray microscopy. In addition, a terawatt CO 2 laser will enable harmonic multiplication of the x-ray spectrum via nonlinear Compton scattering

  6. Image processing of multiphase images obtained via X-ray microtomography: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlüter, S.; Sheppard, A.; Brown, K.; Wildenschild, D. (Oregon State U.)

    2014-04-25

    Easier access to X-ray microtomography (μCT) facilities has provided much new insight from high-resolution imaging for various problems in porous media research. Pore space analysis with respect to functional properties usually requires segmentation of the intensity data into different classes. Image segmentation is a nontrivial problem that may have a profound impact on all subsequent image analyses. This review deals with two issues that are neglected in most of the recent studies on image segmentation: (i) focus on multiclass segmentation and (ii) detailed descriptions as to why a specific method may fail together with strategies for preventing the failure by applying suitable image enhancement prior to segmentation. In this way, the presented algorithms become very robust and are less prone to operator bias. Three different test images are examined: a synthetic image with ground-truth information, a synchrotron image of precision beads with three different fluids residing in the pore space, and a μCT image of a soil sample containing macropores, rocks, organic matter, and the soil matrix. Image blur is identified as the major cause for poor segmentation results. Other impairments of the raw data like noise, ring artifacts, and intensity variation can be removed with current image enhancement methods. Bayesian Markov random field segmentation, watershed segmentation, and converging active contours are well suited for multiclass segmentation, yet with different success to correct for partial volume effects and conserve small image features simultaneously.

  7. High-energy synchrotron radiation x-ray microscopy: Present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    High-energy radiation synchrotron x-ray microscopy is used to characterize materials of importance to the chemical and materials sciences and chemical engineering. The x-ray microscope (XRM) forms images of elemental distributions fluorescent x rays or images of mass distributions by measurement of the linear attenuation coefficient of the material. Distributions of sections through materials are obtained non-destructively using the technique of computed microtomography. The energy range of the x rays used for the XRM ranges from a few keV at the minimum value to more than 100 keV, which is sufficient to excite the K-edge of all naturally occurring elements. The work in progress at the Brookhaven NSLS X26 and X17 XRM is described in order to show the current status of the XRM. While there are many possible approaches to the XRM instrumentation, this instrument gives state-of-the-art performance in most respects and serves as a reasonable example of the present status of the instrumentation in terms of the spatial resolution and minimum detection limits obtainable. The examples of applications cited give an idea of the types of research fields that are currently under investigation. They can be used to illustrate how the field of x-ray microscopy will benefit from the use of bending magnets and insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source. 8 refs., 5 figs

  8. X-ray Micro-Tomography of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Francesco; Ferguson, Joseph; Borner, Arnaud; Mansour, Nagi N.; Barnard, Harold S.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray micro-tomography is a non-destructive characterization technique that allows imaging of materials structures with voxel sizes in the micrometer range. This level of resolution makes the technique very attractive for imaging porous ablators used in hypersonic entry systems. Besides providing a high fidelity description of the material architecture, micro-tomography enables computations of bulk material properties and simulations of micro-scale phenomena. This presentation provides an overview of a collaborative effort between NASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, aimed at developing micro-tomography experiments and simulations for porous ablative materials. Measurements are carried using x-rays from the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley Lab on different classes of ablative materials used in NASA entry systems. Challenges, strengths and limitations of the technique for imaging materials such as lightweight carbon-phenolic systems and woven textiles are discussed. Computational tools developed to perform numerical simulations based on micro-tomography are described. These enable computations of material properties such as permeability, thermal and radiative conductivity, tortuosity and other parameters that are used in ablator response models. Finally, we present the design of environmental cells that enable imaging materials under simulated operational conditions, such as high temperature, mechanical loads and oxidizing atmospheres.Keywords: Micro-tomography, Porous media, Ablation

  9. Hard X-ray Sources for the Mexican Synchrotron Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Herrera, Juan

    2016-10-01

    One of the principal tasks for the design of the Mexican synchrotron was to define the storage ring energy. The main criteria for choosing the energy come from studying the electromagnetic spectrum that can be obtained from the synchrotron, because the energy range of the spectrum that can be obtained will determine the applications available to the users of the future light source. Since there is a public demand of hard X-rays for the experiments in the synchrotron community users from Mexico, in this work we studied the emission spectra from some hard X-ray sources which could be the best options for the parameters of the present Mexican synchrotron design. The calculations of the flux and the brightness for one Bending Magnet and four Insertion Devices are presented; specifically, for a Superconducting Bending Magnet (SBM), a Superconducting Wiggler (SCW), an In Vacuum Short Period Undulator (IV-SPU), a Superconducting Undulator (SCU) and for a Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU). Two commonly available synchrotron radiation programs were used for the computation (XOP and SRW). From the results, it can be concluded that the particle beam energy from the current design is enough to have one or more sources of hard X-rays. Furthermore, a wide range of hard X-ray region can be covered by the analyzed sources, and the choice of each type should be based on the specific characteristics of the X-ray beam to perform the experiments at the involved beamline. This work was done within the project Fomix Conacyt-Morelos ”Plan Estrategico para la construccion y operación de un Sincrotron en Morelos” (224392).

  10. Nondestructive three-dimensional elemental microanalysis by combined helical x-ray microtomographies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golosio, Bruno; Somogyi, Andrea; Simionovici, Alexandre; Bleuet, Pierre; Susini, Jean; Lemelle, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    A nondestructive x-ray technique combining simultaneous transmission, fluorescence, and Compton microtomography has been developed. Simultaneous three-dimensional structural information and three-dimensional internal elemental composition maps down to trace concentration levels have been obtained by a helical scan of the sample through an x-ray microbeam. With this method quantitative three-dimensional chemical distributions can be obtained at (sub)micrometric resolution in a nondestructive and noninvasive way, opening unique possibilities for the microanalysis of rare and fragile samples from several research fields

  11. Identification of the Carbonation Zone in Concrete using X-Ray Microtomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łydżba Dariusz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an application of X-ray microtomography for identification of the carbonation zone in concrete material. A concrete specimen subjected earlier to harsh environmental conditions is investigated. The material is firstly checked with the use of chemical corrosion indicators and then is subjected to microstructural analysis performed with the use of X-ray microtomography. Two different settings of scanning parameters are applied implying the image resolutions of approximately 14 μm per 1 pixel and about 7 μm per 1 pixel, respectively. The results obtained are then compared and analyzed. The depth of the carbonation zone is evaluated based on the attenuation curve. The paper highlights also the significance of the corrosion phenomenon in concrete structures. Details of the deterioration mechanisms in concrete are shortly presented.

  12. Synchrotron x-ray reflectivity study of oxidation/passivation of copper and silicon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Y.; Nagy, Z.; Parkhutik, V.; You, H.

    1999-07-21

    Synchrotron x-ray-scattering technique studies of copper and silicon electrochemical interfaces are reported. These two examples illustrate the application of synchrotron x-ray techniques for oxidation, passivation, and dissolution of metals and semiconductors.

  13. ANALYSING THE SOIL STRUCTURE UNDER DIFFERENT TILLAGE SYSTEMS USING X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY AND PF CURVES

    OpenAIRE

    Beekkerk van Ruth, Jöran; Degre, Aurore; Aubinet, Marc; Roisin, Christian; Léonard, Angélique; Beckers, Eléonore

    2011-01-01

    Assessing soil structure is primordial when comparing tillage systems. Whilst most conventional techniques characterize global parameters, X-ray microtomography allows a characterization of the poral space at a µm-scale. These results, combined with data from pF curves, can form a solid basis in order to quantify soil physical fertility. Soil samples were taken from the organic topsoil on two Belgian experimental sites implementing both conventional tillage (CT, ploughing) and simplified ...

  14. Strain analysis of trabecular bone using time-resolved X-ray microtomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiroušek, Ondřej; Zlámal, Petr; Kytýř, Daniel; Kroupa, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 633, Suppl. 1 (2011), s. 148-151 ISSN 0168-9002. [International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors /11./. Praha, 28.06.2009-02.07.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP103/07/P483 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : trabecular bone * X-ray microtomography * strain analysis * intrinsic material properties Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  15. Characterization of iron ore green pellets by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography

    OpenAIRE

    Bhuiyan, Iftekhar Uddin

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM), image analysis (IA) of SEM micrographs and X-ray microtomography (XMT) were used to obtain new information about the morphology of iron ore green pellets in this work. Cryo-SEM and freeze fracturing was used to observe entrapped air bubbles and arrangement of particles around the bubbles and in the matrix of wet green pellets. The observations of samples prepared by plunge and unidirectional freezing indicate that unidirectional freezing fac...

  16. Ceramic foams porous microstructure characterization by X-ray microtomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Appoloni

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the porous structure of amorphous materials is of fundamental importance in calculating geometrical parameters such as total porosity, pore size distribution and physical parameters relating to fluid flow inside void space. The present work deals with the measurement of the microstructural parameters of porous ceramic filters. Microtomographic measurements of samples were taken using an X-ray tube. Bremsstrahlung radiation was filtered in transmission mode with a Sn filter at 58.5 and 28.3 keV and the images analyzed in two ways. The first method consisted in analyzing transepts of the images in order to calculate total porosity based on the average particle size and media linear attenuation coefficients. The second method involved a study of the images using an image analysis software, called Imago, which allows one to calculate total porosity and pore size distribution. The total measured porosity of the filter C90 was 73.8%, 71.1%, 74.4% and 71.5% by, respectively, the Arquimedes method, simple gamma ray transmission, transept analysis and analysis of the microtomographic images at 28.3 keV.

  17. Diamond detectors for synchrotron radiation X-ray applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Sio, A.; Pace, E.; Cinque, G.; Marcelli, A.; Achard, J.; Tallaire, A.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its unique physical properties, diamond is a very appealing material for the development of electronic devices and sensors. Its wide band gap (5.5 eV) endows diamond based devices with low thermal noise, low dark current levels and, in the case of radiation detectors, high visible-to-X-ray signal discrimination (visible blindness) as well as high sensitivity to energies greater than the band gap. Furthermore, due to its radiation hardness diamond is very interesting for applications in extreme environments, or as monitor of high fluency radiation beams. In this work the use of diamond based detectors for X-ray sensing is discussed. On purpose, some photo-conductors based on different diamond types have been tested at the DAFNE-L synchrotron radiation laboratory at Frascati. X-ray sensitivity spectra, linearity and stability of the response of these diamond devices have been measured in order to evidence the promising performance of such devices

  18. Soft X-ray microscopy and lithography with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudat, W.

    1977-12-01

    Considerable progress in the technique microscopy with soft X-ray radiation has been achieved in particular through the application of synchrotron radiation. Various methods which are currently being studied theoretically or already being used practically will be described briefly. Attention is focussed on the method of contact microscopy. Various biological specimens have been investigated by this method with a resolution as good as 100 A. X-ray lithography which in the technical procedure is very similar to contact microscopy gives promise for the fabrication of high quality submicron structures in electronic device production. Important factors limiting the resolution and determining the performance of contact microscopy and X-ray lithography will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  19. X-ray cone beam microtomography for quantitative assessment of tracheal and pharyngeal volumes of Rhodnius prolixus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Izabella Soares de

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade microcomputerized tomography imaging using synchrotron radiation has become a powerful technique to generate high resolution images of Rhodinus prolixus. Images of soft tissues (protocerebrum and muscles) and dense structures (pharynx, trachea and esophagus) of R. prolixus head have been obtained using synchrotron radiation microtomography in mono and polychromatic configuration, respectively. Advancements in conventional microtomography have increased the achievable resolution and contrast, making this relatively inexpensive and widely available technology potentially useful for studies of insect internal morphology. The main goal of this work was to provide a new set of high quality microtomographic images of R. prolixus achieved by means of a desktop X-ray microtomograph. It allows the three-dimensional visualization of important chitinized structures: pharynx and tracheae. Pharyngeal and tracheal volumes were quantitatively evaluated at different days (1, 4, 10, 15 and 20) after feeding. The results suggest that variation of average volumes could be attributed to insect hormone 20-hydroxy-ecdysone (20-OH-Ec) pulse at 11 days after feeding. Pharyngeal volumes decrease 3.80 times. On the other hand, tracheal volumes increase 1.78 times. Head total volume showed similar trends than trachea. (author)

  20. X-ray microtomography-based measurements of meniscal allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, P; Binkowski, M; Bursig, H; Wróbel, Z

    2015-05-01

    X-ray microcomputed tomography (XMT) is a technique widely used to image hard and soft tissues. Meniscal allografts as collagen structures can be imaged and analyzed using XMT. The aim of this study was to present an XMT scanning protocol that can be used to obtain the 3D geometry of menisci. It was further applied to compare two methods of meniscal allograft measurement: traditional (based on manual measurement) and novel (based on digital measurement of 3D models of menisci obtained with use of XMT scanner). The XMT-based menisci measurement is a reliable method for assessing the geometry of a meniscal allograft by measuring the basic meniscal dimensions known from traditional protocol. Thirteen dissected menisci were measured according the same principles traditionally applied in a tissue bank. Next, the same specimens were scanned by a laboratory scanner in the XMT Lab. The images were processed to obtain a 3D mesh. 3D models of allograft geometry were then measured using a novel protocol enhanced by computer software. Then, both measurements were compared using statistical tests. The results showed significant differences (P<0.05) between the lengths of the medial and lateral menisci measured in the tissue bank and the XMT Lab. Also, medial meniscal widths were significantly different (P<0.05). Differences in meniscal lengths may result from difficulties in dissected meniscus measurements in tissue banks, and may be related to the elastic structure of the dissected meniscus. Errors may also be caused by the lack of highlighted landmarks on the meniscal surface in this study. The XMT may be a good technique for assessing meniscal dimensions without actually touching the specimen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Applications of synchrotron X-rays in microelectronics industry research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan-Sweet, Jean L.; Detavernier, Christophe; Lavoie, Christian; Mooney, Patricia M.; Toney, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    The high flux and density of X-rays produced at synchrotrons provide the microelectronics industry with a powerful probe of the structure and behavior of a wide array of solid materials that are being developed for use in devices of the future. They also are of great use in determining why currently-used materials and processes sometimes fail. This paper describes the X20 X-ray beamline facility operated by IBM at the National Synchrotron Light Source, and presents a series of three industry challenges and results that illustrate the variety of techniques used and problems addressed. The value of this research ranges from solving short-term, technically specific problems to increasing our academic understanding of materials in general. Techniques discussed include high-resolution diffraction, time-resolved diffraction, texture measurements, and grazing-incidence diffraction

  2. Application of X-ray synchrotron microscopy instrumentation in biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasperini, F. M. [Medical Science Program, Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi (Brazil); Pereira, G. R. [Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Granjeiro, J. M. [Molecular and Cell Biology Dept., Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Calasans-Maia, M. D. [Oral Surgery Dept., Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rossi, A. M. [Biomaterials Laboratory, Brazilian Center of Physics Research, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Perez, C. A. [Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lopes, R. T.; Lima, I. [Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    X-ray micro-fluorescence imaging technique has been used as a significant tool in order to investigate minerals contents in some kinds of materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the elemental distribution of calcium and zinc in bone substitute materials (nano-hydroxyapatite spheres) and cortical bones through X-Ray Micro-fluorescence analysis with the increment of Synchrotron Radiation in order to evaluate the characteristics of the newly formed bone and its interface, the preexisting bone and biomaterials by the arrangement of collagen fibers and its birefringence. The elemental mapping was carried out at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas - Sao Paulo, Brazil working at D09-XRF beam line. Based on this study, the results suggest that hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials are biocompatible, promote osteo-conduction and favored bone repair. (authors)

  3. Chemical crystallography with pulsed neutrons and synchrotron x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrondo, M.A.; Jeffrey, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Solid-state chemists and physicists, crystallographers and molecular biologists who are using or who plan to use the special properties of pulsed neutron spallation and synchrotron X-ray sources will find this book invaluable. Those scientists who have not yet gained experience in working with such sources will find the basic physics of the radiations, their production and their scattering properties explained, together with descriptions of the different types of diffraction experiments which use them

  4. Calcified-tissue investigations using synchrotron x-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Schidlovsky, G.; Dejun, X.; Bockman, R.S.; Hammond, P.B.; Bornschein, R.L.; Hoeltzel, D.A.

    1990-10-01

    Synchrotron x-ray microscopy (SXRM) in both emission and absorption modes has been used to examine elemental distributions in specimens of rat tibia, human deciduous teeth, and an orthopedic implant phantom. The work was performed with a spatial resolution of 8 μm for the emission work and 25 μm for the absorption work. The results illustrate the usefulness of SXRM for measurements of different types of calcified tissue. 3 figs

  5. In Situ X-ray Microtomography of Stress Corrosion Cracking and Corrosion Fatigue in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2017-08-01

    Structural materials are subjected to combinations of stress and corrosive environments that work synergistically to cause premature failure. Therefore, studies on the combined effect of stress and corrosive environments on material behavior are required. Existing studies have been performed in two dimensions that are inadequate for full comprehension of the three-dimensional (3D) processes related to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and corrosion-fatigue (CF) behavior. Recently, x-ray synchrotron tomography has evolved as an excellent technique to obtain the microstructure in 3D. Moreover, being nondestructive in nature, x-ray synchrotron tomography is well suited to study the evolution of microstructure with time (4D, or fourth dimension in time). This article presents our recent 4D studies on SCC and CF of Al 7075 alloys using x-ray synchrotron tomography.

  6. K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomini, J C

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to utilize dual energy, monochromatic X-rays produced from synchrotrons radiation in order to obtain noninvasive medical imaging. The application of synchrotrons radiation to medical imaging is based on the principle of iodine dichromography, first described by Bertil Jacobson of the Karolinska Institute in 1953. Medical imaging using synchrotrons radiation and K-edge dichromography was pioneered at Stanford University under the leadership of Dr. Ed Rubenstein, and the late Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dr. Robert Hofstadter. With progressive refinements in hardware, clinical-quality images were obtained of human coronary arteries utilizing peripheral injections of iodinated contrast agent. These images even now are far superior to those being presented by investigators using MRI as an imaging tool for coronary arteries. However, new supplies and instruments in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have served to transform coronary angiography into an outpatient procedure, with r...

  7. A multiple CCD X-ray detector and its first operation with synchrotron radiation X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masayo; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Sato, Kazumichi; Toyokawa, Hidenori; Aries, Ian F.; Jerram, Paul A.; Ueki, Tatzuo

    1999-01-01

    A 4x4 array structure of 16 identical CCD X-ray detector modules, called the multiple CCD X-ray detector system (MCCDX), was submitted to its first synchrotron radiation experiment at the protein crystallography station of the RIKEN beamline (BL45XU) at the SPring-8 facility. An X-ray diffraction pattern of cholesterol powder was specifically taken in order to investigate the overall system performance

  8. A multiple CCD X-ray detector and its first operation with synchrotron radiation X-ray beam

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, M; Kumasaka, T; Sato, K; Toyokawa, H; Aries, I F; Jerram, P A; Ueki, T

    1999-01-01

    A 4x4 array structure of 16 identical CCD X-ray detector modules, called the multiple CCD X-ray detector system (MCCDX), was submitted to its first synchrotron radiation experiment at the protein crystallography station of the RIKEN beamline (BL45XU) at the SPring-8 facility. An X-ray diffraction pattern of cholesterol powder was specifically taken in order to investigate the overall system performance.

  9. Microstructural characterization of industrial foams by gamma ray transmission and X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Luiz Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    This work presents the total porosity measurements of the aluminum and silicon carbide (SiC) foams samples. For porosity determination the gamma ray transmission and X-ray microtomography with conic beam techniques were used. These methods have more advantage than conventional ones, because they are non destructive and provide more details of the analyzed material porous structure. The aluminum foam samples with 10, 20, 30, 40 and 45 ppi (pores per inch) and SiC ceramic foam samples with 20, 30, 45, 60, 75, 80 and 90 ppi were analysed by gamma transmission. The SiC 60, 75 and 90 ppi samples were also analyzed by X-ray microtomography. For the gamma ray transmission measurements it was used an 241 Am source (59.53 keV), a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, collimators, a XYZ micrometric table and standard gamma spectrometry electronics connected to a multichannel analyzer, at the LFNA/UEL. For the X-ray microtomographic measurements, the Fein Focus X-ray system of the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory of the COPPE, located at the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, was used. This equipment provide us images with micrometric resolution (53.48 μm) using a conic X-ray beam and bidimensional detection. The microtomographic images were pre-processed and analyzed by the Imago software, developed at Porous Media and Materials Thermophysical Properties Laboratory (LMPT) of the Mechanical Engineering Department, located at Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC. Employing the The Imago software it was calculated the total porosity, pore size distribution and autocorrelation function C(u) of the binarized microtomographic images of the each sample. The microtomographic 3-D image of each sample was compared with 3-D image reconstructed by the Gaussian truncated method. This method generates a periodic 3-D porous structure by using of the autocorrelation function of one 2-D cross sectional image of the sample. (author)

  10. New Developments and Geoscience Applications of Synchrotron Computed Microtomography (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, M. L.; Wang, Y.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S. R.; Yu, T.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2013-12-01

    Computed microtomography is the extension to micron spatial resolution of the CAT scanning technique developed for medical imaging. Synchrotron sources are ideal for the method, since they provide a monochromatic, parallel beam with high intensity. High energy storage rings such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory produce x-rays with high energy, high brilliance, and high coherence. All of these factors combine to produce an extremely powerful imaging tool for earth science research. Techniques that have been developed include: - Absorption and phase contrast computed tomography with spatial resolution below one micron. - Differential contrast computed tomography, imaging above and below the absorption edge of a particular element. - High-pressure tomography, imaging inside a pressure cell at pressures above 10GPa. - High speed radiography and tomography, with 100 microsecond temporal resolution. - Fluorescence tomography, imaging the 3-D distribution of elements present at ppm concentrations. - Radiographic strain measurements during deformation at high confining pressure, combined with precise x-ray diffraction measurements to determine stress. These techniques have been applied to important problems in earth and environmental sciences, including: - The 3-D distribution of aqueous and organic liquids in porous media, with applications in contaminated groundwater and petroleum recovery. - The kinetics of bubble formation in magma chambers, which control explosive volcanism. - Studies of the evolution of the early solar system from 3-D textures in meteorites - Accurate crystal size distributions in volcanic systems, important for understanding the evolution of magma chambers. - The equation-of-state of amorphous materials at high pressure using both direct measurements of volume as a function of pressure and also by measuring the change x-ray absorption coefficient as a function of pressure. - The location and chemical speciation of toxic

  11. Characterization of metal additive manufacturing surfaces using synchrotron X-ray CT and micromechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantzos, C. A.; Cunningham, R. W.; Tari, V.; Rollett, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    Characterizing complex surface topologies is necessary to understand stress concentrations created by rough surfaces, particularly those made via laser power-bed additive manufacturing (AM). Synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography (μ XCT ) of AM surfaces was shown to provide high resolution detail of surface features and near-surface porosity. Using the CT reconstructions to instantiate a micromechanical model indicated that surface notches and near-surface porosity both act as stress concentrators, while adhered powder carried little to no load. Differences in powder size distribution had no direct effect on the relevant surface features, nor on stress concentrations. Conventional measurements of surface roughness, which are highly influenced by adhered powder, are therefore unlikely to contain the information relevant to damage accumulation and crack initiation.

  12. Study of moire fringes using synchrotron X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Jun-ichi

    1992-01-01

    It has recently been shown that X-ray moire fringes are not exactly the projection of the intensity distribution of the wave field on the exit surface of the crystal, but do oscillate along the beam path behind the crystal. Such nonprojectiveness of moire fringes is inexplicable by the conventional understanding of moire fringes, and therefore is of interest from a fundamental viewpoint as well as practical one. In this paper the phenomena of the nonprojectiveness are described on the basis of the latest experimental data obtained by synchrotron radiation. (author)

  13. Oxides neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Sosnowska, I M

    1999-01-01

    We review some results from several areas of oxide science in which neutron scattering and X-ray synchrotron scattering exercise a complementary role to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The very high-resolution time-of-flight neutron diffraction technique and its role in studies of the magnetic structure of oxides is especially reviewed. The selected topics of structural studies for the chosen oxides are: crystal and magnetic structure of the so-called cellular random systems, magnetic structure and phase transitions in ferrites and the behaviour of water in non-stoichiometric protonic conductors and in the opal silica-water system. (40 refs).

  14. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction using triple-axis spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Als-Nielsen, J.

    1980-12-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction studies of (i) monolayers of the noble gases Kr and Ar physiosorbed on graphite (ii) smectic A fluctuations in the nematic and the smectic A phases of liquid crystals are described. The apparatus used is a triple axis spectrometer situated at the storage ring DORIS at Hasylab, DESY, Hamburg. A monochromatic, well collimated beam is extracted from the synchrotron radiation spectrum by Bragg reflection from perfect Si or Ge crystals. The direction of the beam scattered from the sample is determined by Bragg reflection from a perfect Si or Ge crystal. High intensities even with resolution extending beyond the wavelength of visible light can be obtained. (Auth.)

  15. X-ray microtomography of damage in particle-reinforced metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mummery, P.M.; Derby, B.; Anderson, P.; Davis, G.; Elliott, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The damage which occurs on plastic straining of silicon carbide particle-reinforced aluminium alloys has been characterised using x-ray microtomography. The technique is used to provide density measurements as a function of strain in addition to imaging the internal structure with a resolution of ∼15μm. This allows a much more accurate determination of microstructural damage in terms of void growth than is available from measurements of density using buoyancy methods or from elastic modulus decrease. These data can be combined with acoustic emission measurements during straining to allow damage nucleation and growth contributions to be separated. (orig.)

  16. X-ray Computed Microtomography technique applied for cementitious materials: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ítalo Batista

    2018-04-01

    The main objective of this article is to present a bibliographical review about the use of the X-ray microtomography method in 3D images processing of cementitious materials microstructure, analyzing the pores microstructure and connectivity network, enabling tthe possibility of building a relationship between permeability and porosity. The use of this technique enables the understanding of physical, chemical and mechanical properties of cementitious materials by publishing good results, considering that the quality and quantity of accessible information were significant and may contribute to the study of cementitious materials development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. X-ray microtomography of hydrochloric acid propagation in carbonate rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, A C; Oliveira, T J L; Cruz, F B; Lopes, R T; Lima, I

    2015-02-01

    Acid treatments are used in the oil and gas industry, to increase the permeability of the carbonate reservoirs by creating preferential channels, called wormholes. Channels formation is strongly influenced by acid type and injection rate. The aim of this study is to evaluate some characteristics of the microporous system of carbonate rocks, before and after acidizing. For that purpose X-ray high-resolution microtomography was used. The results show that this technique can be used as a reliable method to analyze microstructural characteristics of the wormholes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography and image analysis of wood microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, Sheridan; Evans, Robert; Chen, Fiona; Lagerstrom, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    A number of commercially important properties of wood depend on details of the wood micro- and nano- structure. CSIRO Forest Biosciences have developed SilviScan, an analytical instrument which uses a number of high-speed techniques for analyzing these properties. X-ray micro-tomographic analysis of wood samples provides detailed 3D reconstructions of the wood microstructure which can be used to validate results from SilviScan measurements. A series of wood samples was analysed using laboratory-based phase-contrast x-ray micro-tomography. Image analysis techniques were applied to the 3D data sets to extract significant features and statistical properties of the specimens. These data provide a means of verification of results from the more rapid SilviScan techniques, and will clarify the results of micro-diffraction studies of wood microfibrils.

  19. X-ray microtomography scanner using time-delay integration for elimination of ring artefacts in the reconstructed image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, G.R.; London Univ.; Elliott, J.C.; London Univ.

    1997-01-01

    Most X-ray microtomography scanners work on the same principle as third-generation medical CT scanners, that is, the same point in each projection is measured by the same detector element. This leads to ring artefacts in the reconstructed image if the X-ray sensitivities of the individual detector elements, after any analytical correction, are not all identical. We have developed an X-ray microtomography scanner which uses the time-delay integration method of imaging with a CCD detector to average the characteristics of all the detector elements in each linear projection together. This has the added advantage of allowing specimens which are larger than the detector and X-ray field to be scanned. The device also uses a novel mechanical stage to ''average out'' inhomogeneities in the X-ray field. The results show that ring artefacts in microtomographic images are eliminated using this technique. (orig.)

  20. Precise stress measurements with white synchrotron x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, Donald J.; Vaughan, Michael T.; Wang Liping; Long, Hongbo; Li Li; Dixon, Nathaniel A.; Durham, William B.

    2010-01-01

    In situ measurement of stress in polycrystalline samples forms the basis for studies of the mechanical properties of materials with very broad earth science and materials science applications. Synchrotron x rays have been used to define the local elastic strain in these samples, which in turn define stress. Experimental work to date has been carried out on a prototype detection system that provided a strain measurement precision >10 -4 , which corresponds to a stress resolution >50 MPa for silicate minerals. Here we report operation of a new, permanent, energy dispersive detection system for white radiation, which has been developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The new system provides differential strain measurements with a precision of 3x10 -5 for volumes that are 50x50x500 μm 3 . This gives a stress precision of about 10 MPa for silicate minerals.

  1. Histomorphometric quantification of human pathological bones from synchrotron radiation 3D computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Liebert P.; Braz, Delson

    2011-01-01

    Conventional bone histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed microtomography is a noninvasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices in trabecular bones (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp). In this technique, the output 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. In this work, histomorphometric quantification using synchrotron 3D X-ray computed microtomography was performed to quantify pathological samples of human bone. Samples of human bones were cut into small blocks (8 mm x 8 mm x 10 mm) with a precision saw and then imaged. The computed microtomographies were obtained at SYRMEP (Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline, at ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Italy). The obtained 3D images yielded excellent resolution and details of intra-trabecular bone structures, including marrow present inside trabeculae. Histomorphometric quantification was compared to literature as well. (author)

  2. A simple and robust method for artifacts correction on X-ray microtomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofey, Sizonenko; Marina, Karsanina; Dina, Gilyazetdinova; Irina, Bayuk; Kirill, Gerke

    2017-04-01

    X-ray microtomography images of rock material often have some kinds of distortion due to different reasons such as X-ray attenuation, beam hardening, irregularity of distribution of liquid/solid phases. Several kinds of distortion can arise from further image processing and stitching of images from different measurements. Beam-hardening is a well-known and studied distortion which is relative easy to be described, fitted and corrected using a number of equations. However, this is not the case for other grey scale intensity distortions. Shading by irregularity of distribution of liquid phases, incorrect scanner operating/parameters choosing, as well as numerous artefacts from mathematical reconstructions from projections, including stitching from separate scans cannot be described using single mathematical model. To correct grey scale intensities on large 3D images we developed a package Traditional method for removing the beam hardening [1] has been modified in order to find the center of distortion. The main contribution of this work is in development of a method for arbitrary image correction. This method is based on fitting the distortion by Bezier curve using image histogram. The distortion along the image is represented by a number of Bezier curves and one base line that characterizes the natural distribution of gray value along the image. All of these curves are set manually by the operator. We have tested our approaches on different X-ray microtomography images of porous media. Arbitrary correction removes all principal distortion. After correction the images has been binarized with subsequent pore-network extracted. Equal distribution of pore-network elements along the image was the criteria to verify the proposed technique to correct grey scale intensities. [1] Iassonov, P. and Tuller, M., 2010. Application of segmentation for correction of intensity bias in X-ray computed tomography images. Vadose Zone Journal, 9(1), pp.187-191.

  3. Revealing the 3D internal structure of natural polymer microcomposites using X-ray ultra microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakzad, A; Parikh, N; Heiden, P A; Yassar, R S

    2011-07-01

    Properties of composite materials are directly affected by the spatial arrangement of reinforcement and matrix. In this research, partially hydrolysed cellulose microcrystals were used to fabricate polycaprolactone microcomposites. The spatial distribution of cellulose microcrystals was characterized by a newly developed technique of X-ray ultra microscopy and microtomography. The phase and absorption contrast imaging of X-ray ultra microscopy revealed two-dimensional and three-dimensional information on CMC distribution in polymer matrices. The highest contrast and flux (signal-to-noise ratio) were obtained using vanadium foil targets with the accelerating voltage of 30 keV and beam current of >200 nA. The spatial distribution of cellulose microcrystals was correlated to the mechanical properties of the microcomposites. It was observed that heterogeneous distribution and clustering of cellulose microcrystals resulted in degradation of tensile strength and elastic modulus of composites. The utilization of X-ray ultra microscopy can open up new opportunities for composite researchers to explore the internal structure of microcomposites. X-ray ultra microscopy sample preparation is relatively simple in comparison to transmission electron microscopy and the spatial information is gathered at much larger scale. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2011 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. 3D/4D analyses of damage and fracture behaviours in structural materials via synchrotron X-ray tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-01

    technique to the deformation behavior of a polycrystalline aluminium alloy will be demonstrated in the presentation [6].The synchrotron-based microtomography has been mainly utilized to light materials due to their good X-ray transmission. In the present talk, the application of the synchrotron-based microtomography to steels will be also introduced. Degradation of contrast and spatial resolution due to forward scattering could be avoided by selecting appropriate experimental conditions in order to obtain superior spatial resolution close to the physical limit even in ferrous materials [7]. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Application of X-rays and Synchrotron X Rays to Residual Stress Evaluation Near Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyzalla, Anke

    1999-01-01

    A nondestructive residual stress analysis can be performed using diffraction methods. The easiest accessible radiation is characteristic X radiation that has a penetration depth of ∼10 microm suitable for the determination of the residual stresses in near-surface layers. Special techniques have been developed, e.g., with respect to in situ analyses of the stress state in oxide layers and the residual stress analysis in coarse grained zones of steel welds or annealed Ni-base alloys. Depending on the size of the gauge volume, neutron diffraction can provide information at depths of tens of millimetres of steel and many tens of millimetres of Al. An alternative to the use of the characteristic synchrotron radiation is the use of a high-energy polychromatic beam in an energy dispersive arrangement, which gives access to higher penetration depths at still gauge volumes as small as 100 microm x 100 microm x 1 mm in steel rods of 15-mm diameter. The combination of neutrons with conventional X rays and monochromatic and polychromatic synchrotron radiation allows for a comprehensive investigation of the phase composition, the texture, and the residual stresses

  6. Synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy of fossil embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Philip C J; Bengtson, Stefan; Dong, Xi-ping; Gostling, Neil J; Huldtgren, Therese; Cunningham, John A; Yin, Chongyu; Yue, Zhao; Peng, Fan; Stampanoni, Marco

    2006-08-10

    Fossilized embryos from the late Neoproterozoic and earliest Phanerozoic have caused much excitement because they preserve the earliest stages of embryology of animals that represent the initial diversification of metazoans. However, the potential of this material has not been fully realized because of reliance on traditional, non-destructive methods that allow analysis of exposed surfaces only, and destructive methods that preserve only a single two-dimensional view of the interior of the specimen. Here, we have applied synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM), obtaining complete three-dimensional recordings at submicrometre resolution. The embryos are preserved by early diagenetic impregnation and encrustation with calcium phosphate, and differences in X-ray attenuation provide information about the distribution of these two diagenetic phases. Three-dimensional visualization of blastomere arrangement and diagenetic cement in cleavage embryos resolves outstanding questions about their nature, including the identity of the columnar blastomeres. The anterior and posterior anatomy of embryos of the bilaterian worm-like Markuelia confirms its position as a scalidophoran, providing new insights into body-plan assembly among constituent phyla. The structure of the developing germ band in another bilaterian, Pseudooides, indicates a unique mode of germ-band development. SRXTM provides a method of non-invasive analysis that rivals the resolution achieved even by destructive methods, probing the very limits of fossilization and providing insight into embryology during the emergence of metazoan phyla.

  7. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... ring (black) is fixed from polyimide side and (g) finally the metal substrate is etched to prepare the X-ray mask. standardized for the present X-ray lithography beamline. X-ray exposures are carried out in 3–10 keV region selected using two X-ray mirrors kept at grazing incidence angles. The total power ...

  8. Microstructural characterization of porous materials by X-ray microtomography and gamma ray transmission techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Anderson Camargo

    2006-01-01

    This work presents the application of the X-ray microtomography and gamma ray transmission techniques for the microstructure characterization of different kinds of materials. Total porosity, pore size distribution and the two point correlation functions were measured. The two point correlation function, which allows the reconstruction of 3D models, was carried out for two samples. Seven ceramic tablets of Alumina (Al 2 O 3 ), seven tablets of Boron Carbide (B 4 C), three samples of sedimentary rocks and one sample of Titanium foam were analyzed. The experimental set up for the Gamma Ray Transmission technique consisted of: a 2'' x 2'' crystal NaI(Tl) detector, an 241 Am radioactive source (59,53 keV, 100 mCi), an automatic micrometric table for the sample XZ movement and standard gamma spectrometry electronics. Two microtomography systems were used: a Fein Focus system, constituted by an X-ray tube, operated at 160 kV and 0.3 to 1.1 mA, a CCD camera and the movement sample system, and a Skyscan system, model 1072, with a X-ray tube operated at 100 kV and 100μA, and a CCD camera. The ceramic tablets, analyzed by the gamma ray transmission technique presented results for most of the porosities data with smaller confidence intervals and inside the intervals supplied by the tablets manufacturer. The Titanium porous sample was analyzed by the two techniques, its microtomography images achieved a resolution of 17μm, obtained employing the Fein Focus system. For both techniques, this sample showed high porosity, which allows its application for this purpose. The sandstones samples were analyzed by the Skyscan system, achieving resolutions of 19μm, 11μm and 3.8μm for each sample, respectively. The resolutions of 11μm and 3.8μm were the ones that generated better 2D sections for the respective samples and, consequently, more reliable porosities. The 3.8μm resolution was the one that best quantified the pore size distribution data, showing information not shown by

  9. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X-ray lenses are fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate using deep X-ray lithography beamline of Indus-2. The focussing performance of these lenses is evaluated using Indus-2 and Diamond Light Source Ltd. The process steps for the fabrication of X-ray lenses and microfocussing at 10 keV at moderate and low emittance ...

  10. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... Abstract. X-ray lenses are fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate using deep X-ray lithography beamline of Indus-2. The focussing performance of these lenses is evaluated using Indus-2 and Dia- mond Light Source Ltd. The process steps for the fabrication of X-ray lenses and microfocussing at 10 keV at ...

  11. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X-ray lenses are fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate using deep X-ray lithography beamline of Indus-2. The focussing performance of these lenses is evaluated using Indus-2 and Diamond Light Source Ltd. The process steps for the fabrication of X-ray lenses and microfocussing at 10 keV at moderate and low emittance ...

  12. A quasi-realtime x-ray microtomography system at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeCarlo, F.; Foster, I.; Insley, J.; Kesselman, C.; Lane, P.; Mancini, D.; McNulty, I.; Su, M.; Tieman, B.; Wang, Y.; Laszewski, G. von

    1999-01-01

    The combination of high-brilliance x-ray sources, fast detector systems, wide-bandwidth networks, and parallel computers can substantially reduce the time required to acquire, reconstruct, and visualize high-resolution three-dimensional tomographic datasets. A quasi-realtime computed x-ray microtomography system has been implemented at the 2-BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. With this system, a complete tomographic data set can be collected in about 15 minutes. Immediately after each projection is obtained, it is rapidly transferred to the Mathematics and Computing Sciences Division where preprocessing and reconstruction calculations are performed concurrently with the data acquisition by a SGI parallel computer. The reconstruction results, once completed, are transferred to a visualization computer that performs the volume rendering calculations. Rendered images of the reconstructed data are available for viewing back at the beamline experiment station minutes after the data acquisition was complete. The fully pipelined data acquisition and reconstruction system also gives us the option to acquire the tomographic data set in several cycles, initially with coarse then with fine angular steps. At present the projections are acquired with a straight-ray projection imaging scheme using 5-20 keV hard x rays in either phase or amplitude contrast mode at a 1-10 pm resolution. In the future, we expect to increase the resolution of the projections to below 100 nm by using a focused x-ray beam at the 2-ID-B beamline and to reduce the combined acquisition and computation time to the 1 min scale with improvements in the detectors, network links, software pipeline, and computation algorithms

  13. X-ray and synchrotron methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval'chuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.; Blagov, A. E.; Tereshchenko, E. Yu.; Prosekov, P. A.; Dyakova, Yu. A.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray and synchrotron methods that are most widely used in studies of cultural heritage objects (including archaeological sites)—X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray spectroscopy, and visualization techniques— have been considered. The reported examples show high efficiency and informativeness of natural science studies when solving most diverse problems of archaeology, history, the study of art, museology, etc.

  14. X-ray and synchrotron methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval’chuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.; Blagov, A. E.; Tereshchenko, E. Yu.; Prosekov, P. A.; Dyakova, Yu. A.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray and synchrotron methods that are most widely used in studies of cultural heritage objects (including archaeological sites)—X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray spectroscopy, and visualization techniques— have been considered. The reported examples show high efficiency and informativeness of natural science studies when solving most diverse problems of archaeology, history, the study of art, museology, etc.

  15. X-ray and synchrotron methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koval’chuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.; Blagov, A. E.; Tereshchenko, E. Yu., E-mail: elenatereschenko@yandex.ru; Prosekov, P. A.; Dyakova, Yu. A. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    X-ray and synchrotron methods that are most widely used in studies of cultural heritage objects (including archaeological sites)—X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray spectroscopy, and visualization techniques— have been considered. The reported examples show high efficiency and informativeness of natural science studies when solving most diverse problems of archaeology, history, the study of art, museology, etc.

  16. White Beam, X-Ray, Energy-Dispersive Diffractometry using Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerward, Leif; Buras, B.; Olsen, J. Staun

    1978-01-01

    The special features of left double quote white right double quote beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometry using synchrotron radiation are discussed on the basis of experiments performed at the Deutsches Electronen-Synchrotron, DESY.......The special features of left double quote white right double quote beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometry using synchrotron radiation are discussed on the basis of experiments performed at the Deutsches Electronen-Synchrotron, DESY....

  17. Utilization of synchrotron radiation in analytical chemistry. Soft X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron soft X-ray spectroscopy includes three major types of spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This paper takes up XAS and XES of soft X-rays, and briefly describes the principle. XAS is roughly classified into XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), and XANES is mainly used in the analysis based on XAS of soft X-rays. As the examples of the latest soft X-ray analyses, the following are introduced: (1) bandgap of boron implantation diamond and the local structure of boron, (2) catalytic sites in solid fuel cell carbon electrode, and (3) soft X-ray analysis under atmospheric pressure. (A.O.)

  18. Actinide science with soft x-ray synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuh, D.

    2002-01-01

    Several workshops, some dating back more than fifteen years, recognised both the potential scientific impact and opportunities that would be made available by the capability to investigate actinide materials in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV)/soft X-ray region of the synchrotron radiation (SR) spectrum. This spectral region revolutionized the approach to surface materials chemistry and physics nearly two decades ego. The actinide science community was unable to capitalize on these SR methodologies for the study of actinide materials until recently because of radiological safety concerns. ,The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL is a third-generation light source providing state-of-the-art performance in the VUV/soft X-ray region. Along with corresponding improvements in detector and vacuum technology, the ALS has rendered experiments with small amounts of actinide materials possible. In particular, it has been the emergence and development of micro-spectroscopic techniques that have enabled investigations of actinide materials at the ALS. The primary methods for the experimental investigation of actinide materials in the VUV/soft X-ray region are the complementary photoelectron spectroscopies, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) techniques. Resonant photo-emission is capable of resolving the 5f electron contributions to actinide bonding and can be used to characterise the electronic structure of actinide materials. This technique is clearly a most important methodology afforded by the tunable SR source. Core level and valence band photoelectron spectroscopies are valuable for the characterisation of the electronic properties of actinide materials, as well as for general analytical purposes. High-resolution core-level photo-emission and resonant photo-emission measurements from the a (monoclinic) and δ (FCC) allotropic phases of plutonium metal have been collected on beam line 7.0 at the ALS and the spectra show

  19. Comparison of agricultural soils' structure depending on tillage system using X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Eléonore; Degré, Aurore; Ly, Sarann; Léonard, Angélique

    2010-05-01

    This study aims at characterizing agricultural soils' structure depending on the tillage system: conventional tillage or conservational tillage. Tillage reduction is an increasing practice, but the micro-structural effects on soils and on their hydrodynamic parameters are still not well described. Recent research shows non-converging results. Our point is to highlight fundamental differences in structure through characterization of soils porosity's parameters using X-ray microtomography measurements coupled to image analysis. This attempt is in line with a more integrated experiment of which the aim is to quantify the effects of tillage intensity on lateral flow production, and finally on global water balance. Parameters' measurements consist in a combined approach, based on two different space-time scales of exploration: fundamental scale, with soil sampling campaign for microtomography analysis, and field scale, with continuous flow measurements (plots' dimensions: 18*28 m). For their part, parameters for water balance determination (precipitation, evapotranspiration…) are monitored on the field. All of these measurements have the main objective of hydrological modeling enhancement by taking into account a better lateral flow description. Discussion in this paper will focus on the first results obtained by X-ray microtomography measurements. Our experiment takes place in Gentinnes (Walloon Brabant, Belgium), on a field organized in a split-plot scheme. Since 2004, plots have been cultivated in conventional tillage or in reduced tillage. The latter consists in sowing after stubble ploughing of about 10cm. The crop rotation is sugar beet followed by winter wheat. The soil is mainly composed of silt loam. Soils samples, with a 3 cm diameter and a 5 cm height, were removed from the upper layer (Ap horizon) for both management practices. Samples are scanned by X-ray microtomography using a Skyscan-1172 high-resolution desk-top micro-CT system (Skyscan, Kontich

  20. Analyzing the compressive behavior of porous Ti6Al4V by X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Iván; Jimenez, Omar; Flores, Martín [Departamento de Ingeniería de Proyectos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Olmos, Luís, E-mail: luisra24@gmail.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Tierra (INICIT), Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Michoacán (Mexico); Vergara-Hernández, Héctor Javier; Gárnica, Pedro [Instituto Tecnológico de Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Bouvard, Didier [Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et Procédés (SIMaP), Université Grenoble Alpes (France)

    2017-11-15

    Samples with 40% vol. of pores and a pore size distribution between 100 and 500 μm were produced by powder metallurgy from Ti6Al4V alloy powders. Sintering was performed at 1300 °C during one hour in an inert Argon atmosphere in a vertical dilatometer. The compressive strength and the porosity of these samples was investigated before and after compression tests through X-ray microtomography. The values of the elastic modulus (8GPa) and yield strength (80MPa) are within the range of those used in bone implants. Porosity leads to greater deformation whereas fracture of compacts occurs perpendicularly to the applied load. It was determined that the origin of the failure is generated by rupture of interparticle necks and, large pores enhance the propagation of cracks. (author)

  1. Analyzing the compressive behavior of porous Ti6Al4V by X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Iván; Jimenez, Omar; Flores, Martín; Olmos, Luís; Vergara-Hernández, Héctor Javier; Gárnica, Pedro; Bouvard, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Samples with 40% vol. of pores and a pore size distribution between 100 and 500 μm were produced by powder metallurgy from Ti6Al4V alloy powders. Sintering was performed at 1300 °C during one hour in an inert Argon atmosphere in a vertical dilatometer. The compressive strength and the porosity of these samples was investigated before and after compression tests through X-ray microtomography. The values of the elastic modulus (8GPa) and yield strength (80MPa) are within the range of those used in bone implants. Porosity leads to greater deformation whereas fracture of compacts occurs perpendicularly to the applied load. It was determined that the origin of the failure is generated by rupture of interparticle necks and, large pores enhance the propagation of cracks. (author)

  2. Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Microprobes in the Study of Metal Homeostasis in Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punshon, T.; Guerinot, M.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: This Botanical Briefing reviews the application of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes to the plant sciences; how the technique has expanded our knowledge of metal(loid) homeostasis, and how it can be used in the future. Scope: The use of SXRF microspectroscopy and microtomography in research on metal homeostasis in plants is reviewed. The potential use of SXRF as part of the ionomics toolbox, where it is able to provide fundamental information on the way that plants control metal homeostasis, is recommended. Conclusions: SXRF is one of the few techniques capable of providing spatially resolved in-vivo metal abundance data on a sub-micrometre scale, without the need for chemical fixation, coating, drying or even sectioning of samples. This gives researchers the ability to uncover mechanisms of plant metal homeostasis that can potentially be obscured by the artefacts of sample preparation. Further, new generation synchrotrons with smaller beam sizes and more sensitive detection systems will allow for the imaging of metal distribution within single living plant cells. Even greater advances in our understanding of metal homeostasis in plants can be gained by overcoming some of the practical boundaries that exist in the use of SXRF analysis.

  3. X-ray absorption microtomography (microCT) and small beam diffraction mapping of sea urchin teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, S R; Barss, J; Dahl, T; Veis, A; Almer, J D

    2002-07-01

    Two noninvasive X-ray techniques, laboratory X-ray absorption microtomography (microCT) and X-ray diffraction mapping, were used to study teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus. MicroCT revealed low attenuation regions at near the tooth's stone part and along the carinar process-central prism boundary; this latter observation appears to be novel. The expected variation of Mg fraction x in the mineral phase (calcite, Ca(1-x)Mg(x)CO(3)) cannot account for all of the linear attenuation coefficient decrease in the two zones: this suggested that soft tissue is localized there. Transmission diffraction mapping (synchrotron X-radiation, 80.8 keV, 0.1 x 0.1mm(2) beam area, 0.1mm translation grid, image plate area detector) simultaneously probed variations in 3-D and showed that the crystal elements of the "T"-shaped tooth were very highly aligned. Diffraction patterns from the keel (adaxial web) and from the abaxial flange (containing primary plates and the stone part) differed markedly. The flange contained two populations of identically oriented crystal elements with lattice parameters corresponding to x=0.13 and x=0.32. The keel produced one set of diffraction spots corresponding to the lower x. The compositions were more or less equivalent to those determined by others for camarodont teeth, and the high Mg phase is expected to be disks of secondary mineral epitaxially related to the underlying primary mineral element. Lattice parameter gradients were not noted in the keel or flange. Taken together, the microCT and diffraction results indicated that there was a band of relatively high protein content, of up to approximately 0.25 volume fraction, in the central part of the flange and paralleling its adaxial and abaxial faces. X-ray microCT and microdiffraction data used in conjunction with protein distribution data will be crucial for understanding the properties of various biocomposites and their mechanical functions.

  4. 3D histomorphometric quantification of trabecular bones by computed microtomography using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, L P; Braz, D; Barroso, R C; Oliveira, L F; Pinheiro, C J G; Dreossi, D; Tromba, G

    2010-12-01

    Conventional bone histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed microtomography is a non-invasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices in trabecular bones (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp). In this technique, 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. In this work, histomorphometric quantification using synchrotron 3D X-ray computed microtomography was performed to quantify the bone structure at different skeletal sites as well as to investigate the effects of bone diseases on quantitative understanding of bone architecture. The images were obtained at Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beamline, at ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility, Italy. Concerning the obtained results for normal and pathological bones from same skeletal sites and individuals, from our results, a certain declining bone volume fraction was achieved. The results obtained could be used in forming the basis for comparison of the bone microarchitecture and can be a valuable tool for predicting bone fragility. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Trace element characterization using a synchrotron radiation X-ray microprobe

    OpenAIRE

    早川, 慎二郎

    1996-01-01

    A scanning X-ray microprobe using synchrotron radiation was developed employing an X-ray focusing system with total reflection mirrors. Utilizing a Wolter mirror system, a hard X-ray microbeam was first realized. With an energy tunable X-ray microprobe, sensitivity in X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis can be optimized for the element of interest at less than 1 ppm in relative concentration. Moreover, small area X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements with XRF detection can provide...

  6. Nano particle fluidisation in model 2-D and 3-D beds using high speed X-ray imaging and microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundogdu, O.; Jenneson, P. M.; Tuzun, U.

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles and nanocomposites have become a major focus of interest in science and technology due to exceptional properties they provide. However, handling and processing of ultra-fine powders is very challenging because they are extremely cohesive. Fluidization is one of techniques available to process powders. It has become increasingly important to understand how these nanoparticles can be handled and processed to benefit from their favourable properties. A high spatial (down to 400 nm) and temporal resolution (down to 1 ms) X-ray imaging apparatus has been designed to study nanoparticles in fluidized beds under different gas flow velocities. The mean volume distribution of the nanoparticle agglomerates was determined with X-ray microtomography. The X-ray microtomography technique provides valuable in situ, non-destructive structural information on the morphological changes that take place during fluidisation of powder samples

  7. Quantitative comparison of X-ray fluorescence microtomography setups: Standard and confocal collimator apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chukalina, M. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: marina@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Simionovici, A. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, University of Grenoble, BP 53, 38041, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: alexandre.simionovici@ujf-grenoble.fr; Zaitsev, S. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: zaitsev@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Vanegas, C.J. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vanegas@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru

    2007-07-15

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest for fluorescence spectroscopy, as provided by modern setups which allow 2D and 3D imaging of elemental distributions. Two directions are currently under development: the SR-based fluorescence tomography in polar scanning geometry, provided by the new generation of X-ray microprobes and the confocal scanning geometry, which can be fielded in both SR and laboratory environments. The new probes bring forth a new age in fluorescence spectrometry: high resolution, high intensity and high sensitivity which allow 3D elemental mapping of volumes. The major task now is the development of these complex tools into fully quantitative probes, reproducible and straightforward for general use. In this work we analyze two X-ray fluorescence microtomography techniques: an apparatus tomography using a confocal collimator for the data collection and a standard first generation Computed Tomography (CT) in the parallel scanning scheme. We calculate the deposited dose (amount of energy deposited and distributed in the sample during the data collection time) and find the conditions for the choice of the tomography scheme.

  8. Three dimensional characterization of soil macroporosity by X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passoni, Sabrina; Pires, Luiz Fernando; Rosa, Jadir Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the soil pore system represents an important way of characterizing soil structure. Properties such as the shape and number of pores can be determined through soil pore evaluations. This study presents a three-dimensional (3D) characterization of the shape and number of pores of a sub-tropical soil. To do so, a second generation X-ray microtomography equipped with a plain type detector was employed. A voltage of 120 kV and current of 80 mA was applied to the X-ray tube. The soil samples analyzed were collected at three different depths (0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm). The results obtained allowed qualitative (images) and quantitative (3D) analyses of the soil structure, revealing the potential of the microtomographic technique, as well as the study of differences in soil macroporosity at different depths. Macroporosity was 5.14 % in the 0-10 cm layer, 5.10 % in the 10-20 cm layer, and 6.64 % in the 20-30 cm layer. The macroporosity of unclassified pores (UN) was 0.30 % (0-10 and 10-20 cm) and 0.40 % (20-30 cm), while equant pores (EQ) had values of 0.01 % at the three depths under analysis. (author)

  9. Three dimensional characterization of soil macroporosity by X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passoni, Sabrina [Centro de Ensino Superior dos Campos Gerais, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Pires, Luiz Fernando, E-mail: lfpires@uepg.br [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UFPG), Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica; Heck, Richard [University of Guelph, School of Environmental Sciences, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Rosa, Jadir Aparecido [Instituto Agronomico do Parana, Polo Regional de Pesquisa de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Analysis of the soil pore system represents an important way of characterizing soil structure. Properties such as the shape and number of pores can be determined through soil pore evaluations. This study presents a three-dimensional (3D) characterization of the shape and number of pores of a sub-tropical soil. To do so, a second generation X-ray microtomography equipped with a plain type detector was employed. A voltage of 120 kV and current of 80 mA was applied to the X-ray tube. The soil samples analyzed were collected at three different depths (0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm). The results obtained allowed qualitative (images) and quantitative (3D) analyses of the soil structure, revealing the potential of the microtomographic technique, as well as the study of differences in soil macroporosity at different depths. Macroporosity was 5.14 % in the 0-10 cm layer, 5.10 % in the 10-20 cm layer, and 6.64 % in the 20-30 cm layer. The macroporosity of unclassified pores (UN) was 0.30 % (0-10 and 10-20 cm) and 0.40 % (20-30 cm), while equant pores (EQ) had values of 0.01 % at the three depths under analysis. (author)

  10. K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomini, John C.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to utilize dual energy, monochromatic X-rays produced from synchrotrons radiation in order to obtain noninvasive medical imaging. The application of synchrotrons radiation to medical imaging is based on the principle of iodine dichromography, first described by Bertil Jacobson of the Karolinska Institute in 1953. Medical imaging using synchrotrons radiation and K-edge dichromography was pioneered at Stanford University under the leadership of Dr. Ed Rubenstein, and the late Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dr. Robert Hofstadter. With progressive refinements in hardware, clinical-quality images were obtained of human coronary arteries utilizing peripheral injections of iodinated contrast agent. These images even now are far superior to those being presented by investigators using MRI as an imaging tool for coronary arteries. However, new supplies and instruments in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have served to transform coronary angiography into an outpatient procedure, with relatively little morbidity. We extended the principles learned with coronary angiography to noninvasive imaging of the human bronchial tree. For these images, we utilized xenon as the contrast agent, as it has a K-edge very similar to that of iodine. In this case, there is no true competing diagnostic test, and pulmonary neoplasm is an enormous public health concern. In early experiments, we demonstrated remarkably clear images of the human bronchial tree. These images have been shown internationally; however, funding difficulties primarily with the Department of Energy have not allowed for progression of this promising avenue of research. One potential criticism of the project is that in order to obtain these images, we utilized national laboratories. Some have questioned whether this would lead to a practical imaging modality. However, we have shown that the technology exists to allow for construction of a miniature storage ring, with a superconducting

  11. Soft X-ray diffractometer for synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Gau, T S; Liu, K Y; Chung, C H; Chen, C K; Lai, S C; Shu, C H; Huang, Y S; Chao, C H; Lee, Y R; Chen, C T; Chang, S L

    2001-01-01

    An ultra-high vacuum soft X-ray diffractometer has been constructed and commissioned at the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (SRRC) to investigate materials structures in mesoscale. The diffractometer, housed in a UHV tank, consists of a 6-circle goniometer, together with the systems for beam-collimation, signal detection, vacuum, and control panels. The kappa-phi (cursive,open) Greek-psi goniostat is adopted for the sample orientation. Crystal samples can be rotated along a given reciprocal lattice vector by using psi scan. Two orthogonal axes, gamma (or 2 theta) and delta, are used to move the detector. The detector is a semiconductor pin diode, which can be used in UHV ambient. This 6-circle goniometer allows for sample scanning of a wide range in the momentum space. The motors used for goniometer rotation and slit selection are UHV compatible. The UHV tank is placed on an XYZ table capable of positioning the center of the goniometer onto the incident beam. Test experiments have been carried on the 1-...

  12. Synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction techniques applied in hydrogen storage materials - A review

    OpenAIRE

    Honghui Cheng; Chen Lu; Jingjing Liu; Yongke Yan; Xingbo Han; Huiming Jin; Yu Wang; Yi Liu; Changle Wu

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is an advanced collimated light source with high intensity. It has particular advantages in structural characterization of materials on the atomic or molecular scale. Synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (SR-XRPD) has been successfully exploited to various areas of hydrogen storage materials. In the paper, we will give a brief introduction on hydrogen storage materials, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and synchrotron radiation light source. The applications of...

  13. Computerized microtomography using synchrotron radiation from the NSLS [National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.

    1986-09-01

    Results of microtomography experiments that employ filtered radiation from the National Synchrotron Light Source X-26 Microprobe beam line are presented. These experiments have yielded images of a freeze-dried caterpillar with a spatial resolution of the order of 30 μm and show that the limit on the spatial resolution with the present apparatus will be 1 to 10 μm. Directions for improvement in synchrotron microtomography techniques and some possible applications are discussed. 14 refs., 3 figs

  14. Accurate 3D modeling of Cable in Conduit Conductor type superconductors by X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiseanu, Ion, E-mail: tiseanu@infim.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (INFLPR), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Zani, Louis [CEA/Cadarache – Institut de Recherche sur la Fusion Magnetique, St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Tiseanu, Catalin-Stefan [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science (Romania); Craciunescu, Teddy; Dobrea, Cosmin [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (INFLPR), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quality controls monitoring of Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC) by X-ray tomography. • High resolution (≈40 μm) X-ray tomography images of CICC section up to 300 mm long. • Assignment of vast majority of strand trajectories over relevant section of CICC. • Non-invasive accurate measurements of local void fraction statistics. - Abstract: Operation and data acquisition of an X-ray microtomography developed at INFLPR are optimized to produce stacks of 2-D high-resolution tomographic sections of Cable in Conduit Conductor (CICC) type superconductors demanded in major fusion projects. High-resolution images for CCIC samples (486 NbTi&Cu strands of 0.81 mm diameter, jacketed in rectangular stainless steel pipes of 22 × 26 mm{sup 2}) are obtained by a combination of high energy/intensity and small focus spot X-ray source and high resolution/efficiency detector array. The stack of reconstructed slices is then used for quantitative analysis consisting of accurate strand positioning, determination of the local and global void fraction and 3D strand trajectory assignment for relevant fragments of cable (∼300 mm). The strand positioning algorithm is based on the application of Gabor Annular filtering followed by local maxima detection. The local void fraction is extensively mapped by employing local segmentation methods at a space resolution of about 50 sub-cells sized to be relevant to the triplet of triplet twisting pattern. For the strand trajectory assignment part we developed a global algorithm of the linear programing type which provides the vast majority of correct strand trajectories for most practical applications. For carefully manufactured benchmark CCIC samples over 99% of the trajectories are correctly assigned. For production samples the efficiency of the algorithm is around 90%. Trajectory assignment of a high proportion of the strands is a crucial factor for the derivation of statistical properties of the cable

  15. Characterization of porosity in a 19th century painting ground by synchrotron radiation X-ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervais, Claire [Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA), Zuerich (Switzerland); Bern University of the Arts, Bern (Switzerland); Boon, Jaap J. [Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA), Zuerich (Switzerland); JAAP Enterprise for MOLART Advice, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Marone, Federica [Paul Scherrer Institute, Swiss Light Source (SLS), Villigen (Switzerland); Ferreira, Ester S.B. [Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA), Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-04-15

    The study of the early oeuvre of the Swiss painter Cuno Amiet (1868-1961) has revealed that, up to 1907, many of his grounds were hand applied and are mainly composed of chalk, bound in protein. These grounds are not only lean and absorbent, but also, as Synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography has shown, porous. Our approach to the characterization of pore structure and quantity, their connectivity, and homogeneity is based on image segmentation and application of a clustering algorithm to high-resolution X-ray tomographic data. The issues associated with the segmentation of the different components of a ground sample based on X-ray imaging data are discussed. The approach applied to a sample taken from ''Portrait of Max Leu'' (1899) by Amiet revealed the presence of three sublayers within the ground with distinct porosity features, which had not been observed optically in cross-section. The upper and lower layers are highly porous with important connectivity and thus prone to water uptake/storage. The middle layer however shows low and nonconnected porosity at the resolution level of the X-ray tomography images, so that few direct water absorption paths through the entire sample exist. The potential of the method to characterize porosity and to understand moisture-related issues in paint layer degradation are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Characterization of porosity in a 19th century painting ground by synchrotron radiation X-ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervais, Claire; Boon, Jaap J.; Marone, Federica; Ferreira, Ester S.B.

    2013-01-01

    The study of the early oeuvre of the Swiss painter Cuno Amiet (1868-1961) has revealed that, up to 1907, many of his grounds were hand applied and are mainly composed of chalk, bound in protein. These grounds are not only lean and absorbent, but also, as Synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography has shown, porous. Our approach to the characterization of pore structure and quantity, their connectivity, and homogeneity is based on image segmentation and application of a clustering algorithm to high-resolution X-ray tomographic data. The issues associated with the segmentation of the different components of a ground sample based on X-ray imaging data are discussed. The approach applied to a sample taken from ''Portrait of Max Leu'' (1899) by Amiet revealed the presence of three sublayers within the ground with distinct porosity features, which had not been observed optically in cross-section. The upper and lower layers are highly porous with important connectivity and thus prone to water uptake/storage. The middle layer however shows low and nonconnected porosity at the resolution level of the X-ray tomography images, so that few direct water absorption paths through the entire sample exist. The potential of the method to characterize porosity and to understand moisture-related issues in paint layer degradation are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Imaging biofilms in porous media using X-ray computed micro-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davit, Y.; Debenest, G.; Quintard, M.

    2009-12-01

    In soils and rivers subsurface, bacterial biofilms growth induce modifications of mass and momentum transport dynamics. Evidence for these modifications have been developed essentially by inspection, that is, observation of the reduction of hydraulic conductivity, permeability, changes in porosity and anomalous transport. Deeper understanding of these sessile communities in porous media environments and of the multiscale/multiphase complexity of the system requires 3-D informations concerning the pore-scale/biofilm-scale geometry. Additionnally, breakthroughs in imaging techniques are likely to trigger breakthroughs in the theoretical analysis. In this study, we develop a new technique for direct observation and imaging of unstrained biofilms in porous media using X-ray computed micro-tomography. The biofilms are grown for ten days on polyamide and expanded polystyrene beads placed in small plastic columns. A circulation of water from the river Garonne (France) is imposed using peristaltic pumps. No particular bacterial strain is introduced, the micro-organisms being naturally present in the water from the river. The X-ray acquisition is performed by a Skyscan-1174 micro-CT. A special experimental technique, based on two different contrast agents, has been designed to solve the challenging problem of imaging 3 phases of initial similar absorption coefficients. On the one hand, we use a suspension of barium sulfate to enhance the contrast of the water-phase. On the other hand, the absorption of the biofilm-phase is increased using iodine which diffuses into the polymeric matrix. Examples of reconstructed images are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the method. We demonstrate how to combine the 3-D measurements with upscaling techniques such as volume averaging, by calculating the modifications of the permeability of the system when biofilms grow. At last, we aim to couple these 3-D measurements with upscaled reactive models to describe the Darcy

  18. X-ray tomographic and laminographic microscopy (XTM, XLM) using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyss, P.; Obrist, A.; Hofmann, J.; Luethi, T.; Sennhauser, U.; Thurner, P.; Stampanoni, M.; Abela, R.; Patterson, B.; Mueller, R.

    2003-01-01

    Inner structures of composite materials, components or tissues have to be characterised with micrometer and even submicrometer resolution. It is often highly desirable that specimens stay unchanged after a first characterization to allow meaningful subsequent tests. This justifies major efforts for an ongoing improvement of nondestructive radiographical and tomographical methods for morphological characterization. Radiography and tomography as well as laminography can fulfill these requirements. X-ray sources and detectors have been improved. This applies for synchrotron-beamline systems as well as for tube based systems. A novel detector concept has been implemented in the XTM station at the SLS of the PSI in Villigen, Switzerland. This microtomography station at the SLS has started its operation in spring 2002. A selection of results related to industrial and scientific applications is presented in this contribution. Special emphasis will be given to first results of tomography with limited numbers of projections which is comparable to laminography. This method allows to characterise e.g. ribbons of tissue under load

  19. Microbial biofilm study by synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennafirme, S.; Lima, I.; Bitencourt, J.A.; Crapez, M.A.C.; Lopes, R.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilm has already being used to remove metals and other pollutants from wastewater. In this sense, our proposal was to isolate and cultivate bacteria consortia from mangrove’s sediment resistant to Zn (II) and Cu (II) at 50 mg L −1 and to observe, through synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (microXRF), whether the biofilm sequestered the metal. The biofilm area analyzed was 1 mm 2 and a 2D map was generated (pixel size 20×20 μm 2 , counting time 5 s/point). The biofilm formation and retention followed the sequence Zn>Cu. Bacterial consortium zinc resistant formed dense biofilm and retained 63.83% of zinc, while the bacterial consortium copper resistant retained 3.21% of copper, with lower biofilm formation. Dehydrogenase activity of Zn resistant bacterial consortium was not negatively affect by 50 mg ml −1 zinc input, whereas copper resistant bacterial consortium showed a significant decrease on dehydrogenase activity (50 mg mL −1 of Cu input). In conclusion, biofilm may protect bacterial cells, acting as barrier against metal toxicity. The bacterial consortia Zn resistant, composed by Nitratireductor spp. and Pseudomonas spp formed dense biofilm and sequestered metal from water, decreasing the metal bioavailability. These bacterial consortia can be used in bioreactors and in bioremediation programs. - Highlights: • We studied bacterial bioremediation by microXRF. • Dense biofilm may act sequestering metal while protecting bacterial metabolism. • Nitratireductor spp. and Pseudomonas spp decreased seawater metal bioavailability. • Bacterial consortia from polluted areas may be used in bioremediation programs.

  20. UV-Visible Absorption Spectroscopy Enhanced X-ray Crystallography at Synchrotron and X-ray Free Electron Laser Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aina E; Doukov, Tzanko; Soltis, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    This review describes the use of single crystal UV-Visible Absorption micro-Spectrophotometry (UV-Vis AS) to enhance the design and execution of X-ray crystallography experiments for structural investigations of reaction intermediates of redox active and photosensitive proteins. Considerations for UV-Vis AS measurements at the synchrotron and associated instrumentation are described. UV-Vis AS is useful to verify the intermediate state of an enzyme and to monitor the progression of reactions within crystals. Radiation induced redox changes within protein crystals may be monitored to devise effective diffraction data collection strategies. An overview of the specific effects of radiation damage on macromolecular crystals is presented along with data collection strategies that minimize these effects by combining data from multiple crystals used at the synchrotron and with the X-ray free electron laser.

  1. Determination of SiC ceramic foams microstructure properties by X-rays microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Rodrigo; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto; Fernandes, Jaquiel Salvi

    2009-01-01

    Silicon carbide ceramic foams (SiC) can operate at high temperatures, which allow them to be used as heat exchangers, liquid metal filters, composite of rocket nozzles, etc. For many of these applications it is very important to know the foams' porosity. In this work the porosity of SiC ceramic foams was determined by X-rays microtomography, a powerful non-destructive technique that allows the analysis of the sample's internal structure. The samples have pore densities of 30, 45, 60, 80 and 100 pores per inch (ppi). The spatial resolution obtained was 24.8 μm. The cross sections' reconstruction was performed with a cone beam filtered backprojection algorithm. In the analyses, micropores were observed in the foam's lattice wire of the 30 ppi and 45 ppi samples. Micropores were present in few cross sections of 60 ppi sample too, but it was not found in the 80 ppi and 100 ppi samples. The total porosities obtained were Φ = (88.8 ± 4.3) %, Φ = (85.2 ± 1.4) %, Φ = (82.3 ± 1.8) %, Φ (79.9 ± 1.3) % and Φ = (80.4 ± 1.5) %, for the 30, 45, 60, 80 and 100 ppi samples, respectively. (author)

  2. Heterogeneous vesiculation of 2011 El Hierro xeno-pumice revealed by X-ray computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, S. E.; Troll, V. R.; Deegan, F. M.; Burchardt, S.; Krumbholz, M.; Mancini, L.; Polacci, M.; Carracedo, J. C.; Soler, V.; Arzilli, F.; Brun, F.

    2016-12-01

    During the first week of the 2011 El Hierro submarine eruption, abundant light-coloured pumiceous, high-silica volcanic bombs coated in dark basanite were found floating on the sea. The composition of the light-coloured frothy material (`xeno-pumice') is akin to that of sedimentary rocks from the region, but the textures resemble felsic magmatic pumice, leaving their exact mode of formation unclear. To help decipher their origin, we investigated representative El Hierro xeno-pumice samples using X-ray computed microtomography for their internal vesicle shapes, volumes, and bulk porosity, as well as for the spatial arrangement and size distributions of vesicles in three dimensions (3D). We find a wide range of vesicle morphologies, which are especially variable around small fragments of rock contained in the xeno-pumice samples. Notably, these rock fragments are almost exclusively of sedimentary origin, and we therefore interpret them as relicts an the original sedimentary ocean crust protolith(s). The irregular vesiculation textures observed probably resulted from pulsatory release of volatiles from multiple sources during xeno-pumice formation, most likely by successive release of pore water and mineral water during incremental heating and decompression of the sedimentary protoliths.

  3. X-ray microtomography study of the spallation response in Ta-W

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Samuel; Cotton, Matthew; Millett, Jeremy; Bourne, Neil; Withers, Philip

    2013-06-01

    The response of metallic materials to high strain-rate (impact) loading is of interest to a number of communities. Traditionally, the largest driver has been the military, in its need to understand armour and resistance to ballistic attack. More recently, industries such as aerospace (foreign object damage, bird strike, etc.), automotive (crash-worthiness) and satellite protection (orbital debris) have all appreciated the necessity of such information. It is therefore important to understand the dynamic tensile or spallation response, and in particular to be able to observe in three-dimensions, and in a non-invasive manner, the physical damage present in the spalled region post-impact. The current study presents plate impact experiments investigating the spallation damage response of recovered targets of the tantalum alloy Ta-2.5%W. Using X-ray microtomography the damage resulting from differing impact conditions (impact velocity/stress, pulse duration) is compared and characterised in 3-D. Combined with free surface velocity measurements, the tensile failure mechanisms during dynamic loading have been identified.

  4. Total porosity of carbonate reservoir rocks by X-ray microtomography in two different spatial resolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Rodrigo; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Marques, Leonardo C.; Fernandes, Celso P.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonate reservoir rocks contain more than 50% of world's petroleum. To know carbonate rocks' structural properties is quite important to petroleum extraction. One of their main structural properties is the total porosity, which shows the rock's capacity to stock petroleum. In recent years, the X-ray microtomography had been used to analyze the structural parameters of reservoir rocks. Such nondestructive technique generates images of the samples' internal structure, allowing the evaluation of its properties. The spatial resolution is a measurement parameter that indicates the smallest structure size observable in a sample. It is possible to measure one sample using two or more different spatial resolutions in order to evaluate the samples' pore scale. In this work, two samples of the same sort of carbonate rock were measured, and in each measurement a different spatial resolution (17 μm and 7 μm) was applied. The obtained results showed that with the better resolution it was possible to measure 8% more pores than with the poorer resolution. Such difference provides us with good expectations about such approach to study the pore scale of carbonate rocks. (author)

  5. 3D Quantitative Analysis of Graphite Morphology in Ductile Cast Iron by X-ray Microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yajun; Tu, Zhixin; Zhou, Jianxin; Zhang, Dongqiao; Wang, Min; Guo, Zhao; Liu, Changchang; Chen, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    In this article, X-ray microtomography and color metallographic techniques have been used to perform three-dimensional quantitative characterization of graphite nodule morphology in a step-shaped ductile cast iron casting. Statistical analyses of the graphite nodule count, diameter, sphericity, and spatial distribution have been processed for three samples in detail. The results reveal that graphite nodules in ductile cast iron can be categorized into two categories. The first types are nodules located in eutectic cells (NIECs), and the other one refers to nodules located between the eutectic cells (NBECs). The NIECs possess a larger average diameter but smaller sphericity compared with the NBECs, and the sphericity decreases along with the increasing of diameter. The increasing casting thickness results in an increasing count and percentage of NBECs. In addition, most nodules are NIECs in thin walls instead of NBECs in thick walls. Nonuniform spatial distributions of graphite nodules caused by the existence of NBECs have been found to become more obvious along with the increase of cast thickness.

  6. X-ray microtomography in the micromorphologic characterization of soil submitted to different management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passoni, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    The X-ray computed microtomography (CT) represents a non-invasive technique that can be used with success to analyze physical properties by the soil scientists without destroying the structure of the soil. The technique has as advantage over conventional methods the characterization of the soil porous system in three dimensions, which allow morphological property analyses such as connectivity and tortuosity of the pores. However, as the soil is a non-homogeneous and complex system, the CT technique needs specific methodologies for digital image processing, mainly during the segmentation procedure. The objectives of this work were: 1) to develop a methodology for microtomographic digital image processing; 2) to characterize the soil structure by using micromorphology analysis of samples submitted to non-tillage and conventional systems collected in three distinct layers (0-10, 10-20 and 20-30 cm); and 3) to identify possible changes in the porous system of the soil analyzed due to the effect of different management systems. The use of the CT technique and the procedures adopted for microtomographic digital image processing show to be efficient for the micromorphologic characterization of soil porous system. Soil under non-tillage system presented the best results from the agricultural point of view regarding porosity, total number of pores, connectivity and tortuosity in comparison to the conventional tillage. (author)

  7. Tensile rupture of medial arterial tissue studied by X-ray micro-tomography on stained samples

    OpenAIRE

    Helfenstein-Didier, Clémentine; Taïnoff, Damien; Viville, Julien; Adrien, Jérôme; Maire, Éric; Badel, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Detailed characterization of damage and rupture mechanics of arteries is one the current challenges in vascular biomechanics, which requires developing suitable experimental approaches. This paper introduces an approach using in situ tensile tests in an X-ray micro-tomography setup to observe mechanisms of damage initiation and progression in medial layers of porcine aortic samples. The technique requires the use of sodium polytungstate as a contrast agent, of which the conditions for use are...

  8. Synchrotron radiation microtomography of musical instruments: a non-destructive monitoring technique for insect infestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Bentivoglio-Ravasio

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available X-ray computed tomography is becoming a common technique for the structural analysis of samples of cultural relevance, providing luthiers, art historians, conservators and restorators with a unique tool for the characterization of musical instruments. Synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast microtomography is an ideal technique for the non-destructive 3D analysis of samples where small lowabsorbing details such as larvae and eggs can be detected. We report results from the first feasibility studies performed at the Elettra synchrotron laboratory, where the 1494 organ by Lorenzo Gusnasco da Pavia has been studied. Together with important information about the structural conditions, the presence of xylophages could be detected and characterized.

  9. Scanning soft x-ray microscopy with a fresnel zoneplate at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenney, J.M.; Kirz, J.; Rarback, H.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.; Howells, M.

    1983-01-01

    We have built a scanning transmission soft x-ray microscope located at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Images of biological specimens have been formed with submicron resolution. A Fresnel zoneplate serves as the focusing element

  10. Recent trends of X-ray detectors in synchrotron radiation science

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, M

    2003-01-01

    This article attempts to describe the recent trends of X-ray detectors in synchrotron radiation science in the light of not only the advance but also the stagnation of which are seriously dependent upon the current semiconductor technology. (author)

  11. Time-resolved materials science opportunities using synchrotron x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.; Tischler, J.Z.

    1995-06-01

    The high brightness, high intensity, and pulsed time-structure of synchrotron sources provide new opportunities for time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigations. With third generation synchrotron sources coming on line, high brilliance and high brightness are now available in x-ray beams with the highest flux. In addition to the high average flux, the instantaneous flux available in synchrotron beams is greatly enhanced by the pulsed time structure, which consists of short bursts of x-rays that are separated by ∼tens to hundreds of nanoseconds. Time-resolved one- and two-dimensional position sensitive detection techniques that take advantage of synchrotron radiation for materials science x-ray diffraction investigations are presented, and time resolved materials science applications are discussed in terms of recent diffraction and spectroscopy results and materials research opportunities

  12. Report of the workshop on transferring X-ray Lithography Synchrotron (XLS) technology to industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuse, W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on plans to develop an x-ray synchrotron for use in lithography. The primary concern of the present paper is technology transfer from national laboratories to private industry. (JDH)

  13. Iron overload of human colon adenocarcinoma cells studied by synchrotron-based X-ray techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihucz, Victor G.; Meirer, Florian; Polgári, Zsófia; Réti, Andrea; Pepponi, Giancarlo; Ingerle, Dieter; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Streli, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Fast- and slow-proliferating human adenocarcinoma colorectal cells, HT-29 and HCA-7, respectively, overloaded with transferrin (Tf), Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III) chloride and Fe(II) sulfate were studied by synchrotron radiation total-reflection X-ray spectrometry (TXRF), TXRF-X-ray absorption near edge

  14. Antiferroelectric surface layers in a liquid crystal as observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, E. F.; de Jeu, W. H.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray reflectivity form the surface of a liquid crystal with terminally polar (cyano substituted) molecules has been studied using a high-resolution triple-axis X-ray spectrometer in combination with a synchrotron source. It is demonstrated that at the surface of the smectic Al phase a few...

  15. X-ray spectrometry with synchrotron radiation; Roentgenspektrometrie mit Synchrotronstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Matthias [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Roentgen- und IR-Spektrometrie' ; Gerlach, Martin; Holfelder, Ina; Hoenicke, Philipp; Lubeck, Janin; Nutsch, Andreas; Pollakowski, Beatrix; Streeck, Cornelia; Unterumsberger, Rainer; Weser, Jan; Beckhoff, Burkhard

    2014-12-15

    The X-ray spectrometry of the PTB at the BESSY II storage ring with radiation in the range from 78 eV to 10.5 keV is described. After a description of the instrumentation development reference-sample free X-ray fluorescence analysis, the determination of fundamental atomic parameters, X-ray fluorescence analysis under glance-angle incidence, highly-resolving absorption spectrometry, and emission spectrometry are considered. Finally liquid cells and in-situ measurement techniques are described. (HSI)

  16. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of liquid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Pershan, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented.......A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented....

  17. Synchrotron radiation sources: their properties and applications for VUV and X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, E.E.

    1976-09-01

    Synchrotron radiation from accelerators and storage rings offers far reaching possibilities for many fields of basic and applied physics. The properties of synchrotron radiation, existing and planned synchrotron radiation facilities, as well as instrumental aspects are discussed. In order to illustrate the usefulness of the synchrotron radiation sources a few highlights from atomic, molelucar, and solid state spectroscopy are presented and examples from x-ray experiments and from the field of applied physics are given. (orig.) [de

  18. Data and videos for ultrafast synchrotron X-ray imaging studies of metal solidification under ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the paper entitled ‘Ultrafast synchrotron X-ray imaging studies of microstructure fragmentation in solidification under ultrasound’ [Wang et al., Acta Mater. 144 (2018 505-515]. This data article provides further supporting information and analytical methods, including the data from both experimental and numerical simulation, as well as the Matlab code for processing the X-ray images. Six videos constructed from the processed synchrotron X-ray images are also provided.

  19. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of light elements with synchrotron radiation and special X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Bauer, V.; Kregsamer, P.; Goergl, R.; Pianetta, P.; Ryon, R.; Pahlke, S.; Fabry, L.

    1997-01-01

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) of light elements, such as C, O and Al (atomic numbers 5-13) generally has poor sensitivity and detection limits due to poor excitation and low fluorescent yields. Special excitation sources are necessary to compensate for these physical limitations. Synchrotron radiation is the ideal source for TXRF due to its high intensity and wide spectral range extending into the low energy region required for light elements. For more routine use, special X-ray tubes can be constructed. Experiments have been performed at the Standford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using beamline III-4, which is specially designed for the sue of low energy photons. Light elements on Si wafers have been analyzed, leading to detection limits below 100 fg for Na, Mg and Al, which corresponds to about 10 9 atoms. A new vacuum chamber is introduced meeting the requirements of wafer handling without the risk of contamination and offering the possibility of scanning a certain area of the wafer. Boron was detected on a wafer with 10 14 atoms cm -2 implanted in the surface layer. A special windowless X-ray tube with Mo, Al and Si as anode materials was also tested. With the optimization of anode geometry, beam path and excitation conditions, a detection limit of 5 pg (corresponds to 10 11 atoms) for Al was achieved. (Author)

  20. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of light elements with synchrotron radiation and special X-ray tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Bauer, V.; Kregsamer, P.; Goergl, R. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Wien (Austria); Pianetta, P. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab. (Canada); Ryon, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. CA (United States); Pahlke, S.; Fabry, L. [Wacker Siltronic AG, Burghausen (Germany)

    1997-06-20

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) of light elements, such as C, O and Al (atomic numbers 5-13) generally has poor sensitivity and detection limits due to poor excitation and low fluorescent yields. Special excitation sources are necessary to compensate for these physical limitations. Synchrotron radiation is the ideal source for TXRF due to its high intensity and wide spectral range extending into the low energy region required for light elements. For more routine use, special X-ray tubes can be constructed. Experiments have been performed at the Standford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using beamline III-4, which is specially designed for the sue of low energy photons. Light elements on Si wafers have been analyzed, leading to detection limits below 100 fg for Na, Mg and Al, which corresponds to about 10{sup 9}atoms. A new vacuum chamber is introduced meeting the requirements of wafer handling without the risk of contamination and offering the possibility of scanning a certain area of the wafer. Boron was detected on a wafer with 10{sup 14} atoms cm{sup -2} implanted in the surface layer. A special windowless X-ray tube with Mo, Al and Si as anode materials was also tested. With the optimization of anode geometry, beam path and excitation conditions, a detection limit of 5 pg (corresponds to 10{sup 11} atoms) for Al was achieved. (Author).

  1. Thermal management of next-generation contact-cooled synchrotron x-ray mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khounsary, A.

    1999-10-29

    In the past decade, several third-generation synchrotrons x-ray sources have been constructed and commissioned around the world. Many of the major problems in the development and design of the optical components capable of handling the extremely high heat loads of the generated x-ray beams have been resolved. It is expected, however, that in the next few years even more powerful x-ray beams will be produced at these facilities, for example, by increasing the particle beam current. In this paper, the design of a next generation of synchrotron x-ray mirrors is discussed. The author shows that the design of contact-cooled mirrors capable of handing x-ray beam heat fluxes in excess of 500 W/mm{sup 2} - or more than three times the present level - is well within reach, and the limiting factor is the thermal stress rather then thermally induced slope error.

  2. About a method for compressing x-ray computed microtomography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Lucia; Kourousias, George; Billè, Fulvio; De Carlo, Francesco; Fidler, Aleš

    2018-04-01

    The management of scientific data is of high importance especially for experimental techniques that produce big data volumes. Such a technique is x-ray computed tomography (CT) and its community has introduced advanced data formats which allow for better management of experimental data. Rather than the organization of the data and the associated meta-data, the main topic on this work is data compression and its applicability to experimental data collected from a synchrotron-based CT beamline at the Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste facility (Italy) and studies images acquired from various types of samples. This study covers parallel beam geometry, but it could be easily extended to a cone-beam one. The reconstruction workflow used is the one currently in operation at the beamline. Contrary to standard image compression studies, this manuscript proposes a systematic framework and workflow for the critical examination of different compression techniques and does so by applying it to experimental data. Beyond the methodology framework, this study presents and examines the use of JPEG-XR in combination with HDF5 and TIFF formats providing insights and strategies on data compression and image quality issues that can be used and implemented at other synchrotron facilities and laboratory systems. In conclusion, projection data compression using JPEG-XR appears as a promising, efficient method to reduce data file size and thus to facilitate data handling and image reconstruction.

  3. Three-dimensional phase-contrast X-ray microtomography with scanning–imaging X-ray microscope optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    A novel three-dimensional X-ray microtomographic micro-imaging system which enables simultaneous measurement of differential phase contrast and absorption contrast has been developed. The optical system consists of a scanning microscope with one-dimensional focusing device and an imaging microscope with one-dimensional objective. A three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomographic micro-imaging system has been developed. The optical system is based on a scanning–imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) optics, which is a hybrid system consisting of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional (1D) focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a 1D objective. In the SIXM system, each 1D dataset of a two-dimensional (2D) image is recorded independently. An object is illuminated with a line-focused beam. Positional information of the region illuminated by the line-focused beam is recorded with the 1D imaging microscope optics as line-profile data. By scanning the object with the line focus, 2D image data are obtained. In the same manner as for a scanning microscope optics with a multi-pixel detector, imaging modes such as phase contrast and absorption contrast can be arbitrarily configured after the image data acquisition. By combining a tomographic scan method and the SIXM system, quantitative 3D imaging is performed. Results of a feasibility study of the SIXM for 3D imaging are shown

  4. Analysis of Soil Structure Turnover with Garnet Particles and X-Ray Microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Matter turnover in soil is tightly linked to soil structure which governs the heterogeneous distribution of habitats, reaction sites and pathways in soil. Thereby, the temporal dynamics of soil structure alteration is deemed to be important for essential ecosystem functions of soil but very little is known about it. A major reason for this knowledge gap is the lack of methods to study soil structure turnover directly at microscopic scales. Here we devise a conceptual approach and an image processing workflow to study soil structure turnover by labeling some initial state of soil structure with small garnet particles and tracking their fate with X-ray microtomography. The particles adhere to aggregate boundaries at the beginning of the experiment but gradually change their position relative to the nearest pore as structure formation progresses and pores are destructed or newly formed. A new metric based on the contact distances between particles and pores is proposed that allows for a direct quantification of soil structure turnover rates. The methodology is tested for a case study about soil compaction of a silty loam soil during stepwise increase of bulk density (ρ = {1.1, 1.3, 1.5} g/cm3). We demonstrate that the analysis of mean contact distances provides genuinely new insights about changing diffusion pathways that cannot be inferred neither from conventional pore space attributes (porosity, mean pore size, pore connectivity) nor from deformation analysis with digital image correlation. This structure labeling approach to quantify soil structure turnover provides a direct analogy to stable isotope labeling for the analysis of matter turnover and can be readily combined with each other.

  5. 3-D IMAGING, ANALYSIS AND MODELLING OF POROUS CEREAL PRODUCTS USING X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Van Dalen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficient design of multi-component food products containing dry and wet components such as biscuits with a moist fruit filling, is of growing interests for food industry. Technology is needed to prevent or reduce water migration from the moist filling to the dry porous cereal material. This can be done by using moisture barrier systems. Knowledge of the microstructure and its relation to water mobility is necessary to develop stable products. This paper describes a study that uses X-ray microtomography (μCT for the characterisation and visualisation of the 3-D structure of crackers with different porosity, coated biscuit shells and soup inclusions. μCT was used for imaging the inner cellular structure of the cereal matrix or to analyse the integrity of moisture barriers applied on the cereal product. 3-D image analysis methods were developed to obtain quantitative information about the cellular matrix which can be used as input for simulation models for moisture migration. The developed 3-D image analysis method maps the open cellular structure onto a network (graph representation in which the nodes correspond to the pores and the vertices to the pore-topore interconnection. The pores (nodes have properties such as volume, surface area and location whereas the vertices have properties such as direct (open connection and indirect (separated by a single lamella area. To check the segmentation and network description a model for pore to pore resistance was used. The obtained results demonstrate the potential of μCT and 3-D image analysis for extracting structural information which can be used in models for the moisture penetration in a cellular bakery product.

  6. Characterizing analogue caldera collapse with computerized X-ray micro-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Sam; Holohan, Eoghan; Boone, Matthieu; Pauwels, Elin; Cnudde, Veerle; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    Analogue models in the past mainly explored caldera collapse structures by documenting 2D model cross-sections. Kinematic aspects and 3D structures of caldera collapse are less well understood, although they are essential to interpret recent field and monitoring data. We applied high resolution radiography and computerized X-ray micro-tomography (µCT) to image the deformation during analogue fluid withdrawal in small-scale caldera collapse models. The models test and highlight the possibilities and limitations of µCT-scanning to qualitatively image and quantitatively analyse deformation of analogue volcano-tectonic experiments. High resolution interval radiography sequences document '2.5D' surface and internal model geometry, and subsidence kinematics of a collapsing caldera block into an emptying fluid body in an unprecedented way. During the whole drainage process, all subsidence was bound by caldera ring faults. Subsidence was associated with dilatation of the analogue granular material within the collapsing column. The temporal subsidence rate pattern within the subsiding volume comprised three phases: 1) Upward ring fault propagation, 2) Rapid subsidence with the highest subsidence rates within the uppermost subsiding volume, 3) Relatively slower subsidence rates over the whole column with intermittent subsidence rate acceleration. Such acceleration did almost never affect the whole column. By using radiography sequences it is possible in a non-destructive manner to obtain a continuous observation of fault propagation, down sag mechanisms and the subsequent development of collapse structures. Multi-angle µCT scans of the collapse result allow for a full virtual 3D reconstruction of the model. This leads to an unprecedented 3D view on fault geometries. The developed method is a step towards the quantitative documentation of volcano-tectonic models that would render data interpretations immediately comparable to monitoring data available from recent

  7. Cracking evolution behaviors of lightweight materials based on in situ synchrotron X-ray tomography: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Wu, S. C.; Hu, Y. N.; Fu, Y. N.

    2018-03-01

    Damage accumulation and failure behaviors are crucial concerns during the design and service of a critical component, leading researchers and engineers to thoroughly identifying the crack evolution. Third-generation synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography can be used to detect the inner damage evolution of a large-density material or component. This paper provides a brief review of studying the crack initiation and propagation inside lightweight materials with advanced synchrotron three-dimensional (3D) X-ray imaging, such as aluminum materials. Various damage modes under both static and dynamic loading are elucidated for pure aluminum, aluminum alloy matrix, aluminum alloy metal matrix composite, and aluminum alloy welded joint. For aluminum alloy matrix, metallurgical defects (porosity, void, inclusion, precipitate, etc.) or artificial defects (notch, scratch, pit, etc.) strongly affect the crack initiation and propagation. For aluminum alloy metal matrix composites, the fracture occurs either from the particle debonding or voids at the particle/matrix interface, and the void evolution is closely related with fatigued cycles. For the hybrid laser welded aluminum alloy, fatigue cracks usually initiate from gas pores located at the surface or sub-surface and gradually propagate to a quarter ellipse or a typical semi-ellipse profile.

  8. Application of x-ray microtomography to environmental fluid flow problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildenschild, D.; Culligan, K.A.; Christensen, B.S.B.

    2005-01-01

    Many environmental processes are controlled by the micro-scale interaction of water and air with the solid phase (soils, sediments, rock) in pore spaces within the subsurface. The distribution in time and space of fluids in pores ultimately controls subsurface flow and contaminant transport relevant to groundwater resource management, contaminant remediation, and agriculture. Many of these physical processes operative at the pore-scale cannot be directly investigated using conventional hydrologic techniques, however recent developments in synchrotron-based micro-imaging have made it possible to observe and quantify pore-scale processes non-invasively. Micron-scale resolution makes it possible to track fluid flow within individual pores and therefore facilitates previously unattainable measurements. We report on experiments performed at the GSECARS** (Advanced Photon Source) microtomography facility and have measured properties such as porosity, fluid saturation and distribution within the pore space, as well as interfacial characteristics of the fluids involved (air, water, contaminant). Different image processing techniques were applied following mathematical reconstruction to produce accurate measurements of the physical flow properties. These new micron-scale measurements make it possible to test existing and new theory, as well as emerging numerical modeling schemes aimed at the pore scale.

  9. Synchrotron X-ray studies of liquid-vapor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The density profile ρ(z) across a liquid-vapor interface may be determined by the reflectivity R(θ) of X-rays at grazing angle incidence θ. The relation between R(θ) and ρ(z) is discussed, and experimental examples illustrating thermal roughness of simple liquids and smectic layering of liquid...

  10. Report on the fifth workshop on synchrotron x ray lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G. P.; Godel, J. B.; Brown, G. S.; Liebmann, W.

    Semiconductors comprise a greater part of the United States economy than the aircraft, steel, and automobile industries combined. In future the semiconductor manufacturing industry will be forced to switch away from present optical manufacturing methods in the early to mid 1990s. X ray lithography has emerged as the leading contender for continuing production below the 0.4 micron level. Brookhaven National Laboratory began a series of workshops on x ray lithography in 1986 to examine key issues and in particular to enable United States industry to take advantage of the technical base established in this field. Since accelerators provide the brightest sources for x ray lithography, most of the research and development to date has taken place at large accelerator-based research centers such as Brookhaven, the University of Wisconsin, and Stanford. The goals of this Fifth Brookhaven Workshop were to review progress and goals since the last workshop and to establish a blueprint for the future. The meeting focused on the exposure tool, that is, a term defined as the source plus beamline and stepper. In order to assess the appropriateness of schedules for the development of this tool, other aspects of the required technology such as masks, resists and inspection and repair were also reviewed. To accomplish this, two working groups were set up, one to review the overall aspects of x ray lithography and set a time frame, the other to focus on sources.

  11. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence techniques and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    raphy system was implemented to analyse human prostate and breast samples and an X-ray mi- crofluorescence system was .... at the lumbar vertebral body of Wistar rat which are trabecular regions with dimensions smaller than those found in human femora, as can be seen in figure 4. Similar behaviour. (a). (b). Figure 5.

  12. Simulations of X-ray synchrotron beams using the EGS4 code system in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orion, I.; Henn, A.; Sagi, I.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Pena, L.; Rosenfeld, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray synchrotron beams are commonly used in biological and medical research. The availability of intense, polarized low-energy photons from the synchrotron beams provides a high dose transfer to biological materials. The EGS4 code system, which includes the photoelectron angular distribution, electron motion inside a magnetic field, and the LSCAT package, found to be the appropriate Monte Carlo code for synchrotron-produced X-ray simulations. The LSCAT package was developed in 1995 for the EGS4 code to contain the routines to simulate the linear polarization, the bound Compton, and the incoherent scattering functions. Three medical applications were demonstrated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code as a proficient simulation code system for the synchrotron low-energy X-ray source. (orig.)

  13. Three-dimensional phase-contrast X-ray microtomography with scanning-imaging X-ray microscope optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomographic micro-imaging system has been developed. The optical system is based on a scanning-imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) optics, which is a hybrid system consisting of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional (1D) focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a 1D objective. In the SIXM system, each 1D dataset of a two-dimensional (2D) image is recorded independently. An object is illuminated with a line-focused beam. Positional information of the region illuminated by the line-focused beam is recorded with the 1D imaging microscope optics as line-profile data. By scanning the object with the line focus, 2D image data are obtained. In the same manner as for a scanning microscope optics with a multi-pixel detector, imaging modes such as phase contrast and absorption contrast can be arbitrarily configured after the image data acquisition. By combining a tomographic scan method and the SIXM system, quantitative 3D imaging is performed. Results of a feasibility study of the SIXM for 3D imaging are shown.

  14. Reservoir core porosity in the Resende formation using 3D high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Milena F.S.; Lima, Inaya; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Rocha, Paula Lucia F. da

    2009-01-01

    The storage capacity and production of oil are influenced, among other things, by rocks and fluids characteristics. Porosity is one of the most important characteristics to be analyzed in oil industry, mainly in oil prospection because it represents the direct capacity of storage fluids in the rocks. By definition, porosity is the ratio of pore volume to the total bulk volume of the formation, expressed in percentage, being able to be absolute or effective. The aim of this study was to calculate porosity by 3D High-Resolution X-ray Computed Microtomography using core plugs from Resende Formation which were collected in Porto Real, Rio de Janeiro State. This formation is characterized by sandstones and fine conglomerates with associated fine siliciclastic sediments, and the paleoenviroment is interpreted as a braided fluvial system. For acquisitions data, it was used a 3D high resolution microtomography system which has a microfocus X-ray tube (spot size < 5μm) and a 12-bit cooled X-ray camera (CCD fiber-optically coupled to a scintillator) operated at 100 kV and 100 μA. Twenty-two samples taken at different depths from two boreholes were analyzed. A total of 961 slices were performed with a resolution of 14.9 μm. The results demonstrated that μ-CT is a reliable and effective technique. Through the images and data it was possible to quantify the porosity and to view the size and shape of porous. (author)

  15. Neutron and Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Studies of Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranquada, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Superconductors hold the promise for a more stable and efficient electrical grid, but new isotropic, high-temperature superconductors are needed in order to reduce cable manufacturing costs. The effort to understand high-temperature superconductivity, especially in the layered cuprates, provides guidance to the search for new superconductors. Neutron scattering has long provided an important probe of the collective excitations that are involved in the pairing mechanism. For the cuprates, neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques also provide information on competing types of order, such as charge and spin stripes, that appear to be closely connected to the superconductivity. Recently, inelastic x-ray scattering has become competitive for studying phonons and may soon provide valuable information on electronic excitations. Examples of how these techniques contribute to our understanding of superconductivity are presented

  16. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  17. Characterization of Polycrystalline Materials Using Synchrotron X-ray Imaging and Diffraction Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, Wolfgang; King, A.; Herbig, M.

    2010-01-01

    propagation based phase contrast imaging, a 3-D imaging mode exploiting the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron beams. Furthermore, for some classes of polycrystalline materials, one may use a 3-D variant of x-ray diffraction imaging, termed x-ray diffraction contrast tomography. X-ray......The combination of synchrotron radiation x-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offers new possibilities for in-situ observation of deformation and damage mechanisms in the bulk of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (i.e., cracks, porosities) can be detected using...... diffraction contrast tomography provides access to the 3-D shape, orientation, and elastic strain state of the individual grains from polycrystalline sample volumes containing up to thousand grains. Combining both imaging modalities, one obtains a comprehensive description of the materials microstructure...

  18. Noninvasive 3D Structural Analysis of Arthropod by Synchrotron X-Ray Phase Contrast Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengkun Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray imaging techniques significantly advanced our understanding of materials and biology, among which phase contrast X-ray microscopy has obvious advantages in imaging biological specimens which have low contrast by conventional absorption contrast microscopy. In this paper, three-dimensional microstructure of arthropod with high contrast has been demonstrated by synchrotron X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography. The external morphology and internal structures of an earthworm were analyzed based upon tomographic reconstructions with and without phase retrieval. We also identified and characterized various fine structural details such as the musculature system, the digestive system, the nervous system, and the circulatory system. This work exhibited the high efficiency, high precision, and wide potential applications of synchrotron X-ray phase contrast tomography in nondestructive investigation of low-density materials and biology.

  19. Noninvasive 3D Structural Analysis of Arthropod by Synchrotron X-Ray Phase Contrast Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, S.; Zong, Y.; Fan, J.; Sun, Z.; Jiang, H.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging techniques significantly advanced our understanding of materials and biology, among which phase contrast X-ray microscopy has obvious advantages in imaging biological specimens which have low contrast by conventional absorption contrast microscopy. In this paper, three-dimensional microstructure of arthropod with high contrast has been demonstrated by synchrotron X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography. The external morphology and internal structures of an earthworm were analyzed based upon tomographic reconstructions with and without phase retrieval. We also identified and characterized various fine structural details such as the musculature system, the digestive system, the nervous system, and the circulatory system. This work exhibited the high efficiency, high precision, and wide potential applications of synchrotron X-ray phase contrast tomography in nondestructive investigation of low-density materials and biology.

  20. Characterization of Polycrystalline Materials Using Synchrotron X-ray Imaging and Diffraction Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, Wolfgang; King, A.; Herbig, M.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of synchrotron radiation x-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offers new possibilities for in-situ observation of deformation and damage mechanisms in the bulk of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (i.e., cracks, porosities) can be detected using...... propagation based phase contrast imaging, a 3-D imaging mode exploiting the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron beams. Furthermore, for some classes of polycrystalline materials, one may use a 3-D variant of x-ray diffraction imaging, termed x-ray diffraction contrast tomography. X......-ray diffraction contrast tomography provides access to the 3-D shape, orientation, and elastic strain state of the individual grains from polycrystalline sample volumes containing up to thousand grains. Combining both imaging modalities, one obtains a comprehensive description of the materials microstructure...

  1. Application of X-ray computed micro-tomography to the study of damage and oxidation kinetics of thermostructural composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caty, Olivier, E-mail: caty@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [Laboratory of Thermostructural Composites (LCTS), Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, SAFRAN, CEA, 3 Allée La Boétie, 33600 Pessac (France); Ibarroule, Philippe; Herbreteau, Mathieu; Rebillat, Francis [Laboratory of Thermostructural Composites (LCTS), Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, SAFRAN, CEA, 3 Allée La Boétie, 33600 Pessac (France); Maire, Eric [MATEIS Laboratory, INSA Lyon, 7 Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Vignoles, Gérard L. [Laboratory of Thermostructural Composites (LCTS), Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, SAFRAN, CEA, 3 Allée La Boétie, 33600 Pessac (France)

    2014-04-01

    Thermostructural composites are three-dimensionally (3D) structured materials. Weakening phenomena (mechanical and chemical) take place inside the material following its 3D structure and are thus hard to describe accurately. X-ray computed micro-tomography (μCT) is a recent solution that allows their experimental investigation. The technique is applied here to the study of failure under tensile loading and to the self healing processes during oxidation. Results are useful data to verify or invalidate hypotheses or estimations made in current models.

  2. Phase contrast X-ray microtomography of the Rhodnius prolixus head: Comparison of direct reconstruction and phase retrieval approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; Nogueira, L. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Soares, J.; Cardoso, S. C.; Garcia, E. S.; Azambuja, P.; Gonzalez, M. S.; Mohammadi, S.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-02-01

    We have used phase-contrast X-ray microtomography (PPC-μCT) to study the head of the blood-feeding bug, Rhodnius prolixus, which is one of the most important insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, ethiologic agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. Images reconstructed from phase-retrieved projections processed by ANKA phase are compared to those obtained through direct tomographic reconstruction of the flat-field-corrected transmission radiographs. It should be noted that the relative locations of the important morphological internal structures are observable with a precision that is difficult to obtain without the phase retrieval approach.

  3. Model experiment of in vivo synchrotron X-ray diffraction of human kidney stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancharov, A.I. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: ancharov@mail.ru; Potapov, S.S. [Institute of Mineralogy UB RAS, Miass (Russian Federation); Moiseenko, T.N. [The State Regional Clinical Hospital, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Feofilov, I.V. [The State Regional Clinical Hospital, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Nizovskii, A.I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-21

    The diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) was used to explore the phase composition of kidney stones placed into a specific object phantom, which imitated the human body. As an imitation of the patient breath, the kidney stone was moved vertically and rotated to an angle of 15{sup o} during the recording of the X-ray pattern. It was shown that rotation and displacement did not distort the X-ray pattern.

  4. Report of the second workshop on synchrotron radiation sources for x-ray lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, M.Q.; Craft, B.; Williams, G.P. (eds.)

    1986-01-01

    The reported workshop is part of an effort to implement a US-based x-ray lithography program. Presentations include designs for three storage rings (one superconducting and two conventional) and an overview of a complete lithography program. The background of the effort described, the need for synchrotron radiation, and the international competition in the area are discussed briefly. The technical feasibility of x-ray lithography is discussed, and synchrotron performance specifications and construction options are given, as well as a near-term plan. It is recommended that a prototype synchrotron source be built as soon as possible, and that a research and development plan on critical technologies which could improve cost effectiveness of the synchrotron source be established. It is further recommended that a small number of second generation prototype synchrotrons be distributed to IC manufacturing centers to expedite commercialization. (LEW)

  5. Report of the second workshop on synchrotron radiation sources for x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, M.Q.; Craft, B.; Williams, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    The reported workshop is part of an effort to implement a US-based x-ray lithography program. Presentations include designs for three storage rings (one superconducting and two conventional) and an overview of a complete lithography program. The background of the effort described, the need for synchrotron radiation, and the international competition in the area are discussed briefly. The technical feasibility of x-ray lithography is discussed, and synchrotron performance specifications and construction options are given, as well as a near-term plan. It is recommended that a prototype synchrotron source be built as soon as possible, and that a research and development plan on critical technologies which could improve cost effectiveness of the synchrotron source be established. It is further recommended that a small number of second generation prototype synchrotrons be distributed to IC manufacturing centers to expedite commercialization

  6. Synchrotron X-ray PIV Technique for Measurement of Blood Flow Velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Guk Bae; Lee, Sang Joon; Je, Jung Ho

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray micro-imaging method has been used to observe internal structures of various organisms, industrial devices, and so on. However, it is not suitable to see internal flows inside a structure because tracers typically employed in conventional optical flow visualization methods cannot be detectable with the X-ray micro-imaging method. On the other hand, a PIV (particle image velocimetry) method which has recently been accepted as a reliable quantitative flow visualization technique can extract lots of flow information by applying digital image processing techniques However, it is not applicable to opaque fluids such as blood. In this study, we combined the PIV method and the synchrotron X-ray micro-imaging technique to compose a new X-ray PIV technique. Using the X-ray PIV technique, we investigated the optical characteristics of blood for a coherent synchrotron X-ray beam and quantitatively visualized real blood flows inside an opaque tube without any contrast media. The velocity field information acquired would be helpful for investigating hemorheologic characteristics of the blood flow

  7. Effect of toroidal mirror on spatial coherence of synchrotron hard X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hua; Yan Shuai; Yan Fen; Mao Chengwen; Liang Dongxun; He Yan; Jiang Sheng; Li Aiguo; Yu Xiaohan

    2012-01-01

    The Gaussian Schell-model source theory is used to describe the hard X-ray micro focusing beamline with an undulator of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Based on the model and general Huygens-Fresnel principle, propagation of cross-spectral density function in free space is studied. Equivalent source hypothesis is proposed and the effect of toroidal mirror on spatial coherence of the hard X-ray beams is studied. The theoretical results are consistent with the experimental results. Only divergence angles of the incident and outgoing X-rays are considered in the equivalent source hypothesis, hence an easy extension of the hypothesis to other beamline optical elements. (authors)

  8. A new miniature microchannel plate X-ray detector for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemeier, R.G.; Green, R.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A state-of-the-art microchannel plate detector has been developed which allows real time X-ray imaging of X-ray diffraction as well as radiographic phenomenon. Advantages of the device include a 50 mm X-ray input, length less than 4'', and a weight of less than 1 lb. Since the use of synchrotron radiation is greatly facilitated by the capability of remote viewing of X-ray diffraction or radiographic images in real time, a prototype electro-optical system has been designed which couples the X-ray microchannel plate detector with a solid state television camera. Advantages of the miniature, lightweight, X-ray synchrotron camera include a large 50 mm X-ray input window, an output signal that is available in both analog format for display on a television monitor and in digital format for computer processing, and a completely modular design which allows all the components to be exchanged for other components optimally suited for the desired applications. (orig.)

  9. Thermal, structural, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Phillips, W.

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology have made it possible to produce thin free-standing diamond foils that can be used as the window material in high heat load, synchrotron beamlines. Numerical simulations suggest that these windows can offer an attractive and at times the only altemative to beryllium windows for use in third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, as are the microstructure characteristics bearing on diamond's performance in this role. Analytic and numerical results are also presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows

  10. A CCD-based area detector for X-ray crystallography using synchrotron and laboratory sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.C.; Li Youli; Stanton, M.; Xie Yuanhui; O'Mara, D.; Kalata, K.

    1993-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a CCD-based area detector suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies using both synchrotron and laboratory sources are described. The active area is 75 mm in diameter, the FWHM of the point response function is 0.20 mm, and for Bragg peaks the dynamic range is 900 and the DQE ∼0.3. The 1320x1035-pixel Kodak CCD is read out into an 8 Mbyte memory system in 0.14 s and digitized to 12 bits. X-ray crystallographic data collected at the NSLS synchrotron from cubic insulin crystals are presented. (orig.)

  11. Synchrotron X-ray Applications Toward an Understanding of Elastic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

    technique was applied to characterize LPO and phase proportions of Posidonia Shale collected in the Hils Syncline from Germany, in order to examine the influence of clay content, burial depth, and thermal history. The samples used in this study had experienced different local temperatures during burial and uplifting, as established by the maturity of kerogen (0.68-1.45% vitrinite reflectance, Ro), but their constituent clay minerals, including kaolinite, illite-mica, and illite-smectite, show similar degrees of LPO in all samples, ranging between 3.7 and 6.3 multiple of random distribution (m.r.d.). These observations imply that the difference in local thermal history, which significantly affects the maturity of kerogen, at most marginally influences LPO of clays, as the alignment of clays was established early in the history. In Chapter 4, the SPO of constituents phases in Kimmeridge Shale (North Sea, UK) and Barnett Shale (Gulf of Mexico, USA) was quantified to a resolution of ˜1 mum by using synchrotron X-ray microtomography (SXMT) technique. Measurements were done at different facilities (ALS, APS, and SLS) to characterize 3D microstructures, explore resolution limitations, and develop satisfactory procedures for data quantification. Segmentation images show that the SPO of low density features, including pores, fractures, and kerogen, is mostly anisotropic and oriented parallel to the bedding plane. Small pores are generally dispersed, whereas some large fractures and kerogen have irregular shapes and remain aligned horizontally. In contrast, pyrite exhibits no SPO. The volume fractions and aspect ratios of low density features extracted from three synchrotron sources show excellent agreement with 6.3(6)% for Kimmeridge Shale and 4.5(4)% for Barnett Shale. A small variation is mainly due to differences of optical instruments and technical setups. The SXMT is proven to be a crucial technique to investigate 3D internal structures of fine-grained materials at high

  12. Effects of synchrotron x-rays on PVD deposited and ion implanted α-Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.M.; Wang, L.; Walukiewicz, W.; Muto, S.; McCormick, S.; Abelson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have studied the effects of intense X-ray irradiation on the structure of amorphous Si films. The films were obtained by either physical vapor deposition or by implantation of high energy ions into crystalline Si. They were exposed to different total doses of synchrotron X-rays. From the EXAFS and EXELFS measurements they find that an exposure to X-rays increases the Si coordination number. Also in the PVD films a prolonged X-ray exposure enlarges, by about 2%, the Si-Si bond length. Raman spectroscopy shows that Si amorphized with high energy ions contains small residual amounts of crystalline material. Irradiation of such films with X-rays annihilates those crystallites resulting in homogeneously amorphous layer with a close to four-fold coordination of Si atoms. This rearrangement of the local structure has a pronounced effect on the crystallization process of the amorphous films. Thermal annealing of X-ray irradiated ion amorphized films leads to nearly defect free solid phase epitaxy at 500 C. Also they observe a delay in the onset of the crystallization process in X-ray irradiated PVD films. They associate this with a reduced concentration of nucleation centers in the x-ray treated materials

  13. Gas bubble network formation in irradiated beryllium pebbles monitored by X-Ray micro-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolier, E; Ferrero, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Zimer 203, Gebaeude 451, Abteilung HVT-TL (Germany); Moslang, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, FZK, Karlsruhe (Germany); Pieritz, R.A. [CNRS, Lab. de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement, 38 - Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The efficient and safe operation of helium cooled ceramic breeder blankets requires among others an efficient tritium release during operation at blanket relevant temperatures. In the past out-of-pile thermal desorption studies on low temperature neutron irradiated beryllium have shown that tritium and helium release peaks occur together. This phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of growth and coalescence of helium bubbles and tritium that either is trapped inside the helium bubbles in form of T{sub 2} molecules or in their strain field. With increasing temperature the bubble density and size at grain interfaces increase together with the probability of interconnected porosities and channel formation to the outer surface, leading to simultaneous helium and tritium release peaks in TDS. For a reliable prediction of gas release up to end-of-life conditions at blanket relevant temperatures, knowledge of the dynamics of bubble growth and coalescence as well as the 3D distribution of bubble network formation is indispensable. Such data could also be used to experimentally validate any future model predictions of tritium and helium release rates. A high resolution computer aided micro-tomography (CMT) setup has been developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility which allowed reconstructing 3-D images of beryllium pebbles without damaging them. By postprocessing the data a 3D rendering of inner surfaces and of interconnected channel networks can be obtained, thus allowing the identification of open porosities in neutron irradiated and tempered beryllium pebbles. In our case Beryllium pebbles of 2 mm diameter had been neutron irradiated in the 'Beryllium' experiment at 770 K with 1.24 x 10{sup 25} nxm{sup -2} resulting in 480 appm He and 12 appm Tritium. After annealing at 1500 K CMT was performed on the pebbles with 4.9 and 1.4 {mu}m voxel resolution, respectively, followed by morphological and topological post

  14. Evaluation of Microstructural Parameters of Reservoir Rocks of the Guarani Aquifer by Analysis of Images Obtained by X- Ray Microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, J S; Lima, F A; Vieira, S F; Reis, P J; Appoloni, C R

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural parameters evaluation of porous materials, such as, rocks reservoir (water, petroleum, gas...), it is of great importance for several knowledge areas. In this context, the X-ray microtomography (μ-CT) has been showing a technical one quite useful for the analysis of such rocks (sandstone, limestone and carbonate), object of great interest of the petroleum and water industries, because it facilitates the characterization of important parameters, among them, porosity, permeability, grains or pore size distribution. The X-ray microtomography is a non-destructive method, that besides already facilitating the reuse of the samples analyzed, it also supplies images 2-D and 3-D of the sample. In this work samples of reservoir rock of the Guarani aquifer will be analyzed, given by the company of perforation of wells artesian Blue Water, in the municipal district of Videira, Santa Catarina, Brazil. The acquisition of the microtomographys data of the reservoir rocks was accomplished in a Skyscan 1172 μ-CT scanner, installed in Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory (LFNA) in the State University of Londrina (UEL), Paraná, Brazil. In this context, this work presents the microstructural characterization of reservoir rock sample of the Guarani aquifer, analyzed for two space resolutions, 2.8 μm and 4.8 μm, where determined average porosity was 28.5% and 21.9%, respectively. Besides, we also determined the pore size distribution for both resolutions. Two 3-D images were generated of this sample, one for each space resolution, in which it is possible to visualize the internal structure of the same ones. (paper)

  15. Evaluation of Microstructural Parameters of Reservoir Rocks of the Guarani Aquifer by Analysis of Images Obtained by X- Ray Microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, J. S.; Lima, F. A.; Vieira, S. F.; Reis, P. J.; Appoloni, C. R.

    2015-07-01

    Microstructural parameters evaluation of porous materials, such as, rocks reservoir (water, petroleum, gas...), it is of great importance for several knowledge areas. In this context, the X-ray microtomography (μ-CT) has been showing a technical one quite useful for the analysis of such rocks (sandstone, limestone and carbonate), object of great interest of the petroleum and water industries, because it facilitates the characterization of important parameters, among them, porosity, permeability, grains or pore size distribution. The X-ray microtomography is a non-destructive method, that besides already facilitating the reuse of the samples analyzed, it also supplies images 2-D and 3-D of the sample. In this work samples of reservoir rock of the Guarani aquifer will be analyzed, given by the company of perforation of wells artesian Blue Water, in the municipal district of Videira, Santa Catarina, Brazil. The acquisition of the microtomographys data of the reservoir rocks was accomplished in a Skyscan 1172 μ-CT scanner, installed in Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory (LFNA) in the State University of Londrina (UEL), Paraná, Brazil. In this context, this work presents the microstructural characterization of reservoir rock sample of the Guarani aquifer, analyzed for two space resolutions, 2.8 μm and 4.8 μm, where determined average porosity was 28.5% and 21.9%, respectively. Besides, we also determined the pore size distribution for both resolutions. Two 3-D images were generated of this sample, one for each space resolution, in which it is possible to visualize the internal structure of the same ones.

  16. Beryllium window flange for synchrotron radiation X-ray beamline fabricated by hot isostatic press method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaoka, Seiji; Maezawa, Hideki; Nishida, Kiyotoshi; Sakamoto, Naoki.

    1995-01-01

    The synchrotron radiation experimental facilities in National Laboratory for High Energy Physics are the experimental facilities for joint utilization, that possess the positron storage ring of 2.5 GeV exclusively used for synchrotron radiation. Synchrotron radiation is led through a mainstay beam channel to the laboratory, and in the beam line of X-ray, it is used for experiment through the taking-out window made of beryllium. At this time, the function of the taking-out window is to shut off between the ultrahigh vacuum in the mainstay beam channel and the atmosphere, and to cut the low energy component of synchrotron radiation spectra. The experiment using X-ray is carried out mostly in the atmosphere. The design of the efficient cooling water channel which is compatible with the flange construction is important under the high thermal load of synchrotron radiation. The beryllium window flange for synchrotron radiation X-ray was made by HIP method, and the ultrahigh vacuum test, the high pressure water flow test and the actual machine test were carried out by heat cycle. The properties required for the window material, the requirement of the construction, the new development of HIP method, and the experiments for evaluating the manufactured beryllium window are described. (K.I.)

  17. Determination of structural geometric parameters of industrial ceramic foams by gamma rays transmission and X-rays microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Wilson Roberto Dejato da

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the gamma rays transmission and X-rays microtomography techniques are used for the evaluation of the porosity and the pore size distribution of SiC ceramic foams. It was also accomplished the three-dimensional images after the determination of samples geometric parameters. The geometric parameters were obtained by two-dimensional images analyses, generated by a Microfocus system, with a CCD camera, an images intensifier, a X-rays tube and an automatic system for rotation of the sample. The spatial resolution of the images was about 32 μm. In the gamma rays transmission methodology, a Nal(Tl) scintillation detector, an 241 Am (59.53 keV, 100 mCi) radioactive source and an automatic X-Z micrometric table was used. The analyzed samples had pores density of 30, 45, 60, 80 and 100 ppi (pores per inch). The gamma rays transmission technique was accurate to supply the porosity of the samples, which ranged about 90% and was in agreement with the values supplied by manufacturer of the foams. The 30 and 45 ppi samples analyzed by X-rays microtomography showed porosity results that agree with the average porosity supplied by the manufacturer. In other hand, the 60, 80 and 100 ppi samples systematically showed average porosity about 4%, lower than the average of the manufacturer. The pore size distributions found through the software IMAGO show the presence of smaller pores than those nominated by the manufacturer. The 30 ppi samples had voids inside the solid material of the ceramic foams structure. Gaussian truncated method, used in the three-dimensional reconstruction, was not able to take into the account the voids inside the solid matrix. (author)

  18. X-ray computed microtomography integrated to petrography for the three-dimensional study of rock porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Neto, Joss Manoel dos; Fiori, Alberto Pio; Lopes, Angela Pacheco; Pinto-Coelho, Cristina Valle; Vasconcellos, Eleonora Maria Gouvea; Silva, Gabriel Fischer da; Marchese, Clarice; Secchi, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    The porosity contained in rocks is object of study by geoscientists due to the various genetic implications of these features. However, what have been motivating the search for new analytical techniques to study pores are the petrophysical analyses. The experimental techniques for porosity analysis, such as mercury or gas injection, allow a quantitative approach, but do not allow the visualization of the porous framework. Petrographic analysis by optical microscopy allows the visualization and quantification of intergranular pores, but it is restricted to the two-dimensional space and quantifications are less representative. Technological advances in X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT) allowed three-dimensional analysis of pore geometry in microscale, in addition to automated volume measurements. The analyses of marble, quartzite, sandstone and dolomite breccia represented in this work and performed under the Project Falhas/ PETROBRAS/UFPR, show the shape, size, connectivity, tortuosity, pore volume and distribution in these rocks, demonstrating the differences in the rocks' porous frameworks. The integration of micro-CT to petrography allows the identification of mineral phases with attenuation of contrasting X-rays, placing the incidence of porosity in the mineralogical context in three dimensions, in addition to the contribution to the consistency of the method. Although the resolution is limited in the X-ray microtomography that was used (the Skyscan model 1172), which does not reach the smallest pore size of some rocks, the integration of both techniques provides new information, of extreme importance for the research about micro-features related to the pores in rocks, helping in genetic interpretations and significantly contributing for the analyses of reservoirs. (author)

  19. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  20. Synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers principles of coherent X-ray generation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Lindberg, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Learn about the latest advances in high-brightness X-ray physics and technology with this authoritative text. Drawing upon the most recent theoretical developments, pre-eminent leaders in the field guide readers through the fundamental principles and techniques of high-brightness X-ray generation from both synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. A wide range of topics is covered, including high-brightness synchrotron radiation from undulators, self-amplified spontaneous emission, seeded high-gain amplifiers with harmonic generation, ultra-short pulses, tapering for higher power, free-electron laser oscillators, and X-ray oscillator and amplifier configuration. Novel mathematical approaches and numerous figures accompanied by intuitive explanations enable easy understanding of key concepts, whilst practical considerations of performance-improving techniques and discussion of recent experimental results provide the tools and knowledge needed to address current research problems in the field. This is a comp...

  1. On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond foils that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptionally attractive thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulations indicate that diamond windows can offer an attractive and at times the only alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical and numerical results are presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows

  2. A microfocus X-ray fluorescence beamline at Indus-2 synchrotron radiation facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, M K; Gupta, P; Sinha, A K; Kane, S R; Singh, A K; Garg, S R; Garg, C K; Lodha, G S; Deb, S K

    2013-03-01

    A microfocus X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy beamline (BL-16) at the Indian synchrotron radiation facility Indus-2 has been constructed with an experimental emphasis on environmental, archaeological, biomedical and material science applications involving heavy metal speciation and their localization. The beamline offers a combination of different analytical probes, e.g. X-ray fluorescence mapping, X-ray microspectroscopy and total-external-reflection fluorescence characterization. The beamline is installed on a bending-magnet source with a working X-ray energy range of 4-20 keV, enabling it to excite K-edges of all elements from S to Nb and L-edges from Ag to U. The optics of the beamline comprises of a double-crystal monochromator with Si(111) symmetric and asymmetric crystals and a pair of Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing mirrors. This paper describes the performance of the beamline and its capabilities with examples of measured results.

  3. Progress in X-ray synchrotron diffraction studies of muscle contraction. Ch. 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Katsuzo

    1991-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of applications of synchrotron radiation (SR) to X-ray diffraction studies on the dynamic aspects of muscle contraction and is, at the same time, a progress report on the technical developments specifically related to muscle research. The introduction of SR as an intense X-ray source and the development of high ability detectors have led to enormous improvement in the quality of data from time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of muscle contraction. The X-ray diffraction pattern taken during contraction shows that the force generation of a muscle proceeds upon interaction of the incommensurate structures of the thin and thick filaments. In this framework a distinct intensity change of the weaker reflections from the thin filaments was detected. However, there was still no strong evidence of direct physical attachment of myosin heads to actin during contraction. (author). 170 refs.; 52 figs.; 3 tabs

  4. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, P J

    2015-03-06

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored.

  5. High counting rates of x-ray photon detection using APD detectors on synchrotron machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakuno, E. M.; Giacomolli, B. A.; Scorzato, C. R. [Universidade Federal do Pampa - UNIPAMPA-Bage, 96413-170 (Brazil); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron - LNLS, 13086-100 (Brazil)

    2012-05-17

    In this work we show the results of 10 x 10 mm{sup 2} Si-APD detector's test with guard ring detecting x-rays. The result of mapping surface is also exhibited. We show and discuss the difficulty of single photon detection in high counting rate experiments in synchrotrons machines.

  6. Energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline at Indus-2 synchrotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline has been designed, developed and commissioned at BL-11 bending magnet port of the Indian synchrotron source, Indus-2. The performance of this beamline has been benchmarked by measuring diffraction patterns from var- ious elemental metals and standard ...

  7. High-pressure phases of uranium monophosphide studied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J. Staun; Gerward, Leif; Benedict, U.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray diffraction studies have been performed on UP powder for pressures up to 51 GPa using synchrotron radiation and a diamond-anvil cell. At ambient pressure UP has the rocksalt structure. The bulk modulus has been determined to B0=102(4) GPa and its pressure derivative to B0’=4.0(8). The cubic...

  8. Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopic studies for bioeffects of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Cai, Xiaoqing; Li, Jiang; Zhong, Zengtao; Huang, Qing; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-04-01

    There have been increasing interests in studying biological effects of nanomaterials, which are nevertheless faced up with many challenges due to the nanoscale dimensions and unique chemical properties of nanomaterials. Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy, an advanced imaging technology with high spatial resolution and excellent elemental specificity, provides a new platform for studying interactions between nanomaterials and living systems. In this article, we review the recent progress of X-ray microscopic studies on bioeffects of nanomaterials in several living systems including cells, model organisms, animals and plants. We aim to provide an overview of the state of the art, and the advantages of using synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy for characterizing in vitro and in vivo behaviors and biodistribution of nanomaterials. We also expect that the use of a combination of new synchrotron techniques should offer unprecedented opportunities for better understanding complex interactions at the nano-biological interface and accounting for unique bioeffects of nanomaterials. Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy is a non-destructive imaging technique that enables high resolution spatial mapping of metals with elemental level detection methods. This review summarizes the current use and perspectives of this novel technique in studying the biology and tissue interactions of nanomaterials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Spectrometer for X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Diffraction using Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun Olsen, Janus; Buras, B; Gerward, Leif

    1981-01-01

    Describes a white-beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometer built for Hasylab in Hamburg, FRG, using the synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring DORIS. The following features of the instrument are discussed: horizontal or vertical scattering plane, collimators, sample environment, ...

  10. Energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline at Indus-2 synchrotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline has been designed, developed and commissioned at BL-11 bending magnet port of the Indian synchrotron source, Indus-2. The performance of this beamline has been benchmarked by measuring diffraction patterns from various elemental metals and standard inorganic ...

  11. CCD [charge-coupled device] sensors in synchrotron x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, M.G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I.S.; Kraimer, M.R.; Westbrook, E.M.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    The intense photon flux from advanced synchrotron light sources, such as the 7-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, require integrating-type detectors. Charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are well suited as synchrotron x-ray detectors. When irradiated indirectly via a phosphor followed by reducing optics, diffraction patterns of 100 cm 2 can be imaged on a 2 cm 2 CCD. With a conversion efficiency of ∼1 CCD electron/x-ray photon, a peak saturation capacity of >10 6 x rays can be obtained. A programmable CCD controller operating at a clock frequency of 20 MHz has been developed. The readout rate is 5 x 10 6 pixels/s and the shift rate in the parallel registers is 10 6 lines/s. The test detector was evaluated in two experiments. In protein crystallography diffraction patterns have been obtained from a lysozyme crystal using a conventional rotating anode x-ray generator. Based on these results we expect to obtain at a synchrotron diffraction images at the rate of ∼1 frame/s or a complete 3-dimensional data set from a single crystal in ∼2 min. 16 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms

  13. Fabrication of nested elliptical KB mirrors using profile coating for synchrotron radiation X-ray focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chian; Ice, G.E.; Liu, W.; Assoufid, L.; Qian, J.; Shi, B.; Khachatryan, R.; Wieczorek, M.; Zschack, P.; Tischler, J.Z.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes fabrication methods used to demonstrate the advantages of nested or Montel optics for micro/nanofocusing of synchrotron X-ray beams. A standard Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror system uses two separated elliptical mirrors at glancing angles to the X-ray beam and sequentially arranged at 90° to each other to focus X-rays successively in the vertical and horizontal directions. A nested KB mirror system has the two mirrors positioned perpendicular and side-by-side to each other. Compared to a standard KB mirror system, Montel optics can focus a larger divergence and the mirrors can have a shorter focal length. As a result, nested mirrors can be fabricated with improved demagnification factor and ultimately smaller focal spot, than with a standard KB arrangement. The nested system is also more compact with an increased working distance, and is more stable, with reduced complexity of mirror stages. However, although Montel optics is commercially available for laboratory X-ray sources, due to technical difficulties they have not been used to microfocus synchrotron radiation X-rays, where ultra-precise mirror surfaces are essential. The main challenge in adapting nested optics for synchrotron microfocusing is to fabricate mirrors with a precise elliptical surface profile at the very edge where the two mirrors meet and where X-rays scatter. For example, in our application to achieve a sub-micron focus with high efficiency, a surface figure root-mean-square (rms) error on the order of 1 nm is required in the useable area along the X-ray footprint with a ∼0.1 mm-diameter cross section. In this paper we describe promising ways to fabricate precise nested KB mirrors using our profile coating technique and inexpensive flat Si substrates.

  14. Interconnected porosity analysis by 3D X-ray microtomography and mechanical behavior of biomimetic organic-inorganic composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Sierra, S; Velázquez-Castillo, R; Millán-Malo, B; Nava, R; Bucio, L; Manzano-Ramírez, A; Cid-Luna, H; Rivera-Muñoz, E M

    2017-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite-based materials have been used for dental and biomedical applications. They are commonly studied due to their favorable response presented when used for replacement of bone tissue. Those materials should be porous enough to allow cell penetration, internal tissue growth, vascular incursion and nutrient supply. Furthermore, their morphology should be designed to guide the growth of new bone tissue in anatomically applicable ways. In this work, the mechanical performance and 3D X-ray microtomography (X-ray μCT) study of a biomimetic, organic-inorganic composite material, based on hydroxyapatite, with physicochemical, structural, morphological and mechanical properties very similar to those of natural bone tissue is reported. Ceramic pieces in different shapes and several porous sizes were produced using a Modified Gel Casting Method. Pieces with a controlled and 3D hierarchical interconnected porous structure were molded by adding polymethylmethacrylate microspheres. Subsequently, they were subject to a thermal treatment to remove polymers and to promote a sinterization of the ceramic particles, obtaining a HAp scaffold with controlled porosity. Then, two different organic phases were used to generate an organic-inorganic composite material, so gelatin and collagen, which was extracted from bovine tail, were used. The biomimetic organic-inorganic composite material was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and 3D X-ray microtomography techniques. Mechanical properties were characterized in compression tests, obtaining a dramatic and synergic increment in the mechanical properties due to the chemical and physical interactions between the two phases and to the open-cell cellular behavior of the final composite material; the maximum compressive strength obtained corresponds to about 3 times higher than that reported for natural cancellous bone. The

  15. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  16. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  17. Synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction techniques applied in hydrogen storage materials - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghui Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Synchrotron radiation is an advanced collimated light source with high intensity. It has particular advantages in structural characterization of materials on the atomic or molecular scale. Synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (SR-XRPD has been successfully exploited to various areas of hydrogen storage materials. In the paper, we will give a brief introduction on hydrogen storage materials, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD, and synchrotron radiation light source. The applications of ex situ and in situ time-resolved SR-XRPD in hydrogen storage materials, are reviewed in detail. Future trends and proposals in the applications of the advanced XRPD techniques in hydrogen storage materials are also discussed.

  18. A powerful flare from Sgr A* confirms the synchrotron nature of the X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G.; George, E.; Scaringi, S.; Zhang, S.; Jin, C.; Dexter, J.; Terrier, R.; Clavel, M.; Degenaar, N.; Eisenhauer, F.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Goldwurm, A.; Habibi, M.; Haggard, D.; Hailey, C.; Harrison, F.; Merloni, A.; Mori, K.; Nandra, K.; Ott, T.; Pfuhl, O.; Plewa, P. M.; Waisberg, I.

    2017-06-01

    We present the first fully simultaneous fits to the near-infrared (NIR) and X-ray spectral slope (and its evolution) during a very bright flare from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the Milky Way's centre. Our study arises from ambitious multiwavelength monitoring campaigns with XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and SINFONI. The average multiwavelength spectrum is well reproduced by a broken power law with ΓNIR = 1.7 ± 0.1 and ΓX = 2.27 ± 0.12. The difference in spectral slopes (ΔΓ = 0.57 ± 0.09) strongly supports synchrotron emission with a cooling break. The flare starts first in the NIR with a flat and bright NIR spectrum, while X-ray radiation is detected only after about 103 s, when a very steep X-ray spectrum (ΔΓ = 1.8 ± 0.4) is observed. These measurements are consistent with synchrotron emission with a cooling break and they suggest that the high-energy cut-off in the electron distribution (γmax) induces an initial cut-off in the optical-UV band that evolves slowly into the X-ray band. The temporal and spectral evolution observed in all bright X-ray flares are also in line with a slow evolution of γmax. We also observe hints for a variation of the cooling break that might be induced by an evolution of the magnetic field (from B ˜ 30 ± 8 G to B ˜ 4.8 ± 1.7 G at the X-ray peak). Such drop of the magnetic field at the flare peak would be expected if the acceleration mechanism is tapping energy from the magnetic field, such as in magnetic reconnection. We conclude that synchrotron emission with a cooling break is a viable process for Sgr A*'s flaring emission.

  19. On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray windows are often used on the front end of synchrotron beamlines to isolate the ultra high vacuum of the storage ring from the downstream environment. The windows are usually made of low atomic number materials, such as beryllium, for maximum x-ray transmission, and they must survive and remain vacuum tight during repeated thermal cycles. The intense x-ray beams generated by the wigglers and undulators at high energy storage rings can deposit substantial amounts of localized heat in the (actively cooled) windows leading to high temperatures, and vacuum or structural failure. Thermal filters upstream of the windows can be used to reduce the radiation absorbed in the windows. This solution has limitations, however, since a small amount of filtering may still leave an unacceptable amount of heat to be absorbed in the windows, while substantial filtering will absorb a large amount of the useful photons. Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond films that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptional thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulation indicates that diamond windows offer an attractive alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical results are presented to provide a basis for design and testing of such windows

  20. X-ray phase contrast imaging: From synchrotrons to conventional sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivo, A.; Castelli, E.

    2014-01-01

    Phase-based approaches can revolutionize X-ray imaging and remove its main limitation: poor image contrast arising from low attenuation differences. They exploit the unit decrement of the real part of the refractive index, typically 1000 times larger than the imaginary part driving attenuation. This increases the contrast of all details, and enables the detection of features classically considered 'X-ray invisible'. Following pioneering experiments dating back to the mid-sixties, X-ray phase contrast imaging 'exploded' in the mid-nineties, when third generation synchrotron sources became more widely available. Applications were proposed in fields as diverse as material science, palaeontology, biology, food science, cultural heritage preservation, and many others. Among these applications, medicine has been constantly considered the most important; among medical applications, mammography is arguably the one that attracted most attention. Applications to mammography were pioneered by the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) group in Trieste, which was already active in the area through a combination of innovative ways to do imaging at synchrotrons and development of novel X-ray detectors. This pioneering phase led to the only clinical experience of phase contrast mammography on human patients, and spawned a number of ideas as to how these advances could be translated into clinical practice.

  1. Synchrotron X-ray adaptative monochromator: study and realization of a prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezoret, D.

    1995-01-01

    This work presents a study of a prototype of a synchrotron X-ray monochromator. The spectral qualities of this optic are sensitive to the heat loads which are particularly important on third synchrotron generation like ESRF. Indeed, powers generated by synchrotron beams can reach few kilowatts and power densities about a few tens watts per square millimeters. The mechanical deformations of the optical elements of the beamlines issue issue of the heat load can damage their spectral efficiencies. In order to compensate the deformations, wa have been studying the transposition of the adaptive astronomical optics technology to the x-ray field. First, we have considered the modifications of the spectral characteristics of a crystal induced by x-rays. We have established the specifications required to a technological realisation. Then, thermomechanical and technological studies have been required to transpose the astronomical technology to an x-ray technology. After these studies, we have begun the realisation of a prototype. This monochromator is composed by a crystal of silicon (111) bonded on a piezo-electric structure. The mechanical control is a loop system composed by a infrared light, a Shack-Hartmann CDD and wave front analyser. This system has to compensate the deformations of the crystal in the 5 kcV to 60 kcV energy range with a power density of 1 watt per square millimeters. (authors)

  2. Imaging of metastatic lymph nodes by X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Haugaard Jensen

    Full Text Available Invasive cancer causes a change in density in the affected tissue, which can be visualized by x-ray phase-contrast tomography. However, the diagnostic value of this method has so far not been investigated in detail. Therefore, the purpose of this study was, in a blinded manner, to investigate whether malignancy could be revealed by non-invasive x-ray phase-contrast tomography in lymph nodes from breast cancer patients. Seventeen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 10 female patients (age range 37-83 years diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinomas were analyzed by X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Ten lymph nodes had metastatic deposits and 7 were benign. The phase-contrast images were analyzed according to standards for conventional CT images looking for characteristics usually only visible by pathological examinations. Histopathology was used as reference. The result of this study was that the diagnostic sensitivity of the image analysis for detecting malignancy was 100% and the specificity was 87%. The positive predictive value was 91% for detecting malignancy and the negative predictive value was 100%. We conclude that x-ray phase-contrast imaging can accurately detect density variations to obtain information regarding lymph node involvement previously inaccessible with standard absorption x-ray imaging.

  3. X-ray detectors for diffraction studies and their use with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milch, J.

    1976-02-01

    All techniques for X-ray diffraction studies on biological materials exhibit certain limitations. The characteristics of several X-ray detection systems, namely film, multiwire proportional counter and image intensified TV, are discussed and compared for application to specific biological studies. For the high count-rate situation existing at a synchrotron, it is shown that film is a good choice, but that the image intensified TV exhibits significant advantages. The details of such a system now being used at Princeton with a low intensity source are given and current results presented

  4. Antiferroelectric surface layers in a liquid crystal as observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, E. F.; de Jeu, W. H.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray reflectivity form the surface of a liquid crystal with terminally polar (cyano substituted) molecules has been studied using a high-resolution triple-axis X-ray spectrometer in combination with a synchrotron source. It is demonstrated that at the surface of the smectic Al phase a few...... antiferroelectric double layers develop that can be distinguished from the bulk single layer structure. A model is developed that separates the electron density in a contribution from the molecular form factor, and from the structure factor of the mono- and the bilayers, respectively. It shows that (i) the first...

  5. A Furnace for Diffraction Studies using Synchrotron X-Ray Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Lebech, Bente; Kofoed, W.

    1984-01-01

    A furnace for diffraction studies using synchrotron X-ray radiation is described. The furnace can be operated between ambient temperature and 1 800 °C with a temperature stability better than 5 °C for temperatures above 300 °C. Kapton windows allow almost 360° access for the X-ray beam in the hor...... in the horizontal scattering plane and the furnace may be used in both conventional monochromatic beam angle-dispersive and white-beam energy-dispersive diffraction experiments. Details of the furnace windows, heating element, thermometry and sample mount are given....

  6. Synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction studies in solid-state chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheetham, A.K.; Wilkinson, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Since the scatterers are different - X-rays are scattered by the electrons of an atom, neutrons by the nuclei - the questions addressed by the two diffraction experiments have been complementary. For example, neighboring elements of the periodic table could be distinguished formerly only by neutron diffraction. Now, however, this is also partly possible with high-energy synchrotron radiation. This review describes recent applications of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods in solid-state chemistry and how the maximal information can be extracted by a combination of techniques. (orig.)

  7. X-ray fluorescence in Member States: Austria. Synchrotron radiation induced TXRF-XANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirer, Florian; Wobrauschek, Peter; Streli, Christina; Pepponi, Giancarlo

    2009-01-01

    X ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis was used in combination with Total reflection X ray Fluorescence (TXRF) at different Synchrotron Radiation (SR) facilities to perform elemental analysis and speciation at trace levels. TXRF-XANES was used to perform analysis of contaminations on Silicon wafer surfaces and determine the oxidation state of Fe. Urban aerosols were sampled size fractioned and the oxidation state of Fe was determined for each impactor stage again using TXRF-XANES. The feasibility of XANES analysis at trace element levels using different SR-XRF setups was demonstrated. (author)

  8. Advanced Nanoscale Characterization of Cement Based Materials Using X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation: A Review

    KAUST Repository

    Chae, Sejung R.

    2013-05-22

    We report various synchrotron radiation laboratory based techniques used to characterize cement based materials in nanometer scale. High resolution X-ray transmission imaging combined with a rotational axis allows for rendering of samples in three dimensions revealing volumetric details. Scanning transmission X-ray microscope combines high spatial resolution imaging with high spectral resolution of the incident beam to reveal X-ray absorption near edge structure variations in the material nanostructure. Microdiffraction scans the surface of a sample to map its high order reflection or crystallographic variations with a micron-sized incident beam. High pressure X-ray diffraction measures compressibility of pure phase materials. Unique results of studies using the above tools are discussed-a study of pores, connectivity, and morphology of a 2,000 year old concrete using nanotomography; detection of localized and varying silicate chain depolymerization in Al-substituted tobermorite, and quantification of monosulfate distribution in tricalcium aluminate hydration using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy; detection and mapping of hydration products in high volume fly ash paste using microdiffraction; and determination of mechanical properties of various AFm phases using high pressure X-ray diffraction. © 2013 The Author(s).

  9. Energy Dependence of Synchrotron X-Ray Rims in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Aaron; Williams, Brian J.; Petre, Robert; Ressler, Sean M.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Several young supernova remnants exhibit thin X-ray bright rims of synchrotron radiation at their forward shocks. Thin rims require strong magnetic field amplification beyond simple shock compression if rim widths are only limited by electron energy losses. But, magnetic field damping behind the shock could produce similarly thin rims with less extreme field amplification. Variation of rim width with energy may thus discriminate between competing influences on rim widths. We measured rim widths around Tycho's supernova remnant in 5 energy bands using an archival 750 ks Chandra observation. Rims narrow with increasing energy and are well described by either loss-limited or damped scenarios, so X-ray rim width-energy dependence does not uniquely specify a model. But, radio counterparts to thin rims are not loss-limited and better reflect magnetic field structure. Joint radio and X-ray modeling favors magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR with damping lengths approximately 1-5% of remnant radius and magnetic field strengths approximately 50-400 micron G assuming Bohm diffusion. X-ray rim widths are approximately 1% of remnant radius, somewhat smaller than inferred damping lengths. Electron energy losses are important in all models of X-ray rims, suggesting that the distinction between loss-limited and damped models is blurred in soft X-rays. All loss-limited and damping models require magnetic fields approximately greater than 20 micron G, arming the necessity of magnetic field amplification beyond simple compression.

  10. Evolution of granule structure and drug content during fluidized bed granulation by X-ray microtomography and confocal Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutiainen, Sami; Pajander, Jari; Savolainen, Armi; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Järvinen, Kristiina

    2011-12-01

    The distribution of the drug in the granular end product is a critical quality attribute in fluidized bed spray granulation of pharmaceuticals. The evolution of drug content inhomogeneity in a case study was examined as a function of granulation time. Intragranular structure was also investigated using confocal Raman spectroscopy and computerized X-ray microtomography. A principal component analysis was conducted on the results to investigate granule structure-drug content relationships. Inhomogeneity increased at the beginning of the process but later it was found to decrease. Changes in the homogeneity were accompanied by significant changes in the intragranular structure. It was concluded that segregation of the primary components explained the observed inhomogeneity at low saturation levels when the granules grow by layering, but at elevated moisture levels, granule growth is mediated by the coalescence of agglomerates, which promotes homogeneous distribution of the drug particles. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Characterization of test specimens produced in reduced size for X-ray microtomography (µ-CT tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. BERNARDES

    Full Text Available Abstract The need to use reduced sample sizes, in order to attain improved spatial resolution in (µ-CT tests applied in Portland cement composites, makes researchers perform the fractionation of materials to obtain samples with dimensions compatible with the capacity of the scanning equipment, which might cause alterations in the microstructure under analysis. Therefore, a test specimen (TS with dimensions compatible with the scanning capacity of a microtomography system that operates with an X-ray tube and voltage ranging from 20 to 100 kV was proposed. Axial compression strength tests were made and their total porosity was assessed by an apparent density and solid fraction density ratio, which were obtained by means of mercury and helium pycnometry and µ-CT technique, respectively. The adoption of that TS has shown to be viable for providing a sample with a higher level of representation.

  12. Analysis of 3D Prints by X-ray Computed Microtomography and Terahertz Pulsed Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markl, Daniel; Zeitler, J Axel; Rasch, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: A 3D printer was used to realise compartmental dosage forms containing multiple active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) formulations. This work demonstrates the microstructural characterisation of 3D printed solid dosage forms using X-ray computed microtomography (XμCT) and terahertz pulsed...... was characterised by XμCT and TPI on the basis of the computer-aided design (CAD) models of the dosage form (compartmentalised PVA structures were 7.5 ± 0.75% larger than designed; n = 3). CONCLUSIONS: The 3D printer can reproduce specific structures very accurately, whereas the 3D prints can deviate from...... imaging (TPI). METHODS: Printing was performed with either polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or polylactic acid (PLA). The structures were examined by XμCT and TPI. Liquid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) formulations containing saquinavir and halofantrine were incorporated into the 3D printed...

  13. Evaluation of the effect of varying the workability in concrete pore structure by using X-ray microtomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Bernardes

    Full Text Available The useful life of concrete is associated with the penetrative ability of aggressive agents on their structures. Structural parameters such as porosity, pore distribution and connectivity have great influence on the properties of mass transport in porous solids. In the present study, the effect of varying the workability of concrete in fresh state, produced through the use of additives, on pore structure and on the mechanical compressive strength of hardened concrete was assessed. The pore structure was analyzed with the aid of X-ray microtomography, and the results obtained were compared to the total pore volume calculated from data derived from helium and mercury pycnometry tests. A good approximation between the porosity values obtained through the two techniques was observed, and it was found that, regardless of concrete consistency, the samples from the surface of the specimens showed a percentage of pores higher than those taken from the more inner layers.

  14. Imaging of metastatic lymph nodes by X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Haugaard; Bech, Martin; Binderup, Tina

    2013-01-01

    whether malignancy could be revealed by non-invasive x-ray phase-contrast tomography in lymph nodes from breast cancer patients. Seventeen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 10 female patients (age range 37-83 years) diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinomas were analyzed by X-ray phase......Invasive cancer causes a change in density in the affected tissue, which can be visualized by x-ray phase-contrast tomography. However, the diagnostic value of this method has so far not been investigated in detail. Therefore, the purpose of this study was, in a blinded manner, to investigate......-contrast tomography. Ten lymph nodes had metastatic deposits and 7 were benign. The phase-contrast images were analyzed according to standards for conventional CT images looking for characteristics usually only visible by pathological examinations. Histopathology was used as reference. The result of this study...

  15. An iterative reconstruction algorithm in cone beam geometry: simulation and application in X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolfaghari, A.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray microtomograph has been built in our laboratory from a conventional scanning electron microscope. An algorithm based on algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART) has been developed to reconstruct the internal structure of the imaged object. This algorithm takes into account the diverging nature of the X-ray beam. In this paper we explain the reconstruction algorithm and we analyse the quality of the reconstructed objects in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), spatial resolution and cross-entropy. (orig.)

  16. Hard X-ray full field microscopy and magnifying microtomography using compound refractive lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Schrör, C; Benner, B; Kuhlmann, M; Tümmler, J; Lengeler, B; Rau, C; Weitkamp, T; Snigirev, A; Snigireva, I

    2001-01-01

    For hard X-rays, parabolic compound refractive lenses (PCRLs) are genuine imaging devices like glass lenses for visible light. Based on these new lenses, a hard X-ray full field microscope has been constructed that is ideally suited to image the interior of opaque samples with a minimum of sample preparation. As a result of a large depth of field, CRL micrographs are sharp projection images of most samples. To obtain 3D information about a sample, tomographic techniques are combined with magnified imaging.

  17. Optimizing a synchrotron based x-ray lithography system for IC manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Stephen; Speiser, Kenneth; Thaw, Winston; Heese, Richard N.

    1990-05-01

    The electron storage ring is a realistic solution as a radiation source for production grade, industrial X-ray lithography system. Today several large scale plans are in motion to design and implement synchrotron storage rings of different types for this purpose in the USA and abroad. Most of the scientific and technological problems related to the physics, design and manufacturing engineering, and commissioning of these systems for microlithography have been resolved or are under extensive study. However, investigation on issues connected to application of Synchrotron Orbit Radiation (SOR ) in chip production environment has been somewhat neglected. In this paper we have filled this gap pointing out direct effects of some basic synchrotron design parameters and associated subsystems (injector, X-ray beam line) on the operation and cost of lithography in production. The following factors were considered: synchrotron configuration, injection energy, beam intensity variability, number of beam lines and wafer exposure concept. A cost model has been worked out and applied to three different X-ray Lithography Source (XLS) systems. The results of these applications are compared and conclusions drawn.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray Analytical Techniques for Studying Materials Electrochemistry in Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Liu, Yijin; Yu, Xiqian; Cheng, Lei; Singer, Andrej; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Xin, Huolin L; Tamura, Nobumichi; Tian, Chixia; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Meng, Ying Shirley; Nordlund, Dennis; Yang, Wanli; Doeff, Marca M

    2017-11-08

    Rechargeable battery technologies have ignited major breakthroughs in contemporary society, including but not limited to revolutions in transportation, electronics, and grid energy storage. The remarkable development of rechargeable batteries is largely attributed to in-depth efforts to improve battery electrode and electrolyte materials. There are, however, still intimidating challenges of lower cost, longer cycle and calendar life, higher energy density, and better safety for large scale energy storage and vehicular applications. Further progress with rechargeable batteries may require new chemistries (lithium ion batteries and beyond) and better understanding of materials electrochemistry in the various battery technologies. In the past decade, advancement of battery materials has been complemented by new analytical techniques that are capable of probing battery chemistries at various length and time scales. Synchrotron X-ray techniques stand out as one of the most effective methods that allow for nearly nondestructive probing of materials characteristics such as electronic and geometric structures with various depth sensitivities through spectroscopy, scattering, and imaging capabilities. This article begins with the discussion of various rechargeable batteries and associated important scientific questions in the field, followed by a review of synchrotron X-ray based analytical tools (scattering, spectroscopy, and imaging) and their successful applications (ex situ, in situ, and in operando) in gaining fundamental insights into these scientific questions. Furthermore, electron microscopy and spectroscopy complement the detection length scales of synchrotron X-ray tools and are also discussed toward the end. We highlight the importance of studying battery materials by combining analytical techniques with complementary length sensitivities, such as the combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron spectroscopy with spatial resolution, because a sole

  19. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens developed at Indus-2 deep X-ray lithography beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhamgaye, V.P.; Tiwari, M.K.; Lodha, G.S.; Sawhney, K.J.S.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray lenses are fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate using deep X-ray lithography beamline of Indus-2. The focussing performance of these lenses is evaluated using Indus-2 and Diamond Light Source Ltd. The process steps for the fabrication of X-ray lenses and microfocussing at 10 keV at moderate and low emittance sources are compared. (author)

  20. Diamond monochromator for high heat flux synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Smither, R.K.; Davey, S.; Purohit, A.

    1992-12-01

    Single crystal silicon has been the material of choice for x-ray monochromators for the past several decades. However, the need for suitable monochromators to handle the high heat load of the next generation synchrotron x-ray beams on the one hand and the rapid and on-going advances in synthetic diamond technology on the other make a compelling case for the consideration of a diamond mollochromator system. In this Paper, we consider various aspects, advantage and disadvantages, and promises and pitfalls of such a system and evaluate the comparative an monochromator subjected to the high heat load of the most powerful x-ray beam that will become available in the next few years. The results of experiments performed to evaluate the diffraction properties of a currently available synthetic single crystal diamond are also presented. Fabrication of diamond-based monochromator is within present technical means

  1. Characterisation of microfocused beam for synchrotron powder diffraction using a new X-ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C; Potter, J; Tang, C C; Lennie, A R

    2012-01-01

    The powder diffraction beamline I11, Diamond Light Source, is being continually upgraded as requirements of the user community evolve. Intensities of X-rays from the I11 in-vacuum electron undulator in the 3 GeV synchrotron fall off at higher energies. By focusing higher energy X-rays, we can overcome flux limitations, and open up new diffraction experiments. Here, we describe characterisation of microfocusing using compound refractive lenses (CRL). For a relatively modest outlay, we have developed an experimental setup and a novel X-ray camera with good sensitivity and a resolution specification suitable for characterising these focusing optics. We show that vertical oscillations in the focused beam compromise resolution of the source imaged by the CRL. Nevertheless, we have measured CRL focusing properties, and demonstrate the use of energy scanning to determine lens alignment. Real benefits of the intensity gain are illustrated.

  2. Synchrotron-Radiation X-Ray Investigation of Li+/Na+ Intercalation into Prussian Blue Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Moritomo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prussian blue analogies (PBAs are promising cathode materials for lithium ion (LIB and sodium ion (SIB secondary batteries, reflecting their covalent and nanoporous host structure. With use of synchrotron-radiation (SR X-ray source, we investigated the structural and electronic responses of the host framework of PBAs against Li+ and Na+ intercalation by means of the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS. The structural investigation reveals a robust nature of the host framework against Li+ and Na+ intercalation, which is advantageous for the stability and lifetime of the batteries. The spectroscopic investigation identifies the redox processes in respective plateaus in the discharge curves. We further compare these characteristics with those of the conventional cathode materials, such as, LiCoO2, LiFePO4, and LiMn2O4.

  3. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Kazimirov, Alexander; Gillilan, Richard; Cornaby, Sterling; Woll, Arthur; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Huang Rong

    2007-01-01

    A number of synchrotron x-ray applications such as powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc. can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the flux per square micron on a sample. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus at a 25 to 50 mm distance beyond the capillary tip. For modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000. We show some of the results obtained at CHESS and Hasylab with capillaries focusing 5 to 40 keV radiation, their properties, and how even better the experimental results could be if more ideal capillaries were fabricated in the future

  4. X-Ray Microtomography (μCT as a Useful Tool for Visualization and Interpretation of Shear Strength Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefaniuk Damian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates the applicability of X-ray microtomography (ìCT to analysis of the results of shear strength examinations of clayey soils. The method of X-ray three-dimensional imaging offers new possibilities in soil testing. The work focuses on a non-destructive method of evaluation of specimen quality used in shear tests and mechanical behavior of soil. The paper presents the results of examination of 4 selected clayey soils. Specimens prepared for the triaxial test have been scanned using ìCT before and after the triaxial compression tests. The shear strength parameters of the soils have been estimated. Changes in soil structure caused by compression and shear failure have been presented as visualizations of the samples tested. This allowed for improved interpretation and evaluation of soil strength parameters and recognition of pre-existing fissures and the exact mode of failure. Basic geometrical parameters have been determined for selected cross-sections of specimens after failure. The test results indicate the utility of the method applied in soil testing.

  5. Beer analysis by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Dept. de Recursos Hidricos]. E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Vives, Ana Elisa S. de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: virgilio@cena.usp.br; Zucchi, Orgheda L.D.A. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto]. E-mail: olzucchi@fcfrp.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    In this work the concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn and Br in twenty-nine brands of national and international beers were determined by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence analysis (SR-TXRF). The results were compared with the limits established by the Brazilian Legislation and the nutritive values established by National Agricultural Library (NAL). The measurements were performed at the X-ray Fluorescence Beamline at Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory, in Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, using a polychromatic beam for excitation. A small volume of 5 {mu}L of sample beers containing just an internal standard, used to correct geometry effects, were analyzed without any pre-treatment. The measuring time was 100 s and the detection limits obtained varied from 1{mu}g.L{sup -1} for Mn and Fe to 15{mu}g.L{sup -1} for P. (author)

  6. Beer analysis by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Silvana; Vives, Ana Elisa S. de; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F.; Zucchi, Orgheda L.D.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this work the concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn and Br in twenty-nine brands of national and international beers were determined by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence analysis (SR-TXRF). The results were compared with the limits established by the Brazilian Legislation and the nutritive values established by National Agricultural Library (NAL). The measurements were performed at the X-ray Fluorescence Beamline at Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory, in Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, using a polychromatic beam for excitation. A small volume of 5 μL of sample beers containing just an internal standard, used to correct geometry effects, were analyzed without any pre-treatment. The measuring time was 100 s and the detection limits obtained varied from 1μg.L -1 for Mn and Fe to 15μg.L -1 for P. (author)

  7. Analysis of beers from Brazil with synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, S.; Vives, A.E.S.; Brienza, S.M.B.; Zucchi, O.L.A.D.; Jesus, E.F.O. de; Nascimento Filho, V.F.

    2006-01-01

    In this study the concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn and Br in twenty-nine brands of national and international beers were determined by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-TXRF). The results were compared with the limits established by the Brazilian legislation and the nutritional values established by National Agricultural Library (NAL, USA). The measurements were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence Beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory, in Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, using a polychromatic beam for excitation. A small volume of 5 μl of beers containing an internal standard used to correct geometry effects was analyzed without pretreatment. The measuring time was 100 seconds and the detection limits obtained varied from 1 μg x l -1 for Mn and Fe to 15 μg x l -1 for P. (author)

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M.

    1987-08-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS

  9. Nondestructive analysis of silver in gold foil using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasamatsu, Masaaki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Shinichi; Nakanishi, Toshio; Shimoda, Osamu; Nishiwaki, Yoshinori; Miyamoto, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    Small particles of gold foil detached from an indoor decoration might be important evidence to associate a suspect with a crime scene. We have investigated the application of elemental analysis using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to discriminate small particles of gold foil. Eight kinds of gold foil samples collected in Japan were used in the experiments. As a result of synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, only two elements, gold and silver, were detected from all gold foil samples. The intensity ratios of AgK α /AuL α showed good correlation with the content ratios of Ag/Au. The variation of intensity ratio within a same sample was sufficiently small compared with those of different samples. Therefore the comparison of this intensity ratio can be an effective method to discriminate small particles originating from different types of gold foil. (author)

  10. Synchrotron X-Ray Reciprocal Space Mapping, Topography and Diffraction Resolution Studies of Macromolecular Crystal Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggon, T. J.; Helliwell, J. R.; Judge, Russell A.; Siddons, D. P.; Snell, Edward H.; Stojanoff, V.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive study of microgravity and ground grown chicken egg white lysozyme crystals is presented using synchrotron X-ray reciprocal space mapping, topography techniques and diffraction resolution. Microgravity crystals displayed, on average, reduced intrinsic mosaicities but no differences in terms of stress over their earth grown counterparts. Topographic analysis revealed that in the microgravity case the majority of the crystal was contributing to the peak of the reflection at the appropriate Bragg angle. In the earth case at the diffraction peak only a small volume of the crystal contributed to the intensity. The techniques prove to be highly complementary with the reciprocal space mapping providing a quantitative measure of the crystal mosaicity and stress (or variation in lattice spacing) and topography providing a qualitative overall assessment of the crystal in terms of its X-ray diffraction properties. Structural data collection was also carried out both at the synchrotron and in the laboratory.

  11. Synchrotron X-ray CT of rose peduncles. Evaluation of tissue damage by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herppich, Werner B. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Agrartechnik Potsdam-Bornim e.V., Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Technik im Gartenbau; Matsushima, Uzuki [Iwate Univ., Morioka (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture; Graf, Wolfgang [Association for Technology and Structures in Agriculture (KTBL), Darmstadt (Germany); Zabler, Simon [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Integrierte Schaltungen (IIS), Wuerzburg (Germany). Project group NanoCT Systems (NCTS); Dawson, Martin [Salford Univ., Greater Manchester (United Kingdom); Choinka, Gerard; Manke, Ingo [Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy (HZB), Berlin (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    ''Bent-neck'' syndrome, an important postharvest problem of cut roses, is probably caused by water supply limitations and/or the structural weakness of vascular bundles of the peduncle tissue. For this reason, advanced knowledge about the microstructures of rose peduncles and their cultivar specific variations may lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (SXCT), especially phase-based CT, is a highly suitable technique to nondestructively investigate plants' micro anatomy. SXCT with monochromatic X-ray beams of 30, 40 and 50 keV photon energy was used to evaluate the three-dimensional inner structures of the peduncles of 3 rose cultivars that differ greatly in their bent-neck susceptibility. Results indicated that this technique achieves sufficiently high spatial resolution to investigate complex tissues. However, further investigations with chlorophyll fluorescence analysis (CFA) and optical microscope imagery reveal different kinds of heavy damage of the irradiated regions induced by synchrotron X-rays; in a cultivar-specific manner, partial destruction of cell walls occurred a few hours after X-ray irradiation. Furthermore, a delayed inhibition of photosynthesis accompanied by the degradation of chlorophyll was obvious from CFA within hours and days after the end of CT measurements. Although SXCT is certainly well suited for three-dimensional anatomical analysis of rose peduncles, the applied technique is not nondestructive.

  12. Electron density measurement with dual-energy x-ray CT using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torikoshi, Masami; Tsunoo, Takanori; Sasaki, Makoto; Endo, Masahiro; Noda, Yutaka; Ohno, Yumiko; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2003-01-01

    Monochromatic x-ray computed tomography (CT) at two different energies provides information about electron density of human tissue without ambiguity due to the beam hardening effect. This information makes the treatment planning for proton and heavy-ion radiotherapy more precise. We have started a feasibility study on dual energy x-ray CT by using synchrotron radiation. A translation-rotation scanning CT system was developed for quantitative measurement in order to clarify what precision in the measurement was achieved. Liquid samples of solutions of K 2 HPO 4 and solid samples of tissue equivalent materials were used to simulate human tissue. The experiments were carried out using monochromatic x-rays with energies of 40, 70 and 80 keV produced by monochromatizing synchrotron radiation. The solid samples were also measured in a complementary method using high-energy carbon beams to evaluate the electron densities. The measured electron densities were compared with the theoretical values or the values measured in the complementary method. It was found that these values were in agreement in 0.9% on average. Effective atomic numbers were obtained as well from dual-energy x-ray CT. The tomographic image based on each of the electron densities and the effective atomic number presents a different feature of the material, and its contrast drastically differs from that in a conventional CT image

  13. High resolution hard x-ray microscope on a second generation synchrotron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yangchao; Li Wenjie; Chen Jie; Liu Longhua; Liu Gang; Tian Jinping; Xiong Ying; Tkachuk, Andrei; Gelb, Jeff; Hsu, George; Yun Wenbing

    2008-01-01

    A full-field, transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) operating in the energy range of 7-11 keV has been installed at the U7A beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a second generation synchrotron source operating at 0.8 GeV. Although the photon flux at sample position in the operating energy range is significantly low due to its relatively large emittance, the TXM can get high quality x-ray images with a spatial resolution down to 50 nm with acceptable exposure time. This TXM operates in either absorption or Zernike phase contrast mode with similar resolution. This TXM is a powerful analytical tool for a wide range of scientific areas, especially studies on nanoscale phenomena and structural imaging in biology, materials science, and environmental science. We present here the property of the x-ray source, beamline design, and the operation and key optical components of the x-ray TXM. Plans to improve the throughput of the TXM will be discussed.

  14. Preliminary results for X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography on the biomedical imaging beamline at SSRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rongchang; Du Guohao; Xie Honglan; Deng Biao; Tong Yajun; Hu Wen; Xue Yanling; Chen Can; Ren Yuqi; Zhou Guangzhao; Wang Yudan; Xiao Tiqiao; Xu Hongjie; Zhu Peiping

    2009-01-01

    With X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography(CT), one is able to obtain edge-enhanced image of internal structure of the samples. This allows visualization of the fine internal features for biology tissues, which is not able to resolve by conventional absorption CT. After preliminary modulation, monochromatic X-rays (8-72.5 keV) are available for experiments on the experimental station of the biomedical imaging beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility(SSRF). In this paper, we report the in line phase contrast micro-tomography(IL-XPCT) of biology sample (locust) on the beamline. The reconstruct slice images and three dimensional rendering images of the locust were obtained, with clearly visible images of locus's wing, surface texture and internal tissue distribution. (authors)

  15. Synchrotron X-ray Investigations of Mineral-Microbe-Metal Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemner, Kenneth M.; O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between microbes and minerals can play an important role in metal transformations (i.e. changes to an element's valence state, coordination chemistry, or both), which can ultimately affect that element's mobility. Mineralogy affects microbial metabolism and ecology in a system; microbes, in turn, can affect the system's mineralogy. Increasingly, synchrotron-based X-ray experiments are in routine use for determining an element's valence state and coordination chemistry, as well as for examining the role of microbes in metal transformations.

  16. Characterization of a next-generation piezo bimorph X-ray mirror for synchrotron beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcock, Simon G.; Nistea, Ioana; Sutter, John P.; Sawhney, Kawal; Fermé, Jean-Jacques; Thellièr, Christophe; Peverini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    A next-generation bimorph mirror with piezos bonded to the side faces of a monolithic substrate was created. When replacing a first-generation bimorph mirror suffering from the junction effect, the new type of mirror significantly improved the size and shape of the reflected synchrotron X-ray beam. No evidence of the junction effect was observed even after eight months of continuous beamline usage. Piezo bimorph mirrors are versatile active optics used on many synchrotron beamlines. However, many bimorphs suffer from the ‘junction effect’: a periodic deformation of the optical surface which causes major aberrations to the reflected X-ray beam. This effect is linked to the construction of such mirrors, where piezo ceramics are glued directly below the thin optical substrate. In order to address this problem, a next-generation bimorph with piezos bonded to the side faces of a monolithic substrate was developed at Thales-SESO and optimized at Diamond Light Source. Using metrology feedback from the Diamond-NOM, the optical slope error was reduced to ∼0.5 µrad r.m.s. for a range of ellipses. To maximize usability, a novel holder was built to accommodate the substrate in any orientation. When replacing a first-generation bimorph on a synchrotron beamline, the new mirror significantly improved the size and shape of the reflected X-ray beam. Most importantly, there was no evidence of the junction effect even after eight months of continuous beamline usage. It is hoped that this new design will reinvigorate the use of active bimorph optics at synchrotron and free-electron laser facilities to manipulate and correct X-ray wavefronts

  17. Synchrotron radiation phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of acupuncture points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongming; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinyi [Fudan University, Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Liu, Chenglin [Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers' College, Yancheng (China); Dang, Ruishan [The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xiao, Tiqiao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Peiping [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2011-08-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using synchrotron radiation in-line X-ray phase contrast computerized tomography. Two acupuncture points, named Zhongji (RN3) and Zusanli (ST36), were studied. We found an accumulation of microvessels at each acupuncture point region. Images of the tissues surrounding the acupuncture points do not show such kinds of structure. This is the first time that 3D images have revealed the specific structures of acupuncture points. (orig.)

  18. Synchrotron radiation phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of acupuncture points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Dongming; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinyi; Liu, Chenglin; Dang, Ruishan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Zhu, Peiping

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using synchrotron radiation in-line X-ray phase contrast computerized tomography. Two acupuncture points, named Zhongji (RN3) and Zusanli (ST36), were studied. We found an accumulation of microvessels at each acupuncture point region. Images of the tissues surrounding the acupuncture points do not show such kinds of structure. This is the first time that 3D images have revealed the specific structures of acupuncture points. (orig.)

  19. Parallel beam microradiography of dental hard tissue using synchrotron radiation and X-ray image magnification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, S.; Chow, L.C.; Brown, W.E.; Dobbyn, R.C.; Kuriyama, M.

    1984-01-01

    A novel technique utilizing a highly parallel beam of monochromatic synchrotron radiation combined with X-ray image magnification has been used to obtain microradiographs of caries lesions in relatively thick tooth sections. Preliminary results reveal structural features not previously reported. This technique holds the promise of allowing one to follow the structural changes accompanying the formation, destruction and chemical repair of mineralized tissue in real time. (orig.)

  20. A method for measuring the time structure of synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1989-08-01

    We describe a method employing a plastic scintillator coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube to generate a timing pulse from the x-ray bursts emitted from a synchrotron radiation source. This technique is useful for performing synchrotron experiments where detailed knowledge of the timing distribution is necessary, such as time resolved spectroscopy or fluorescence lifetime experiments. By digitizing the time difference between the timing signal generated on one beam crossing with the timing signal generated on the next beam crossing, the time structure of a synchrotron beam can be analyzed. Using this technique, we have investigated the single bunch time structure at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) during pilot runs in January, 1989, and found that the majority of the beam (96%) is contained in one rf bucket, while the remainder of the beam (4%) is contained in satellite rf buckets preceeding and following the main rf bucket by 19 ns. 1 ref., 4 figs

  1. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruner, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  2. Multimodal imaging of human cerebellum - merging X-ray phase microtomography, magnetic resonance microscopy and histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Georg; Waschkies, Conny; Pfeiffer, Franz; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; David, Christian; Müller, Bert

    2012-11-01

    Imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging and X-ray computed tomography are established methods in daily clinical diagnosis of human brain. Clinical equipment does not provide sufficient spatial resolution to obtain morphological information on the cellular level, essential for applying minimally or non-invasive surgical interventions. Therefore, generic data with lateral sub-micrometer resolution have been generated from histological slices post mortem. Sub-cellular spatial resolution, lost in the third dimension as a result of sectioning, is obtained using magnetic resonance microscopy and micro computed tomography. We demonstrate that for human cerebellum grating-based X-ray phase tomography shows complementary contrast to magnetic resonance microscopy and histology. In this study, the contrast-to-noise values of magnetic resonance microscopy and phase tomography were comparable whereas the spatial resolution in phase tomography is an order of magnitude better. The registered data with their complementary information permit the distinct segmentation of tissues within the human cerebellum.

  3. Processing of Bi-2212 and Nb$_3$Sn studied in situ by high energy synchrotron diffraction and micro-tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Kadar, Julian

    Next generation superconducting wires have been studied to obtain more information on the evolution of phase growth, crystallite size and strain state during wire processing. The high energy scattering beam line ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility provides a very high flux of high energy photons for very fast in situ X-ray diffraction and micro-tomography studies of Bi-2212/Ag and Nb$_3$S/Cu wire samples. The typical wire processing conditions could be imitated in the X-ray transparent furnace at ID15 for diffraction and tomography studies. Efficient data analysis is mandatory in order to handle the very fast data acquisition rate. For this purpose an Excel-VBA based program was developed that allows a semi-automated fitting and tracking of peaks with pre-set constraints. With this method, more than one thousand diffraction patterns have been analysed to extract d-spacing, peak intensity and peak width values. X ray absorption micro tomograms were recorded simultaneously with the X-ray diffrac...

  4. X-Ray microtomography analysis of the impact of pCO2 on serpentinization reactions: A reactive percolation experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escario, Sofia; Godard, Marguerite; Gouze, Philippe; Smal, Pavel; Rodriguez, Olivier; Leprovost, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Serpentinization is the main hydrothermal process driving the alteration of the mantle lithosphere by seawater at ridges. It consists in the alteration of olivine to serpentine and is associated to processes such as oxidation as well as carbonation when CO2 is present. The sustainability and efficiency of the reaction requires penetration and renewal of fluids at the mineral-fluid interface. Yet the secondary low density minerals can fill the porous network, clogging flow paths efficiently. This study aims at better understanding the coupled hydrodynamic and chemical processes driving the earliest stages of alteration of the ultramafic basement, when seawater-derived hydrothermal fluids penetrate and interact with exposed mantle rocks at slow spreading ridges. We investigate the structural changes of the rock in relation to dissolution-precipitation reactions triggered by the injection CO2-rich seawater using an experimental approach. The experiments simulate open conditions and were performed using the reactive percolation bench ICARE Lab 3 - Géosciences Montpellier. ICARE 3 allows to continuously measuring permeability changes during experiments and sampling the outlet fluids passing through the sample. We analysed the reacted samples before and after the experiments using a combination of geochemical (TGA-MS) and high resolution X-Ray microtomography (ESRF ID19 synchrotron beamline, Grenoble) approaches. A series of experiments was carried out at 190°C and 25 MPa. CO2 enriched natural seawater (XCO2 5.24 mmol/kg) was injected into Titanium capsules (2 mm diameter, 6 mm length) filled by pressed powdered San Carlos olivine (Fo90; grains 150-200 µm). The outlet section of the samples were analysed at 0.65 µm resolution using microtomography before and after the experiments. The reacted powdered sample was analysed by TGA-MS. Comparison of microtomography images of reacted and unreacted samples shows evidences of olivine dissolution and secondary minerals

  5. Apparatus development for high-pressure X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, L.G.; Orlando, M.T.D.; Rossi, J.L.; Passamai Junior, J.L.; Melo, F.C.L.; Ferreira, F.F.

    2006-01-01

    Some phenomena in the field of condensed matter physics can be studied when the matter is submitted to extreme conditions of pressure, magnetic fields or temperatures. Once submitted to these conditions it is generally necessary to measure the properties of the matter in situ. The existence of a synchrotron light laboratory in Brazil opens up the chance of studying materials in extreme conditions by techniques like X-ray diffraction and absorption. However, when compared to high-energy synchrotrons accelerators, the Brazilian source offers a narrower energy range and lower flux. These facts impose limitation to perform diffraction experiments by energy dispersion and, consequently, the use of pressure cells with denser anvils like diamond. However, for a lower-pressure range, preliminary studies showed the viability of measurements in an angular dispersion configuration. This allows the use of silicon carbide anvils B 4C . In this work it is described the development of a hydrostatic pressure cell suitable for X-rays diffraction measurements in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory using materials and technologies developed by the institutions and researchers involved in this project (IPEN, UFES, CTA and LNLS). This development can provide the scientific community with the possibility of performing X-ray diffraction measurements under hydrostatic pressure, initially up to 2 GPa, with possibilities of increasing the maximum pressure to higher values, with or without application of magnetic fields and high or low temperatures. (author)

  6. Characterization of a next-generation piezo bimorph X-ray mirror for synchrotron beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Simon G; Nistea, Ioana; Sutter, John P; Sawhney, Kawal; Fermé, Jean Jacques; Thellièr, Christophe; Peverini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Piezo bimorph mirrors are versatile active optics used on many synchrotron beamlines. However, many bimorphs suffer from the `junction effect': a periodic deformation of the optical surface which causes major aberrations to the reflected X-ray beam. This effect is linked to the construction of such mirrors, where piezo ceramics are glued directly below the thin optical substrate. In order to address this problem, a next-generation bimorph with piezos bonded to the side faces of a monolithic substrate was developed at Thales-SESO and optimized at Diamond Light Source. Using metrology feedback from the Diamond-NOM, the optical slope error was reduced to ∼ 0.5 µrad r.m.s. for a range of ellipses. To maximize usability, a novel holder was built to accommodate the substrate in any orientation. When replacing a first-generation bimorph on a synchrotron beamline, the new mirror significantly improved the size and shape of the reflected X-ray beam. Most importantly, there was no evidence of the junction effect even after eight months of continuous beamline usage. It is hoped that this new design will reinvigorate the use of active bimorph optics at synchrotron and free-electron laser facilities to manipulate and correct X-ray wavefronts.

  7. Effective atomic number and density determination of rocks by X-ray microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jussiani, Eduardo Inocente; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Microtomography, as a non-destructive technique, has become an important tool in studies of internal properties of materials. Recently, interest using this methodology in characterizing the samples with respect to their compositions, especially rocks, has grown. Two physical properties, density and effective atomic number, are important in determining the composition of rocks. In this work, six samples of materials with densities that varied from 2.42 to 6.84g/cm(3) and effective atomic numbers from 15.0 to 77.3 were studied. The measurements were made using a SkyScan-Bruker 1172 microtomography apparatus operating in voltages at 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100kV with a resolution of 13.1μm. Through micro-CT images, an average gray scale was calculated for the samples and correlation studies of this value with the density and the effective atomic number of samples were made. Linear fits were obtained for each energy value. The obtained functions were tested with samples of Amazonite, Gabbro, Sandstone and Sodalite. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of a synchrotron radiation x-ray microprobe for elemental analysis at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a facility consisting of a 700 MeV and a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring and dedicated to providing synchrotron radiation in the energy range from the vacuum ultraviolet to high energy x rays. Some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that contribute to its usefulness for x-ray fluorescence are: a continuous, tunable energy spectrum, strong collimation in the horizontal plane, high polarization in the storage ring plane, and relatively low energy deposition. The highest priority is for the development of an x-ray microprobe beam line capable of trace analysis in the parts per million range with spatial resolution as low as one micrometer. An eventual capability for bulk sample analysis is also planned with sensitivities in the more favorable cases beings low as 50 parts per billion in dry biological tissue. The microprobe technique has application to a variety of fields including the geological, medical, materials and environmental sciences. Examples of investigations include multielemental trace analysis across grain boundaries for the study of diffusion and cooling processes in geological and materials sciences samples; in leukocytes and other types of individual cells for studying the relationship between trace element concentrations and disease or nutrition; and in individual particles in air pollution samples

  9. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2016-01-01

    A high-speed pixel array detector for time-resolved X-ray imaging at synchrotrons has been developed. The ability to isolate single synchrotron bunches makes it ideal for time-resolved dynamical studies. A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed

  10. Radial lens distortion correction with sub-pixel accuracy for X-ray micro-tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nghia T; Atwood, Robert C; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2015-12-14

    Distortion correction or camera calibration for an imaging system which is highly configurable and requires frequent disassembly for maintenance or replacement of parts needs a speedy method for recalibration. Here we present direct techniques for calculating distortion parameters of a non-linear model based on the correct determination of the center of distortion. These techniques are fast, very easy to implement, and accurate at sub-pixel level. The implementation at the X-ray tomography system of the I12 beamline, Diamond Light Source, which strictly requires sub-pixel accuracy, shows excellent performance in the calibration image and in the reconstructed images.

  11. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  12. THREE DIMENSIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL MACROPOROSITY BY X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Passoni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the soil pore system represents an important way of characterizing soil structure. Properties such as the shape and number of pores can be determined through soil pore evaluations. This study presents a three-dimensional (3D characterization of the shape and number of pores of a sub-tropical soil. To do so, a second generation X-ray microtomograph equipped with a plain type detector was employed. A voltage of 120 kV and current of 80 mA was applied to the X-ray tube. The soil samples analyzed were collected at three different depths (0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm. The results obtained allowed qualitative (images and quantitative (3D analyses of the soil structure, revealing the potential of the microtomographic technique, as well as the study of differences in soil macroporosity at different depths. Macroporosity was 5.14 % in the 0-10 cm layer, 5.10 % in the 10-20 cm layer, and 6.64 % in the 20-30 cm layer. The macroporosity of unclassified pores (UN was 0.30 % (0-10 and 10-20 cm and 0.40 % (20-30 cm, while equant pores (EQ had values of 0.01 % at the three depths under analysis.

  13. X-ray microtomography and laser ablation in the analysis of ink distribution in coated paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllys, M.; Häkkänen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Backfolk, K.; Sirviö, P.; Timonen, J.

    2015-04-01

    A novel method was developed for studying the ink-paper interface and the structural variations of a deposited layer of ink. Combining high-resolution x-ray tomography with laser ablation, the depth profile of ink (toner), i.e., its varying thickness, could be determined in a paper substrate. X-ray tomography was used to produce the 3D structure of paper with about 1 μm spatial resolution. Laser ablation combined with optical imaging was used to produce the 3D structure of the printed layer of ink on top of that paper with about 70 nm depth resolution. Ablation depth was calibrated with an optical profilometer. It can be concluded that a toner layer on a light-weight-coated paper substrate was strongly perturbed by protruding fibers of the base paper. Such fibers together with the surface topography of the base paper seem to be the major factors that control the leveling of toner and its penetration into a thinly coated paper substrate.

  14. Effects of manual threshold setting on image analysis results of a sandstone sample structural characterization by X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Anderson C.; Fernandes, Celso P.; Fernandes, Jaquiel S.; Marques, Leonardo C.; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Nagata, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    X-ray microtomography is a nondestructive nuclear technique widely applied for samples structural characterization. This methodology permits the investigation of materials porous phase, without special sample preparation, generating bidimensional images of the irradiated sample. The images are generated by the linear attenuation coefficient mapping of the sample. In order to do a quantitative characterization, the images have to be binarized, separating porous phase from the material matrix. The choice of the correct threshold in the grey level histogram is an important and discerning procedure for the binary images creation. Slight variations of the threshold level led to substantial variations in physical parameters determination, like porosity and pore size distribution values. The aim of this work is to evaluate these variations based on some manual threshold setting. Employing Imago image analysis software, four operators determined the porosity and pore size distribution of a sandstone sample by image analysis. The microtomography measurements were accomplished with the following scan conditions: 60 kV, 165 μA, 1 mm Al filter, 0.45 deg step size and 180.0 deg total rotation angle with and 3.8 μm and 11 μm spatial resolution. The global average porosity values, determined by the operators, range from 27.8 to 32.4 % for 3.8 μm spatial resolution and 12.3 to 28.3 % for 11 μm spatial resolution. Percentage differences among the pore size distributions were also found. For the same pore size range, 5.5 % and 17.1 %, for 3.8 μm and 11 μm spatial resolutions respectively, were noted. (author)

  15. Magma mixing in the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field brought to light by X-ray microtomography and chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgavi, Daniele; Arzilli, Fabio; Pritchard, Chad; Perugini, Diego; Mancini, Lucia; Larson, Peter; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2015-04-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YVF) hosts at least four mixed magma complexes (Wilcox, 1944; Christiansen et al. 2007; Pritchard et al., 2013). We focus on the well-exposed Grizzly Lake complex. The main evidence of mixing in igneous rocks is commonly found as textural heterogeneities, such as i) flow structures, ii) magmatic enclaves and iii) physico-chemical disequilibria in melt and crystals (e.g. Perugini and Poli, 2012). From the geochemical and mineralogical point of view, quantitative and qualitative analyses of chemical and textural heterogeneity in mixed rocks highlights the important role of mixing dynamics in producing geochemical complexities and heterogeneities (Kratzmann et al., 2009). Zoned crystals and complex mineralogical associations are also considered, in many cases, evidence for mixing (e.g., Murphy at al., 1998; Couch et al., 2001). The generation of such textures implies the development of large contact interfaces between interacting melts/solids through which chemical and crystals exchanges are strongly amplified, leading to highly variable degrees of homogenization depending on differing element mobility (e.g. Perugini et al., 2006; 2008; De Campos et al., 2011; Perugini et al., 2012; Perugini and Poli, 2012; Morgavi et al., 2013a, b, c). Despite the abundant literature regarding magma mixing processes, only a few studies are focused on describing and quantifying the inter-relationship between the morphological texture of mixing patterns and the geochemical variability in mixed rhyolitic and basaltic complexes. (Freundt and Schmincke 1992; Morgavi et al., 2013 a, b, c;). Here, we combine two analytical techniques; X-ray computed microtomography and microprobe analysis to study the texture and chemistry of mixed rocks. Since mixed rocks of Grizzly Lake in the YVF had a very complex history and evolution, a significant amount of chemical measurements were needed to characterize the phases. In addition, X-ray microtomography was

  16. Effects of synchrotron radiation spectrum energy on polymethyl methacrylate photosensitivity to deep x-ray lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Mekaru, H; Hattori, T

    2003-01-01

    Since X-ray lithography requires a high photon flux to achieve deep resist exposure, a synchrotron radiation beam, which is not monochromatized, is generally used as a light source. If the synchrotron radiation beam is monochromatized, photon flux will decrease rapidly. Because of this reason, the wavelength dependence of the resist sensitivity has not been investigated for deep X-ray lithography. Measuring the spectrum of a white beam with a Si solid-state detector (SSD) is difficult because a white beam has a high intensity and an SSD has a high sensitivity. We were able to measure the spectrum and the photocurrent of a white beam from a beam line used for deep X-ray lithography by keeping the ring current below 0.05 mA. We evaluated the characteristics of the output beam based on the measured spectrum and photocurrent, and used them to investigate the relationship between the total exposure energy and the dose-processing depth with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). We found that it is possible to guess the p...

  17. Conical geometry for sagittal focusing as applied to X rays from synchrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J.

    1993-06-01

    The authors describe a method for simultaneously focusing and monochromatization of X rays from a fan of radiation having up to 15 mrad divergence in one dimension. This geometry is well suited to synchrotron radiation sources at magnifications of one-fifth to two and is efficient for X-ray energies between 3 and 40 keV (0.48 and 6.4 fJ). The method uses crystals bent to part of a cone for sagittal focusing and allows for the collection of a larger divergence with less mixing of the horizontal into the vertical divergence than is possible with X-ray mirrors. They describe the geometry required to achieve the highest efficiency when a conical crystal follows a flat crystal in a nondispersive two-crystal monochromator. At a magnification of one-third, the geometry is identical to a cylindrical focusing design described previously. A simple theoretical calculation is shown to agree well with ray-tracing results. Minimum aberrations are observed at magnifications near one. Applications of the conical focusing geometry to existing and future synchrotron radiation facilities are discussed

  18. Heat transfer issues in high-heat-load synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Mills, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    In this paper, a short description of the synchrotron radiation x-ray sources and the associated power loads is given, followed by a brief description of typical synchrotron components and their heat load. It is emphasized that the design goals for most of these components is to limit (a) temperature, (b) stresses, or (c) strains in the system. Each design calls for a different geometry, material selection, and cooling scheme. Cooling schemes that have been utilized so far are primarily single phase and include simple macrochannel cooling, microchannel cooling, contact cooling, pin-post cooling, porous-flow cooling, jet cooling, etc. Water, liquid metals, and various cryogenic coolants have been used. Because the trend in x-ray beam development is towards brighter (i.e., more powerful) beams and assuming that no radical changes in the design of x-ray generating machines occurs in the next few years, it is fair to state that the utilization of various effective cooling schemes and, in particular, two-phase flow (e.g., subcooled boiling) warrants further investigation. This, however, requires a thorough examination of stability and reliability of two-phase flows for high-heat-flux components operating in ultrahigh vacuum with stringent reliability requirements

  19. Diffraction measurements of residual macrostress and microstress using x-rays, synchrotron and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki

    2004-01-01

    The present paper reviews some recent developments of the measurements of the macrostress and microstress by diffraction using X-rays, synchrotron and neutrons especially in Japan. These three methods are based on the same principle of the diffraction of crystals, and have different advantages. The conventional X-rays detect the stress very near the surface, while the neutron diffraction takes the stress in the interior of the materials. High-energy X-rays from synchrotron sources have the penetration depth in between and are suitable for the measurement of subsurface stresses. After describing the developments of the fundamentals of the methods, the paper covers the recent applications of the diffraction methods to the residual stress analysis in textured thin films, the nondestructive determination of the subsurface distribution of residual stress in shot-peened materials, local stress measurements near the crack tip, the stress measurements of single crystals, macrostress and microstress measurements in composites, and the determination of the internal distribution of the residual stress in welded joints. (author)

  20. Synthesis of nanoparticles through x-ray radiolysis using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Okada, I.; Fukuoka, T.; Ishihara, M.; Sakurai, I.; Utsumi, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis and deposition of nanoparticles consisting of Cu and Au in a CuSO4 solution with some kinds of alcohol and electroplating solution containing gold (I) trisodium disulphite under synchrotron X-ray radiation was investigated. The functional group of alcohol plays an important in nucleation, growth and aggregation process of copper and cupric oxide particles. We found that the laboratory X-ray source also enables us to synthesize the NPs from the metallic solution. As increasing X-ray exposure time, the full length at half width of particle size distribution is broader and higher-order nanostructure containing NPs clusters is formed. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 4, 4'-bipyridine (4bpy) in aqueous solution was measured using higher-order nanostructure immobilized on silicon substrates under systematically-varied X-ray exposure. This demonstration provide a clue to develop a three-dimensional printing and sensor for environmental analyses and molecular detection through simple SERS measurements.

  1. X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigations on radioactive matter using MARS beamline at SOLEIL synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorens, Isabelle; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Sitaud, Bruno [Synchrotron SOLEIL - l' Orme des Merisiers Saint Aubin, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2014-07-01

    The MARS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron is dedicated to the characterization of radioactive material samples. One great advantage of the beamline is the possibility to characterize about 380 radionuclides by different X-ray techniques in the same place. This facility is unique in Europe. A wide energy range from around 3.5 keV to 36 keV K-edges from K to Cs, and L3 edges from Cd to Am and beyond can be used. The MARS beamline is optimized for X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques (XANES/EXAFS), powder diffraction (XRD) but X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detected-XAS (HERFD-XAS), X-ray Emission (XES) and μ-XAS/XRD are also possible. A description of the beamline as well as its performances are given in a first part. Then some scientific examples of XAS studies from users are presented which cover a wide variety of topics in radiochemistry and nuclear materials.

  2. Diffraction enhanced imaging and x-ray fluorescence microtomography for analyzing biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, H.S.; Pereira, G.R.; Lopes, R.T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear-COPPE/UFRJ-RJ (Brazil); Anjos, M.J. [Instituto de Fisica-UERJ-RJ (Brazil); Faria, P. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer-INCa-RJ (Brazil); Kellermann, G.; Perez, C.A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-Campinas-SP (Brazil); Tirao, G. [Faculdad de Mat. Astronomia y Fisica (FAMAF), UNC. Cordoba (Argentina); Mazzaro, I. [Laboratorio de Optica de Raios X e Instrumentacao-UFPR-Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Giles, C. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia Aplicada e Raios X-UNICAMP-Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-15

    In this work, breast tissue samples were investigated in order to verify the distribution of certain elements by x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XRFCT) correlated with the characteristics and pathology of each tissue observed by diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI). The DEI system can show details in low attenuation tissues. It is based on the contrast imaging obtained by extinction, diffraction and refraction characteristics and can improve reduction in false positive and false negative diagnoses. XRFCT allows mapping of all elements within the sample, since even a minute fluorescence signal can be detected. DEI imaging techniques revealed the complex structure of the disease, confirmed by the histological section, and showed microstructures in all planes of the sample. The XRFCT showed the distribution of Zn, Cu and Fe at higher concentration. (authors)

  3. Volume digital image correlation to assess displacement field in compression loaded bread crumb under X-ray microtomography

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we present an original approach to assess structural changes during bread crumb compression using a mechanical testing bench coupled to 3D X-ray microtomography. X-ray images taken at different levels of compression of the bread crumb are processed using image analysis. A subset-based digital volume correlation method is used to achieve the 3D displacement field. Within the limit of the approach, deterministic search strategy is implemented for solving subset displacement in each deformed image with regards to the undeformed one. The predicted displacement field in the transverse directions shows differences that depend on local cell arrangement as confirmed by finite element analysis. The displacement component in the loading direction is affected by the magnitude of imposed displacement and shows more regular change. Large displacement levels in the compression direction are in good agreement with the imposed experimental displacement. The results presented here are promising in a sense of possible identification of local foam properties. New insights are expected to achieve better understanding of structural heterogeneities in the overall perception of the product. Industrial relevance: Texture evaluation of cereal product is an important aspect for testing consumer acceptability of new designed products. Mechanical evaluation of backed products is a systemic route for determining texture of cereal based product. From the industrial viewpoint, mechanical evaluation allows saving both time and cost compared to panel evaluation. We demonstrate that better understanding of structural changes during texture evaluation can be achieved in addition to texture evaluation. Sensing structural changes during bread crumb compression is achievable by combining novel imaging technique and processing based on image analysis. We present thus an efficient way to predict displacements during compression of freshly baked product. This method can be used in different

  4. Identifying microbial habitats in soil using quantum dots and x-ray fluorescence microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, S. L.; Whiteside, M. D.; Sholto-Douglas, D.; Dohnalkova, A.; Durall, D. M.; Gursoy, D.; Jones, M. D.; Kovarik, L.; Lai, B.; Roehrig, C.; Sullivan, S.; Vogt, S.; Kemner, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The metabolic activities of soil microbes are the primary drivers of biogeochemical processes controlling the terrestrial carbon cycle, nutrient availability to plants, contaminant remediation, water quality, and other ecosystem services. However, we have a limited understanding of microbial metabolic processes such as nutrient uptake rates, substrate preferences, or how microbes and microbial metabolism are distributed throughout the three-dimensional pore network of the soil. Here we use a novel combination of imaging techniques with quantum dots (QDs, engineered semiconductor nanoparticles that produce size or composition-dependent fluorescence) to locate bacteria in the three-dimensional pore network of a soil aggregate. First, we show using confocal and aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopies that bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas protogens) actively take up and internalize CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs conjugated to biologically relevant substrates. Next, we show that cells bearing QDs can be identified using fluorescence imaging with hard x-rays at 2ID-D at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Finally, we demonstrate that the Se constituent to the QDs can be used to label bacteria in three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of natural soil at 0.5 nm spatial resolution using hard x-rays at 2ID-E at the APS. This is the first time soil bacteria have been imaged in the intact soil matrix at such high resolution. These results offer a new way to experimentally investigate basic bacterial ecology in situ, revealing constraints on microbial function in soil that will help improve connections between pore-scale and ecosystem-scale processes in models.

  5. Application of morphological operations in the X-rays microtomography measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Alessandra C.; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Lima, Inaya, E-mail: alecastro@lin.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    The extraction of 3D geometry information in digital images can be done by a process called renderization through image processing analysis. As a result a new image with specific information, depending on the desired application is created. The goal of this work is to evaluate the quantification process of geometric parameters such as the volume of a hole made in a carbonate rock when different morphological operations, e.g., opening by reconstruction and closing by reconstruction, are applied in the renderization of microtomographic images, for different pixel matrices. For that purpose it was performed a wormhole structure in one carbonate rock by acidizing process and the sample was scanned with a 3D high energy computed microtomography system. The images were obtained with 130kV voltage, 61μA current, 20 μm pixel size and 2240x2240 pixel matrices. In the process of renderization, the used matrices ranged from 70kP to 5MP. The results obtained show that the application of the morphological operations opening by reconstruction and closing by reconstruction directly interfere in the quantification of the volume of the hole, overestimating or underestimating the results, depending on the applied operation and the used matrix. It can be noted that for smaller matrices the difference in the quantified values to the real values exceeds acceptable values, and for larger matrices there is no loss or gain of significant information. (author)

  6. Development of confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy at the Cornell high energy synchrotron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woll, A.R.; Huang, R.; Mass, J.; Bisulca, C.; Bilderback, D.H.; Gruner, S.; Gao, N.

    2006-01-01

    A confocal X-ray fluorescence microscope was built at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) to obtain compositional depth profiles of historic paintings. The microscope consists of a single-bounce, borosilicate monocapillary optic to focus the incident beam onto the painting and a commercial borosilicate polycapillary lens to collect the fluorescent X-rays. The resolution of the microscope was measured by scanning a variety of thin metal films through this confocal volume while monitoring the fluorescence signal. The capabilities of the technique were then probed using test paint microstructures with up to four distinct layers, each having a thickness in the range of 10-80 microns. Results from confocal XRF were compared with those from stand-alone XRF and visible light microscopy of the paint cross-sections. A large area, high-resolution scanner is currently being built to perform 3D scans on moderately sized paintings. (orig.)

  7. Source assemblage types for cratonic diamonds from X-ray synchrotron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, F.; Alvaro, M.; Casati, M. N.; Wilhelm, H.; Kleppe, A. K.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Domeneghetti, M. C.; Harris, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Three single crystals of clinopyroxene trapped within three different gem-quality diamonds from the Udachnaya kimberlite (Siberia, Russia) were analysed in situ by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to obtain information on their chemical composition and infer source assemblage type. A non-destructive approach was used with high-energy (≈ 60 keV; λ ≈ 0.206 Å) at I15, the extreme-conditions beamline at Diamond Light Source. A dedicated protocol was used to center the mineral inclusions located deep inside the diamonds in the X-ray beam. Our results reveal that two of the inclusions can be associated with peridotitic paragenesis whereas the third is eclogitic. This study also demonstrates that this non-destructive experimental approach is extremely efficient in evaluating the origin of minerals trapped in their diamond hosts.

  8. Synchrotron hard X-ray imaging of shock-compressed metal powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This poster will present the application of a new, high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray radiography technique to the study of shock-compressed granular materials. Following plate-impact loading, transmission radiography was used to quantitatively observe the compaction and release processes in a range of high-Z metal powders (e.g. Fe, Ni, Cu). By comparing the predictions of 3D numerical models initialized from X-ray tomograms-captured prior to loading-with experimental results, this research represents a new approach to refining mesoscopic compaction models. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  9. Metals determination in wood treated by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Silva, Richard Maximiliano da Cunha [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: maxcunha@cena.usp.br; Medeiros, Jean Gabriel da Silva; Tomazello Filho, Mario [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz]. E-mail: jeangm@esalq.usp.br; mtomazel@esalq.usp.br; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: Silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Zucchi, Orgheda Luiza Araujo Domingues [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas]. E-mail: olzucchi@fcfrp.usp.br; Barroso, Regina Cely [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: cely@uerj.br

    2005-07-01

    The paper describes the use of X-Ray fluorescence analysis for distribution and quantification of metals in the hardwood (Eucalyptus sp) and softwood (Pinus sp) treated with CCA (copper-chromium-arsenic). The sapwood/heartwood for hardwood sample and the growth-rings for softwood sample were analyzed. The samples were scanned in 320 mm steps in the vertical direction. For excitation of the elements a white beam synchrotron radiation of {approx} 320 x 180 mm was employed and for the X-ray detection a Si(Li) semiconductor detector. The elements K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn and As were determined. Fundamental parameters were used to quantify the elements concentrations. (author)

  10. Metals determination in wood treated by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de; Medeiros, Jean Gabriel da Silva; Tomazello Filho, Mario

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the use of X-Ray fluorescence analysis for distribution and quantification of metals in the hardwood (Eucalyptus sp) and softwood (Pinus sp) treated with CCA (copper-chromium-arsenic). The sapwood/heartwood for hardwood sample and the growth-rings for softwood sample were analyzed. The samples were scanned in 320 mm steps in the vertical direction. For excitation of the elements a white beam synchrotron radiation of ∼ 320 x 180 mm was employed and for the X-ray detection a Si(Li) semiconductor detector. The elements K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn and As were determined. Fundamental parameters were used to quantify the elements concentrations. (author)

  11. High-resolution X-ray scattering topography using synchrotron radiation microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikaura, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Kii, Hideki

    1994-01-01

    Although spatial resolution is the most essential factor determining the function of X-ray topography, it has not been improved in 30 years in spite of increasing requirements for highly-resolvable topography in materials science. X-ray scattering topography using a microbeam is a method capable of overcoming this resolution problem. Because the maximum resolution of an apparatus using a sealed-off tube is limited to 20μm, we designed and constructed scattering topography equipment using a synchrotron radiation microbeam. In the experiment, the slit system forms the microbeam 7 μm in diameter. We observed a cellulose distribution in bamboo as a testing material. When the scanning step was 2 μm, we attained spatial resolution less than 5 μm. (author)

  12. Optics for protein microcrystallography using synchrotron and laboratory X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, J.N.; Van Donkelaar, A.; Balaic, D.X.; Barnea, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: For protein crystallography, a highly-intense focused beam overcomes a serious constraint in current biological research: the inability of many protein molecules to form crystals larger than a few tens of microns in size. High structure-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals is currently only being studied at synchrotron X-ray sources. We shall examine how this is being carried out, and also report the development of a novel tapered glass monocapillary toroidal-mirror optic, which achieves a high-intensity, low-divergence focused beam from a rotating-anode Xray generator. We have used this optic, which demonstrates an ∼28x intensity gain at the beam focus to solve the structure of a plant exoglucanse/inhibtor complex microcrystal to 2.8 Angstroms, with volume equivalent to a 30-micron-edge cube

  13. X-rays from synchrotron: A new challenge for neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirane, G.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review is given of current developments in X-ray scattering techniques at synchrotron radiation facilities. Highly collimated, intense sources of white radiation open up new areas of research in condensed matter physics and challenge the traditional domains of neutron scattering. These include energy dispersive scattering, the use of anomalous dispersion, magnetic diffraction and direct energy analysis by backscattering. The relative merits of X-ray and neutron scattering techniques will be discussed. The unique advantage of neutron scattering is the capability of performing polarization analysis. We will discuss in some detail the current developments at Brookhaven inelastic scattering of polarized neutrons. In addition, we will also discuss special technical problems associated with the search for phasons utilizing a high-resolution triple axis spectrometer. (orig.)

  14. Nanostructure of protective rust layer on weathering steel examined using synchrotron radiation x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Masato; Uchida, Hitoshi; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectrum of pure goethite around the Fe K absorption edge and that of the protective rust layer formed on weathering steel exposed for 17 years in an atmospheric environment around the Cr K edge, have been examined using synchrotron radiation X-rays. It was found that the rust layer on the weathering steel mainly consisted of Cr-goethite. By examining the fine structure at the Cr K edge and the Fe K edge, we concluded that Cr 3+ in the rust layer is coordinated with O 2- and is positioned in the double chains of vacant sites in the network of FeO 3 (OH) 3 octahedra in the goethite crystal. This Cr 3+ site indicates that the protective effect of the rust layer is due to the dense aggregation of fine crystals of Cr-goethite with cation selectivity. (author)

  15. Low energy X-ray grating interferometry at the Brazilian Synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, F. J.; O'Dowd, F. P.; Cardoso, M. B.; Da Silva, R. R.; Cavicchioli, M.; Ribeiro, S. J. L.; Schröter, T. J.; Faisal, A.; Meyer, P.; Kunka, D.; Mohr, J.

    2017-06-01

    Grating based X-ray differential phase contrast imaging has found a large variety of applications in the last decade. Different types of samples call for different imaging energies, and efforts have been made to establish the technique all over the spectrum used for conventional X-ray imaging. Here we present a two-grating interferometer working at 8.3 keV, implemented at the bending magnet source of the IMX beamline of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory. The low design energy is made possible by gratings fabricated on polymer substrates, and makes the interferometer mainly suited to the investigation of light and thin samples. We investigate polymer microspheres filled with Fe2O3 nanoparticles, and find that these particles give rise to a significant visibility reduction due to small angle scattering.

  16. Characterization of methane hydrate host sediments using synchrotron-computed microtomography (CMT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W. [Laboratory for Earth and Environmental Sciences, Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Feng, Huan [Department of Earth and Environmental Studies, Montclair State University, Upper Montclair, NJ 07043 (United States); Tomov, Stanmire [Information Technology Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Winters, William J. [U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole Science Center, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Prodanovic, Masa [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3600 (United States); Mahajan, Devinder [Energy Sciences and Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 USA, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2275 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    The hydrate-sediment interaction is an important aspect of gas hydrate studies that needs further examination. We describe here the applicability of the computed microtomography (CMT) technique that utilizes an intense X-ray synchrotron source to characterize sediment samples, two at various depths from the Blake Ridge area (a well-known hydrate-prone region) and one from Georges Bank, that once contained methane trapped as hydrates. Detailed results of the tomographic analysis performed on the deepest sample (667 m) from Blake Ridge are presented as 2-D and 3-D images which show several mineral constituents, the internal grain/pore microstructure, and, following segmentation into pore and grain space, a visualization of the connecting pathways through the pore-space of the sediment. Various parameters obtained from the analysis of the CMT data are presented for all three sediment samples. The micro-scale porosity values showed decreasing trend with increasing depth for all three samples that is consistent with the previously reported bulk porosity data. The 3-D morphology, pore-space pathways, porosity, and permeability values are also reported for all three samples. The application of CMT is now being expanded to the laboratory-formed samples of hydrate in sediments as well as field samples of methane hydrate bearing sediments. (author)

  17. Characterization of methane hydrate host sediments using synchrotron-computed microtomography (CMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K.W.; Feng, H.; Tomov, S.; Winters, W.J.; Prodanovic, M.; Mahajan, D.

    2007-01-01

    The hydrate-sediment interaction is an important aspect of gas hydrate studies that needs further examination. We describe here the applicability of the computed microtomography (CMT) technique that utilizes an intense X-ray synchrotron source to characterize sediment samples, two at various depths from the Blake Ridge area (a well-known hydrate-prone region) and one from Georges Bank, that once contained methane trapped as hydrates. Detailed results of the tomographic analysis performed on the deepest sample (667??m) from Blake Ridge are presented as 2-D and 3-D images which show several mineral constituents, the internal grain/pore microstructure, and, following segmentation into pore and grain space, a visualization of the connecting pathways through the pore-space of the sediment. Various parameters obtained from the analysis of the CMT data are presented for all three sediment samples. The micro-scale porosity values showed decreasing trend with increasing depth for all three samples that is consistent with the previously reported bulk porosity data. The 3-D morphology, pore-space pathways, porosity, and permeability values are also reported for all three samples. The application of CMT is now being expanded to the laboratory-formed samples of hydrate in sediments as well as field samples of methane hydrate bearing sediments.

  18. Homogenization of sample absorption for the imaging of large and dense fossils with synchrotron microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Sophie; Fernandez, Vincent; Pierce, Stephanie E; Tafforeau, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Propagation phase-contrast synchrotron radiation microtomography (PPC-SRμCT) has proved to be very successful for examining fossils. Because fossils range widely in taphonomic preservation, size, shape and density, X-ray computed tomography protocols are constantly being developed and refined. Here we present a 1-h procedure that combines a filtered high-energy polychromatic beam with long-distance PPC-SRμCT (sample to detector: 4-16 m) and an attenuation protocol normalizing the absorption profile (tested on 13-cm-thick and 5.242 g cm(-3) locally dense samples but applicable to 20-cm-thick samples). This approach provides high-quality imaging results, which show marked improvement relative to results from images obtained without the attenuation protocol in apparent transmission, contrast and signal-to-noise ratio. The attenuation protocol involves immersing samples in a tube filled with aluminum or glass balls in association with a U-shaped aluminum profiler. This technique therefore provides access to a larger dynamic range of the detector used for tomographic reconstruction. This protocol homogenizes beam-hardening artifacts, thereby rendering it effective for use with conventional μCT scanners.

  19. Development of a speckle-based portable device for in situ metrology of synchrotron X-ray mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Yogesh; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-09-01

    A portable device for in situ metrology of synchrotron X-ray mirrors based on the near-field speckle scanning technique has been developed. Ultra-high angular sensitivity is achieved by scanning a piece of abrasive paper or filter membrane in the X-ray beam. In addition to the compact setup and ease of implementation, a user-friendly graphical user interface has been developed to ensure that optimizing active X-ray mirrors is simple and fast. The functionality and feasibility of this device have been demonstrated by characterizing and optimizing X-ray mirrors.

  20. CCD-based detector for protein crystallography with synchrotron X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, M.G.; Westbrook, E.M.; Naday, I.; Coleman, T.A.; Westbrook, M.L.; Travis, D.J.; Sweet, R.M.; Pflugrath, J.W.; Stanton, M.

    1990-01-01

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for X-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source with a beam intensity, through a 0.3 mm collimator, of greater than 10 9 X-ray photons/s. A fiberoptic taper, an image intensifier, and a lens demagnify, intensity, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512x512 pixels. The statistical uncertainty in the detector output was evaluated as a function of conversion gain. From this, a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of 0.36 was derived. The dynamic range of 4x4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 10 4 . The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel is 160 μm on the detector face. A data set collected from a chicken egg-white lysozyme crystal, consisting of 495 0.1deg frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program. The symmetry R-factors for the data were 3.2-3.5%. In a separate experiment a complete lysozyme data set consisting of 45 1deg frames was obtained in just 36 s of X-ray exposure. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a=275 A) were also recorded; the Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were separated but not fully resolved. Changes in the detector design that will improve the DQE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for X-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources. (orig.)

  1. CCD-based detector for protein crystallography with synchrotron X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, M.G.; Westbrook, E.M.; Naday, I.; Coleman, T.A.; Westbrook, M.L.; Travis, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Sweet, R.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Pflugrath, J.W. (Cold Spring Harbor Lab., NY (USA)); Stanton, M. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA))

    1990-11-15

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for X-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source with a beam intensity, through a 0.3 mm collimator, of greater than 10{sup 9} X-ray photons/s. A fiberoptic taper, an image intensifier, and a lens demagnify, intensity, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512x512 pixels. The statistical uncertainty in the detector output was evaluated as a function of conversion gain. From this, a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of 0.36 was derived. The dynamic range of 4x4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 10{sup 4}. The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel is 160 {mu}m on the detector face. A data set collected from a chicken egg-white lysozyme crystal, consisting of 495 0.1deg frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program. The symmetry R-factors for the data were 3.2-3.5%. In a separate experiment a complete lysozyme data set consisting of 45 1deg frames was obtained in just 36 s of X-ray exposure. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a=275 A) were also recorded; the Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were separated but not fully resolved. Changes in the detector design that will improve the DQE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for X-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources. (orig.).

  2. CCD-based detector for protein crystallography with synchrotron X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, M. G.; Westbrook, E. M.; Naday, I.; Coleman, T. A.; Westbrook, M. L.; Travis, D. J.; Sweet, R. M.; Pflugrath, J. W.; Stanton, M.

    1990-11-01

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for X-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source with a beam intensity, through a 0.3 mm collimator, of greater than 109 X-ray photons/s. A fiberoptic taper, an image intensifier, and a lens demagnify, intensify, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512×512 pixels. The statistical uncertainty in the detector output was evaluated as a function of conversion gain. From this, a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of 0.36 was derived. The dynamic range of a 4×4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 104. The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel is 160 μm on the detector face. A data set collected from a chicken egg-white lysozyme crystal, consisting of 495 0.1° frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program. The symmetry R-factors for the data were 3.2-3.5%. In a separate experiment a complete lysozyme data set consisting of 45 1° frames was obtained in just 36 s of X-ray exposure. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a = 275 Å) were also recorded; the Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were separated but not fully resolved. Changes in the detector design that will improve the DQE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for X-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources.

  3. Synchrotron x-ray methods in studies of thin organic film structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentle, I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In recent years, the study of the structures of organic films as thin as a single monolayer has been revolutionized by methods that take advantage of the characteristics of synchrotron radiation. In particular, the methods of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) and X-ray reflectivity have led to a number of valuable insights into structural aspects of thin films at molecular resolution. Our group has been studying films formed at the air/water interface as insoluble monolayers and subsequently transferred to solid substrates using either the vertical (Langmuir-Blodgett) or horizontal (Langmuir-Schaeffer) methods. The main aim of these experiments is to exert control over film structure in the direction parallel to the substrate surface. This is highly desirable in order to design devices that exploit the optical and electrooptical properties of functional materials, but is difficult to do. By varying the chemical structure of the film materials and controlling deposition conditions a degree of control is possible, but only using synchrotron methods can it be easily verified. We have also developed a novel method of rapidly collecting data from GIXD measurements by the application of area detection (imaging plates), which has made possible measurements of dynamic processes such as in-situ annealing. Such measurements are not possible using traditional scanning methods. One area of current interest is films composed of porphyrins as functional materials, either alone or as mixed films with fatty acids. We have been investigating ways of assembling porphyrins in such a way as to overcome the tendency to aggregate, and to produce patterning and ordered structures in the plane of the interface. Examples will be given of how film composition and deposition method affects the final structure, and of how X-ray methods can be used to elucidate both the structures and the mechanisms. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  4. DOE/DMS workshop on future synchrotron VUV and x-ray beam Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, P.H.

    1992-03-01

    This document contains an overview of the participating DOE Laboratory beam line interests and the projected science to be addressed on these beam lines, both at new and existing synchrotron facilities. The scientific programs associated with present and planned synchrotron research by DOE Laboratories are discussed in chapters titled ''VUV and Soft X-Ray Research'' and ''Hard X-Ray Research.'' This research encompasses a broad range of the nation's scientific and technical research needs from fundamental to applied, in areas including environmental, biological, and physical sciences; new materials; and energy-related technologies. The projected cost of this proposed construction has been provided in tabular form using a uniform format so that anticipated DOE and outside funding agency contributions for construction and for research and development can be determined. The cost figures are, of course, subject to uncertainties of detailed design requirements and the availability of facility-designed generic components and outside vendors. The report also contains a compendium (as submitted by the beam line proposers) of the design capabilities, the anticipated costs, and the scientific programs of projected beam line construction at the four synchrotron facilities. A summary of the projected cost of these beam lines to be requested of DOE is compiled

  5. X-ray beam splitting design for concurrent imaging at hard X-ray FELs and synchrotron facilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oberta, Peter; Mokso, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 729, NOV (2013), s. 85-89 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : diffractive-refractive optics * hard X-ray FEL * X-ray imaging Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168900213009613

  6. Tensile rupture of medial arterial tissue studied by X-ray micro-tomography on stained samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein-Didier, Clémentine; Taïnoff, Damien; Viville, Julien; Adrien, Jérôme; Maire, Éric; Badel, Pierre

    2018-02-01

    Detailed characterization of damage and rupture mechanics of arteries is one the current challenges in vascular biomechanics, which requires developing suitable experimental approaches. This paper introduces an approach using in situ tensile tests in an X-ray micro-tomography setup to observe mechanisms of damage initiation and progression in medial layers of porcine aortic samples. The technique requires the use of sodium polytungstate as a contrast agent, of which the conditions for use are detailed in this paper. Immersion of the samples during 24h in a 15g/L concentrated solution provided the best compromise for viewing musculo-elastic units in this tissue. The process of damage initiation, delamination and rupture of medial tissue under tensile loading was observed and can be described as an elementary process repeating several times until complete failure. This elementary process initiates with a sudden mode I fracture of a group of musculo-elastic units, followed by an elastic recoil of these units, causing mode II separation of these, hence a delamination plane. The presented experimental approach constitutes a basis for observation of other constituents, or for investigations on other tissues and damage mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Improved estimates of percolation and anisotropic permeability from 3-D X-ray microtomography using stochastic analyses and visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Hines, Chris; Liu, Keyu; Gaede, Oliver; Squelch, Andrew

    2009-05-01

    X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) with micron resolution enables new ways of characterizing microstructures and opens pathways for forward calculations of multiscale rock properties. A quantitative characterization of the microstructure is the first step in this challenge. We developed a new approach to extract scale-dependent characteristics of porosity, percolation, and anisotropic permeability from 3-D microstructural models of rocks. The Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm of percolation theory is employed for a standard percolation analysis. The anisotropy of permeability is calculated by means of the star volume distribution approach. The local porosity distribution and local percolation probability are obtained by using the local porosity theory. Additionally, the local anisotropy distribution is defined and analyzed through two empirical probability density functions, the isotropy index and the elongation index. For such a high-resolution data set, the typical data sizes of the CT images are on the order of gigabytes to tens of gigabytes; thus an extremely large number of calculations are required. To resolve this large memory problem parallelization in OpenMP was used to optimally harness the shared memory infrastructure on cache coherent Non-Uniform Memory Access architecture machines such as the iVEC SGI Altix 3700Bx2 Supercomputer. We see adequate visualization of the results as an important element in this first pioneering study.

  8. X-ray computed microtomography as a tool for the comparative morphological characterization of Proceratophrys bigibbosa species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmann, Francielle da Silva; Evseev, Ivan; Paz, Manoela Guimaraes Ferreira da; Lingnau, Rodrigo, E-mail: evseev@utfpr.edu.b, E-mail: rodrigolingnau@utfpr.edu.b [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Francisco Beltrao, PR (Brazil); Ievsieieva, Ievgeniia; Assis, Joaquim T. de, E-mail: ievsieieva@iprj.uerj.b, E-mail: joaquim@iprj.uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IPRJ/UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico; Alves, Haimon D.L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The Proceratophrys bigibbosa species group is characterized by the presence of postocular swellings and absence of hornlike palpebral appendages. A new member of this group was described recently from southern Brazil: Proceratophrys brauni. Its body size is between the smaller Proceratophrys avelinoi and the larger Proceratophrys bigibbosa species, both living in the same region. As the external appearance of these three members of the group is very similar to each other, it is interesting to discover a specific morphological categorization through internal characteristics, such as the cranium's proportions. In this paper, we report the preliminary results for comparative cranium's morphological characterization of Proceratophrys bigibbosa species from Brazil using the X-ray computed Microtomography technique through Skyscan 1174 system. Five samples of each three species, i.e., fifteen samples in total, were scanned. The tomographic slice images were reconstructed by SkyScan software. Then, these 2D images were used to create the cranium's models by 3D DOCTOR software. The main result is that some visible differences in the cranium's proportions of the species were observed. (author)

  9. Determination of the Representative Elementary Volume for the study of sandstones and siltstones by X-Ray microtomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaquiel Salvi Fernandes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available X-Ray computerized microtomography (µ-CT besides providing two-dimensional images (2-D of the transversal sections of the sample, the biggest attraction of the methodology is the rendering of three-dimensional images (3-D, enabling a more real analysis of the porous structure of the rock. However, the reconstruction, visualization and analysis of such 3-D images are limited in computer terms. Thus, it is not always possible to reconstruct the images with the total size of the microtomographed sample. Therefore, this study aims at determining the Representative Elementary Volume (REV in reservoir rocks concerning their porosity. In order to collect microtomographic data from reservoir rocks, a microtomograph Skyscan model 1172 was utilized for the sandstone and siltstone samples scanning. After the analysis of the graphs obtained by REV, it was concluded that the most adequate dimensions for the reconstructed volume in each analyzed sample were approximately 1400 × 1400 × 1400 µm, which are dimensions that can easily be reconstructed, visualized and analyzed.

  10. Application of X-ray microtomography for the characterisation of hollow polymer-stabilised spray dried amorphous dispersion particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, John F; Terada, Masako; Holzner, Christian; Lavery, Leah; Nicholson, Sarah J; Timmins, Peter; Tobyn, Mike

    2016-08-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capability of X-ray microtomography to obtain information relating to powder characteristics such as wall thickness and solid volume fraction for hollow, polymer-stabilised spray dried dispersion (SDD) particles. SDDs of varying particle properties, with respect to shell wall thickness and degree of particle collapse, were utilised to assess the capability of the approach. The results demonstrate that the approach can provide insight into the morphological characteristics of these hollow particles, and thereby a means to understand/predict the processability and performance characteristics of the bulk material. Quantitative assessments of particle wall thickness, particle/void volume and thereby solid volume fraction were also demonstrated to be achievable. The analysis was also shown to be able to qualitatively assess the impact of the drying rate on the morphological nature of the particle surfaces, thus providing further insight into the final particle shape. The approach demonstrated a practical means to access potentially important particle characteristics for SDD materials which, in addition to the standard bulk powder measurements such as particle size and bulk density, may enable a better understanding of such materials, and their impact on downstream processability and dosage form performance. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of highly hydrophobic textiles by means of X-ray microtomography, wettability analysis and drop impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, M.; Guilizzoni, M.; Fest-Santini, S.; Lorenzi, M.

    2017-11-01

    Highly hydrophobic surfaces have been intensively investigated in the last years because their properties may lead to very promising technological spillovers encompassing both everyday use and high-tech fields. Focusing on textiles, hydrophobic fabrics are of major interest for applications ranging from clothes to architecture to environment protection and energy conversion. Gas diffusion media - made by a gas diffusion layer (GDL) and a microporous layer (MPL) - for fuel cells are a good benchmark to develop techniques aimed at characterizing the wetting performances of engineered textiles. An experimental investigation was carried out about carbon-based, PTFE-treated GDLs with and without MPLs. Two samples (woven and woven-non-woven) were analysed before and after coating with a MPL. Their three-dimensional structure was reconstructed and analysed by computer-aided X-ray microtomography (µCT). Static and dynamic wettability analyses were then carried out using a modified axisymmetric drop shape analysis technique. All the surfaces exhibited very high hydrophobicity, three of them near to a super-hydrophobic behavior. Water drop impacts were performed, evidencing different bouncing, sticking and fragmentation outcomes for which critical values of the Weber number were identified. Finally, a µCT scan of a drop on a GDL was performed, confirming the Cassie-Baxter wetting state on such surface.

  12. Reaction Rates in Chemically Heterogeneous Rock: Coupled Impact of Structure and Flow Properties Studied by X-ray Microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khulaifi, Yousef; Lin, Qingyang; Blunt, Martin J; Bijeljic, Branko

    2017-04-04

    We study dissolution in a chemically heterogeneous medium consisting of two minerals with contrasting initial structure and transport properties. We perform a reactive transport experiment using CO 2 -saturated brine at reservoir conditions in a millimeter-scale composite core composed of Silurian dolomite and Ketton limestone (calcite) arranged in series. We repeatedly image the composite core using X-ray microtomography (XMT) and collect effluent to assess the individual mineral dissolution. The mineral dissolution from image analysis was comparable to that measured from effluent analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We find that the ratio of the effective reaction rate of calcite to that of dolomite decreases with time, indicating the influence of dynamic transport effects originating from changes in pore structure coupled with differences in intrinsic reaction rates. Moreover, evolving flow and transport heterogeneity in the initially heterogeneous dolomite is a key determinant in producing a two-stage dissolution in the calcite. The first stage is characterized by a uniform dissolution of the pore space, while the second stage follows a single-channel growth regime. This implies that spatial memory effects in the medium with a heterogeneous flow characteristic (dolomite) can change the dissolution patterns in the medium with a homogeneous flow characteristic (calcite).

  13. Iron overload of human colon adenocarcinoma cells studied by synchrotron-based X-ray techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihucz, Victor G; Meirer, Florian; Polgári, Zsófia; Réti, Andrea; Pepponi, Giancarlo; Ingerle, Dieter; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Streli, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Fast- and slow-proliferating human adenocarcinoma colorectal cells, HT-29 and HCA-7, respectively, overloaded with transferrin (Tf), Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III) chloride and Fe(II) sulfate were studied by synchrotron radiation total-reflection X-ray spectrometry (TXRF), TXRF-X-ray absorption near edge structure (TXRF-XANES), and micro-X-ray fluorescence imaging to obtain information on the intracellular storage of overloaded iron (Fe). The determined TfR1 mRNA expression for the investigated cells correlated with their proliferation rate. In all cases, the Fe XANES of cells overloaded with inorganic Fe was found to be similar to that of deliquescent Fe(III) sulfate characterized by a distorted octahedral geometry. A fitting model using a linear combination of the XANES of Tf and deliquescent Fe(III) sulfate allowed to explain the near edge structure recorded for HT-29 cells indicating that cellular overload with inorganic Fe results in a non-ferritin-like fast Fe storage. Hierarchical cluster analysis of XANES spectra recorded for Fe overloaded HT-29 and HCA-7 cells was able to distinguish between Fe treatments performed with different Fe species with a 95% hit rate, indicating clear differences in the Fe storage system. Micro-X-ray fluorescence imaging of Fe overloaded HT-29 cells revealed that Fe is primarily located in the cytosol of the cells. By characterizing the cellular Fe uptake, Fe/S content ratios were calculated based on the X-ray fluorescence signals of the analytes. These Fe/S ratios were dramatically lower for HCA-7 treated with organic Fe(III) treatments suggesting dissimilarities from the Tf-like Fe uptake.

  14. Reference-free total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of semiconductor surfaces with synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckhoff, Burkhard; Fliegauf, Rolf; Kolbe, Michael; Müller, Matthias; Weser, Jan; Ulm, Gerhard

    2007-10-15

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a well-established method to monitor lowest level contamination on semiconductor surfaces. Even light elements on a wafer surface can be excited effectively when using high-flux synchrotron radiation in the soft X-ray range. To meet current industrial requirements in nondestructive semiconductor analysis, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) operates dedicated instrumentation for analyzing light element contamination on wafer pieces as well as on 200- and 300-mm silicon wafer surfaces. This instrumentation is also suited for grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis and conventional energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of buried and surface nanolayered structures, respectively. The most prominent features are a high-vacuum load-lock combined with an equipment front end module and a UHV irradiation chamber with an electrostatic chuck mounted on an eight-axis manipulator. Here, the entire surface of a 200- or a 300-mm wafer can be scanned by monochromatized radiation provided by the plane grating monochromator beamline for undulator radiation in the PTB laboratory at the electron storage ring BESSY II. This beamline provides high spectral purity and high photon flux in the range of 0.078-1.86 keV. In addition, absolutely calibrated photodiodes and Si(Li) detectors are used to monitor the exciting radiant power respectively the fluorescence radiation. Furthermore, the footprint of the excitation radiation at the wafer surface is well-known due to beam profile recordings by a CCD during special operation conditions at BESSY II that allow for drastically reduced electron beam currents. Thus, all the requirements of completely reference-free quantitation of TXRF analysis are fulfilled and are to be presented in the present work. The perspectives to arrange for reference-free quantitation using X-ray tube-based, table-top TXRF analysis are also addressed.

  15. Probing deformation substructure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and dislocation dynamics modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hofmann, Felix; Song, Xu; Eve, Sophie; Collins, Steve P

    2010-09-01

    Materials characterization at the nano-scale is motivated by the desire to resolve the structural aspects and deformation behavior at length scales relevant to those mechanisms that define the novel and unusual properties of nano-structured materials. A range of novel techniques has recently become accessible with the help of synchrotron X-ray beams that can be focused down to spot sizes of less than a few microns on the sample. The unique combination of tunability (energy selection), parallelism and brightness of synchrotron X-ray beams allows their use for high resolution diffraction (determination of crystal structure and transformations, analysis of dislocation sub-structures, orientation and texture analysis, strain mapping); small angle X-ray scattering (analysis of nano-scale voids and defects; orientation analysis) and imaging (radiography and tomography). After a brief review of the state-of-the-art capabilities for monochromatic and white beam synchrotron diffraction, we consider the usefulness of these techniques for the task of bridging the gap between experiment and modeling. Namely, we discuss how the experiments can be configured to provide information relevant to the validation and improvement of modeling approaches, and also how the results of various simulations can be post-processed to improve the possibility of (more or less) direct comparison with experiments. Using the example of some recent experiments carried out on beamline 116 at Diamond Light Source near Oxford, we discuss how such experimental results can be interpreted in view and in conjunction with numerical deformation models, particularly those incorporating dislocation effects, e.g., finite-element based pseudo-continuum strain gradient formulations, and discrete dislocation simulations. Post-processing of FE and discrete dislocation simulations is described, illustrating the kind of information that can be extracted from comparisons between modeling and experimental data.

  16. Quantitative analysis of packed and compacted granular systems by x-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaowei; Milroy, Georgina E.; Dutt, Meenakshi; Bentham, A. Craig; Hancock, Bruno C.; Elliott, James A.

    2005-04-01

    The packing and compaction of powders are general processes in pharmaceutical, food, ceramic and powder metallurgy industries. Understanding how particles pack in a confined space and how powders behave during compaction is crucial for producing high quality products. This paper outlines a new technique, based on modern desktop X-ray tomography and image processing, to quantitatively investigate the packing of particles in the process of powder compaction and provide great insights on how powder densify during powder compaction, which relate in terms of materials properties and processing conditions to tablet manufacture by compaction. A variety of powder systems were considered, which include glass, sugar, NaCl, with a typical particle size of 200-300 mm and binary mixtures of NaCl-Glass Spheres. The results are new and have been validated by SEM observation and numerical simulations using discrete element methods (DEM). The research demonstrates that XMT technique has the potential in further investigating of pharmaceutical processing and even verifying other physical models on complex packing.

  17. Characterization of transport phenomena in porous transport layers using X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanpour, S.; Hoorfar, M.; Phillion, A. B.

    2017-06-01

    Among different methods available for estimating the transport properties of porous transport layers (PTLs) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, X-ray micro computed tomography (X-μCT) imaging in combination with image-based numerical simulation has been recognized as a viable tool. In this study, four commercially-available single-layer and dual-layer PTLs are analyzed using this method in order to compare and contrast transport properties between different PTLs, as well as the variability within a single sheet. Complete transport property datasets are created for each PTL. The simulation predictions indicate that PTLs with high porosity show considerable variability in permeability and effective diffusivity, while PTLs with low porosity do not. Furthermore, it is seen that the Tomadakis-Sotirchos (TS) analytical expressions for porous media match the image-based simulations when porosity is relatively low but predict higher permeability and effective diffusivity for porosity values greater than 80%. Finally, the simulations show that cracks within MPL of dual-layer PTLs have a significant effect on the overall permeability and effective diffusivity of the PTLs. This must be considered when estimating the transport properties of dual-layer PTLs. These findings can be used to improve macro-scale models of product and reactant transport within fuel cells, and ultimately, fuel cell efficiency.

  18. Morphological evaluation of heterogeneous oolitic limestone under pressure and fluid flow using X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihuai; Lebedev, Maxim; Al-Yaseri, Ahmed; Yu, Hongyan; Nwidee, Lezorgia N.; Sarmadivaleh, Mohammad; Barifcani, Ahmed; Iglauer, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    Pore-scale analysis of carbonate rock is of great relevance to the oil and gas industry owing to their vast application potentials. Although, efficient fluid flow at pore scale is often disrupted owing to the tight rock matrix and complex heterogeneity of limestone microstructures, factors such as porosity, permeability and effective stress greatly impact the rock microstructures; as such an understanding of the effect of these variables is vital for various natural and engineered processes. In this study, the Savonnières limestone as a carbonate mineral was evaluated at micro scales using X-ray micro-computed tomography at high resolutions (3.43 μm and 1.25 μm voxel size) under different effective stress (0 MPa, 20 MPa) to ascertain limestone microstructure and gas permeability and porosity effect. The waterflooding (5 wt% NaCl) test was conducted using microCT in-situ scanning and nanoindentation test was also performed to evaluate microscale geomechanical heterogeneity of the rock. The nanoindentation test results showed that the nano/micro scale geomechanical properties are quite heterogeneous where the indentation modulus for the weak consolidated area was as low as 1 GPa. We observed that the fluid flow easily broke some less-consolidated areas (low indentation modulus) area, coupled with increase in porosity; and consistent with fines/particles migration and re-sedimentation were identified, although the effective stress showed only a minor effect on the rock microstructure.

  19. Raphide crystal structure in agave tequilana determined by x-ray originating from synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadokoro, Makoto; Ozawa, Yoshiki; Mitsumi, Minoru; Toriumi, Kohshiro; Ogura, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The first single crystal structure of small natural raphides in an agave plant is completely determined using an intense X-ray originating from a synchrotron radiation. The SEM image shows that the tip of the crystal is approximately hundreds of nanometer in width sharply grow to stick to the tissue of herbivorous vermin. Furthermore, the crystal develops cracks that propagate at an inclination of approximately 45deg towards the direction of crystal growth such that the crystal easily splits into small pieces in the tissue. (author)

  20. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, C.; Marrow, T. J.; Reinhard, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.

    2016-03-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a "node-bond" geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1~ 9.3% closed micropores.

  1. An x-ray fluorescence study of lake sediments from ancient Turkey using synchrotron radiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alatas, A.; Alp, E. E.; Friedman, E. S.; Jennings, G.; Johnson, C. E.; Lai, B.; Mini, S. M.; Sato, Y.; Wilkinson, T. J.; Yener, K. A.

    1999-03-10

    Sediments from relic Lake Golbasi were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence with synchrotrons radiation to determine changes in element concentrations over time with selected elements serving as proxies for environmental change. Increases in Ca and Sr suggest soil formation during a dry period, from ca. 4500 BC to ca. 200 AD at which point K, Rb, Zr, Ti, and Y increase, indicating the return of a wet environment. Soil erosion, represented by Cr and Ni, increases ca. 7000 BC, probably as a consequence of environmental change, prior to suggested exploitation of natural resources by the newly urbanized society of the third millennium BC.

  2. Synchrotron total reflection X-ray fluorescence at BL-16 microfocus beamline of Indus-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, M. K.; Singh, A. K.; Das, Gangadhar; Chowdhury, Anupam; Lodha, G. S.

    2014-04-01

    Determination of ultra trace elements is important in many disciplines both in basic and applied sciences. Numerous applications show their importance in medical science, environmental science, materials science, food processing and semiconductor industries and in maintaining the quality control of ultra pure chemicals and reagents. We report commissioning of a synchrotron based total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) facility on the BL-16 microfocus beamline of Indus-2. This paper describes the performance of the BL-16 TXRF spectrometer and the detailed description of its capabilities through examples of measured results.

  3. Non-destructive synchrotron X-ray diffraction mapping of a Roman painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooryhee, E.; Anne, M.; Hodeau, J.-L.; Martinetto, P.; Rondot, S.; Bardies, I.; Salomon, J.; Walter, P.; Vaughan, G.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    The history and the properties of materials are deduced not only from their elemental and molecular signatures, but also from their exact phase compositions, and from the structures and the defects of their constituents. Here we implement a non-destructive synchrotron X-ray based method, which combines both the quantitative structural content of diffraction and the imaging mode. As a demonstration case, the pigments of a Roman wall painting are examined. The joined elemental and mineral maps mimic the major features of the painting. Different structural phases made of common atomic elements are differentiated. Textures and graininess are measured and related to the artist's know-how. (orig.)

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of synchrotron radiation irradiation of a polytetrafluoroethylene surface

    CERN Document Server

    Haruyama, Y; Matsui, S; Ideta, T; Ishigaki, H

    2003-01-01

    The effect of synchrotron radiation (SR) irradiation of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). After the SR irradiation, the relative intensity of the F ls peak to the C ls peak decreased markedly. The chemical composition ratio to the F atoms to C atoms was estimated to be 0.29. From the curve fitting analysis of C ls and F ls XPS spectra, the chemical components and their intensity ratio were determined. The reason for the chemical composition change by the SR irradiation was discussed. (author)

  5. Electron multiplier as a detector for soft x rays from synchrotron and laser plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Christopher J.; Dermody, Geraint; Khaleque, Naz I.; Michette, Alan G.; Pfauntsch, Slawka J.; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Allott, Ric M.

    1998-11-01

    An electron-tubes-LTD 129EM electron multiplier tube has been modified to act as a detector of soft x-rays. the first dynode was coated with 100 nm of CsI and the assembly was mounted in a small vacuum chamber with 100 nm thick silicon nitride entrance window. Initial tests show the detector is linear up to an input flux of approximately 1MHz on a synchrotron source and has proved effective in providing pulse height discrimination when used on a pulsed laser plasma source.

  6. Synchrotron total reflection X-ray fluorescence at BL-16 microfocus beamline of Indus-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, M. K., E-mail: mktiwari@rrcat.gov.in; Singh, A. K., E-mail: mktiwari@rrcat.gov.in; Das, Gangadhar, E-mail: mktiwari@rrcat.gov.in; Chowdhury, Anupam, E-mail: mktiwari@rrcat.gov.in; Lodha, G. S., E-mail: mktiwari@rrcat.gov.in [Indus Synchrotrons Utilisation Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Determination of ultra trace elements is important in many disciplines both in basic and applied sciences. Numerous applications show their importance in medical science, environmental science, materials science, food processing and semiconductor industries and in maintaining the quality control of ultra pure chemicals and reagents. We report commissioning of a synchrotron based total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) facility on the BL-16 microfocus beamline of Indus-2. This paper describes the performance of the BL-16 TXRF spectrometer and the detailed description of its capabilities through examples of measured results.

  7. Total and available metal contents in sediments by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana; Sobrinho, Gilmar A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil]. E-mail: silvana@fecf.unicamp.br; Vives, Ana Elisa S. de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), SP (Brazil); Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    2002-07-01

    In this work the total and available contents of Al, Si, Cl, K, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Zr, Ba, Ce and Pb in sediments from river Atibaia were determined by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence technique. The detection limits for K series varies from 200 ng.mL{sup -1} for Al to 2 ng.mL{sup -1} for Zn while for L series the value varies from 20 ng.mL{sup -1} for Ba to 10 ng.mL{sup -1} for Pb. The samples were submitted to two different processes, in order to obtain the total and biological available metal contents. The information about metal content is a important parameter for a correct evaluation about the hydrologic cycle in Piracicaba basin. All the measure were carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas, SP, Brazil, using a white beam for excitation. (author)

  8. Extending the possibilities in phase space analysis of synchrotron radiation x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Claudio; Smilgies, Detlef-Matthias; Riekel, Christian; Gatta, Gilles; Daly, Peter

    2008-08-01

    A simple analytical approach to phase space analysis of the performance of x-ray optical setups (beamlines) combining several elements in position-angle-wavelength space is presented. The mathematical description of a large class of optical elements commonly used on synchrotron beamlines has been reviewed and extended with respect to the existing literature and is reported in a revised form. Novel features are introduced, in particular, the possibility to account for imperfections on mirror surfaces and to incorporate nanofocusing devices like refractive lenses in advanced beamline setups using the same analytical framework. Phase space analysis results of the simulation of an undulator beamline with focusing optics at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility compare favorably with results obtained by geometric ray-tracing methods and, more importantly, with experimental measurements. This approach has been implemented into a simple and easy-to-use program toolkit for optical calculations based on the Mathematica software package.

  9. Investigation of mineral distribution in bone by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy after tibolone therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, I. [Rio de Janeiro State Univ., Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy; Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Instrumentation Lab. - COPPE; Carvalho, A.C.B.; Henriques, H.N.; Guzman-Silva, M.A. [Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Lab. of Experimental Pathology; Sales, E.; Lopes, R.T. [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Instrumentation Lab. - COPPE; Granjeiro, J.M. [Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    2011-07-01

    Tibolone is a synthetic steroid with estrogenic, androgenic, and progestagenic properties used for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and treatment of climacteric symptoms. Tibolone shows almost no action on breast and endometrium, which are target-organs for estrogens and progesterone activity. The aim of this work was to investigate the spatial distribution of calcium and zinc minerals in the femoral head of ovariectomized rat in order to evaluate the effects of the long-term administration of tibolone. For that purpose X-ray microfluorescence was used with synchrotron radiation imaging technique which was performed at Brazilian Light Synchrotron Laboratory, Campinas, SP. Minerals were not homogeneously distributed in trabecular bone areas; a higher concentration of calcium in the trabecular regions at femoral heads was found in ovariectomized and tibolone-treated rats compared to ovariectomized and control groups. (orig.)

  10. Multielemental analysis in Brazilian cigarettes using total reflection X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpa, Renata F.B.; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Moreira, Silvana

    2005-01-01

    In order to identify major and trace elements in conventional and light Brazilian cigarettes, Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence with Synchrotron Radiation (SR-TXRF) was used. The fluorescence measurements were carried out at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas - Sao Paulo. This technique enables detection limit is in the ngg -1 range, which is very useful in elemental tobacco smoke analysis, since it presents most of its elements at a trace level. The major elements identified in tobacco samples were: S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe and Cd, and the trace elements were: Ti, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr and Ba. However in tobacco smoke samples, there were only two major elements: K and Ca, the others were present a trace level. The rate transfer of tobacco to tobacco smoke was about 2.5 % for all elements studied. (author)

  11. Online monitoring the detector calibration process at a synchrotron X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huapng; Zhao, Yidong; Zheng, Lei; Tang, Kun; Liu, Shuhu; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Yashuai; Li, Fan

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes an online noble gas monitor used for the detector calibration process with a cryogenic radiometer. The process is implemented under a high-flux synchrotron radiation X-ray source in the energy range from 2100 to 6000 eV at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). This online monitoring system aims to lower the uncertainty of the calibration results caused by electron beam decay in the storage ring during the detector calibration process. Because the calibration process is performed under the high vacuum condition, an ionization chamber with adjustable Kr gas pressure is chosen as the monitoring device. To decrease the electronic noise, a method for obtaining the signal by collecting the counts within a specified time has been applied. Under the properly controlled conditions, the uncertainty of the calibration results introduced by the online monitoring system is estimated to be better than 0.15%, which can meet the demands of various high-precision calibration processes.

  12. Synchrotron radiation based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis of the calibration samples used in surface sensitive total reflection and grazing emission X-ray fluorescence techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Banaś, D.; Pajek, M.; Szlachetko, J.; Jagodziński, P.; Susini, J.; Salomé, M.

    2013-12-01

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) are surface sensitive techniques and can be used for detailed surface studies of different materials, including ultra-low concentration contamination or the lateral and depth distributions of elements. The calibration procedure typically used involves placing a micro-droplet (˜μl) of the standard solution onto a silicon wafer (or quartz backing). After evaporation of the solvent, the residual amount of elements is used as a reference standard. Knowledge of the distribution of residue material on the substrate surface is crucial for precise quantification. In the present work the investigation of the lateral distribution of elements in the multielemental calibrating samples, containing the 23 most commonly studied elements, by using the synchrotron radiation based micro X-ray fluorescence is presented. The goal of this project was the study of a uniformity of the elemental distributions and determination of the residual elements morphology depending on the temperature of the drying process. The X-ray images were compared with optical and SEM images. Paper presents in details the experimental setup, sample preparation procedures, measurements and results. In the analysis of the X-ray images of the sample dried in high temperature the censoring approach was applied improving the quality of statistical analysis. The information on the elements distribution in the calibrating samples can be useful for developing more accurate calibration procedures applied in quantitative analysis of surface sensitive TXRF and GEXRF techniques.

  13. STEADY X-RAY SYNCHROTRON EMISSION IN THE NORTHEASTERN LIMB OF SN 1006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Mori, Koji; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Long, Knox S.; Winkler, P. Frank; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We investigate time variations and detailed spatial structures of X-ray synchrotron emission in the northeastern limb of SN 1006, using two Chandra observations taken in 2000 and 2008. We extract spectra from a number of small (∼10'') regions. After taking account of proper motion and isolating the synchrotron from the thermal emission, we study time variations in the synchrotron emission in the small regions. We find that there are no regions showing strong flux variations. Our analysis shows an apparent flux decline in the overall synchrotron flux of ∼4% at high energies, but we suspect that this is mostly a calibration effect, and that flux is actually constant to ∼1%. This is much less than the variation found in other remnants where it was used to infer magnetic-field strengths up to 1 mG. We attribute the lack of variability to the smoothness of the synchrotron morphology, in contrast to the small-scale knots found to be variable in other remnants. The smoothness is to be expected for a Type Ia remnant encountering uniform material. Finally, we find a spatial correlation between the flux and the cutoff frequency in synchrotron emission. The simplest interpretation is that the cutoff frequency depends on the magnetic-field strength. This would require that the maximum energy of accelerated electrons is not limited by synchrotron losses, but by some other effect. Alternatively, the rate of particle injection and acceleration may vary due to some effect not yet accounted for, such as a dependence on shock obliquity.

  14. Advancements and Application of Microsecond Synchrotron X-ray Footprinting at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sayan; Celestre, Rich; Feng, Jun; Ralston, Corie

    2016-01-02

    The method of synchrotron X-ray protein footprinting (XF-MS) is used to determine protein conformational changes, folding, protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, providing information which is often difficult to obtain using X-ray crystallography and other common structural biology methods [1 G. Xu and M.R. Chance, Chemical Reviews 107, 3514–3543 (2007). [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar] –3 V.N. Bavro, Biochem Soc Trans 43, 983–994 (2015). [CrossRef], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar] ]. The technique uses comparative in situ labeling of solvent-accessible side chains by highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (•OH) in buffered aqueous solution under different assay conditions. In regions where a protein is folded or binds a partner, these •OH susceptible sites are inaccessible to solvent, and therefore protected from labeling. The •OH are generated by the ionization of water using high-flux-density X-rays. High-flux density is a key factor for XF-MS labeling because obtaining an adequate steady-state concentration of hydroxyl radical within a short irradiation time is necessary to minimize radiation-induced secondary damage and also to overcome various scavenging reactions that reduce the yield of labeled side chains.

  15. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mirian L.A.F.; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray CT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumba (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based CT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies.

  16. Synchrotron Vacuum Ultraviolet Light and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was deployed in low Earth orbit in April 1990, two servicing missions have been conducted to upgrade its scientific capabilities. Minor cracking of second-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene) surfaces from multilayer insulation (MLI) was first observed upon close examination of samples with high solar exposure retrieved during the first servicing mission, which was conducted 3.6 years after deployment. During the second HST servicing mission, 6.8 years after deployment, astronaut observations and photographic documentation revealed significant cracks in the Teflon FEP layer of the MLI on both the solar- and anti-solar-facing surfaces of the telescope. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included identifying the low-Earth-orbit environmental constituent(s) responsible for the cracking and embrittling of Teflon FEP which was observed during the second servicing mission. The NASA Lewis Research Center provided significant support to this effort. Because soft x-ray radiation from solar flares had been considered as a possible cause for the degradation of the mechanical properties of Teflon FEP (ref. 1), the effects of soft xray radiation and vacuum ultraviolet light on Teflon FEP were investigated. In this Lewisled effort, samples of Teflon FEP with a 100-nm layer of vapor-deposited aluminum (VDA) on the backside were exposed to synchrotron radiation of various vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelengths between 18 nm (69 eV) and 0.65 nm (1900 eV). Synchrotron radiation exposures were conducted using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples of FEP/VDA were exposed with the FEP surface facing the synchrotron beam. Doses and fluences were compared with those estimated for the 20-yr Hubble Space Telescope mission.

  17. Synchrotron Powder X-ray Diffraction Study of the Structure and Dehydration Behavior of Sepiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J. E.; Bish, D. L.; Heaney, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    Sepiolite is a hydrous Mg-silicate clay mineral with fibrous morphology that typically occurs as fine-grained, poorly crystalline masses. It occurs in a wide variety of geological environments and has been mined for centuries because of its many uses, e.g. in the pharmaceutical, fertilizer, and pesticide industries. Its versatile functionality derives from the large surface area and microporosity that are characteristic of the material. In recent years, sepiolite has received considerable attention with regard to the adsorption of organics, for use as a support for catalysts, as a molecular sieve, and as an inorganic membrane for ultrafiltration. Because of its fine-grained and poorly crystalline nature, it has not been possible to study sepiolite's crystal structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods, and consequently many details of the structure are still not well known. In this study, Rietveld refinements using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data were used to investigate the crystal structure and dehydration behavior of sepiolite from Durango, Mexico. The room- temperature (RT) sepiolite structure in air compares well with previous models but reveals an additional zeolitic water site. The RT structure under vacuum retained only ~1/8 of the zeolitic water and the volume decreased 1.3%. Real-time, temperature-resolved synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements were used to investigate the behavior of the sepiolite structure from 300 to 925 K. Rietveld refinements revealed that most of the zeolitic water is lost by ~390 K, accompanied by a decrease in the a and c unit-cell parameters. Above ~600 K the sepiolite structure folds as one-half of the crystallographically bound water is lost. Rietveld refinements of the "anhydrous" sepiolite structure reveal that, in general, unit-cell parameters a, b, â and volume steadily decrease with increasing temperature; there is an obvious change in slope at ~820 K suggesting a phase

  18. Mapping Metal Elements of Shuangbai Dinosaur Fossil by Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Qun, Y.; Ablett, J.

    2008-01-01

    The metal elements mapping of Shuangbai dinosaur fossil, was obtained by synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF). Eight elements, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Y and Sr were determined. Elements As and Y were detected for the first time in the dinosaur fossil. The data indicated that metal elements are asymmetrical on fossil section. This is different from common minerals. Mapping metals showed that metal element As is few. The dinosaur most likely belongs to natural death. This is different from Zigong dinosaurs which were found dead from poisoning. This method has been used to find that metals Fe and Mn are accrete, and the same is true for Sr and Y. This study indicated that colloid granule Fe and Mn, as well as Sr and Y had opposite electric charges in lithification process of fossils. By this analysis, compound forms can be ascertained. Synchrotron light source x-ray fluorescence is a complementary method that shows mapping of metal elements at the dinosaur fossil, and is rapid, exact and intuitionist. This study shows that dinosaur fossil mineral imaging has a potential in reconstructing the paleoenvironment and ancient geology.

  19. Analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns from fluorotic enamel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ana P.G.; Braz, Delson, E-mail: anapaulagalmeida@gmail.co [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Colaco, Marcos V.; Barroso, Regina C., E-mail: cely@uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Porto, Isabel M., E-mail: belporto@ig.com.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Gerlach, Raquel F., E-mail: rfgerlach@forp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Droppa Junior, Roosevelt, E-mail: rdroppa@lnls.b [Associacao Brasileira de Tecnologia de Luz Sincrotron (ABTLuS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basics physical-chemistry reactions of demineralisation and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The hexagonal symmetry seems to work well with the powder diffraction data, and the crystal structure of HAp is usually described in space group P63/m. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using technique Synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to determine the crystal structure and crystallinity of on fluoroapatite (FAp) crystal present in fluoritic enamel. All the scattering profile measurements was carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory - LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. (author)

  20. Evaluation of osteoporotic bone structure through synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, I. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, 21941-914 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br; Anjos, M.J. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, 21941-914 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Physics Institute, UERJ (Brazil); Farias, M.L.F. [University Hospital, UFRJ (Brazil); Pantaleao, T.U.; Correa da Costa, V.M. [Biophysics Institute, UFRJ (Brazil); Lopes, R.T. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, 21941-914 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    The abnormal accumulation or deficiency of trace elements may theoretically impair the formation of bone and contribute to osteoporosis. In this context, the knowledge of major and trace elements is very important in order to clarify many issues regarding diseases of the bone, such as osteoporosis, that remain unresolved. Several kinds of imaging techniques can be useful to access morphology and the minerals present in osteoporotic bones. In this work, synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence was used as an X-ray imaging technique to investigate bone structures. Therefore, this research aims to improve the knowledge about some aspects of bone quality. The measurements were carried out at the Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory Light Laboratory, in Brazil. A white beam with an energy range of 4-23 keV, a 45 deg./45 deg. geometry and a capillary optics were used. It was demonstrated that bone quality can and must be evaluated not only by considering the architecture of bones but also by taking into account the concentration and the distribution of minerals. Our results showed that the elemental distributions in bone zones on a micron scale were very helpful to understand functions in those structures.

  1. ENDIX. A computer program to simulate energy dispersive X-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovestreydt, E.; Karlsruhe Univ.; Parthe, E.; Benedict, U.

    1987-01-01

    A Fortran 77 computer program is described which allows the simulation of energy dispersive X-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction diagrams. The input consists of structural data (space group, unit cell dimensions, atomic positional and displacement parameters) and information on the experimental conditions (chosen Bragg angle, type of X-ray tube and applied voltage or operating power of synchrotron radiation source). The output consists of the normalized intensities of the diffraction lines, listed by increasing energy (in keV), and of an optional intensity-energy plot. The intensities are calculated with due consideration of the wave-length dependence of both the anomalous dispersion and the absorption coefficients. For a better agreement between observed and calculated spectra provision is made to optionally superimpose, on the calculated diffraction line spectrum, all additional lines such as fluorescence and emission lines and escape peaks. The different effects which have been considered in the simulation are discussed in some detail. A sample calculation of the energy dispersive powder diffraction pattern of UPt 3 (Ni 3 Sn structure type) is given. Warning: the user of ENDIX should be aware that for a successful application it is necessary to adapt the program to correspond to the actual experimental conditions. Even then, due to the only approximately known values of certain functions, the agreement between observed and calculated intensities will not be as good as for angle dispersive diffraction methods

  2. Synchrotron X-ray measurement techniques for thermal barrier coated cylindrical samples under thermal gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sanna F; Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2013-08-01

    Measurement techniques to obtain accurate in situ synchrotron strain measurements of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) applied to hollow cylindrical specimens are presented in this work. The Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition coated specimens with internal cooling were designed to achieve realistic temperature gradients over the TBC coated material such as that occurring in the turbine blades of aeroengines. Effects of the circular cross section on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in the various layers, including the thermally grown oxide, are investigated using high-energy synchrotron x-rays. Multiple approaches for beam penetration including collection, tangential, and normal to the layers, along with variations in collection parameters are compared for their ability to attain high-resolution XRD data from the internal layers. This study displays the ability to monitor in situ, the response of the internal layers within the TBC, while implementing a thermal gradient across the thickness of the coated sample. The thermal setup maintained coating surface temperatures in the range of operating conditions, while monitoring the substrate cooling, for a controlled thermal gradient. Through variation in measurement location and beam parameters, sufficient intensities are obtained from the internal layers which can be used for depth resolved strain measurements. Results are used to establish the various techniques for obtaining XRD measurements through multi-layered coating systems and their outcomes will pave the way towards goals in achieving realistic in situ testing of these coatings.

  3. X-ray diffraction studies on single and mixed confectionery fats using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacMillan, S.C.; Roberts, K.J.; Wells, M.; Polgreen, M.; Smith, I. [Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, (United Kingdom). Department of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, Centre for Molecular and Interface Engineering

    1999-12-01

    and stirring rate (shear rate). The X-rays used are from a high intensity synchrotron radiation source, enabling polymorphic phase transformations for a variety of fat mixtures to observed. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc.

  4. X-ray diffraction studies on single and mixed confectionery fats using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacMillan, S.C.; Roberts, K.J.; Wells, M.; Polgreen, M.; Smith, I.

    1999-01-01

    and stirring rate (shear rate). The X-rays used are from a high intensity synchrotron radiation source, enabling polymorphic phase transformations for a variety of fat mixtures to observed. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  5. Energy dispersive detector for white beam synchrotron x-ray fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Matthew D., E-mail: Matt.Wilson@stfc.ac.uk; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Campus,UK (United Kingdom); Connolley, Thomas [Diamond Light Source, I12 Beamline, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Dolbnya, Igor P.; Malandain, Andrew; Sawhney, Kawal [Diamond Light Source, B16 Beamline, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Grant, Patrick S.; Liotti, Enzo; Lui, Andrew [Department of Materials, University of Oxford Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    A novel, “single-shot” fluorescence imaging technique has been demonstrated on the B16 beamline at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron using the HEXITEC energy dispersive imaging detector. A custom made furnace with 200µm thick metal alloy samples was positioned in a white X-ray beam with a hole made in the furnace walls to allow the transmitted beam to be imaged with a conventional X-ray imaging camera consisting of a 500 µm thick single crystal LYSO scintillator, mirror and lens coupled to an AVT Manta G125B CCD sensor. The samples were positioned 45° to the incident beam to enable simultaneous transmission and fluorescence imaging. The HEXITEC detector was positioned at 90° to the sample with a 50 µm pinhole 13 cm from the sample and the detector positioned 2.3m from pinhole. The geometric magnification provided a field of view of 1.1×1.1mm{sup 2} with one of the 80×80 pixels imaging an area equivalent to 13µm{sup 2}. Al-Cu alloys doped with Zr, Ag and Mo were imaged in transmission and fluorescence mode. The fluorescence images showed that the dopant metals could be simultaneously imaged with sufficient counts on all 80x80 pixels within 60 s, with the X-ray flux limiting the fluorescence imaging rate. This technique demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously image and identify multiple elements on a spatial resolution scale ~10µm or higher without the time consuming need to scan monochromatic energies or raster scan a focused beam of X-rays. Moving to high flux beamlines and using an array of detectors could improve the imaging speed of the technique with element specific imaging estimated to be on a 1 s timescale.

  6. X-ray computed microtomography characterizes the wound effect that causes sap flow underestimation by thermal dissipation sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón-Jiménez, S; Van den Bulcke, J; Piayda, A; Van Acker, J; Cuntz, M; Rebmann, C; Steppe, K

    2018-02-01

    Insertion of thermal dissipation (TD) sap flow sensors in living tree stems causes damage of the wood tissue, as is the case with other invasive methods. The subsequent wound formation is one of the main causes of underestimation of tree water-use measured by TD sensors. However, the specific alterations in wood anatomy in response to inserted sensors have not yet been characterized, and the linked dysfunctions in xylem conductance and sensor accuracy are still unknown. In this study, we investigate the anatomical mechanisms prompting sap flow underestimation and the dynamic process of wound formation. Successive sets of TD sensors were installed in the early, mid and end stage of the growing season in diffuse- and ring-porous trees, Fagus sylvatica (Linnaeus) and Quercus petraea ((Mattuschka) Lieblein), respectively. The trees were cut in autumn and additional sensors were installed in the cut stem segments as controls without wound formation. The wounded area and volume surrounding each sensor was then visually determined by X-ray computed microtomography (X-ray microCT). This technique allowed the characterization of vessel anatomical transformations such as tyloses formation, their spatial distribution and quantification of reduction in conductive area. MicroCT scans showed considerable formation of tyloses that reduced the conductive area of vessels surrounding the inserted TD probes, thus causing an underestimation in sap flux density (SFD) in both beech and oak. Discolored wood tissue was ellipsoidal, larger in the radial plane, more extensive in beech than in oak, and also for sensors installed for longer times. However, the severity of anatomical transformations did not always follow this pattern. Increased wound size with time, for example, did not result in larger SFD underestimation. This information helps us to better understand the mechanisms involved in wound effects with TD sensors and allows the provision of practical recommendations to reduce

  7. High-contrast differentiation resolution 3D imaging of rodent brain by X-ray computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikmund, T.; Novotná, M.; Kavková, M.; Tesařová, M.; Kaucká, M.; Szarowská, B.; Adameyko, I.; Hrubá, E.; Buchtová, M.; Dražanová, E.; Starčuk, Z.; Kaiser, J.

    2018-02-01

    The biomedically focused brain research is largely performed on laboratory mice considering a high homology between the human and mouse genomes. A brain has an intricate and highly complex geometrical structure that is hard to display and analyse using only 2D methods. Applying some fast and efficient methods of brain visualization in 3D will be crucial for the neurobiology in the future. A post-mortem analysis of experimental animals' brains usually involves techniques such as magnetic resonance and computed tomography. These techniques are employed to visualize abnormalities in the brains' morphology or reparation processes. The X-ray computed microtomography (micro CT) plays an important role in the 3D imaging of internal structures of a large variety of soft and hard tissues. This non-destructive technique is applied in biological studies because the lab-based CT devices enable to obtain a several-micrometer resolution. However, this technique is always used along with some visualization methods, which are based on the tissue staining and thus differentiate soft tissues in biological samples. Here, a modified chemical contrasting protocol of tissues for a micro CT usage is introduced as the best tool for ex vivo 3D imaging of a post-mortem mouse brain. This way, the micro CT provides a high spatial resolution of the brain microscopic anatomy together with a high tissue differentiation contrast enabling to identify more anatomical details in the brain. As the micro CT allows a consequent reconstruction of the brain structures into a coherent 3D model, some small morphological changes can be given into context of their mutual spatial relationships.

  8. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation: lecture 4. Soft x-ray imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.

    1986-04-01

    The history and present techniques of soft x-ray imaging are reviewed briefly. The physics of x-ray imaging is described, including the temporal and spatial coherence of x-ray sources. Particular technologies described are: contact x-ray microscopy, zone plate imaging, scanned image zone plate microscopy, scanned image reflection microscopy, and soft x-ray holography and diffraction

  9. A structural study of bone changes in knee osteoarthritis by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhupakorn, Bura; Thienpratharn, Suwittaya; Kidkhunthod, Pinit

    2017-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage and thickening of subchondral bone. The present study investigated the changing of biochemical components of cartilage and bone compared between normal and OA people. Using Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniquesincluding X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were employed for the bone changes in kneeosteoarthritisstudies. The bone samples were collected from various osteoarthritis patients with both male and female in the ages range between 20 and 74 years old. SR-XRF results excited at 4240 eV for Ca elements show a majority three main groups, based on their XRF intensities, 20-36 years, 40-60 years and over 70 years, respectively. By employing XAS techniques, XANES features can be used to clearly explain in term of electronic transitions occurring in bone samples which are affected from osteoarthritis symptoms. Moreover, a structural change around Ca ions in bone samples is obviously obtained by EXAFS results indicating an increase of Ca-amorphous phase when the ages increase.

  10. A compact dispersive refocusing Rowland circle X-ray emission spectrometer for laboratory, synchrotron, and XFEL applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, William M.; Hoidn, Oliver R.; Ditter, Alexander S.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Kas, Joshua; Stein, Jennifer L.; Cossairt, Brandi M.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Guo, Jinghua; Ye, Yifan; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine

    2017-07-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy is emerging as an important complement to x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, providing a characterization of the occupied electronic density of states local to the species of interest. Here, we present details of the design and performance of a compact x-ray emission spectrometer that uses a dispersive refocusing Rowland (DRR) circle geometry to achieve excellent performance for the 2-2.5 keV range, i.e., especially for the K-edge emission from sulfur and phosphorous. The DRR approach allows high energy resolution even for unfocused x-ray sources. This property enables high count rates in laboratory studies, approaching those of insertion-device beamlines at third-generation synchrotrons, despite use of only a low-powered, conventional x-ray tube. The spectrometer, whose overall scale is set by use of a 10-cm diameter Rowland circle and a new small-pixel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor x-ray camera, is easily portable to synchrotron or x-ray free electron laser beamlines. Photometrics from measurements at the Advanced Light Source show excellent overall instrumental efficiency. In addition, the compact size of this instrument lends itself to future multiplexing to gain large factors in net collection efficiency or its implementation in controlled gas gloveboxes either in the lab or in an endstation.

  11. Observation of X-ray shadings in synchrotron radiation-total reflection X-ray fluorescence using a color X-ray camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittschen, Ursula Elisabeth Adriane, E-mail: ursula.fittschen@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [Institut für Anorganische und Angewandte Chemie, Universität Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Menzel, Magnus [Institut für Anorganische und Angewandte Chemie, Universität Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Scharf, Oliver [IfG Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Radtke, Martin; Reinholz, Uwe; Buzanich, Günther [BAM Federal Institute of Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Lopez, Velma M.; McIntosh, Kathryn [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Vienna (Austria); Havrilla, George Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Absorption effects and the impact of specimen shape on TXRF analysis has been discussed intensively. Model calculations indicated that ring shaped specimens should give better results in terms of higher counts per mass signals than filled rectangle or circle shaped specimens. One major reason for the difference in signal is shading effects. Full field micro-XRF with a color X-ray camera (CXC) was used to investigate shading, which occurs when working with small angles of excitation as in TXRF. The device allows monitoring the illuminated parts of the sample and the shaded parts at the same time. It is expected that sample material hit first by the primary beam shade material behind it. Using the CXC shading could be directly visualized for the high concentration specimens. In order to compare the experimental results with calculation of the shading effect the generation of controlled specimens is crucial. This was achieved by “drop on demand” technology. It allows generating uniform, microscopic deposits of elements. The experimentally measured shadings match well with those expected from calculation. - Highlights: • Use of a color X-ray camera and drop on demand printing to diagnose X-ray shading • Specimens were obtained uniform and well-defined in shape and concentration by printing. • Direct visualization and determination of shading in such specimens using the camera.

  12. In-Situ Synchrotron X-ray Study of the Phase and Texture Evolution of Ceria and Superconductor Films Deposited by Chemical Solution Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Grivel, Jean-Claude; He, Dong

    2012-01-01

    In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction is used to study the phase and texture formation of ceria based films and superconductor films deposited by the chemical solution method on technical substrates. Combined analysis using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry/differential ther......In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction is used to study the phase and texture formation of ceria based films and superconductor films deposited by the chemical solution method on technical substrates. Combined analysis using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry...

  13. Chemical shifts of K-X-ray absorption edges on copper in different compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with Synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, D.; Basu, S.; Jha, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2012-03-01

    Cu K X-ray absorption edges were measured in compounds such as CuO, Cu(CH3CO2)2, Cu(CO3)2, and CuSO4 where Cu is present in oxidation state of 2+, using the energy dispersive EXAFS beamline at INDUS-2 Synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore. Energy shifts of ˜4-7 eV were observed for Cu K X-ray absorption edge in the above compounds compared to its value in elemental copper. The difference in the Cu K edge energy shifts in the different compounds having same oxidation state of Cu shows the effect of different chemical environments surrounding the cation in the above compounds. The above chemical effect has been quantitatively described by determining the effective charges on Cu cations in the above compounds.

  14. Investigations of the phase transition in V3O5 using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and synchrotron radiation white beam X-ray topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbrink, S.; Gerward, L.; Staun Olsen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The reversible first order phase transition in V 3 O 5 at T t =155 0 C has been studied using a specially constructed oven, where the temperature can be kept constant within a few hundredths of a degree for several hours. Energy dispersive diffraction measurements have beem made in a temperature region around the phase transition with the fixed crystal method and the θ/2θ scanning method. White beam X-ray topographs have been obtained from the same crystal in the same temperature region using synchrotron radiation. The integrated intensities of the strong h 0 0 reflections show anomalies that are correlated with the corresponding X-ray topographs. Thus, an unexpected increase of crystal perfection is observed a few hundredths of a degree below T t . The energy dependence of the intensity maximum at T t for strong reflections has been determined and semi-quantitatively explained on the basis of extinction theory. (orig.)

  15. A setup for synchrotron-radiation-induced total reflection X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near-edge structure recently commissioned at BESSY II BAMline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittschen, U; Guilherme, A; Böttger, S; Rosenberg, D; Menzel, M; Jansen, W; Busker, M; Gotlib, Z P; Radtke, M; Riesemeier, H; Wobrauschek, P; Streli, C

    2016-05-01

    An automatic sample changer chamber for total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis in TXRF geometry was successfully set up at the BAMline at BESSY II. TXRF and TXRF-XANES are valuable tools for elemental determination and speciation, especially where sample amounts are limited (TXRF requires a well defined geometry regarding the reflecting surface of a sample carrier and the synchrotron beam. The newly installed chamber allows for reliable sample positioning, remote sample changing and evacuation of the fluorescence beam path. The chamber was successfully used showing accurate determination of elemental amounts in the certified reference material NIST water 1640. Low limits of detection of less than 100 fg absolute (10 pg ml(-1)) for Ni were found. TXRF-XANES on different Re species was applied. An unknown species of Re was found to be Re in the +7 oxidation state.

  16. Protein folding and protein metallocluster studies using synchrotron small angler X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, D.

    1994-06-01

    Proteins, biological macromolecules composed of amino-acid building blocks, possess unique three dimensional shapes or conformations which are intimately related to their biological function. All of the information necessary to determine this conformation is stored in a protein's amino acid sequence. The problem of understanding the process by which nature maps protein amino-acid sequences to three-dimensional conformations is known as the protein folding problem, and is one of the central unsolved problems in biophysics today. The possible applications of a solution are broad, ranging from the elucidation of thousands of protein structures to the rational modification and design of protein-based drugs. The scattering of X-rays by matter has long been useful as a tool for the characterization of physical properties of materials, including biological samples. The high photon flux available at synchrotron X-ray sources allows for the measurement of scattering cross-sections of dilute and/or disordered samples. Such measurements do not yield the detailed geometrical information available from crystalline samples, but do allow for lower resolution studies of dynamical processes not observable in the crystalline state. The main focus of the work described here has been the study of the protein folding process using time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering measurements. The original intention was to observe the decrease in overall size which must accompany the folding of a protein from an extended conformation to its compact native state. Although this process proved too fast for the current time-resolution of the technique, upper bounds were set on the probable compaction times of several small proteins. In addition, an interesting and unexpected process was detected, in which the folding protein passes through an intermediate state which shows a tendency to associate. This state is proposed to be a kinetic molten globule folding intermediate

  17. Protein folding and protein metallocluster studies using synchrotron small angler X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliezer, D.

    1994-06-01

    Proteins, biological macromolecules composed of amino-acid building blocks, possess unique three dimensional shapes or conformations which are intimately related to their biological function. All of the information necessary to determine this conformation is stored in a protein`s amino acid sequence. The problem of understanding the process by which nature maps protein amino-acid sequences to three-dimensional conformations is known as the protein folding problem, and is one of the central unsolved problems in biophysics today. The possible applications of a solution are broad, ranging from the elucidation of thousands of protein structures to the rational modification and design of protein-based drugs. The scattering of X-rays by matter has long been useful as a tool for the characterization of physical properties of materials, including biological samples. The high photon flux available at synchrotron X-ray sources allows for the measurement of scattering cross-sections of dilute and/or disordered samples. Such measurements do not yield the detailed geometrical information available from crystalline samples, but do allow for lower resolution studies of dynamical processes not observable in the crystalline state. The main focus of the work described here has been the study of the protein folding process using time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering measurements. The original intention was to observe the decrease in overall size which must accompany the folding of a protein from an extended conformation to its compact native state. Although this process proved too fast for the current time-resolution of the technique, upper bounds were set on the probable compaction times of several small proteins. In addition, an interesting and unexpected process was detected, in which the folding protein passes through an intermediate state which shows a tendency to associate. This state is proposed to be a kinetic molten globule folding intermediate.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies at mineral-water interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarello, R.P.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques provide a powerful tool for the in situ study of atomic scale processes occurring at solid-liquid interfaces. We have applied these techniques to characterize and study reactions at mineral-water interfaces. Here we present two examples. The first is the characterization of the calcite (CaCO 3 ) (10 bar 14) cleavage surface, in equilibrium with deionized water, by crystal truncation rod measurements. The second is the in situ study of the heteroepitaxial growth of otavite (CdCO 3 ) on the calcite (10 bar 14) cleavage surface. The results of such studies will lead to significant progress in understanding mineral-water interface geochemistry

  19. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature.

  20. Multi-elemental analysis of produced water by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, P M; Anjos, M J; Melo, D M A; Melo, M A F; Gonçalves, L M; Silva, C N; Lopes, R T

    2008-02-15

    The synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SRTXRF) technique was used for the analysis of heavy metals in produced water samples from oil field in Rio Grande do Norte, in order to determine potential sources of pollution. Since the inorganic components in produced water generally resembling sea water, pre-concentration procedures have been applied to increase the concentration of the analyte of interest and to minimize the salt matrix effects. This technique allows us to determine the contents of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Hg and Pb in 20 produced water samples. The great majority of the sampling points presented low elemental concentration value. However, in some sample, the Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Hg concentration were higher than the established limits by the Brazilian legislation.

  1. Generating picosecond x-ray pulses in synchrotron light sources using dipole kickers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Guo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The duration of the x-ray pulse generated at a synchrotron light source is typically tens of picoseconds. Shorter pulses are highly desired by the users. In electron storage rings, the vertical beam size is usually orders of magnitude less than the bunch length due to radiation damping; therefore, a shorter pulse can be obtained by slitting the vertically tilted bunch. Zholents proposed tilting the bunch using rf deflection. We found that tilted bunches can also be generated by a dipole magnet kick. A vertical tilt is developed after the kick in the presence of nonzero chromaticity. The tilt was successfully observed and a 4.2-ps pulse was obtained from a 27-ps electron bunch at the Advanced Photon Source. Based on this principle, we propose a short-pulse generation scheme that produces picosecond x-ray pulses at a repetition rate of 1–2 kHz, which can be used for pump-probe experiments.

  2. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Chemical Crystallography with Pulsed Neutrons and Synchrotron X-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, George

    1988-01-01

    X-ray and neutron crystallography have played an increasingly impor­ tant role in the chemical and biochemical sciences over the past fifty years. The principal obstacles in this methodology, the phase problem and com­ puting, have been overcome. The former by the methods developed in the 1960's and just recognised by the 1985 Chemistry Nobel Prize award to Karle and Hauptman, the latter by the dramatic advances that have taken place in computer technology in the past twenty years. Within the last decade, two new radiation sources have been added to the crystallographer's tools. One is synchrotron X-rays and the other is spallation neutrons. Both have much more powerful fluxes than the pre­ vious sources and they are pulsed rather than continuos. New techniques are necessary to fully exploit the intense continuos radiation spectrum and its pulsed property. Both radiations are only available from particular National Laboratories on a guest-user basis for scientists outside these Na­ tional Laboratories. Hi...

  3. Spatially resolved synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence analyses of rare Rembrandt silverpoint drawings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, I.; Radtke, M.; Berger, A.; Goerner, W.; Merchel, S.; Riesemeier, H.; Bevers, H.

    2006-01-01

    New analyses of a series of very rare silverpoint drawings that were executed by Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (1606-1669) which are kept today in the Kupferstichkabinett (Museum of Prints and Drawings) of the State Museums of Berlin are reported here. Analysis of these drawings requires particular attention because the study has to be fully non-destructive and extremely sensitive. The metal alloy on the paper does not exceed some hundreds of μg/cm 2 . Therefore, synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) is - together with external micro-proton-induced X-ray emission - the only well-suited method for the analyses of metalpoint drawings. In some primary work, about 25 German and Flemish metalpoint drawings were investigated using spatially resolved SR-XRF analysis at the BAMline at BESSY. This study enlarges the existing French-German database of metalpoint drawings dating from the 15th and 16th centuries, as these Rembrandt drawings originate from the 17th century where this graphical technique was even rarer and already obsolete. It also illustrates how SR-XRF analysis can reinforce art historical assumptions on the dating of drawings and their connection. (orig.)

  4. Effect of Cobalt Fillers on Polyurethane Segmentations Investigated by Synchrotron Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krit Koyvanich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The segmentation between rigid and rubbery chains in polyurethanes (PUs influences polymeric properties and implementations. Several models have successfully been proposed to visualize the configuration between the hard segment (HS and soft segment (SS. For particulate PU composites, the arrangement of HS and SS is more complicated because the fillers tend to disrupt the chain formation and segmentation. In this work, the effect of ferromagnetic cobalt (Co powders (average diameter 2 μm on PU synthesized from a reaction between polyether polyol (soft segment and diphenylmethane-4,4′-diisocyanate (hard segment was studied with varying loadings (0, 20, 40, and 60 wt.%. The 300 μm thick PU/Co samples were tape-casted and then received heat treatment at 80°C for 180 min. From synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, the plot of the X-ray scattering intensity (I against the scattering vector (q exhibited a typical single peak of PU whose intensity was reduced by the increase in the Co loading. Characteristic SAXS peaks in the case of 0-20 wt.% Co agreed well with the scattering by globular hard segment domains according to Zernike-Prins and Percus-Yevick models. The higher Co loadings led to larger deviations from all theoretical models.

  5. Synchrotron X-Ray Studies of Model SOFC Cathodes, Part I: Thin Film Cathodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee-Chul; Ingram, Brian; Ilavsky, Jan; Lee, Shiwoo; Fuoss, Paul; You, Hoydoo

    2017-11-15

    We present synchrotron x-ray investigations of thin film La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) model cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells, grown on electrolyte substrates by pulse laser deposition, in situ during half-cell operations. We observed dynamic segregations of cations, such as Sr and Co, on the surfaces of the film cathodes. The effects of temperature, applied potentials, and capping layers on the segregations were investigated using a surfacesensitive technique of total external reflection x-ray fluorescence. We also studied patterned thin film LSCF cathodes using high-resolution micro-beam diffraction measurements. We find chemical expansion decreases for narrow stripes. This suggests the expansion is dominated by the bulk pathway reactions. The chemical expansion vs. the distance from the electrode contact was measured at three temperatures and an oxygen vacancy activation energy was estimated to be ~1.4 eV.

  6. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature. This paper presents an overview of the principal results obtained from X-ray microdiffraction studies of electromigration effects on aluminum and copper interconnects at the ALS throughout continuous efforts that spanned over a decade (1998-2008) from approximately 40 weeks of combined beamtime.

  7. $YB_{66} a new soft X-ray monochromator for synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, J; Rowen, M; Schäfers, F; Müller, B R; Rek, Z U

    1999-01-01

    For pt.I see Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., vol.A291, p.243-8, 1990. YB/sub 66/, a complex boron-rich man-made crystal, has been singled out as a potential monochromator material to disperse synchrotron soft X-rays in the 1-2 keV region. Results of a series of systematic property characterizations pertinent for this application are presented in this paper. These include Laue diffraction patterns and high-precision lattice-constant determination, etch rate, stoichiometry, thermal expansion, soft X-ray reflectivity and rocking-curve measurements, thermal load effects on monochromator performance, nature of intrinsic positive glitches and their reduction. The 004 reflection of YB/sub 66/ has a reflectance of ~3 in this spectral region. The width of the rocking curve varies from 0.25 eV at 1.1 keV to 1.0 eV at 2 keV, which is a factor of two better than that of beryl(1010) in the same energy range, and enables measurements of high-resolution XANES spectra at the Mg, Al and Si K- edges. The thermal bump on the...

  8. Characterization and quantification of cerebral edema induced by synchrotron x-ray microbeam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serduc, Raphael; Looij, Yohan van de; Francony, Gilles; Verdonck, Olivier; Sanden, Boudewijn van der; Farion, Regine; Segebarth, Christoph; Remy, Chantal; Lahrech, Hana; Laissue, Jean; Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Bravin, Alberto; Prezado, Yolanda

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral edema is one of the main acute complications arising after irradiation of brain tumors. Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), an innovative experimental radiotherapy technique using spatially fractionated synchrotron x-rays, has been shown to spare radiosensitive tissues such as mammal brains. The aim of this study was to determine if cerebral edema occurs after MRT using diffusion-weighted MRI and microgravimetry. Prone Swiss nude mice's heads were positioned horizontally in the synchrotron x-ray beam and the upper part of the left hemisphere was irradiated in the antero-posterior direction by an array of 18 planar microbeams (25 mm wide, on-center spacing 211 mm, height 4 mm, entrance dose 312 Gy or 1000 Gy). An apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured at 7 T 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after irradiation. Eventually, the cerebral water content (CWC) was determined by microgravimetry. The ADC and CWC in the irradiated (312 Gy or 1000 Gy) and in the contralateral non-irradiated hemispheres were not significantly different at all measurement times, with two exceptions: (1) a 9% ADC decrease (p < 0.05) was observed in the irradiated cortex 1 day after exposure to 312 Gy, (2) a 0.7% increase (p < 0.05) in the CWC was measured in the irradiated hemispheres 1 day after exposure to 1000 Gy. The results demonstrate the presence of a minor and transient cellular edema (ADC decrease) at 1 day after a 312 Gy exposure, without a significant CWC increase. One day after a 1000 Gy exposure, the CWC increased, while the ADC remained unchanged and may reflect the simultaneous presence of cellular and vasogenic edema. Both types of edema disappear within a week after microbeam exposure which may confirm the normal tissue sparing effect of MRT. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  9. Characterization and quantification of cerebral edema induced by synchrotron x-ray microbeam radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serduc, Raphaël; van de Looij, Yohan; Francony, Gilles; Verdonck, Olivier; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Laissue, Jean; Farion, Régine; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Bravin, Alberto; Prezado, Yolanda; Segebarth, Christoph; Rémy, Chantal; Lahrech, Hana

    2008-03-01

    Cerebral edema is one of the main acute complications arising after irradiation of brain tumors. Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), an innovative experimental radiotherapy technique using spatially fractionated synchrotron x-rays, has been shown to spare radiosensitive tissues such as mammal brains. The aim of this study was to determine if cerebral edema occurs after MRT using diffusion-weighted MRI and microgravimetry. Prone Swiss nude mice's heads were positioned horizontally in the synchrotron x-ray beam and the upper part of the left hemisphere was irradiated in the antero-posterior direction by an array of 18 planar microbeams (25 mm wide, on-center spacing 211 mm, height 4 mm, entrance dose 312 Gy or 1000 Gy). An apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured at 7 T 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after irradiation. Eventually, the cerebral water content (CWC) was determined by microgravimetry. The ADC and CWC in the irradiated (312 Gy or 1000 Gy) and in the contralateral non-irradiated hemispheres were not significantly different at all measurement times, with two exceptions: (1) a 9% ADC decrease (p edema (ADC decrease) at 1 day after a 312 Gy exposure, without a significant CWC increase. One day after a 1000 Gy exposure, the CWC increased, while the ADC remained unchanged and may reflect the simultaneous presence of cellular and vasogenic edema. Both types of edema disappear within a week after microbeam exposure which may confirm the normal tissue sparing effect of MRT. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  10. Characterization and quantification of cerebral edema induced by synchrotron x-ray microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serduc, Raphael; Looij, Yohan van de; Francony, Gilles; Verdonck, Olivier; Sanden, Boudewijn van der; Farion, Regine; Segebarth, Christoph; Remy, Chantal; Lahrech, Hana [INSERM, U836, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Laissue, Jean [Institute of Pathology, University of Bern (Switzerland); Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik Albert; Bravin, Alberto; Prezado, Yolanda [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: serduc@esrf.fr

    2008-03-07

    Cerebral edema is one of the main acute complications arising after irradiation of brain tumors. Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT), an innovative experimental radiotherapy technique using spatially fractionated synchrotron x-rays, has been shown to spare radiosensitive tissues such as mammal brains. The aim of this study was to determine if cerebral edema occurs after MRT using diffusion-weighted MRI and microgravimetry. Prone Swiss nude mice's heads were positioned horizontally in the synchrotron x-ray beam and the upper part of the left hemisphere was irradiated in the antero-posterior direction by an array of 18 planar microbeams (25 mm wide, on-center spacing 211 mm, height 4 mm, entrance dose 312 Gy or 1000 Gy). An apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured at 7 T 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after irradiation. Eventually, the cerebral water content (CWC) was determined by microgravimetry. The ADC and CWC in the irradiated (312 Gy or 1000 Gy) and in the contralateral non-irradiated hemispheres were not significantly different at all measurement times, with two exceptions: (1) a 9% ADC decrease (p < 0.05) was observed in the irradiated cortex 1 day after exposure to 312 Gy, (2) a 0.7% increase (p < 0.05) in the CWC was measured in the irradiated hemispheres 1 day after exposure to 1000 Gy. The results demonstrate the presence of a minor and transient cellular edema (ADC decrease) at 1 day after a 312 Gy exposure, without a significant CWC increase. One day after a 1000 Gy exposure, the CWC increased, while the ADC remained unchanged and may reflect the simultaneous presence of cellular and vasogenic edema. Both types of edema disappear within a week after microbeam exposure which may confirm the normal tissue sparing effect of MRT. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org.

  11. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy for art conservation: looking back and looking forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, Marine; Susini, Jean; Dik, Joris; Janssens, Koen

    2010-06-15

    A variety of analytical techniques augmented by the use of synchrotron radiation (SR), such as X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD), are now readily available, and they differ little, conceptually, from their common laboratory counterparts. Because of numerous advantages afforded by SR-based techniques over benchtop versions, however, SR methods have become popular with archaeologists, art historians, curators, and other researchers in the field of cultural heritage (CH). Although the CH community now commonly uses both SR-XRF and SR-XRD, the use of synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SR-XAS) techniques remains marginal, mostly because CH specialists rarely interact with SR physicists. In this Account, we examine the basic principles and capabilities of XAS techniques in art preservation. XAS techniques offer a combination of features particularly well-suited for the chemical analysis of works of art. The methods are noninvasive, have low detection limits, afford high lateral resolution, and provide exceptional chemical sensitivity. These characteristics are highly desirable for the chemical characterization of precious, heterogeneous, and complex materials. In particular, the chemical mapping capability, with high spatial resolution that provides information about local composition and chemical states, even for trace elements, is a unique asset. The chemistry involved in both the object's history (that is, during fabrication) and future (that is, during preservation and restoration treatments) can be addressed by XAS. On the one hand, many studies seek to explain optical effects occurring in historical glasses or ceramics by probing the molecular environment of relevant chromophores. Hence, XAS can provide insight into craft skills that were mastered years, decades, or centuries ago but were lost over the course of time. On the other hand, XAS can also be used to characterize unwanted reactions, which are then considered

  12. Validation of DEM modeling of sintering using an in situ X-ray microtomography analysis of the sintering of NaCl powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sylvain; Navarro, Sebastián; Palancher, Hervé; Bonnin, Anne; Léchelle, Jacques; Guessasma, Mohamed; Fortin, Jérôme; Saleh, Khashayar

    2016-11-01

    This paper aims to validate the discrete element method (DEM) model of sintering. In situ X-ray microtomography experiments have been carried out at the ESRF to follow the sintering of NaCl powder, the properties of which are close to the DEM model assumptions. DEM simulations are then run using an improved implicit method. The comparison between experiment and simulation shows the capability of DEM to predict the behavior of the sample on both particle and packing scale. The main advantages and limits of this approach are finally discussed based on these results and those of previous studies.

  13. Chemical Mapping of Paleontological and Archeological Artifacts with Synchrotron X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Manning, Phillip L.; Wogelius, Roy A.

    2012-07-01

    The application of the recently developed synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence (SRS-XRF) technique to the mapping of large objects is the focus of this review. We discuss the advantages of SRS-XRF over traditional systems and the use of other synchrotron radiation (SR) techniques to provide corroborating spectroscopic and diffraction analyses during the same analytical session. After reviewing routine techniques used to analyze precious specimens, we present several case studies that show how SR-based methods have been successfully applied in archeology and paleontology. For example, SRS-XRF imaging of a seventh-century Qur'ān palimpsest and an overpainted original opera score from Luigi Cherubini is described. We also review the recent discovery of soft-tissue residue in fossils of Archaeopteryx and an ancient reptile, as well as work that has successfully resolved the remnants of pigment in Confuciusornis sanctus, a 120-million-year-old fossil of the oldest documented bird with a fully derived avian beak.

  14. Synchrotron radiation total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis; of polymer coated silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehm, L.; Kregsamer, P.; Pianetta, P.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) provides an efficient method for analyzing trace metal contamination on silicon wafer surfaces. New polymeric materials used as interlayer dielectrics in microprocessors are applied to the surface of silicon wafers by a spin-coating process. Analysis of these polymer coated wafers present a new challenge for TXRF analysis. Polymer solutions are typically analyzed for bulk metal contamination prior to application on the wafer using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Questions have arisen about how to relate results of surface contamination analysis (TXRF) of a polymer coated wafer to bulk trace analysis (ICP-MS) of the polymer solutions. Experiments were done to explore this issue using synchrotron radiation (SR) TXRF. Polymer solutions were spiked with several different concentrations of metals. These solutions were applied to silicon wafers using the normal spin-coating process. The polymer coated wafers were then measured using the SR-TXRF instrument set-up at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). Several methods of quantitation were evaluated. The best results were obtained by developing calibration curves (intensity versus ppb) using the spiked polymer coated wafers as standards. Conversion of SR-TXRF surface analysis results (atoms/cm 2 ) to a volume related concentration was also investigated. (author)

  15. Ring artifact reduction in synchrotron x-ray tomography through helical acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelt, Daniël M.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2018-03-01

    In synchrotron x-ray tomography, systematic defects in certain detector elements can result in arc-shaped artifacts in the final reconstructed image of the scanned sample. These ring artifacts are commonly found in many applications of synchrotron tomography, and can make it difficult or impossible to use the reconstructed image in further analyses. The severity of ring artifacts is often reduced in practice by applying pre-processing on the acquired data, or post-processing on the reconstructed image. However, such additional processing steps can introduce additional artifacts as well, and rely on specific choices of hyperparameter values. In this paper, a different approach to reducing the severity of ring artifacts is introduced: a helical acquisition mode. By moving the sample parallel to the rotation axis during the experiment, the sample is detected at different detector positions in each projection, reducing the effect of systematic errors in detector elements. Alternatively, helical acquisition can be viewed as a way to transform ring artifacts to helix-like artifacts in the reconstructed volume, reducing their severity. We show that data acquired with the proposed mode can be transformed to data acquired with a virtual circular trajectory, enabling further processing of the data with existing software packages for circular data. Results for both simulated data and experimental data show that the proposed method is able to significantly reduce ring artifacts in practice, even compared with popular existing methods, without introducing additional artifacts.

  16. Sulfur fixation in wood mapped by synchrotron X-ray studies: implications for environmental archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Ian I; Loader, Neil J; Wynn, Peter M; Frisia, Silvia; Thomas, Peter A; Lageard, Jonathan G A; De Momi, Anna; Hartland, Adam; Borsato, Andrea; La Porta, Nicola; Susini, Jean

    2009-03-01

    There is a shortage of archives of sulfur that can be used to investigate industrial orvolcanic pollution in terrestrial catchments, but the role of S as a nutrient, coupled with sparse published evidence, suggests that trees are promising targets. We focused on two conifer species (Picea abies (L.) Karst and Abies alba Miller) from an Alpine site in NE Italy. Bulk analyses of Abies demonstrate that S concentrations were higher in the second half of the 20th century but with some high outliers possibly reflecting particulate impurities. X-ray synchrotron analyses confirmed the observed time trend, which is similar to that of a nearby stalagmite, and reflects an atmospheric pollution record mediated by storage in the soil and ecosystem. S and P were found to be localized in the inner cell wall (ca. 2 microm wide), local thickenings of which probably account for some outlying high values of S in synchrotron studies. S occurs as a mixture of oxidation states (0 to +0.5, +2, +5, and +6) which are consistent in space and time. The results indicate that wood older than a few years contains archive-quality S but that robust conclusions require multiple replicate analyses.

  17. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on the GALAXIES beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Céolin, D.; Ablett, J.M.; Prieur, D.; Moreno, T. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, l’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, FR-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Rueff, J.-P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, l’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, FR-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, Université Pierre et Marie Curie and CNRS UMR7614, FR-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Marchenko, T.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Pilette, B.; Marin, T. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, Université Pierre et Marie Curie and CNRS UMR7614, FR-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Simon, M., E-mail: marc.simon@upmc.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, l’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, FR-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, Université Pierre et Marie Curie and CNRS UMR7614, FR-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We developed a new HAXPES endstation at the French synchrotron facility SOLEIL. ► The setup is operational for both solid state and gas phase experiments. ► Beamline performances allow working in the Auger Raman conditions. ► Beamline flux compensates for ionization cross section decrease at high photon energy. ► Spectrometer compensates for ionization cross section decrease at high photon energy. -- Abstract: We report on the newly operational HAXPES endstation located on the GALAXIES beamline of the SOLEIL French synchrotron facility. The photon energy provided by the beamline covers the 2.4–12 keV range, and electrons of kinetic energy up to 12 keV can be analyzed. The HAXPES station is comprised of a UHV analysis chamber designed for investigating both solid samples and gases for the first time at high kinetic energy, and a fully equipped preparation chamber. We present the first results of X-ray photoemission and photoabsorption collected with this setup.

  18. Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Microcontamination Analysis on Silicon Wafer Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaura, Norikatsu

    1997-10-01

    As dimensions in state-of-the-art CMOS devices shrink to less than 0.1 pm, even low levels of impurities on wafer surfaces can cause device degradation. Conventionally, metal contamination on wafer surfaces is measured using Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TXRF). However, commercially available TXRF systems do not have the necessary sensitivity for measuring the lower levels of contamination required to develop new CMOS technologies. In an attempt to improve the sensitivity of TXRF, this research investigates Synchrotron Radiation TXRF (SR TXRF). The advantages of SR TXRF over conventional TXRF are higher incident photon flux, energy tunability, and linear polarization. We made use of these advantages to develop an optimized SR TXRF system at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The results of measurements show that the Minimum Detection Limits (MDLs) of SR TXRF for 3-d transition metals are typically at a level-of 3x10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2}, which is better than conventional TXRF by about a factor of 20. However, to use our SR TXRF system for practical applications, it was necessary to modify a commercially available Si (Li) detector which generates parasitic fluorescence signals. With the modified detector, we could achieve true MDLs of 3x10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} for 3-d transition metals. In addition, the analysis of Al on Si wafers is described. Al analysis is difficult because strong Si signals overlap the Al signals. In this work, the Si signals are greatly reduced by tuning the incident beam energy below the Si K edge. The results of our measurements show that the sensitivity for Al is limited by x-ray Raman scattering. Furthermore, we show the results of theoretical modeling of SR TXRF backgrounds consisting of the bremsstrahlung generated by photoelectrons, Compton scattering, and Raman scattering. To model these backgrounds, we extended conventional theoretical models by taking into account several aspects particular

  19. Time-resolved structural studies at synchrotrons and X-ray free electron lasers: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard; Moffat, Keith

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are potentially revolutionary X-ray sources because of their very short pulse duration, extreme peak brilliance and high spatial coherence, features that distinguish them from today’s synchrotron sources. We review recent time-resolved Laue diffraction and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) studies at synchrotron sources, and initial static studies at XFELs. XFELs have the potential to transform the field of time-resolved structural biology, yet many challenges arise in devising and adapting hardware, experimental design and data analysis strategies to exploit their unusual properties. Despite these challenges, we are confident that XFEL sources are poised to shed new light on ultrafast protein reaction dynamics. PMID:23021004

  20. High resolution hard X-ray photoemission using synchrotron radiation as an essential tool for characterization of thin solid films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.J.; Ikenaga, E.; Kobata, M.; Takeuchi, A.; Awaji, M.; Makino, H.; Chen, P.P.; Yamamoto, A.; Matsuoka, T.; Miwa, D.; Nishino, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Yao, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy using undulator X-rays at SPring-8 is quite feasible with both high resolution and high throughput. Here we report an application of hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy to the characterization of electronic and chemical states of thin solid films, for which conventional PES is not applicable. As a typical example, we focus on the problem of the scatter in the reported band-gap values for InN. We show that oxygen incorporation into the InN film strongly modifies the valence and plays a crucial role in the band gap problem. The present results demonstrate the powerful applicability of high resolution photoemission spectroscopy with hard X-rays from a synchrotron source

  1. Studies of protein structure in solution and protein folding using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lingling [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has been applied to the structural study of several biological systems, including the nitrogenase complex, the heat shock cognate protein (hsc70), and lysozyme folding. The structural information revealed from the SAXS experiments is complementary to information obtained by other physical and biochemical methods, and adds to our knowledge and understanding of these systems.

  2. Efficient Analytical Approaches to the Optics of Compound Refractive Lenses for Use with Synchrotron X-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2014-01-01

    The properties of compound refractive lenses (CRLs) of biconcave parabolic lenses for focusing and imaging synchrotron X-rays have been investigated theoretically by ray transfer matrix analysis and Gaussian beam propagation. We present approximate analytical expressions, that allow fast estimati...

  3. Multispecies Biofilms Transform Selenium Oxyanions into Elemental Selenium Particles: Studies Using Combined Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Imaging and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Soo In; George, Graham N.; Lawrence, John R.; Kaminskyj, Susan G. W.; Dynes, James J.; Lai, Barry; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2016-10-04

    Selenium (Se) is an element of growing environmental concern, because low aqueous concentrations can lead to biomagnification through the aquatic food web. Biofilms, naturally occurring microbial consortia, play numerous important roles in the environment, especially in biogeochemical cycling of toxic elements in aquatic systems. The complexity of naturally forming multispecies biofilms presents challenges for characterization because conventional microscopic techniques require chemical and physical modifications of the sample. Here, multispecies biofilms biotransforming selenium oxyanions were characterized using X-ray fluorescence imaging (XFI) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). These complementary synchrotron techniques required minimal sample preparation and were applied correlatively to the same biofilm areas. Sub-micrometer XFI showed distributions of Se and endogenous metals, while Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated the presence of elemental Se (Se0). Nanoscale carbon K-edge STXM revealed the distributions of microbial cells, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and lipids using the protein, saccharide, and lipid signatures, respectively, together with highly localized Se0 using the Se LIII edge. Transmission electron microscopy showed the electron-dense particle diameter to be 50–700 nm, suggesting Se0 nanoparticles. The intimate association of Se0 particles with protein and polysaccharide biofilm components has implications for the bioavailability of selenium in the environment.

  4. Theoretical analysis of the background intensity distribution in X-ray Birefringence Imaging using synchrotron bending-magnet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, John P.; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Collins, Stephen P.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Edwards-Gau, Gregory R.; Palmer, Benjamin A.

    2015-04-01

    In the recently developed technique of X-ray Birefringence Imaging, molecular orientational order in anisotropic materials is studied by exploiting the birefringence of linearly polarized X-rays with energy close to an absorption edge of an element in the material. In the experimental setup, a vertically deflecting high-resolution double-crystal monochromator is used upstream from the sample to select the appropriate photon energy, and a horizontally deflecting X-ray polarization analyzer, consisting of a perfect single crystal with a Bragg reflection at Bragg angle of approximately 45°, is placed downstream from the sample to measure the resulting rotation of the X-ray polarization. However, if the experiment is performed on a synchrotron bending-magnet beamline, then the elliptical polarization of the X-rays out of the electron orbit plane affects the shape of the output beam. Also, because the monochromator introduces a correlation between vertical position and photon energy to the X-ray beam, the polarization analyzer does not select the entire beam, but instead selects a diagonal stripe, the slope of which depends on the Bragg angles of the monochromator and the polarization analyzer. In the present work, the final background intensity distribution is calculated analytically because the phase space sampling methods normally used in ray traces are too inefficient for this setup. X-ray Birefringence Imaging data measured at the Diamond Light Source beamline B16 agree well with the theory developed here.

  5. Theoretical analysis of the background intensity distribution in X-ray Birefringence Imaging using synchrotron bending-magnet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, John P., E-mail: john.sutter@diamond.ac.uk; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Collins, Stephen P. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Edwards-Gau, Gregory R. [School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT, Wales (United Kingdom); Palmer, Benjamin A. [Department of Structural Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 234 Herzl St., Rehovot 7610001 (Israel)

    2015-04-28

    In the recently developed technique of X-ray Birefringence Imaging, molecular orientational order in anisotropic materials is studied by exploiting the birefringence of linearly polarized X-rays with energy close to an absorption edge of an element in the material. In the experimental setup, a vertically deflecting high-resolution double-crystal monochromator is used upstream from the sample to select the appropriate photon energy, and a horizontally deflecting X-ray polarization analyzer, consisting of a perfect single crystal with a Bragg reflection at Bragg angle of approximately 45°, is placed downstream from the sample to measure the resulting rotation of the X-ray polarization. However, if the experiment is performed on a synchrotron bending-magnet beamline, then the elliptical polarization of the X-rays out of the electron orbit plane affects the shape of the output beam. Also, because the monochromator introduces a correlation between vertical position and photon energy to the X-ray beam, the polarization analyzer does not select the entire beam, but instead selects a diagonal stripe, the slope of which depends on the Bragg angles of the monochromator and the polarization analyzer. In the present work, the final background intensity distribution is calculated analytically because the phase space sampling methods normally used in ray traces are too inefficient for this setup. X-ray Birefringence Imaging data measured at the Diamond Light Source beamline B16 agree well with the theory developed here.

  6. Rare earth element concentrations in geological and synthetic samples using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.R.; Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Cygan, G.L.; Grossman, J.N.; Reed, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    The concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) in specific mineral grains from the Bayan Obo ore deposit and synthetic high-silica glass samples have been measured by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) analysis using excitation of the REE K lines between 33 and 63 keV. Because SXRF, a nondestructive analytical technique, has much lower minimum detection limits (MDLs) for REEs, it is an important device that extends the in situ analytical capability of electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The distribution of trace amounts of REEs in common rock-forming minerals, as well as in REE minerals and minerals having minor quantities of REEs, can be analyzed with SXRF. Synchrotron radiation from a bending magnet and a wiggler source at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, was used to excite the REEs. MDLs of 6 ppm (La) to 26 ppm (Lu) for 3600 s in 60-??m-thick standard samples were obtained with a 25-??m diameter wiggler beam. The MDLs for the light REEs were a factor of 10-20 lower than the MDLs obtained with a bending magnet beam. The SXRF REE concentrations in mineral grains greater than 25 ??m compared favorably with measurements using EPMA. Because EPMA offered REE MDLs as low as several hundred ppm, the comparison was limited to the abundant light REEs (La, Ce, Pr, Nd). For trace values of medium and heavy REEs, the SXRF concentrations were in good agreement with measurements using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), a bulk analysis technique. ?? 1993.

  7. In situ hydration of sulphoaluminate cement mixtures monitored by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turrillas, X. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Martinez, L.G.; Carvalho, A.M.; Carezzato, G.L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rossetto, C.M. [Faculdade de Tecnologia de Sao Paulo (FATEC), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The hydration of calcium sulpho-aluminate cement mixtures was studied in situ by synchrotron X-ray diffraction at the XRD1 beamline of the Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS) in Campinas, SP. The powder specimens were introduced in borosilicate glass capillary tubes of 0.7 mm of internal diameter and imbued with deionized water. As the hydration reaction is very fast the capillaries were placed on the goniometer and the data collection was started after two minutes of mixing with water. The X-ray energy chosen to get an adequate flux for these short time acquisitions was 12 keV or more precisely 1.033258 Å, determined with polycrystalline corundum standard. Diffraction patterns were collected sequentially every 35 seconds for several hours at temperatures ranging from 40 degC to 55 degC with an accuracy better than 0.1 degC attained with the help of a hot air blower. The diffracted signal was collected with an array of twenty-four Mythen detectors at 760 mm from the capillary tube. The diffraction patterns had appropriate statistics to determine the kinetics of the reaction either by quantitative Rietveld analysis or by fitting isolated diffraction peaks to Gaussian curves as a function of time. The most important phases involved in the hydration are Klein´s salt, also known as Ye’elimite, Ca4(AlO2)6SO4, and gypsum, CaSO4.2H2O to yield Ettringite, Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12 - 26H2O, phase responsible for the mechanical properties. (author)

  8. Probing platinum degradation in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by synchrotron X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Martin, Zulima; West, Marcia; Kundu, Sumit; Bessarabov, Dmitri; Stumper, Jürgen; Susac, Darija; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2012-04-14

    Synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) was used to characterize the local chemical environment at and around the platinum particles in the membrane (PTIM) which form in operationally tested (end-of-life, EOL) catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEM-FC). The band of metallic Pt particles in operationally tested CCM membranes was imaged using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The cathode catalyst layer in the beginning-of-life (BOL) CCMs was fabricated using commercially available catalysts created from Pt precursors with and without nitrogen containing ligands. The surface composition of these catalyst powders was measured by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The local chemical environment of the PTIM in EOL CCMs was found to be directly related to the Pt precursor used in CCM fabrication. STXM chemical mapping at the N 1s edge revealed a characteristic spectrum at and around the dendritic Pt particles in CCMs fabricated with nitrogen containing Pt-precursors. This N 1s spectrum was identical to that of the cathode and different from the membrane. For CCM samples fabricated without nitrogen containing Pt-precursors the N 1s spectrum at the Pt particles was indistinguishable from that of the adjacent membrane. We interpret these observations to indicate that nitrogenous ligands in the nitrogen containing precursors, or decomposition product(s) from that source, are transported together with the dissolved Pt from the cathode into the membrane as a result of the catalyst degradation process. This places constraints on possible mechanisms for the PTIM band formation process.

  9. Fabrication of an 8:1 ellipsoidal mirror for a synchrotron x-ray microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Takacs, P.Z.; Hastings, J.B.; Casstevens, J.M.; Pionke, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    The fabrication of an 8:1 demagnifying ellipsoidal mirror to be used for an x-ray microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source X-26 beam port is described. The design aim was to produce a mirror that could be used over the photon energy range from about 3 to 17 keV. The 300-mm long mirror was required to operate at a grazing angle of 5 mr. The semimajor axis was 4500 mm and the semiminor axis 14.142 mm. Surface roughness of 1 nm or less and slope errors of 1 arc second parallel to the long axis and 200 arc seconds parallel to the short direction were specified. Production of the first electroless nickel-coated aluminum mirror using a diamond-turning technique has been completed. The mirror meets the 1 arc sec surface figure specification except for areas near the ends of the mirror. The reasons for these deviations arise from subtle details of the diamond-turning process which have not been fully incorporated in to the computer program that controls the diamond-turning machines. Further work in computer correction of repeatable errors of the diamond-turning machine can eliminate the waviness at the ends of the mirror. The diamond-turned mirror surface was not fully polished under this effort and therefore does not meet the roughness specification; however, surface smoothness of a fully polished cylindrical mirror manufactured using the same techniques does not meet the specification. It can be concluded that it is now technically feasible to meet the required specifications for the mirror and that the x-ray microprobe based on its use can be achieved

  10. Observation of X-ray shadings in synchrotron radiation-total reflection X-ray fluorescence using a color X-ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittschen, Ursula Elisabeth Adriane; Menzel, Magnus; Scharf, Oliver; Radtke, Martin; Reinholz, Uwe; Buzanich, Günther; Lopez, Velma M.; McIntosh, Kathryn; Streli, Christina; Havrilla, George Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Absorption effects and the impact of specimen shape on TXRF analysis has been discussed intensively. Model calculations indicated that ring shaped specimens should give better results in terms of higher counts per mass signals than filled rectangle or circle shaped specimens. One major reason for the difference in signal is shading effects. Full field micro-XRF with a color X-ray camera (CXC) was used to investigate shading, which occurs when working with small angles of excitation as in TXRF. The device allows monitoring the illuminated parts of the sample and the shaded parts at the same time. It is expected that sample material hit first by the primary beam shade material behind it. Using the CXC shading could be directly visualized for the high concentration specimens. In order to compare the experimental results with calculation of the shading effect the generation of controlled specimens is crucial. This was achieved by “drop on demand” technology. It allows generating uniform, microscopic deposits of elements. The experimentally measured shadings match well with those expected from calculation.

  11. Micron-scale 3D imaging of wood and plant microstructure using high-resolution X-ray phase-contrast microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, S C; Chen, F; Evans, R

    2010-08-01

    The structure of wood on a range of length-scales is critical to the performance and properties of this industrially important natural material. Much analysis of wood on the micron-scale upwards is carried out in two dimensions using optical microscopy. In recent years, however, three-dimensional (3D) analysis using X-ray microtomography has proved to be of increasing interest, providing volumetric data without the risk of damage from physical sectioning. In the present work we explore the potential of laboratory-based phase-contrast X-ray microtomography for analysis of wood microstructure on the micron scale. 3D datasets with quality enhanced by the use of phase-contrast, have been obtained for a number of different wood specimens. Segmentation of the datasets followed by different types of quantitative analysis is also successfully demonstrated, confirming the value of this technique for high-resolution analysis of 3D wood microstructure. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Recent developments in hard X-ray tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, C; Snigirev, A; Schrör, C; Tümmler, J; Lengeler, B

    2001-01-01

    A new technique for magnified hard X-ray tomography using compound refractive lenses (CRLs) has been tested. A full-field X-ray microscope was included into a conventional microtomography setup at a synchrotron undulator beamline. Experiments were carried out at 19.7 keV with a monochromatic beam as well as with the so-called 'pink' beam using a larger energy bandwidth. During this pilot experiment a resolution of about 1 mu m was already achieved, which corresponds to the best resolution obtained with phase-contrast enhanced microtomography. The technique has the potential to increase the spatial resolution of hard-X-ray microtomography to a scale of several hundred nanometers.

  13. Formation mechanism of channel segregation in carbon steels by inclusion flotation: X-ray microtomography characterization and multi-phase flow modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Yan Fei; Chen, Yun; Li, Dian Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental dissections of steel ingots and multi-scale simulations have led to the discovery of a potential driving force for channel segregation: the flotation of oxide-based inclusion (D. Li et al., Nat. Commun. 5:5572 (2014)). Further experimental analysis and numerical modeling are necessary to clarify this mechanism in detail. In this work, the inclusions in a carbon steel ingot that exhibits severe channel segregations were characterized by the 3D X-ray microtomography, which revealed a significant enrichment and growth of inclusions in the channels. Based on above microtomography characterization, a 2D macrosegregation model encompassing the inclusion flotation was established. In the model, the motions of solid inclusions and liquid were described using the multi-phase flow scheme within the Euler-Lagrange framework. The benchmark simulations showed that sufficient inclusion populations with appropriate sizes are capable of altering the local flow patterns and destabilize the mushy zone, initiating the subsequent channel segregation. The continuous interplay between melt convection, inclusion flotation and solidification eventually causes the formation of macroscale channel. The predicted sizes and volume fraction of inclusions that are able to trigger the channel segregation effectively are consistent with the data obtained via microtomography characterization. The macrosegregation model was then applied to predict the channel segregations in an industrial carbon steel ingot. A rather good agreement of A-segregates was achieved between the simulation and the dissected ingot.

  14. K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomini, John C.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to utilize dual energy, monochromatic X-rays produced from synchrotrons radiation in order to obtain noninvasive medical imaging. The application of synchrotrons radiation to medical imaging is based on the principle of iodine dichromography, first described by Bertil Jacobson of the Karolinska Institute in 1953. Medical imaging using synchrotrons radiation and K-edge dichromography was pioneered at Stanford University under the leadership of Dr. Ed Rubenstein, and the late Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dr. Robert Hofstadter. With progressive refinements in hardware, clinical-quality images were obtained of human coronary arteries utilizing peripheral injections of iodinated contrast agent. These images even now are far superior to those being presented by investigators using MRI as an imaging tool for coronary arteries. However, new supplies and instruments in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have served to transform coronary angiography into an outpatient procedure, with relatively little morbidity. We extended the principles learned with coronary angiography to noninvasive imaging of the human bronchial tree. For these images, we utilized xenon as the contrast agent, as it has a K-edge very similar to that of iodine. In this case, there is no true competing diagnostic test, and pulmonary neoplasm is an enormous public health concern. In early experiments, we demonstrated remarkably clear images of the human bronchial tree. These images have been shown internationally; however, funding difficulties primarily with the Department of Energy have not allowed for progression of this promising avenue of research. One potential criticism of the project is that in order to obtain these images, we utilized national laboratories. Some have questioned whether this would lead to a practical imaging modality. However, we have shown that the technology exists to allow for construction of a miniature storage ring, with a superconducting

  15. Assessment of the Structural Integrity of a Prototypical Instrumented IFMIF High Flux Test Module Rig by Fully 3D X-Ray Microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiseanu, I.; Craciunescu, T.; Mandache, B.N.; Simon, M.; Heinzel, V.; Stratmanns, E.; Simakov, S.P.; Leichtle, D.

    2006-01-01

    An inspection procedure to asses the mechanical integrity of IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) capsules and rigs during the irradiation campaign is necessary. Due to its penetration ability and contrast mechanism, the X-ray micro-tomography is the only known tool that could meet these requirements. In the High Flux Test Module (HFTM) of IFMIF miniaturized specimens are densely packed in capsules. The capsules which wear electric heaters and thermocouples are housed in rigs. To assure a well defined thermal contact the heater wires have to be attached to the capsules by brazing them into grooves. The examination of the quality of the braze material layer is of crucial interest in order to assure the best heat coupling of the heater wires to the capsule. A high density of the heaters is necessary to maintain the required temperature and, in addition NaK filling of narrow channels is employed for improving the 3D-heat transfer between the irradiation specimens and the capsule wall. Fully 3D tomographic inspections of a prototypical HFTM instrumented capsule, developed and manufactures at FZK, were conducted. In order to identify the optimum irradiation parameters and scanning configuration we carried out a comparative NDT analysis on two micro-tomography facilities, our compact, high magnification installation at NILPRP and two high-end industrial tomography facilities with higher X-ray energy and intensity at HWM. At optimum inspection parameters of a microfocus X-ray source (U=220 kV and I=300 μA) the geometry resolution was about 30-50 microns for characteristic dimension of the sample of 50 mm. Voids of 30 microns diameter and cracks of about 20 microns width can be detected. The absolute error of geometrical measurements should be sufficient for the assessment of the structural integrity of the irradiation capsule and for the geometry description within the thermal-hydraulic modeling. Space resolution could be further improved if one

  16. Construction of a forensic soil database of the Hokkaido region in Japan by synchrotron radiation X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirota, Yusuke; Hirao, Masataka; Abe, Yoshinari; Nakai, Izumi; Osaka, Keiichi; Itou, Masayoshi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to construct a nation-wide forensic soil database, which allows for the identification of soil evidence based on heavy element and heavy mineral signatures determined by two synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray techniques, i.e., a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis and a synchrotron-radiation X-ray powder diffraction analysis, respectively. The heavy element and heavy mineral compositions of the stream sediments collected at 3024 points located all over Japan were measured by the two SR X-ray techniques. The present paper focuses on a regional characterization of the sediments collected from the Hokkaido areas. The concentrations of heavy elements and heavy minerals in the Hokkaido areas were visualized as maps that enable us to compare the heavy element and heavy mineral compositions with the geological context of the samples. Based on a hierarchical cluster analysis using the semi-quantitative compositions of the heavy minerals, we could successfully classify the sediments into six groups corresponding to their background geologies. A Bonferroni multiple comparison demonstrated that these six groups also have significant differences in the heavy element composition. From these examinations, we could demonstrate that detailed regional identification of unknown samples is possible by analyzing both heavy element and heavy mineral compositions of each sample. (author)

  17. Quantifying Electromigration Processes in Sn-0.7Cu Solder with Lab-Scale X-Ray Computed Micro-Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, James Charles Edwin

    For decades, microelectronics manufacturing has been concerned with failures related to electromigration phenomena in conductors experiencing high current densities. The influence of interconnect microstructure on device failures related to electromigration in BGA and flip chip solder interconnects has become a significant interest with reduced individual solder interconnect volumes. A survey indicates that x-ray computed micro-tomography (muXCT) is an emerging, novel means for characterizing the microstructures' role in governing electromigration failures. This work details the design and construction of a lab-scale muXCT system to characterize electromigration in the Sn-0.7Cu lead-free solder system by leveraging in situ imaging. In order to enhance the attenuation contrast observed in multi-phase material systems, a modeling approach has been developed to predict settings for the controllable imaging parameters which yield relatively high detection rates over the range of x-ray energies for which maximum attenuation contrast is expected in the polychromatic x-ray imaging system. In order to develop this predictive tool, a model has been constructed for the Bremsstrahlung spectrum of an x-ray tube, and calculations for the detector's efficiency over the relevant range of x-ray energies have been made, and the product of emitted and detected spectra has been used to calculate the effective x-ray imaging spectrum. An approach has also been established for filtering 'zinger' noise in x-ray radiographs, which has proven problematic at high x-ray energies used for solder imaging. The performance of this filter has been compared with a known existing method and the results indicate a significant increase in the accuracy of zinger filtered radiographs. The obtained results indicate the conception of a powerful means for the study of failure causing processes in solder systems used as interconnects in microelectronic packaging devices. These results include the

  18. X-ray diffraction measurement of liquid As2Se3 by using third-generation synchrotron radiation source

    OpenAIRE

    Kajihara, Yukio; Inui, Masanori; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Kozaburo; Hosokawa, Shinya

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XD) measurements of liquid As2Se3 were carried out in the temperature range up to 1600◦C where the temperature is well beyond the semiconductor to metal (SC-M) transition temperature around 1000◦C . The measurements were done by using third-generation synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8 and the obtained structure factors have much improvements over the previous XD measurements by using in house X-ray sources with regard to the momentum transfer range and the data stati...

  19. In situ analysis of cracks in structural materials using synchrotron X-ray tomography and diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steuwer, A.; Edwards, L.; Pratihar, S.; Ganguly, S.; Peel, M.; Fitzpatrick, M.E.; Marrow, T.J.; Withers, P.J.; Sinclair, I.; Singh, K.D.; Gao, N.; Buslaps, T.; Buffiere, J.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    The structural integrity and performance of many components and structures are dominated by cracks and hence the study of cracked bodies study is of major economical and social importance. Despite nearly 30 years of study, there is still no detailed consensus regarding either the fundamental parameters that drive cracks or the precise mechanisms of their growth in most materials. Thus, virtually all crack life prediction models currently in engineering use are largely phenomenological rather than physically based. Historically, a major hindrance to our understanding of crack initiation and propagation has been the inability to measure either the crack tip stresses or the crack morphology deep within materials. The development of very high-resolution strain and tomography mapping on third generation synchrotron sources such as the ESRF has opened up the possibility of developing complementary techniques to monitor the entire plastic/process zone growth mechanisms and the accompanying crack tip field and crack wake field around growing cracks. If realized, such techniques would produce unique information that would be invaluable both in validating present finite element simulations of fatigue crack growth and in developing the future high accuracy simulations necessary for the development of physically realistic fatigue life-prediction models. Recent technique developments at the ESRF, Grenoble, opens up the possibility of imaging cracks and crack tip stress/strain fields, and the ability to study the extend of crack closure and overload effects, even under in situ loading. In this paper, first results from synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomography experiments performed on ID11 and ID19 (respectively) at the ESRF, Grenoble, are presented and discussed in comparison with predictions from finite element modeling

  20. Classification of lead white pigments using synchrotron radiation micro X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcomme, E.; Walter, P.; Bleuet, P.; Hodeau, J.-L.; Dooryhee, E.; Martinetto, P.; Menu, M.

    2007-12-01

    Lead white pigment was used and synthesised for cosmetic and artistic purposes since the antiquity. Ancient texts describe the various recipes, and preparation processes as well as locations of production. In this study, we describe the results achieved on several paint samples taken from Matthias Grünewald’s works. Grünewald, who was active between 1503 and 1524, was a major painter at the beginning of the German Renaissance. Thanks to X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation, it is possible to associate the composition of the paint samples with the masters ancient recipes. Different approaches were used, in reflection and transmission modes, directly on minute samples or on paint cross-sections embedded in resin. Characterisation of lead white pigments reveals variations in terms of composition, graininess and proportion of mineral phases. The present work enlightens the presence of lead white as differentiable main composition groups, which could be specific of a period, a know-how or a geographical origin. In this way, we aim at understanding the choices and the trading of pigments used to realise paintings during northern European Renaissance.

  1. Classification of lead white pigments using synchrotron radiation micro X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welcomme, E.; Walter, P.; Menu, M. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France - CNRS UMR 171, Paris (France); Bleuet, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Hodeau, J.L.; Dooryhee, E.; Martinetto, P. [Institut Neel CNRS-UPR 503-1, 25, Av. des Martyrs, BP 166, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2007-12-15

    Lead white pigment was used and synthesised for cosmetic and artistic purposes since the antiquity. Ancient texts describe the various recipes, and preparation processes as well as locations of production. In this study, we describe the results achieved on several paint samples taken from Matthias Gruenewald's works. Gruenewald, who was active between 1503 and 1524, was a major painter at the beginning of the German Renaissance. Thanks to X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation, it is possible to associate the composition of the paint samples with the masters ancient recipes. Different approaches were used, in reflection and transmission modes, directly on minute samples or on paint cross-sections embedded in resin. Characterisation of lead white pigments reveals variations in terms of composition, graininess and proportion of mineral phases. The present work enlightens the presence of lead white as differentiable main composition groups, which could be specific of a period, a know-how or a geographical origin. In this way, we aim at understanding the choices and the trading of pigments used to realise paintings during northern European Renaissance. (orig.)

  2. Synchrotron X-ray Absorption and In Vitro Bioactivity of Magnetic Macro/Mesoporous Bioactive Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanida Charoensuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxides in macro/mesoporous bioactive glasses were characterized by synchrotron X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES spectroscopy. This magnetic phase was introduced by adding Fe(NO33 9H2O during the sol-gel synthesis. The obtained bioactive glass scaffolds exhibited superparamagnetism, in which the magnetization was increased with the increase in the Fe molar ratio from 10 to 20%. The linear combination fits of the XANES spectra indicated that the increase in the Fe molar ratio to 20% enhanced the γ-Fe2O3 formation at the expense of the α- Fe2O3 phase. This variation also promoted the formation of fine-grained bone-like apatites on the surface of the scaffolds in the in vitro test. The apatite growth between three and seven days was confirmed by the changing elemental compositions. However, the highest magnetic proportion led to the distortion of the skeleton walls and the collapse of the porous networks.

  3. Crystal structure and charge density analysis of Li2NH by synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noritake, T.; Nozaki, H.; Aoki, M.; Towata, S.; Kitahara, G.; Nakamori, Y.; Orimo, S.

    2005-01-01

    Complex hydrides, such as lithium amide (LiNH 2 ) and lithium imide (Li 2 NH), have recently been noticed as one of the most promising materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In this paper, we reveal the bonding nature of hydrogen in Li 2 NH crystal by synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction measurement at room temperature. The crystal structure was refined by Rietveld method and the charge density distribution was analyzed by maximum entropy method (MEM). The Li 2 NH crystal is anti-fluorite type structure (space group Fm3-bar m) consisting of Li and NH. Hydrogen atom occupies randomly the 48h (Wyckoff notation) sites around N atom. The refined lattice constant is a=5.0742(2)A. The charge density distribution around NH anion in Li 2 NH is almost spherical. The number of electrons within the sphere around the Li and NH is estimated from the obtained charge density distribution. As the result, the ionic charge is expressed as [Li 0.99+ ] 2 [NH] 1.21- . Therefore, it is confirmed experimentally that Li 2 NH is ionically bonded

  4. Deformation in Metallic Glasses Studied by Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Egami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High mechanical strength is one of the superior properties of metallic glasses which render them promising as a structural material. However, understanding the process of mechanical deformation in strongly disordered matter, such as metallic glass, is exceedingly difficult because even an effort to describe the structure qualitatively is hampered by the absence of crystalline periodicity. In spite of such challenges, we demonstrate that high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurement under stress, using a two-dimensional detector coupled with the anisotropic pair-density function (PDF analysis, has greatly facilitated the effort of unraveling complex atomic rearrangements involved in the elastic, anelastic, and plastic deformation of metallic glasses. Even though PDF only provides information on the correlation between two atoms and not on many-body correlations, which are often necessary in elucidating various properties, by using stress as means of exciting the system we can garner rich information on the nature of the atomic structure and local atomic rearrangements during deformation in glasses.

  5. Classification of lead white pigments using synchrotron radiation micro X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welcomme, E.; Walter, P.; Menu, M.; Bleuet, P.; Hodeau, J.L.; Dooryhee, E.; Martinetto, P.

    2007-01-01

    Lead white pigment was used and synthesised for cosmetic and artistic purposes since the antiquity. Ancient texts describe the various recipes, and preparation processes as well as locations of production. In this study, we describe the results achieved on several paint samples taken from Matthias Gruenewald's works. Gruenewald, who was active between 1503 and 1524, was a major painter at the beginning of the German Renaissance. Thanks to X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation, it is possible to associate the composition of the paint samples with the masters ancient recipes. Different approaches were used, in reflection and transmission modes, directly on minute samples or on paint cross-sections embedded in resin. Characterisation of lead white pigments reveals variations in terms of composition, graininess and proportion of mineral phases. The present work enlightens the presence of lead white as differentiable main composition groups, which could be specific of a period, a know-how or a geographical origin. In this way, we aim at understanding the choices and the trading of pigments used to realise paintings during northern European Renaissance. (orig.)

  6. Detection of genetically altered copper levels in Drosophila tissues by synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica C Lye

    Full Text Available Tissue-specific manipulation of known copper transport genes in Drosophila tissues results in phenotypes that are presumably due to an alteration in copper levels in the targeted cells. However direct confirmation of this has to date been technically challenging. Measures of cellular copper content such as expression levels of copper-responsive genes or cuproenzyme activity levels, while useful, are indirect. First-generation copper-sensitive fluorophores show promise but currently lack the sensitivity required to detect subtle changes in copper levels. Moreover such techniques do not provide information regarding other relevant biometals such as zinc or iron. Traditional techniques for measuring elemental composition such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy are not sensitive enough for use with the small tissue amounts available in Drosophila research. Here we present synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microscopy analysis of two different Drosophila tissues, the larval wing imaginal disc, and sectioned adult fly heads and show that this technique can be used to detect changes in tissue copper levels caused by targeted manipulation of known copper homeostasis genes.

  7. Indentation Size Effects in Single Crystal Copper as Revealed by Synchrotron X-ray Microdiffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, G.; Budiman, A. S.; Nix, W. D.; Tamura, N.; Patel, J. R.

    2007-11-19

    The indentation size effect (ISE) has been observed in numerous nanoindentation studies on crystalline materials; it is found that the hardness increases dramatically with decreasing indentation size - a 'smaller is stronger' phenomenon. Some have attributed the ISE to the existence of strain gradients and the geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs). Since the GND density is directly related to the local lattice curvature, the Scanning X-ray Microdiffraction ({mu}SXRD) technique, which can quantitatively measure relative lattice rotations through the streaking of Laue diffractions, can used to study the strain gradients. The synchrotron {mu}SXRD technique we use - which was developed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Berkeley Lab - allows for probing the local plastic behavior of crystals with sub-micrometer resolution. Using this technique, we studied the local plasticity for indentations of different depths in a Cu single crystal. Broadening of Laue diffractions (streaking) was observed, showing local crystal lattice rotation due to the indentation-induced plastic deformation. A quantitative analysis of the streaking allows us to estimate the average GND density in the indentation plastic zones. The size dependence of the hardness, as found by nanoindentation, will be described, and its correlation to the observed lattice rotations will be discussed.

  8. Solving mercury (Hg) speciation in soil samples by synchrotron X-ray microspectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzano, Roberto; Santoro, Anna; Spagnuolo, Matteo; Vekemans, Bart; Medici, Luca; Janssens, Koen; Goettlicher, Joerg; Denecke, Melissa A.; Mangold, Stefan; Ruggiero, Pacifico

    2010-01-01

    Direct mercury (Hg) speciation was assessed for soil samples with a Hg concentration ranging from 7 up to 240 mg kg -1 . Hg chemical forms were identified and quantified by sequential extractions and bulk- and micro-analytical techniques exploiting synchrotron generated X-rays. In particular, microspectroscopic techniques such as μ-XRF, μ-XRD and μ-XANES were necessary to solve bulk Hg speciation, in both soil fractions 3 S 2 Cl 2 ), and an amorphous phase containing Hg bound to chlorine and sulfur. The amount of metacinnabar and amorphous phases increased in the fraction <2 μm. No interaction among Hg-species and soil components was observed. All the observed Hg-species originated from the slow weathering of an inert Hg-containing waste material (K106, U.S. EPA) dumped in the area several years ago, which is changing into a relatively more dangerous source of pollution. - Direct mercury (Hg) speciation in chlor-alkali plant contaminated soils enabled the identification of potentially dangerous Hg-S/Cl amorphous species.

  9. Experimental measurement of lattice strain pole figures using synchrotron x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.P.; Bernier, J.V.; Park, J.-S.; Kazimirov, A.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a system for mechanically loading test specimens in situ for the determination of lattice strain pole figures and their evolution in multiphase alloys via powder diffraction. The data from these experiments provide insight into the three-dimensional mechanical response of a polycrystalline aggregate and represent an extremely powerful material model validation tool. Relatively thin (0.5 mm) iron/copper specimens were axially strained using a mechanical loading frame beyond the macroscopic yield strength of the material. The loading was halted at multiple points during the deformation to conduct a diffraction experiment using a 0.5x0.5 mm 2 monochromatic (50 keV) x ray beam. Entire Debye rings of data were collected for multiple lattice planes ({hkl}'s) in both copper and iron using an online image plate detector. Strain pole figures were constructed by rotating the loading frame about the specimen transverse direction. Ideal powder patterns were superimposed on each image for the purpose of geometric correction. The chosen reference material was cerium (IV) oxide powder, which was spread in a thin layer on the downstream face of the specimen using petroleum jelly to prevent any mechanical coupling. Implementation of the system at the A2 experimental station at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) is described. The diffraction moduli measured at CHESS were shown to compare favorably to in situ data from neutron-diffraction experiments conducted on the same alloys

  10. Rainwater analysis by synchrotron radiation-total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, María L.; Ceppi, Sergio A.; Asar, María L.; Bürgesser, Rodrigo E.; Ávila, Eldo E.

    2015-11-01

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis excited with synchrotron radiation was used to quantify the elemental concentration of rainwater in Córdoba, Argentina. Standard solutions with gallium as internal standard were prepared for the calibration curves. Rainwater samples of 5 μl were added to an acrylic reflector, allowed to dry, and analyzed for 200 s measuring time. The elemental concentrations of As, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Ni, Pb, S, Sr, V, and Zn were determined. The electrical conductivity, pH, and elemental concentrations were compared to data previously reported for the soluble fraction of rainwater at different sites. A factor analysis was performed in order to determine the sources that contributed to the elemental concentration in rainwater. Anthropogenic sources were identified as traffic pollution, vehicular emissions, and metallurgical factories. The quality of rainwater was analyzed by comparing the concentrations of all the elements in rainwater samples with the WHO guideline values for drinking water. The results show the need to control the atmospheric emissions in order to preserve the quality of rainwater. SR-TXRF analysis of chemical composition of rainwater in Córdoba represents the very first contribution in the region to the knowledge of the concentration of trace metals in the soluble fraction of rainwater. These data are scarce, especially in the Southern Hemisphere.

  11. Phantom and animal imaging studies using PLS synchrotron X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Hee Joung Kim; Kyu Ho Lee; Hai Jo Jung; Eun Kyung Kim; Jung Ho Je; In Woo Kim; Yeukuang, Hwu; Wen Li Tsai; Je Kyung Seong; Seung Won Lee; Hyung Sik Yoo

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-high resolution radiographs can be obtained using synchrotron X-rays. A collaboration team consisting of K-JIST, POSTECH and YUMC has recently commissioned a new beamline (5C1) at Pohang Light Source (PLS) in Korea for medical applications using phase contrast radiology. Relatively simple image acquisition systems were set up on 5C1 beamline, and imaging studies were performed for resolution test patterns, mammographic phantom, and animals. Resolution test patterns and mammographic phantom images showed much better image resolution and quality with the 5C1 imaging system than the mammography system. Both fish and mouse images with 5C1 imaging system also showed much better image resolution with great details of organs and anatomy compared to those obtained with a conventional mammography system. A simple and inexpensive ultra-high resolution imaging system on 5C1 beamline was successfully implemented. The authors were able to acquire ultra-high resolution images for, resolution test patterns, mammograph...

  12. A synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of non-proportional strain-path effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, D.M.; Erinosho, T.; Dunne, F.P.E.; Todd, R.I.; Connolley, T.; Mostafavi, M.; Kupfer, H.; Wilkinson, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Common alloys used in sheet form can display a significant ductility benefit when they are subjected to certain multiaxial strain paths. This effect has been studied here for a polycrystalline ferritic steel using a combination of Nakajima bulge testing, X-ray diffraction during biaxial testing of cruciform samples and crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) modelling. Greatest gains in strain to failure were found when subjecting sheets to uniaxial loading followed by balanced biaxial deformation, resulting in a total deformation close to plane-strain. A combined strain of approximately double that of proportional loading was achieved. The evolution of macrostrain, microstrain and texture during non-proportional loading were evaluated by in-situ high energy synchrotron diffraction. The results have demonstrated that the inhomogeneous strain accumulation from non-proportional deformation is strongly dependent on texture and the applied strain-ratio of the first deformation pass. Experimental diffraction evidence is supported by results produced by a novel method of CPFE-derived diffraction simulation. Using constitutive laws selected on the basis of good agreement with measured lattice strain development, the CPFE model demonstrated the capability to replicate ductility gains measured experimentally.

  13. Effect of Tube-Based X-Ray Microtomography Imaging on the Amino Acid and Amine Content of the Murchison CM2 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Friedrich, J. M.; Aponte, J. C.; Dworkin, J. P.; Ebel, D. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Hill, M.; McLain, H. L.; Towbin, W. H.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray and synchrotron X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) are increasingly being used for three dimensional reconnaissance imaging of chondrites and returned extraterrestrial material prior to detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses. Although micro-CT imaging is generally considered to be a non-destructive technique since silicate and metallic minerals in chondrites are not affected by X-ray exposures at the intensities and wavelengths typically used, there are concerns that the use of micro-CT could be detrimental to the organics in carbonaceous chondrites. We recently conducted a synchrotron micro-CT experiment on a powdered sample of the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite exposed to a monochromatic high energy (approximately 48 kiloelectronvolts) total X-ray radiation dose of approximately 1 kilogray (kGy) using the Advanced Photon Source beamline 13-BMD (13-Bending Magnet-D Beamline) at Argonne National Laboratory and found that there were no detectable changes in the amino acid abundances or enantiomeric compositions in the chondrite after exposure relative to a Murchison control sample that was not exposed. However, lower energy bremsstrahlung X-rays could interact more with amino acids and other lower molecular weight amines in meteorites. To test for this possibility, three separate micro-CT imaging experiments of the Murchison meteorite using the GE Phoenix v/tome/x s 240 kilovolt microfocus high resolution tungsten target X-ray tube instrument at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) were conducted and the amino acid abundances and enantiomeric compositions were determined. We also investigated the abundances of the C1-C5 amines in Murchison which were not analyzed in the first study.

  14. Synchrotron X-ray Scattering from Self-organized Soft Nanostructures in Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, J. O.

    2009-04-01

    In the general context of self-organization of nanoparticles (in our case clay particles), and transitions in such structures, we study interconnected universal complex physical phenomena such as: (i) spontaneous gravitationally induced phase separation and nematic self-organization in systems of anisotropic clay nanoparticles in aqueous suspension, including studies of isotropic to nematic transitions [1,2] (ii) transitions from biaxial to uniaxial nematics by application of external magnetic field to self-organized systems of the same anisotropic (diamagnetic) clay nanoparticle systems [3,4] (iii) guided self-organization into chainlike structures of the same anisotropic clay nanoparticles in oil suspension when subjected to external electrical fields (electrorheological structures of polarized nanoparticles), and the stability of, and transitions of, such structures, when subjected to external mechanical stress [5,6] The experimental techniques used by us include synchrotron X-ray scattering, neutron scattering, rheometry. microscopy and magnetic resonance. We have demonstrated that clays may be used as good model systems for studies of universal physical phenomena and transitions in self-organized nanostructured soft and complex matter. Self-organization and related transitions in clay systems in particular, may have practical relevance for nano-patterning, properties of nanocomposites, and macroscopically anisotropic gels, among many other applications [7]. The synchrotron experiments have been performed at LNLS-Brazil, PLS- Korea, BNL-USA and ESRF-France. Acknowledgments: Collaborators, postdocs and students at NTNU-Norway, UiO-Norway, IFE-Norway, BNL-USA, LNLS-Brazil, UFPE-Brazil, UnB-Brazil, Univ. Amsterdam-Netherlands, Univ.Paris 7-France and other places. This research has been supported by the Research Council of Norway (RCN), through the NANOMAT, SUP and FRINAT Programs. References 1. J.O. Fossum, E. Gudding, D.d.M. Fonseca, Y. Meheust, E. DiMasi, T

  15. X-ray study of a test quadrant of the SODART telescopes using the expanded beam x-ray optics facility at the Daresbury synchrotron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; Frederiksen, P.

    1994-01-01

    The imaging properties of a test model of the SODART telescopes have been studied using an expanded beam X-ray facility at the Daresbury synchrotron. The encircled power and the point spread function at three energies 6.627 keV, 8.837 keV and 11.046 keV have been measured using 1D and 2D position......V the HPD is 2.5 - 3.0 arcmin for all detectors whereas it is somewhat larger at 11.046 keV for HEPC and LEPC but essentially unchanged for SIXA. Finally, the data are used to point to improvements that can be introduced during the manufacture of the flight telescopes....

  16. X-ray study of a SODART flight telescope using the expanded beam x-ray optics beamline at the Daresbury synchrotron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; Frederiksen, P. K.

    1995-01-01

    The on- and off-axis imaging properties of the first of two SODART flight telescopes have been studied using the expanded beam x-ray facility at the Daresbury synchrotron. From on- axis measurements the encircled power distribution and the point spread function at three energies 6.627 keV, 8.837 ke...... element solid state array detector (SIXA). We found that the HPD decreases with increasing energy due to poorer figure error of the outermost mirrors. The HPD falls in the range from 2.3 to 3 arcmin for all detectors. Residual misalignment of the individual quadrants of the telescope was found...... to contribute to the HPD by approximately 10%. If 33% of the geometric telescope area near the edges of the quadrants are covered a reduction of 10% of the HPD can be obtained. On- and off-axis images generated from the one dimensional intensity distribution are presented. Finally the data have been used...

  17. Research in x-ray optics with the ultimate aim of constructing a synchrotron radiation pumped soft x-ray lithium laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csonka, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    One of the primary components of the proposed synchrotron radiation (SR) pumped Li X-Ray Laser which the present research (DOE Proposal No. DE-FG06-85ER-13309) undertook to develop, was a vacuum-based high density plasma of predominantly monatomic Lithium as the lasing medium. A monomer density in excess of 10 19 particles/cm 3 at temperatures > 1600 degree C, in volume of roughly 1cm x 0.001cm x 0.001cm was estimated as being necessary for attaining useful gain. Originally two different methods of achieving this were considered, namely: laser-driven ablation of solid Li, and steady-state thermal emission of Li gas from an orifice in a suitable chamber. Due to uncertainties associated with the first option, the resources of the present development program were focused primarily on the latter technique. 9 figs

  18. Spatial imaging and speciation of Cu in rice (Oryza sativa L.) roots using synchrotron-based X-ray microfluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lingli; Xie, Ruohan; Liu, Ting; Wang, Haixing; Hou, Dandi; Du, Yonghua; He, Zhenli; Yang, Xiaoe; Sun, Hui; Tian, Shengke

    2017-05-01

    Knowledge of elemental localization and speciation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) roots is crucial for elucidating the mechanisms of Cu accumulation so as to facilitate the development of strategies to inhibit Cu accumulation in rice grain grown in contaminated soils. Using synchrotron-based X-ray microfluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we investigated the distribution patterns and speciation of Cu in rice roots treated with 50 μM Cu for 7 days. A clear preferential localization of Cu in the meristematic zone was observed in root tips as compared with the elongation zone. Investigation of Cu in the root cross sections revealed that the intensity of Cu in the vascular bundles was more than 10-fold higher than that in the other scanned sites (epidermis and cortex) in rice roots. The dominant chemical form of Cu (79.1%) in rice roots was similar to that in the Cu-cell wall compounds. These results suggest that although Cu can be easily transported into the vascular tissues in rice roots, most of the metal absorbed by plants is retained in the roots owing to its high binding to the cell wall compounds, thus preventing metal translocation to the aerial parts of the plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. LAMBDA 2M GaAs—A multi-megapixel hard X-ray detector for synchrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennicard, D.; Smoljanin, S.; Pithan, F.; Sarajlic, M.; Rothkirch, A.; Yu, Y.; Liermann, H. P.; Morgenroth, W.; Winkler, B.; Jenei, Z.; Stawitz, H.; Becker, J.; Graafsma, H.

    2018-01-01

    Synchrotrons can provide very intense and focused X-ray beams, which can be used to study the structure of matter down to the atomic scale. In many experiments, the quality of the results depends strongly on detector performance; in particular, experiments studying dynamics of samples require fast, sensitive X-ray detectors. "LAMBDA" is a photon-counting hybrid pixel detector system for experiments at synchrotrons, based on the Medipix3 readout chip. Its main features are a combination of comparatively small pixel size (55 μm), high readout speed at up to 2000 frames per second with no time gap between images, a large tileable module design, and compatibility with high-Z sensors for efficient detection of higher X-ray energies. A large LAMBDA system for hard X-ray detection has been built using Cr-compensated GaAs as a sensor material. The system is composed of 6 GaAs tiles, each of 768 by 512 pixels, giving a system with approximately 2 megapixels and an area of 8.5 by 8.5 cm2. While the sensor uniformity of GaAs is not as high as that of silicon, its behaviour is stable over time, and it is possible to correct nonuniformities effectively by postprocessing of images. By using multiple 10 Gigabit Ethernet data links, the system can be read out at the full speed of 2000 frames per second. The system has been used in hard X-ray diffraction experiments studying the structure of samples under extreme pressure in diamond anvil cells. These experiments can provide insight into geological processes. Thanks to the combination of high speed readout, large area and high sensitivity to hard X-rays, it is possible to obtain previously unattainable information in these experiments about atomic-scale structure on a millisecond timescale during rapid changes of pressure or temperature.

  20. Search for Fluid Inclusions in a Carbonaceous Chondrite Using a New X-Ray Micro-Tomography Technique Combined with FIB Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Miyake, A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Uesugi, K.; Nakano, T.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Yoshida, K.

    2014-01-01

    Early solar system aqueous fluids are preserved in some H chondrites as aqueous fluid inclusions in halite (e.g., [1]). Although potential fluid inclusions are also expected in carbonaceous chondrites [2], they have not been surely confirmed. In order to search for these fluid inclusions, we have developped a new X-ray micro-tomography technique combined with FIB sampling and applied this techniqu to a carbanaceous chondrite. Experimental: A polished thin section of Sutter's Mill meteorite (CM) was observed with an optical microscope and FE-SEM (JEOL 7001F) for chosing mineral grains of carbonates (mainly calcite) and sulfides (FeS and ZnS) 20-50 microns in typical size, which may have aqueous fluid inclusions. Then, a "house" similar to a cube with a roof (20-30 microns in size) is sampled from the mineral grain by using FIB (FEI Quanta 200 3DS). Then, the house was atached to a thin W-needle by FIB and imaged by a SR-based imaging microtomography system with a Fresnel zone plate at beamline BL47XU, SPring-8, Japan. One sample was imaged at two X-ray energies, 7 and 8 keV, to identify mineral phases (dual-enegy microtomography: [3]). The size of voxel (pixel in 3D) was 50-80 nm, which gave the effective spatial resolution of approx. 200 nm. A terrestrial quartz sample with an aqueous fluid inclusion with a bubble was also examined as a test sample by the same method. Results and discussion: A fluid inclusion of 5-8 microns in quartz was clearly identified in a CT image. A bubble of approx. 4 microns was also identified as refraction contrast although the X-ray absorption difference between fluid and bubble is small. Volumes of the fluid and bubble were obtained from the 3D CT images. Fourteen grains of calcite, two grains of iron sulfide and one grain of (Zn,Fe)S were examined. Ten calcite, one iron sulfide and one (Zn,Fe)S grains have inclusions >1 micron in size (the maximum: approx. 5 microns). The shapes are spherical or irregular. Tiny inclusions (tiny solid

  1. Synchrotron radiation sources and condensers for projection x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.B.; MacDowell, A.A.; White, D.L.; Wood, O.R. II

    1992-01-01

    The design requirements for a compact electron storage ring that could be used as a soft x-ray source for projection lithography are discussed. The design concepts of the x-ray optics that are required to collect and condition the radiation in divergence, uniformity and direction to properly illuminate the mask and the particular x-ray projection camera used are discussed. Preliminary designs for an entire soft x-ray projection lithography system using an electron storage ring as a soft X-ray source are presented. It is shown that by combining the existing technology of storage rings with large collection angle condensers, a powerful and reliable source of 130 Angstrom photons for production line projection x-ray lithography is possible

  2. Imaging of forced-imbibition in carbonate rocks using synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K.; Menke, H. P.; Andrew, M. G.; Lin, Q.; Saif, T.; Al-Khulaifi, Y.; Reynolds, C. A.; Bijeljic, B.; Rau, C.; Blunt, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated the pore-scale behavior of brine-oil systems and oil trapping during forced-imbibition in a water-wet carbonate rock in a capillary-dominated flow regime at reservoir pressure conditions. To capture the dynamics of the brine-oil front progression and snap-off process, real-time tomograms with a time resolution of 38 s (24 s for imaging and 14 s for recording the data) and a spatial resolution of 3.28 µm were acquired at Diamond Light Source (UK). The data were first analyzed at global scale (complete imaged rock) for overall front behavior. From the saturation profiles, we obtain the location of the tail of the desaturation front that progresses with a velocity of 13 µm/min. This velocity is smaller than average flow velocity 16.88 µm/min, which explains why it needs slightly more than 1 pore volume of brine injection to reach the residual saturation of oil in a water-wet rock. The data were further analyzed at local scale to investigate the pore-scale mechanisms of oil trapping during brine flooding. We isolated various trapping events which resulted in the creation of discrete oil ganglia occupying one to several pore bodies. We perform pore-scale curvature analysis of brine-oil interfaces to obtain local capillary pressure that will be related to the shape and the size of throats in which ganglia were trapped.

  3. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY ABSORPTION-EDGE COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF THALLIUM COMPARTMENTALIZATION IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallium (TI) is an extremely toxic metal which, due to its similarities to K, is readily taken up by plants. Thallium is efficiently hyperaccumulated in Iberis intermedia as TI(I). Distribution and compartmentalization of TI in I. intermedia is highes...

  4. Synchrotron radiation induced x-ray micro analysis: A realistic alternative for electron- and ion beam microscopy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, K.; Adams, F.

    1992-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation induced X-ray micro Fluorescence analysis (μ-SRXRF) is compared with more conventional microanalytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Microscopy (SIMS) and Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) for two typical microanalytical applications. SRXRF and EPXMA are employed for the analysis of individual particles, showing the complementary character of both techniques. By means of element mapping of trace constituents in a heterogeneous feldspar, the strong and weak points of SRXRF in comparison to EPXMA and SIMS are illustrated. The most striking difference between SRXRF and the other two microanalytical methods is the ability of SRXRF to probe deep into the investigated Material, whereas SIMS and EPXMA only investigate the upper surface of the material. The possibilities of SRXRF at third generation synchrotron rings is also briefly discussed

  5. Role of the Template in Model Biomineralization: Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Ahmet

    Synthesis of functional nanoparticles in cheap and environment friendly ways is one of the big challenges we face today. Interestingly, many biological systems are already expert at this task. Living organisms can grow nanocrystals of inorganic minerals with certain orientations and shapes and use them together with organic material to build structures with properties superior to the sum of their components. This process is called biomineralization. It has been previously shown that floating monolayers of amphiphilic molecules (Langmuir monolayers) can be used to simulate this process. This project covers the study of three different minerals, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and gold, in an attempt to understand the role of the organic template in the model biomineralization experiments. We used in situ synchrotron x-ray scattering techniques to monitor the organic-inorganic interface during nucleation and growth of inorganic crystals. We also used scanning and transmission electron microscopy to study the structure of mature crystals ex situ . Although kidney stones (mostly calcium oxalate) are pathological in humans and animals, their microscopic structures exhibit considerable orientation and order, probably caused by organic molecules. Our x-ray scattering experiments revealed, first time, that in the early stages of the crystallization calcium oxalate crystals adapt a structure different from their known bulk structures. In the later stages, the crystals relax back to the bulk structure while changing the organization of the organic molecules next to them. We developed a model that explains these interactions in terms of the organic-inorganic interface potential energy. Hydroxyapatite is the main inorganic constituent of the vertebrate bone. In spite of the vast literature about bone mineralization, there is little known about the organic-inorganic interactions at the molecular level. In this thesis, we report the first in situ x-ray scattering experiments

  6. Synchrotron X-ray adaptative monochromator: study and realization of a prototype; Monochromateur adaptatif pour rayonnement X synchrotron: etude et realisation d`un prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dezoret, D.

    1995-12-12

    This work presents a study of a prototype of a synchrotron X-ray monochromator. The spectral qualities of this optic are sensitive to the heat loads which are particularly important on third synchrotron generation like ESRF. Indeed, powers generated by synchrotron beams can reach few kilowatts and power densities about a few tens watts per square millimeters. The mechanical deformations of the optical elements of the beamlines issue issue of the heat load can damage their spectral efficiencies. In order to compensate the deformations, wa have been studying the transposition of the adaptive astronomical optics technology to the x-ray field. First, we have considered the modifications of the spectral characteristics of a crystal induced by x-rays. We have established the specifications required to a technological realisation. Then, thermomechanical and technological studies have been required to transpose the astronomical technology to an x-ray technology. After these studies, we have begun the realisation of a prototype. This monochromator is composed by a crystal of silicon (111) bonded on a piezo-electric structure. The mechanical control is a loop system composed by a infrared light, a Shack-Hartmann CDD and wave front analyser. This system has to compensate the deformations of the crystal in the 5 kcV to 60 kcV energy range with a power density of 1 watt per square millimeters. (authors).

  7. A flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Madsen, Ian C.; Loan, Melissa J.; Scarlett, Nicola V. Y.; Wallwork, Kia S.

    2009-08-01

    The design, construction, and commissioning of a stainless steel flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions is described. The use of the cell is demonstrated by a study of Al(OH)3 scale formation on a mild steel substrate from synthetic Bayer liquor at 70 °C. The cell design allows for interchangeable parts and substrates and would be suitable for the study of scale formation in other industrial processes.

  8. Design status of the 2.5 GeV National Synchrotron Light Source x-ray ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.; Blumberg, L.; Bittner, J.; Galayda, J.; Heese, R.; Schuchman, J.C.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    The present state of the design of the 2.5 GeV electron storage ring for the National Synchrotron Light Source is described. This ring will serve as a dedicated source of synchrotron radiation in the wavelength range 0.1 A to 30 A. While maintaining the basic high brigtness features of the eariler developed lattice structure, recent work resulted in a more economical magnet system, is simplified chromaticity corrections, and improved distribution of the X-ray beam lines. In addition, the adequacy of the dynamic aperture for stable betatron oscillations has been verified for a variety of betatron tunes

  9. Demonstration experiment of a laser synchrotron source for tunable, monochromatic x-rays at 500 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, A.; Fischer, R.; Fisher, A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A Laser Synchrotron Source (LSS) was proposed to generate short-pulsed, tunable x-rays by Thomson scattering of laser photons from a relativistic electron beam. A proof-of-principle experiment was performed to generate x-ray photons of 20 eV. A demonstration experiment is being planned and constructed to generate x-ray photons in the range of {approximately}500 eV. Laser photons of {lambda}=1.06 {mu}m are Thomson backscattered by a 4.5 MeV electron beam which is produced by an S-band RF electron gun. The laser photons are derived from either (i) a 15 Joules, 3 nsec Nd:glass laser, (ii) the uncompressed nsec: pulse of the NRL table-top terawatt (T{sup 3}) laser, or (iii) the compressed sub-picosec pulse of the T{sup 3} laser. The RF electron gun is being constructed with initial operation using a thermionic cathode. It will be upgraded to a photocathode to produce high quality electron beams with high current and low emittance. The x-ray pulse structure consists of {approximately}10 psec within an envelope of a macropulse whose length depends on the laser used. The estimated x-ray photon flux is {approximately}10{sup 18} photons/sec, and the number of photons per macropulse is {approximately}10{sup 8}. Design parameters and progress of the experiment will be presented.

  10. CCD[charge-coupled device]-based synchrotron x-ray detector for protein crystallography: Performance projected from an experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, M.G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I.S.; Kraimer, M.R.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The intense x radiation from a synchrotron source could, with a suitable detector, provide a complete set of diffraction images from a protein crystal before the crystal is damaged by radiation (2 to 3 min). An area detector consisting of a 40 mm dia. x-ray fluorescing phosphor, coupled with an image intensifier and lens to a CCD image sensor, was developed to determine the effectiveness of such a detector in protein crystallography. The detector was used in an experiment with a rotating anode x-ray generator. Diffraction patterns from a lysozyme crystal obtained with this detector are compared to those obtained with film. The two images appear to be virtually identical. The flux of 10 4 x-ray photons/s was observed on the detector at the rotating anode generator. At the 6-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, the flux on an 80 x 80 mm 2 detector is expected to be >10 9 photons/s. The projected design of such a synchrotron detector shows that a diffraction-peak count >10 6 could be obtained in ∼0.5 s. With an additional ∼0.5 s readout time of a 512 x 512 pixel CCD, the data acquisition time per frame would be ∼1 s so that ninety 1 0 diffraction images could be obtained, with approximately 1% precision, in less than 3 min

  11. Ion distributions at charged aqueous surfaces: Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Surface sensitive synchrotron X-ray scattering studies were performed to obtain the distribution of monovalent ions next to a highly charged interface at room temperature. To control surface charge density, lipids, dihexadecyl hydrogen-phosphate (DHDP) and dimysteroyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA), were spread as monolayer materials at the air/water interface, containing CsI at various concentrations. Five decades in bulk concentrations (CsI) are investigated, demonstrating that the interfacial distribution is strongly dependent on bulk concentration. We show that this is due to the strong binding constant of hydronium H3O+ to the phosphate group, leading to proton-transfer back to the phosphate group and to a reduced surface charge. Using anomalous reflectivity off and at the L3 Cs+ resonance, we provide spatial counterion (Cs+) distributions next to the negatively charged interfaces. The experimental ion distributions are in excellent agreement with a renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions without fitting parameters or additional assumptions. Energy Scans at four fixed momentum transfers under specular reflectivity conditions near the Cs+ L3 resonance were conducted on 10-3 M CsI with DHDP monolayer materials on the surface. The energy scans exhibit a periodic dependence on photon momentum transfer. The ion distributions obtained from the analysis are in excellent agreement with those obtained from anomalous reflectivity measurements, providing further confirmation to the validity of the renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions. Moreover, the dispersion corrections f0 and f00 for Cs+ around L3 resonance, revealing the local environment of a Cs+ ion in the solution at the interface, were extracted simultaneously with output of ion distributions.

  12. Visualizing Metal Content and Intracellular Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons with Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Colvin

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that metal dyshomeostasis plays an important role in human neurodegenerative diseases. Although distinctive metal distributions are described for mature hippocampus and cortex, much less is known about metal levels and intracellular distribution in individual hippocampal neuronal somata. To solve this problem, we conducted quantitative metal analyses utilizing synchrotron radiation X-Ray fluorescence on frozen hydrated primary cultured neurons derived from rat embryonic cortex (CTX and two regions of the hippocampus: dentate gyrus (DG and CA1. Comparing average metal contents showed that the most abundant metals were calcium, iron, and zinc, whereas metals such as copper and manganese were less than 10% of zinc. Average metal contents were generally similar when compared across neurons cultured from CTX, DG, and CA1, except for manganese that was larger in CA1. However, each metal showed a characteristic spatial distribution in individual neuronal somata. Zinc was uniformly distributed throughout the cytosol, with no evidence for the existence of previously identified zinc-enriched organelles, zincosomes. Calcium showed a peri-nuclear distribution consistent with accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. Iron showed 2-3 distinct highly concentrated puncta only in peri-nuclear locations. Notwithstanding the small sample size, these analyses demonstrate that primary cultured neurons show characteristic metal signatures. The iron puncta probably represent iron-accumulating organelles, siderosomes. Thus, the metal distributions observed in mature brain structures are likely the result of both intrinsic neuronal factors that control cellular metal content and extrinsic factors related to the synaptic organization, function, and contacts formed and maintained in each region.

  13. Accommodation stresses in hydride precipitates by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J R; Vicente, M A; Vizcaino, P; Banchik, A D; Almer, J

    2012-01-01

    Hydride-forming materials (Zr, Ti, Nb, etc) are affected by a sub-critical crack growth mechanism that involves the diffusion of H to the stressed region ahead of a crack, followed by nucleation and fracture of hydrides at the crack tip [1]. The phenomenon is intermittent, with the crack propagating through the hydride and stopping when it reaches the matrix. By repeating these processes, the crack propagates through a component at a rate that is highly dependent on the temperature history of the component. Most research effort to understand this phenomenon has occurred within the nuclear industry, as it affects the safe operation of pressure tubes (Zr2.5%Nb) and the long-term storage of nuclear fuel (Zircaloy cladding). Stress-induced hydride formation is a consequence of the volume dilatation that accompanies hydride formation (of the order of 15%), which is elastoplastically accommodated by the matrix and precipitate. Compressive stresses are expected within hydride precipitates due to the constraint imposed by the matrix. Such 'accommodation' stresses are essential ingredients in all theoretical models developed to assess the crack growth rate dependence on operational variables such as temperature, applied stress intensity factor, or overall H concentration [2]. Yet little experimental information is available about the magnitude and directionality of such accommodation stresses. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction is the only technique capable of quantifying such stresses. Here we briefly describe the fundaments of the technique, when used through an area detector placed in transmission geometry. The results of the experiments have allowed us to produce a comprehensive picture about the magnitude and origin of accommodation stresses in δ zirconium hydride platelets (author)

  14. Lead tolerance and cellular distribution in Elsholtzia splendens using synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Tian, Shengke [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, Indian River Research and Education Center, Fort Pierce, FL 34945 (United States); Lu, Lingli; Shohag, M.J.I.; Liao, Haibing [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Xiaoe, E-mail: xyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elsholtzia splendens had a good ability of lead tolerance and accumulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb was mostly restricted to the vascular bundles and epidermis tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb and Ca shared most similar distribution patterns in E. splendens. - Abstract: Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate the tolerance and spatial distribution of lead (Pb) in Elsholtzia splendens-a copper (Cu) accumulator plant using synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence. According to chlorophyll concentration and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, E. splendens displayed certain tolerance at 100 {mu}M Pb treatment. Lead concentration in roots, stems and leaves of E. splendens reached 45,183.6, 1657.6, and 380.9 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. Pb was mostly accumulated in the roots, and there were also high concentrations of Pb been transported into stems and leaves. Micro-XRF analysis of the stem and leaf cross section revealed that Pb was mostly restricted in the vascular bundles and epidermis tissues of both stem and leaf of E. splendens. The correlation between distribution of K, Ca, Zn and Pb were analyzed. There were significant positive correlations (P < 0.01) among Pb and Ca, K, Zn distribution both in stem and leaf of E. splendens. However, among the three elements, Ca shared the most similar distribution pattern and the highest correlation coefficients with Pb in both stem and leaf cross section of E. splendens. This suggests that Ca may play an important role in Pb accumulation in stem and leaf of E. splendens.

  15. Assessment of the structural integrity of a prototypical instrumented IFMIF high flux test module rig by fully 3D X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiseanu, Ion [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Laboratory NILPRP, P.O. Box MG-36, R-77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)], E-mail: tiseanu@infim.ro; Simon, Martin [Hans Waelischmiller GmbH (HWM), Schiessstattweg 16, D-88677 Markdorf (Germany); Craciunescu, Teddy; Mandache, Bogdan N. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Laboratory NILPRP, P.O. Box MG-36, R-77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Heinzel, Volker; Stratmanns, Erwin; Simakov, Stanislaw P.; Leichtle, Dieter [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), Institut fuer Reaktorsicherheit IRS, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    An inspection procedure to assess the mechanical integrity of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) capsules and rigs during the irradiation campaign is necessary. Due to its penetration ability and contrast mechanism, the X-ray microtomography is the only known tool that could meet these requirements. In the high flux test module (HFTM) of IFMIF miniaturized specimens are densely packed in capsules. The capsules, which wear electric heaters and thermocouples, are housed in rigs. To assure a well-defined thermal contact the heater wires have to be attached to the capsules by brazing them into grooves. The examination of the quality of the braze material layer is of crucial interest in order to assure the best heat coupling of the heater wires to the capsule. A high density of the heaters is necessary to maintain the required temperature and, in addition NaK filling of narrow channels is employed for improving the 3D-heat transfer between the irradiation specimens and the capsule wall. Fully 3D tomographic inspections of a prototypical HFTM instrumented capsule, developed and manufactured at FZK, were conducted. In order to identify the optimum irradiation parameters and scanning configuration we carried out a comparative NDT analysis on two microtomography facilities: a compact, high magnification installation at NILPRP and a high-end industrial tomography facility with higher X-ray energy and intensity at HWM. At optimum inspection parameters of a directional microfocus X-ray source (U = 220 kV and I = 300 {mu}A) the geometry resolution was about 30 microns for characteristic dimension of the sample of 50 mm. Voids of 30 microns diameter and cracks of about 20 microns width can be detected. The absolute error of geometrical measurements is sufficient for the assessment of the structural integrity of the irradiation capsule and for the geometry description within the thermal-hydraulic modeling. The space resolution and the overall

  16. Assessment of the structural integrity of a prototypical instrumented IFMIF high flux test module rig by fully 3D X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiseanu, Ion; Simon, Martin; Craciunescu, Teddy; Mandache, Bogdan N.; Heinzel, Volker; Stratmanns, Erwin; Simakov, Stanislaw P.; Leichtle, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    An inspection procedure to assess the mechanical integrity of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) capsules and rigs during the irradiation campaign is necessary. Due to its penetration ability and contrast mechanism, the X-ray microtomography is the only known tool that could meet these requirements. In the high flux test module (HFTM) of IFMIF miniaturized specimens are densely packed in capsules. The capsules, which wear electric heaters and thermocouples, are housed in rigs. To assure a well-defined thermal contact the heater wires have to be attached to the capsules by brazing them into grooves. The examination of the quality of the braze material layer is of crucial interest in order to assure the best heat coupling of the heater wires to the capsule. A high density of the heaters is necessary to maintain the required temperature and, in addition NaK filling of narrow channels is employed for improving the 3D-heat transfer between the irradiation specimens and the capsule wall. Fully 3D tomographic inspections of a prototypical HFTM instrumented capsule, developed and manufactured at FZK, were conducted. In order to identify the optimum irradiation parameters and scanning configuration we carried out a comparative NDT analysis on two microtomography facilities: a compact, high magnification installation at NILPRP and a high-end industrial tomography facility with higher X-ray energy and intensity at HWM. At optimum inspection parameters of a directional microfocus X-ray source (U = 220 kV and I = 300 μA) the geometry resolution was about 30 microns for characteristic dimension of the sample of 50 mm. Voids of 30 microns diameter and cracks of about 20 microns width can be detected. The absolute error of geometrical measurements is sufficient for the assessment of the structural integrity of the irradiation capsule and for the geometry description within the thermal-hydraulic modeling. The space resolution and the overall

  17. Application of X-ray microtomography to study the influence of the casting microstructure upon the tensile behaviour of an Al–Si alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limodin, Nathalie, E-mail: nathalie.limodin@ec-lille.fr [Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille (LML), CNRS, UMR 8107, Cité Scientifique, 59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); El Bartali, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.elbartali@ec-lille.fr [Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille (LML), CNRS, UMR 8107, Cité Scientifique, 59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Ecole Centrale de Lille, 59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Wang, Long, E-mail: long.wang@ec-lille.fr [Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille (LML), CNRS, UMR 8107, Cité Scientifique, 59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Ecole Centrale de Lille, 59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Lachambre, Joël, E-mail: joel.lachambre@insa-lyon.fr [Laboratoire Matériaux, Ingénierie et Sciences (MATEIS), INSA-Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5510, 20 Av. Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Buffiere, Jean-Yves, E-mail: jean-yves.buffiere@insa-lyon.fr [Laboratoire Matériaux, Ingénierie et Sciences (MATEIS), INSA-Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5510, 20 Av. Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Charkaluk, Eric, E-mail: eric.charkaluk@ec-lille.fr [Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille (LML), CNRS, UMR 8107, Cité Scientifique, 59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2014-04-01

    In cast aluminium alloys used in the automotive industry the microstructure inherited from the foundry process has a strong influence on the mechanical properties. In the cylinder heads produced by the Lost Foam Casting process, the microstructure consists of hard intermetallic phases and large gas and microshrinkage pores. To study its influence, full field measurements at the microstructure scale were performed during a tensile test performed in situ under X-ray microtomography. Intermetallics were used as a natural speckle pattern. Feasibility of Digital Volume Correlation on this alloy was proved and the accuracy of the measurement was assessed and discussed in light of the small volume fraction of intermetallics and in comparison with the accuracy of Digital Image Correlation performed on optical images at a finer spatial resolution.

  18. Three-dimensional visualization of magnetic domain structure with strong uniaxial anisotropy via scanning hard X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motohiro; Kim, Kab-Jin; Kim, Sanghoon; Yoshikawa, Hiroki; Tono, Takayuki; Yamada, Kihiro T.; Taniguchi, Takuya; Mizuno, Hayato; Oda, Kent; Ishibashi, Mio; Hirata, Yuushou; Li, Tian; Tsukamoto, Arata; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2018-03-01

    An X-ray tomographic technique was developed to investigate the internal magnetic domain structure in a micrometer-sized ferromagnetic sample. The technique is based on a scanning hard X-ray nanoprobe using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). From transmission XMCD images at the Gd L3 edge as a function of the sample rotation angle, the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of a single component of the magnetic vector in a GdFeCo microdisc was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of 360 nm, using a modified algebraic reconstruction algorithm. The method is applicable to practical magnetic materials and can be extended to 3D visualization of the magnetic domain formation process under external magnetic fields.

  19. X-ray phase microtomography with a single grating for high-throughput investigations of biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdora, Marie-Christine; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Schulz, Georg; Khimchenko, Anna; Hipp, Alexander; Cook, Andrew C; Dilg, Daniel; David, Christian; Grünzweig, Christian; Rau, Christoph; Thibault, Pierre; Zanette, Irene

    2017-02-01

    The high-throughput 3D visualisation of biological specimens is essential for studying diseases and developmental disorders. It requires imaging methods that deliver high-contrast, high-resolution volumetric information at short sample preparation and acquisition times. Here we show that X-ray phase-contrast tomography using a single grating can provide a powerful alternative to commonly employed techniques, such as high-resolution episcopic microscopy (HREM). We present the phase tomography of a mouse embryo in paraffin obtained with an X-ray single-grating interferometer at I13-2 Beamline at Diamond Light Source and discuss the results in comparison with HREM measurements. The excellent contrast and quantitative density information achieved non-destructively and without staining using a simple, robust setup make X-ray single-grating interferometry an optimum candidate for high-throughput imaging of biological specimens as an alternative for existing methods like HREM.

  20. Characterization of the Pore Structure of Functionalized Calcium Carbonate Tablets by Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy and X-Ray Computed Microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markl, Daniel; Wang, Parry; Ridgway, Cathy; Karttunen, Anssi-Pekka; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Bawuah, Prince; Pääkkönen, Pertti; Gane, Patrick; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Zeitler, J Axel

    2017-06-01

    Novel excipients are entering the market to enhance the bioavailability of drug particles by having a high porosity and, thus, providing a rapid liquid uptake and disintegration to accelerate subsequent drug dissolution. One example of such a novel excipient is functionalized calcium carbonate, which enables the manufacture of compacts with a bimodal pore size distribution consisting of larger interparticle and fine intraparticle pores. Five sets of functionalized calcium carbonate tablets with a target porosity of 45%-65% were prepared in 5% steps and characterized using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and X-ray computed microtomography. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy was used to derive the porosity using effective medium approximations, that is, the traditional and an anisotropic Bruggeman model. The anisotropic Bruggeman model yields the better correlation with the nominal porosity (R 2  = 0.995) and it provided additional information about the shape and orientation of the pores within the powder compact. The spheroidal (ellipsoids of revolution) shaped pores have a preferred orientation perpendicular to the compaction direction causing an anisotropic behavior of the dielectric porous medium. The results from X-ray computed microtomography confirmed the nonspherical shape and the orientation of the pores, and it further revealed that the anisotropic behavior is mainly caused by the interparticle pores. The information from both techniques provides a detailed insight into the pore structure of pharmaceutical tablets. This is of great interest to study the impact of tablet microstructure on the disintegration and dissolution performance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of synchrotron x-ray micro-spectroscopic techniques and application to problems in low temperature geochemistry. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The focus of the technical development effort has been the development of apparatus and techniques for the utilization of X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopies in a microprobe mode. The present XRM uses white synchrotron radiation (3 to 30 keV) from a bending magnet for trace element analyses using the x-ray fluorescence technique Two significant improvements to this device have been recently implemented. Focusing Mirror: An 8:1 ellipsoidal mirror was installed in the X26A beamline to focus the incident synchrotron radiation and thereby increase the flux on the sample by about a factor of 30. Incident Beam Monochromator: The monochromator has been successfully installed and commissioned in the X26A beamline upstream of the mirror to permit analyses with focused monochromatic radiation. The monochromator consists of a channel-cut silicon (111) crystal driven by a Klinger stepping motor translator. We have demonstrated the operating range of this instrument is 4 and 20 keV with 0.01 eV steps and produces a beam with a {approximately}10{sup {minus}4} energy bandwidth. The primary purpose of the monochromator is for x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements but it is also used for selective excitation in trace element microanalysis. To date, we have conducted XANES studies on Ti, Cr, Fe, Ce and U, spanning the entire accessible energy range and including both K and L edge spectra. Practical detection limits for microXANES are 10--100 ppM for 100 {mu}m spots.

  2. Utilization of X-ray computed micro-tomography to evaluate iron sulphide distribution in roofing slates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavro, Martin; Souček, Kamil; Daněk, T.; Matýsek, D.; Georgiovská, Lucie; Zajícová, Vendula

    (2018) ISSN 1470-9236 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : roofing slate * iron sulphides * X-ray CT * slate pathologies * dimension stone Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 1.102, year: 2016 http://qjegh.lyellcollection.org/

  3. In situ analyses of Ag speciation in tissues of cucumber and wheat using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In situ analyses of Ag speciation in tissues of cucumber and wheat using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy showing spectral fitting and linear...

  4. A redox equilibrator for the preparation of cytochrome oxidase of mixed valence states and intermediate compounds for x-ray synchrotron studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chance, B.; Moore, J.; Powers, L.; Ching, Y.

    1982-01-01

    A redox titrator for the preparation of small volumes of highly concentrated biological samples of X-ray synchrotron studies provides for the redox equilibration at temperatures of 40 to -30 0 C. Anaerobic transfer directly to the X-ray sample chamber and mixing of an additional reagent just prior to freeze-trapping of the redox-equilibrated sample are provided

  5. X-ray television area detectors for macromolecular structural studies with synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, U.W.; Gilmore, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction patterns may be recorded quantitatively by means of X-ray-to-electron converters which are scanned in a television-type raster scan. Detectors of this type are capable of operating over the whole range of counting rates from very low to higher than those with which other types of converters can deal. The component parts of an X-ray television detector are examined and the limits to the precision of the measurements are analysed. (Auth.)

  6. Synchrotron-radiation-induced formation of salt particles on an X-ray lithography mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Y.; Takahashi, J.; Hosokawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    The suppression and removal of contaminants on X-ray masks are required for the application of X-ray lithography to practical semiconductor production, because contamination is easily transferred to the replicated resist patterns and degrades the LSI patterns in order to study contamination of a Ta/SiN X-ray mask, its growth process was investigated using an atmospheric reaction chamber and in situ observation apparatus for gases at atmospheric pressure. It was found that the contamination particles were ammonium sulfate and oxalate. The sources of the salt particle were also identified

  7. X-Ray-induced Deuterium Enrichment of N-rich Organics in Protoplanetary Disks: An Experimental Investigation Using Synchrotron Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavilan, Lisseth; Carrasco, Nathalie [LATMOS, Université Versailles St Quentin, UPMC Université Paris 06, CNRS, 11 blvd d’Alembert, F-78280 Guyancourt (France); Remusat, Laurent; Roskosz, Mathieu [IMPMC, CNRS UMR 7590, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, IRD, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CP 52, 57 rue Cuvier, Paris F-75231 (France); Popescu, Horia; Jaouen, Nicolas [SEXTANTS beamline, SOLEIL synchrotron, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Sandt, Christophe [SMIS beamline, SOLEIL synchrotron, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Jäger, Cornelia [Laboratory Astrophysics and Cluster Physics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University and Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Henning, Thomas [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Simionovici, Alexandre [Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Observatoire des Sciences de l’Univers de Grenoble, BP 53, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Lemaire, Jean Louis [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay (ISMO), CNRS, Univ. Paris Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91405 Orsay (France); Mangin, Denis, E-mail: lisseth.gavilan@latmos.ipsl.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS, Université de Lorraine, F-54011 Nancy (France)

    2017-05-01

    The deuterium enrichment of organics in the interstellar medium, protoplanetary disks, and meteorites has been proposed to be the result of ionizing radiation. The goal of this study is to simulate and quantify the effects of soft X-rays (0.1–2 keV), an important component of stellar radiation fields illuminating protoplanetary disks, on the refractory organics present in the disks. We prepared tholins, nitrogen-rich organic analogs to solids found in several astrophysical environments, e.g., Titan’s atmosphere, cometary surfaces, and protoplanetary disks, via plasma deposition. Controlled irradiation experiments with soft X-rays at 0.5 and 1.3 keV were performed at the SEXTANTS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, and were immediately followed by ex-situ infrared, Raman, and isotopic diagnostics. Infrared spectroscopy revealed the preferential loss of singly bonded groups (N–H, C–H, and R–N≡C) and the formation of sp{sup 3} carbon defects with signatures at ∼1250–1300 cm{sup −1}. Raman analysis revealed that, while the length of polyaromatic units is only slightly modified, the introduction of defects leads to structural amorphization. Finally, tholins were measured via secondary ion mass spectrometry to quantify the D, H, and C elemental abundances in the irradiated versus non-irradiated areas. Isotopic analysis revealed that significant D-enrichment is induced by X-ray irradiation. Our results are compared to previous experimental studies involving the thermal degradation and electron irradiation of organics. The penetration depth of soft X-rays in μ m-sized tholins leads to volume rather than surface modifications: lower-energy X-rays (0.5 keV) induce a larger D-enrichment than 1.3 keV X-rays, reaching a plateau for doses larger than 5 × 10{sup 27} eV cm{sup −3}. Synchrotron fluences fall within the expected soft X-ray fluences in protoplanetary disks, and thus provide evidence of a new non-thermal pathway to deuterium fractionation of

  8. Measurements of internal stresses in bond coating using high energy x-rays from synchrotron radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, K; Akiniwa, Y; Nishio, K; Kawamura, M; Okado, H

    2002-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) techniques enable high temperature combustion of turbines made of Ni-base alloy. TBC is made of zirconia top coating on NiCoCrAlY bond coating. The internal stresses in the bond coating play essential role in the delamination or fracture of TBC in service. With the X-rays from laboratory equipments, it is impossible to measure nondestructively the internal stress in the bond coating under the top coating. synchrotron radiations with a high energy and high brightness have a large penetration depth as compared with laboratory X-rays. Using the high energy X-rays from the synchrotron radiation, it is possible to measure the internal stress in the bond coating through the top coating. In this study, the furnace, which can heat a specimen to 1473 K, was developed for the stress measurement of the thermal barrier coatings. The internal stresses in the bond coating were measured at the room temperature, 773 K, 1073 K and 1373 K by using the 311 diffraction from Ni sub 3 Al with about 73...

  9. Application of synchrotron x-ray microbeam spectroscopy to the determination of metal distribution and speciation in biological tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punshon, T.; Jackson, B.P.; Lanzirotti, A.; Hopkins, W.A.; Bertsch, P.M.; Burger, J. [Rutgers State University, Piscataway, NJ (United States). Division of Life Science

    2005-07-01

    Resolving the distribution and speciation of metal(loid)s within biological environmental samples is essential for understanding bioavailability, trophic transfer, and environmental risk. We used synchrotron x-ray microspectroscopy to analyze a range of samples that had been exposed to metal(loid) contamination. Microprobe x-ray fluorescence elemental mapping ({mu} SXRF) of decomposing rhizosphere microcosms consisting of Ni- and U-contaminated soil planted with wheat (Triticum aestivum) showed the change in Ni and U distribution over a 27-day period, with a progressive movement of U into decaying tissue. mu SXRF maps showed the micrometer-scale distribution of Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, and U in roots of willow (Salix nigra L.) growing on a former radiological settling pond, with U located outside of the epidermis and Ni inside the cortex. X-ray computed tomography (CMT) of woody tissue of this same affected willow showed that small points of high Ni fluorescence observed previously are actually a Ni-rich substance contained within an individual xylem vessel. {mu} SXRF and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) linked the elevated Se concentrations in sediments of a coal fly ash settling pond with oral deformities of bullfrog tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana). Se distribution was localized within the deformed mouthparts, and with an oxidation state of Se (-II) consistent with organo-Se compounds, it suggests oral deformities are caused by incorporation of Se into proteins.

  10. Analysis of cortical bone porosity using synchrotron radiation microtomography to evaluate the effects of chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessio, R.; Nogueira, L. P.; Salata, C.; Mantuano, A.; Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; de Almeida, C. E.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2015-11-01

    Microporosities play important biologic and mechanical roles on health. One of the side effects caused by some chemotherapy drugs is the induction of amenorrhea, temporary or not, in premenopausal women, with a consequent decrease in estrogen production, which can lead to cortical bone changes. In the present work, the femur diaphysis of rats treated with chemotherapy drugs were evaluated by 3D morphometric parameters using synchrotron radiation microtomography. Control animals were also evaluated for comparison. The 3D tomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. Results showed significant differences in morphometric parameters measured from the 3D images of femur diaphysis of rats.

  11. Correction of the X-ray tube spot movement as a tool for improvement of the micro-tomography quality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavřík, Daniel; Jandejsek, Ivan; Pichotka, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2016), C01029 ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : computerized tomography (CT) * computed radiography (CR) * inspection with x-rays * detector alignment and calibration methods Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-0221/11/01/C01029

  12. Accessing developmental information of fossil hominin teeth using new synchrotron microtomography-based visualization techniques of dental surfaces and interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cabec, Adeline; Tang, Nancy; Tafforeau, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of dental long-period growth lines (Retzius lines in enamel and Andresen lines in dentine) and matching of stress patterns (internal accentuated lines and hypoplasias) are used in determining crown formation time and age at death in juvenile fossil hominins. They yield the chronology employed for inferences of life history. Synchrotron virtual histology has been demonstrated as a non-destructive alternative to conventional invasive approaches. Nevertheless, fossil teeth are sometimes poorly preserved or physically inaccessible, preventing observation of the external expression of incremental lines (perikymata and periradicular bands). Here we present a new approach combining synchrotron virtual histology and high quality three-dimensional rendering of dental surfaces and internal interfaces. We illustrate this approach with seventeen permanent fossil hominin teeth. The outer enamel surface and enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) were segmented by capturing the phase contrast fringes at the structural interfaces. Three-dimensional models were rendered with Phong's algorithm, and a combination of directional colored lights to enhance surface topography and the pattern of subtle variations in tissue density. The process reveals perikymata and linear enamel hypoplasias on the entire crown surface, including unerupted teeth. Using this method, highly detailed stress patterns at the EDJ allow precise matching of teeth within an individual's dentition when virtual histology is not sufficient. We highlight that taphonomical altered enamel can in particular cases yield artificial subdivisions of perikymata when imaged using X-ray microtomography with insufficient resolution. This may complicate assessments of developmental time, although this can be circumvented by a careful analysis of external and internal structures in parallel. We further present new crown formation times for two unerupted canines from South African Australopiths, which were found to form over

  13. Accessing developmental information of fossil hominin teeth using new synchrotron microtomography-based visualization techniques of dental surfaces and interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Le Cabec

    Full Text Available Quantification of dental long-period growth lines (Retzius lines in enamel and Andresen lines in dentine and matching of stress patterns (internal accentuated lines and hypoplasias are used in determining crown formation time and age at death in juvenile fossil hominins. They yield the chronology employed for inferences of life history. Synchrotron virtual histology has been demonstrated as a non-destructive alternative to conventional invasive approaches. Nevertheless, fossil teeth are sometimes poorly preserved or physically inaccessible, preventing observation of the external expression of incremental lines (perikymata and periradicular bands. Here we present a new approach combining synchrotron virtual histology and high quality three-dimensional rendering of dental surfaces and internal interfaces. We illustrate this approach with seventeen permanent fossil hominin teeth. The outer enamel surface and enamel-dentine junction (EDJ were segmented by capturing the phase contrast fringes at the structural interfaces. Three-dimensional models were rendered with Phong's algorithm, and a combination of directional colored lights to enhance surface topography and the pattern of subtle variations in tissue density. The process reveals perikymata and linear enamel hypoplasias on the entire crown surface, including unerupted teeth. Using this method, highly detailed stress patterns at the EDJ allow precise matching of teeth within an individual's dentition when virtual histology is not sufficient. We highlight that taphonomical altered enamel can in particular cases yield artificial subdivisions of perikymata when imaged using X-ray microtomography with insufficient resolution. This may complicate assessments of developmental time, although this can be circumvented by a careful analysis of external and internal structures in parallel. We further present new crown formation times for two unerupted canines from South African Australopiths, which were

  14. A modular reactor design for in situ synchrotron x-ray investigation of atomic layer deposition processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Jeffrey A.; Weimer, Matthew S.; Emery, Jonathan D.; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Seifert, Sönke; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Hock, Adam S.; Proslier, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron characterization techniques provide some of the most powerful tools for the study of film structure and chemistry. The brilliance and tunability of the Advanced Photon Source allow access to scattering and spectroscopic techniques unavailable with in-house laboratory setups and provide the opportunity to probe various atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes in situ starting at the very first deposition cycle. Here, we present the design and implementation of a portable ALD instrument which possesses a modular reactor scheme that enables simple experimental switchover between various beamlines and characterization techniques. As first examples, we present in situ results for (1) X-ray surface scattering and reflectivity measurements of epitaxial ZnO ALD on sapphire, (2) grazing-incidence small angle scattering of MnO nucleation on silicon, and (3) grazing-incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy of nucleation-regime Er2O3 ALD on amorphous ALD alumina and single crystalline sapphire.

  15. Phased-Resolved Strain Measuremetns in Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement Using Synchrotron x-Rays (Prop. 2003-033)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biernacki, Joseph J.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Parnham, C.J.; Hubbard, Camden R.; Bai, J.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray diffraction methods developed for the determination of residual stress states in crystalline materials have been applied to study residual strains and strains because of mechanical loading of ordinary portland cement paste. Synchrotron X-rays were used to make in situ measurements of interplanar spacings in the calcium hydroxide (CH) phase of hydrated neat portland cement under uniaxial compression. The results indicate that strains on the order of 1/100 000 can be resolved providing an essentially new technique by which to measure the phase-resolved meso-scale mechanical behavior of cement under different loading conditions. Evaluation of these strain data in view of published elastic parameters for CH suggests that the CH carries a large fraction of the applied stress and that plastic interactions with the matrix are notable.

  16. Fabrication Of Supersmooth Spherical Quartz Blank For Soft X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation Grating Monochromator In China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changxin, Zhou; Deming, Shu; Wuming, Liu

    1989-07-01

    A spherical grating monochromator (SGM) has been designed and installed in beamline 48913 at Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) for synchrotron radiation soft x-ray photoemission experiments. There are four laminar gratings in this monochromator to covering the region of 10 -1100ev. On three of them, which covering the soft x-ray range, a supersmooth blank surface with large radial (57M) and high figuring accuracy (>λ/50) is required to suit the monochromator high resolving power desgn (>2000) and reduce the beam power loss. In this paper, the methods of fabrication and metrology has been described, the test results of this plank using WYKO and ZYGO show that the surface roughness of this blank is about 2Å RMS with 0.014 figure tolerance.

  17. Probing Stress States in Silicon Nanowires During Electrochemical Lithiation Using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ali

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Silicon is considered as a promising anode material for the next-generation lithium-ion battery (LIB due to its high capacity at nanoscale. However, silicon expands up to 300% during lithiation, which induces high stresses and leads to fractures. To design silicon nanostructures that could minimize fracture, it is important to understand and characterize stress states in the silicon nanostructures during lithiation. Synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction has proven to be effective in revealing insights of mechanical stress and other mechanics considerations in small-scale crystalline structures used in many important technological applications, such as microelectronics, nanotechnology, and energy systems. In the present study, an in situ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction experiment was conducted to elucidate the mechanical stress states during the first electrochemical cycle of lithiation in single-crystalline silicon nanowires (SiNWs in an LIB test cell. Morphological changes in the SiNWs at different levels of lithiation were also studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM. It was found from SEM observation that lithiation commenced predominantly at the top surface of SiNWs followed by further progression toward the bottom of the SiNWs gradually. The hydrostatic stress of the crystalline core of the SiNWs at different levels of electrochemical lithiation was determined using the in situ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction technique. We found that the crystalline core of the SiNWs became highly compressive (up to -325.5 MPa once lithiation started. This finding helps unravel insights about mechanical stress states in the SiNWs during the electrochemical lithiation, which could potentially pave the path toward the fracture-free design of silicon nanostructure anode materials in the next-generation LIB.

  18. Gadolinium Deposition in Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis: An Examination of Tissue using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    High, W.; Ranville, J; Brown, M; Punshon, T; Lanzirotti, A; Jackson, B

    2010-01-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder associated with gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents dosed during renal insufficiency. In two patients, Gd deposition in tissue affected by nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The presence of Gd was confirmed and mapped using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Affected skin and soft tissue from the lower extremity demonstrated 89 and 209 ppm ({micro}g/g, dry weight, formalin fixed) in cases 1 and 2, respectively. In case 2, the same skin and soft tissue was retested after paraffin embedding, with the fat content removed by xylene washes, and this resulted in a measured value of 189 ppm ({micro}g/g, dry weight, paraffin embedded). Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed Gd in the affected tissue of both cases, and provided high-sensitivity and high-resolution spatial mapping of Gd deposition. A gradient of Gd deposition in tissue correlated with fibrosis and cellularity. Gd deposited in periadnexal locations within the skin, including hair and eccrine ducts, where it colocalized to areas of high calcium and zinc content. Because of the difficulty in obtaining synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy scans, tissue from only two patients were mapped. A single control with kidney disease and gadolinium-based contrast agent exposure did not contain Gd. Gd content on a gravimetric basis was impacted by processing that removed fat and altered the dry weight of the specimens. Gradients of Gd deposition in tissue corresponded to fibrosis and cellularity. Adnexal deposition of Gd correlated with areas of high calcium and zinc content.

  19. Analysis of micro-structure in raw and heat treated meat emulsions from multimodal X-ray microtomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur; Nielsen, Mikkel Schou; Miklos, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    protein network quality. Industrial relevance: Meat emulsions have previously been thoroughly studied, and the use of various fat substitutes and protein stabilizers has been investigated. The grating-based multimodal X-ray tomography method presented here is a feasible method to investigate...... the microstructural changes induced by heat treatment. It provides high-resolution three dimensional spatial information and in contrast to 2D imaging methods, quantitative parameters can be extracted by image analysis for the entire sample volume. Additionally, the non-destructive method allows for imaging the same...

  20. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron X-ray diffraction ina diamond anvil cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk,Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-29

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radialx-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup ofALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a samplein a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser whileprobing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cellis placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to thebeam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while thesample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparentboron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of(Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observedabove 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  1. Thermal expansion and phase transformations of nitrogen-expanded austenite studied with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2014-01-01

    as a fitting parameter. The stacking fault density is constant for temperatures up to 680 K, whereafter it decreases to nil. Surprisingly, a transition phase with composition M4N (M = Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo) appears for temperatures above 770 K. The linear coefficient of thermal expansion depends on the nitrogen......Nitrogen-expanded austenite, _N, with high and low nitrogen contents was produced from AISI 316 grade stainless steel powder by gaseous nitriding in ammonia/hydrogen gas mixtures. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the thermal expansion and thermal stability...

  2. Plastic deformation in Al (Cu) interconnects stressed by electromigration and studied by synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Advanced Light Source; UCLA; Chen, Kai; Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Valek, Bryan C.; Tu, King-Ning

    2008-05-14

    We report here an in-depth synchrotron radiation based white beam X-ray microdiffraction study of plasticity in individual grains of an Al (Cu) interconnect during the early stage of electromigration. The study shows a rearrangement of the geometrically necessary dislocations (GND) in bamboo typed grains during that stage. We find that about 90percent of the GNDs are oriented so that their line direction is the closest to the current flow direction. In non-bamboo typed grains, the Laue peak positions shift, indicating that the grains rotate. An analysis in terms of force directions has been carried out and is consistent with observed electromigration induced grain rotation and bending.

  3. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umetani, K; Fukushima, K

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  4. High-resolution X-ray microtomography for three-dimensional imaging of cardiac progenitor cell homing in infarcted rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Alessandra; Frati, Caterina; Rossini, Alessandra; Komlev, Vladimir S; Lagrasta, Costanza; Savi, Monia; Cavalli, Stefano; Gaetano, Carlo; Quaini, Federico; Manescu, Adrian; Rustichelli, Franco

    2011-08-01

    The recent introduction of stem cells in cardiology provides new tools in understanding the regenerative processes of the normal and pathological heart and has opened a search for new therapeutic strategies. Recent published reports have contributed to identifying possible cellular therapy approaches to generate new myocardium, involving transcoronary and intramyocardial injection of progenitor cells. However, one of the limiting factors in the overall interpretation of clinical results obtained by cell therapy is represented by the lack of three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution methods for the visualization of the injected cells and their fate within the myocardium. This work shows that X-ray computed microtomography may offer the unique possibility of detecting, with high definition and resolution and in ex vivo conditions, the 3D spatial distribution of rat cardiac progenitor cells, labelled with iron oxide nanoparticles, inside the infarcted rat heart early after injection. The obtained 3D images represent a very innovative progress as compared to experimental two-dimensional (2D) histological analysis, which requires time-consuming energies for image reconstruction in order to provide the overall distribution of rat clonogenic cells within the heart. Through microtomography, we were able to observe in 3D the presence of these cells within damaged cardiac tissue, with important structural details that are difficult to visualize by conventional bidimensional imaging techniques. This new 3D-imaging approach appears to be an important way to investigate the cellular events involved in cardiac regeneration and represents a promising tool for future clinical applications. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Conventional and Synchrotron X-Ray Topography of Defects in the Core Region of SrLaGaO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowska, A.; Lefeld-Sosnowska, M.; Wieteska, K.; Wierzchowski, W.; Pajaczkowska, A.; Graeff, W.

    2008-01-01

    SrLaGaO 4 single crystals are perspective substrate materials for high temperature superconductors thin films, elements of thermal radiation receivers and other electronic devices. The defect structure of the Czochralski grown SrLaGaO 4 crystal was investigated by means of X-ray topography exploring both conventional and synchrotron sources. The crystal lattice defects in the core region of the crystal were investigated. The regular network of defects arranged in rows only in direction was observed. Owing to high resolution of synchrotron radiation white beam back reflection topographs one can distinguish individual spots forming the lines of the rows. It can be supposed that these elongated rod-like volume defects are located in f100g lattice planes forming a kind of walls. They are built approximately of the same phase as crystal but crystallize at a different moment than a rest of the crystal due to the constitutional supercooling. (authors)

  6. Individual particle analysis of coarse air suspended particulate material by synchrotron radiation X-ray micro fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana; Melo Junior, Ariston [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Dept. de Recursos Hidricos]. E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Perez, Carlos Alberto [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: perez@lnls.br; Vives, Ana Elisa S. de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: virgilio@cena.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this work is evaluate the size of individual particles present in the air suspended particulate material collected in Campinas, Sao Paulo State, and analyze quantitatively the particles using the synchrotron radiation X-ray micro fluorescence ({mu}-SRXRF) associated with the fundamental parameter method to correct attenuation/absorption effects by the matrix. The particles analyzed have size between 50-10 {mu}m and to perform the spatial distribution a white beam of synchrotron radiation condensed by a conical capillary (13 {mu}m diameter) was used. For the quantitative analysis punctual measures in thin films standards in Mylar subtract were performed. The elements detected were Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb. (author)

  7. Individual particle analysis of coarse air suspended particulate material by synchrotron radiation X-ray micro fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Silvana; Melo Junior, Ariston; Vives, Ana Elisa S. de; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work is evaluate the size of individual particles present in the air suspended particulate material collected in Campinas, Sao Paulo State, and analyze quantitatively the particles using the synchrotron radiation X-ray micro fluorescence (μ-SRXRF) associated with the fundamental parameter method to correct attenuation/absorption effects by the matrix. The particles analyzed have size between 50-10 μm and to perform the spatial distribution a white beam of synchrotron radiation condensed by a conical capillary (13 μm diameter) was used. For the quantitative analysis punctual measures in thin films standards in Mylar subtract were performed. The elements detected were Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb. (author)

  8. Multielemental analysis in organic products and seed of linum by X-ray total reflection fluorescence with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serpa, Renata F.B.; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: renata@lin.ufrj.br; Carmo, Maria da Graca T. do [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Nutricao; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil]. E-mail: silvana@fec.com.br

    2005-07-01

    The main goal of this study is to determining the trace and major elements levels in organic seeds samples, like soy, rice, bean and in Brazilian and Canadian linum seed by X-ray Total Reflection Fluorescence with Synchrotron Radiation (SR-TXRF). The measurements were carried out in the XRF beamline at the Light Synchrotron National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The organic soy presented major concentrations of P, Ca, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb and Sr than organic bean and rice. Brazilian linum samples presented higher concentrations of S, P, Ca, Ni, Cu, Sr, Zr and Mo than Canadian one, even than organic samples. However potassium, iron and zinc were more pronounced in the Canadian seed of linum (author)

  9. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence analyses of stratospheric cosmic dust: New results for chondritic and nickel-depleted particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, G.J.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-06-01

    Trace element abundance determinations were performed using synchrotron x-ray fluorescence on nine particles collected from the stratosphere and classified as ''cosmic''. Improvements to the Synchrotron Light Source allowed the detection of all elements between Cr and Mo, with the exceptions of Co and As, in our largest particle. The minor and trace element abundance patterns of three Ni-depleted particles were remarkably similar to those of extraterrestrial igneous rocks. Fe/Ni and Fe/Mn ratios suggest that one of these may be of lunar origin. All nine particles exhibited an enrichment in Br, ranging form 1.3 to 38 times the Cl concentration. Br concentrations were uncorrelated with particle size, as would be expected for a surface correlated component acquires from the stratosphere. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  10. A powerful flare from Sgr A* confirms the synchrotron nature of the X-ray emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponti, G.; George, E.; Scaringi, S.; Zhang, S.; Jin, C.; Dexter, J.; Terrier, R.; Clavel, M.; Degenaar, N.; Eisenhauer, F.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Goldwurm, A.; Habibi, M.; Haggard, D.; Hailey, C.; Harrison, F.; Merloni, A.; Mori, K.; Nandra, K.; Ott, T.; Pfuhl, O.; Plewa, P.M.; Waisberg, I.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first fully simultaneous fits to the near-infrared (NIR) and X-ray spectral slope (and its evolution) during a very bright flare from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the Milky Way's centre. Our study arises from ambitious multiwavelength monitoring campaigns with XMM-Newton,

  11. Report of the fifth workshop on synchrotron x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, G.P.; Godel, J.B.; Brown, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Semiconductors comprise a greater part of the United States economy than the aircraft, steel and automobile industries combined. In future the semiconductor manufacturing industry will be forced to switch away from present optical manufacturing methods in the early to mid 1990's. X-ray lithography has emerged as the leading contender for continuing production below the 0.4 micron level. Brookhaven National Laboratory began a series of workshops on x-ray lithography in 1986 to examine key issues and in particular to enable United States industry to take advantage of the technical base established in this field. Since accelerators provide the brightest sources for x-ray lithography, most of the research and development to date has taken place at large accelerator-based research centers such as Brookhaven, the University of Wisconsin and Stanford. The goals of this Fifth Brookhaven Workshop were to review progress and goals since the last workshop and to establish a blueprint for the future. The meeting focused on the ''Exposure Tool,'' that is, a term defined as the source plus beamline and stepper. In order to assess the appropriateness of schedules for the development of this tool, other aspects of the required technology such as masks, resists and inspection and repair were also reviewed. To accomplish this, two working groups were set up, one to review the overall aspects of x-ray lithography and set a time frame, the other to focus on sources

  12. Report of the fifth workshop on synchrotron x-ray lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.P.; Godel, J.B. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Brown, G.S. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Liebmann, W. (Suss (Karl) America, Essex Junction, VT (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Semiconductors comprise a greater part of the United States economy than the aircraft, steel and automobile industries combined. In future the semiconductor manufacturing industry will be forced to switch away from present optical manufacturing methods in the early to mid 1990's. X-ray lithography has emerged as the leading contender for continuing production below the 0.4 micron level. Brookhaven National Laboratory began a series of workshops on x-ray lithography in 1986 to examine key issues and in particular to enable United States industry to take advantage of the technical base established in this field. Since accelerators provide the brightest sources for x-ray lithography, most of the research and development to date has taken place at large accelerator-based research centers such as Brookhaven, the University of Wisconsin and Stanford. The goals of this Fifth Brookhaven Workshop were to review progress and goals since the last workshop and to establish a blueprint for the future. The meeting focused on the Exposure Tool,'' that is, a term defined as the source plus beamline and stepper. In order to assess the appropriateness of schedules for the development of this tool, other aspects of the required technology such as masks, resists and inspection and repair were also reviewed. To accomplish this, two working groups were set up, one to review the overall aspects of x-ray lithography and set a time frame, the other to focus on sources.

  13. BioCARS: a synchrotron resource for time-resolved X-ray science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, T; Anderson, S; Brewer, H; Chen, Y S; Cho, H S; Dashdorj, N; Henning, R W; Kosheleva, I; Macha, G; Meron, M; Pahl, R; Ren, Z; Ruan, S; Schotte, F; Srajer, V; Viccaro, P J; Westferro, F; Anfinrud, P; Moffat, K

    2011-07-01

    BioCARS, a NIH-supported national user facility for macromolecular time-resolved X-ray crystallography at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), has recently completed commissioning of an upgraded undulator-based beamline optimized for single-shot laser-pump X-ray-probe measurements with time resolution as short as 100 ps. The source consists of two in-line undulators with periods of 23 and 27 mm that together provide high-flux pink-beam capability at 12 keV as well as first-harmonic coverage from 6.8 to 19 keV. A high-heat-load chopper reduces the average power load on downstream components, thereby preserving the surface figure of a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system capable of focusing the X-ray beam to a spot size of 90 µm horizontal by 20 µm vertical. A high-speed chopper isolates single X-ray pulses at 1 kHz in both hybrid and 24-bunch modes of the APS storage ring. In hybrid mode each isolated X-ray pulse delivers up to ~4 × 10(10) photons to the sample, thereby achieving a time-averaged flux approaching that of fourth-generation X-FEL sources. A new high-power picosecond laser system delivers pulses tunable over the wavelength range 450-2000 nm. These pulses are synchronized to the storage-ring RF clock with long-term stability better than 10 ps RMS. Monochromatic experimental capability with Biosafety Level 3 certification has been retained.

  14. The external and internal structures of Amphizoa davidi Lucas (Coleoptera, Amphizoidae), using X-ray phase contrast microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dee; Zhang, Kai; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Peiping; Xu, Caifeng; Wu, Ziyu; Zhou, Hongzhang

    2015-05-27

    The Chinese endemic water beetle Amphizoa davidi Lucas, is a rare and endangered species belonging to the monotypic family Amphizoidae (Coleoptera: Adephaga). A study of the external and internal structures of A. davidi is here presented, by using X-ray phase contrast tomography and light microscopy. Morphological details and three dimensional (3D) structures of this species are provided: skeletons, muscles, reproductive organs of male and female, nervous system, alimentary canal and pygidial gland. The reproductive organs of females are compared in two different developmental phases (ages): before copulation without mature ovaries and after copulation with mature ovaries. Such detailed 3D tomographic study based on micro-CT technology may promote our understanding of the detailed morphology in Amphizoidae and Coleoptera in general.

  15. Microbeam X-ray fluorescence mapping of Cu and Fe in human prostatic carcinoma cell lines using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, K.M.J.; Leitao, R.G.; Oliveira-Barros, E.G.; Oliveira, M.A.; Canellas, C.G.L.; Anjos, M.J.; Nasciutti, L.E.; Lopes, R.T.; Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a worldwide public health problem and prostate cancer continues to be one of the most common fatal cancers in men. Copper plays an important role in the aetiology and growth of tumours however, whether intratumoral copper is actually elevated in prostate cancer patients has not been established. Iron, an important trace element, plays a vital function in oxygen metabolism, oxygen uptake, and electron transport in mitochondria, energy metabolism, muscle function, and hematopoiesis. The X-ray microfluorescence technique (μXRF) is a rapid and non-destructive method of elemental analysis that provides useful elemental information about samples without causing damage or requiring extra sample preparations. This study investigated the behavior of cells in spheroids of human prostate cells, tumour cell line (DU145) and normal cell line (RWPE-1), after supplementation with zinc chloride by 24 hours using synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence (μSRXRF). The measurements were performed with a standard geometry of 45 deg of incidence, excited by a white beam using a pixel of 25 μm and a time of 300 ms/pixel at the XRF beamline at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results by SRμXRF showed non-uniform Cu and Fe distributions in all the spheroids analyzed. (author)

  16. In situ X-ray diffraction of surface oxide on type 430 stainless steel in breakaway condition using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Isao, E-mail: isaos@mmm.muroran-it.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran, Hokkaido 050-8585 (Japan); Sugiyama, Yusuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran, Hokkaido 050-8585 (Japan); Hayashi, Shigenari; Yamauchi, Akira [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 006-8628 (Japan); Doi, Takashi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka [Corporate R and D Laboratories, Sumitomo Metals Industries Ltd., 1-8 Fuso-cho, Amagasaki, Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); Kyo, Shoji [Power Engineering R and D Centre, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., 3-11-20 Wakaoji, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0794 (Japan); Suzuki, Shigeru [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Sato, Masugu [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fujimoto, Shinji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Breakaway studied with Synchrotron radiation X-ray. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local equilibria between phases established during high-temperature oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical failure model well describes the breakaway. - Abstract: Changes in the crystal structure of type 430 stainless steel and the oxides on its surface were studied in situ at 1373 K using a high-intensity synchrotron X-ray source provided by SPring-8 in Japan. The surface of the steel was initially covered with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which was then converted to FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and finally Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed on it. These results indicated that the reason for the breakaway oxidation in type 430 stainless steel is Cr depletion beneath Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer and the subsequent ionisation of Fe, not the simple mechanical failure of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  17. A compressed sensing based reconstruction algorithm for synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melli, Seyed Ali, E-mail: sem649@mail.usask.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wahid, Khan A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Babyn, Paul [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Montgomery, James [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Snead, Elisabeth [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); El-Gayed, Ali [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Pettitt, Murray; Wolkowski, Bailey [College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wesolowski, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2016-01-11

    Synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is increasingly used in pre-clinical imaging. However, it typically requires a large number of projections, and subsequently a large radiation dose, to produce high quality images. To improve the applicability of this imaging technique, reconstruction algorithms that can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time without degrading image quality are needed. The proposed research focused on using a novel combination of Douglas–Rachford splitting and randomized Kaczmarz algorithms to solve large-scale total variation based optimization in a compressed sensing framework to reconstruct 2D images from a reduced number of projections. Visual assessment and quantitative performance evaluations of a synthetic abdomen phantom and real reconstructed image of an ex-vivo slice of canine prostate tissue demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive in reconstruction process compared with other well-known algorithms. An additional potential benefit of reducing the number of projections would be reduction of time for motion artifact to occur if the sample moves during image acquisition. Use of this reconstruction algorithm to reduce the required number of projections in synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is an effective form of dose reduction that may pave the way for imaging of in-vivo samples.

  18. Increased cell survival and cytogenetic integrity by spatial dose redistribution at a compact synchrotron X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilicic, Katarina; Dierolf, Martin; Günther, Benedikt; Walsh, Dietrich W. M.; Schmid, Ernst; Eggl, Elena; Achterhold, Klaus; Gleich, Bernhard; Combs, Stephanie E.; Molls, Michael; Schmid, Thomas E.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray microbeam radiotherapy can potentially widen the therapeutic window due to a geometrical redistribution of the dose. However, high requirements on photon flux, beam collimation, and system stability restrict its application mainly to large-scale, cost-intensive synchrotron facilities. With a unique laser-based Compact Light Source using inverse Compton scattering, we investigated the translation of this promising radiotherapy technique to a machine of future clinical relevance. We performed in vitro colony-forming assays and chromosome aberration tests in normal tissue cells after microbeam irradiation compared to homogeneous irradiation at the same mean dose using 25 keV X-rays. The microplanar pattern was achieved with a tungsten slit array of 50 μm slit size and a spacing of 350 μm. Applying microbeams significantly increased cell survival for a mean dose above 2 Gy, which indicates fewer normal tissue complications. The observation of significantly less chromosome aberrations suggests a lower risk of second cancer development. Our findings provide valuable insight into the mechanisms of microbeam radiotherapy and prove its applicability at a compact synchrotron, which contributes to its future clinical translation. PMID:29049300

  19. Ice Recrystallization in a Solution of a Cryoprotector and Its Inhibition by a Protein: Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Boris; Fisyuk, Alexander; Fitch, Andy; Watier, Yves; Kostyuchenko, Anastasia; Varshney, Dushyant; Sztucki, Michael; Boldyreva, Elena; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2016-07-01

    Ice formation and recrystallization is a key phenomenon in freezing and freeze-drying of pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals. In this investigation, high-resolution synchrotr