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Sample records for symptomatic aortic stenosis

  1. Postoperative Reverse Remodeling and Symptomatic Improvement in Normal-Flow Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis After Aortic Valve Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob E; Christensen, Nicolaj L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe aortic stenosis (AS) most often presents with reduced aortic valve area (benefit of aortic valve...... replacement (AVR) among NFLG patients is controversial. We compared the impact of NFLG condition on preoperative left ventricular (LV) remodeling and myocardial fibrosis and postoperative remodeling and symptomatic benefit. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-seven consecutive patients with reduced aortic valve area...... and normal stroke volume index undergoing AVR underwent echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, a 6-minute walk test, and measurement of natriuretic peptides before and 1 year after AVR. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed from magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were stratified as NFLG or normal...

  2. Postoperative Reverse Remodeling and Symptomatic Improvement in Normal-Flow Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis After Aortic Valve Replacement.

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    Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob E; Christensen, Nicolaj L; Irmukhadenov, Akhmadjon; Rasmussen, Lars M; Pecini, Redi; Øvrehus, Kristian A; Søndergård, Eva V; Marcussen, Niels; Dahl, Jordi S

    2017-12-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) most often presents with reduced aortic valve area (gradient (≥40 mm Hg; normal-flow high-gradient AS) or low mean gradient (normal-flow low-gradient [NFLG] AS). The benefit of aortic valve replacement (AVR) among NFLG patients is controversial. We compared the impact of NFLG condition on preoperative left ventricular (LV) remodeling and myocardial fibrosis and postoperative remodeling and symptomatic benefit. Eighty-seven consecutive patients with reduced aortic valve area and normal stroke volume index undergoing AVR underwent echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, a 6-minute walk test, and measurement of natriuretic peptides before and 1 year after AVR. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed from magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were stratified as NFLG or normal-flow high-gradient. In total, 33 patients (38%) had NFLG. Before AVR, they were characterized by similar symptom burden but less severe AS measured by aortic valve area index (0.50±0.09 versus 0.40±0.08 cm 2 /m 2 ; P gradient condition independently predicted change in LV mass index. Patients with NFLG had less severe AS and LV remodeling than patients with normal-flow high-gradient. Furthermore, NFLG patients experienced less reverse remodeling but the same symptomatic benefit. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02316587. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Transesophageal echocardiography for cardiac thromboembolic risk assessment in patients with severe, symptomatic aortic valve stenosis referred for potential transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

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    Lenders, Guy D; Paelinck, Bernard P; Wouters, Kristien; Claeys, Marc J; Rodrigus, Inez E; Van Herck, Paul L; Vrints, Christiaan J; Bosmans, Johan M

    2013-05-15

    Stroke is a devastating complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and might partially be related to cardiac embolization. The aim of this single-center prospective study was to determine the incidence of intracardiac thrombi and left atrial spontaneous echo contrast (SEC), both known predictors of cardiac embolic stroke, in patients referred for potential TAVI. One hundred four consecutive patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis and at high or very high risk for surgery were included and underwent transesophageal echocardiography. In 11 patients (10.6%), intracardiac thrombi were detected, and 25 patients (24%) showed dense grade 2 SEC. Atrial fibrillation (p risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis referred for potential TAVI is high and can accurately be detected using transesophageal echocardiography. Systematic thromboembolic evaluation using transesophageal echocardiography is thus recommended in patients referred for TAVI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prognostic Usefulness of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing for Managing Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis

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    Le, Van D; Jensen, Gunnar V; Kjøller-Hansen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    The approach to managing asymptomatic or questionably symptomatic patients for aortic stenosis is difficult. We aimed to determine whether cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is prognostically useful in such patients. Patients judged asymptomatic or questionably symptomatic for aortic stenosis...... with aortic valve area index managed conservatively provided they had either (group 1) normal peak oxygen consumption and peak oxygen pulse (>83% and >95% of the predicted values, respectively) or (group 2) subnormal peak oxygen consumption or peak...... oxygen pulse but with CPET data pointing to pathologies other than hemodynamic compromise from aortic stenosis. Increase in systolic blood pressure events included cardiac death or hospitalization with heart...

  5. Refractory pulmonary edema secondary to severe aortic valvular stenosis - aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Salazar; Hanna, Franklin; Capasso, Aminta

    2009-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a progressive disease; when it is severe and symptomatic has a bleak prognosis that affects adversely the patient survival. In these cases, the treatment of choice is valve replacement surgery that under certain circumstances can bear a huge risk that forces the physician to consider less aggressive management alternatives to solve the problem. The case of a 65 years old male with severe aortic valve stenosis is reported. He developed pulmonary edema refractory to medical treatment that was solved by aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery.

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: emerging role in poor left ventricular function severe aortic stenosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. John Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI has become an established treatment option for high risk elderly patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. Its role in less high risk patients is being evaluated in clinical trials. Patients with severely impaired left ventricular function may be another group who may benefit from this emerging percutaneous treatment option.

  7. The left ventricle in aortic stenosis--imaging assessment and clinical implications.

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    Călin, Andreea; Roşca, Monica; Beladan, Carmen Cristiana; Enache, Roxana; Mateescu, Anca Doina; Ginghină, Carmen; Popescu, Bogdan Alexandru

    2015-04-29

    Aortic stenosis has an increasing prevalence in the context of aging population. In these patients non-invasive imaging allows not only the grading of valve stenosis severity, but also the assessment of left ventricular function. These two goals play a key role in clinical decision-making. Although left ventricular ejection fraction is currently the only left ventricular function parameter that guides intervention, current imaging techniques are able to detect early changes in LV structure and function even in asymptomatic patients with significant aortic stenosis and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, new imaging parameters emerged as predictors of disease progression in patients with aortic stenosis. Although proper standardization and confirmatory data from large prospective studies are needed, these novel parameters have the potential of becoming useful tools in guiding intervention in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis and stratify risk in symptomatic patients undergoing aortic valve replacement.This review focuses on the mechanisms of transition from compensatory left ventricular hypertrophy to left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure in aortic stenosis and the role of non-invasive imaging assessment of the left ventricular geometry and function in these patients.

  8. Global Strain in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

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    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2012-01-01

    Score, history with ischemic heart disease and ejection fraction. CONCLUSIONS: -In patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis undergoing AVR reduced GLS provides important prognostic information beyond standard risk factors. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrial.gov. Unique identifier......BACKGROUND: -Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) is often reduced in aortic stenosis despite normal ejection fraction. The importance of reduced preoperative GLS on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: -A total of 125 patients with severe...... and mortality. In a stepwise cox model with forward selection GLS was the sole independent predictor HR=1.13 (95% confidence interval 1.02-1.25), p=0.04. Comparing the overall log likelihood χ(2) of the predictive power of the multivariable model containing GLS was statistically superior to models based on Euro...

  9. Prognostic implications of left ventricular asymmetry in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis

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    Sigvardsen, Per Ejlstrup; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Carstensen, Helle Gervig

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Left ventricular (LV) regional hypertrophy in the form of LV asymmetry is a common finding in patients with aortic valve stenosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that LV asymmetry predicts future symptomatic status and indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patie......Aims: Left ventricular (LV) regional hypertrophy in the form of LV asymmetry is a common finding in patients with aortic valve stenosis. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that LV asymmetry predicts future symptomatic status and indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR...... occurred in 46 patients (40%). Patients with LV asymmetry had more than 3 times the risk of AVR (hazard ratio: 3.16; 95% CI: 1.77-5.66; P future need of AVR (hazard ratio: 3.10; 95......% CI: 1.44-6.65; P = 0.004), independent of LV geometry, jet velocity, valvular calcification, and pro-BNP. Conclusions: LV asymmetry is an independent predictor of future need for AVR in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis. It has incremental prognostic value to LV geometry and may...

  10. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch.

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    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Bieliauskas, Gintautas; Chow, Danny H F; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has evolved from a novel technology to an established therapy for high/intermediate-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Although TAVR is used to treat bicuspid severe AS, the large randomized trials typically excluded bicuspid AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a "gothic aortic arch"; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled a sharply angulated aortic arch. This life-threatening complication was successfully treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Association Between Gout and Aortic Stenosis.

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    Chang, Kevin; Yokose, Chio; Tenner, Craig; Oh, Cheongeun; Donnino, Robert; Choy-Shan, Alana; Pike, Virginia C; Shah, Binita D; Lorin, Jeffrey D; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Sedlis, Steven P; Pillinger, Michael H

    2017-02-01

    An independent association between gout and coronary artery disease is well established. The relationship between gout and valvular heart disease, however, is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the association between gout and aortic stenosis. We performed a retrospective case-control study. Aortic stenosis cases were identified through a review of outpatient transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) reports. Age-matched controls were randomly selected from patients who had undergone TTE and did not have aortic stenosis. Charts were reviewed to identify diagnoses of gout and the earliest dates of gout and aortic stenosis diagnosis. Among 1085 patients who underwent TTE, 112 aortic stenosis cases were identified. Cases and nonaortic stenosis controls (n = 224) were similar in age and cardiovascular comorbidities. A history of gout was present in 21.4% (n = 24) of aortic stenosis subjects compared with 12.5% (n = 28) of controls (unadjusted odds ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.48, P = .038). Multivariate analysis retained significance only for gout (adjusted odds ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.00-4.32, P = .049). Among subjects with aortic stenosis and gout, gout diagnosis preceded aortic stenosis diagnosis by 5.8 ± 1.6 years. The age at onset of aortic stenosis was similar among patients with and without gout (78.7 ± 1.8 vs 75.8 ± 1.0 years old, P = .16). Aortic stenosis patients had a markedly higher prevalence of precedent gout than age-matched controls. Whether gout is a marker of, or a risk factor for, the development of aortic stenosis remains uncertain. Studies investigating the potential role of gout in the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis are warranted and could have therapeutic implications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Statins for progression of aortic valve stenosis and the best evidence for making decisions in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Thiago

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Western world, calcified aortic valve stenosis is the most common form of valvular heart disease, affecting up to 3% of adults over the age of 75 years. It is a gradually progressive disease, characterized by a long asymptomatic phase that may last for several decades, followed by a short symptomatic phase associated with severe restriction of the valve orifice. Investigations on treatments for aortic valve stenosis are still in progress. Thus, it is believed that calcification of aortic valve stenosis is similar to the process of atherosclerosis that occurs in coronary artery disease. Recent studies have suggested that cholesterol lowering through the use of statins may have a salutary effect on the progression of aortic valve stenosis

  13. Comparison of early clinical outcomes following transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement versus optimal medical therapy in patients older than 80 years with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

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    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki; Ko, Young-Guk; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jung-Sun; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Choi, Donghoon; Shim, Chi Young; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Shim, Jae-Kwang; Kwak, Young-Lan; Lee, Sak; Chang, Byung-Chul; Jang, Yangsoo

    2013-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an attractive therapeutic strategy for severe aortic stenosis (AS) in elderly patients due to its minimally-invasive nature. Therefore, early results of its clinical outcomes in elderly Korean patients were evaluated. We compared early clinical outcomes of TAVI, surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), and optimal medical therapy (OMT) in patients aged≥80 years with symptomatic severe AS. Treatment groups were allocated as follows: TAVI (n=10), SAVR (n=14), and OMT (n=42). Baseline clinical characteristics including predicted operative mortality were similar among the three groups. However, patients with New York Heart Association functional class III or IV symptoms and smaller aortic valve area were treated with TAVI or SAVR rather than OMT. In-hospital combined safety endpoints (all-cause mortality, major stroke, peri-procedural myocardial infarction, life-threatening bleeding, major vascular complication, and acute kidney injury) after TAVI or SAVR were significantly lower in the TAVI group than in the SAVR group (10.0% vs. 71.4%, respectively, p=0.005), along with an acceptable rate of symptom improvement and device success. During the follow-up period, the TAVI group showed the lowest rate of 3-month major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, a composite of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, major stroke, and re-hospitalization (TAVI 0.0% vs. SAVR 50.0% vs. OMT 42.9%, p=0.017). Treatment with TAVI was associated with lower event rates compared to SAVR or OMT. Therefore, TAVI may be considered as the first therapeutic strategy in selected patients aged≥80 years with symptomatic severe AS.

  14. Clinical efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis in high-risk patients: the PREVAIL JAPAN trial.

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    Sawa, Yoshiki; Takayama, Morimasa; Mitsudo, Kazuaki; Nanto, Shinsuke; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Kuratani, Toru; Tobaru, Tetsuya; Goto, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is suggested to be less invasive and/or equally effective in comparison to conventional aortic valve replacement for high-risk symptomatic aortic stenosis patients. We herein report the initial results of a pivotal clinical trial of TAVR in Japan (the PREVAIL JAPAN). Sixty-four aortic stenosis patients (mean age 84.3 ± 6.1 years) not suitable for surgery were enrolled at three centers in Japan, with a primary composite endpoint of the 6-month post-procedure improvements in the aortic valve area and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification. A transfemoral approach was used in 37 patients and a transapical approach was used in 27. The device success rate was 91.9 %. After 30 days and 6 months, the rates of mortality from any cause were 8.1 and 11.3 %, respectively. At 6 months, symptomatic stroke was found in 3.1 % of the patients, and silent infarction in 7.8 %. The aortic valve area and mean pressure gradient were significantly improved over time with both approaches (p < 0.001). At 6 months, the NYHA functional classification based on a conventional physician's assessment was improved in 87.9 % of the patients. We found results that were equivalent to those in other major TAVR trials, such as an acceptable 30-day survival (91.9 %), suggesting that balloon-expandable TAVR is effective for small Japanese AS patients classified as high-risk or inoperable.

  15. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Patients with Asymptomatic or Equivocal Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis: Feasibility, Reproducibility, Safety and Information Obtained on Exercise Physiology.

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    van Le, Douet; Jensen, Gunnar Vagn Hagemann; Carstensen, Steen; Kjøller-Hansen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, reproducibility, safety and information obtained on exercise physiology from cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) in patients with aortic stenosis. Patients with an aortic valve area (AVA) exercise, lower peak heart rate and FEV1, and higher VE/VCO2, but not by AVA index. Equivocal symptomatic status and a low gradient but high valvulo-arterial impedance were associated with a lower pVO2, but not with an inability to increase stroke volume. In total, 18 patients were referred for valve replacement. At 1 year, no cardiovascular deaths had occurred. CPX was feasible and reproducible and provided comprehensive data on exercise physiology. A CPX-guided treatment strategy was safe up to 1 year. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Percutaneous implantation of the first repositionable aortic valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis.

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    Buellesfeld, Lutz; Gerckens, Ulrich; Grube, Eberhard

    2008-04-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a new less-invasive alternative for high-risk surgical candidates with aortic stenosis. However, the clinical experience is still limited, and the currently available 'first-generation devices' revealed technical shortcomings, such as lack of repositionability and presence of paravalvular leakages. We report the first-in-man experience with the new self-expanding Lotus Valve prosthesis composed of a nitinol frame with implemented bovine pericardial leaflets which is designed to address these issues, being repositionable and covered by a flexible membrane to seal paravalvular gaps. We implanted this prosthesis in a 93-year old patient presenting with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (valve area: 0.6 cm(2)). Surgical valve replacement had been declined due to comorbidities. We used a retrograde approach for insertion of the 21-French Lotus catheter loaded with the valve prosthesis via surgical cut-down to the external iliac artery. Positioning of the valve was guided by transesophageal echo and supra-aortic angiograms. The prosthesis was successfully inserted and deployed within the calcified native valve. Echocardiography immediately after device deployment showed a significant reduction of the transaortic mean pressure gradient (32 to 9 mmHg; final valve area 1.7 cm(2)) without evidence of residual aortic regurgitation. The postprocedural clinical status improved from NYHA-IV to NYHA-II. These results remained unchanged up to the 3 month follow-up. Successful percutaneous aortic valve replacement can be performed using the new self-expanding and repositionable Lotus valve for treatment of high-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. Further studies are mandatory to assess device safety and efficacy in larger patient populations. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Association Between Left Atrial Dilatation and Invasive Hemodynamics at Rest and During Exercise in Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

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    Christensen, Nicolaj Lyhne; Dahl, Jordi Sanchez; Carter-Storch, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transition from an asymptomatic to symptomatic state in severe aortic stenosis is often difficult to assess. Identification of a morphological sign of increased hemodynamic load may be important in asymptomatic aortic stenosis to identify patients at risk. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty...... was similar between groups (0.81±0.15 versus 0.84±0.18 cm(2); P=0.58). PCWP was higher at rest and during exercise in patients with LA volume index ≥35 mL/m(2) (Prest, PCWP was

  18. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of aortic stenosis.

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    Yetkin, Ertan; Waltenberger, Johannes

    2009-06-12

    Calcific aortic stenosis is the most common cause of aortic valve replacement in developed countries, and this condition increases in prevalence with advancing age. The fibrotic thickening and calcification are common eventual endpoint in both non-rheumatic calcific and rheumatic aortic stenoses. New observations in human aortic valves support the hypothesis that degenerative valvular aortic stenosis is the result of active bone formation in the aortic valve, which may be mediated through a process of osteoblast-like differentiation in these tissues. Additionally histopathologic evidence suggests that early lesions in aortic valves are not just a disease process secondary to aging, but an active cellular process that follows the classical "response to injury hypothesis" similar to the situation in atherosclerosis. Although there are similarities with the risk factor and as well as with the process of atherogenesis, not all the patients with coronary artery disease or atherosclerosis have calcific aortic stenosis. This review mainly focuses on the potential vascular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis. Namely extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, inflammation, and eventually osteoblast-like differentiation resulting in bone formation have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis. Several mediators related to underlying mechanisms, including growth factors especially transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factors, angiogenesis, cathepsin enzymes, adhesion molecules, bone regulatory proteins and matrix metalloproteinases have been demonstrated, however the target to be attacked is not defined yet.

  19. Statins for aortic valve stenosis

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    Luciana Thiago

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity, freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. MAIN RESULTS: We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants with placebo (1175 participants. We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2, valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2

  20. Statins for aortic valve stenosis.

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    Thiago, Luciana; Tsuji, Selma Rumiko; Nyong, Jonathan; Puga, Maria Eduarda Dos Santos; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Macedo, Cristiane Rufino; Valente, Orsine; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of valvular heart disease in the USA and Europe. Aortic valve stenosis is considered similar to atherosclerotic disease. Some studies have evaluated statins for aortic valve stenosis. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of statins in aortic valve stenosis. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS - IBECS, Web of Science and CINAHL Plus. These databases were searched from their inception to 24 November 2015. We also searched trials in registers for ongoing trials. We used no language restrictions.Selection criteria: Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) comparing statins alone or in association with other systemic drugs to reduce cholesterol levels versus placebo or usual care. Data collection and analysis: Primary outcomes were severity of aortic valve stenosis (evaluated by echocardiographic criteria: mean pressure gradient, valve area and aortic jet velocity), freedom from valve replacement and death from cardiovascular cause. Secondary outcomes were hospitalization for any reason, overall mortality, adverse events and patient quality of life.Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The GRADE methodology was employed to assess the quality of result findings and the GRADE profiler (GRADEPRO) was used to import data from Review Manager 5.3 to create a 'Summary of findings' table. We included four RCTs with 2360 participants comparing statins (1185 participants) with placebo (1175 participants). We found low-quality evidence for our primary outcome of severity of aortic valve stenosis, evaluated by mean pressure gradient (mean difference (MD) -0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.88 to 0.80; participants = 1935; studies = 2), valve area (MD -0.07, 95% CI -0.28 to 0.14; participants = 127; studies = 2), and aortic jet velocity (MD -0.06, 95% CI -0.26 to 0

  1. Aortic stenosis

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    ... Images Aortic stenosis Heart valves References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  2. Paradoxical aortic stenosis: A systematic review.

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    Cavaca, Rita; Teixeira, Rogério; Vieira, Maria João; Gonçalves, Lino

    2017-04-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a complex systemic valvular and vascular disease with a high prevalence in developed countries. The new entity "paradoxical low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis" refers to cases in which patients have severe AS based on assessment of aortic valve area (AVA) (≤1 cm 2 ) or indexed AVA (≤0.6 cm 2 /m 2 ), but paradoxically have a low mean transvalvular gradient (<40 mmHg) and a low stroke volume index (≤35 ml/m 2 ), despite preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (≥50%). A search was carried out in the PubMed database on paradoxical AS for the period 2007-2014. A total of 57 articles were included for this review. The prevalence of paradoxical AS ranged from 3% to 35% of the population with severe degenerative AS. It was more frequent in females and in older patients. Paradoxical AS was associated with characteristic left ventricular remodeling as well as an increase in systemic arterial stiffness. It was noted that there may be errors and inaccuracies in the calculation of AVA by the continuity equation, which could erroneously suggest the paradoxical phenotype. There are new diagnostic methods to facilitate the study of AS, such as aortic valve calcium score, valvuloarterial impedance and the longitudinal mechanics of the left ventricle. With regard to its natural history, it is not clear whether paradoxical AS corresponds to an advance stage of the disease or if paradoxical AS patients have a distinct phenotype with specific characteristics. Valve replacement, either surgical or percutaneous, may be indicated in patients with severe and symptomatic paradoxical AS. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. The Effects of Fetuin-A Levels on Aortic Stenosis

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    Ahmet Tutuncu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to investigate the relation between fetuin-A and calcific aortic stenosis in non diabetic patients whose renal function were normal. Material and Method: 26 patients followed for aortic stenosis by our cardiology clinic for outpatients and 25 voluntary healthy subjects were included in the study. The fetuin%u2013A levels were measured from the venous blood samples of the study population. All patients underwent transthorasic echocardiography, the aortic valvular area and left ventricular parameters of the patients were measured. Results: The average age of the patients in degenerative aortic stenosis group was significantly higher than the control group. The parameters related to aortic valve were naturally higher in patients with dejenerative aortic valve. There was no siginificant difference between two groups about fetuin-A levels. Further more there was no significant relation between fetuin-a levels and aortic stenosis severity. Discussion: In conclusion fetuin-A is a multifunctional glycoprotein that plays important role in systemic calcification inhibition and valvular calcification. Finally aortic stenosis is an active process and larger studies that investigate the relation between fetuin-a and the progression and prognosis of aortic stenosis are needed.

  4. Aortic stenosis: From diagnosis to optimal treatment

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    Tavčiovski Dragan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis is the most frequent valvular heart disease. Aortic sclerosis is the first characteristic lesion of the cusps, which is considered today as the process similar to atherosclerosis. Progression of the disease is an active process leading to forming of bone matrix and heavily calcified stiff cusps by inflammatory cells and osteopontin. It is a chronic, progressive disease which can remain asymptomatic for a long time even in the presence of severe aortic stenosis. Proper physical examination remains an essential diagnostic tool in aortic stenosis. Recognition of characteristic systolic murmur draws attention and guides further diagnosis in the right direction. Doppler echocardiography is an ideal tool to confirm diagnosis. It is well known that exercise tests help in stratification risk of asymptomatic aortic stenosis. Serial measurements of brain natriuretic peptide during a follow-up period may help to identify the optimal time for surgery. Heart catheterization is mostly restricted to preoperative evaluation of coronary arteries rather than to evaluation of the valve lesion itself. Currently, there is no ideal medical treatment for slowing down the disease progression. The first results about the effect of ACE inhibitors and statins in aortic sclerosis and stenosis are encouraging, but there is still not enough evidence. Onset symptoms based on current ACC/AHA/ESC recommendations are I class indication for aortic valve replacement. Aortic valve can be replaced with a biological or prosthetic valve. There is a possibility of percutaneous aortic valve implantation and transapical operation for patients that are contraindicated for standard cardiac surgery.

  5. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are......To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are...

  6. Severe aortic stenosis: diagnosis, treatment and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.A. van Geldorp (Martijn)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDegenerative aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in developed countries. The prevalence of severe aortic stenosis increases with age from 1% in people below 65 years of age to nearly 6% in people over the age of 85. Since the population life expectancy continues to

  7. Aortic valve bypass

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    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). ...

  8. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis caused by alkaptonuria.

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    Hiroyoshi, Junko; Saito, Aya; Panthee, Nirmal; Imai, Yasushi; Kawashima, Dai; Motomura, Noboru; Ono, Minoru

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of aortic stenosis associated with ochronosis in a 70-year-old man who underwent biologic aortic valve replacement. Intraoperative findings included ochronosis of a severely calcified pigmented aortic valve along with pigmentation of the intima of the aorta. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Lower-Risk Patients With Aortic Stenosis: Is It Justified to Be the Preferred Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghani, Mohammad; Serruys, Patrick W

    2016-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation underwent progressive improvements until it became the default therapy for inoperable patients, and a recommended therapy in high-risk operable patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. In the lower-risk patient strata, a currently costly therapy that still has important complications with questionable durability is competing with the established effective and still-improving surgical replacement. This report tries to weigh the clinical evidence, the recent technical improvements, the durability, and the cost-effectiveness claims supporting the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve implantation in intermediate-low risk patients. The importance of appropriate patients' risk stratification and a more comprehensive approach to estimate that risk are also emphasized in the present report. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Successful resuscitation from two cardiac arrests in a female patient with critical aortic stenosis, severe mitral regurgitation and coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijušković Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The incidence of sudden cardiac death in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis is up to 34% and resuscitation is described as highly unsuccessful. Case report. A 72-year-old female patient with severe aortic stenosis combined with severe mitral regurgitation and three-vessel coronary artery disease was successfully resuscitated following two in-hospital cardiac arrests. The first cardiac arrest occurred immediately after intraarterial injection of low osmolar iodinated agent during coronary angiography. Angiography revealed 90% occlusion of the proximal left main coronary artery and circumflex branch. The second arrest followed induction of anesthesia. Following successful open-chest resuscitation, aortic valve replacement, mitral valvuloplasty and three-vessel aortocoronary bypass were performed. Postoperative pericardial tamponade required surgical revision. The patient recovered completely. Conclusion. Decision to start resuscitation may be justified in selected patients with critical aortic stenosis, even though cardiopulmonary resuscitation in such cases is generally considered futile.

  11. Alkaptonuria-associated aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Zoe S Y; Goldstein, Jacob; Smith, Julian A

    2013-07-01

    Alkaptonuria is an autosomal recessive disorder of tyrosine metabolism, which results in accumulation of unmetabolized homogentisic acid and its oxidized product in various tissues, including the heart. Cardiovascular involvement is a rare but serious complication of the disease. We present two patients who have undergone successful aortic valve replacement for alkaptonuria-associated aortic stenosis along with a review of the literature. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. New classification of geometric ventricular patterns in severe aortic stenosis: Could it be clinically useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nora, Concetta; Cervesato, Eugenio; Cosei, Iulian; Ravasel, Andreea; Popescu, Bogdan A; Zito, Concetta; Carerj, Scipione; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Popescu, Andreea C

    2018-04-16

    In severe aortic stenosis, different left ventricle (LV) remodeling patterns as a response to pressure overload have distinct hemodynamic profiles, cardiac function, and outcomes. The most common classification considers LV relative wall thickness and LV mass index to create 4 different groups. A new classification including also end-diastolic volume index has been recently proposed. To describe the prevalence of the newly identified remodeling patterns in patients with severe aortic stenosis and to evaluate their clinical relevance according to symptoms. We analyzed 286 consecutive patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis. Current guidelines were used for echocardiographic evaluation. Symptoms were defined as the presence of angina, syncope, or NYHA class III-IV. The mean age was 75 ± 9 years, 156 patients (54%) were men, while 158 (55%) were symptomatic. According to the new classification, the most frequent remodeling pattern was concentric hypertrophy (57.3%), followed by mixed (18.9%) and dilated hypertrophy (8.4%). There were no patients with eccentric remodeling; only 4 patients had a normalLV geometry. Symptomatic patients showed significantly more mixed hypertrophy (P < .05), while the difference regarding the prevalence of the other patterns was not statistically significant. When we analyzed the distribution of the classic 4 patterns stratified by the presence of symptoms, however, we did not find a significant difference (P = .157). The new classification had refined the description of different cardiac geometric phenotypes that develop as a response to pressure overload. It might be superior to the classic 4 patterns in terms of association with symptoms. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Retrospective analysis of co-occurrence of congenital aortic stenosis and pulmonary artery stenosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kander, M; Pasławska, U; Staszczyk, M; Cepiel, A; Pasławski, R; Mazur, G; Noszczyk-Nowak, A

    2015-01-01

    The study has focused on the retrospective analysis of cases of coexisting congenital aortic stenosis (AS) and pulmonary artery stenosis (PS) in dogs. The research included 5463 dogs which were referred for cardiological examination (including clinical examination, ECG and echocardiography) between 2004 and 2014. Aortic stenosis and PS stenosis were detected in 31 dogs. This complex defect was the most commonly diagnosed in Boxers - 7 dogs, other breeds were represented by: 4 cross-breed dogs, 2 Bichon Maltais, 3 Miniature Pinschers, 2 Bernese Mountain Dogs, 2 French Bulldogs, and individuals of following breeds: Bichon Frise, Bull Terrier, Czech Wolfdog, German Shepherd, Hairless Chinese Crested Dog, Miniature Schnauzer, Pug, Rottweiler, Samoyed, West Highland White Terrier and Yorkshire Terrier. In all the dogs, the murmurs could be heard, graded from 2 to 5 (on a scale of 1-6). Besides, in 9 cases other congenital defects were diagnosed: patent ductus arteriosus, mitral valve dysplasia, pulmonary or aortic valve regurgitation, tricuspid valve dysplasia, ventricular or atrial septal defect. The majority of the dogs suffered from pulmonary valvular stenosis (1 dog had supravalvular pulmonary artery stenosis) and subvalvular aortic stenosis (2 dogs had valvular aortic stenosis). Conclusions and clinical relevance - co-occurrence of AS and PS is the most common complex congenital heart defect. Boxer breed was predisposed to this complex defect. It was found that coexisting AS and PS is more common in male dogs and the degree of PS and AS was mostly similar.

  14. Diminutive Porcelain Ascending Aorta With Supravalvular Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houmsse, Mustafa; McDavid, Asia; Kilic, Ahmet

    2018-05-01

    This report describes the case of a 49-year-old man with a medical history significant for congenital aortic stenosis. The patient presented with progressive shortness of breath and decreased stamina and was found to have a concentric, diminutive porcelain ascending aorta with diffuse supravalvular aortic stenosis. We describe treatment with an aortic root augmentation and Bentall procedure using hypothermic circulatory arrest. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aortic valve replacement and the stentless Freedom SOLO valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wollersheim, L.W.L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most prevalent valvular heart disease in Europe and North America, and is generally caused by age-related calcification of the aortic valve. For most patients, severe symptomatic aortic stenosis needs effective mechanical relief in the form of valve replacement

  16. The changing course of aortic valve disease in Scotland: temporal trends in hospitalizations and mortality and prognostic importance of aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Colin; Lloyd, Suzanne M; Wang, Yanzhong; Macdonald, Alyson; Ford, Ian

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the contemporary clinical course of aortic valve disease types. We performed a retrospective population-level epidemiological study of hospitalized care in Scotland from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2005 using electronic case identification of hospital admissions and deaths. Time-to-event analyses were performed using Cox Proportional-Hazards models. A total of 19 733 adults with an index hospitalization and a final diagnosis of non-congenital aortic valve disease were identified. Aortic stenosis, aortic insufficiency, mixed aortic valve disease, or unspecified aortic valve disease occurred in 13 220 (67.0%), 2807 (14.2%), 699 (3.5%), and 3007 (15.2%), individuals, respectively. The majority of hospitalizations occurred in elderly persons aged 80 and older. In total, 9981 (50.6%) patients had died by 31 December 2006. When compared with aortic stenosis, the risk of death was less with aortic insufficiency [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 0.79 (0.74, 0.84)] and mixed aortic valve disease [0.83 (0.74, 0.93)]. Female gender, admission year, and hypertension were associated with lower mortality in patients with aortic stenosis. Patients with aortic stenosis had increased risk of death or heart failure (adjusted P valve replacement of whom 73.2% had aortic stenosis, 11.9% aortic valve disease (unspecified),10.0% aortic insufficiency, and 4.9% aortic stenosis with insufficiency. Patients with aortic stenosis with insufficiency had increased likelihood of aortic valve replacement [1.19 (1.02, 1.38)]. Age, female gender, and co-morbidity reduced the likelihood of aortic valve replacement. The incidence of aortic valve stenosis has substantially increased in Scotland in recent years. Aortic stenosis predicts morbidity and mortality when compared with other types of aortic valve disease.

  17. Imaging techniques in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaife RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert A Quaife, Jennifer Dorosz, John C Messenger, Ernesto E Salcedo Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Calcific aortic stenosis is now understood as a complex valvular degenerative process sharing many risk factors with atherosclerosis. Once patients develop symptomatic calcific aortic stenosis, the only effective treatment is aortic valve replacement. In the past decade, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR has been developed as an alternative to surgery to treat severe calcific aortic stenosis. Cardiac imaging plays a pivotal role in the contemporary management of patients with calcific aortic stenosis, and particularly in patients being considered for TAVR, who demand detailed imaging of the aortic valve apparatus. In this review, we highlight the role of cardiac imaging for patient selection, procedural guidance, and evaluation of results of TAVR. Keywords: aortic stenosis, cardiovascular imaging, transcutaneous aortic valve replacement

  18. Atypical initial presentation of Takayasu arteritis as isolated supra-valvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yeon; Kim, Hwan Wook

    2016-01-19

    Among the vascular involvements of Takayasu arteritis, a supra-valvular aortic stenosis has been reported very rarely. We report a case of surgically corrected, supra-valvular aortic stenosis caused by Takayasu arteritis. A 32-year-old female was diagnosed with supra-valvular aortic stenosis by transthoracic echocardiography for the evaluation of cardiac murmur with constitutional symptoms. Under the impression of non-familial sporadic type of supra-valvular aortic stenosis, surgical correction was performed. However, after 1 year from the operation, we could know the cause of her disease through the findings of computed tomographic aortography that Takayasu arteritis was suspected. Takayasu arteritis should be considered in adult female patients presenting supra-valvular aortic stenosis with constitutional symptoms, even if no typical features of vascular involvement.

  19. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Idhrees

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS. On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA. Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  20. Transfemoral Aortic Valve Implantation with the New Edwards Sapien 3 Valve for Treatment of Severe Aortic Stenosis-Impact of Valve Size in a Single Center Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Wöhrle

    Full Text Available The third generation Edwards Sapien 3 (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Irvine, California system was optimized to reduce residual aortic regurgitation and vascular complications.235 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. Transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI were performed without general anesthesia by transfemoral approach. Patients were followed for 30 days. Patients received 23mm (N = 77, 26mm (N = 91 or 29mm (N = 67 valve based on pre-procedural 256 multislice computer tomography. Mean oversizing did not differ between the 3 valves. There was no residual moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Rate of mild aortic regurgitation and regurgitation index did not differ between groups. There was no switch to general anesthesia or conversion to surgery. Rate of major vascular complication was 3.0% with no difference between valve and delivery sheath sizes. Within 30 days rates of all cause mortality (2.6% and stroke (2.1% were low.In patients with severe aortic stenosis transfemoral TAVI with the Edwards Sapien 3 valve without general anesthesia was associated with a high rate of device success, no moderate or severe residual aortic regurgitation, low rates of major vascular complication, mortality and stroke within 30 days with no difference between the 3 valve sizes.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02162069.

  1. Supravalvular aortic stenosis with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD most commonly results from previously undiagnosed congenital, acquired, or hereditary cardiac diseases. Congenital aortic valvular, subvalvular, and supravalvular disease with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an important preventable cause of sudden death. This report documents sudden death presumably due to acute myocardial ischemia in a young male with an undiagnosed supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS due to a rare association of isolation of coronary sinuses of Valsalva. Congenital supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and mitral valvular dysplasia were also present.

  2. Assessing Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Olav W; Sajadieh, Ahmad; Sabbah, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for treating hypertension in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis is scarce. We used data from the SEAS trial (Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis) to assess what blood pressure (BP) would be optimal. METHODS: A total of 1767 patients with asymptomatic aortic...... stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease were analyzed. Outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, and aortic valve replacement. BP was analyzed in Cox models as the cumulative average of serially measured BP and a time-varying covariate.......039). CONCLUSIONS: Optimal BP seems to be systolic BP of 130 to 139 mm Hg and diastolic BP of 70 to 90 mm Hg in these patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no manifest atherosclerotic disease or diabetes mellitus. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT...

  3. Intensive lipid lowering with simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossebo, A.B.; Pedersen, T.R.; Boman, K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperlipidemia has been suggested as a risk factor for stenosis of the aortic valve, but lipid-lowering studies have had conflicting results. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial involving 1873 patients with mild-to-moderate, asymptomatic aortic stenosis. The patients...

  4. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Plaque Characteristics of Patients with Symptomatic Mild Carotid Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Hiroki; Uemura, Juniti; Yagita, Yoshiki; Ogawa, Yukari; Kinoshita, Keita; Hirai, Satoshi; Ishihara, Manabu; Hara, Keijirou; Toi, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Shunji; Nishimura, Hirotake; Uno, Masaaki

    2018-03-20

    Carotid revascularization may be considered for severe stenosis, but its use for symptomatic mild stenosis (<50%) with vulnerable plaque or ulcer remains uncertain. The characteristics of patients with symptomatic mild stenosis who underwent revascularization are reviewed. The subjects of this study were 18 patients with symptomatic mild stenosis (<50%) on angiography from among 175 patients who underwent revascularization in our department. The plaques were evaluated by black-blood magnetic resonance imaging (BB-MRI) and ultrasonography (US) and classified into 2 types: type 1 (n = 15), a lesion with an ulcer or mobile plaque or thrombosis on angiography or US; and type 2 (n = 3), a lesion without any of the above. Fourteen patients underwent carotid endarterectomy (CEA), and 4 patients underwent carotid artery stenting. The stenosis on angiography was 27.2% ± 10.7 (5%-41%), and the area carotid artery stenosis rate on US was 69.8 ± 14.5% (44.5%-97%). The stenosis rate of these 2 methods was not at all correlated. In type 1 plaque that underwent CEA, 10 of 11 patients had vulnerable plaque by histopathology, and 1 patient had thrombus on the plaque by operative findings. In type 2 plaque that underwent CEA, all patients had vulnerable plaque by histopathology. During the follow-up period, none of the patients had restenosis or stroke. The findings of US and BB-MRI in patients with symptomatic mild stenosis (<50%) on angiography are important for determining treatment. If BB-MRI or US shows the findings of vulnerable plaque in mild stenosis, surgical treatment may be considered for these patients. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Percutaneous implantation of self-expandable aortic valve in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: The first experiences in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljković Milan A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Aortic stenosis (AS is the most common valvular heart disease in elderly people, with rather poor prognosis in symptomatic patients. Surgical valve replacement is the therapy of choice, but a significant number of patients cannot undergo surgical procedure. We presented initial experience of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI performed in Catheterization Laboratory of the Clinic for Cardiology, Clinical Center of Serbia. Methods. The procedures were performed in 5 patients (mean age 76 ± 6 years, 2 males, 3 female with severe and symptomatic AS with contraindication to surgery or high surgical risk. The decision to perform TAVI was made by the heart team. Pre-procedure screening included detailed clinical and echocardiographic evaluation, coronary angiography and computed tomography scan. In all the patients we implanted a self-expandable aortic valve (Core Valve, Medtronic, USA. Six months follow-up was available for all the patients. Results. All interventions were successfully performed without significant periprocedural complications. Immediate hemodynamic improvement was obtained in all the patients (peak gradient 94.2 ± 27.6 to 17.6 ± 5.2 mmHg, p < 0.001, mean pressure gradient 52.8 ± 14.5 to 8.0 ± 2.1 mmHg, p < 0.001. None of the patients developed heart block, stroke, vascular complication or significant aortic regurgitation. After 6 months, the survival was 100% with New York Heart Association (NYHA functional improvement in all the patients. Conclusion. This successful initial experience provides a solid basis to treat larger number of patients with symptomatic AS and high surgical risk who are left untreated. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 175 020

  7. Aortic valvuloplasty of calcific aortic stenosis with monofoil and trefoil balloon catheters: practical considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Plante (Sylvain); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); L.C.P. van Veen; C. di Mario (Carlo); C.E. Essed; K.J. Beatt (Kevin); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractIn order to evaluate the relation between balloon design (monofoil, trefoil) and valvular configuration, experimental aortic valvuloplasty was performed in four post-mortem hearts with calcific aortic stenosis of various morphology. The degree of obstruction of the aortic orifice was

  8. Left ventricular hypertrophy in valvular aortic stenosis: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Florian; Sachdev, Esha; Arsanjani, Reza; Siegel, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Valvular aortic stenosis is the second most prevalent adult valve disease in the United States and causes progressive pressure overload, invariably leading to life-threatening complications. Surgical aortic valve replacement and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve replacement effectively relieve the hemodynamic burden and improve the symptoms and survival of affected individuals. However, according to current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease, the indications for aortic valve replacement, including transcatheter aortic valve replacement, are based primarily on the development of clinical symptoms, because their presence indicates a dismal prognosis. Left ventricular hypertrophy develops in a sizeable proportion of patients before the onset of symptoms, and a growing body of literature demonstrates that regression of left ventricular hypertrophy resulting from aortic stenosis is incomplete after aortic valve replacement and associated with adverse early postoperative outcomes and worse long-term outcomes. Thus, reliance on the development of symptoms alone without consideration of structural abnormalities of the myocardium for optimal timing of aortic valve replacement potentially constitutes a missed opportunity to prevent postoperative morbidity and mortality from severe aortic stenosis, especially in the face of the quickly expanding indications of lower-risk transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The purpose of this review is to discuss the mechanisms and clinical implications of left ventricular hypertrophy in severe valvular aortic stenosis, which may eventually move to center stage as an indication for aortic valve replacement in the asymptomatic patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dipyridamole thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography in aortic stenosis: gender differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rask, L.P.; Karp, K.H.; Eriksson, N.P.; Mooe, T.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to establish the gender-specific normal limits of thallium-201 distribution in patients with aortic stenosis and to apply these normal limits in a larger group of patients with aortic stenosis to obtain the sensitivity and specificity for coexisting CAD. A low-dose dipyridamole protocol was used (0.56 mg/kg during 4 min). Thallium was injected 2 min later and tomographic imaging was performed. Following image reconstruction a basal, a mid-ventricular and an apical short-axis slice were selected. The highest activity in each 6 segment was normalised to the maximal activity of each slice. The normal uptake for patients with aortic stenosis was obtained from ten men and ten women with aortic stenosis and a normal coronary angiography. Eighty-nine patients were prospectively evaluated. An area reduction of at least 75% in a coronary artery was considered to be a significant coronary lesion and was found in 57 (64%) patients. With gender-specific curves (-2.5 SD) sensitivity for detecting CAD was 100% and specificity was 75% in men, while sensitivity was 61% and specificity 64% in women. It is concluded that the gender-specific normal distribution of 201 Tl uptake in patients with aortic stenosis, using dipyridamole SPET, yields a high sensitivity and specificity for coronary artery lesions in men but a lower sensitivity and specificity in women with aortic stenosis. (orig./MG)

  10. Neonatal aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Nigel E; Veldtman, Gruschen R; Benson, Lee N

    2005-09-01

    Neonatal aortic stenosis is a complex and heterogeneous condition, defined as left ventricular outflow tract obstruction at valvular level, presenting and often requiring treatment in the first month of life. Initial presentation may be catastrophic, necessitating hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic resuscitation. Subsequent management is focused on maintaining systemic blood flow, either via a univentricular Norwood palliation or a biventricular route, in which the effective aortic valve area is increased by balloon dilation or surgical valvotomy. In infants with aortic annular hypoplasia but adequately sized left ventricle, the Ross-Konno procedure is also an attractive option. Outcomes after biventricular management have improved in recent years as a consequence of better patient selection, perioperative management and advances in catheter technology. Exciting new developments are likely to significantly modify the natural history of this disorder, including fetal intervention for the salvage of the hypoplastic left ventricle; 3D echocardiography providing better definition of valve morphology and aiding patient selection for a surgical or catheter-based intervention; and new transcutaneous approaches, such as duel beam echo, to perforate the valve.

  11. Five-year clinical and economic outcomes among patients with medically managed severe aortic stenosis: results from a Medicare claims analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Mary Ann; Arnold, Suzanne V; Duhay, Francis G; Thompson, Ann K; Keyes, Michelle J; Svensson, Lars G; Bonow, Robert O; Stockwell, Benjamin T; Cohen, David J

    2012-09-01

    Patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis, who do not undergo valve replacement surgery have a poor long-term prognosis. Limited data exist on the medical resource utilization and costs during the final stages of the disease. We used data from the 2003 Medicare 5% standard analytic files to identify patients with aortic stenosis and a recent hospitalization for heart failure, who did not undergo valve replacement surgery within the ensuing 2 calendar quarters. These patients (n=2150) were considered to have medically managed severe aortic stenosis and were tracked over 5 years to measure clinical outcomes, medical resource use, and costs (from the perspective of the Medicare Program). The mean age of the cohort was 82 years, 64% were female, and the estimated logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) (a measure of predicted mortality with cardiac surgery) was 17%. During 5 years of follow-up, overall mortality was 88.4% with a mean survival duration of 1.8 years. During this time period, patients experienced an average of 4.4 hospital admissions, 52% were admitted to skilled nursing care, and 28% were admitted to hospice care. The total 5-year costs were $63 844 per patient, whereas mean annual follow-up costs (excluding the index quarter) per year alive were $29 278. Elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing medical management have limited long-term survival and incur substantial costs to the Medicare Program. These results have important implications for policy makers interested in better understanding the cost-effectiveness of emerging treatment options such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

  12. Emergency aortic valve replacement and Caesarian section in a primigravida with severe aortic stenosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Puneet K; Zutshi, V; Shamsunder, S; Batra, S; Ghosh, P

    2011-01-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valve with severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a rare condition (3-6% of patients with congenital heart disease). Pregnancy in these patients carries a high risk of maternal and fetal mortality. With advancing gestational age, these women may develop cardiac failure due to increased cardiorespiratory requirements. When medical therapy proves insufficient, cardiac surgery becomes mandatory to save the patient's life. Balloon valvuloplasty is only palliative treatment, the duration of benefit being only 6 months. Valve replacement is thus recommended. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery with valve replacement has been reported to carry a lower risk of maternal mortality (1.5-13%) but a very high fetal risk (16-40%). This paper reports the case of a 30-year-old primigravida with severe AS with bicuspid aortic valve and pulmonary congestion clinically uncontrolled, in whom CPB surgery and aortic valve replacement was performed as an emergency procedure, along with a lower segment Caesarian section. The outcome of unrelieved severe symptomatic AS in pregnancy is poor. Multidisciplinary management is important to avoid deterioration in cardiac performance in parturients with severe AS. CPB during pregnancy carries a high risk to the fetus. Therefore, open heart surgery during pregnancy should be advised only in extreme emergencies (ie, heart failure refractory to conventional therapy).

  13. PREVALENCE AND PREDICTORS OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN SEVERE AORTIC STENOSIS PATIENTS UNDERGOING SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanapilai Jayaprasad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present study is to find out the prevalence of CAD in severe Aortic Stenosis (AS patients undergoing aortic valve replacement and the relation between the conventional risk factors and CAD in them. Calcific aortic stenosis is associated with the same risk factors as coronary artery disease. Studies on calcific aortic stenosis and CAD are rarely reported from India. The aim of the study is to find out the predictive value of angina for presence of CAD in severe aortic stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS All cases of isolated severe aortic stenosis undergoing CAG before aortic valve replacement were included in the study. Data regarding various risk factors, symptoms, echocardiographic parameters and angiographic profile were collected. RESULTS Among a total of 94 patients who have undergone aortic valve replacement for severe AS 40 (42.6% had CAD. Risk factors like advanced age, hypertension, diabetes and smoking were more in patients with CAD compared to isolate AS. Mean gradient was more in the AS + CAD group compared with AS group. Presence of angina had a sensitivity of 82.5% and specificity of 51.85% for predicting coexisting CAD. CONCLUSION Among severe aortic stenosis, patients undergoing AVR 42.6% of patients had significant obstructive CAD. The conventional risk factors predict presence of coronary artery disease. Angina has got a fairly good sensitivity, but moderate specificity for CAD.

  14. Common iliac vein stenosis and risk of symptomatic pulmonary embolism: an inverse correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith T; Popat, Rita A; Sze, Daniel Y; Kuo, William T; Kothary, Nishita; Louie, John D; Hovsepian, David M; Hwang, Gloria L; Hofmann, Lawrence V

    2011-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that a common iliac vein (CIV) stenosis may impair embolization of a large deep venous thrombosis (DVT) to the lungs, decreasing the incidence of a symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). Between January 2002 and August 2007, 75 patients diagnosed with unilateral DVT were included in a single-institution case-control study. Minimum CIV diameters were measured 1 cm below the inferior vena cava (IVC) bifurcation on computed tomography (CT) images. A significant stenosis in the CIV ipsilateral to the DVT was defined as having either a diameter 4 mm or less or a greater than 70% reduction in lumen diameter. A symptomatic PE was defined as having symptoms and imaging findings consistent with a PE. The odds of symptomatic PE versus CIV stenosis were assessed using logistic regression models. The associations between thrombus location, stenosis, and symptomatic PE were assessed using a stratified analysis. Of 75 subjects, 49 (65%) presented with symptomatic PE. There were 17 (23%) subjects with a venous lumen 4 mm or less and 12 (16%) subjects with a greater than 70% stenosis. CIV stenosis of 4 mm or less resulted in a decreased odds of a symptomatic PE compared with a lumen greater than 4 mm (odds ratio [OR] 0.17, P = .011), whereas a greater than 70% stenosis increased the odds of DVT involving the CIV (OR 7.1, P = .047). Among patients with unilateral DVT, those with an ipsilateral CIV lumen of 4 mm or less have an 83% lower risk of developing symptomatic PE compared with patients with a CIV lumen greater than 4 mm. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dipyridamole thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography in aortic stenosis: gender differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rask, L P [Dept. of Clinical Physiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); [Dept. of Cardiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Karp, K H [Dept. of Clinical Physiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Eriksson, N P [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Spain); [Dept. of Cardiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Mooe, T [Dept. of Cardiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden)

    1995-10-01

    This study was undertaken to establish the gender-specific normal limits of thallium-201 distribution in patients with aortic stenosis and to apply these normal limits in a larger group of patients with aortic stenosis to obtain the sensitivity and specificity for coexisting CAD. A low-dose dipyridamole protocol was used (0.56 mg/kg during 4 min). Thallium was injected 2 min later and tomographic imaging was performed. Following image reconstruction a basal, a mid-ventricular and an apical short-axis slice were selected. The highest activity in each 6 segment was normalised to the maximal activity of each slice. The normal uptake for patients with aortic stenosis was obtained from ten men and ten women with aortic stenosis and a normal coronary angiography. Eighty-nine patients were prospectively evaluated. An area reduction of at least 75% in a coronary artery was considered to be a significant coronary lesion and was found in 57 (64%) patients. With gender-specific curves (-2.5 SD) sensitivity for detecting CAD was 100% and specificity was 75% in men, while sensitivity was 61% and specificity 64% in women. It is concluded that the gender-specific normal distribution of {sup 201}Tl uptake in patients with aortic stenosis, using dipyridamole SPET, yields a high sensitivity and specificity for coronary artery lesions in men but a lower sensitivity and specificity in women with aortic stenosis. (orig./MG)

  16. Low-gradient aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-09-07

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a 'low-gradient' AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA gradient (gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA-low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Impact of hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with asymptomatic aortic valve stenosis (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieck, Ashild E; Cramariuc, Dana; Staal, Eva M

    2010-01-01

    Both hypertension and aortic valve stenosis induce left ventricular hypertrophy. However, less is known about the influence of concomitant hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with aortic valve stenosis.......Both hypertension and aortic valve stenosis induce left ventricular hypertrophy. However, less is known about the influence of concomitant hypertension on left ventricular structure in patients with aortic valve stenosis....

  18. Systematic review of the outcome of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Umesh C.; Barenbrug, Paul; Pokharel, Saraswati; Dassen, Willem R. M.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Maessen, Jos G.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After the establishment of aortic valve replacement procedure for aortic stenosis, there are heterogeneous studies and varying reports on outcome. An analysis that compares individual studies to summarize the overall effect is still lacking. This study systematically analyzes the change

  19. Simultaneous rota-stenting and transcatheter aortic valve implantation for patients with heavily calcified coronary stenosis and aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tsai Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Given that coronary artery disease (CAD in octogenarians undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI often presents with more complex lesions and extensive calcification, rotational atherectomy (RA may be needed in some cases before stenting. However, data regarding the feasibility and safety of simultaneous RA during TAVI using the Medtronic CoreValve (MCV; Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA system are lacking. Three out of 107 (2.8% patients (2 females, average age 85.6 years, mean aortic valve area 0.5 cm2, mean left ventricular ejection fraction 39%, mean Logistic EuroScore 70%, with complex, heavily calcified coronary stenosis, and severe valvular aortic stenosis (AS were treated with TAVI and RA due to high surgical risk. After balloon valvuloplasty, all coronary lesions were successfully treated with RA and stenting, immediately followed by transfemoral TAVI with a self-expandable MCV. Our data suggested that in the very elderly patients with severe and heavily calcified CAD and AS who were turned down for cardiac surgery, RA and stenting followed by TAVI may be performed successfully in a combined, single-stage procedure.

  20. Association of Neuromuscular Attributes With Performance-Based Mobility Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults With Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Catherine T; Ward, Rachel E; Suri, Pradeep; Kiely, Dan K; Ni, Pengsheng; Anderson, Dennis E; Bean, Jonathan F

    2017-07-01

    To identify differences in health factors, neuromuscular attributes, and performance-based mobility among community-dwelling older adults with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis; and to determine which neuromuscular attributes are associated with performance-based measures of mobility. Cross-sectional; secondary data analysis of a cohort study. Outpatient rehabilitation center. Community-dwelling adults aged ≥65 years with self-reported mobility limitations and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (N=54). Not applicable. Short Physical Performance Battery score, habitual gait speed, and chair stand test. Symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis was classified using self-reported symptoms of neurogenic claudication and imaging. Among 430 community-dwelling older adults, 54 (13%) met criteria for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. Compared with participants without symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis, those with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis had more comorbidities, higher body mass index, greater pain, and less balance confidence. Participants with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis had greater impairment in trunk extensor muscle endurance, leg strength, leg strength asymmetry, knee flexion range of motion (ROM), knee extension ROM, and ankle ROM compared with participants without symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. Five neuromuscular attributes were associated with performance-based mobility among participants with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis: trunk extensor muscle endurance, leg strength, leg strength asymmetry, knee flexion ROM, and knee extension ROM asymmetry. Community-dwelling older adults with self-reported mobility limitations and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis exhibit poorer health characteristics, greater neuromuscular impairment, and worse mobility when compared with those without symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. Poorer trunk extensor muscle endurance, leg strength, leg strength asymmetry, knee flexion ROM, and knee extension ROM asymmetry

  1. Predictors of exercise capacity and symptoms in severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS).......This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS)....

  2. Severe aortic valve stenosis and nosebleed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoedel, Johannes; Obergfell, Achim; Maass, Alexander H.; Schodel, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is known to be associated with loss of high molecular von Willebrand multimers. This can lead to gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with gastrointestinal angiodysplasia, the Heyde syndrome. Here we present a case of anaemia and severe epistaxis associated with acquired von

  3. Blood Pressure and Arterial Load After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Otto, Catherine M; Douglas, Pamela S; Hahn, Rebecca T; Elmariah, Sammy; Weissman, Neil J; Stewart, William J; Ayele, Girma M; Zhang, Feifan; Zajarias, Alan; Maniar, Hersh S; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Blackstone, Eugene; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja M; Tuzcu, E Murat; Leon, Martin B; Pibarot, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    After aortic valve replacement, left ventricular afterload is often characterized by the residual valve obstruction. Our objective was to determine whether higher systemic arterial afterload-as reflected in blood pressure, pulsatile and resistive load-is associated with adverse clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Total, pulsatile, and resistive arterial load were measured in 2141 patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with TAVR in the PARTNER I trial (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve) who had systolic blood pressure (SBP) and an echocardiogram obtained 30 days after TAVR. The primary end point was 30-day to 1-year all-cause mortality. Lower SBP at 30 days after TAVR was associated with higher mortality (20.0% for SBP 100-129 mm Hg versus 12.0% for SBP 130-170 mm Hg; P <0.001). This association remained significant after adjustment, was consistent across subgroups, and confirmed in sensitivity analyses. In adjusted models that included SBP, higher total and pulsatile arterial load were associated with increased mortality ( P <0.001 for all), but resistive load was not. Patients with low 30-day SBP and high pulsatile load had a 3-fold higher mortality than those with high 30-day SBP and low pulsatile load (26.1% versus 8.1%; hazard ratio, 3.62; 95% confidence interval, 2.36-5.55). Even after relief of valve obstruction in patients with aortic stenosis, there is an independent association between post-TAVR blood pressure, systemic arterial load, and mortality. Blood pressure goals in patients with a history of aortic stenosis may need to be redefined. Increased pulsatile arterial load, rather than blood pressure, may be a target for adjunctive medical therapy to improve outcomes after TAVR. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00530894. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Outcome of endovascular treatment in symptomatic intracranial vascular stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Dae Chul; Kim, Sang Joon; Lee, Duk Hee; Kim, Won; Choi, Choong Gon; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kwon, Sun Uck; Kim, Jong Sung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Jeong [Daejeon Catholic Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    The outcome evaluation for the revascularization of intracranial vascular stenoses has not been fully described due to the highly technical nature of the procedure. We report here on the early and late clinical outcome of angioplasty and/or stenting of symptomatic severe intracranial vascular stenoses at a single institute. Since 1995, we have treated 35 patients with symptomatic intracranial vascular stenosis (more than 70% stenosis, mean stenosis: 78.6% {+-} 6.2%). Angioplasty (n = 19) was performed for the horizontal segment of the middle cerebral artery (M1) (n = 16) and the basilar artery (BA) (n = 1), the intradural vertebral artery (VA) (n = 1), and the cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA) (n = 1). Stenting (n = 16) was performed for the cavernous or petrous ICAs (n = 9), the intradural VA (n = 3), BA (n = 2), and M1 (n = 2) artery. We assessed the angiographic success (defined as residual stenosis < 50%) rate, the periprocedural complications during the 30-day periprocedural period, the symptomatic recurrence and restenosis during a mean 22-month follow-up (FU) period. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of the cumulative even-free rate of the major cerebrovascular events, i.e. death, stroke or restenosis, was also done. Angiographic success was achieved in 97% of our patients (34/35). There were four procedure-related complications (11%) including a death and a minor stroke. During the mean 22-month FU, the asymptomatic restenosis rate was 9% and the symptomatic restenosis rate was 6% in the target lesion and 9% in all the vascular territories. The Kaplan-Meier estimate was 70.6% (95% confidence interval = 46.5-94.7) after 33 month of FU. In addition to a high angiographic success rate and an acceptable periprocedural complication rate, intracranial angioplasty and/or stenting revealed a relatively low symptomatic recurrence rate. Hemorrhage is a rare, but the physician must aware that potentially fatal periprocedural complications can occur.

  5. Resting heart rate and risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Bang, Casper N; Berg, Ronan M G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated resting heart rate (RHR) may be an early sign of cardiac failure, but its prognostic value during watchful waiting in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is largely unknown. METHODS: RHR was determined by annual ECGs in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS)...

  6. Effect of candesartan treatment on left ventricular remodeling after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbaek, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2010-01-01

    In hypertension, angiotensin receptor blockers can augment regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. It is not known whether this also is the case after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). To test the hypothesis that treatment with candesartan in addition to con...

  7. Wingspan stent for symptomatic M1 stenosis of middle cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xinbin; Ma Nan; Hu Xiaobo; Guan Sheng; Fan Yimu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Stent placement for intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis has become an alternative treatment technique; however, stent placement for middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis remains a technical and clinical challenge. Our purpose was to assess the safety and feasibility of Wingspan stent for patients with symptomatic M1 stenosis, and its initial effect on prevention of ischemic events. Methods: Fifty-three cases with recurrent symptomatic MCA stenosis resistant to medical therapy treated by self-expanding stent were reviewed retrospectively (average 58 ± 18.5 years old, 19 women). All patients underwent angioplasty and stenting with the Gateway balloon–Wingspan stent system, and advised follow-up with DSA or TCD at 6th month. Results: Patients had an average stenosis ratio of 76.5 ± 15.4% prior to the treatment. Of the 53 patients, the technical success rate was 98.1% as a whole (52/53). The mean degree of stenosis reduced from (76.5 ± 15.4)% to (18.2 ± 11.3)%. Complications associated with the procedure include subarachnoid hemorrhage (1.89%) and occlusion (3.78%) occurred. During a follow-up of 6 months, there was no recurrence of transient ischemic attack or stroke in 52 cases with successful stenting. Cerebral hemodynamics of MCA using transcranial Doppler monitoring were at normal level (<120 cm/s) in 41 follow-up patients. The follow up angiography at 6 month post-procedure was conducted in 32 patients and showed good patency in stented vessels. Conclusions: Wingspan stent for symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery is a safe and feasible procedure. It improves clinical outcome in the intermediate follow up, but its long-term effect remains to be further evaluated.

  8. Discrete subvalvular aortic stenosis in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirani, J; Natarajan, K; Varga, P; Vitullo, D A

    1993-07-01

    Various congenital cardiac malformations have been described in patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann (BW) syndrome, including reversible obstructive subaortic stenosis in one patient. We herein present a case of a 2.5-year-old black boy with BW syndrome and discrete subvalvular aortic stenosis of the membraneous type. Such association of these two entities has previously not been documented.

  9. Primary balloon angioplasty for symptomatic, high-grade intracranial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomycz, Luke; Bansal, Neil K; Lockney, Tim; Strothers, Megan; Connors, John J; Shay, Scott; Singer, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    In light of recent controversy about the safety and efficacy of intracranial stenting, we sought to evaluate our experience with primary balloon angioplasty for symptomatic, high-grade intracranial stenosis. All intracranial angioplasty cases performed at Vanderbilt University Medical Center from 2006 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed for degree of stenosis pre- and post-procedure. Immediate peri-procedural complications were evaluated as well as one-month and long-term outcomes. A total of 26 patients were included in the study with a mean age of 63.0 years and a mean follow-up of 350.2 days. The average pre-procedure stenosis was 71.2%. The immediate, average post-procedure stenosis was 46.6%, and the average post-procedure stenosis at last angiographic follow-up was 44.5%. Retreatment was required in only 3.8% of patients. The primary end-point of major stroke or death at 30 days was observed in 11.5%, and the overall intra-procedural complication rate was 7.7%. The incidence of stroke or death at last follow-up was 15.4%, which is comparable to the one-year stroke or death rate in the medical arm of the SAMPRISS trial. In this retrospective series, primary balloon angioplasty was found to be effective as a treatment option for symptomatic intracranial stenosis with the risk of stroke or death at 30 days higher than the medical arm of SAMPRIS but lower than the stenting arm. The one-year risk of stroke was comparable to that reported for the one-year outcomes in the SAMPRISS medical arm.

  10. Sequential transcatheter aortic valve implantation due to valve dislodgement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campante Teles, Rui; Costa, Cátia; Almeida, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an important treatment in high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), whose complications need to be managed promptly. The authors report the case of an 86-year-old woman presenting with severe symptomatic AS, rejected...

  11. Aortic annulus and ascending aorta: Comparison of preoperative and periooperative measurement in patients with aortic stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, Michal; Ferda, Jiri; Baxa, Jan; Cech, Jakub; Hajek, Tomas; Kreuzberg, Boris; Rokyta, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background: Precise determination of the aortic annulus size constitutes an integral part of the preoperative evaluation prior to aortic valve replacement. It enables the estimation of the size of prosthesis to be implanted. Knowledge of the size of the ascending aorta is required in the preoperative analysis and monitoring of its dilation enables the precise timing of the operation. Our goal was to compare the precision of measurement of the aortic annulus and ascending aorta using magnetic resonance (MR), multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in patients with degenerative aortic stenosis. Methods and results: A total of 15 patients scheduled to have aortic valve replacement were enrolled into this prospective study. TTE was performed in all patients and was supplemented with TEE, CT and MR in the majority of patients. The values obtained were compared with perioperative measurements. For the measurement of aortic annulus, MR was found to be the most precise technique, followed by MDCT, TTE, and TEE. For the measurement of ascending aorta, MR again was found to be the most precise technique, followed by MDCT, TEE, and TTE. Conclusion: In our study, magnetic resonance was found to be the most precise technique for the measurement of aortic annulus and ascending aorta in patients with severe degenerative aortic stenosis.

  12. Left Atrial Systolic Force in Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cioffi, Giovanni; Cramariuc, Dana; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2011-01-01

    LASF in the total study population was 21 ± 14 kdynes/cm(2) . The determinants of LASF were higher age, heart rate, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) mass, mitral peak early velocity, maximal LA volume, and longer mitral deceleration time (multiple R(2) = 0.37, P ...Background: There is a limited knowledge about left atrial (LA) systolic force (LASF) and its key determinants in patients with asymptomatic mild-moderate aortic stenosis (AS). Methods: We used baseline clinic and echocardiographic data from 1,566 patients recruited in the simvastatin ezetimibe...... in aortic stenosis study evaluating the effect of placebo-controlled combined simvastatin and ezetimibe treatment in asymptomatic AS. The LASF was calculated by Manning's method. Low and high LASF were defined as 95th percentile of the distribution within the study population, respectively. Results: Mean...

  13. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part XXX: Transcatheter Aortic Valve Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2017-12-01

    Initially, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedure was approved only for patients with aortic stenosis that was both severe and symptomatic who either also had too high a risk of aortic valve replacement surgery to have the surgery or who had a high risk for the surgery. Between the years 2012 and 2015, the death rate at 30 days declined from an initial rate of 7.5% to 4.6%. There has also been more use of the transfemoral approach over the years. In 2016, the transcatheter aortic valve replacement was approved for patients with aortic stenosis at intermediate risk of surgery.

  14. Aortic stenosis with abnormal eccentric left ventricular remodeling secondary to hypothyroidism in a Bourdeaux Mastiff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Augusto Minozzo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This paper describes a case of congenital aortic stenosis with eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy associated with hypothyroidism in a 1-year-old Bourdeaux Mastiff dog. The dog had ascites, apathy, alopecic and erythematous skin lesions in different parts of the body. A two-dimensional echocardiogram revealed aortic valve stenosis, with poststenotic dilation in the ascending aorta. The same exam showed eccentric hypertrophy and dilation of the left ventricle during systole and diastole. Aortic stenosis usually results in concentric left ventricular hypertrophy instead of eccentric hypertrophy; and therefore, this finding was very unusual. Hypothyroidism, which is uncommon in young dogs, may be incriminated as the cause of ventricular dilation, making this report even more interesting. Because hypothyroidism would only result in dilatation, the eccentric hypertrophy was attributed to pressure overload caused by aortic stenosis. Thus, cardiac alterations of this case represent a paradoxical association of both diseases.

  15. Increased platelet activation in early symptomatic versus asymptomatic carotid stenosis and relationship with microembolic status: Results from the Platelets And Carotid Stenosis (PACS) Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, Ja

    2013-04-26

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral microembolic signals (MES) may predict increased stroke risk in carotid stenosis. However, the relationship between platelet counts or platelet activation status and MES in symptomatic versus asymptomatic carotid stenosis has not been comprehensively assessed. SETTING: University teaching hospitals. METHODS: This prospective, pilot observational study assessed platelet counts and platelet activation status, and the relationship between platelet activation and MES in asymptomatic versus early (≤4 weeks after TIA\\/stroke) and late phase (≥3 months) symptomatic moderate or severe (≥50%) carotid stenosis patients. Full blood count measurements were performed, and whole blood flow cytometry was used to quantify platelet surface activation marker expression (CD62P and CD63) and circulating leucocyte-platelet complexes. Bilateral simultaneous transcranial Doppler ultrasound monitoring of the middle cerebral arteries was performed for 1 hour to classify patients as MES-positive or MES-negative. RESULTS: Data from 31 asymptomatic patients were compared with 46 symptomatic patients in the early phase, and 35 of these patients followed up to the late phase after symptom onset. The median platelet count (211 vs. 200 x 10(9) \\/L; p=0.03) and the median% lymphocyte-platelet complexes were higher in early symptomatic than asymptomatic patients (2.8 vs. 2.4%, p=0.001). The% lymphocyte-platelet complexes was higher in early symptomatic than asymptomatic patients with ≥70% carotid stenosis (p=0.0005), and in symptomatic patients recruited within 7 days of symptom onset (p=0.028). Complete TCD data were available in 25 asymptomatic and 31 early phase symptomatic, and 27 late phase symptomatic patients. 12% of asymptomatic versus 32% of early phase symptomatic (p=0.02) and 19% of late phase symptomatic patients (p=0.2) were MES-positive. Early symptomatic MES-negative patients had a higher% lymphocyte-platelet complexes than asymptomatic MES

  16. Recognition and treatment of outflow tract stenosis during and after endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qingsheng; Jing Zaiping; Zhao Zhiqing; Bao Junmin; Zhao Jun; Feng Xiang; Feng Rui; Huang Sheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the cognition and treatment of outflow tract stenosis in and after endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods: From Mar 1997 to Oct 2002, in 136 patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular exclusion, 8 patients had outflow tract stenosis during the operation, and 3 patients had outflow tract stenosis after operation. The stenosis of 5 patients occurred at the crotch of the graft-stent. PTA was done in 7 patients and stents were placed in stenotic segment in 2 patients. 2 patients were treated with crossover operation. Results: Following up 1 month to 2 years, all patients have no lower limbs ischemia. Conclusions: The diagnosis of outflow tract stenosis during and after abdominal endovascular exclusion for aortic aneurysm must be in time. The treatment should be according to the different causes of stenosis

  17. The prevalence of carotid artery stenosis in patients undergoing aortic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahan, M A; Killewich, L A; Kolodner, L; Powell, C C; Metz, M; Sawyer, R; Lilly, M P; Benjamin, M E; Flinn, W R

    1999-09-01

    Coronary artery disease occurs frequently in patients undergoing aortic reconstruction, and it has been presumed that internal carotid artery occlusive disease is also common. This has led to the practice of screening for and repairing significant carotid lesions in asymptomatic patients prior to aortic reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to determine the true prevalence of internal carotid artery disease in these patients. The records of 240 patients who underwent duplex ultrasound screening for carotid artery disease prior to aortic reconstruction were reviewed. Surgery was performed for aortic aneurysm (AA) or aorto-iliac occlusive disease (AO). The prevalence of hyperlipidemia and coronary artery disease was similar between the two groups, but tobacco use, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus differed. Internal carotid artery stenosis > or = 50% occurred in 26.7% of the total group (64 of 240 cases). Stenosis > or = 50% was more common in the AO group (40 of 101 cases, 39.6%) than the AA group (24 of 139 cases, 17.3%, P = 0.0001). Severe disease (70% to 99%) was also more common in the AO group than the AA group (9.9% versus 3.6%, P = 0.0464). Internal carotid artery disease occurs commonly in patients undergoing aortic reconstruction, and screening is worthwhile. Significant disease is more common in patients with aorto-iliac occlusive disease than in those with aortic aneurysm, although atherosclerotic risk factors occur with varying frequency in the two groups. These findings suggest that additional factors may contribute to the higher prevalence of internal carotid artery stenosis in aorto-iliac occlusive disease.

  18. Stenting for symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis associated with bilateral carotid rate mirabile: The long-term clinical and angiographic outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jang Hyun; Kim, Byung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Symptomatic vertebral artery (VA) stenosis associated with bilateral carotid rate mirabile (CRM) has not been reported. We report the long-term clinical and angiographic outcome after stenting for symptomatic VA stenosis in the patient with bilateral CRM. This report is the first case that symptomatic VA stenosis associated with bilateral CRM was treated with stenting.

  19. Stenting for symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis associated with bilateral carotid rate mirabile: The long-term clinical and angiographic outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jang Hyun; Kim, Byung Moon

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic vertebral artery (VA) stenosis associated with bilateral carotid rate mirabile (CRM) has not been reported. We report the long-term clinical and angiographic outcome after stenting for symptomatic VA stenosis in the patient with bilateral CRM. This report is the first case that symptomatic VA stenosis associated with bilateral CRM was treated with stenting.

  20. Is there a rural gradient in the diagnosis of aortic stenosis? An analysis of a remote Scottish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maycock, Matthew I; Farman, Colin; Mort, Alasdair; Turpie, David; Leslie, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Calcific aortic stenosis is the most common cardiac valve lesion and is becoming increasingly prevalent as life expectancy rises. There is evidence that patients in remote and rural areas with certain diseases have worse outcomes and present to specialist services later than their urban counterparts. It is not known whether patients with aortic stenosis follow a similar pattern. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increasing rurality was associated with later presentation to healthcare services at a more advanced stage of aortic stenosis. This was a retrospective cohort study. Using ICD-10 discharge codes and local databases, 605 patients with aortic stenosis who presented between 31 November 1999 and 1 December 2008 were identified. Aortic stenosis was defined as a pressure gradient across the aortic valve of 25 mmHg or more. Patients with prior aortic valve replacement were excluded. Clinical notes were reviewed for all patients. Gender, age and pressure gradient across the aortic valve at presentation and patient GP-practice location were recorded. Patients were then assigned a Clinical Peripherality Index score based on the postcode of their GP's practice to define rurality. Patient data were compared across the six defined levels of clinical peripherality by ANOVA. Mean patient age was 73 ± 13 years, and 336 (54%) were male. The peak gradient across the valve was 41.1 ± 26.7 mmHg. There was no association between the level of clinical peripherality and the stage of aortic stenosis at presentation, age or gender (all p >0.05). There was no urban-rural gradient in the severity of aortic stenosis at presentation in this remote Scottish cohort. This suggests that patients with this condition in remote areas do not present later in their disease trajectory.

  1. Increased hsCRP is associated with higher risk of aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Nielsen, Olav W.; Asferg, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate relations between inflammation and aortic valve stenosis (AS) by measuring high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, at baseline (hsCRP0) and after 1 year (hsCRP1) and exploring associations with aortic valve replacement (AVR). Design We examined 1423 patients from...... the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. Results During first year of treatment, hsCRP was reduced both in patients later receiving AVR (2.3 [0.9–4.9] to 1.8 [0.8–5.4] mg/l, p CRP1...... predicted later AVR (HR = 1.17, p CRP0 (HR = 0.96, p = 0.33), aortic valve area (AVA) and other risk factors. A higher rate of AVR was observed in the group with high hsCRP0 and an increase during the first year (AVRhighCRP0CRP1inc=47.3% versus AVRhighCRP0CRP1dec=27.5%, p

  2. Efficiency of aortic valve commissurotomy for congenital aortic valve stenosis in pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Лукьянов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to evaluate short-term and long-term outcomes after open aortic valve commissurotomy in the pediatric patients at our center over a period of 10 years. Methods. A retrospective study of 94 patients who underwent open surgical commissurotomy because of aortic valve stenosis between 2003 and 2013 is presented. Follow-up time was in the range of 1 to 7 years. Results. The open aortic valve commissurotomy combined with debridement of leaflet free edge 36.1 %, LVOT myectomy 11.7%, leaflet suture plastic 7.4%, modified Konno procedure 6.3%, Brom's aortoplasty 4.2% was performed for all patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 59.2 30.7 min. Median aortic cross-clamping time was 31.52 15.1 min. Hospital complications were observed in 38.2% of cases. ICU time was in the range of 1 to 31 (mean 3.2 5.1 day. Artificial lung ventilation time varied from 2 to 76 (mean 15.3 18.3 hours. Inotropic support was needed in 26.5% of cases. Mean hospital stay time was 17.1 7.3 days. At follow-up between 2 and 7 years, reoperations were required for 3 patients who underwent a Ross procedure. Conclusions. The results evidence that open surgical commissurotomy is an effective way of treatment for aortic valve stenosis, considering the accuracy of plasty and additional techniques of leaflet correction. The best children age group for this type of operation is from first to five years of life.

  3. Wingspan stent system in the treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianxiao; Li Zhaoshuo; Wang Ziliang; Xue Jiangyu; Bai Weixing; Li Li; Zhai Shuiting; Feng Yingpu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the safety, feasibility, short- and mid-term efficacy of wingspan stent for treating patients with symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis. Methods: A total of 113 patients with severe symptomatic intracranial stenosis were enrolled and Gateway-wingspan stenting were performed on all patients. The technical success, the pre- and post-stenting stenosis, perioperative complications, clinical outcome and restenosis rates were recorded, and chi-square test was used for analysis of complication rate by comparing our results with the results of Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID) study and NIH multi-center Wingspan stenting trial. Results: The technical success rate was 99.1% (112/ 113). The mean pre and post-stent stenoses were (80.7±9.3)% and (27.7±9.7)% (χ 2 =9.397, P<0.05). The total complication rate was 4.4% (5/113) during the follow-up (mean 14.5 months, range 1-28 months), and the frequency of' restenosis was 12.5% (5/40) at 6 months. The primary endpoint events, ischemic stroke, and lesion-related ischemic stroke were lower in our study (4.5%, 3.5%, 3.5%) compared with the results of WASID trial (21.1%, 20.4%, 15.0%, P<0.05). For those with poor outcome in the three high-risk sub-groups which were with more than 70% stenosis, or last event from the treatment was less than 17 days, or NIHSS was above 1, a better outcome was observed in our group (4.5%, 4.7% and 2.0% in our study, 19.0%, 17.0% and 19.6% in previous study, P<0.05). The medium-term efficacy in this group (4.5%) significantly improved compared with NIH study (14.0%, P< 0.05). Conclusions: Wingspan stenting for symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis is with good safety, feasibility and low perioperative stroke rate and mortality. The incidence of primary endpoint events and the ischemic events are lower than those of medication group, and the efficacy of stenting is significantly better than medication even in high-risk population. (authors)

  4. Phase-mapping technique for the evaluation of aortic valve stenosis by MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, G.; Mueller, E.; Reynen, K.; Wilke, N.; Bachmann, K.

    1992-01-01

    New MR-techniques for quantitative blood flow registration such as phase-mapping (a two-dimensional space-resolved technique with a time-averaged measurement of blood flow) or RACE (real-time acquisition and evaluation of blood flow in one-dimensional space projection) are available for the diagnosis of valvular heart disease. Initial results of grading aortic valve stenosis by these methods are shown in comparison to continuous wave Ultrasound-Doppler. Two groups of 15 patients were examined by RACE or phase-mapping, 12 respectively 8 of whom suffered from an aortic valve stenosis. The shape of blood flow profiles as well as grading of aortic valve stenosis show high concordance when comparing the results of MR and Doppler technique. Good reliability and practicability of the demonstrated MR-method are shown. With respect to the results of RACE and phase-mapping the development of an alternative and competing MR-method for the evaluation of valvular heart disease and shunt diagnostics seems possible. (orig.)

  5. Phase-mapping technique for the evaluation of aortic valve stenosis by MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engels, G. [Medizinische Klinik 2, Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Mueller, E. [Siemens Medical Engineering Group, Erlangen (Germany); Reynen, K. [Medizinische Klinik 2, Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Wilke, N. [Siemens Medical Engineering Group, Erlangen (Germany); Bachmann, K. [Medizinische Klinik 2, Univ. of Erlangen (Germany)

    1992-08-01

    New MR-techniques for quantitative blood flow registration such as phase-mapping (a two-dimensional space-resolved technique with a time-averaged measurement of blood flow) or RACE (real-time acquisition and evaluation of blood flow in one-dimensional space projection) are available for the diagnosis of valvular heart disease. Initial results of grading aortic valve stenosis by these methods are shown in comparison to continuous wave Ultrasound-Doppler. Two groups of 15 patients were examined by RACE or phase-mapping, 12 respectively 8 of whom suffered from an aortic valve stenosis. The shape of blood flow profiles as well as grading of aortic valve stenosis show high concordance when comparing the results of MR and Doppler technique. Good reliability and practicability of the demonstrated MR-method are shown. With respect to the results of RACE and phase-mapping the development of an alternative and competing MR-method for the evaluation of valvular heart disease and shunt diagnostics seems possible. (orig.)

  6. Velocity ratio predicts outcomes in patients with low gradient severe aortic stenosis and preserved EF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jander, Nikolaus; Hochholzer, Willibald; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of velocity ratio (VR) in patients with low gradient severe aortic stenosis (LGSAS) and preserved EF. BACKGROUND: LGSAS despite preserved EF represents a clinically challenging entity. Reliance on mean pressure gradient (MPG) may underestimate stenosis severity...... for severe stenosis. We hypothesised that VR may have conceptual advantages over MPG and AVA, predict clinical outcomes and thereby be useful in the management of patients with LGSAS. METHODS: Patients from the prospective Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study with an AVA...≤40 mm Hg and EF≥55% and asymptomatic at baseline were stratified according to VR with a cut-off value of 0.25. Outcomes were evaluated according to aortic valve-related events and cardiovascular death. RESULTS: Of 435 patients with LGSAS, 197 (45%) had VRVR≥0...

  7. Aortic stenosis and vascular calcifications in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannoush, Hwaida; Introne, Wendy J; Chen, Marcus Y; Lee, Sook-Jin; O'Brien, Kevin; Suwannarat, Pim; Kayser, Michael A; Gahl, William A; Sachdev, Vandana

    2012-02-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disorder of tyrosine catabolism in which homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates and is deposited throughout the spine, large joints, cardiovascular system, and various tissues throughout the body. In the cardiovascular system, pigment deposition has been described in the heart valves, endocardium, pericardium, aortic intima and coronary arteries. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with alkaptonuria varies in previous reports. We present a series of 76 consecutive adult patients with alkaptonuria who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between 2000 and 2009. A subgroup of 40 patients enrolled in a treatment study underwent non-contrast CT scans and these were assessed for vascular calcifications. Six of the 76 patients had aortic valve replacement. In the remaining 70 patients, 12 patients had aortic sclerosis and 7 patients had aortic stenosis. Unlike degenerative aortic valve disease, we found no correlation with standard cardiac risk factors. There was a modest association between the severity of aortic valve disease and joint involvement, however, we saw no correlation with urine HGA levels. Vascular calcifications were seen in the coronaries, cardiac valves, aortic root, descending aorta and iliac arteries. These findings suggest an important role for echocardiographic screening of alkaptonuria patients to detect valvular heart disease and cardiac CT to detect coronary artery calcifications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Current management of symptomatic intracranial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert A; Weigele, John B; Kasner, Scott E

    2011-08-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS) is the cause of about 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States, but may account for about 40% of strokes in some populations. After a stroke or transient ischemic attack due to IAS, patients face a 12% annual risk of recurrent stroke on medical therapy, with most strokes occurring in the first year. Warfarin is no better than aspirin in preventing recurrent strokes but poses a higher risk of serious bleeding and death. Groups with the highest risk of recurrent stroke are those with high-grade (≥ 70%) stenosis, those with recent symptom onset, those with symptoms precipitated by hemodynamic maneuvers, and women. Endovascular treatment of IAS is a rapidly evolving therapeutic option. Antiplatelet agents are currently recommended as the primary treatment for symptomatic IAS, with endovascular therapy reserved for appropriate high-risk cases refractory to medical therapy.

  9. Embrella embolic deflection device for cerebral protection during transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samim, Mariam; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Budde, Ricardo P J; Nijhoff, Freek; Kluin, Jolanda; Ramjankhan, Faiz; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stella, Pieter R.

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To compare the extent of cerebral ischemic injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the use of an Embrella Embolic Deflector System versus unprotected TAVR. METHODS: Fifteen patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis underwent TAVR with use of the Embrella Embolic

  10. Embrella embolic deflection device for cerebral protection during transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samim, Mariam; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Nijhoff, Freek; Kluin, Jolanda; Ramjankhan, Faiz; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stella, Pieter R.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the extent of cerebral ischemic injury after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with the use of an Embrella Embolic Deflector System versus unprotected TAVR. Methods: Fifteen patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis underwent TAVR with use of the Embrella Embolic

  11. First report on a human percutaneous transluminal implantation of a self-expanding valve prosthesis for interventional treatment of aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Eberhard; Laborde, Jean C; Zickmann, Bernfried; Gerckens, Ulrich; Felderhoff, Thomas; Sauren, Barthel; Bootsveld, Andreas; Buellesfeld, Lutz; Iversen, Stein

    2005-12-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a new technology for the treatment of patients with significant aortic valve stenosis. We present the first report on a human implantation of a self-expanding aortic valve prosthesis, which is composed of three bovine pericardial leaflets inserted within a self-expanding nitinol stent. The 73-year-old woman presented with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis (mean transvalvular gradient of 45 mmHg; valve area of 0.7 cm2). Surgical valve replacement had been declined for the patient because of comorbidities, including previous bypass surgery. A retrograde approach via the common iliac artery was used for valve deployment. The contralateral femoral vessels were used for a temporary extracorporal circulation, unloading the left ventricle during the actual stent expansion. Clinical, hemodynamic, and echocardiographic outcomes were assessed serially during the procedure. Clinical and echocardiographic follow-up at day 1, 2, and 14 post procedure was performed to evaluate the short-term outcome. The prosthesis was successfully deployed within the native aortic valve, with accurate and stable positioning and with no impairment of the coronary artery or vein graft blood flow. 2D and doppler echo immediately after device deployment showed a significant reduction in transaortic mean pressure gradient (from 45 to 8 mmHg) without evidence of aortic or mitral valve insufficiency. The clinical status has then significantly improved. These results remained unchanged up to the day 14 follow-up. This case report demonstrates a successful percutaneous implantation of a self-expanding aortic valve prosthesis with remarkable functional and clinical improvements in the acute and short-term outcome. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Gender differences in left ventricular function in patients with isolated aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, Luca; Giordan, Massimo; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Ramondo, Angelo Bruno; Cardaioli, Paolo; Isabella, Giambattista; Chioin, Raffaello; Lupia, Mario; Razzolini, Renato

    2003-05-01

    Hypertrophic response of the left ventricle to systolic overload in aortic stenosis appears to be gender-dependent. To examine gender-related differences in left ventricular (LV) function in patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis, 145 patients (65 women, 80 men; mean age 66 +/- 8 years; range: 50 to 89 years) with aortic valve area 199 mmHg, the mass:volume ratio was increased in men compared with women; of note, the mass:volume ratio in women was not increased in this subgroup compared with the general population. LV pump function in this subgroup was normal and did not differ between men and women. Although no clear-cut difference in hemodynamic parameters was seen, there was a trend towards a less compensatory increase in LV mass in females.

  13. Echocardiographic aortic valve calcification and outcomes in women and men with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, Henrik K; Cioffi, Giovanni; Gerdts, Eva; Einarsen, Eigir; Midtbø, Helga Bergljot; Mancusi, Costantino; Cramariuc, Dana

    2017-10-01

    Sex differences in risk factors of aortic valve calcification (AVC) by echocardiography have not been reported from a large prospective study in aortic stenosis (AS). AVC was assessed using a prognostically validated visual score and grouped into none/mild or moderate/severe AVC in 1725 men and women with asymptomatic AS in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study. The severity of AS was assessed by the energy loss index (ELI) taking pressure recovery in the aortic root into account. More men than women had moderate/severe AVC at baseline despite less severe AS by ELI (pAVC at baseline was independently associated with lower aortic compliance and more severe AS in both sexes, and with increased high-sensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP) only in men (all pAVC at baseline was associated with a 2.5-fold (95% CI 1.64 to 3.80) higher hazard rate of major cardiovascular events in women, and a 2.2-fold higher hazard rate in men (95% CI 1.54 to 3.17) (both pAVC at baseline also predicted a 1.8-fold higher hazard rate of all-cause mortality in men (95% CI 1.04 to 3.06, pAVC scored by echocardiography has sex-specific characteristics in AS. Moderate/severe AVC is associated with higher cardiovascular morbidity in both sexes, and with higher all-cause mortality in men. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00092677. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Carotid angioplasty and stenting for symptomatic carotid kinking combined with stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANG Xue-li

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Carotid endarterectomy (CEA is currently the preferred treatment for severe carotid kinking and stenosis. Kinking is generally believed to be a relative contraindication for endovascular stent placement. This article aims to study the necessity, feasibility and security of carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS for symptomatic carotid kinking combined with stenosis, and summarize clinical experience of this disease according to therapeutic results. Methods Twenty-two cases with symptomatic carotid kinking and high-grade stenosis demonstrated by digital subtraction angiography (DSA were performed CAS. Their clinical manifestations, imaging features, procedure safety and follow-up data were collected and retrospectively analyzed. All patients understood CEA and voluntarily received CAS. Results Twenty-two cases with carotid kinking and stenosis were all successfully performed CAS (the success rate was 100% without stent-related disability or mortality. Twenty-four self-expandable stents were implanted. The mean degree of stenosis was reduced from 85.63%before stenting to 11.25% after stenting and the angles of kinking were improved from 120° (Metz' category. During the period of hospitalization, no transient ischemic attack (TIA or cerebral infarction occurred, and the clinical symptoms and signs of ischemia, such as dizziness and headache, were improved or disappeared. Besides, no permenant complications or deaths happened. All cases were followed up from 6 to 72 months, among whom 1 patient experienced contralateral carotid TIA, and 2 patients experienced ipsilateral carotid TIA (one indicated aspirin resistance in platelet aggregation test and the other showed restenosis in DSA. Computed tomography angiography (CTA of 10 patients and Duplex scan of 7 patients during the follow-up demonstrated carotid in good morphology and fluent blood flow, without kinking or restenosis. Conclusion CAS is a feasible and safe therapeutic method and

  15. Updated clinical indications for transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with severe aortic stenosis: expert opinion of the Italian Society of Cardiology and GISE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indolfi, Ciro; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Berti, Sergio; Golino, Paolo; Esposito, Giovanni; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Petronio, Sonia; Tamburino, Corrado; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Ussia, Gianpaolo; Vassanelli, Corrado; Spaccarotella, Carmen; Violini, Roberto; Mercuro, Giuseppe; Romeo, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    : The introduction of percutaneous treatment of severe aortic stenosis with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) remains one of the greatest achievements of interventional cardiology. In fact, TAVI emerged as a better option than either medical therapy or balloon aortic valvuloplasty for patients who cannot undergo surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or are at high surgical risk. Recently, increased operator experience and improved device systems have led to a worldwide trend toward the extension of TAVI to low-risk or intermediate-risk patients. In this expert opinion paper, we first discuss the basic pathophysiology of aortic stenosis in different settings then the key results of recent clinical investigations on TAVI in intermediate-risk aortic stenosis patients are summarized. Particular emphasis is placed on the results of the nordic aortic valve intervention, placement of aortic transcatheter valves (PARTNER) 2 and Surgical Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Randomized trials. The PARTNER 2 was the first large randomized trial that evaluated the outcome of TAVI in patients at intermediate risk. The PARTNER 2 data demonstrated that TAVI is a feasible and reasonable alternative to surgery in intermediate-risk patients (Society of Thoracic Surgeons 4-8%), especially if they are elderly or frail. There was a significant interaction between TAVI approach and mortality, with transfemoral TAVI showing superiority over SAVR. Moreover, we examine the complementary results of the recently concluded Surgical Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation trial. This prospective randomized trial demonstrated that TAVI is comparable with surgery (primary end point 12.6% in the TAVI group vs. 14.0% in the SAVR group) in severe aortic stenosis patients deemed to be at intermediate risk. We review the most relevant clinical evidence deriving from nonrandomized studies and meta-analyses. Altogether, clinical outcome available data

  16. [Intravascular Hemolysis Caused by Stenosis of an Elephant Trunk;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamaru, Rikako; Kawahito, Koji; Aizawa, Kei; Misawa, Yoshio

    2017-07-01

    Symptomatic intravascular hemolysis after prosthetic aortic graft replacement is rare. It is primarily attributed to mechanical injury of red blood cells caused by stenosis of the vascular graft. A 50-year-old man presented with hemolytic anemia, 5 years after total arch replacement with an elephant trunk for type A aortic dissection. The hemolysis was caused by graft stenosis of the elephant trunk. Endovascular treatment for the stenotic elephant trunk was successfully performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the hemolysis was resolved immediately after operation.

  17. Adjusting parameters of aortic valve stenosis severity by body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minners, Jan; Gohlke-Baerwolf, Christa; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2014-01-01

    stenosis (jet velocity ≥2.5 m/s) and related to outcomes in a second cohort of 1525 patients from the Simvastatin/Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study. RESULTS: Whereas jet velocity and MPG were independent of body size, AVA was significantly correlated with height, weight, BSA and BMI (Pearson...... correlation coefficient (r) 0.319, 0.281, 0.317 and 0.126, respectively, all pcorrelation between AVA and body size...

  18. Acute Right Coronary Ostial Stenosis during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Umran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of acute right coronary artery stenosis developing in a patient undergoing aortic valve replacement. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to coronary artery occlusion associated with cardiac valve surgery - the theories and treatments are discussed. A 85 year-old female was admitted under the care of the cardiothoracic team with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Investigations, including cardiac echocardiography and coronary angiography, indicated a critical aortic valve stenosis. Intraoperative right ventricular failure ensued post aortic valve replacement. Subsequent investigations revealed an acute occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery with resultant absence of distal flow supplying the right ventricle. An immediate right coronary artery bypass procedure was performed with resolution of the right ventricular failure. Subsequent weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass was uneventful and the patient continued to make excellent recovery in the postoperative phase. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of intraoperative acute coronary artery occlusion developing during valve surgery. However, surgeons should be aware of the potential for acute occlusion so that early recognition and rapid intervention can be instituted.

  19. Immediate versus delayed treatment for recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The timing of surgery for recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis remains controversial. Early cerebral revascularization may prevent a disabling or fatal ischemic recurrence, but it may also increase the risk of hemorrhagic transformation, or of dislodging a thrombus. This review examined the randomized controlled evidence that addressed whether the increased risk of recurrent events outweighed the increased benefit of an earlier intervention. OBJECTIVES: To assess the risks and benefits of performing very early cerebral revascularization (within two days compared with delayed treatment (after two days for people with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register in January 2016, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2016, issue 1, MEDLINE (1948 to 26 January 2016, EMBASE (1974 to 26 January 2016, LILACS (1982 to 26 January 2016, and trial registers (from inception to 26 January 2016. We also handsearched conference proceedings and journals, and searched reference lists. There were no language restrictions. We contacted colleagues and pharmaceutical companies to identify further studies and unpublished trials Selection criteria: All completed, truly randomized trials (RCT that compared very early cerebral revascularization (within two days with delayed treatment (after two days for people with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Data collection and analysis: We independently selected trials for inclusion according to the above criteria, assessed risk of bias for each trial, and performed data extraction. We utilized an intention-to-treat analysis strategy. MAIN RESULTS: We identified one RCT that involved 40 participants, and addressed the timing of surgery for people with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. It compared very early surgery with surgery performed after 14 days of

  20. Management of emergency caesarean section in a patient with decompensated critical aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Leatherbarrow

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of congenital heart disease patients are now surviving to child bearing age. This complex patient cohort present a great challenge to the obstetric anaesthetist and multidisciplinary teams. This report describes a rare case of a patient undergoing emergency caesarean section at 31 weeks gestation due to decompensated critical congenital aortic stenosis. The physiological effects of pregnancy in patients with aortic stenosis are discussed along with principles of managing anaesthesia for caesarean section in the presence of this cardiac lesion.

  1. Valve Calcification in Aortic Stenosis: Etiology and Diagnostic Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Manuela Izquierdo-Gómez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic stenosis is the most common valvulopathy in the Western world. Its prevalence has increased significantly in recent years due to population aging; hence, up to 8% of westerners above the age of 84 now have severe aortic stenosis (Lindroos et al., 1993. This causes increased morbidity and mortality and therein lies the importance of adequate diagnosis and stratification of the degree of severity which allows planning the best therapeutic option in each case. Long understood as a passive age-related degenerative process, it is now considered a rather more complex entity involving mechanisms and factors similar to those of atherosclerosis (Stewart et al., 1997. In this review, we summarize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of the disease and analyze the current role of cardiac imaging techniques for diagnosis.

  2. Stent angioplasty for the treatment of symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Huisheng; Niu Huiming; Chao Yuanxiang; Li Xiaoning; Wu Dingfeng; Zhang Chenhong; Yang Jie; Zhang Liang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the safety and feasibility of endovascular stent angioplasty in treating symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery. Methods: Endovascular angioplasty with coronary stents was performed in 27 patients with symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery. The clinical results were reviewed and analyzed. Results: Of the total 27 patients, successful placement of the coronary stents was achieved in 24. Angiography immediately after the procedure showed that the stenotic degree of the diseased artery was markedly decreased from preoperative (80 ± 19)% to postoperative (8 ±4)%, the improvement was very obvious. Percutaneous transcatheter angioplasty had to be employed in two cases because of the failure of stent placement. A mean follow-up period of 18 months was carried out. During the following up period no transient cerebral ischemia attack occurred in 25 patients and no newly-developed cerebral infarction in region fed by the responsible vessels occurred either.Re-irrigation cerebral hemorrhage was seen in one patient, which occurred three hours after the placement of the stent. In one case the placed stent fell off and immigrated into the siphon of internal carotid artery, and the displaced stent was took out later with a catching apparatus. In another case re-stenosis occurred six months after the stenting. Conclusion: Percutaneous endovascular stent angioplasty is a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery, although its long-term results need to be further evaluated. (authors)

  3. Effect of lipid lowering on new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders; Boman, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF). This effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS).......Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF). This effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS)....

  4. Analysis of the pathological severity degree of aortic stenosis (AS) and mitral stenosis (MS) using the discrete wavelet transform (DWT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziani, F; Debbal, S M; Atbi, A

    2013-01-01

    The heart is the principal organ that circulates blood. In normal conditions it produces four sounds for each cardiac cycle. However, most often only two sounds appear essential: S1 and S2. Two other sounds: S3 and S4, with lower amplitude than S1 or S2, appear occasionally in the cardiac cycle by the effect of disease or age. The presence of abnormal sounds in one cardiac cycle provide valuable information on various diseases. The aortic stenosis (AS), as being a valvular pathology, is characterized by a systolic murmur due to a narrowing of the aortic valve. The mitral stenosis (MS) is characterized by a diastolic murmur due to a reduction in the mitral valve. Early screening of these diseases is necessary; it's done by a simple technique known as: phonocardiography. Analysis of phonocardiograms signals using signal processing techniques can provide for clinicians useful information considered as a platform for significant decisions in their medical diagnosis. In this work two types of diseases were studied: aortic stenosis (AS) and mitral stenosis (MS). Each one presents six different cases. The application of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) to analyse pathological severity of the (AS and MS was presented. Then, the calculation of various parameters was performed for each patient. This study examines the possibility of using the DWT in the analysis of pathological severity of AS and MS.

  5. The use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement vs surgical aortic valve replacement for the treatment of aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen HA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hanna A Jensen, Lillian L Tsai, Vinod H Thourani Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Joseph B Whitehead Department of Surgery, Structural Heart and Valve Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Severe aortic stenosis (AS is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality and is increasing in prevalence as the global population increases. Since AS primarily affects the elderly, many of these patients have comorbidities that make them poor candidates for the gold standard treatment for AS, surgical aortic valve replacement. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as a novel technology for the management of AS in higher risk patients over the past decade. Randomized trials have established the safety and efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and the medical community has rallied to identify the patients who are most suitable for this transformative treatment. This review focuses on outlining the key procedural differences, describing the unique challenges of both operations, and finally assessing and comparing outcomes both on a general level and in challenging patient subgroups. Keywords: aortic valve replacement, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, surgical aortic valve replacement 

  6. Effects of rosuvastatin on progression of stenosis in adult patients with congenital aortic stenosis (PROCAS Trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde, D. van der; Yap, S.C.; Dijk, A.P. van; Budts, W.; Pieper, P.G.; Burgh, P.H. van der; Mulder, B.J.; Witsenburg, M.; Cuypers, J.A.; Lindemans, J.; Takkenberg, J.J.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent trials have failed to show that statin therapy halts the progression of calcific aortic stenosis (AS). We hypothesized that statin therapy in younger patients with congenital AS would be more beneficial, because the valve is less calcified. In the present double-blind, placebo-controlled

  7. Design and baseline characteristics of the simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis (SEAS) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossebø, Anne B; Pedersen, Terje R; Allen, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis and atherosclerotic disease have several risk factors in common, in particular, hypercholesterolemia. Histologically, the diseased valves appear to have areas of inflammation much like atherosclerotic plaques. The effect of lipid-lowering therapy on the progression of aortic...

  8. Longitudinal strain predicts left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsomino, Sandro; Lucà, Fabiana; Parise, Orlando; Lorusso, Roberto; Rao, Carmelo Massimiliano; Vizzardi, Enrico; Gensini, Gian Franco; Maessen, Jos G

    2013-11-01

    We explored the influence of global longitudinal strain (GLS) measured with two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography on left ventricular mass regression (LVMR) in patients with pure aortic stenosis (AS) and normal left ventricular function undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). The study population included 83 patients with severe AS (aortic valve area regression (all P regression in patients with pure AS undergoing AVR. Our findings must be confirmed by further larger studies.

  9. Symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis and occlusion. Comparison of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography with conventional angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Motoshi; Yano, Hirohito; Shinoda, Jun; Funakoshi, Takashi [Daiyukai General Hospital, Ichinomiya, Aichi (Japan); Kumagai, Morio

    1994-10-01

    The usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using the three-dimensional time-of-flight method for the characterization of symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusive lesions was evaluated in 10 patients with MCA occlusion and 10 with MCA stenosis. All lesions were symptomatic and documented by conventional angiography. There was no false-negative MR angiogram that failed to demonstrate the MCA occlusive lesion. MR angiography correctly evaluated the location of lesions and the difference between stenosis and occlusion. Stenosis appeared as a focal signal loss (<1.0cm) of the MCA at the site of stenosis, and occlusion as a complete signal loss of the MCA distal to the site of occlusion. However, MR angiography could not distinguish diffuse stenosis and one point stenosis demonstrated by conventional angiography. MR angiography is a useful noninvasive diagnostic method for evaluating occlusive lesions of the MCA in symptomatic patients. (author).

  10. Novel ELN mutation in a family with supravalvular aortic stenosis and intracranial aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Urban, Zsolt; Hucthagowder, Vishwanathan

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic germline mutations in ELN can be detected in patients with supravalvular aortic stenosis. The mutation might occur de novo or be inherited following an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. In this report we describe a three-generation family suffering from supravalvular aortic st...... in the phenotype within a single SVAS family....

  11. Cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement compared with surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: results of the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trial (Cohort A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Vilain, Katherine; Li, Haiyan; Walczak, Joshua; Pinto, Duane S; Thourani, Vinod H; Svensson, Lars G; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Satler, Lowell E; Bavaria, Joseph; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B; Cohen, David J

    2012-12-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. TAVR is an alternative to AVR for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. We performed a formal economic analysis based on cost, quality of life, and survival data collected in the PARTNER A (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trial in which patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk were randomized to TAVR or AVR. Cumulative 12-month costs (assessed from a U.S. societal perspective) and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were compared separately for the transfemoral (TF) and transapical (TA) cohorts. Although 12-month costs and QALYs were similar for TAVR and AVR in the overall population, there were important differences when results were stratified by access site. In the TF cohort, total 12-month costs were slightly lower with TAVR and QALYs were slightly higher such that TF-TAVR was economically dominant compared with AVR in the base case and economically attractive (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio economically dominated by AVR in the base case and economically attractive in only 7.1% of replicates. In the PARTNER trial, TAVR was an economically attractive strategy compared with AVR for patients suitable for TF access. Future studies are necessary to determine whether improved experience and outcomes with TA-TAVR can improve its cost-effectiveness relative to AVR. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Poor performances of EuroSCORE and CARE score for prediction of perioperative mortality in octogenarians undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhor, Vibol; Merceron, Sybille; Ricome, Sylvie; Baron, Gabriel; Daoud, Omar; Dilly, Marie-Pierre; Aubier, Benjamin; Provenchere, Sophie; Philip, Ivan

    2010-08-01

    Although results of cardiac surgery are improving, octogenarians have a higher procedure-related mortality and more complications with increased length of stay in ICU. Consequently, careful evaluation of perioperative risk seems necessary. The aims of our study were to assess and compare the performances of EuroSCORE and CARE score in the prediction of perioperative mortality among octogenarians undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis and to compare these predictive performances with those obtained in younger patients. This retrospective study included all consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery in our institution between November 2005 and December 2007. For each patient, risk assessment for mortality was performed using logistic EuroSCORE, additive EuroSCORE and CARE score. The main outcome measure was early postoperative mortality. Predictive performances of these scores were assessed by calibration and discrimination using goodness-of-fit test and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, respectively. During this 2-year period, we studied 2117 patients, among whom 134/211 octogenarians and 335/1906 nonoctogenarians underwent an aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis. When considering patients with aortic stenosis, discrimination was poor in octogenarians and the difference from nonoctogenarians was significant for each score (0.58, 0.59 and 0.56 vs. 0.82, 0.81 and 0.77 for additive EuroSCORE, logistic EuroSCORE and CARE score in octogenarians and nonoctogenarians, respectively, P performances of these scores are poor in octogenarians undergoing cardiac surgery, especially aortic valve replacement. Risk assessment and therapeutic decisions in octogenarians should not be made with these scoring systems alone.

  13. Magnetic resonance measurement of turbulent kinetic energy for the estimation of irreversible pressure loss in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Hope, Michael D; Tseng, Elaine E; Saloner, David

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to measure the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in the ascending aorta of patients with aortic stenosis and to assess its relationship to irreversible pressure loss. Irreversible pressure loss caused by energy dissipation in post-stenotic flow is an important determinant of the hemodynamic significance of aortic stenosis. The simplified Bernoulli equation used to estimate pressure gradients often misclassifies the ventricular overload caused by aortic stenosis. The current gold standard for estimation of irreversible pressure loss is catheterization, but this method is rarely used due to its invasiveness. Post-stenotic pressure loss is largely caused by dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy into heat. Recent developments in magnetic resonance flow imaging permit noninvasive estimation of TKE. The study was approved by the local ethics review board and all subjects gave written informed consent. Three-dimensional cine magnetic resonance flow imaging was used to measure TKE in 18 subjects (4 normal volunteers, 14 patients with aortic stenosis with and without dilation). For each subject, the peak total TKE in the ascending aorta was compared with a pressure loss index. The pressure loss index was based on a previously validated theory relating pressure loss to measures obtainable by echocardiography. The total TKE did not appear to be related to global flow patterns visualized based on magnetic resonance-measured velocity fields. The TKE was significantly higher in patients with aortic stenosis than in normal volunteers (p < 0.001). The peak total TKE in the ascending aorta was strongly correlated to index pressure loss (R(2) = 0.91). Peak total TKE in the ascending aorta correlated strongly with irreversible pressure loss estimated by a well-established method. Direct measurement of TKE by magnetic resonance flow imaging may, with further validation, be used to estimate irreversible pressure loss in aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2013 American

  14. Assessment of 'on-treatment platelet reactivity' and relationship with cerebral micro-embolic signals in asymptomatic and symptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Justin A; Oliver Tobin, W; Tierney, Sean; Feeley, Timothy M; Egan, Bridget; Coughlan, Tara; Ronan Collins, D; O'Neill, Desmond; Harbison, Joseph A; Doherty, Colin P; Madhavan, Prakash; Moore, Dermot J; O'Neill, Sean M; Colgan, Mary-Paula; Saqqur, Maher; Murphy, Raymond P; Moran, Niamh; Hamilton, George; McCabe, Dominick J H

    2017-05-15

    The relationship between on-treatment platelet reactivity and cerebral micro-embolic signals (MES) is unknown, and has not been previously simultaneously assessed in asymptomatic and symptomatic carotid stenosis patients. Consecutive eligible patients with ≥50% asymptomatic or recently symptomatic carotid stenosis (≤4weeks following TIA/ischaemic stroke) were recruited to this pilot study. Symptomatic patients were followed up to the 'late' phase (≥3months) following symptom onset or carotid intervention; longitudinal data were analysed from symptomatic patients with data available at both time-points. Platelet function/reactivity was assessed with the PFA-100® to measure collagen-ADP (C-ADP) and collagen-epinephrine (C-EPI) closure times in citrate-anticoagulated whole blood. Bilateral simultaneous 1-hour transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) monitoring of the middle cerebral arteries was performed to classify patients as MES +ve or MES -ve. 31 patients with ≥50% asymptomatic and 46 with early symptomatic carotid stenosis or occlusion were included. 35 symptomatic patients were followed up to the late phase (23 following carotid intervention). Prevalence of 'high on-treatment platelet reactivity' (HTPR) on the C-EPI cartridge did not differ between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients overall, but was lower in 'symptomatic post-intervention' than asymptomatic patients on aspirin monotherapy (10% vs. 50%; p=0.03). The prevalence of HTPR on the C-EPI cartridge decreased between the early and late phases in symptomatic patients (63% vs. 34%; p=0.017), including those on aspirin monotherapy (p=0.016). There were no significant differences in HTPR status between asymptomatic vs. early or late symptomatic MES +ve or MES -ve patients. Carotid interventional treatment, presumably in combination with resolution of the acute phase response, may decrease the prevalence of HTPR in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis over time. Preliminary subgroup

  15. Hemodynamics of Aortic Stenosis and Implications for Non-invasive Diagnosis via Auscultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chi; Seo, Jung-Hee; Mittal, Rajat

    2017-11-01

    Aortic stenosis refers to the abnormal narrowing of the aortic valve and it is one of the most common valvular diseases. It is also known to generate ejection murmurs, which contain valuable disease-related information. However, an incomplete understanding of the flow mechanism(s) responsible for the murmur generation, as well as the effect of intervening tissue on murmur propagation has limited the diagnostic information can be extracted through cardiac auscultation. In this study, a canonical model of the aorta with stenosis is used, and a multiphysics computational modeling approach is employed to investigate the generation and propagation of the murmurs. First, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to explore the hemodynamics of the post-stenotic flow. Then, a high-order, linear viscoelastic wave solver is used to investigate the wave propagation in a modeled thorax. The results show that both the aortic jet and the secondary flow contribute significantly to the murmur generation. The murmur signals on the epidermal surface are measured and analyzed. The break frequencies obtained from the spectra of cases with different degrees of stenosis are found to follow a universal scaling. The implications of these results for cardiac auscultation are discussed. The authors would like to acknowledge support from NSF Grants IIS-1344772, CBET-1511200, and NSF XSEDE Grant TG-CTS100002.

  16. MDCT assessment of tracheomalacia in symptomatic infants with mediastinal aortic vascular anomalies: preliminary technical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Mason, Keira P.; Zurakowski, David; Waltz, David A.; Ralph, Amy; Riaz, Farhana; Boiselle, Phillip M.

    2008-01-01

    Mediastinal aortic vascular anomalies are relatively common causes of extrinsic central airway narrowing in infants with respiratory symptoms. Surgical correction of mediastinal aortic vascular anomalies alone might not adequately treat airway symptoms if extrinsic narrowing is accompanied by intrinsic tracheomalacia (TM), a condition that escapes detection on routine end-inspiratory imaging. Paired inspiratory-expiratory multidetector CT (MDCT) has the potential to facilitate early diagnosis and timely management of TM in symptomatic infants with mediastinal aortic vascular anomalies. To assess the technical feasibility of paired inspiratory-expiratory MDCT for evaluating TM among symptomatic infants with mediastinal aortic vascular anomalies. The study group consisted of five consecutive symptomatic infants (four male, one female; mean age 4.1 months, age range 2 weeks to 6 months) with mediastinal aortic vascular anomalies who were referred for paired inspiratory-expiratory MDCT during a 22-month period. CT angiography was concurrently performed during the end-inspiration phase of the study. Two pediatric radiologists in consensus reviewed all CT images in a randomized and blinded fashion. The end-inspiration and end-expiration CT images were reviewed for the presence and severity of tracheal narrowing. TM was defined as ≥50% reduction in tracheal cross-sectional luminal area between end-inspiration and end-expiration. The presence of TM was compared to the bronchoscopy results when available (n = 4). Paired inspiratory-expiratory MDCT was technically successful in all five patients. Mediastinal aortic vascular anomalies included a right aortic arch with an aberrant left subclavian artery (n = 2), innominate artery compression (n = 2), and a left aortic arch with an aberrant right subclavian artery (n 1). Three (60%) of the five patients demonstrated focal TM at the level of mediastinal aortic vascular anomalies. The CT results were concordant with the results

  17. Continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring for surgical hip repair in two patients with severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Mercedes López

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Aortic stenosis increases perioperative morbidity and mortality, perioperative invasive monitoring is advised for patients with an aortic valve area 30 mm Hg and it is important to avoid hypotension and arrhythmias. We report the anaesthetic management with continuous spinal anaesthesia and minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring of two patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing surgical hip repair. CASE REPORT: Two women with severe aortic stenosis were scheduled for hip fracture repair. Continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring was used for anaesthetic management of both. Surgery was performed successfully after two consecutive doses of 2 mg of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% in one of them and four consecutive doses in the other. Haemodynamic conditions remained stable throughout the intervention. Vital signs and haemodynamic parameters remained stable throughout the two interventions. CONCLUSION: Our report illustrates the use of continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring as a valid alternative to general or epidural anaesthesia in two patients with severe aortic stenosis who are undergoing lower limb surgery. However, controlled clinical trials would be required to establish that this technique is safe and effective in these type or patients.

  18. Enhanced left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis is associated with improved long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ayyaz; Patel, Amit; Ali, Ziad; Abu-Omar, Yasir; Saeed, Amber; Athanasiou, Thanos; Pepper, John

    2011-08-01

    Aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis is usually followed by regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. More complete resolution of left ventricular hypertrophy is suggested to be associated with superior clinical outcomes; however, its translational impact on long-term survival after aortic valve replacement has not been investigated. Demographic, operative, and clinical data were obtained retrospectively through case note review. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular mass preoperatively and at annual follow-up visits. Patients were classified according to their reduction in left ventricular mass at 1 year after the operation: group 1, less than 25 g; group 2, 25 to 150 g; and group 3, more than 150 g. Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression were used. A total of 147 patients were discharged from the hospital after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis between 1991 and 2001. Preoperative left ventricular mass was 279 ± 98 g in group 1 (n = 47), 347 ± 104 g in group 2 (n = 62), and 491 ± 183 g in group 3 (n = 38) (P regression such as ischemic heart disease or hypertension, valve type, or valve size used. Ten-year actuarial survival was not statistically different in patients with enhanced left ventricular mass regression when compared with the log-rank test (group 1, 51% ± 9%; group 2, 54% ± 8%; and group 3, 72% ± 10%) (P = .26). After adjustment, left ventricular mass reduction of more than 150 g was demonstrated as an independent predictor of improved long-term survival on multivariate analysis (P = .02). Our study is the first to suggest that enhanced postoperative left ventricular mass regression, specifically in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis, may be associated with improved long-term survival. In view of these findings, strategies purported to be associated with superior left ventricular mass regression should be considered when undertaking

  19. Technique and Patient Selection Criteria of Right Anterior Mini-Thoracotomy for Minimal Access Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Leprince, Pascal; Gassmann, Max; Jamshidi, Peiman; Yamani, Nassrin; Amour, Julien; Lebreton, Guillaume

    2018-03-26

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most prevalent valvular heart disease in developed countries, and is due to the aging of these populations. The incidence of the pathology increases with growing age after 65 years. Conventional surgical aortic valve replacement through median sternotomy has been the gold standard of patient care for symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. However, as the risk profile of patients worsens, other therapeutic strategies have been introduced in an attempt to maintain the excellent results obtained by the established surgical treatment. One of these approaches is represented by transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Although the outcomes of high-risk patients undergoing treatment for symptomatic aortic valve stenosis have improved with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, many patients with this condition remain candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. In order to reduce the surgical trauma in patients who are candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement, minimally invasive approaches have garnered interest during the past decade. Since the introduction of right anterior thoracotomy for aortic valve replacement in 1993, right anterior mini-thoracotomy and upper hemi-sternotomy have become the predominant incisional approaches among cardiac surgeons performing minimal access aortic valve replacement. Beside the location of the incision, the arterial cannulation site represents the second major landmark of minimal access techniques for aortic valve replacement. The two most frequently used arterial cannulation sites include central aortic and peripheral femoral approaches. With the purpose of reducing surgical trauma in these patients, we have opted for a right anterior mini-thoracotomy approach with a central aortic cannulation site. This protocol describes in detail a technique for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement and provides recommendations for patient selection criteria, including cardiac computer

  20. The association between pro-arrhythmic agents and aortic stenosis in young adults: is it sufficient to clarify the sudden unexpected deaths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnic, Bojana; Radojevic, Nemanja; Vucinic, Jelena; Duborija-Kovacevic, Natasa

    2017-07-01

    Most young patients with mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis show no symptoms, and sudden death appears only occasionally. We hypothesised that malignant ventricular arrhythmias could be responsible for the high incidence of sudden death in such patients. If multiple factors such as asymptomatic aortic stenosis in association with arrhythmia-provoking agents are involved, could it be sufficient to account for sudden unexpected death? In this study, eight cases of sudden death in young adults, with ages ranging from 22 to 36 years, who had never reported any symptoms that could be related to aortic stenosis, were investigated. Full autopsies were performed, and congenital aortic stenosis in all eight cases was confirmed. DNA testing for channelopathies was negative. Comprehensive toxicological analyses found an electrolyte imbalance, or non-toxic concentrations of amitriptyline, terfenadine, caffeine, and ethanol. Collectively, these results suggest that congenital asymptomatic aortic stenosis without cardiac hypertrophy in young adults is not sufficient to cause sudden death merely on its own; rather, an additional provoking factor is necessary. According to our findings, the provoking factor may be a state of physical or emotional stress, a state of electrolyte imbalance, or even taking a therapeutic dose of a particular drug.

  1. Immediate post-operative responses to transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Nielsen, Susanne; Lisby, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Background:Conventional treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis is surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), but transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a reliable alternative in high-risk patients.Aims:The aim of our study was to describe the post......-operative patient response to TAVI on the evening of the procedure and the following day before discharge from the coronary care unit. A secondary aim was to compare responses of patients younger and older than 80 years of age.Methods:A prospective, comparative observational study triangulating nurse assessment...

  2. Increased platelet count and leucocyte-platelet complex formation in acute symptomatic compared with asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCabe, D J H

    2005-09-01

    The risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis is considerably higher than in patients with asymptomatic stenosis. In the present study it was hypothesised that excessive platelet activation might partly contribute to this difference.

  3. Low Transvalvular Flow Rate Predicts Mortality in Patients With Low-Gradient Aortic Stenosis Following Aortic Valve Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvakidou, Anastasia; Jin, Wenying; Danylenko, Oleksandr; Chahal, Navtej; Khattar, Rajdeep; Senior, Roxy

    2018-03-09

    This study aimed to assess the value of low transvalvular flow rate (FR) for the prediction of mortality compared with low stroke volume index (SVi) in patients with low-gradient (mean gradient: gradient AS who had undergone valve intervention. We retrospectively followed prospectively assessed consecutive patients with low-gradient, low aortic valve area AS who underwent aortic valve intervention between 2010 and 2014 for all-cause mortality. Of the 218 patients with mean age 75 ± 12 years, 102 (46.8%) had low stroke volume index (SVi) (gradient, low valve area aortic stenosis undergoing aortic valve intervention, low FR, not low SVi, was an independent predictor of medium-term mortality. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Differences in cardiovascular risk profile between electrocardiographic hypertrophy versus strain in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (from SEAS data)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Electrocardiograms are routinely obtained in clinical follow-up of patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). The association with aortic valve, left ventricular (LV) response to long-term pressure load, and clinical covariates is unclear and the clinical value is thus uncertain. Data from...... clinical examination, electrocardiogram, and echocardiogram in 1,563 patients in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study were used. Electrocardiograms were Minnesota coded for arrhythmias and atrioventricular and intraventricular blocks; LV hypertrophy was assessed by Sokolow...

  5. A meta-analysis and meta-regression of long-term outcomes of transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villablanca, Pedro A; Mathew, Verghese; Thourani, Vinod H; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Bangalore, Sripal; Makkiya, Mohammed; Vlismas, Peter; Briceno, David F; Slovut, David P; Taub, Cynthia C; McCarthy, Patrick M; Augoustides, John G; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-12-15

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as an alternative to surgical aortic-valve replacement (SAVR) for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) who are at high operative risk. We sought to determine the long-term (≥1year follow-up) safety and efficacy TAVR compared with SAVR in patients with severe AS. A comprehensive search of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, conference proceedings, and relevant Web sites from inception through 10 April 2016. Fifty studies enrolling 44,247 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean duration follow-up was 21.4months. No difference was found in long-term all-cause mortality (risk ratios (RR), 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91-1.22). There was a significant difference favoring TAVR in the incidence of stroke (RR, 0.82; 95% CI 0.71-0.94), atrial fibrillation (RR, 0.43; 95% CI 0.33-0.54), acute kidney injury (RR, 0.70; 95% CI 0.53-0.92), and major bleeding (RR, 0.57; 95% CI 0.40-0.81). TAVR had significant higher incidence of vascular complications (RR, 2.90; 95% CI 1.87-4.49), aortic regurgitation (RR, 7.00; 95% CI 5.27-9.30), and pacemaker implantation (PPM) (RR, 2.02; 95% CI 1.51-2.68). TAVR demonstrated significantly lower stroke risk compared to SAVR in high-risk patients (RR, 1.49; 95% CI 1.06-2.10); no differences in PPM implantation were observed in intermediate-risk patients (RR, 1.68; 95% CI 0.94-3.00). In a meta-regression analysis, the effect of TAVR baseline clinical features did not affect the long-term all-cause mortality outcome. TAVR and SAVR showed similar long-term survival in patients with severe AS; with important differences in treatment-associated morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimal timing of valve replacement in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Emine; Ipek, Gökürk; Ayhan, Huseyin; Nacar, Alper Bugra; Kasapkara, Haci Ahmet; Sani, Cenk; Basbug, Serdar; Kurt, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-09-01

    Patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) constitute a heterogeneous group which includes not only certain cases who are at high risk of sudden death and valve-related heart failure, but also those at low risk for these events. Degenerative AS, which includes a majority of patients with AS, is characterized by stricture of the valve, increased arterial stiffness, and diverse left ventricular response to the valvular plus arterial vascular load. In addition to using traditional primary parameters, the severity of AS and the total left ventricular load should be assessed using new measures such as energy loss index and valvulo-arterial impedance. Natriuretic peptide levels and global longitudinal strain imaging may also be used as secondary parameters to obtain information about left ventricular systolic function, although these parameters do not correlate with the severity of AS. Exercise stress testing and exercise echocardiography are also beneficial when assessing the patient if they are symptomatic, and for determining valvular and left ventricular contractile reserves. The aim of this review was to emphasize the importance of risk stratifications in asymptomatic severe AS cases, and to assess the severity of AS using not only conventional methods but also new methods on which much emphasis has been placed during recent years.

  7. Alkaptonuria Presenting with Impressive Osteoarticular Changes and Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Bernardino; Roca, Manuel; Monferrer, Raquel

    2016-03-01

    Alkaptonuria, or ochronosis, a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, causes an excess of homogentisic acid that results in dark pigmentation, calcification, and inflammation of cartilaginous and other tissues. Cardiovascular complications are also typical of the disease. We report the case of a 78-year-old male who presented with impressive osteoarticular changes and aortic stenosis associated with alkaptonuria.

  8. [Coarctation of the descending aorta. A rare form of connatal aortic stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammwitz, E; Schöttler, M; Brix, F; Poser, H L; Langkau, G; Yükseltan, I

    1983-07-01

    A clinical diagnosis of a coarctation of the aorta was made in a 17-year-old female hypertensive patient. Angiography revealed an atypical stenosis of the descending aorta which was surgically corrected. The causes of aortic stenoses are discussed.

  9. Does lowering cholesterol have an impact on the progression of aortic stenosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, A.M.; Wachtell, K.

    2008-01-01

    reviews the pathophysiological mechanisms of calcific AS, reviews current clinical trials of statin use in aortic stenosis and reports on on-going trials, evaluating whether cholesterol lowering therapy can slow disease progression in different populations. Finally, we review if computerized tomography...

  10. Angioplasty of symptomatic high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis with intraluminal thrombus: therapeutic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A.; Mayol, A. [Seccion de Neurorradiologia Intervencionista, Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain); Gil-Peralta, A.; Gonzalez-Marcos, J.R. [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain); Boza, F. [Servicio de Neurofisiologia, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain); Ruano, J. [Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla (Spain)

    2004-04-01

    Intraluminal thrombus in the internal carotid artery (ICA) is usually found in patients with severe atheromatous stenosis. Having reviewed 300 carotid angioplasties for symptomatic >70% ICA stenosis, we found three patients (1%) with intraluminal thrombus. Conservative treatment with anticoagulants and double antiplatelet coverage can result in lysis of the thrombus without severe risks. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting, preferably with distal protection, can be an excellent alternative to carotid endarterectomy. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of left ventricular outflow geometry and aortic valve area in patients with aortic stenosis by 2-dimensional versus 3-dimensional echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Takeji; Shiota, Maiko; Izumo, Masaki; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Tolstrup, Kirsten; Siegel, Robert J; Shiota, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    The present study sought to elucidate the geometry of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) in patients with aortic stenosis and its effect on the accuracy of the continuity equation-based aortic valve area (AVA) estimation. Real-time 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (RT3D-TEE) provides high-resolution images of LVOT in patients with aortic stenosis. Thus, AVA is derived reliably with the continuity equation. Forty patients with aortic stenosis who underwent 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (2D-TTE), 2-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (2D-TEE), and RT3D-TEE were studied. In 2D-TTE and 2D-TEE, the LVOT areas were calculated as π × (LVOT dimension/2)(2). In RT3D-TEE, the LVOT areas and ellipticity ([diameter of the anteroposterior axis]/[diameter of the medial-lateral axis]) were evaluated by planimetry. The AVA is then determined using planimetry and the continuity equation method. LVOT shape was found to be elliptical (ellipticity of 0.80 ± 0.08). Accordingly, the LVOT areas measured by 2D-TTE (median 3.7 cm(2), interquartile range 3.1 to 4.1) and 2D-TEE (median 3.7 cm(2), interquartile range 3.1 to 4.0) were smaller than those by 3D-TEE (median 4.6 cm(2), interquartile range 3.9 to 5.3; p interquartile range 0.79 to 1.3, p interquartile range 0.64 to 0.94) and 2D-TEE (median 0.76 cm(2), interquartile range 0.62 to 0.95). Additionally, the continuity equation-based AVA by RT3D-TEE was consistent with the planimetry method. In conclusion, RT3D-TEE might allow more accurate evaluation of the elliptical LVOT geometry and continuity equation-based AVA in patients with aortic stenosis than 2D-TTE and 2D-TEE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy and safety of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in aortic stenosis patients at low to moderate surgical risk: a comprehensive meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Elmaraezy, Ahmed; Ismail, Ammar; Abushouk, Abdelrahman Ibrahim; Eltoomy, Moutaz; Saad, Soha; Negida, Ahmed; Abdelaty, Osama Mahmoud; Abdallah, Ahmed Ramadan; Aboelfotoh, Ahmed Magdy; Hassan, Hossam Mahmoud; Elmaraezy, Aya Gamal; Morsi, Mahmoud; Althaher, Farah; Althaher, Moath; AlSafadi, Ammar M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Recently, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has become the procedure of choice in high surgical risk patients with aortic stenosis (AS). However, its value is still debated in operable AS cases. We performed this meta-analysis to compare the safety and efficacy of TAVR to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in low-to-moderate surgical risk patients with AS. Methods A systematic search of five authentic databases retrieved 11 eligible studies (20,056 patients). Rele...

  13. Asymptomatic aortic stenosis: An assessment of patients' and of their general practitioners' knowledge, after an indexed specialized assessment in community practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaëlle-Ashley Guerbaii

    Full Text Available Clinical and echocardiography follow-up is recommended in patients with aortic stenosis to detect symptom onset, thus a watchful waiting approach has to be safe and effective. For both AS patients and their general practitioners, evaluation of valvular heart disease (VHD knowledge, after the indexed specialized assessment has never been measured.To evaluate the knowledge of clinical symptoms of aortic stenosis by both patients and their general practitioner.Sixty-four patients, with moderate to severe and initially asymptomatic AS (median AVA (interquartile range 1.01(0.80-1.15 cm2 previously referred to a tertiary center and medically managed for at least 6 months after the index echocardiogram, and their primary care doctors were interviewed on the phone and asked to answer specific questions related to knowledge of aortic stenosis symptoms.Fifty-six percent of patients quoted shortness of breath as one of the aortic stenosis symptoms, and only 16% knew the 3 aortic stenosis symptoms. Fifty percent of patients reported having received sufficient information regarding aortic stenosis; only 48% remembered receiving information regarding specific symptoms. Only 14% general practitioners quoted the 3 specific symptoms. According to the initial recommendation, only 41 patients (64% benefitted from a 6-to-12 month clinical and echocardiography follow up.GPs are not sufficiently trained to safely manage AS patients in the community and to ensure adequate follow-up and monitoring. AS patients were not properly informed about their diagnosis and symptomatology. Hence, therapeutic education should be improved for patients with asymptomatic AS and continuous medical education on VHD should be reinforced, for GPs.

  14. Genome-wide analysis yields new loci associating with aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgadottir, Anna; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Gretarsdottir, Solveig

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular heart disease, and valve replacement is the only definitive treatment. Here we report a large genome-wide association (GWA) study of 2,457 Icelandic AS cases and 349,342 controls with a follow-up in up to 4,850 cases and 451,731 controls...

  15. High sensitivity C reactive protein as a prognostic marker in patients with mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis during lipid-lowering treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blyme, Adam; Asferg, Camilla; Nielsen, Olav W

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prognostic importance of high-sensitive C reactive protein (hsCRP) in patients with mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis during placebo or simvastatin/ezetimibe treatment in Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS). METHODS AND RESULTS: In 1620 SEAS patients, we m...

  16. Will Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR be the Primary Therapy for Aortic Stenosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose F. Condado, MD, MS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR is increasingly used for the treatment of high or very high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS or failing surgical bioprosthesis (valve-in-valve, VIV-TAVR. In TAVR, the collapsed transcatheter heart valve (THV is introduced using the delivery system inserted from the femoral artery (preferred or other alternative accesses (transapical, transaortic, transcarotid, subclavian/transinnominate or transcaval. The delivery system is then advanced until coaxially aligned with the aortic annulus, where the THV is deployed. This procedure can be associated with complications such as access site injury (vascular complication, paravalvar leak, cerebrovascular events and conduction disturbances. However, the rapid acceptance and successes observed with TAVR have been made possible through careful patient selection, preprocedural planning (i.e. MDCT annular sizing, THV technology (i.e. new generation valves, and procedural techniques (i.e. minimalist TF-TAVR and alternative percutaneous access options, as well as a decrease in complications as TAVR experience grows. Though the results or ongoing clinical trials evaluating TAVR in intermediate surgical risk patients are pending, it is likely that TAVR will soon be approved for lower risk patients as well.

  17. Observed and predicted reduction of ischemic cardiovascular events in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Ingar; Boman, Kurt; Brudi, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) trial, combined ezetimibe (10 mg) and simvastatin (40 mg) decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by 50% and ischemic cardiovascular event (ICE) risk by 22% compared to placebo. A larger decrease in ICE risk might have been...... expected for the degree of lipid-lowering observed. This analysis investigated relations between changes in lipoprotein components (LCs), and ICE risk decrease in the SEAS trial in all patients, by severity of aortic stenosis (AS), and compared to results of other clinical trials. A total of 1,570 patients...

  18. A Comparison of Stent Implant versus Medical Treatment for Severe Symptomatic Intracranial Stenosis: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezao Mohammadian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atherosclerotic stenosis of the major intracranial arteries is the most common cause of ischemic stroke. There are limited treatments for severe intracranial stenosis, and stent placement versus medical treatment remains controversial. The aim of this study was to compare functional outcomes of these two modalities in patients with severe symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Methods: At a single center, between 2008 and 2011, patients with angiographically demonstrated severe (70–90% symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis were divided into two groups: group A, which received only medical treatment, and group B, which underwent endovascular stent implant treatment. The severity and location of the stenosis was determined by digital subtraction angiography and the Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID trial criteria in all patients. The exclusion criteria were: specific causes other than atherosclerosis, such as artery dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia, vasculitis, radiation and intracranial hemorrhage, focal neurological deficit that did not correlate to internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery stenosis. All procedures were done under light anesthesia. Technical success was defined as the reduction of stenosis to Results: Overall, 63 patients (29 in group A and 34 in group B were evaluated and followed for a mean period of 15.22 months (range 6–25. The technical success rate was 97% in a total of 34 stents in 34 patients. There was no difference between the early (within 30 days adverse event rates of the two groups. The median follow-up duration for the stent implant patients was 15 months (range 6–25, and for the medically treated cohort it was 14 months (range 8–25. The re-stenosis rate was 5.8% and the total number of late (>30 days adverse events, including stroke, myocardial infarction and death, was 1 (2.9% and 6 (20.7% in the stent implant and medical groups, respectively (p = 0.042. The

  19. Antihypertensive treatment with β-blockade in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and association with cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N.; Greve, Anders M.; Rossebø, Anne B.

    2017-01-01

    Background--Patients with aortic stenosis (AS) often have concomitant hypertension. Antihypertensive treatment with a β-blocker (Bbl) is frequently avoided because of fear of depression of left ventricular function. However, it remains unclear whether antihypertensive treatment with a Bbl...... is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate AS. Methods and Results--We did a post hoc analysis of 1873 asymptomatic patients with mild to moderate AS and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction in the SEAS (Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic...... Stenosis) study. Propensity-matched Cox regression and competing risk analyses were used to assess risk ratios for all-cause mortality, sudden cardiac death, and cardiovascular death. A total of 932 (50%) patients received Bbl at baseline. During a median follow-up of 4.3±0.9 years, 545 underwent aortic...

  20. Left atrial size and function as predictors of new-onset of atrial fibrillation in patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper Niels Furbo; Dalsgaard, Morten; Greve, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) size and function change with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressures. It remains unclear whether these variations in LA parameters can predict new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS).......Left atrial (LA) size and function change with chronically increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressures. It remains unclear whether these variations in LA parameters can predict new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS)....

  1. Beyond adding years to life: health-related quality-of-life and functional outcomes in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis at high surgical risk undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Marcus-Andre; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Elhmidi, Yacine; Piazza, Nicolo; Voss, Bernhard; Lange, Ruediger; Krane, Markus

    2013-11-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is the most frequent acquired valvular heart disease in western industrialized countries and its prevalence considerably increases with age. Once becoming symptomatic severe AVS has a very poor prognosis. Progressive and rapid symptom deterioration leads to an impairment of functional status and compromised healthrelated quality-of-life (HrQoL) simultaneously. Until recently, surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has been the only effective treatment option for improving symptoms and prolonging survival. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) emerged as an alternative treatment modality for those patients with severe symptomatic AVS in whom the risk for SAVR is considered prohibitive or too high. TAVR has gained clinical acceptance with almost startling rapidity and has even quickly become the standard of care for the treatment of appropriately selected individuals with inoperable AVS during recent years. Typically, patients currently referred for and treated by TAVR are elderly with a concomitant variable spectrum of multiple comorbidities, disabilities and limited life expectancy. Beyond mortality and morbidity, the assessment of HrQoL is of paramount importance not only to guide patient-centered clinical decision-making but also to judge this new treatment modality. As per current evidence, TAVR significantly improves HrQoL in high-surgical risk patients with severe AVS with sustained effects up to two years when compared with optimal medical care and demonstrates comparable benefits relative to SAVR. Along with a provision of a detailed overview of the current literature regarding functional and HrQoL outcomes in patients undergoing TAVR, this review article addresses specific considerations of the HrQoL aspect in the elderly patient and finally outlines the implications of HrQoL outcomes for medico-economic deliberations.

  2. Early Manifestation of Supravalvular Aortic and Pulmonary Artery Stenosis in a Patient with Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Uk Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a developmental disorder characterized by vascular abnormalities such as thickening of the vascular media layer in medium- and large-sized arteries. Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS are common vascular abnormalities in WS. The natural course of SVAS and PPAS is variable, and the timing of surgery or intervention is determined according to the progression of vascular stenosis. In our patient, SVAS and PPAS showed rapid concurrent progression within two weeks after birth. We report the early manifestation of SVAS and PPAS in the neonatal period and describe the surgical treatment for stenosis relief.

  3. A randomized trial comparing primary angioplasty versus stent placement for symptomatic intracranial stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Chaudhry, Saqib A; Siddiq, Farhan; Majidi, Shahram; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Suri, M Fareed K

    2013-01-01

    Background: Both primary angioplasty alone and angioplasty with a self-expanding stent have been compared in non-randomized concurrent clinical studies that suggest equivalent results. However, there is no randomized trial that has compared the two procedures in patients with symptomatic high grade intracranial stenosis. Objective: The primary aim of the randomized trial was to compare the clinical and angiographic efficacy of primary angioplasty and angioplasty followed by stent placement in preventing restenosis, stroke, requirement for second treatment, and death in patients with symptomatic intracranial stenosis. Methods: The study prospectively evaluated efficacy and safety of the two existing neurointerventional techniques for treatment of moderate intracranial stenosis (stenosis ≥ 50%) with documented failure of medical treatment or severe stenosis (≥70%) with or without failure of medical treatment. Results: A total of 18 patients were recruited in the study (mean age [±SD] was 64.7 ± 15.1 years); out of these, 12 were men. Of these 18, 10 were treated with primary angioplasty and 8 were treated with angioplasty followed by self-expanding stent. The technical success rates of intracranial angioplasty and stent placements defined as ability to achieve <30% residual stenosis when assessed by immediate post-procedure angiography was 5 of 10 and 5 of 8 patients, respectively. The total fluoroscopic time (mean [±SD]) was lower in patients undergoing primary angioplasty 37 [±11] min versus those undergoing angioplasty followed by self-expanding stent 42 [±15] min, P = 0.4321. The stroke and death rate within 1 month was very low in both patient groups (1 of 10 versus 0 of 8 patients). One patient randomized to stent placement continued to have recurrent ischemic symptoms requiring another angioplasty in the vertebral artery on post-procedure Day 2. Conclusions: The trial suggests that a randomized trial comparing primary angioplasty to angioplasty

  4. Increased transcript level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) in human tricuspid compared with bicuspid aortic valves correlates with the stenosis severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Edit; Caidahl, Kenneth; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Bäck, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathomechanism of calcific aortic valve stenosis. ► We assessed the transcript levels for PARP-1 (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase), acts as a DNA damage nick sensor in stenotic valves. ► Early stage of diseased tricuspid valves exhibited higher mRNA levels for PARP-1 compared to bicuspid valves. ► The mRNA levels for PARP-1 inversely correlated with the clinical stenosis severity in tricuspid valves. ► Our data demonstrated that DNA damage pathways might be associated with stenosis severity only in tricuspid valves. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress may contribute to the hemodynamic progression of aortic valve stenosis, and is associated with activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1. The aim of the present study was to assess the transcriptional profile and the topological distribution of PARP-1 in human aortic valves, and its relation to the stenosis severity. Human stenotic aortic valves were obtained from 46 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery and used for mRNA extraction followed by quantitative real-time PCR to correlate the PARP-1 expression levels with the non invasive hemodynamic parameters quantifying the stenosis severity. Primary isolated valvular interstitial cells (VICs) were used to explore the effects of cytokines and leukotriene C 4 (LTC 4 ) on valvular PARP-1 expression. The thickened areas of stenotic valves with tricuspid morphology expressed significantly higher levels of PARP-1 mRNA compared with the corresponding part of bicuspid valves (0.501 vs 0.243, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the quantitative gene expression levels of PARP-1 were inversely correlated with the aortic valve area (AVA) (r = −0.46, P = 0.0469) and AVA indexed for body surface area (BSA) (r = −0.498; P = 0.0298) only in tricuspid aortic valves. LTC 4 (1 nM) significantly elevated the mRNA levels of PARP-1 by 2.38-fold in VICs. Taken together, these data suggest that

  5. Computed Tomography Aortic Valve Calcium Scoring in Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawade, Tania; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Julien; Mathieu, Tiffany; Tastet, Lionel; Renard, Cedric; Gun, Mesut; Jenkins, William Steven Arthur; Macron, Laurent; Sechrist, Jacob W; Lacomis, Joan M; Nguyen, Virginia; Galian Gay, Laura; Cuéllar Calabria, Hug; Ntalas, Ioannis; Cartlidge, Timothy Robert Graham; Prendergast, Bernard; Rajani, Ronak; Evangelista, Arturo; Cavalcante, João L; Newby, David E; Pibarot, Philippe; Messika Zeitoun, David; Dweck, Marc R

    2018-03-01

    Computed tomography aortic valve calcium scoring (CT-AVC) holds promise for the assessment of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). We sought to establish the clinical utility of CT-AVC in an international multicenter cohort of patients. Patients with AS who underwent ECG-gated CT-AVC within 3 months of echocardiography were entered into an international, multicenter, observational registry. Optimal CT-AVC thresholds for diagnosing severe AS were determined in patients with concordant echocardiographic assessments, before being used to arbitrate disease severity in those with discordant measurements. In patients with long-term follow-up, we assessed whether CT-AVC thresholds predicted aortic valve replacement and death. In 918 patients from 8 centers (age, 77±10 years; 60% men; peak velocity, 3.88±0.90 m/s), 708 (77%) patients had concordant echocardiographic assessments, in whom CT-AVC provided excellent discrimination for severe AS (C statistic: women 0.92, men 0.89). Our optimal sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds (women 1377 Agatston unit and men 2062 Agatston unit) were nearly identical to those previously reported (women 1274 Agatston unit and men 2065 Agatston unit). Clinical outcomes were available in 215 patients (follow-up 1029 [126-2251] days). Sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds independently predicted aortic valve replacement and death (hazard ratio, 3.90 [95% confidence interval, 2.19-6.78]; P AVC scores, which again were an independent predictor of clinical outcomes (hazard ratio, 3.67 [95% confidence interval, 1.39-9.73]; P =0.010). Sex-specific CT-AVC thresholds accurately identify severe AS and provide powerful prognostic information. These findings support their integration into routine clinical practice. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT01358513, NCT02132026, NCT00338676, NCT00647088, NCT01679431. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Anesthetic management for laparoscopy surgery in a patient with residual coarctation of aorta and mild aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative management of patients with congenital heart disease is a challenge for the anesthesiologist. We present successful anesthetic management for diagnostic laparoscopy and cystectomy for tubo-ovarian mass in a case of residual coarctation of the aorta along with bicuspid aortic valve and mild aortic stenosis.

  7. [Selection of patients for transcatheter aortic valve implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Christophe; Godin, Matthieu; Litzler, Pierre-Yves; Bauer, Fabrice; Caudron, Jérome; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Borz, Bogdan; Canville, Alexandre; Kurtz, Baptiste; Bessou, Jean-Paul; Cribier, Alain; Eltchaninoff, Hélène

    2012-06-01

    A good selection of patients is a crucial step before transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in order to select the good indications and choose the access route. TAVI should be considered only in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis and either contraindication or high surgical risk. Indication for TAVI should be discussed in a multidisciplinary team meeting. Echocardiography and/or CT scan are mandatory to evaluate the aortic annulus size and select the good prosthesis size. The possibility of transfemoral implantation is evaluated by angiography and CT scan, and based on the arterial diameters, but also on the presence of tortuosities and arterial calcifications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary Mitral Valve Regurgitation Outcome in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis 1 Year After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Echocardiographic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Marinho Florentino

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Mitral valve regurgitation (MR, present in up to 74% of the patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS, can be a negative prognostic factor when moderate or severe. The outcome of MR after percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI and predictors associated with that outcome have not been well established in the literature. Objective: To assess the outcome of primary MR in patients submitted to TAVI and to identify associated factors. Methods: Observational study of patients with symptomatic severe AS submitted to TAVI from January 2009 to April 2015 at two specialized centers. Echocardiographic outcome was assessed with data collected before and 1 year after TAVI. Results: Of the 91 patients with MR submitted to TAVI and followed up for at least 12 months, 67 (73.6% had minimum/mild MR before the procedure and 24 (26.4% had moderate/severe MR. Of those with minimum/mild MR, 62 (92.5% had no change in the MR grade (p < 0.001, while 5 (7.5% showed worsening. Of those with moderate/severe MR, 8 (33.3% maintained the same grade and 16 (66.7% improved it (p = 0.076. Patients with moderate/severe MR who improved MR grade had lower EuroSCORE II (p = 0.023 and STS morbidity (p = 0.027 scores, as compared to those who maintained the MR grade. Conclusion: MR grades change after TAVI. This study suggests a trend towards improvement in moderate/severe MR after TAVI, which was associated with lower preoperative risk scores.

  9. Sex differences in aortic valve calcification measured by multidetector computed tomography in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Shivani R; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Cueff, Caroline; Malouf, Joseph; Araoz, Philip A; Mankad, Rekha; Michelena, Hector; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is the intrinsic mechanism of valvular obstruction leading to aortic stenosis (AS) and is measurable by multidetector computed tomography. The link between sex and AS is controversial and that with AVC is unknown. We prospectively performed multidetector computed tomography in 665 patients with AS (aortic valve area, 1.05±0.35 cm(2); mean gradient, 39±19 mm Hg) to measure AVC and to assess the impact of sex on the AVC-AS severity link in men and women. AS severity was comparable between women and men (peak aortic jet velocity: 4.05±0.99 versus 3.93±0.91 m/s, P=0.11; aortic valve area index: 0.55±0.20 versus 0.56±0.18 cm(2)/m(2); P=0.46). Conversely, AVC load was lower in women versus men (1703±1321 versus 2694±1628 arbitrary units; PAVC load were much greater in men than in women (odds ratio, 5.07; PAVC showed good associations with hemodynamic AS severity in men and women (all r>0.67; PAVC load, absolute or indexed, was higher in men versus women (all P≤0.01). In this large AS population, women incurred similar AS severity than men for lower AVC loads, even after indexing for their smaller body size. Hence, the relationship between valvular calcification process and AS severity differs in women and men, warranting further pathophysiological inquiry. For AS severity diagnostic purposes, interpretation of AVC load should be different in men and in women.

  10. Usefulness of the Electrocardiogram in Predicting Cardiovascular Mortality in Asymptomatic Adults With Aortic Stenosis (from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Dalsgaard, Morten; Bang, Casper N

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension and coronary heart disease are common in aortic stenosis (AS) and may impair prognosis for similar AS severity. Different changes in the electrocardiogram may be reflective of the separate impacts of AS, hypertension, and coronary heart disease, which could lead to enhanced risk...... stratification in AS. The aim of this study was therefore to examine if combining prognostically relevant electrocardiographic (ECG) findings improves prediction of cardiovascular mortality in asymptomatic AS. All patients with baseline electrocardiograms in the SEAS study were included. The primary end point...

  11. TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION. STATE OF THE PROBLEM AND PROSPECTS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Imaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays aortic stenosis is the most common valvular pathology in Europe and North America and its incidence increases with age. Long asymptomatic period, the duration of which varies in different patients, is the main clinical feature of this disease. In 80% of asymptomatic patients with the severe aortic stenosis the onset of clinical signs that significantly worsen the prognosis, occurs within the next 4 years. So, if two-year survival rate in asymptomatic period is at least 50%, a 5-year survival rate in patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis without surgery, according to some estimates, is reduced to 15%. Therefore, these patients do not have any alternative to surgery. At that, high risk of complications after surgery and perioperative mortality related to them are the most essential problems of surgical treatment of the aortic valve diseases in the setting of cardiopulmonary bypass. This was the decisive factor for the development of alternative methods of surgical correction of the aortic valve diseases. Indications and contraindications for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, which is currently a "disruptive technology", are discussed. Different models of aortic valve prostheses, the use of which is confirmed by the available evidence, are considered. The most important unsolved problems of TAVI use in recent times are mentioned in brief. More than 300 TAVI procedures have been performed in Russia recently which definitely does not cover the actual needs.

  12. TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE IMPLANTATION. STATE OF THE PROBLEM AND PROSPECTS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Imaev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays aortic stenosis is the most common valvular pathology in Europe and North America and its incidence increases with age. Long asymptomatic period, the duration of which varies in different patients, is the main clinical feature of this disease. In 80% of asymptomatic patients with the severe aortic stenosis the onset of clinical signs that significantly worsen the prognosis, occurs within the next 4 years. So, if two-year survival rate in asymptomatic period is at least 50%, a 5-year survival rate in patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis without surgery, according to some estimates, is reduced to 15%. Therefore, these patients do not have any alternative to surgery. At that, high risk of complications after surgery and perioperative mortality related to them are the most essential problems of surgical treatment of the aortic valve diseases in the setting of cardiopulmonary bypass. This was the decisive factor for the development of alternative methods of surgical correction of the aortic valve diseases. Indications and contraindications for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, which is currently a "disruptive technology", are discussed. Different models of aortic valve prostheses, the use of which is confirmed by the available evidence, are considered. The most important unsolved problems of TAVI use in recent times are mentioned in brief. More than 300 TAVI procedures have been performed in Russia recently which definitely does not cover the actual needs.

  13. A comparison of conventional surgery, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and sutureless valves in "real-world" patients with aortic stenosis and intermediate- to high-risk profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneretto, Claudio; Alfieri, Ottavio; Cesana, Bruno Mario; Bisleri, Gianluigi; De Bonis, Michele; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Savini, Carlo; Folesani, Gianluca; Di Bacco, Lorenzo; Rambaldini, Manfredo; Maureira, Juan Pablo; Laborde, Francois; Tespili, Maurizio; Repossini, Alberto; Folliguet, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    We sought to investigate the clinical outcomes of patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis and an intermediate- to high-risk profile treated by means of conventional surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement), sutureless valve implantation, or transcatheter aortic valve replacement in a multicenter evaluation. Among 991 consecutive patients with isolated severe aortic stenosis and an intermediate- to high-risk profile (Society of Thoracic Surgeons score >4 and logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation I >10), a propensity score analysis was performed on the basis of the therapeutic strategy: surgical aortic valve replacement (n = 204), sutureless valve implantation (n = 204), and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (n = 204). Primary end points were 30-day mortality and overall survival at 24-month follow-up; the secondary end point was survival free from a composite end point of major adverse cardiac events (defined as cardiac-related mortality, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accidents, and major hemorrhagic events) and periprosthetic regurgitation greater than 2. Thirty-day mortality was significantly higher in the transcatheter aortic valve replacement group (surgical aortic valve replacement = 3.4% vs sutureless = 5.8% vs transcatheter aortic valve replacement = 9.8%; P = .005). The incidence of postprocedural was 3.9% in asurgical aortic valve replacement vs 9.8% in sutureless vs 14.7% in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (Prisk factor for overall mortality hazard ratio (hazard ratio, 2.5; confidence interval, 1.1-4.2; P = .018). The use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with an intermediate- to high-risk profile was associated with a significantly higher incidence of perioperative complications and decreased survival at short- and mid-term when compared with conventional surgery and sutureless valve implantation. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by

  14. Heart Team therapeutic decision-making and treatment in severe aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted; Holmberg, Fredrik; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: After transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been available for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS), the decision-making of the Heart Team (HT) has not been examined. Design: All adult patients with severe AVS referred to a large tertiary medical......%), and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in 392 (81%) of patients. In patients referred to intervention, TAVI compared with SAVR patients were older (OR = 1.17 per year, 95% CI 1.09-1.26; p obesity (OR = 4.69, 1.......51-13.77; p disease (COPD) (OR = 3.66, 1.21-10.75; p = 0.02). MT patients compared with patients referred to any intervention were older, had a higher prevalence of COPD, peripheral arterial disease, previous myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease...

  15. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With Early- and New-Generation Devices in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Sung Han; Lefèvre, Thierry; Ahn, Jung Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis (AS). Particularly, limited data exist comparing the results of TAVR with new-generation devices versus early-generation devices.  Objectives...... This study sought to evaluate the clinical outcomes of TAVR for bicuspid AS with early- and new-generation devices.  Methods The Bicuspid TAVR Registry is an international multicenter study enrolling consecutive patients with bicuspid AS undergoing TAVR between April 2005 and May 2015.  Results Of 301...... patients, 199 patients (71.1%) were treated with early-generation devices (Sapien XT [Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, Irvine, California]: n = 87; CoreValve [Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota]: n = 112) and 102 with new-generation devices (Sapien 3 [Edwards Lifesciences Corporation]: n = 91; Lotus...

  16. Relationship between pattern of ischemic manifestation and hemodynamics in symptomatic M1 stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokumitsu, Naoki; Sako, Kazuhiro; Aizawa, Shizuka; Shirai, Wakako

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism through which ischemic manifestations develop in patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis is still uncertain. It may cause ischemic symptoms through both embolic and hemodynamic mechanisms. In this study, we compared the findings from cerebral angiograms with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with M1 stenosis to determine the pathogenesis of ischema. At our hospital from 1994 to 2000, 14 patients (12 males and 2 females; mean age, 60.9; range, 31 to 85 years) with angiographically demonstrated symptomatic M1 stenosis were enrolled in this study. In 10, their stenotic lesion was located at the proximal site of the perforating arteries and for the other 4, stenosis was found at the distal site. Nine presented with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and 5 with completed stroke for an initial episode. The discrepancy in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was evaluated in relation to the site and degree of stenosis, type of ischemic presentation, and frequency of ischemic events. There was no significant difference in CBF between the patients with stenosis involving the proximal site and those with distal stenosis; but the cortical CBF decreased significantly in those with severe stenosis compared with moderate stenosis. The cortical CBF of those who had a complete stroke is similar to that of the patients with TIA; but CBF of BGA decreased significantly in those with a complete stroke. The single ischemic event group showed a significant decrease in cortical CBF. On the other hand, the group with multiple ischemic events exhibited normal hemodynamics. We concluded that multiple ischemic events that occurred in M1 stenosis are caused by an embolic mechanism. (author)

  17. Edema pulmonar refractario secundario a estenosis valvular aórtica severa - valvuloplastia aórtica como terapia puente a cirugía: Presentación de un caso Refractory pulmonary edema secondary to severe aortic valvular stenosis - aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Salazar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available La estenosis valvular aórtica es una entidad progresiva, que cuando es severa y produce síntomas, tiene un pronóstico sombrío que afecta de forma adversa la sobrevida. En estos casos el tratamiento de elección es la cirugía de cambio valvular, la cual, bajo determinadas circunstancias clínicas, puede ser de muy alto riesgo, y obliga así a considerar alternativas de manejo menos agresivas que permitan solucionar el problema. Se muestra el caso de un hombre de 65 años, con estenosis valvular aórtica severa, quien desarrolló edema pulmonar refractario al manejo médico, que se resolvió mediante valvuloplastia aórtica, como terapia puente a cirugía.Aortic valve stenosis is a progressive disease; when it is severe and symptomatic has a bleak prognosis that affects adversely the patient survival. In these cases, the treatment of choice is valve replacement surgery that under certain circumstances can bear a huge risk that forces the physician to consider less aggressive management alternatives to solve the problem. The case of a 65 years old male with severe aortic valve stenosis is reported. He developed pulmonary edema refractory to medical treatment that was solved by aortic valvuloplasty as bridge therapy to surgery.

  18. Differences in cardiovascular risk profile between electrocardiographic hypertrophy versus strain in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (from SEAS data)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Electrocardiograms are routinely obtained in clinical follow-up of patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). The association with aortic valve, left ventricular (LV) response to long-term pressure load, and clinical covariates is unclear and the clinical value is thus uncertain. Data from ...

  19. Enterprise stent for the treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis: an initial experience of 44 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhengzhe; Duan, Guoli; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Lei; Xu, Yi; Hong, Bo; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2015-10-08

    Wingspan stenting for the treatment of complex intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS), i.e., that involving tortuous vascular pathways, long (>15 mm) lesions or arterial bifurcations, has a relatively high risk of complications. This retrospective study assessed the safety and efficacy of undersized balloon angioplasty followed by deployment of the more flexible Enterprise stent for the treatment of complex symptomatic ICAS. Forty-four patients on combined antiplatelet therapy and intensive risk factor management and a symptomatic 70-99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery in complex settings that was treated with balloon angioplasty and Enterprise stent deployment between July 2009 and August 2013 were enrolled. Primary outcome was occurrence of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke or death within 30 days after intervention. Secondary outcomes included procedural success (defined as achievement of 50% in-stent restenosis after mean 22 months follow-up. In this retrospective, single-center experience, undersized balloon angioplasty followed by Enterprise stent deployment appears technically feasible with a relatively low rate of complications for the treatment of complex symptomatic ICAS. Prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trials against optimal medical management are warranted.

  20. Is Revision Surgery Justified for Symptomatic Pancreatico-enteric Anastomotic Stenosis in Long-term Survivors Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy for Malignancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Prasad; Yadav, Kamal Sunder; Sali, Priyanka Akhilesh; Garg, Raman; Varty, Paresh

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatico-enteric anastomotic (PEA) stenosis is one of the late complications following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and reported for benign diseases. Literature for PEA stenosis following PD for malignancy is very limited due to low survival. Patients undergoing surgery for symptomatic, recurrent, obstructive pancreatitis due to PEA stenosis following PD for malignancy were retrospectively identified from the authors' prospective database between January 1997 and December 2014. Six patients with median age 56.5 years underwent revision surgery for PEA stenosis during this time period. At primary PD, all were node negative with T1/T2 disease. The primary PEA were pancreatico-jejunostomy (PJ) (n = 5) and pancreatico-gastrostomy (n = 1). Median time to develop symptoms was 62 months. At revision surgery, a Roux-en-Y longitudinal PJ (n = 5) and an end-to-side PJ (n = 1) were done. With a median follow-up of 36 months, pain relief was excellent (n = 5) to average (n = 1). With improving long-term survival in patients undergoing PD for malignancy more such patients will be identified in future. Patients with symptomatic PEA stenosis following PD for malignancy can be managed surgically, with excellent outcomes in centers of expertise in pancreatic surgery.

  1. High-pressure balloon dilation in a dog with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkos, A; Stauthammer, C; Rittenberg, R; Barncord, K

    2017-02-01

    A 6-month-old female intact Goldendoodle was presented for diagnostic work up of a grade IV/VI left basilar systolic heart murmur. An echocardiogram was performed and revealed a ridge of tissue distal to the aortic valve leaflets at the sinotubular junction causing an instantaneous pressure gradient of 62 mmHg across the supravalvular aortic stenosis and moderate concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle. Intervention with a high-pressure balloon dilation catheter was pursued and significantly decreased the pressure gradient to 34 mmHg. No complications were encountered. The patient returned in 5 months for re-evaluation and static long-term reduction in the pressure gradient was noted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term outcomes after stenting versus endarterectomy for treatment of symptomatic carotid stenosis: the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonati, Leo H.; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Ederle, Jörg; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Mali, Willem P. Th M.; Beard, Jonathan D.; Cleveland, Trevor; Engelter, Stefan T.; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Ford, Gary A.; Dorman, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Doig, D.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Kennedy, F.; Tindall, H.; Turner, E.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stenting is an alternative to endarterectomy for treatment of carotid artery stenosis, but long-term efficacy is uncertain. We report long-term data from the randomised International Carotid Stenting Study comparison of these treatments. Methods Patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis

  3. Noncardiac Surgery in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Jørgensen, Mads Emil; Martinsson, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    (MACE) and all-cause mortality were investigated in a contemporary Danish cohort. HYPOTHESIS: AS is not an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes in noncardiac surgery. METHODS: All patients with and without diagnosed AS who underwent noncardiac surgery in 2005 to 2011 were identified through......BACKGROUND: Past research has identified aortic stenosis (AS) as a major risk factor for adverse outcomes in noncardiac surgery; however, more contemporary studies have questioned the grave prognosis. To further our understanding of this, the risks of a 30-day major adverse cardiovascular event...... nationwide administrative registers. AS patients (n = 2823; mean age, 75.5 years, 53% female) were matched with patients without AS (n = 2823) on propensity score for AS and surgery type. RESULTS: In elective surgery, MACE (ie, nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or cardiovascular death...

  4. A clinical study on perforator stroke resulting from Wingspan stent angioplasty for symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ziliang; Xu Haowen; Li Tianxiao; Zhu Liangfu; Li Zhaoshuo; Xue Jiangyu; Bai Weixing; Li Li; Guan Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence, potential hazards and effective countermeasure for perforator stroke (PS) resulting from stent angioplasty of symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis. Methods: Peri-operation PS complications of 258 patients receiving Gateway balloon-Wingspan stenting for severe symptomatic intracranial stenosis were analyzed. The incidence, clinical course, and prognosis of PS resulting from stenting were recorded. Special attention was given to the anatomical features, clinical manifestation and video materials of patients with PS. χ 2 test was used for statistics. Results: Two hundred and fifty-five patients received stent angioplasty successfully and 7 patients had PS (incidence rate 2.7%). The patients with basilar artery stenosis had a higher incidence of PS resulting from intracranial stenting (6.1%, 4/66) than patients with middle cerebral artery stenosis (2.5%, 3/118) (χ 2 =2.320, P= 0.025). The potential hazards for PS included preoperative perforator stroke adjacent to the stenotic segment and prominent dissection during operation. Six patients presented symptoms after awake from general anaesthesia and one had symptoms 3 hours after stenting. One deteriorated gradually and the others reached the maximum deficit almost at once. At the follow-up of 3 months, 3 patients were disabled and scored one, two, two by mRS respectively. Conclusion: The incidence of PS resulting from intracranial stenting was low and the prognosis was not disastrous. Stenosis at basilar artery and preoperative perforator stroke adjacent to the stenotic segment were potential risk factors for PS complication. Proper maneuver of angioplasty may decrease the incidence of PS and improve the prognosis. (authors)

  5. Global left ventricular load in asymptomatic aortic stenosis: covariates and prognostic implication (the SEAS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieck Åshild E

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Valvuloarterial impedance (Zva is a measure of global (combined valvular and arterial load opposing left ventricular (LV ejection in aortic stenosis (AS. The present study identified covariates and tested the prognostic significance of global LV load in patients with asymptomatic AS. Methods 1418 patients with mild-moderate, asymptomatic AS in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS study were followed for a mean of 43±14 months during randomized, placebo-controlled treatment with combined simvastatin 40 mg and ezetimibe 10 mg daily. High global LV load was defined as Zva >5 mm Hg/ml/m2. The impact of baseline global LV load on rate of major cardiovascular (CV events, aortic valve events and total mortality was assessed in Cox regression models reporting hazard ratio (HR and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI. Results High global LV load was found in 18% (n=252 of patients and associated with female gender, higher age, hypertension, more severe AS and lower ejection fraction (all p Conclusion In asymptomatic AS, assessment of global LV load adds complementary information on prognosis to that provided by hypertension or established prognosticators like AS severity and LV ejection fraction.

  6. Exercise-induced changes in left ventricular global longitudinal strain in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Agnieszka K; Dobrowolski, Piotr P; Klisiewicz, Anna; Hoffman, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (ASAS) is still under discussion. Therefore, it is advisable to search for the parameters of early damage to left ventricular (LV) function. The aim of the study was to assess exercise-induced changes in LV global longitudinal strain (GLS) in ASAS. The ASAS group consisted of 50 patients (26 women and 24 men, aged 38.4 ± 18.1 years) meeting the echocardiographic criteria of severe aortic stenosis (AVA 4 m/s, mean aortic gradient > 40 mm Hg), with normal LV ejection fraction (LVEF ≥ 55%) and sinus rhythm on electrocardiogram, and without significant concomitant valvular heart diseases. The control group consisted of 21 people matched for age and sex. Echocardiographic examinations and echocardiographic stress tests with the assessment of GLS using the speckle tracking imaging were performed. The ASAS group was characterised by statistically significantly higher LV mass index (LVMI) and higher LVEF. GLS values at rest in both groups were within normal limits but were significantly higher in the control group (-18.9 ± 2.4% vs. -20.7 ± 1.7%, p = 0.006). An increase in GLS at peak exercise in both groups was observed, lower in the ASAS group (the difference was not statistically significant: -0.8 ± 3.0% vs. -2.2 ± 3.1%, p = 0.086). Changes in GLS during exercise (ΔGLS) did not correlate with the parameters of the severity of aortic stenosis. In the multivariate model, LVMI proved to be a factor associated with GLS at rest and during exercise. In patients with ASAS, GLS is a non-invasive marker of an early stage of LV myocardial damage associated with myocardial hypertrophy. An increase in GLS during exercise in the ASAS group, smaller than in the control group, indicates a preserved functional reserve of the LV myocardium but smaller than in healthy individuals. The assessment of the clinical usefulness of exercise-induced changes in GLS requires further research.

  7. A risk score for predicting mortality in patients with asymptomatic mild to moderate aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Ingar; Pedersen, Terje R; Boman, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundPrognostic information for asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS) from prospective studies is scarce and there is no risk score available to assess mortality.ObjectivesTo develop an easily calculable score, from which clinicians could stratify patients into high and lower risk...

  8. Coronary Physiology During Exercise and Vasodilation in the Healthy Heart and in Severe Aortic Stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lumley, Matthew; Williams, Rupert; Asrress, Kaleab N.; Arri, Satpal; Briceno, Natalia; Ellis, Howard; Rajani, Ronak; Siebes, Maria; Piek, Jan J.; Clapp, Brian; Redwood, Simon R.; Marber, Michael S.; Chambers, John B.; Perera, Divaka

    2016-01-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) can manifest as exertional angina even in the presence of unobstructed coronary arteries. The authors describe coronary physiological changes during exercise and hyperemia in the healthy heart and in patients with severe AS. Simultaneous intracoronary pressure and flow

  9. Central Sleep Apnea in Patients due to Severe Aortic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Prinz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available History. We report about the course of central sleep apnea (CSA in 3 patients (70.3±15.2 years with severe aortic stenosis (AS (AVA≤1.0 cm2, NYHA 2.7±1.4. Investigations. Every patient received echocardiography, left/right-heart catheterization, and cardiorespiratory polygraphy before and 6 months after surgical aortic valve replacement (without right-heart catheterization during follow up. Course. Preoperatively all patients demonstrated reduced systolic left ventricular function (EF <55%. They had elevated pulmoraryarterialy pressures and severe CSA. After valve replacement left ventricular function and exercise capacity improved, as well as the severity of CSA. Conclusion. Patients with severe AS can develop CSA, which seems to improve after surgery. Patients with severe AS should be screened for CSA, because CSA might be an additional risk factor and hint that myocardial adaptation is exhausting.

  10. Predictive value of platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe Edem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS is the most common cause of left ventricular outflow obstruction, and its prevalence among elderly patients causes a major public health burden. Recently, platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR has been recognized as a novel prognostic biomarker that offers information about both aggregation and inflammation pathways. Since PLR indicates inflammation, we hypothesized that PLR may be associated with the severity of AVS due to chronic inflammation pathways that cause stiffness and calcification of the aortic valve. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively enrolled 117 patients with severe degenerative AVS, who underwent aortic valve replacement and 117 control patients in our clinic. PLR was defined as the absolute platelet count divided by the absolute lymphocyte count. Severe AVS was defined as calcification and sclerosis of the valve with a mean pressure gradient of >40 mmHg. Results: PLR was 197.03 ± 49.61 in the AVS group and 144.9 ± 40.35 in the control group, which indicated a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis demonstrated that PLR values over 188 predicted the severity of aortic stenosis with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 70% (95% confidence interval = 0.734–0.882; P < 0.001; area under ROC curve: 0.808. Conclusion: We suggest that the level of PLR elevation is related to the severity of degenerative AVS, and PLR should be used to monitor patients' inflammatory responses and the efficacy of treatment, which will lead us to more closely monitor this high-risk population to detect severe degenerative AVS at an early stage.

  11. Effect of Randomized Lipid Lowering With Simvastatin and Ezetimibe on Cataract Development (from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper N; Greve, Anders M; Dornonville de la Cour, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Recent American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on statin initiation on the basis of total atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk argue that the preventive effect of statins on cardiovascular events outweigh the side effects, although this is controversial. Studies...... indicate a possible effect of statin therapy on reducing risk of lens opacities. However, the results are conflicting. The Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis study (NCT00092677) enrolled 1,873 patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis and no history of diabetes, coronary heart disease, or other...

  12. Initial non-opioid based anesthesia in a parturient having severe aortic stenosis undergoing cesarean section with aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Podder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in presence of severe aortic stenosis (AS causes worsening of symptoms needing further intervention. In the advanced stages of pregnancy, some patients may even require aortic valve replacement (AVR and cesarean delivery in the same sitting. Opioid based general anesthesia for combined lower segment cesarean section (LSCS with AVR has been described. However, the use of opioid may lead to fetal morbidity and need of respiratory support for the baby. We describe successful anesthetic management for LSCS with AVR in a >33 week gravida with severe AS and congestive heart failure. We avoided opioids till delivery of the baby AVR; the delivered neonate showed a normal APGAR score.

  13. Implementing a Continuous Quality Improvement Program in a High-Volume Clinical Echocardiography Laboratory: Improving Care for Patients With Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Zainab; Minter, Stephanie; Armour, Alicia; Tinnemore, Amanda; Sivak, Joseph A; Sedberry, Brenda; Strub, Karen; Horan, Seanna M; Harrison, J Kevin; Kisslo, Joseph; Douglas, Pamela S; Velazquez, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    The management of aortic stenosis rests on accurate echocardiographic diagnosis. Hence, it was chosen as a test case to examine the utility of continuous quality improvement (CQI) approaches to increase echocardiographic data accuracy and reliability. A novel, multistep CQI program was designed and prospectively used to investigate whether it could minimize the difference in aortic valve mean gradients reported by echocardiography when compared with cardiac catheterization. The Duke Echo Laboratory compiled a multidisciplinary CQI team including 4 senior sonographers and MD faculty to develop a mapped CQI process that incorporated Intersocietal Accreditation Commission standards. Quarterly, the CQI team reviewed all moderate- or greater-severity aortic stenosis echocardiography studies with concomitant catheterization data, and deidentified individual and group results were shared at meetings attended by cardiologists and sonographers. After review of 2011 data, the CQI team proposed specific amendments implemented over 2012: the use of nontraditional imaging and Doppler windows as well as evaluation of aortic gradients by a second sonographer. The primary outcome measure was agreement between catheterization- and echocardiography-derived mean gradients calculated by using the coverage probability index with a prespecified acceptable echocardiography-catheterization difference of <10 mm Hg in mean gradient. Between January 2011 and January 2014, 2093 echocardiograms reported moderate or greater aortic stenosis. Among cases with available catheterization data pre- and post-CQI, the coverage probability index increased from 54% to 70% (P=0.03; 98 cases, year 2011; 70 cases, year 2013). The proportion of patients referred for invasive valve hemodynamics decreased from 47% pre-CQI to 19% post-CQI (P<0.001). A laboratory practice pattern that was amenable to reform was identified, and a multistep modification was designed and implemented that produced clinically

  14. Impact of pannus formation on hemodynamic dysfunction of prosthetic aortic valve: pannus extent and its relationship to prosthetic valve motion and degree of stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun Jung; Ha, Hojin; Kang, Joon-Won; Kim, Jeong A; Song, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Hwa Jung; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2018-02-19

    Although pannus is an important cause of prosthetic valve dysfunction, the minimum pannus size that can induce hemodynamic dysfunction has not yet been determined. This study investigated the correlation between the limitation of motion (LOM) of the prosthetic valve and pannus extent and determined the pannus extent that could induce severe aortic stenosis. This study included 49 patients who underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) and showed pannus on cardiac computed tomography (CT). Pannus width, ratio of pannus width to valve diameter, pannus area, effective orifice area, encroachment ratio by pannus, pannus involvement angle and percent LOM of mechanical valves were evaluated on CT. Transvalvular peak velocity (TPV) and transvalvular pressure gradient (TPG) were measured by transesophageal echocardiography to determine the degree of aortic stenosis. The relationship between percent LOM of the prosthetic valve and pannus extent and the cut-off of pannus extent required to induce severe aortic stenosis were evaluated. The mean interval between AVR and pannus formation was 11 years and was longer in patients with than without severe aortic stenosis (14.0 vs. 7.3 years). On CT, the percent LOM of the prosthetic valve was significantly associated with the extent of pannus only in patients with pannus involvement angle > 180° (r = 0.55-0.68, P Pannus width, effective orifice area, and encroachment ratio were significantly associated with increased TPV and TPG (r = 0.51-0.62, P Pannus width > 3.5 mm, pannus width/valve inner diameter > 0.15, and encroachment ratio > 0.14 were significantly associated with severe aortic stenosis (TPV > 4 m/s; mean TPG ≥ 35 mmHg), with c-indices of 0.74-079 (P pannus extent parameters are good indicators of significant hemodynamic changes with increased TPV and mean TPG.

  15. Impact of Aortic Insufficiency on Ascending Aortic Dilatation and Adverse Aortic Events After Isolated Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With a Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongshi; Wu, Boting; Li, Jun; Dong, Lili; Wang, Chunsheng; Shu, Xianhong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant flow pattern and congenital fragility bestows bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with a propensity toward ascending aorta dilatation, aneurysm, and dissection. Whether isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) can prevent further dilatation in BAV ascending aorta and what indicates concurrent aortic intervention in the case of valve operation remain controversial. From June 2006 to January 2009, patients with a BAV who underwent isolated AVR were consecutively included and categorized into aortic insufficiency (BAV-AI, n = 84) and aortic stenosis (n = 112) groups, and another population of patients with a tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency (n = 149) was also recruited during the same period for comparison of annual aortic dilatation rate and adverse aortic events after isolated AVR. With a median follow-up period of 72 months (interquartile range, 66 to 78 months), ascending aorta dilatation rates were faster in the BAV-AI group than the BAV plus aortic stenosis and tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency groups (both p regression analysis identified aortic insufficiency (hazard ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 11.1; p = 0.019) as an independent risk factor for adverse aortic events among patients with BAV in general, whereas preoperative ascending aortic diameter larger than 45 mm (hazard ratio, 13.8; 95% confidence interval, 3.0 to 63.3; p = 0.001) served as a prognostic indicator in the BAV-AI group. An aggressive policy of preventive aortic interventions seemed appropriate in patients with BAV-AI during AVR, and BAV phenotype presenting as either insufficiency or stenosis should be taken into consideration when contemplating optimal surgical strategies for BAV aortopathy. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Plaque inflammation and unstable morphology are associated with early stroke recurrence in symptomatic carotid stenosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marnane, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Although symptomatic carotid stenosis is associated with 3-fold increased risk of early stroke recurrence, the pathophysiologic mechanisms of high early stroke risk have not been established. We aimed to investigate the relationship between early stroke recurrence after initial symptoms and histological features of plaque inflammation and instability in resected carotid plaque.

  17. Aortic stenosis concomitant with microscopic polyangiitis: a challenge in medical reasoning and thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Aiello, Vera Demarchi

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) is part of the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-related vasculitis, which usually presents as renal pulmonary syndrome. It is defined as a pauci-immune necrotizing small vessel vasculitis, which usually affects the kidneys, followed by the lungs. It also presents systemic symptoms. The etiology of MPA is still unclear, but evidence reinforces the autoimmune mechanisms as the main etiopathogenic factor. Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is not an uncommon disease whose etiology varies according to geographical differences and the patient's age. The natural history of AS begins with a prolonged asymptomatic period, but when symptomatic, respiratory failure is one of its main clinical presentations. The authors present the case of a 55-year-old woman who was admitted with the diagnosis of renal failure, anemia, and a cardiac murmur. The patient had been recently diagnosed with pneumonia. During hospitalization, diagnostic workup disclosed a normal kidney size as well as parenchymal thickness. A renal biopsy was undertaken but the specimen was exiguous, showing 4 sclerotic glomeruli and 1 glomerulus with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The search for ANCA was positive. The investigation of the cardiac murmur disclosed AS. The patient, on hemodialysis, presented episodes of respiratory failure, which was interpreted as acute pulmonary edema, but a suspicion of ANCA-related pulmonary renal syndrome was raised. However, the aortic valve replacement was prioritized. While awaiting cardiac surgery, the patient died because of respiratory insufficiency. Autopsy findings concluded that MPA with pulmonary hemorrhage due to vasculitis was the immediate cause of death. Although AS was present at autopsy and classified as moderate/severe, this lesion was a bystander in the process of this patient's end of life, demonstrating the value of autopsy for medical learning and reasoning purposes.

  18. Aortic stenosis concomitant with microscopic polyangiitis: a challenge in medical reasoning and thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sampaio Gutierrez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA is part of the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA-related vasculitis, which usually presents as renal pulmonary syndrome. It is defined as a pauci-immune necrotizing small vessel vasculitis, which usually affects the kidneys, followed by the lungs. It also presents systemic symptoms. The etiology of MPA is still unclear, but evidence reinforces the autoimmune mechanisms as the main etiopathogenic factor. Aortic valve stenosis (AS is not an uncommon disease whose etiology varies according to geographical differences and the patient’s age. The natural history of AS begins with a prolonged asymptomatic period, but when symptomatic, respiratory failure is one of its main clinical presentations. The authors present the case of a 55-year-old woman who was admitted with the diagnosis of renal failure, anemia, and a cardiac murmur. The patient had been recently diagnosed with pneumonia. During hospitalization, diagnostic workup disclosed a normal kidney size as well as parenchymal thickness. A renal biopsy was undertaken but the specimen was exiguous, showing 4 sclerotic glomeruli and 1 glomerulus with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The search for ANCA was positive. The investigation of the cardiac murmur disclosed AS. The patient, on hemodialysis, presented episodes of respiratory failure, which was interpreted as acute pulmonary edema, but a suspicion of ANCA-related pulmonary renal syndrome was raised. However, the aortic valve replacement was prioritized. While awaiting cardiac surgery, the patient died because of respiratory insufficiency. Autopsy findings concluded that MPA with pulmonary hemorrhage due to vasculitis was the immediate cause of death. Although AS was present at autopsy and classified as moderate/severe, this lesion was a bystander in the process of this patient’s end of life, demonstrating the value of autopsy for medical learning and reasoning purposes.

  19. Contemporary management of symptomatic primary aortic mural thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Himanshu; Meda, Narendranadh; Vora, Simit; George, Robbie K; Tripathi, Ramesh K

    2014-12-01

    Primary aortic mural thrombus (PAMT) is an uncommon condition but an important source of noncardiogenic emboli with a difficult diagnosis and a high rate of complications, including high mortality. We report our experience of thromboembolic disease from PAMT and review its contemporary management. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of all patients who presented with acute occlusion of a limb or visceral vessels between January 2011 and September 2013 was performed. A total of 88 patients presented with acute occlusion of the extremities or visceral arteries. All underwent extensive evaluation for the possible source of the embolism. Of these 88 patients, 19 patients (mean age, 41.2 years; male:female ratio, 1:2.1) were found to have aortic mural thrombus as the source of distal embolism. Thrombus was located in the thoracic aorta in 10 patients, in the perivisceral aorta in three patients, and in the infrarenal aorta in six patients. Thrombus in the thoracic aorta was treated with stent grafts in four patients, bare metal stents in three patients, and anticoagulation alone in two patients. In the suprarenal abdominal aorta, all three patients underwent trapdoor aortic thrombectomy. Infrarenal aortic thrombus was managed by aortobifemoral embolectomy in two patients, aortic stenting in two patients, surgical thrombectomy in one patient, and anticoagulation alone in one patient. Successful treatment, defined as freedom from further embolic events or recurrence of thrombus, was achieved in 14 of 19 patients (76.4%) with a mean follow-up period of 16.2 months (range, 2-28 months). There were four (21%) thrombus-related deaths, all due to primary thromboembolic insults. One patient needed a below-knee amputation because of a recurrent thrombotic episode. Symptomatic PAMT is an uncommon but important source of noncardiogenic embolus. It appears to occur more frequently in young women. Endovascular coverage of the aortic thrombus, when feasible

  20. Visual Aids for Improving Patient Decision Making in Severe Symptomatic Carotid Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Sebastian; Saposnik, Gustavo; Sposato, Luciano A

    2017-12-01

    Because of the large amount of information to process and the limited time of a clinical consult, choosing between carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid angioplasty with stenting (CAS) can be confusing for patients with severe symptomatic internal carotid stenosis (ICA). We aim to develop a visual aid tool to help clinicians and patients in the decision-making process of selecting between CEA and CAS. Based on pooled analysis from randomized controlled trials including patients with symptomatic and severe ICA (SSICA), we generated visual plots comparing CEA with CAS for 3 prespecified postprocedural time points: (1) any stroke or death at 4 months, and (2) any stroke or death in the first 30 days and ipsilateral stroke thereafter at 5 years and (3) at 10 years. A total of 4574 participants (2393 assigned to CAS, and 2361 to CEA) were included in the analyses. For every 100 patients with SSICA, 6 would develop any stroke or death in the CEA group compared with 9 undergoing CAS at 4 months (hazard ratio [HR] 1.53; 95%CI 1.20-1.95). At 5 years, 7 patients in the CEA group would develop any periprocedural stroke or death and ipsilateral stroke thereafter versus 12 undergoing CAS (HR 1.72; 95%CI 1.24-2.39), compared with 10 patients in the CEA and 13 in the CAS groups at 10 years (HR 1.17; 95%CI 0.82-1.66). Visual aids presented in this study could potentially help patients with severe symptomatic internal carotid stenosis to better weigh the risks and benefits of CEA versus CAS as a function of time, allowing for the prioritization of personal preferences, and should be prospectively assessed. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of Valvuloarterial Impedance on Concentric Remodeling in Aortic Stenosis and Its Regression after Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jeong Yoon; Seo, Jeong-Sook; Sun, Byung Joo; Kim, Dae-Hee; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    Left ventricle (LV) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) faces a double hemodynamic load incorporating both valvular stenosis and reduced systemic arterial compliance (SAC). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of global LV afterload on LV hypertrophy (LVH) before and after aortic valve replacement (AVR). The study cohort included 453 patients (247 males; mean age, 64 ± 11 years) who underwent AVR. Pre- and post-AVR echocardiographic examinations were retrospectively analyzed including an index of valvuloarterial impedance (Z VA ) and LV mass index/LV end-diastolic volume index (LVMI/LVEDVI) as a parameter of LVH. Pre-AVR LVMI/LVEDVI was 2.7 ± 0.9 g/mL with an aortic valve area (AVA) of 0.6 ± 0.2 cm 2 . Z VA was 5.9 ± 1.9 mm Hg/mL/m 2 and showed a stronger correlation (β = 0.601, p regression in 322 patients with follow-up duration >1 year after AVR. Z VA is a major determinant of concentric remodeling in AS before AVR and LVH regression after AVR, which should be incorporated in routine evaluation of AS.

  2. Effect of tricuspid regurgitation and the right heart on survival after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: insights from the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves II inoperable cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Maniar, Hersh S; Jaber, Wael A; Lerakis, Stamatios; Mack, Michael J; Suri, Rakesh M; Thourani, Vinod H; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Kereiakes, Dean J; Whisenant, Brian; Miller, D Craig; Tuzcu, E Murat; Svensson, Lars G; Xu, Ke; Doshi, Darshan; Leon, Martin B; Zajarias, Alan

    2015-04-01

    Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) and right ventricular (RV) dysfunction adversely affect outcomes in patients with heart failure or mitral valve disease, but their impact on outcomes in patients with aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement has not been well characterized. Among 542 patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis treated in the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNER) II trial (inoperable cohort) with a Sapien or Sapien XT valve via a transfemoral approach, baseline TR severity, right atrial and RV size and RV function were evaluated by echocardiography according to established guidelines. One-year mortality was 16.9%, 17.2%, 32.6%, and 61.1% for patients with no/trace (n=167), mild (n=205), moderate (n=117), and severe (n=18) TR, respectively (Pright atrial and RV enlargement were also associated with increased mortality (Pright atrial and RV enlargement, but not RV dysfunction. There was an interaction between TR and mitral regurgitation severity (P=0.04); the increased hazard of death associated with moderate/severe TR only occurred in those with no/trace/mild mitral regurgitation. In inoperable patients treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, moderate or severe TR and right heart enlargement are independently associated with increased 1-year mortality; however, the association between moderate or severe TR and an increased hazard of death was only found in those with minimal mitral regurgitation at baseline. These findings may improve our assessment of anticipated benefit from transcatheter aortic valve replacement and support the need for future studies on TR and the right heart, including whether concomitant treatment of TR in operable but high-risk patients with aortic stenosis is warranted. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01314313. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Increased platelet count and reticulated platelets in recently symptomatic versus asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis and in cerebral microembolic signal-negative patient subgroups: results from the HaEmostasis In carotid STenosis (HEIST) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, S J X; Lim, S T; Kinsella, J A; Murphy, D; Enright, H M; McCabe, Dominick J H

    2018-02-23

    The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the disparity in stroke risk between asymptomatic and symptomatic carotid stenosis patients are not fully understood. The functionally important reticulated platelet fraction and reticulocytes could play a role. We performed a prospective, multi-centre, observational analytical study comparing full blood count parameters and platelet production/turnover/activation markers in patients with asymptomatic versus recently symptomatic moderate (≥ 50-69%) or severe (≥ 70-99%) carotid stenosis. Data from 34 asymptomatic patients were compared with 43 symptomatic patients in the 'early phase' (≤ 4 weeks) and 37 of these patients in the 'late phase' (≥ 3 months) after TIA/ischaemic stroke. Reticulated platelets were quantified by whole blood flow cytometry and reticulated platelets and red cell reticulocytes by 'automated assays' (Sysmex XE-2100™). Bilateral simultaneous transcranial Doppler ultrasound monitoring classified patients as micro-embolic signal (MES)+ve or MES-ve. Mean platelet count was higher in early (216 × 10 9 /L; P = 0.04) and late symptomatic (219 × 10 9 /L; P = 0.044) than asymptomatic patients (194 × 10 9 /L). Mean platelet volume was higher in early symptomatic than asymptomatic patients (10.8 vs. 10.45 fl; P = 0.045). Automated assays revealed higher % reticulated platelet fractions in early (5.78%; P < 0.001) and late symptomatic (5.11%; P = 0.01) than asymptomatic patients (3.48%). Red cell reticulocyte counts were lower in early (0.92%; P = 0.035) and late symptomatic (0.93%; P = 0.036) than asymptomatic patients (1.07%). The automated % reticulated platelet fraction was also higher in early symptomatic than asymptomatic MES-ve patients (5.7 vs. 3.55%; P = 0.001). The combination of increased platelet counts and a shift towards production of an increased population of larger, young, reticulated platelets could contribute to a higher risk of first or recurrent

  4. Safety analysis of Wingspan stent angioplasty for symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis: A report of 109 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-ping DENG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study aims to probe into the feasibility and safety of larger balloons in the self-expandable stent Wingspan system when treating symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis.Methods The clinical data of 109 symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis patients,consisting of 68 males and 41 females,were analyzed.These patients were treated via angioplasty using the Wingspan system from March 2007 to June 2010.The ages of the patients ranged from 36 years to 79 years,with an average of 62.4.The patients were divided into two groups according to the sizes of the Gateway balloons they used.The balloon diameter for group A(n=31 was based on 80% of the diameter of the normal blood vessels on both sides of the arterial vessel.Meanwhile,the balloon diameter for group B was based on the average diameter of the vessels on both sides of the arterial vessel.The effects of the treatment and the occurrence of complications in both groups were analyzed and compared.Results The degree of arteriostenosis before operation for group A was 56.0% to 87.8%,with an average of 71.8%,residual stenosis after operation was 0% to 45%,with an average of 24.9%.The degree of ateriostenosis before operation for group B was 68.9% to 98.0%,with an average of 76.0%,residual stenosis after operation was 0% to 21%,with an average of 10.2%.Group A had four cases(12.9% of durability neurological dysfunction.One case was a visual-field defect.In group B,six patients(7.7% experienced complications.The differences were not statistically significant,and no deaths occurred in both groups.Conclusions Wingspan stent angioplasty is a safe and effective treatment for intracranial arterial stenosis,and even the use of larger balloons does not increase the risk in patients.

  5. Symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) with concurrent contralateral vertebral atherosclerotic diseases in 88 patients treated with the intracranial stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zi-Liang [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Bu-Lang [Department of Medical Research Shijiazhuang First Hospital, Hebei Medical University (China); Li, Tian-Xiao, E-mail: litianxiaod@163.com [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Cai, Dong-Yang; Zhu, Liang-Fu; Bai, Wei-Xing; Xue, Jiang-Yu; Li, Zhao-Shuo [Stroke Center, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis can be treated with intracranial stenting. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis is safe and effective. • Stenting for intracranial vertebral artery stenosis can prevent long-term stroke. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the safety, effect and instent restenosis rate of Wingspan stenting in treating patients with intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (70–99%) concurrent with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases. Materials and methods: Eighty-eight patients with severe symptomatic intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis (≥70%) combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases were treated with the Wingpsan stent. All the baseline, cerebral angiography, success rate, perioperative complications, clinical and imaging follow-up data were prospectively analyzed. Results: The success rate of stenting was 100%, and the mean stenotic rate was reduced from prestenting (84.9 ± 6.8)% to poststenting (17.2 ± 5.9)%. The perioperative stroke rate was 1.1%. Among eighty patients (90.9%) with clinical follow-up 8-62 months (mean 29.3 ± 17.2) poststenting, five (6.3%) had posterior circulation TIA only, three (3.8%) had mild stroke in the posterior circulation but recovered completely, and another five patients greater than 70 years old died of non-ischemic stroke. Imaging follow-up in 46 patients (52.3%) 5–54 months (mean 9.9 ± 9.9) following stenting revealed instent restenosis in 12 patients (26.1%) including 7 (58.3%) symptomatic restenosis. Age and residual stenosis were the two factors to significantly (P < 0.05) affect instent restenosis. Conclusion: Wingspan stenting in the intracranial vertebral artery atherosclerotic stenosis combined with contralateral vertebral artery atherosclerotic diseases has a low perioperative stroke rate and a good preventive effect on long-term ischemic stroke, but the instent restenosis

  6. Choice of valve prosthesis in a rare clinical condition: aortic stenosis due to alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Sameer; Markman, Phuong; Cullen, Hugh

    2013-10-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare inherited disorder of tyrosine metabolism, which results in deposition of homogentisic acid in the connective tissues. The accumulation of homogentisic acid in connective tissue causes the syndrome known as ochronosis, which is typically manifested by skin pigmentation, degenerative arthropathy and discolouration of urine. Cardiovascular involvement is a much less common complication of alkaptonuria but poses a greater risk to the patient's health. We present the case of a 65 year-old man with aortic stenosis and a previous diagnosis of alkaptonuria who underwent successful aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High- Versus Low-Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis: Demographics, Clinical Outcomes, and Effects of the Initial Aortic Valve Replacement Strategy on Long-Term Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiko; Morimoto, Takeshi; Shiomi, Hiroki; Ando, Kenji; Kanamori, Norio; Murata, Koichiro; Kitai, Takeshi; Kawase, Yuichi; Izumi, Chisato; Miyake, Makoto; Mitsuoka, Hirokazu; Kato, Masashi; Hirano, Yutaka; Matsuda, Shintaro; Inada, Tsukasa; Nagao, Kazuya; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Takeuchi, Yasuyo; Yamane, Keiichiro; Toyofuku, Mamoru; Ishii, Mitsuru; Minamino-Muta, Eri; Kato, Takao; Inoko, Moriaki; Ikeda, Tomoyuki; Komasa, Akihiro; Ishii, Katsuhisa; Hotta, Kozo; Higashitani, Nobuya; Kato, Yoshihiro; Inuzuka, Yasutaka; Maeda, Chiyo; Jinnai, Toshikazu; Morikami, Yuko; Saito, Naritatsu; Minatoya, Kenji; Kimura, Takeshi

    2017-05-01

    There is considerable debate on the management of patients with low-gradient severe aortic stenosis (LG-AS), defined as aortic valve area strategy: n=977, and conservative strategy: n=1120) with high-gradient severe aortic stenosis (HG-AS) and 1712 patients (initial AVR strategy: n=219, and conservative strategy: n=1493) with LG-AS. AVR was more frequently performed in HG-AS patients than in LG-AS patients (60% versus 28%) during the entire follow-up. In the comparison between the initial AVR and conservative groups, the propensity score-matched cohorts were developed in both HG-AS (n=887 for each group) and LG-AS (n=218 for each group) strata. The initial AVR strategy when compared with the conservative strategy was associated with markedly lower risk for a composite of aortic valve-related death or heart failure hospitalization in both HG-AS and LG-AS strata (hazard ratio, 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.37; P strategy was associated with a better outcome than the conservative strategy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-0.59; P strategy was associated with better outcomes than the conservative strategy in both HG-AS and LG-AS patients, although AVR was less frequently performed in LG-AS patients than in HG-AS patients. The favorable effect of initial AVR strategy was also seen in patients with LG-AS with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. URL: http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm. Unique identifier: UMIN000012140. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Effect of the prosthesis-patient mismatch on long-term clinical outcomes after isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soonchang; Yi, Gijong; Youn, Young-Nam; Lee, Sak; Yoo, Kyung-Jong; Chang, Byung-Chul

    2013-11-01

    The effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) on clinical outcomes after aortic valve replacement remains controversial. We evaluated effect of PPM on long-term clinical outcomes after isolated aortic valve replacement in patients with predominant aortic stenosis. We analyzed data from patients with predominant aortic stenosis who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement between January 1995 and July 2010. The indexed effective orifice area, obtained by dividing the in vivo effective orifice area by the patient's body surface area, was used to define PPM as clinically nonsignificant (group I, 224 patients), mild (group II, 52 patients), moderate (group III, 39 patients), and severe (group IV, 36 patients). Early survival was not significantly different among the groups, but overall survival was decreased gradually in group IV. Overall survival at 12 years was lower in group IV than in group I (92.8% ± 2.7% vs 67.0 ± 10.1, respectively; P = .001). Cardiac-related-death-free survival at 12 years was lower in patients with severe PPM. Left ventricular mass index decreased during the follow-up period in all groups. But left ventricular mass index was less decreased in group IV compared with groups I, II, and III. Age, severe PPM, and ejection fraction <40%, and New York Heart Association Functional Class IV were independent risk factors of overall survival on multivariate analysis. Severe PPM was an independent risk factor for cardiac-related death. Severe PPM showed an adverse effect on long-term survival, and was an independent risk factor for cardiac-related death. In addition, patients with severe PPM showed less decreasing left ventricular mass index during follow-up. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The evaluation of the predictors of left ventricular systolic function improvement in patients with severe aortic stenosis after aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Ponych

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to evaluate clinical and echocardiographic predictors of the systolic function improvement in patients with aortic stenosis (AS and low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF after aortic valve replacement (AVR. Material and methods. One-center study analyzed data received at clinical and instrumental examination of 72 consecutively examined patients with severe aortic stenosis and systolic dysfunction (LVEF less than 45 % selected for AVR with or without coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. The average age of patients was 62 (lower-upper quartiles 34–79 years. All patients underwent clinical and instrumental investigations, including transthoracic echocardiography and coronary angiography. Patients were retrospectively divided into two groups: 48 (66.76 % patients with left ventricular ejection fraction increased more than 30 % in the early post-surgery period, and 24 (33.3 % – less than 30 %. In 21 (29.2 % patients AVR was combined with CABG. Results. Group of patients with greater growth of LVEF was characterized by lower body mass index (p = 0.016, greater initial signs of heart failure (p = 0.019, less frequent arterial hypertension. In addition, patients with LVEF growth over 30 % had more pronounced decrease of initial EF, greater end-systolic volume (ESV index and changes of some indices of diastolic LV function. The smaller increase in LVEF was associated with greater rate of atrial fibrillation (p = 0.028 and aortic regurgitation I degree (p = 0.012. Conclusions. The median LVEF in patients with AS and systolic dysfunction after AVR increased from 29 to 43 %. Under proper selection of patients with AS and reduced LVEF for surgery more than 30 % improvement of LVEF may be expected at early postoperative period. Critical AS with reduced LVEF, including low-flow, low gradient AS should not be regarded as an independent restriction to AVR.

  10. Utility of digital subtraction angiography-based collateral evaluation in medically treated acute symptomatic basilar artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W-J; Jung, K-H; Ryu, Y J; Kim, J-M; Lee, S-T; Chu, K; Kim, M; Lee, S K; Roh, J-K

    2017-09-01

    Although a stroke from atherosclerosis in the basilar artery (BA) often presents with mild initial stroke severity, it has heterogeneous clinical courses. We investigated the efficacy of digital subtraction angiography (DSA)-based collateral perfusion evaluation in association with long-term outcomes of medically treated symptomatic basilar artery stenosis. From a registry database of all consecutive patients with stroke, we included 98 medically treated patients (due to mild initial stroke severity) [National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores ≤ 4; symptomatic basilar artery stenosis, 70-99%] with available initial diagnostic DSA. Basilar collateral scoring was performed via the DSA, using a modified version of the American Society of Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology/Society of Interventional Radiology grading system in both the superior cerebellar artery and anterior/posterior-inferior cerebellar artery territories (score 0-8). The outcomes were designated as the 90-day modified Rankin Scale (mRS90) score (poor, 3-6). Student's t-test, chi-square test and logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with a poor outcome. The median initial NIHSS score was 2 [interquartile range (IQR), 0-3], median posterior circulation Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score was 8 (IQR, 7-10), median collateral score was 7 (IQR, 7-8) and 20 (20.4%) had poor mRS90 scores. In multivariate analysis, poorer collateral scores (P = 0.003), higher NIHSS scores (P = 0.005) and lower posterior circulation Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (P = 0.017) were independently associated with a poor mRS90 score. The DSA-based collateral scoring of the BA large branches might predict long-term outcome in medically treated symptomatic basilar artery stenosis with mild initial severity. Evaluation of BA collateral perfusion status might be useful to determine appropriate treatment strategies. © 2017 EAN.

  11. Latest-Generation Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Devices and Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamandi, Chekrallah; Puri, Rishi; Rodriguez-Gabella, Tania; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a well-established treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are at high or prohibitive surgical risk. More recently, TAVR has emerged as a valid alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement for treating intermediate-risk patients, and several studies are currently evaluating the role of TAVR in low-risk patients. Transcatheter heart valve (THV) technologies have evolved considerably over time, and important iterations have been implemented in many of the latest-generation devices to (1) reduce the size and improve delivery system properties; (2) improve valve deployment, repositioning, and retrievability; and (3) reduce paravalvular leaks. This article reviews the main characteristics of, and clinical results associated with, the newer-generation THVs while providing an overview of novel TAVR indications. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Aortic valve bypass surgery in severe aortic valve stenosis: Insights from cardiac and brain magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantini, Cesare; Caulo, Massimo; Marinelli, Daniele; Chiacchiaretta, Piero; Tartaro, Armando; Cotroneo, Antonio Raffaele; Di Giammarco, Gabriele

    2018-04-13

    To investigate and describe the distribution of aortic and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with severe valvular aortic stenosis (AS) before and after aortic valve bypass (AVB) surgery. We enrolled 10 consecutive patients who underwent AVB surgery for severe AS. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and brain magnetic resonance imaging were performed as baseline before surgery and twice after surgery. Quantitative flow measurements were obtained using 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner phase-contrast images of the ascending aorta, descending thoracic aorta (3 cm proximally and distally from the conduit-to-aorta anastomosis), and ventricular outflow portion of the conduit. The evaluation of CBF was performed using 3.0-T MRI scanner arterial spin labeling (ASL) through sequences acquired at the gray matter, dorsal default-mode network, and sensorimotor levels. Conduit flow, expressed as the percentage of total antegrade flow through the conduit, was 63.5 ± 8% and 67.8 ± 7% on early and mid-term postoperative CMR, respectively (P surgery in patients with severe AS, cardiac output is split between the native left ventricular outflow tract and the apico-aortic bypass, with two-thirds of the total antegrade flow passing through the latter and one-third passing through the former. In our experience, CBF assessment confirms that the flow redistribution does not jeopardize cerebral blood supply. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Right branch pulmonary artery stenosis with supravalvar aortic stenosis as a complication of Lecompte maneuver for tetralogy of Fallot associated with absent pulmonary valve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Shoji; Kaga, Shigeaki; Yoshida, Yukiyo; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Kamiya, Kentaro; Sakakibara, Kenji; Katsu, Masatake

    2015-05-01

    The patient was diagnosed with tetralogy of Fallot associated with absent pulmonary valve syndrome and a low birth weight of 1,912 g. He suffered from respiratory distress on day 14 and received non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. At 5 months of age and 4.1 kg, he underwent intracardiac repair including right ventricular outflow repair with a monocusp patch, patch closure of the ventricular septum defect and right pulmonary transposition to the anterior of the ascending aorta following the Lecompte maneuver for airway decompression. He was subsequently discharged to home and exhibited an uneventful clinical course with non-invasive positive pressure ventilation for 5 months postoperatively. However, right pulmonary artery and supra-aortic stenosis was noted 2 years after the operation. Computed tomography (CT) and angiography showed ascending aorta strangulation by the right pulmonary artery with right ventricular outflow regurgitation. Right pulmonary artery reconstruction using polytetrafluoroethylene graft interposition and repeat right ventricular outflow repair with bicuspid hand-sewn valves was therefore performed;the postoperative course was uneventful. Pre- and post-operative management using non-invasive positive pressure ventilation and airway decompression with pulmonary artery translocation is a useful strategy in patients exhibiting symptomatic tetralogy of Fallot associated with absent pulmonary valve syndrome in the neonatal period.

  14. Practical considerations for optimizing cardiac computed tomography protocols for comprehensive acquisition prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalique, Omar K; Pulerwitz, Todd C; Halliburton, Sandra S; Kodali, Susheel K; Hahn, Rebecca T; Nazif, Tamim M; Vahl, Torsten P; George, Isaac; Leon, Martin B; D'Souza, Belinda; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is performed frequently in patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who are at high risk or inoperable for open surgical aortic valve replacement. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) has become the gold standard imaging modality for pre-TAVR cardiac anatomic and vascular access assessment. Traditionally, cardiac CTA has been most frequently used for assessment of coronary artery stenosis, and scanning protocols have generally been tailored for this purpose. Pre-TAVR CTA has different goals than coronary CTA and the high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the TAVR patient population creates a particular need to optimize protocols for a reduction in iodinated contrast volume. This document reviews details which allow the physician to tailor CTA examinations to maximize image quality and minimize harm, while factoring in multiple patient and scanner variables which must be considered in customizing a pre-TAVR protocol. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation and cerebrovascular accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortecky, Stefan; Wenaweser, Peter; Windecker, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an evidence-based treatment alternative for selected high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis as acknowledged in the most recent edition of the ESC Guidelines on Valvular Heart Disease 2012. However, periprocedural complications and in particular cerebrovascular accidents remain a matter of concern. While transcatheter heart valve technology continuously improves and the development of novel and even less invasive implantation techniques is on-going, cerebrovascular events complicating TAVI may abrogate the usual improvement in terms of prognosis and quality of life. This article describes the incidence of cerebrovascular events after cardiovascular procedures, provides an overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms as well as the impact on outcomes and provides some insights into preventive strategies as well as the acute management of these events.

  16. Which elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis benefit from surgical treatment? An aid to clinical decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Berto J.; van den Brink, Renee B.; Zwinderman, K.; Cheriex, Emile C.; Hamer, Hans H.; Lie, Kong I.; Tijssen, Jan G.

    2004-01-01

    Background and aim of the study: Clinical decision-making in an individual elderly patient with severe aortic stenosis (AS) is difficult. The prognosis is influenced by increased age and various cardiac morbidity and comorbidity, and the benefit of surgery is uncertain because the prognosis with

  17. Body mass index and outcome after revascularization for symptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greving, Jacoba P.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Algra, Ale; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Becquemin, Jean-Pierre; Bonati, Leo H.; Brott, Thomas G.; Bulbulia, Richard; Calvet, David; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gregson, John; Halliday, Alison; Howard, George; Jansen, Olav; Roubin, Gary S.; Brown, Martin M.; Mas, Jean-Louis; Ringleb, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the obesity paradox exists in patients who undergo carotid artery stenting (CAS) or carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Methods: We combined individual patient data from 2 randomized trials (Endarterectomy vs Angioplasty in Patients with Symptomatic Severe Carotid Stenosis and Stent-Protected Angioplasty vs Carotid Endarterectomy) and 3 centers in a third trial (International Carotid Stenting Study). Baseline body mass index (BMI) was available for 1,969 patients and classified into 4 groups: 120 days after randomization). This outcome was compared between different BMI strata in CAS and CEA patients separately, and in the total group. We performed intention-to-treat multivariable Cox regression analyses. Results: Median follow-up was 2.0 years. Stroke or death occurred in 159 patients in the periprocedural (cumulative risk 8.1%) and in 270 patients in the postprocedural period (rate 4.8/100 person-years). BMI did not affect periprocedural risk of stroke or death for patients assigned to CAS (ptrend = 0.39) or CEA (ptrend = 0.77) or for the total group (ptrend = 0.48). Within the total group, patients with BMI 25–<30 had lower postprocedural risk of stroke or death than patients with BMI 20–<25 (BMI 25–<30 vs BMI 20–<25; hazard ratio 0.72; 95% confidence interval 0.55–0.94). Conclusions: BMI is not associated with periprocedural risk of stroke or death; however, BMI 25–<30 is associated with lower postprocedural risk than BMI 20–<25. These observations were similar for CAS and CEA. PMID:28446644

  18. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alexander D; Rolston, John D; Gauger, Grant E; Larson, Paul S

    2016-07-12

    BACKGROUND Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. CASE REPORT Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3-4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. CONCLUSIONS These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess.

  19. Optimal timing of aortic valve replacement in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Akira; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Saiki, Munehiro; Nishimura, Motonobu

    2014-01-01

    The elderly population with severe aortic stenosis (AS) requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) is increasing. The optimal timing of AVR in these patients has been under discussion. We retrospectively reviewed the data from severe AS patients (n = 84) who underwent AVR with/without concomitant procedures from 2005 to 2010. The symptom status, preoperative data, operative outcome, late survival and freedom from cardiac events were compared between elderly patients (age ≥80 years [n = 31]) and younger patients (age <80 years [n = 53]). The operative mortality in elderly patients (3.2 %) and younger patients (3.8 %) was comparable. The symptoms in elderly patients were more severe and hospitalized heart failure (HF) was more frequently noted as the primary symptom (p = 0.017). Patients with and without hospitalized HF differed significantly in late survival and freedom from cardiac events (p = 0.001), but advanced age had no significant effect. The results of a Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that hospitalized HF was a significant predictor for cardiac events after AVR, irrespective of age (hazard ratio 6.93, 95 % confidence interval 1.83-26.26, p < 0.004). In elderly patients with severe AS, surgery should be recommended even in the presence of minimal symptoms and should be performed before the onset of life-threatening HF.

  20. Intimal spindle cell sarcoma masquerading as adult-onset symptomatic pulmonic stenosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manmadhan, Arun; Malhotra, Sunil P; Weinberg, Catherine R; Reyentovich, Alex; Latson, Larry A; Bhatla, Puneet; Saric, Muhamed

    2017-10-30

    Pulmonary artery intimal spindle cell sarcomas are rare and carry with them a poor prognosis and high rate of recurrence. In extremely rare cases, this tumor can infiltrate the pulmonic valve and manifest as adult-onset pulmonic stenosis. We report an unusual case of a patient with symptomatic, adult-onset severe pulmonic stenosis who was referred for possible balloon valvuloplasty but was subsequently found to have pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma infiltrating the pulmonary valve leading to progressive exertional dyspnea. The presence of adult-onset pulmonic stenosis should prompt the clinician to investigate further as most cases of pulmonic stenosis are congenital in nature and present early in life. Careful diagnostic evaluation in concert with multimodal imaging should take place to arrive at the correct and challenging diagnosis of sarcoma-induced adult-onset severe pulmonic stenosis. Given the poor prognosis and rapid progression of disease, early diagnosis is crucial.

  1. Evaluation of NT-proBNP concentrations during exercise in asymptomatic patients with severe high-gradient aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Lech, Agnieszka; Klisiewicz, Anna; Hoffman, Piotr

    2016-08-11

    INTRODUCTION The effect of asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (ASAS) on N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels ar rest and during exercise, as well as their relevance for clinical practice remain controversial.  OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of whether the evaluation of NT-proBNP concentrations during exercise provides additional information about the severity of aortic stenosis and left ventricular remodeling in patients with ASAS. PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 50 patients with ASAS (mean age, 38.4 ±18.1 years) and 21 healthy subjects (mean age, 43.4 ±10.6 years) were enrolled. Rest and exercise echocardiography was performed to evaluate maximum velocity (Vmax), mean aortic gradient (AG), and aortic valve area (AVA). The left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was calculated. NT-proBNP concentrations at rest and during exercise were assessed, and the difference between the 2 values was calculated (ΔNT-proBNP). RESULTS NT-proBNP and ΔNT-proBNP levels at rest and during exercise were significantly higher in the ASAS group compared with the control group. In the ASAS group, NT-proBNP levels at rest significantly correlated with LVMI (r = 0.432; P <0.0001), AVA (r = -0.408; P <0.0001), Vmax (r = 0.375; P = 0.002), and mean AG (r = 0.257; P = 0.03). NT-proBNP levels during exercise significantly correlated with LVMI (r = 0.432; P <0.0001), mean AG (r = 0.401; P = 0.001), and AVA (r = -0.375; P = 0.001). In the multivariate logistic regression model, the factors independently associated with NT-proBNP both at rest and during exercise were age, AVA, and LVMI. CONCLUSIONS NT-proBNP levels at rest provide valuable information for identifying patients with more advanced left ventricular hypertrophy secondary to severe aortic stenosis. NT-proBNP levels during exercise do not provide new information on the severity of AS.

  2. A Double Whammy: Severe Aortic Stenosis and Cocaine Overwhelm the Mitral Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, Rohit; Lim, Jonathan; Liu, Jing; Birnbaum, Itamar; Mirza, Farooq; Lakkis, Nasser; Hamzeh, Ihab

    2018-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with acute onset dyspnea following cocaine use. He had severe aortic stenosis (AS), mild mitral regurgitation (MR) due to mitral valve prolapse, and no coronary artery disease on recent coronary angiography. He was in acute heart failure with signs of impending cardiogenic shock. Urgent bedside echocardiography revealed hyperdynamic left ventricular systolic function with acute severe MR from a ruptured chordae tendineae. The acute cocaine-induced spike of his already elevated left ventricular systolic pressure from severe AS likely precipitated chordal rupture of his vulnerable mitral valve. This patient underwent emergent mitral and aortic valve replacements. Although cocaine use has been associated with a myriad of cardiovascular complications, acute MR due to chordal rupture has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported in this setting. Prompt diagnosis with echocardiography and surgical intervention are of paramount importance in the management of acute MR.

  3. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  4. Medial arterial calcification, calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification in a diabetic patient with severe autonomic neuropathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Medial arterial calcification (Monckeberg\\'s arteriosclerosis) is well described in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. There is also a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus among subjects with calcific aortic stenosis and mitral annular calcification. We describe a diabetic patient with autonomic neuropathy and extensive medial arterial calcification who also had calcification of the aortic valve and of the mitral valve annulus. We propose that autonomic neuropathy may play a role in calcification of these structures at the base of the heart.

  5. Aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation as predictors of atrial fibrillation during 11 years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widgren Veronica

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited information about any association between the onset of atrial fibrillation (AF and the presence of valvular disease. Methods We retrospectively examined 940 patients in sinus rhythm, examined by echocardiography in 1996. During 11 years of follow-up, we assessed the incidence of AF and outcome defined as valvular surgery or death, in relation to baseline valvular function. AS (aortic stenosis severity at baseline examination was assessed using peak transaortic valve pressure gradient. Results In univariate analysis, the risk of developing AF was related to AS (significant AS versus no significant AS; hazard ratio (HR 3.73, 95% confidence interval (CI 2.39-5.61, p Conclusions AS, but not MR, was independently predictive of development of AF and combined valvular surgery or death. In patients with combined AS and MR, the grade of AS, more than the grade of MR, determined the risk of AF and combination of valvular surgery or death. Further studies using contemporary echocardiographic quantification of aortic stenosis are warranted to confirm these retrospective data based on peak transaortic valve pressure gradient.

  6. Intimal spindle cell sarcoma masquerading as adult-onset symptomatic pulmonic stenosis: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Manmadhan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary artery intimal spindle cell sarcomas are rare and carry with them a poor prognosis and high rate of recurrence. In extremely rare cases, this tumor can infiltrate the pulmonic valve and manifest as adult-onset pulmonic stenosis. Case presentation We report an unusual case of a patient with symptomatic, adult-onset severe pulmonic stenosis who was referred for possible balloon valvuloplasty but was subsequently found to have pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma infiltrating the pulmonary valve leading to progressive exertional dyspnea. Conclusion The presence of adult-onset pulmonic stenosis should prompt the clinician to investigate further as most cases of pulmonic stenosis are congenital in nature and present early in life. Careful diagnostic evaluation in concert with multimodal imaging should take place to arrive at the correct and challenging diagnosis of sarcoma-induced adult-onset severe pulmonic stenosis. Given the poor prognosis and rapid progression of disease, early diagnosis is crucial.

  7. Atherosclerotic plaque volume and composition in symptomatic carotid arteries assessed with multidetector CT angiography; relationship with severity of stenosis and cardiovascular risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozie, S.; Weert, T.T. de; Monye, C. de; Homburg, P.J.; Tanghe, H.L.J.; Lugt, A. van der; Dippel, D.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the volume and the composition of atherosclerotic plaque in symptomatic carotid arteries and to investigate the relationship between these plaque features and the severity of stenosis and the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. One hundred patients with cerebrovascular symptoms underwent CT angiography. We measured plaque volume (PV) and the relative contribution of plaque components (calcifications, fibrous tissue, and lipid) in the symptomatic artery. The contribution of different components was measured as the number of voxels within defined ranges of HU values (calcification >130 HU, fibrous tissue 60-130 HU, lipid core <60 HU). Fifty-seven patients had atherosclerotic plaque in the symptomatic carotid artery. The severity of stenosis and PV were moderately correlated. Age and smoking were independently related to PV. Patients with hypercholesterolemia had significantly less lipid and more calcium in their plaques than patients without hypercholesterolemia. Other cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly related to PV or plaque composition. Luminal stenosis of the carotid artery partly reflects the amount of atherosclerotic carotid disease. Plaque volume and plaque composition are associated with cardiovascular risk factors. (orig.)

  8. Atherosclerotic plaque volume and composition in symptomatic carotid arteries assessed with multidetector CT angiography; relationship with severity of stenosis and cardiovascular risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozie, S.; Weert, T.T. de; Monye, C. de; Homburg, P.J.; Tanghe, H.L.J.; Lugt, A. van der [Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Dippel, D.W.J. [Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Neurology, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the volume and the composition of atherosclerotic plaque in symptomatic carotid arteries and to investigate the relationship between these plaque features and the severity of stenosis and the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. One hundred patients with cerebrovascular symptoms underwent CT angiography. We measured plaque volume (PV) and the relative contribution of plaque components (calcifications, fibrous tissue, and lipid) in the symptomatic artery. The contribution of different components was measured as the number of voxels within defined ranges of HU values (calcification >130 HU, fibrous tissue 60-130 HU, lipid core <60 HU). Fifty-seven patients had atherosclerotic plaque in the symptomatic carotid artery. The severity of stenosis and PV were moderately correlated. Age and smoking were independently related to PV. Patients with hypercholesterolemia had significantly less lipid and more calcium in their plaques than patients without hypercholesterolemia. Other cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly related to PV or plaque composition. Luminal stenosis of the carotid artery partly reflects the amount of atherosclerotic carotid disease. Plaque volume and plaque composition are associated with cardiovascular risk factors. (orig.)

  9. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity and apnea test in symptomatic and asymptomatic high-grade carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lučić-Prokin Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity (VMR represents an autoregulatory response of the arterial trunks on the specific vasoactive stimuli, most commonly CO2. Objective. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare VMR in high-grade symptomatic (SCAS and asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACAS, using the apnea test to evaluate the hemodynamic status. Methods. The study included 50 patients who were hospitalized at the neurology and vascular surgery departments as part of preparation for carotid endarterectomy. We evaluated VMR by calculating the breath holding index (BHI in 34 patients with SCAS and 16 patients with ACAS, with isolated high-grade carotid stenosis. We evaluated the impact of risk factors and collateral circulation on BHI, as well as the correlation between the degree of carotid stenosis and BHI. Results. A pathological BHI was more frequent in the SCAS group (p<0.01. There was no difference in the range of BHI values between the groups, both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. Only male gender was associated with pathological BHI in both groups (p<0.05. Collateral circulation did not exist in over 60% of all subjects. We confirmed a negative correlation between the degree of carotid stenosis and BHI. Conclusion. SCAS and ACAS patients present with different hemodynamics. While ACAS patients have stable hemodynamics, combination of hemodynamic and thromboembolic effects is characteristic of SCAS patients.

  10. Recovery from anemia in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation--prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Arnous, Samer; Lønborg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative anemia is common in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and has been linked to a poorer outcome--including a higher 1-year mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of successful TAVI...... on baseline anemia. METHODS: A total of 253 patients who survived at least 1 year following TAVI were included in this study. The prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome of hemoglobin (Hb)-recovery were assessed. RESULTS: The prevalence of baseline anemia was 49% (n = 124)--recovery from anemia occurred......-recovery, while blood transfusion (OR 0.31, P = 0.038) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, OR 0.33, P = 0.043) were identified as negative predictors at, respectively, one and two years after TAVI. When compared to patients without baseline anemia, those anemic patients with Hb-recovery had a similar functional...

  11. Impact of Aortic Valve Replacement on Left Ventricular Remodeling in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahmane Bakkali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aortic valve replacement on left ventricular function and remodeling among patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe left ventricular dysfunction. Methods: In this retrospective bicentric study extended over a 15-year period, 61 consecutive patients underwent isolated AVR for severe AS associated to reduced LV function. The mean age was 58.21 ± 12.50 years and 83.60 % were men. 70.50% of patients were in class III or IV NYHA. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was 32.9 ± 5.6.The mean LVEDD and LVESD were respectively 63.6 ± 9.2 and 50.2 ± 8.8 mm. The mean calculated logistic EuroScore was 12.2 ±4.5. Results: The hospital mortality was 11.5%. Morbidity was marked mainly by low output syndrome in 40.8% of cases. After a median follow-up of 38 months we have recorded 3 deaths. Almost all survivors were in class I and II of NYHA. The mean LV end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters decreased significantly at late postoperative stage. The mean LV ejection fraction increased significantly from 32.9 ± 5.6 to 38.2 ± 9.3 and to 50.3 ± 9.6 in early and late postoperative stages, respectively. Multivariate linear regression analysis found that increased early postoperative LVEF (β= 0.44, 95% CI [0.14; 0.75], p=0.006 and low mean transprosthesis gradient (β=-0.72, 95% CI [-1.42; -0.02], p= 0.04 were the independent predictors of left ventricular systolic function recovery. Conclusion: Patients with aortic valve stenosis and impaired LV systolic function benefited from AVR as regard improvement of LV function parameters and regression of the LV diameters .This improvement depends mainly on early postoperative LVEF and mean transprosthesis gradient.

  12. Angioplasty in stenosis of the innominate artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobinia, G.S.; Bergmann, H. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a successful percutaneous transluminal dilatation (PTD) of an innominate artery stenosis in a 40-year-old patient with aortic arch syndrome. Five years earlier both a left central carotid artery occlusion and an innominate and left subclavian artery stenosis were treated by grafting from the aorta to the distal vessels. At recurrence of the neurological symptoms, reocclusion of the graft to the innominate artery and subtotal stenosis of the left carotid anastomosis were noted. The prevent the hazards of a reoperation, the innominate artery stenosis was dilated by means of PTD via the right brachial artery. Success of the procedure was demonstrated by Doppler sonography and angiography. It appears that PTD serves as an excellent method of treating stenoses of the aortic arch branches in aortic arch syndrome. (orig.)

  13. A novel diagnostic parameter, foraminal stenotic ratio using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging, as a discriminator for surgery in symptomatic lumbar foraminal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kentaro; Abe, Yuichiro; Satoh, Shigenobu; Yanagibashi, Yasushi; Hyakumachi, Takahiko; Masuda, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    No previous studies have reported the radiological features of patients requiring surgery in symptomatic lumbar foraminal stenosis (LFS). This study aims to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of a novel technique, foraminal stenotic ratio (FSR), using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging for LFS at L5-S by comparing patients requiring surgery, patients with successful conservative treatment, and asymptomatic patients. This is a retrospective radiological comparative study. We assessed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results of 84 patients (168 L5-S foramina) aged ≥40 years without L4-L5 lumbar spinal stenosis. The foramina were divided into three groups following standardized treatment: stenosis requiring surgery (20 foramina), stenosis with successful conservative treatment (26 foramina), and asymptomatic stenotic foramen (122 foramina). Foraminal stenotic ratio was defined as the ratio of the length of the stenosis to the length of the foramen on the reconstructed oblique coronal image, referring to perineural fat obliterations in whole oblique sagittal images. We also evaluated the foraminal nerve angle and the minimum nerve diameter on reconstructed images, and the Lee classification on conventional T1 images. The differences in each MRI parameter between the groups were investigated. To predict which patients require surgery, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted after calculating the area under the ROC curve. The FSR showed a stepwise increase when comparing asymptomatic, conservative, and surgical groups (mean, 8.6%, 38.5%, 54.9%, respectively). Only FSR was significantly different between the surgical and conservative groups (p=.002), whereas all parameters were significantly different comparing the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. The ROC curve showed that the area under the curve for FSR was 0.742, and the optimal cutoff value for FSR for predicting a surgical requirement in symptomatic patients was 50

  14. The evolving approach to the evaluation of low-gradient aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, William B; Bavry, Anthony A

    2018-04-07

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is typically identified by a low valve area (≤1.0 cm 2 ) and high mean gradient (≥40 mm Hg). A subset of patients are found to have a less than severe mean gradient (gradient AS (stage D2) or normal ejection fraction with low-gradient AS (stage D3). Determining the true severity of disease within these categories has proved difficult. In this review we illustrate both traditional and novel techniques that can be used for further valvular assessment. We also propose a simple algorithm that can be used to evaluate low-gradient AS. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Low Rate of Prenatal Diagnosis among Neonates with Critical Aortic Stenosis: Insight into the Natural History In Utero (Aortic Stenosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Lindsay R.; Moon-Grady, Anita; Escobar-Diaz, Maria C.; Gotteiner, Nina L.; Young, Luciana T.; McElhinney, Doff B.; Tworetzky, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To better understand the natural history and spectrum of fetal aortic stenosis (AS), we aimed to 1) determine the prenatal diagnosis rate of neonates with critical AS and a biventricular (BV) outcome; and 2) describe the findings at fetal echocardiography in prenatally diagnosed patients. Methods A multi-center, retrospective study was performed from 2000 to 2013. Neonates with critical AS who were discharged with a BV outcome were included. The prenatal diagnosis rate was compared to that reported for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). Fetal echocardiographic findings in prenatally diagnosed patients were reviewed. Results Only 10 of 117 neonates (8.5%) with critical AS and a BV outcome were diagnosed prenatally, a rate significantly lower than that for HLHS in the contemporary era (82%; p<0.0001). Of the 10 patients diagnosed prenatally, all developed LV dysfunction by a median gestational age of 33 weeks (range, 28–35). When present, Doppler abnormalities such as retrograde flow in the aortic arch (n=2), monophasic mitral inflow (n=2), and left to right flow across the foramen ovale (n=8) developed late in gestation (median 33 weeks). Conclusion The prenatal diagnosis rate among neonates with critical AS and a BV outcome is very low, likely due to a relatively normal 4-chamber view in mid-gestation with development of significant obstruction in the 3rd trimester. This natural history contrasts with that of severe mid-gestation AS with evolving HLHS and suggests that the timing in gestation of significant AS has an important impact on subsequent left heart growth in utero. PMID:25251721

  16. Prospective assessment of the frequency of low gradient severe aortic stenosis with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction: Critical impact of aortic flow misalignment and pressure recovery phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringle, Anne; Castel, Anne-Laure; Le Goffic, Caroline; Delelis, François; Binda, Camille; Bohbot, Yohan; Ennezat, Pierre Vladimir; Guerbaai, Raphaëlle A; Levy, Franck; Vincentelli, André; Graux, Pierre; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Maréchaux, Sylvestre

    2018-02-10

    The frequency of paradoxical low-gradient severe aortic stenosis (AS) varies widely across studies. The impact of misalignment of aortic flow and pressure recovery phenomenon on the frequency of low-gradient severe AS with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) has not been evaluated in prospective studies. To investigate prospectively the impact of aortic flow misalignment by Doppler and lack of pressure recovery phenomenon correction on the frequency of low-gradient (LG) severe aortic stenosis (AS) with preserved LVEF. Aortic jet velocities and mean pressure gradient (MPG) were obtained by interrogating all windows in 68 consecutive patients with normal LVEF and severe AS (aortic valve area [AVA] ≤1cm 2 ) on the basis of the apical imaging window alone (two-dimensional [2D] apical approach). Patients were classified as having LG or high-gradient (HG) AS according to MPG 35mL/m 2 or ≤35mL/m 2 , on the basis of the 2D apical approach, the multiview approach (multiple windows evaluation) and AVA corrected for pressure recovery. The proportion of LG severe AS was 57% using the 2D apical approach alone. After the multiview approach and correction for pressure recovery, the proportion of LG severe AS decreased from 57% to 13% (LF-LG severe AS decreased from 23% to 3%; NF-LG severe AS decreased from 34% to 10%). As a result, 25% of patients were reclassified as having HG severe AS (AVA ≤1cm 2 and MPG ≥40mmHg) and 19% as having moderate AS. Hence, 77% of patients initially diagnosed with LG severe AS did not have "true" LG severe AS when the multiview approach and the pressure recovery phenomenon correction were used. Aortic flow misevaluation, resulting from lack of use of multiple windows evaluation and pressure recovery phenomenon correction, accounts for a large proportion of incorrectly graded AS and considerable overestimation of the frequency of LG severe AS with preserved LVEF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. A CASE OF OSTEOPOROSIS OF THE SPINE IN AN ELDERLY MALE WITH CALCIFIC AORTIC STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Karpova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The given clinical example presents a case of concomitant diseases of the heart and axial skeleton. Calcific aortic stenosis detected by chance in an elderly male was associated with osteoporosis of the lumbar spine with moderate perturbation of the calcium–vitamin D–parathyroid hormone axis and with no classical risk factors for impaired bone mineral density. Possible approaches to pathogenetic therapy are described.

  18. A CASE OF OSTEOPOROSIS OF THE SPINE IN AN ELDERLY MALE WITH CALCIFIC AORTIC STENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Karpova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The given clinical example presents a case of concomitant diseases of the heart and axial skeleton. Calcific aortic stenosis detected by chance in an elderly male was associated with osteoporosis of the lumbar spine with moderate perturbation of the calcium–vitamin D–parathyroid hormone axis and with no classical risk factors for impaired bone mineral density. Possible approaches to pathogenetic therapy are described.

  19. Circulating levels of miR-133a predict the regression potential of left ventricular hypertrophy after valve replacement surgery in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Raquel; Villar, Ana V; Cobo, Manuel; Llano, Miguel; Martín-Durán, Rafael; Hurlé, María A; Nistal, J Francisco

    2013-08-15

    Myocardial microRNA-133a (miR-133a) is directly related to reverse remodeling after pressure overload release in aortic stenosis patients. Herein, we assessed the significance of plasma miR-133a as an accessible biomarker with prognostic value in predicting the reversibility potential of LV hypertrophy after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients. The expressions of miR-133a and its targets were measured in LV biopsies from 74 aortic stenosis patients. Circulating miR-133a was measured in peripheral and coronary sinus blood. LV mass reduction was determined echocardiographically. Myocardial and plasma levels of miR-133a correlated directly (r=0.46, Pregression analysis identified plasma miR-133a as a positive predictor of the hypertrophy reversibility after surgery. The discrimination of the model yielded an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.89 (Pregression analysis revealed plasma miR-133a and its myocardial target Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 2/Negative elongation factor A as opposite predictors of the LV mass loss (g) after AVR. Preoperative plasma levels of miR-133a reflect their myocardial expression and predict the regression potential of LV hypertrophy after AVR. The value of this bedside information for the surgical timing, particularly in asymptomatic aortic stenosis patients, deserves confirmation in further clinical studies.

  20. Elevated lipoprotein(a) and risk of aortic valve stenosis in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Pia R; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine whether elevated lipoprotein(a) levels and corresponding LPA risk genotypes (rs10455872, rs3798220, kringle IV type 2 repeat polymorphism) prospectively associate with increased risk of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). BACKGROUND: The etiologic...... to 90 mg/dl), and 2.9 (95% CI: 1.8 to 4.9) for levels greater than 95th percentile (>90 mg/dl), versus levels less than the 22nd percentile (rs3798220 minor alleles, and of low number of KIV-2 repeats (trend, all p...

  1. Diabetes Mellitus Impairs Left Ventricular Mass Regression after Surgical or Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teruya; Toda, Koichi; Kuratani, Toru; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Kashiyama, Noriyuki; Daimon, Takashi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    It is well-documented that persistent myocardial hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis is related to suboptimal postoperative outcomes after aortic valve replacement. Although diabetes is known to potentially exacerbate myocardial hypertrophy, it has yet to be examined if it affects postoperative left ventricular mass regression (LVMR). A single-centre, retrospective analysis was performed on 183 consecutive patients who underwent either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement between 2010 and May 2013. Patient demographics, postoperative outcomes and echocardiographic data were obtained preoperatively and a year after surgery. There were 42 diabetic and 141 non-diabetic patients. Preoperative characteristics of diabetic patients were statistically similar to those of non-diabetic patients, except for higher prevalence of hyperlipidaemia (p regression analysis demonstrated that diabetes (standardised partial regression coefficient (SPRC)=-0.187, p=0.018), female gender (SPRC=0.245, p=0.026) and age (SPRC=0.203, p=0.018) were associated with poor postoperative LVMR. Patients with diabetes showed suboptimal postoperative LVMR, and the disease was a prognostic factor that was associated with poor LVMR. These findings suggest that diabetes may predispose the particular group of patients to worse postoperative outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Survival after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis with low transvalvular gradients and severe left ventricular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jeremy J.; Lauer, Michael S.; Bashir, Mohammad; Afridi, Imran; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Stewart, William J.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.; Asher, Craig R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess whether aortic valve replacement (AVR) among patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and a low transvalvular gradient (TVG) is associated with improved survival. BACKGROUND: The optimal management of patients with severe AS with severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG remains controversial. METHODS: Between 1990 and 1998, we evaluated 68 patients who underwent AVR at our institution (AVR group) and 89 patients who did not undergo AVR (control group), with an aortic valve area < or = 0.75 cm(2), LV ejection fraction < or = 35% and mean gradient < or = 30 mm Hg. Using propensity analysis, survival was compared between a cohort of 39 patients in the AVR group and 56 patients in the control group. RESULTS: Despite well-matched baseline characteristics among propensity-matched patients, the one- and four-year survival rates were markedly improved in patients in the AVR group (82% and 78%), as compared with patients in the control group (41% and 15%; p < 0.0001). By multivariable analysis, the main predictor of improved survival was AVR (adjusted risk ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.39; p < 0.0001). The only other predictors of mortality were age and the serum creatinine level. CONCLUSIONS: Among select patients with severe AS, severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG, AVR was associated with significantly improved survival.

  3. Two cases of electrocautery incision therapy using an insulated-tip knife for treatment of symptomatic benign short-segment colonic stenosis following colonic resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jang Hoon; Han, Koon Hee; Kim, Moon Ho; Jang, Woo Sung; Yun, Jung Ho; Song, Yun A; Park, Jong Kyu; Cheon, Gab Jin

    2014-09-25

    Anastomotic stenosis of the colon is not an uncommon finding; however, its frequency varies from one study to another. Traditionally, postoperative colonic stenosis is managed surgically. However, endoscopic therapy has recently become the preferred treatment modality over traditional surgery. Good short-term success has been achieved with use of endoscopic balloon dilation; however, restenosis may occur over time in 14% to 25% of patients. The current report showed the effectiveness and usefulness of an insulated-tip knife (IT-knife) for electrocautery therapy of a patient with symptomatic anastomotic colonic stenosis.

  4. Impact of afterload on the assessment of severity of aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sung-A; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2012-06-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is increasingly diagnosed in current aging society. Echocardiography is the most important tool in the assessment of AS and its severity. However, load-dependency of Doppler measurement could affect the accuracy of AS severity assessment. We tried to evaluate the impact of afterload on the assessment of AS severity by modification of afterload using pneumatic compression (Pcom). Forty patients diagnosed as moderate or severe AS [effective orifice area of aortic valve (EOA(AV)) by continuity equation of < 1.5 cm(2)] were consecutively enrolled. Patients with severely uncontrolled hypertension, severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and other significant valve disease were excluded. Comprehensive echocardiography was performed at baseline to assess AS severity. Then, pneumatic compression of the lower extremities by 100 mmHg was applied to increase LV afterload. After 3 minutes, echocardiography was repeated to assess AS severity. Mean blood pressure was significantly increased under Pcom (p < 0.001), while heart rate remained unchanged. Peak aortic valve velocity (V(max)) was slightly, but significantly decreased under Pcom (p = 0.03). However, Doppler velocity index and EOA(AV) by continuity equation were not affected by Pcom. AS severity assessment by echocardiography was not dependent on the change of LV afterload imposed by Pcom. AV V(max) was slightly decreased with LV afterload increment, but these changes were too small to alter treatment plan of AS patients. EOA(AV) and Doppler velocity index are more stable parameters for AS severity assessment.

  5. Studies on intracranial collateral circulation with multi-slice CT angiography in patients with symptomatic cerebral artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-qing ZHOU

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the features of intracranial collateral circulation in patients with symptomatic cerebral artery stenosis.Method Ninety-four patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease admitted from Apr.2004 to Jun.2009 were involved in present study.All the patients were examined with cerebral multi-slice CT angiography,and the features of cerebral artery stenosis and intracranial collateral circulation were evaluated using maximum intensity projection(MIP and volume rendering(VR images of CT angiography.Result Of the 94 patients involved,48 were diagnosed as cerebral artery stenosis,including 29 cases of cerebral infarction,18 of transient ischemic attack(TIA and 1 of moyamoya disease(MMD.Among the 14 cases of severe cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion,cerebral infarction was found in 6 cases with lesser intracranial collateral vessels(including massive cerebral infarction in 4 cases and watershed infarction in 2 cases,and focal infarction of central semi-ovale in 1 case and TIA in 7 cases were found with abundant intracranial collateral vessels.Multiple lacunar infarction was found in 22 cases of mild or moderate cerebral artery stenosis,but there was no significant correlation between the stenosed arteries and infarction sites.Abundant intracranial collateral vessels were found in one patient with Moyamoya disease but no infarction was observed.Conclusions Intracranial collateral circulation plays an important role of compensation in patients with severe cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion.Cerebral angiography with multi-slice CT is of great significance in evaluation of cerebral artery stenosis and intracranial collateral circulation.

  6. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan

    1988-01-01

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures

  7. Association of aortic valve calcification severity with the degree of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Ralf; Mahnken, Andreas Horst; Dohmen, Guido; Brehmer, Kathrin; Günther, Rolf W; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Marx, Nikolaus; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2011-07-15

    This study sought to examine a possible relationship between the severity of aortic valve calcification (AVC), the distribution of AVC and the degree of aortic valve regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). 57 patients (22 men, 81 ± 5 years) with symptomatic AS and with a logistic EuroSCORE of 24 ± 12 were included. 38 patients (67%) received a third (18F)-generation CoreValve® aortic valve prosthesis, in 19 patients (33%) an Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis was implanted. Prior to TAVI dual-source computed tomography for assessment of AVC was performed. To determine the distribution of AVC the percentage of the calcium load of the most severely calcified cusp was calculated. After TAVI the degree of AR was determined by angiography and echocardiography. The severity of AR after TAVI was related to the severity and distribution of AVC. There was no association between the distribution of AVC and the degree of paravalvular AR after TAVI as assessed by angiography (r = -0.02, p = 0.88). Agatston AVC scores were significantly higher in patients with AR grade ≥ 3 (5055 ± 1753, n = 3) than in patients with AR grade AVC scores > 3000 were associated with a relevant paravalvular AR and showed a trend for increased need for second manoeuvres. There was a significant correlation between the severity of AVC and the degree of AR after AVR (r = 0.50, p AVC have an increased risk for a relevant AR after TAVI as well as a trend for increased need for additional procedures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-term outcomes after stenting versus endarterectomy for treatment of symptomatic carotid stenosis: the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonati, L.H.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R.L.; Ederle, J.; Worp, H.B. van der; Borst, G.J. de; Mali, W.P.; Beard, J.D.; Cleveland, T.; Engelter, S.T.; Lyrer, P.A.; Ford, G.A.; Dorman, P.J.; Brown, M.M.; Leeuw, F.E. de; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stenting is an alternative to endarterectomy for treatment of carotid artery stenosis, but long-term efficacy is uncertain. We report long-term data from the randomised International Carotid Stenting Study comparison of these treatments. METHODS: Patients with symptomatic carotid

  9. Early Diastolic Strain Rate in Relation to Systolic and Diastolic Function and Prognosis in Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Barros-Gomes, Sergio; Videbæk, Lars

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the impact of early mitral inflow velocity-to-early diastolic strain rate (E/SRe) ratio on long-term outcome after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in aortic stenosis (AS). BACKGROUND: In AS, increased filling pressures are associated with a poor prognosis and can...... be estimated using the early diastolic mitral inflow velocity-to-early diastolic velocity of the mitral annulus (E/e') ratio. Recent studies suggest that the E/SRe ratio surpasses the E/e' ratio in estimating outcome. METHODS: Pre-operative evaluation was performed in 121 patients with severe AS (aortic valve...... area 40% who were scheduled for AVR. Patients were divided according to E/SRe median and followed for 5 years. The primary endpoint was overall mortality. RESULTS: LVEF was lower (53 ± 7% vs. 56 ± 7%, respectively; p = 0.03) and a restrictive...

  10. Impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch on the regression of secondary mitral regurgitation after isolated aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve in patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeloni, Emiliano; Melina, Giovanni; Pibarot, Philippe; Benedetto, Umberto; Refice, Simone; Ciavarella, Giuseppino M; Roscitano, Antonino; Sinatra, Riccardo; Pepper, John R

    2012-01-01

    Secondary mitral regurgitation (SMR) is generally reduced after isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR), but there is important interindividual variability in the magnitude of this reduction. Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may hinder normalization of left ventricular geometry and pressure overload following AVR, therefore we aimed to investigate the relationship between PPM and regression of SMR following AVR for aortic valve stenosis. A total of 419 patients with AS who underwent isolated AVR at 2 institutions and presenting moderate SMR (mitral regurgitant volume 30 to 45 mL/beat) not considered for surgical correction were included in this study. Clinical and echocardiographic follow-up were completed at a median follow-up time of 37 months. PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤0.85 cm(2)/m(2) and was found in 170/419 patients (40.6%). There were no significant differences in baseline and operative characteristics between patients with or without PPM. Patients with PPM had less regression of SMR following AVR compared with those with no PPM (change in mitral regurgitant volume: -11±4 versus -17±5 mL, respectively; Pregression model, which showed indexed effective orifice area (Pregression of SMR following AVR. This unfavorable effect was associated with worse functional capacity. These findings emphasize the importance of operative strategies aiming to prevent PPM in patients with aortic valve stenosis and concomitant SMR.

  11. Congenital midline cleft of the posterior arch of atlas: a rare cause of symptomatic cervical canal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Chandler, C.; Robinson, S.; Jarosz, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Developmental symptomatic C1 canal stenosis is very rare. We describe the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances in a 8-year-old child who presented with progressive upper and lower limb neurological symptoms and in whom imaging revealed the medial posterior hemiarches of a bifid C1 to be inturned and compressing the cervical cord. This particular configuration of the posterior arch of atlas is frequently associated with other craniocervical bony anomalies and presents with neurological symptoms early in life. Early CT or MRI examination of patients with symptomatic posterior arch of C1 defects is necessary, in order to detect such an appearance, since surgical treatment may prevent neurological deterioration. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of Aortic Blood Flow and Wall Shear Stress in Aortic Stenosis and Its Association With Left Ventricular Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Karunaharamoorthy, Achudhan; Trauzeddel, Ralf Felix; Barker, Alex J; Blaszczyk, Edyta; Markl, Michael; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stenosis (AS) leads to variable stress for the left ventricle (LV) and consequently a broad range of LV remodeling. Study aim was to describe blood flow patterns in the ascending aorta of AS patients and determine their association with remodeling. Methods and Results Thirty-seven patients with AS (14 mild, 8 moderate, 15 severe; age 63±13 years) and 37 healthy controls (age 60±10 years) underwent 4D-flow MRI. Helical and vortical flow formations and flow eccentricity were assessed in the ascending aorta. Normalized flow displacement from the vessel center and peak systolic wall shear stress (WSSpeak) in the ascending aorta were quantified. LV remodeling was assessed based on LV mass index (LVMI-I) and the ratio of LV mass to enddiastolic volume (relative wall mass; RWM). Marked helical and vortical flow formation and eccentricity were more prevalent in patients with AS than in healthy subjects, and AS patients exhibited an asymmetric and elevated distribution of WSSpeak. In AS, aortic orifice area was strongly negatively associated with vortical flow formation (p=0.0274), eccentricity (p=0.0070) and flow displacement (p=0.0021). Bicuspid aortic valve was associated with more intense helical (p=0.0098) and vortical flow formation (p=0.0536), higher flow displacement (p=0.11) and higher WSSpeak (p=0.0926). LVM-I and RWM were significantly associated with aortic orifice area (p=0.0611, p=0.0058) and flow displacement (p=0.0058, p=0.0283). Conclusions In this pilot study, AS leads to abnormal blood flow pattern and WSSpeak in the ascending aorta. In addition to aortic orifice area, normalized flow displacement was significantly associated with LV remodeling. PMID:26917824

  13. Prosthetic valve endocarditis 7 months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation diagnosed with 3D TEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Sarı

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI was introduced as an alternative treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis for whom surgery would be high-risk. Prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis is a serious complication of surgical AVR (SAVR with high morbidity and mortality. According to recent cases, post-TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE seems to occur very rarely. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman who underwent TAVI (Edwards Saphien XT with an uneventful postoperative stay. She was diagnosed with endocarditis using three dimensional (3D echocardiography on the TAVI device 7 months later and she subsequently underwent surgical aortic valve replacement. Little experience of the interpretation of transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE and the clinical course and effectiveness of treatment strategies in post-TAVI endocarditis exists. We report a case of PVE in a TAVI patient which was diagnosed with three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE.

  14. Ethical considerations of transparency, informed consent, and nudging in a patient with paediatric aortic stenosis and symptomatic left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine D; Cook, Thomas; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Mavroudis, Constantine

    2016-12-01

    A 9-year-old boy who was born with bicuspid aortic stenosis underwent two unsuccessful aortic valvuloplasty interventions, and by 2 years of age he developed restrictive cardiomyopathy caused by left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis and diastolic dysfunction. The attending cardiologist referred the patient to a high-volume, high-profile congenital cardiac surgical programme 1000 miles away that has a team with considerable experience with left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis resection and a reputation of achieving good results. Owing to problems with insurance coverage, the parents sought other options for the care of their child in their home state. Dr George Miller is a well-respected local congenital and paediatric cardiac surgeon with considerable experience with the Ross operation as well as with right ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis resection. When talking with Dr Miller, he implied that there is little difference between right ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis and left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis resection, and stated that he would perform the operation with low mortality based on his overall experience. Dr Miller stated that the local institution could provide an equivalent surgical procedure with comparable outcomes, without the patient and family having to travel out of state. A fundamental dilemma that often arises in clinical surgical practice concerns the conduct of assessing and performing new procedures, especially in rare cases, for which the collective global experience is scant. Although Dr Miller has performed right ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis resection, this procedure differs from left ventricular endocardial fibroelastosis resection, and he cannot be sure that he will indeed be able to perform the procedure better than the high-volume surgeon. This ethical situation is best understood in terms of the principles of respect for patient autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. The tension

  15. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most cases, doctors don't know why a heart valve fails to develop properly, so it isn't something you could have prevented. Calcium buildup on the valve. With age, heart valves may accumulate deposits of calcium (aortic valve ...

  16. Temporal Trends in Disease Severity and Predicted Surgical Risk at the Time of Referral for Echocardiography in Patients Diagnosed with Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersboll, Mads; Samad, Zainab; Al Enezi, Fawaz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common underlying pathology in patients undergoing heart valve surgery, with an expected increasing prevalence among the aging population. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified the temporal trends in referral patterns, disease severity, and assoc......BACKGROUND: Calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common underlying pathology in patients undergoing heart valve surgery, with an expected increasing prevalence among the aging population. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified the temporal trends in referral patterns, disease severity......, and associated surgical risk among patients with AS between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2012 at the Duke University Hospital. A total of 6103 patients had a finding of mild (n = 3303), moderate (n = 1648), or severe AS (n = 1152) in a native aortic valve. Overall presence of severe AS increased...... with a finding of severe AS, the proportion of patients aged older than 80 years increased to 51.0% in the most recent time period (2010-2012) compared with 32.6% in the preceding time period (P proportion of patients with a logistic EuroSCORE greater than 20...

  17. Surgical or Transcatheter Aortic-Valve Replacement in Intermediate-Risk Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reardon, Michael J; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Popma, Jeffrey J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) is an accepted alternative to surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high surgical risk, less is known about comparative outcomes among patients with aortic stenosis who are at intermediate surgical risk. METHO...

  18. 4D spiral imaging of flows in stenotic phantoms and subjects with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, M J; Kadbi, Mo; Kendrick, Michael; Stoddard, Marcus F; Amini, Amir A

    2016-03-01

    The utility of four-dimensional (4D) spiral flow in imaging of stenotic flows in both phantoms and human subjects with aortic stenosis is investigated. The method performs 4D flow acquisitions through a stack of interleaved spiral k-space readouts. Relative to conventional 4D flow, which performs Cartesian readout, the method has reduced echo time. Thus, reduced flow artifacts are observed when imaging high-speed stenotic flows. Four-dimensional spiral flow also provides significant savings in scan times relative to conventional 4D flow. In vitro experiments were performed under both steady and pulsatile flows in a phantom model of severe stenosis (one inch diameter at the inlet, with 87% area reduction at the throat of the stenosis) while imaging a 6-cm axial extent of the phantom, which included the Gaussian-shaped stenotic narrowing. In all cases, gradient strength and slew rate for standard clinical acquisitions, and identical field of view and resolution were used. For low steady flow rates, quantitative and qualitative results showed a similar level of accuracy between 4D spiral flow (echo time [TE] = 2 ms, scan time = 40 s) and conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.6 ms, scan time = 1:01 min). However, in the case of high steady flow rates, 4D spiral flow (TE = 1.57 ms, scan time = 38 s) showed better visualization and accuracy as compared to conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.2 ms, scan time = 51 s). At low pulsatile flow rates, a good agreement was observed between 4D spiral flow (TE = 2 ms, scan time = 10:26 min) and conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.6 ms, scan time = 14:20 min). However, in the case of high flow-rate pulsatile flows, 4D spiral flow (TE = 1.57 ms, scan time = 10:26 min) demonstrated better visualization as compared to conventional 4D flow (TE = 3.2 ms, scan time = 14:20 min). The feasibility of 4D spiral flow was also investigated in five normal volunteers and four subjects with mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis. The approach achieved TE = 1.68 ms and scan

  19. Suprarenal fixation resulting in intestinal malperfusion after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siani, Andrea; Accrocca, Federico; De Vivo, Gennaro; Marcucci, Giustino

    2016-05-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and coeliac axis (CA) occlusion after endovascular abdominal aneurysm aortic repair (EVAR-AAA), using endograft with suprarenal fixation, are uncommon. However, we are reporting a case of visceral malperfusion, which occurred 7 days after successful EVAR with suprarenal fixation for symptomatic AAA. Endograft metal stent barbs caused severe stenosis of SMA and CA. A successful recovery of SMA was carried out by means of a balloon-expandable stent released through bare metal stent barbs. We believe that an unfavourable anatomy of a proximal aortic neck and visceral aorta may have caused a wrong stent strut deployment with the coverage of CA and SMA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. The importance of echocardiography in transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Emine; Sari, Cenk; Durmaz, Tahir; Keleş, Telat; Bayram, Nihal A; Akçay, Murat; Ayhan, Hüseyin M; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart diseases cause serious health problems in Turkey as well as in Western countries. According to a study conducted in Turkey, aortic stenosis (AS) is second after mitral valve disease among all valvular heart diseases. AS is frequently observed in elderly patients who have several cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. In symptomatic severe AS, surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is a definitive treatment. However, in elderly patients with left ventricular dysfunction and comorbidities, the risk of operative morbidity and mortality increases and outweighs the gain obtained from AVR surgery. As a result, almost one-third of the patients with serious AS are considered ineligible for surgery. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic severe AS who have high risk for conventional surgery. Since being performed for the first time in 2002, with a procedure success rate reported as 95% and a mortality rate of 5%, TAVI has become a promising method. Assessment of vascular anatomy, aortic annular diameter, and left ventricular function may be useful for the appropriate selection of patients and may reduce the risk of complications. Cardiac imaging methods including 2D and 3D echocardiography and multidetector computed tomography are critical during the evaluation of suitable patients for TAVI as well as during and after the procedure. In this review, we describe the role of echocardiography methods in clinical practice for TAVI procedure in its entirety, i.e. from patient selection to guidance during the procedure, and subsequent monitoring. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis and the Effect of Vitamin K2 on Calcification Using 18F-Sodium Fluoride Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance: The BASIK2 Rationale and Trial Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Frederique E C M; van Mourik, Manouk J W; Meex, Steven J R; Bucerius, Jan; Schalla, Simon M; Gerretsen, Suzanne C; Mihl, Casper; Dweck, Marc R; Schurgers, Leon J; Wildberger, Joachim E; Crijns, Harry J G M; Kietselaer, Bas L J H

    2018-03-21

    BASIK2 is a prospective, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial investigating the effect of vitamin K2 (menaquinone-7;MK7) on imaging measurements of calcification in the bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAVS). BAV is associated with early development of CAVS. Pathophysiologic mechanisms are incompletely defined, and the only treatment available is valve replacement upon progression to severe symptomatic stenosis. Matrix Gla protein (MGP) inactivity is suggested to be involved in progression. Being a vitamin K dependent protein, supplementation with MK7 is a pharmacological option for activating MGP and intervening in the progression of CAVS. Forty-four subjects with BAV and mild-moderate CAVS will be included in the study, and baseline 18 F-sodiumfluoride ( 18 F-NaF) positron emission tomography (PET)/ magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) assessments will be performed. Thereafter, subjects will be randomized (1:1) to MK7 (360 mcg/day) or placebo. During an 18-month follow-up period, subjects will visit the hospital every 6 months, undergoing a second 18 F-NaF PET/MR after 6 months and CT after 6 and 18 months. The primary endpoint is the change in PET/MR 18 F-NaF uptake (6 months minus baseline) compared to this delta change in the placebo arm. The main secondary endpoints are changes in calcium score (CT), progression of the left ventricularremodeling response and CAVS severity (echocardiography). We will also examine the association between early calcification activity (PET) and later changes in calcium score (CT).

  2. Acute pulmonary edema due to stress cardiomyopathy in a patient with aortic stenosis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Monika F

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Stress cardiomyopathy is a condition of chest pain, breathlessness, abnormal heart rhythms and sometimes congestive heart failure or shock precipitated by intense mental or physical stress. Case presentation A 64-year-old male with a known diagnosis of moderate-to-severe aortic stenosis and advised that valve replacement was not urgent, presented with acute pulmonary edema following extraordinary mental distress. The patient was misdiagnosed as having a "massive heart attack" and...

  3. The impact of age on the postoperative response of the diastolic function and left ventricular mass regression after surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teruya; Toda, Koichi; Kuratani, Toru; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Shunsuke; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-06-01

    We examined the impact of advanced age on left ventricular mass regression and the change in the diastolic function after aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic stenosis. The present study included 129 patients who underwent either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement and 1-year postoperative echocardiography. The patient characteristics and echocardiographic findings were compared between patients who were regression was significantly greater (p = 0.02) and diastolic dysfunction was less prevalent in group Y (p = 0.02) in comparison to group O. The change in E/e' was significantly correlated with the left ventricular mass regression in group Y (p = 0.02), but not in Group O (p = 0.21). The patients in group O were less susceptible to improvements in myocardial remodeling and the diastolic function in comparison to those in group Y. The altered physiological response to aortic valve replacement might help to determine the appropriate timing of surgery in elderly patients.

  4. Association between aortic valve calcification measured on non-contrast computed tomography and aortic valve stenosis in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Niels Herluf; Bønløkke Carlsen, Bjarke; Dahl, Jordi Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aortic valve calcification (AVC) measured on non-contrast computed tomography (CT) has shown correlation to severity of aortic valve stenosis (AS) and mortality in patients with known AS. The aim of this study was to determine the association of CT verified AVC and subclinical...... AS in a general population undergoing CT. METHODS: CT scans from 566 randomly selected male participants (age 65-74) in the Danish cardiovascular screening study (DANCAVAS) were analyzed for AVC. All participants with a moderately or severely increased AVC score (≥300 arbitrary units (AU)) and a matched control...... ICD leads 16 individuals were excluded from the AVC scoring. Moderate or severe increased AVC was observed in 10.7% (95% CI: 8.4-13.7). Echocardiography was performed in 101 individuals; 32.7% (95% CI: 21.8 to 46.0) with moderate or high AVC score had moderate or severe AS, while none with no or low...

  5. Dynamics of the aortic annulus in 4D CT angiography for transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, Mustafa A.; Vink, Leon W.; van Mourik, Martijn S.; Baan, Jan; Vanbavel, Ed T.; Planken, R. Nils; Marquering, Henk A.

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a well-established treatment for patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. This procedure requires pre-operative planning by assessment of aortic dimensions on CT Angiography (CTA). It is well-known that the aortic root dimensions vary over the

  6. Prosthetic valve endocarditis 7 months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation diagnosed with 3D TEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarı, Cenk; Durmaz, Tahir; Karaduman, Bilge Duran; Keleş, Telat; Bayram, Hüseyin; Baştuğ, Serdal; Özen, Mehmet Burak; Bayram, Nihal Akar; Bilen, Emine; Ayhan, Hüseyin; Kasapkara, Hacı Ahmet; Bozkurt, Engin

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced as an alternative treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis for whom surgery would be high-risk. Prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis is a serious complication of surgical AVR (SAVR) with high morbidity and mortality. According to recent cases, post-TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) seems to occur very rarely. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman who underwent TAVI (Edwards Saphien XT) with an uneventful postoperative stay. She was diagnosed with endocarditis using three dimensional (3D) echocardiography on the TAVI device 7 months later and she subsequently underwent surgical aortic valve replacement. Little experience of the interpretation of transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and the clinical course and effectiveness of treatment strategies in post-TAVI endocarditis exists. We report a case of PVE in a TAVI patient which was diagnosed with three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE). Copyright © 2016 Hellenic Cardiological Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fate of remnant sinuses of Valsalva in patients with bicuspid and trileaflet valves undergoing aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Rita Karianna; Habertheuer, Andreas; Bavaria, Joseph E; Siki, Mary; Szeto, Wilson Y; Krause, Eric; Korutla, Varun; Desai, Nimesh D; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2017-08-01

    In patients presenting with aortic valvulopathy with concomitant ascending aortic aneurysm, surgical management of the sinus of Valsalva segment remains undefined, especially for moderately dilated aortic roots. In patients with this pathology undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, we assessed the fate of the remnant preserved sinus of Valsalva segment stratified by aortic valve morphology and pathology. From 2002 to 2015, 428 patients underwent elective aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement. Patients were stratified on the basis of valvular morphology (bicuspid aortic valve [n = 254] and tricuspid aortic valve [n = 174]), valvular pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 178], bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 76], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis [n = 61], tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency [n = 113]), and preoperative sinus of Valsalva dimensions (45 mm). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no significant difference in freedom from reoperation in tricuspid aortic valve versus bicuspid aortic valve (P = .576). Multivariable Cox regression model performed with sinus of Valsalva dimensions at baseline and follow-up as time-varying covariates did not adversely affect survival. A repeated-measure, mixed-effects model constructed to assess longitudinal sinus of Valsalva trends revealed that the retained sinus of Valsalva dimensions remain stable over long-term follow-up (discharge to ≥10 years), irrespective of valvular morphology/pathology (bicuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic insufficiency, tricuspid aortic valve with aortic stenosis) and preoperative sinus of Valsalva groups (45 mm). In patients with nonaneurysmal sinuses of Valsalva undergoing aortic valve replacement with supracoronary ascending aorta replacement, the sinus segment can be preserved irrespective of

  8. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ederle, Jörg

    2010-03-20

    Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy.

  9. Endovascular Treatment of a Symptomatic Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Chimney and Periscope Techniques for Total Visceral and Renal Artery Revascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cariati, Maurizio, E-mail: cariati.maurizio@sancarlo.mi.it [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Sciences (Italy); Mingazzini, Pietro; Dallatana, Raffaello [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy); Rossi, Umberto G. [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Sciences (Italy); Settembrini, Alberto [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Università degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Santuari, Davide [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy)

    2013-05-02

    Conventional endovascular therapy of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with involving visceral and renal arteries is limited by the absence of a landing zone for the aortic endograft. Solutions have been proposed to overcome the problem of no landing zone; however, most of them are not feasible in urgent and high-risk patients. We describe a case that was successfully treated by total endovascular technique with a two-by-two chimney-and-periscope approach in a patient with acute symptomatic type IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with supra-anastomotic aneurysm formation involving the renal and visceral arteries and a pseduaneurismatic sac localized in the left ileopsoas muscle.

  10. Lipoprotein(a) levels, genotype, and incident aortic valve stenosis: a prospective mendelian randomization study and replication in a case-control cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsenault, Benoit J.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Rhéaume, Eric; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Although a previous study has suggested that a genetic variant in the LPA region was associated with the presence of aortic valve stenosis (AVS), no prospective study has suggested a role for lipoprotein(a) levels in the pathophysiology of AVS. Our objective was to determine whether lipoprotein(a)

  11. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan [College of Medicine, Yeungam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-06-15

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures.

  12. Clinical Correlates and Prognostic Value of Plasma Galectin-3 Levels in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis: A Single-Center Prospective Study of Patients Referred for Invasive Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Bobrowska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 (Gal-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, has been implicated in myocardial fibrosis, development of left ventricular (LV dysfunction and transition from compensated LV hypertrophy to overt heart failure (HF, being a novel prognostic marker in HF. Risk stratification is crucial for the choice of the optimal therapy in degenerative aortic stenosis (AS, affecting elderly subjects with coexistent diseases. Our aim was to assess correlates and prognostic value of circulating Gal-3 in real-world patients with degenerative AS referred for invasive treatment. Gal-3 levels were measured at admission in 80 consecutive patients with symptomatic degenerative AS (mean age: 79 ± 8 years; aortic valve area (AVA index: 0.4 ± 0.1 cm2/m2. The therapeutic strategy was chosen following a dedicated multidisciplinary team-oriented approach, including surgical valve replacement (n = 11, transcatheter valve implantation (n = 19, balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV (n = 25 and optimal medical therapy (n = 25. Besides routine echocardiographic indices, valvulo-arterial impedance (Zva, an index of global LV afterload, was computed. There were 22 deaths over a median follow-up of 523 days. Baseline Gal-3 correlated negatively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR (r = −0.61, p < 0.001 and was unrelated to age, symptomatic status, AVA index, LV ejection fraction, LV mass index or Zva. For the study group as a whole, Gal-3 tended to predict mortality (Gal-3 >17.8 vs. Gal-3 <17.8 ng/mL; hazard ratio (HR: 2.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.88–4.69, p = 0.09, which was abolished upon adjustment for eGFR (HR: 1.70 (0.61–4.73, p = 0.3. However, in post-BAV patients multivariate-adjusted pre-procedural Gal-3 was associated with worse survival (HR: 7.41 (1.52–36.1, p = 0.01 regardless of eGFR. In conclusion, the inverse eGFR–Gal-3 relationship underlies a weak association between Gal-3 and adverse outcome in patients with degenerative AS referred for

  13. Feasibility of Angioplasty and Stenting for Abdominal Aortic Lesions Adjacent to Previously Stented Visceral Artery Lesions in Patients with Takayasu Arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, George; George, Paul V.; Pati, Purendra Kumar; Chandy, Sunil Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Two young female patients with Takayasu arteritis presented with symptomatic long-segment abdominal aortic stenosis in the vicinity of previously deployed celiac and renal artery stents that projected markedly into the narrowed aortic lumen. Crushing or distortion of the visceral artery stents during aortic angioplasty was avoided by performing simultaneous or alternating balloon dilatations in the aorta and in the visceral artery stents. Consequently, the visceral artery stents remained patent and shortened longitudinally, allowing unhindered deployment of Wallstents in the adjacent aorta and abolition of a pressure gradient across the aortic lesions. Access to side branches covered by the Wallstent was obtained without difficulty, enabling the performance of balloon dilatation in multiple side branches and ostial stent deployment in a renal artery. These techniques could increase the scope of endovascular therapy in the treatment of patients with Takayasu arteritis

  14. Association of the C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP rs1205 C>T Polymorphism with Aortic Valve Calcification in Patients with Aortic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Wypasek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Elevation in C-reactive protein (CRP levels have been shown in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS. Minor allele of the CRP gene (CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism has been associated with lower plasma CRP concentrations in cohorts of healthy and atherosclerotic patients. Considering the existing similarities between atherosclerosis and AS, we examined the effect of CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism on the AS severity. Three hundred consecutive Caucasian patients diagnosed with AS were genotyped for the rs1205 C>T polymorphism using the TaqMan assay. Severity of the AS was assessed using transthoracic echocardiography. The degree of calcification was analyzed semi-quantitatively. Carriers of the rs1205 T allele were characterized by elevated serum CRP levels (2.53 (1.51–3.96 vs. 1.68 (0.98–2.90 mg/L, p < 0.001 and a higher proportion of the severe aortic valve calcification (70.4% vs. 55.1%, p = 0.01 compared with major homozygotes. The effect of CRP rs1205 polymorphism on CRP levels is opposite in AS-affected than in unaffected subjects, suggesting existence of a disease-specific molecular regulatory mechanism. Furthermore, rs1205 variant allele predisposes to larger aortic valve calcification, potentially being a novel genetic risk marker of disease progression.

  15. Differences in left ventricular remodelling in patients with aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement with corevalve prostheses compared to surgery with porcine or bovine biological prostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Thuc Anh; Hassager, Christian; Thyregod, Hans Gustav Hørsted

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) can be considered for treatment with either transcatheter (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). The purpose of this study was to compare left ventricular (LV) remodeling in patients with AS after treatment with TAVR or SAVR. Methods...... were randomized to TAVR and 112 to SAVR. From baseline to 12 months post-procedure, aortic valve area (AVA) increased in both groups, but with a larger increase in the TAVR group (0.65 ± 0.04 cm2 vs. 1.02 ± 0.05 cm2 for SAVR and TAVR group, P regression was more.......0001). Paravalvular leakage (PVL) and pacemaker implantations were more common in patients treated with TAVR, which was associated with an increase in EDV (P regression at 1 year compared with patients undergoing TAVR, which may be due to increasing...

  16. Retrograde catheterisation vs. Doppler echocardiographic evaluation of aortic stenosis--a survey of contemporary UK practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Iftikhar A; Alfakih, Khaled; Wilcox, Robert G; Walsh, John T

    2009-05-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common indication for valve surgery. Recent data suggested an increased risk of cerebral emboli when the aortic valve is crossed to obtain 'pull-back' gradient. We conducted a large questionnaire based study to evaluate current practice in the assessment of aortic valve gradient amongst cardiologists and the preferences of cardiac surgeons in the UK. E-mail questionnaires were sent to 645 (72%) UK consultant cardiologists and to 198 (92%) UK consultant cardiac surgeons. 232 cardiologists and 52 cardiac surgeons responded. 53% of cardiologists routinely attempt to cross the valve in moderate AS while only 23% do so in severe AS. 38% of cardiologists in the age group '50+ years' cross the valve in severe AS compared to 13% in the age group '30-40 years'. Common reasons given for crossing a stenosed valve included 'to verify the echocardiographic gradient' (85%) and 'maintaining skill' (24%). 64% of cardiologists have changed their views on the necessity of crossing the valve in the last ten years. Although the majority appreciate the increased risk of crossing the valve only 18% of patients are consented differently if crossing the valve is planned. 26% of cardiac surgeons prefer the valve to be crossed to provide information on 'pull-back' gradient, 32% for LV function assessment and 14% to confirm MV competence. 92% would accept echocardiographic data alone if both the gradient and aortic valve area were available and considered correct. Our survey found that the practice of crossing the aortic valve has changed in the last 10 years and that younger consultant cardiologists are less likely to cross the aortic valve. Increasing confidence in echocardiographic data and potential complications of crossing the valve are implicated. 92% of cardiac surgeons do not require the valve to be crossed if the echo data is considered accurate.

  17. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, J.; Dobson, J.; Featherstone, R.L.; Bonati, L.H.; Worp, H.B. van der; Borst, G.J. de; Lo, T.H.; Gaines, P.; Dorman, P.J.; Macdonald, S.; Lyrer, P.A.; Hendriks, J.M.; McCollum, C.; Nederkoorn, P.J.; Brown, M.M.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der; et al.,

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  18. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Jörg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molyneux, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Brooks, M.; Chambers, B.; Chan, A.; Chu, P.; Clark, D.; Dewey, H.; Donnan, G.; Fell, G.; Hoare, M.; Molan, M.; Roberts, A.; Roberts, N.; Beiles, B.; Bladin, C.; Clifford, C.; Grigg, M.; New, G.; Bell, R.; Bower, S.; Chong, W.; Holt, M.; Saunder, A.; Than, P. G.; Gett, S.; Leggett, D.; McGahan, T.; Quinn, J.; Ray, M.; Wong, A.; Woodruff, P.; Foreman, R.; Schultz, D.; Scroop, R.; Stanley, B.; Allard, B.; Atkinson, N.; Cambell, W.; Davies, S.; Field, P.; Milne, P.; Mitchell, P.; Tress, B.; Yan, B.; Beasley, A.; Dunbabin, D.; Stary, D.; Walker, S.; Cras, P.; d'Archambeau, O.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; van Schil, P.; St Blasius, A. Z.; Bosiers, M.; Deloose, K.; van Buggenhout, E.; de Letter, J.; Devos, V.; Ghekiere, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Astarci, P.; Hammer, F.; Lacroix, V.; Peeters, A.; Verbist, J.; Blair, J.-F.; Caron, J. L.; Daneault, N.; Giroux, M.-F.; Guilbert, F.; Lanthier, S.; Lebrun, L.-H.; Oliva, V.; Raymond, J.; Roy, D.; Soulez, G.; Weill, A.; Hill, M.; Hu, W.; Hudion, M.; Morrish, W.; Sutherland, G.; Wong, J.; Albäck, A.; Harno, H.; Ijäs, P.; Kaste, M.; Lepäntalo, M.; Mustanoja, S.; Paananen, T.; Porras, M.; Putaala, J.; Railo, M.; Sairanen, T.; Soinne, L.; Vehmas, A.; Vikatmaa, P.; Goertler, M.; Halloul, Z.; Skalej, M.; Brennan, P.; Kelly, C.; Leahy, A.; Moroney, J.; Thornton, J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Hendriks, J. M.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van der Lugt, A.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; de Bruijn, S. F.; Keunen, R.; Knippenberg, B.; Mosch, A.; Treurniet, F.; van Dijk, L.; van Overhagen, H.; Wever, J.; de Beer, F. C.; van den Berg, J. S. P.; van Hasselt, B. A. A. M.; Zeilstra, D. J.; Boiten, J.; van Otterloo, J. C. A. de Mol; de Vries, A. C.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, G. J.; van der Kallen, B. F. W.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; de Leeuw, F. E.; Kool, L. J. Schultze; van der Vliet, J. A.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Kapelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F.; van der Worp, H. B.; Verhagen, H.; Barber, P. A.; Bourchier, R.; Hill, A.; Holden, A.; Stewart, J.; Bakke, S. J.; Krohg-Sørensen, K.; Skjelland, M.; Tennøe, B.; Bialek, P.; Biejat, Z.; Czepiel, W.; Czlonkowska, A.; Dowzenko, A.; Jedrzejewska, J.; Kobayashi, A.; Lelek, M.; Polanski, J.; Kirbis, J.; Milosevic, Z.; Zvan, B.; Blasco, J.; Chamorro, A.; Macho, J.; Obach, V.; Riambau, V.; San Roman, L.; Branera, J.; Canovas, D.; Estela, Jordi; Gaibar, A. Gimenez; Perendreu, J.; Björses, K.; Gottsater, A.; Ivancev, K.; Maetzsch, T.; Sonesson, B.; Berg, B.; Delle, M.; Formgren, J.; Gillgren, P.; Kall, T.-B.; Konrad, P.; Nyman, N.; Takolander, R.; Andersson, T.; Malmstedt, J.; Soderman, M.; Wahlgren, C.; Wahlgren, N.; Binaghi, S.; Hirt, L.; Michel, P.; Ruchat, P.; Engelter, S. T.; Fluri, F.; Guerke, L.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E.-W.; Stierli, P.; Wasner, M.; Wetzel, S.; Bonvin, C.; Kalangos, A.; Lovblad, K.; Murith, M.; Ruefenacht, D.; Sztajzel, R.; Higgins, N.; Kirkpatrick, P. J.; Martin, P.; Varty, K.; Adam, D.; Bell, J.; Crowe, P.; Gannon, M.; Henderson, M. J.; Sandler, D.; Shinton, R. A.; Scriven, J. M.; Wilmink, T.; D'Souza, S.; Egun, A.; Guta, R.; Punekar, S.; Seriki, D. M.; Thomson, G.; Brennan, J. A.; Enevoldson, T. P.; Gilling-Smith, G.; Gould, D. A.; Harris, P. L.; McWilliams, R. G.; Nasser, H.-C.; White, R.; Prakash, K. G.; Serracino-Inglott, F.; Subramanian, G.; Symth, J. V.; Walker, M. G.; Clarke, M.; Davis, M.; Dixit, S. A.; Dorman, P.; Dyker, A.; Ford, G.; Golkar, A.; Jackson, R.; Jayakrishnan, V.; Lambert, D.; Lees, T.; Louw, S.; Macdonald, S.; Mendelow, A. D.; Rodgers, H.; Rose, J.; Stansby, G.; Wyatt, M.; Baker, T.; Baldwin, N.; Jones, L.; Mitchell, D.; Munro, E.; Thornton, M.; Baker, D.; Davis, N.; Hamilton, G.; McCabe, D.; Platts, A.; Tibballs, J.; Cleveland, T.; Dodd, D.; Lonsdale, R.; Nair, R.; Nassef, A.; Nawaz, S.; Venables, G.; Belli, A.; Cloud, G.; Halliday, A.; Markus, H.; McFarland, R.; Morgan, R.; Pereira, A.; Thompson, A.; Chataway, J.; Cheshire, N.; Gibbs, R.; Hammady, M.; Jenkins, M.; Malik, I.; Wolfe, J.; Adiseshiah, M.; Bishop, C.; Brew, S.; Brookes, J.; Jäger, R.; Kitchen, N.; Ashleigh, R.; Butterfield, S.; Gamble, G. E.; McCollum, C.; Nasim, A.; O'Neill, P.; Edwards, R. D.; Lees, K. R.; MacKay, A. J.; Moss, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. METHODS: The International

  19. New ischaemic brain lesions on MRI after stenting or endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis: a substudy of the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonati, Leo H.; Jongen, Lisa M.; Haller, Sven; Flach, H. Zwenneke; Dobson, Joanna; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Gaines, Peter A.; Waaijer, Annet; Waajier, Annet; Stierli, Peter; Jäger, H. Rolf; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Wetzel, Stephan G.; van der Lugt, Aad; Mali, Willem P.; Brown, Martin M.; van der Worp, H. Bart; Engelter, Stefan T.; Koelemaij, M. J. W.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; Reekers, J. A. A.; Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Flach, H. Z.; Hendriks, J. M.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Pattynama, P. M. T.; van Dijk, L. C.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; van der Lugt, A.; van Urk, H.; Verhagen, H. J. M.; de Borst, G. J.; de Kort, G. A. P.; Jongen, L. M.; Kappelle, L. J.; Lo, T. H.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moll, F. L.; van der Worp, H. B.; Bonati, L. H.; Engelter, S. T.; Fluri, F.; Haller, S.; Jacob, A. L.; Kirsch, E.; Lyrer, P. A.; Radue, E.-W.; Stierli, P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) of stenting and endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis found a higher incidence of stroke within 30 days of stenting compared with endarterectomy. We aimed to compare the rate of ischaemic brain injury detectable on MRI between the

  20. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study) : an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ederle, Joerg; Dobson, Joanna; Featherstone, Roland L.; Bonati, Leo H.; van der Worp, H. Bart; de Borst, Gert J.; Lo, T. Hauw; Gaines, Peter; Dorman, Paul J.; Macdonald, Sumaira; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Hendriks, Johanna M.; McCollum, Charles; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Brown, Martin M.; Algra, A.; Bamford, J.; Beard, J.; Bland, M.; Bradbury, A. W.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Hacke, W.; Halliday, A.; Malik, I.; Mas, J. L.; McGuire, A. J.; Sidhu, P.; Venables, G.; Bradbury, A.; Brown, M. M.; Clifton, A.; Gaines, P.; Collins, R.; Molynewc, A.; Naylor, R.; Warlow, C.; Ferro, J. M.; Thomas, D.; Bonati, L. H.; Coward, L.; Dobson, J.; Ederle, J.; Featherstone, R. F.; Tindall, H.; McCabe, D. J. H.; Wallis, A.; Hendriks, J. M. H.; Hendriks, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid

  1. The nordic aortic valve intervention (NOTION) trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Søndergaard, Lars; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic valve (AV) stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can...

  2. Stroke prevention-surgical and interventional approaches to carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajamani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra cranial carotid artery stenosis is an important cause of stroke, which often needs treatment with carotid revascularization. To prevent stroke recurrence, carotid endarterectomy (CEA has been well-established for several decades for symptomatic high and moderate grade stenosis. Carotid stenting is a less invasive alternative to CEA and several recent trials have compared the efficacy of the 2 procedures in patients with carotid stenosis. Carotid artery stenting has emerged as a potential mode of therapy for high surgical risk patients with symptomatic high-grade stenosis. This review focuses on the current data available that will enable the clinician to decide optimal treatment strategies for patients with carotid stenosis.

  3. Relation of Left Atrial Size, Cardiac Morphology, and Clinical Outcome in Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nicolaj Lyhne; Dahl, Jordi; Carter-Storch, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    characterized by higher LV mass index (73 ± 17 g/m² vs. 66 ± 16 g/m² , p=0.03), increased right ventricle (70 ± 14 ml/m² vs. 63 ± 12 ml/m², p=0.01) and LV end-diastolic volume index (84 ± 18 ml/m² vs. 77 ± 16 ml/m², p=0.05), and higher brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). No difference in late enhancement was seen......Left atrial (LA) dilatation in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) may be an indicator of advanced disease. The aim was to investigate the association between LA volume index (LAVi) and left ventricular (LV) morphology assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI), and to assess...... underwent echocardiography, cMRI, exercise test, and patients were followed for the composite endpoint of death, readmission or aortic valve replacement. AVA index was similar (0.45 ± 0.08 cm² /m² vs. 0.45 ± 0.09 cm², p=0.85) in patients with a dilated and normal LA. On cMRI patients with dilated LA were...

  4. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on the outcome after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Marijana; Vukadinovic, Davor; Cvijanovic, Dane; Celic, Vera; Kocica, Mladen; Putnik, Svetozar; Ivanovic, Branislava

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of the metabolic syndrome on the left ventricular geometry as well as on the early and mid-time outcome in patients with aortic stenosis who underwent aortic valve replacement. The study included 182 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement due to aortic stenosis. The metabolic syndrome was defined by the presence of at least three AHA-NHLB (American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) criteria. All the patients were followed for at least 2 years after the surgery. The metabolic syndrome did not influence the severity of aortic stenosis (mean gradient and aortic valve area). However, the metabolic syndrome was associated with the reduced prevalence of the normal left ventricular geometry and the increased risk of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis. Among the metabolic syndrome criteria, only increased blood pressure was simultaneously associated with the short-term and mid-term outcome, independently of other risk factors. Increased fasting glucose level was an independent predictor of the only 30-day outcome after the valve replacement. The metabolic syndrome and left ventricular hypertrophy were, independently of hypertension and diabetes, associated with the 30-day outcome, as well as incidence of major cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events in the 2-year postoperative period. The metabolic syndrome does not change severity of the aortic stenosis, but significantly impacts the left ventricular remodeling in these patients. The metabolic syndrome and left ventricular hypertrophy, irrespective of hypertension and diabetes, are predictors of the short-term and mid-term outcome of patients with aortic stenosis who underwent aortic valve replacement.

  5. Predictors and progression of aortic stenosis in patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, Mads; Schulte, Phillip J; Al Enezi, Fawaz

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the hemodynamic progression of aortic stenosis (AS) in a contemporary unselected cohort of patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Current guidelines recommend echocardiographic surveillance of hemodynamic progression. However, limited data exist...... reported, a significant proportion of patients with mild and moderate AS progressed to higher grades within the currently recommended time windows for echocardiographic follow-up....... on the expected rate of progression and whether clinical variables are associated with accelerated progression in contemporarily managed patients with AS. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients presenting with AS and explored the trajectory of AS mean gradient over time using generalized estimating...

  6. Estimating the Population Impact of Lp(a) Lowering on the Incidence of Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshar, Mehdi; Kamstrup, Pia R; Williams, Ken

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: High lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is the most common genetic dyslipidemia and is a causal factor for myocardial infarction (MI) and aortic stenosis (AS). We sought to estimate the population impact of Lp(a) lowering that could be achieved in primary prevention using the therapies in developm......OBJECTIVE: High lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is the most common genetic dyslipidemia and is a causal factor for myocardial infarction (MI) and aortic stenosis (AS). We sought to estimate the population impact of Lp(a) lowering that could be achieved in primary prevention using the therapies...... as measures of the population impact. For MI, the event rate was 4.0% versus 2.8% for high versus low Lp(a) (relative risk, 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-1.46). The attributable risk was 1.26% (95% CI, 1.24-1.27), corresponding to 31.3% (95% CI, 31.0-31.7) of the excess MI risk in those with high...... and 7.8% for AS. CONCLUSIONS: Lp(a) lowering among the top 20% of the population distribution for Lp(a) could prevent 1 in 14 cases of MI and 1 in 7 cases of AS, suggesting a major impact on reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease. Targeting the top 10% could prevent 1 in 20 MI cases and 1 in 12...

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Self-Expanding Prosthesis Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja; Vilain, Katherine A; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Galper, Benjamin Z; Meduri, Christopher U; Arnold, Suzanne V; Baron, Suzanne J; Reardon, Michael J; Adams, David H; Popma, Jeffrey J; Cohen, David J

    2016-01-05

    Symptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis in High Risk and Very High Risk Subjects Who Need Aortic Valve Replacement [Medtronic CoreValve U.S. Pivotal Trial]; NCT01240902). Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenograft achieves superior regression of left ventricular hypertrophy compared to pericardial stented aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Reza; Auf der Maur, Christoph; Mueller, Xavier; Schläpfer, Reinhard; Jamshidi, Peiman; Daubeuf, François; Frossard, Nelly

    2015-02-03

    Full-root aortic valve replacement with stentless xenografts has potentially superior hemodynamic performance compared to stented valves. However, a number of cardiac surgeons are reluctant to transform a classical stented aortic valve replacement into a technically more demanding full-root stentless aortic valve replacement. Here we describe our technique of full-root stentless aortic xenograft implantation and compare the early clinical and midterm hemodynamic outcomes to those after aortic valve replacement with stented valves. We retrospectively compared the pre-operative characteristics of 180 consecutive patients who underwent full-root replacement with stentless aortic xenografts with those of 80 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement with stented valves. In subgroups presenting with aortic stenosis, we further analyzed the intra-operative data, early postoperative outcomes and mid-term regression of left ventricular mass index. Patients in the stentless group were younger (62.6 ± 13 vs. 70.3 ± 11.8 years, p regression of the left ventricular mass index in the stentless (p replacement can be performed without adversely affecting the early morbidity or mortality in patients operated on for aortic valve stenosis provided that the coronary ostia are not heavily calcified. The additional time necessary for the full-root stentless compared to the classical stented aortic valve replacement is therefore not detrimental to the early clinical outcomes and is largely rewarded in patients with aortic stenosis by lower transvalvular gradients at mid-term and a better regression of their left ventricular mass index.

  9. Left ventricular filling pressure estimation at rest and during exercise in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis: comparison of echocardiographic and invasive measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Doppler index of left ventricular (LV) filling (E/e') is recognized as a noninvasive measure for LV filling pressure at rest but has also been suggested as a reliable measure of exercise-induced changes. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in LV filling pressure......, measured invasively as pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), at rest and during exercise to describe the relation with E/e' in patients with severe aortic stenosis. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with an aortic valve areas

  10. Impact of secondary hyperparathyroidism on ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis in hemodialysis-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Yoshiyuki; Tajima, Kazuyoshi

    2015-07-01

    In hemodialysis (HD)-dependent patients, secondary hyperparathyroidism induces cardiac hypertrophy. This study investigated whether parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels affect the degree of left ventricular (LV) mass regression in HD patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis (AS). We retrospectively obtained preoperative and 2-year postoperative echocardiography and intact PTH measurements in 88 HD patients who underwent AVR, with bioprostheses (n = 35, 40%) and mechanical valves (n = 53, 60%) of effective orifice area >0.80 cm2/m2, between January 1997 and December 2010. The LV mass decreased significantly from 308 ± 88 to 217 ± 68 g at follow-up of 28 ± 4 months after AVR (p regression at follow-up was inversely related to preoperative PTH values (R = 0.44, p = 0.001). The LV mass regression at follow-up was significantly smaller in the patients (n = 47) with PTH ≥100 pg/mL than in those (n = 41) with PTH regression at 2-year follow-up (β = 0.23, r2 = 0.24, p = 0.02). In conclusion, the HD patients with high levels of PTH presented with less LV mass regression after AVR for AS without patient-prosthesis mismatch. Secondary hyperparathyroidism may impair regression of cardiac hypertrophy after AVR in HD patients with AS.

  11. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves.

  12. Short-term outcome after stenting versus endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis: a preplanned meta-analysis of individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonati, Leo H; Dobson, Joanna; Algra, Ale; Branchereau, Alain; Chatellier, Gilles; Fraedrich, Gustav; Mali, Willem P; Zeumer, Hermann; Brown, Martin M; Mas, Jean-Louis; Ringleb, Peter A

    2010-09-25

    Results from randomised controlled trials have shown a higher short-term risk of stroke associated with carotid stenting than with carotid endarterectomy for the treatment of symptomatic carotid stenosis. However, these trials were underpowered for investigation of whether carotid artery stenting might be a safe alternative to endarterectomy in specific patient subgroups. We therefore did a preplanned meta-analysis of individual patient data from three randomised controlled trials. Data from all 3433 patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis who were randomly assigned and analysed in the Endarterectomy versus Angioplasty in Patients with Symptomatic Severe Carotid Stenosis (EVA-3S) trial, the Stent-Protected Angioplasty versus Carotid Endarterectomy (SPACE) trial, and the International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) were pooled and analysed with fixed-effect binomial regression models adjusted for source trial. The primary outcome event was any stroke or death. The intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis included all patients and outcome events occurring between randomisation and 120 days thereafter. The per-protocol (PP) analysis was restricted to patients receiving the allocated treatment and events occurring within 30 days after treatment. In the first 120 days after randomisation (ITT analysis), any stroke or death occurred significantly more often in the carotid stenting group (153 [8·9%] of 1725) than in the carotid endarterectomy group (99 [5·8%] of 1708, risk ratio [RR] 1·53, [95% CI 1·20-1·95], p=0·0006; absolute risk difference 3·2 [1·4-4·9]). Of all subgroup variables assessed, only age significantly modified the treatment effect: in patients younger than 70 years (median age), the estimated 120-day risk of stroke or death was 50 (5·8%) of 869 patients in the carotid stenting group and 48 (5·7%) of 843 in the carotid endarterectomy group (RR 1·00 [0·68-1·47]); in patients 70 years or older, the estimated risk with carotid stenting was twice that

  13. The evidence for medicine versus surgery for carotid stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ederle, Joerg; Brown, Martin M.

    2006-01-01

    Atherosclerotic stenosis of the internal carotid artery is an important cause of stroke. Several large randomised trials have compared best medical management with carotid endarterectomy and provide a strong evidence base for advising and selecting patients for carotid surgery. Best medical management of carotid stenosis includes lowering of blood pressure, treatment with statins and antiplatelet therapy in symptomatic patients. Combined analysis of the symptomatic carotid surgery trials, together with observational data, has shown that patients with recently symptomatic severe carotid stenosis have a very high risk of recurrent stroke in the first few days and weeks after symptoms. Carotid endarterectomy has a risk of causing stroke or death at the time of surgery in symptomatic patients of around 5-7%, but in patients with recently symptomatic stenosis of more than 70%, the benefits of endarterectomy outweigh the risks. In patients with moderate stenosis of between 50 and 69%, the benefits may justify surgery in patients with very recent symptoms, and in patients older than 75 years within a few months of symptoms. Patients with less than 50% stenosis do not benefit from surgery. In asymptomatic patients, or those whose symptoms occurred more than 6 months ago, the benefits of surgery are considerably less. Patients with asymptomatic stenosis treated medically only have a small risk of future stroke when treated medically of about 2% per annum. If carotid endarterectomy can be performed safely with a perioperative stroke and death rate of no more than 3%, then the randomised trials showed a significant benefit of surgery over 5 years follow-up, with an overall reduction in the risk of stroke from about 11% over 5 years down to 6%. However, of 100 patients operated, only 5 will benefit from avoiding a stroke over 5 years. The majority of neurologists have concluded that this does not justify a policy of routine screening and endarterectomy for asymptomatic

  14. Aortic replacement in aorto-occlusive disease: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winter Richard K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many patients with aorto-occlusive disease, where stent deployment is not possible, surgery remains the only treatment option available. The aim of this study was to assess the results of aortic reconstruction surgery performed in patients with critical ischaemia. Methods All patients with critical ischaemia undergoing surgery during 1991–2004 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Mortality data was verified against death certificate data. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from the clinical notes and the radiology database. Disease was classified as: type I – limited to aorta and common iliac arteries; type II – external iliac disease and type III combined aortic, iliac and infra-inguinal disease. Results 86 patients underwent aortic replacement surgery all of whom had critical ischaemia consisting of: type I (n = 16; type II (n = 37 and type III (n = 33. The 30-day mortality rate was 10.4%, the one-year patient survival was 80%, and the 1-year graft survival was 80%. At 2 years the actual patient survival was 73% and no additional graft losses were identified. All patients surviving 30 days reported excellent symptomatic relief. Early, complications occurred in 6 (7% patients: thrombosis within diseased superficial femoral arteries (n = 4; haemorrhage and subsequent death (n = 2. Ten (14% late complications (> 12 months occurred in the 69 surviving patients and included: anastomotic stenosis (n = 3; graft thrombosis (n = 4, graft infection (n = 3. Four patients developed claudication as a result of more distal disease in the presence of a patent graft, and 1 patient who continued smoking required an amputation for progressive distal disease. Conclusion Aortic reconstruction for patients with extensive aorto-occlussive disease provides long-standing symptomatic relief for the majority of patients. After the first year, there is continued patient attrition due to co

  15. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation due to severe aortic regurgitation in a degenerated aortic homograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjaer; Engstrøm, Thomas; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in severe aortic stenosis has proven to be a feasible and effective treatment modality for inoperable patients. Until now, neither aortic regurgitation nor degenerated bioprostheses has been an indication for TAVI. However, this article reports...... a successful valve-in-valve implantation of a CoreValve aortic valve prosthesis through the right subclavian artery in a case of severe aortic regurgitation within a degenerated aortic homograft. The case exemplifies the possibilities of expanding the indications for TAVI, as well as other vascular access...

  16. Association between aortic valve calcification measured on non-contrast computed tomography and aortic valve stenosis in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Niels Herluf; Carlsen, Bjarke Bønløkke; Dahl, Jordi Sanchez; Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Christensen, Nicolaj Lyhne; Khurrami, Lida; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Lindholt, Jes Sandal; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) measured on non-contrast computed tomography (CT) has shown correlation to severity of aortic valve stenosis (AS) and mortality in patients with known AS. The aim of this study was to determine the association of CT verified AVC and subclinical AS in a general population undergoing CT. CT scans from 566 randomly selected male participants (age 65-74) in the Danish cardiovascular screening study (DANCAVAS) were analyzed for AVC. All participants with a moderately or severely increased AVC score (≥300 arbitrary units (AU)) and a matched control group were invited for a supplementary echocardiography. AS was graded by indexed aortic valve area (AVAi) on echocardiography as moderate 0.6-0.85 cm(2)/m(2) and severe AVC scoring. Moderate or severe increased AVC was observed in 10.7% (95% CI: 8.4-13.7). Echocardiography was performed in 101 individuals; 32.7% (95% CI: 21.8 to 46.0) with moderate or high AVC score had moderate or severe AS, while none with no or low AVC. A ROC analysis defined an AVC score ≥588 AU to be suggestive of moderate or severe AS (AUC 0.89 ± 0.04, sensitivity 83% and specificity 87%). In the univariate analyses, AVC was the only variable significantly associated with AS. This study indicates an association between CT verified AVC and subclinical AS. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Value of cardiac multislice spiral CT for the assessment of degenerative aortic stenosis: comparison with echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnken, A.H.; Wildberger, J.E.; Das, M.; Muehlenbruch, G.; Guenther, R.W.; Koos, R.; Sinha, A.M.; Stanzel, S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To non-invasively assess the severity of aortic valve stenosis (AS) by the determination of aortic valve calcification (AVC) using multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT). Materials and Methods: Forty-one consecutive patients (17 male, 24 female, mean age 71.0±7.9 years) with a history of AS and an aortic valve area ≤2 cm 2 underwent retrospectively ECG-gated 4-slice MSCT and echocardiography. The AVCs were quantitatively assessed using the score described by Agatston as well as by calculating the calcium mass. The echocardiographically determined aortic valve area (AVA) and the severity of AS according to the ACC/AHA guidelines were compared to the degree of a aortic valve calcifications. Pearson's correlation coefficient, cut-off values, kappa test and F-test with post hoc Boneferroni t-tests were calculated. Results: Calcium scores were significantly higher in patients with severe AS, when compared to mild or moderate AS (p<0.001). In patients suffering from severe AS, the mean Agatston score was 4125.5±1168.9 (calcium mass 904.1±263.3) while in patients with moderate and mild AS the corresponding values were 1596.3±987.0 (319.1±208.3) and 785.9±390.1 (149.1±90.2), respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficients were r-=0.75 for the Agatston score and r=-0.72 for the calcium mass. There was a moderate agreement between severity of AS according to the ACC/AHA guidelines and the degree of AS determined from AVC scores with κ=0.6091 and κ=0.6985, respectively. Conclusion: Severe AS may be differentiated from moderate or mild AS using cardiac MSCT. Extensive calcifications of the aortic valve presenting with an Agatston-Score ≥2824 (calcium mass ≥611) indicate a severe AS and should be taken as an indication for further diagnostic workup. (orig.)

  18. Outcomes in Asymptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis With Preserved Ejection Fraction Undergoing Rest and Treadmill Stress Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huded, Chetan P; Masri, Ahmad; Kusunose, Kenya; Goodman, Andrew L; Grimm, Richard A; Gillinov, A Marc; Johnston, Douglas R; Rodriguez, L Leonardo; Popovic, Zoran B; Svensson, Lars G; Griffin, Brian P; Desai, Milind Y

    2018-04-12

    In asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction, we sought to assess the incremental prognostic value of resting valvuloarterial impedence (Zva) and left ventricular global longitudinal strain (LV-GLS) to treadmill stress echocardiography. We studied 504 such patients (66±12 years, 78% men, 32% with coronary artery disease who underwent treadmill stress echocardiography between 2001 and 2012. Clinical and exercise variables (% of age-sex predicted metabolic equivalents [%AGP-METs]) were recorded. Resting Zva ([systolic arterial pressure+mean aortic valve gradient]/[LV-stroke volume index]) and LV-GLS (measured offline using Velocity Vector Imaging, Siemens) were obtained from the baseline resting echocardiogram. Death was the primary outcome. There were no major adverse cardiac events during treadmill stress echocardiography. Indexed aortic valve area, Zva, and LV-GLS were 0.46±0.1 cm 2 /m 2 , 4.5±0.9 mm Hg/mL per m 2 and -16±4%, respectively; only 50% achieved >100% AGP-METs. Sixty-four percent underwent aortic valve replacement. Death occurred in 164 (33%) patients over 8.9±3.6 years (2 within 30 days of aortic valve replacement). On multivariable Cox survival analysis, higher Society of Thoracic Surgeons score (hazard ratio or HR 1.06), lower % AGP-METS (HR 1.16), higher Zva (HR 1.25) and lower LV-GLS (HR 1.12) were associated with higher longer-term mortality, while aortic valve replacement (HR 0.45) was associated with improved survival (all P statistic from 0.65 to 0.69 and 0.75, respectively, both P stress echocardiography, LV-GLS and ZVa offer incremental prognostic value. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  19. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  20. MRI for therapy control in patients with aortic isthmus stenosis; MRT zur Therapiekontrolle bei Patienten mit Aortenisthmusstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintersperger, B.J. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Toronto General Hospital, University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Toronto M5G 2N2 (Canada); Theisen, D.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Aortic isthmus stenosis is the most common congenital aortic anomaly and is often a problem for therapy surveillance. In addition to possible comorbidities (e.g. bicuspid aortic valve) it is accompanied by various middle and long-term complications depending on the primary choice of the therapeutic procedure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role for the mostly young patients in the control of the aortic isthmus stenosis and therapy because it is non-invasive and there is no X-ray exposure. Radiologists should be well-informed on the principles of the therapeutic procedure in order to be competent in the interpretation of MRI findings. Due to the continuous development of MRI technology, techniques for functional evaluation (e.g. dynamic MRA, 4D PC flow measurement) are increasingly becoming available in addition to high-resolution MR angiography (MRA), which could predict the risk of possible complications, such as aneurysms. However, in this aspect further studies are necessary. Interventional therapy with stents and stent grafts is often employed for the therapy of possible complications following an operation (aneurysms, restenosis) but because of massive metal artefacts the use of MRI is often sometimes severely limited. (orig.) [German] Die Aortenisthmusstenose als haeufigste angeborene Aortenanomalie stellt ein haeufiges Problem der Therapieueberwachung dar und ist neben moeglichen begleitenden Anomalien (z. B. bikuspidale Aortenklappe) in Abhaengigkeit vom primaer gewaehlten Therapieverfahren mit verschiedenen Komplikationen im mittel- bis laengerfristigem Verlauf vergesellschaftet. Bei der Kontrolle der Aortenisthmusstenose bzw. deren Therapie spielt die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) aufgrund der Nichtinvasivitaet und fehlenden Strahlenexposition bei den meist juengeren Patienten eine wichtige Rolle. Der Radiologe sollte ueber die Grundzuege der Therapieverfahren informiert sein, um die MRT-Befunde kompetent zu befunden. Durch stetige

  1. Relevance of G8 scale in referring elderly patients with aortic stenosis requiring a TAVI for a geriatric consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thézy, Albane; Lafargue, Aurélie; d'Arailh, Lydie; Dijos, Marina; Leroux, Lionel; Salles, Nathalie; Rainfray, Muriel

    2017-12-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) may soon become a significant public health issue. Referring elderly suffering from aortic stenosis for a transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) versus surgical valve replacement might be difficult and requires a multidisciplinary staff. G8 is a geriatric screening scale for frailty, validated in oncogeriatry. We study sensibility and specificity of G8 used by cardiologists in comparison to a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) performed by geriatrician. Prospective study, from February to July 2015, in Bordeaux university Hospital, France. Every elderly admitted for a TAVI had a G8 scale performed by cardiologist and CGA by a geriatrician in blind. Comorbidities were assessed using Cumulative Illness Rating Scale in his geriatric version (CIRS-G). CGA was abnormal if: MMSE value in comparison to gold-standard CGA. 49 patients were included (55.1% women, mean age 84.8 years old). Nearly half of the patients (48.96%) had multiple comorbidities (CIRS G score >3 for at least three items excluding the cardiology item). 38 CGA were abnormal (77.55%) and 41 G8 (83.67%). G8 had a sensibility of 100% (IC 95% [0.9-1]), a specificity of 72.7% (IC 95% [0.43-0.9]), a positive predictive value of 92.6% and a negative prospective value of 100% (IC: 95%). G8 scale seems to be an efficient geriatric screening tool for frailty in elderly undergoing TAVI in comparison to CGA. Simple and useful, G8 scale could be performed by cardiologists in older patients with AS for identifying patients with a geriatric risk profile in consultation before surgery. Further studies with bigger samples are needed to confirm these results.

  2. Experiences of and Coping With Severe Aortic Stenosis Among Patients Waiting for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Karin; Näslund, Ulf; Nilsson, Johan; Hörnsten, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valve disease in Western countries. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has made it possible to treat patients with higher surgical risks. These patients are informed about their poor prognosis with only months or a few years to live without treatment. Because of their severe symptoms, limitations, and suffering, patients awaiting TAVI need special attention. The aim of this study is to describe patients' experiences of coping with severe AS and of waiting for TAVI. Swedish participants (n = 24; 9 women, 15 men) with a mean (SD) age of 80 (7.4) years who had been offered TAVI all agreed to participate in a presurgical interview. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The participants' experiences of coping with AS and awaiting TAVI were described by the main theme "living on the edge, but trying to stay in control," which comprised 3 categories: "trying to cope with physical symptoms and anxiety," "trying to preserve self and self-esteem despite life-threatening illness," and "trying to process the decision to undergo TAVI." Patients with AS and awaiting TAVI must cope with increasing symptoms and limitations in their social lives but still wish to be seen as the people they always have been. These patients may need extra support from healthcare personnel to process their experiences, which could help them to attach personal meaning to clinical information about the condition and its treatment that they could include in their decision about whether to undergo TAVI. Listening to patients' stories could help nurses and physicians to ensure that disease and treatment are meaningfully understood by the patient.

  3. Primary Mitral Valve Regurgitation Outcome in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis 1 Year After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Echocardiographic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentino, Thiago Marinho; Bihan, David Le; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Cedro, Alexandre Vianna; Corrêa, Amably Pessoa; Santos, Alexandre Roginski Mendes Dos; Souza, Alexandre Costa; Bignoto, Tiago Costa; Sousa, José Eduardo Moraes Rego; Sousa, Amanda Guerra de Moraes Rego

    2017-07-10

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR), present in up to 74% of the patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), can be a negative prognostic factor when moderate or severe. The outcome of MR after percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and predictors associated with that outcome have not been well established in the literature. To assess the outcome of primary MR in patients submitted to TAVI and to identify associated factors. Observational study of patients with symptomatic severe AS submitted to TAVI from January 2009 to April 2015 at two specialized centers. Echocardiographic outcome was assessed with data collected before and 1 year after TAVI. Of the 91 patients with MR submitted to TAVI and followed up for at least 12 months, 67 (73.6%) had minimum/mild MR before the procedure and 24 (26.4%) had moderate/severe MR. Of those with minimum/mild MR, 62 (92.5%) had no change in the MR grade (p literatura. Avaliar a evolução da IM primária em pacientes submetidos ao TAVI e identificar fatores associados a essa evolução. Realizou-se um estudo observacional em pacientes com EA grave sintomática, submetidos ao TAVI no período de janeiro de 2009 a abril de 2015 em dois centros especializados. Foram avaliados desfechos ecocardiográficos com dados antes e 1 ano após a intervenção. Dos 91 pacientes com IM que realizaram TAVI e tinham acompanhamento de pelo menos 12 meses, 67 (73,6%) apresentavam IM mínima ou discreta antes da realização do procedimento e 24 (26,4%), IM moderada ou grave. Entre os com IM mínima ou discreta, 62 (92,5%) não apresentaram mudança no grau de refluxo (p < 0,001) e 5 (7,5%) tiveram piora. Entre os com IM moderada ou grave, 8 (33,3%) permaneceram na mesma classe e 16 (66,7%) tiveram melhora (p = 0,076). Pacientes com IM moderada ou grave que melhoraram o grau de insuficiência apresentavam menores valores de EuroSCORE II (p = 0,023) e STS morbidade (p = 0,027), quando comparados aos que continuaram na mesma classe

  4. PCSK9 R46L Loss-of-Function Mutation Reduces Lipoprotein(a), LDL Cholesterol, and Risk of Aortic Valve Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langsted, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge; Benn, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Novel, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol-lowering proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9) inhibitors also lower lipoprotein(a) levels, but the effect on aortic valve stenosis and myocardial infarction is unknown. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that the PCSK9 R46L...... individuals of Danish descent. PARTICIPANTS: We studied 103 083 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study, the Copenhagen City Heart Study, and the Copenhagen Ischemic Heart Disease Study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Lipoprotein(a), LDL cholesterol, and PCSK9 R46L genotype and diagnoses of aortic...... P = .02). The corresponding values for LDL cholesterol levels were 124 (101-147) mg/dl, 104 (85-132) mg/dl, and 97 (85-128) mg/dl, respectively (trend P = 2 × 10(-52)). PCSK9 R46L carriers vs noncarriers had an age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio of 0.64 (95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.95) for aortic...

  5. Early regression of severe left ventricular hypertrophy after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with decreased hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindman, Brian R; Stewart, William J; Pibarot, Philippe; Hahn, Rebecca T; Otto, Catherine M; Xu, Ke; Devereux, Richard B; Weissman, Neil J; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Szeto, Wilson Y; Makkar, Raj; Miller, D Craig; Lerakis, Stamatios; Kapadia, Samir; Bowers, Bruce; Greason, Kevin L; McAndrew, Thomas C; Lei, Yang; Leon, Martin B; Douglas, Pamela S

    2014-06-01

    This study sought to examine the relationship between left ventricular mass (LVM) regression and clinical outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). LVM regression after valve replacement for aortic stenosis is assumed to be a favorable effect of LV unloading, but its relationship to improved clinical outcomes is unclear. Of 2,115 patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis at high surgical risk receiving TAVR in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) randomized trial or continued access registry, 690 had both severe LV hypertrophy (left ventricular mass index [LVMi] ≥ 149 g/m(2) men, ≥ 122 g/m(2) women) at baseline and an LVMi measurement at 30-day post-TAVR follow-up. Clinical outcomes were compared for patients with greater than versus lesser than median percentage change in LVMi between baseline and 30 days using Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate event rates from 30 to 365 days. Compared with patients with lesser regression, patients with greater LVMi regression had a similar rate of all-cause mortality (14.1% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.99), but a lower rate of rehospitalization (9.5% vs. 18.5%, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.50, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.32 to 0.78; p = 0.002) and a lower rate of rehospitalization specifically for heart failure (7.3% vs. 13.6%, p = 0.01). The association with a lower rate of rehospitalization was consistent across subgroups and remained significant after multivariable adjustment (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.84; p = 0.007). Patients with greater LVMi regression had lower B-type natriuretic peptide (p = 0.002) and a trend toward better quality of life (p = 0.06) at 1-year follow-up than did those with lesser regression. In high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe LV hypertrophy undergoing TAVR, those with greater early LVM regression had one-half the rate of rehospitalization over the subsequent year compared to those with lesser regression. Copyright © 2014 American College of

  6. Automatic segmentation of the aortic root in CT angiography of candidate patients for transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, M.A.; Wiegerinck, E.; Planken, R.N.; VanBavel, E.T.; Assen, van H.C.; Baan Jr., J.; Marquering, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a minimal-invasive intervention for implanting prosthetic valves in patients with aortic stenosis. Accurate automated sizing for planning and patient selection is expected to reduce adverse effects such as paravalvular leakage and stroke. Segmentation of

  7. frequency of severe mitral stenosis in young female patients having pure mitral stenosis secondary to rheumatic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Hayat, U.; Naz, H.

    2010-01-01

    High morbidity and mortality due to Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) associated with females is mainly because of late diagnosis on one hand and socioeconomic reasons on the other hand. Poor referral to tertiary care centres leads to delayed diagnosis which results in complications. The objectives of this cross-sectional descriptive study was to assess the frequency of severe mitral stenosis in woman of child bearing age, having pure mitral stenosis (MS) secondary to rheumatic heart disease. Methods: Two hundred and fifty women of child bearing age with RHD were enrolled in the study using consecutive non-probability sampling technique. Out of these 250 patients, cases of pure MS were selected. Patients with associated mitral regurgitation and aortic valve disease were excluded. After admission, assessment of mitral valve stenosis was done with 2D colour Doppler echocardiography. Results: Out of 250 consecutive patients of rheumatic carditis, 110 (44%) patients had pure mitral valve stenosis, 85 (34%) had stenosis with mitral regurgitation and 55 (22%) patients had both mitral and aortic valve problem of varying severity. Among 110 patients with pure mitral valve stenosis, 48 (43.6%) had severe mitral valve stenosis. Severe mitral valve gradient (MVG) and high pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) was observed in 66 (60%) and 49 (44.5%) of the patients respectively. Conclusion: This high frequency can be linked to lack of early detection of the disease at primary level, poor management of throat infections and poor rheumatic fever prophylaxis at community level. (author )

  8. Colorectal Anastomotic Stenosis: Lesson Learned after 1643 Colorectal Resections for Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocchi, Elisa; Barugola, Giuliano; Benini, Marco; Bocus, Paolo; Rossini, Roberto; Ceccaroni, Marcello; Ruffo, Giacomo

    2018-04-17

    To evaluate incidence, risk factors, and treatment of colorectal anastomotic stenosis in patients who underwent rectosigmoid resection for deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). A retrospective analysis of prospective database (Canadian Task Force classification III). Public Medical Center PATIENTS: All women who underwent laparoscopic rectosigmoid resections for DIE between January 2002 and December 2016. All patients were evaluated clinically and endoscopically at 1 and 3 months after bowel resection. Stenosis was defined as the lack of passage through the anastomosis of a 12-mm proctoscope. Symptomatic stenosis was defined as the presence of endoscopically confirmed stricture accompanied by at least two of the following symptoms: constipation, need to push, tenesmus, ribbon stools. Only patients with symptomatic stenosis were studied. Demographics, surgical technique, and postoperative complications were prospectively recorded. Treatment and results of anastomotic symptomatic stricture were analyzed. One thousand six hundred and forty-three patients underwent laparoscopic rectosigmoid resections. One hundred and four patients (6.3%) presented with symptomatic anastomotic stenosis. The mean age of patients was 27 years (range, 23-44). Interval between diagnosis and symptomatic stenosis was 57 days (range, 21-64 days). The only statistically significant predictors of anastomotic stenosis were the presence of ileostomy (p = .01) and previous pelvic surgery (p = .002). Treatment of choice was always conservative. Of 104 patients in analysis, 90 patients (86.5%) underwent three endoscopic dilatations. Reoperations were not necessary. The anastomotic stricture is a recognized complication in patients following intestinal resection for DIE, and protective ileostomy represents the only modifiable factor related to anastomotic stenosis. Endoscopic dilatation is a valid option to treat this complication. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Detecting atheromatous plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries for more accurate stroke subtype classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyang; Wu, Simiao; Zeng, Quantao; Xiao, Jiahe; Liu, Ming

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the correlations of atheromatous plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries with intracranial arterial stenosis and carotid plaques in stroke patients, and to determine whether taking these plaques into account will reduce the proportion of patients in the undetermined etiology group. We prospectively enrolled 308 ischemic stroke patients, whose clinical characteristics and A-S-C-O classifications were compared with analyses of intracranial arteries, carotid arteries, aortic arch, and supra-aortic arteries. 125(40.6%) patients had plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries, of which 106 (84.8%) had complex plaques. No correlations were observed between these plaques and carotid plaques ( p = 0.283) or intracranial arterial stenosis ( p = 0.097). After detecting the mobile thrombi in the aortic arch and supra-aortic arteries, the proportion of patients in the atherothrombosis group was increased from 33.8% to 55.5% ( p = 0.00), whereas the proportion of patients in stroke of undetermined etiology group was decreased from 19.2% to 11.0% ( p = 0.00). Examining only the carotid and intracranial arteries may not provide adequate information about large arteries in stroke patients. Therefore, it would be better to include a search for relevant plaques in the aortic arch or supra-aortic arteries in modern stroke workup, for it may lead to more accurate stroke subtype classification and guide secondary prevention.

  10. Coronary Physiology During Exercise and Vasodilation in the Healthy Heart and in Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Matthew; Williams, Rupert; Asrress, Kaleab N; Arri, Satpal; Briceno, Natalia; Ellis, Howard; Rajani, Ronak; Siebes, Maria; Piek, Jan J; Clapp, Brian; Redwood, Simon R; Marber, Michael S; Chambers, John B; Perera, Divaka

    2016-08-16

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) can manifest as exertional angina even in the presence of unobstructed coronary arteries. The authors describe coronary physiological changes during exercise and hyperemia in the healthy heart and in patients with severe AS. Simultaneous intracoronary pressure and flow velocity recordings were made in unobstructed coronary arteries of 22 patients with severe AS (mean effective orifice area 0.7 cm(2)) and 38 controls, at rest, during supine bicycle exercise, and during hyperemia. Stress echocardiography was performed to estimate myocardial work. Wave intensity analysis was used to quantify waves that accelerate and decelerate coronary blood flow (CBF). Despite a greater myocardial workload in AS patients compared with controls at rest (12,721 vs. 9,707 mm Hg/min(-1); p = 0.003) and during exercise (27,467 vs. 20,841 mm Hg/min(-1); p = 0.02), CBF was similar in both groups. Hyperemic CBF was less in AS compared with controls (2,170 vs. 2,716 cm/min(-1); p = 0.05). Diastolic time fraction was greater in AS compared with controls, but minimum microvascular resistance was similar. With exercise and hyperemia, efficiency of perfusion improved in the healthy heart, demonstrated by an increase in the relative contribution of accelerating waves. By contrast, in AS, perfusion efficiency decreased due to augmentation of early systolic deceleration and an attenuated rise in systolic acceleration waves. Invasive coronary physiological evaluation can be safely performed during exercise and hyperemia in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Ischemia in AS is not related to microvascular disease; rather, it is driven by abnormal cardiac-coronary coupling. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Left Ventricular Diastolic Function and Characteristics in Fetal Aortic Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kevin G.; Schidlow, David; Freud, Lindsay; Escobar-Diaz, Maria; Tworetzky, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Fetal aortic valvuloplasty (FAV) has shown promise in averting progression of mid-gestation aortic stenosis (AS) to hypoplastic left heart syndrome in a subset of patients. Patients who achieve biventricular circulation after FAV frequently have left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction (DD). This study evaluates DD in fetuses with AS by comparing echocardiographic indices of LV diastolic function in fetuses undergoing FAV (n=20) to controls (n=40) and evaluates for LV factors associated with DD in FAV patients. We also compared pre- and post-FAV DD variables (n=16). Median gestational age (24 weeks, range 18–29 weeks) and fetal heart rate were similar between FAV and controls. Compared to controls, FAV patients had universally abnormal LV diastolic parameters including fused mitral inflow E and A waves (p=0.008), higher E velocity(p<0.001), shorter mitral inflow time (p=0.001), lower LV lateral annulus E′ (p<0.001), septal E′ (p=0.003) and higher E/E′ (p<0.001) than controls. FAV patients had abnormal right ventricular mechanics with higher tricuspid inflow E velocity (p<0.001), and shorter tricuspid inflow time (p=0.03). Worse LV diastolic function (lower LV E′) was associated with higher endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE) grade (r=0.74, p<0.001), large LV volume (r=0.55, p=0.013) and sphericity (r=0.58, P=0.009) and with lower LV pressure by mitral regurgitation jet (r=−0.68, p<0.001). Post-FAV, fewer patients had fused mitral inflow E and A than pre-FAV (p=0.05) and septal E′ was higher (=0.04). In conclusion, fetuses with mid-gestation AS have evidence of marked DD. Worse DD is associated with larger, more spherical LV, with more extensive EFE and lower LV pressure. PMID:24819899

  12. Successful transfemoral aortic Edwards(®) SAPIEN(®) bioprosthesis implantation without using iodinated contrast media in a woman with severe allergy to contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Lionel; Dijos, Marina; Dos Santos, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Severe anaphylactoid reaction after the use of iodinated contrast media are rare but can contraindicate the use of contrast agent. It was the case of a 53-year-old woman suffering from symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, recused for cardiac surgery because of deleterious effects of chest-wall irradiation, with porcelain aorta. We decided to implant a 23-mm Edwards(®) SAPIEN(®) transcatheter aortic valve via a femoral route without using any contrast media. The implantation was successful after surgical approach of the femoral artery, transesophageal echocardiography guiding, and localization of native leaflets and coronary trunk with catheters. Immediate and one month post-interventional follow-up was favorable and echocardiography showed a good functioning of the aortic bioprosthesis. Although conventional angiography is the best way to visualize the good positioning of the valve before deployment, our case suggests that, in special situations, transfemoral implantation of an Edwards(®) SAPIEN(®) aortic bioprosthesis is feasible without any contrast injection. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Association of body mass index and visceral fat with aortic valve calcification and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the obesity paradox in severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancio, Jennifer; Fonseca, Paulo; Figueiredo, Bruno; Ferreira, Wilson; Carvalho, Monica; Ferreira, Nuno; Braga, Pedro; Rodrigues, Alberto; Barros, Antonio; Falcao-Pires, Ines; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Ribeiro, Vasco Gama; Bettencourt, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that metabolic syndrome is associated with aortic valve calcification (AVC) and poor outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS). However, if these associations change and how body fat impacts the prognosis of patients in late stage of the disease have been not yet explored. To determine the association of body mass index (BMI) and visceral fat with AVC and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). This was a prospective cohort of 170 severe AS patients referred to TAVR. We quantified AVC mass score and fat depots including epicardial adipose tissue, intrathoracic fat, and abdominal visceral (VAF) and subcutaneous fats by computed tomography. Fat depots were indexed to body surface area. All-cause and cardiovascular-related deaths after TAVR were recorded over a median follow-up of 1.2 years. Higher AVC mass was independently associated with low BMI and low VAF. All-cause mortality risk increased with the decrease of BMI and increment of VAF. A stratified analysis by obesity showed that in non-obese, VAF was inversely associated with mortality, whereas in obese, high VAF was associated with higher mortality (p value for interaction < 0.05). At long-term, hazard ratio [HR] with non-obese/low VAF was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.9; p = 0.021) and HR with obese/high VAF was 2.5 (95% CI 1.1-5.8; p = 0.031) compared with obese/low VAF patients. In AS patients submitted to TAVR, BMI and VAF were inversely associated with AVC. Pre-intervention assessment of VAF by computed tomography may provide a better discrimination of mortality than BMI alone.

  14. Aortic Valve Stenosis and Atrial Fibrillation Influence Plasma Fibulin-1 Levels in Patients Treated with Coronary Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Lyck; Dahl, Jordi S; Argraves, W Scott

    2013-01-01

    on outcome, death or other adverse events. Conclusion: This study shows that plasma fibulin-1 levels are increased in patients with AS and AF compared to patients with coronary disease only. Our study results suggest fibulin-1, a vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, as a marker of ECM turnover......Objectives: Aortic valve stenosis (AS) causes cardiac fibrosis and left ventricular hypertrophy, and over time heart failure can occur. To date, a reliable marker to predict progression of AS or the development of heart failure is still lacking. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis...

  15. Polyflex stenting of tracheomalacia after surgery for congenital tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibballs, James; Fasulakis, Stephen; Robertson, Colin F; Berkowitz, Robert G; Massie, John; Brizard, Christian; Rose, Elizabeth; Bekhit, Elhamy; Eyres, Robert; Ragg, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Polyflex self-expanding stents (Rüsch, Germany) were used in three young children who had presented with life-threatening long-segment tracheal stenosis with bronchial stenosis in two cases. Two children had slide tracheoplasties and subsequently aortic homografts and another tracheal resection and autotracheoplasty. However, in all cases persistent lower tracheal malacia necessitated stenting. Complications of granuloma, stent migration or dislodgement occurred in all cases. A fatal tracheo-aortic fistula occurred in one child. Granuloma in one was treated successfully with steroids. One child survives.

  16. Speckle tracking echocardiography derived 2-dimensional myocardial strain predicts left ventricular function and mass regression in aortic stenosis patients undergoing aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staron, Adam; Bansal, Manish; Kalakoti, Piyush; Nakabo, Ayumi; Gasior, Zbigniew; Pysz, Piotr; Wita, Krystian; Jasinski, Marek; Sengupta, Partho P

    2013-04-01

    Regression of left ventricular (LV) mass in severe aortic stenosis (AS) following aortic valve replacement (AVR) reduces the potential risk of sudden death and congestive heart failure associated with LV hypertrophy. We investigated whether abnormalities of resting LV deformation in severe AS can predict the lack of regression of LV mass following AVR. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) was performed in a total of 100 subjects including 60 consecutive patients with severe AS having normal LV ejection fraction (EF > 50 %) and 40 controls. STE was performed preoperatively and at 4 months following AVR, including longitudinal strain assessed from the apical 4-chamber and 2-chamber views and the circumferential and rotational mechanics measured from the apical short axis view. In comparison with controls, the patients with AS showed a significantly lower LV longitudinal (p regression (>10 %) following AVR. In conclusion, STE can quantify the burden of myocardial dysfunction in patients with severe AS despite the presence of normal LV ejection fraction. Furthermore, resting abnormalities in circumferential strain at LV apex is related with a hemodynamic milieu associated with the lack of LV mass regression during short-term follow up after AVR.

  17. Exercise testing in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic aortic regurgitation: relationship of left ventricular ejection fraction to left ventricular filling pressure during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, C.A.; Wilson, R.A.; Kanarek, D.J.; Hutter, A.M. Jr.; Okada, R.D.; Liberthson, R.R.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Exercise radionuclide angiography is being used to evaluate left ventricular function in patients with aortic regurgitation. Ejection fraction is the most common variable analyzed. To better understand the rest and exercise ejection fraction in this setting, 20 patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic severe aortic regurgitation were studied. All underwent simultaneous supine exercise radionuclide angiography and pulmonary gas exchange measurement and underwent rest and exercise measurement of pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) during cardiac catheterization. Eight patients had a peak exercise PAWP less than 15 mm Hg (group 1) and 12 had a peak exercise PAWP greater than or equal to 15 mm Hg (group 2). Group 1 patients were younger and more were in New York Heart Association class I. The two groups had similar cardiothoracic ratios, changes in ejection fractions with exercise, and rest and exercise regurgitant indexes. Using multiple regression analysis, the best correlate of the exercise PAWP was peak oxygen uptake (r . -0.78, p less than 0.01). No other measurement added significantly to the regression. When peak oxygen uptake was excluded, rest and exercise ejection fraction also correlated significantly (r . -0.62 and r . -0.60, respectively, p less than 0.01). Patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic severe aortic regurgitation have a wide spectrum of cardiac performance in terms of the PAWP during exercise. The absolute rest and exercise ejection fraction and the level of exercise achieved are noninvasive variables that correlate with exercise PAWP in aortic regurgitation, but the change in ejection fraction with exercise by itself is not

  18. Direct transcatheter aortic valve implantation with self-expandable bioprosthesis: Feasibility and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorina, Claudia, E-mail: clafiorina@yahoo.it [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Maffeo, Diego; Curello, Salvatore [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Lipartiti, Felicia [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Chizzola, Giuliano [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); D' Aloia, Antonio [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Adamo, Marianna [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Mastropierro, Rosy [Division of Cardiothoracic Anestesiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Gavazzi, Emanuele [Department of Radiology, University of Brescia, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Ciccarese, Camilla; Chiari, Ermanna [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Ettori, Federica [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    Background: Balloon valvuloplasty has been considered a mandatory step of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), although it is not without risk. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of TAVI performed without pre-dilation (direct TAVI) of the stenosed aortic valve. Material and Methods: Between June 2012 and June 2013, 55 consecutive TAVI performed without pre-dilation at our institution using the self-expandable CoreValve prosthesis (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) were analyzed and compared with 45 pre-dilated TAVI performed the previous year. Inclusion criteria were a symptomatic and severe aortic stenosis. Exclusion criteria were defined as presence of pure aortic regurgitation, degenerated surgical bioprosthesis or bicuspid aortic valve and prior procedure of balloon aortic valvuloplasty performed as a bridge to TAVI. Results: High-burden calcification in the device landing zone, assessed by CT scan, was found in most of the patients. The valve size implanted was similar in both groups. Device success was higher in direct TAVI (85% vs. 64%, p = 0.014), mostly driven by a significant lower incidence of paravalvular leak (PVL ≥2; 9% vs. 33%, p = 0.02). Safety combined end point at 30 days was similar in both groups. Conclusion: Compared to TAVI with pre-dilation, direct TAVI is feasible regardless of the presence of bulky calcified aortic valve and the valve size implanted. Device success was higher in direct TAVI, mostly driven by a lower incidence of paravalvular leak. Safety at 30 days was similar in two groups.

  19. Cerebrovascular accidents complicating transcatheter aortic valve implantation: frequency, timing and impact on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortecky, Stefan; Windecker, Stephan; Pilgrim, Thomas; Heg, Dik; Buellesfeld, Lutz; Khattab, Ahmed A; Huber, Christoph; Gloekler, Steffen; Nietlispach, Fabian; Mattle, Heinrich; Jüni, Peter; Wenaweser, Peter

    2012-05-15

    Cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) are considered among the most serious adverse events after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the frequency and timing of CVA after TAVI and to investigate the impact on clinical outcomes within 30 days of the procedure. Between August 2007 and October 2011, 389 high-risk elderly patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis underwent TAVI via transfemoral, transapical or subclavian access. A total of 14 patients (3.6%) experienced at least one CVA within 30 days of follow-up and most events (74%) occurred within the first day of the procedure. Patients with CVA had an increased risk of all-cause (42.3% vs. 5.1%, ORadjusted 11.7, 95% CI 3.4-40.3, pCerebrovascular accidents among patients undergoing TAVI occur predominantly during the periprocedural period, are associated with multiple implantation attempts of the bioprosthesis and significantly impair prognosis.

  20. Transcatheter aortic-valve replacement with a self-expanding prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David H; Popma, Jeffrey J; Reardon, Michael J; Yakubov, Steven J; Coselli, Joseph S; Deeb, G Michael; Gleason, Thomas G; Buchbinder, Maurice; Hermiller, James; Kleiman, Neal S; Chetcuti, Stan; Heiser, John; Merhi, William; Zorn, George; Tadros, Peter; Robinson, Newell; Petrossian, George; Hughes, G Chad; Harrison, J Kevin; Conte, John; Maini, Brijeshwar; Mumtaz, Mubashir; Chenoweth, Sharla; Oh, Jae K

    2014-05-08

    We compared transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR), using a self-expanding transcatheter aortic-valve bioprosthesis, with surgical aortic-valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis and an increased risk of death during surgery. We recruited patients with severe aortic stenosis who were at increased surgical risk as determined by the heart team at each study center. Risk assessment included the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Predictor Risk of Mortality estimate and consideration of other key risk factors. Eligible patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to TAVR with the self-expanding transcatheter valve (TAVR group) or to surgical aortic-valve replacement (surgical group). The primary end point was the rate of death from any cause at 1 year, evaluated with the use of both noninferiority and superiority testing. A total of 795 patients underwent randomization at 45 centers in the United States. In the as-treated analysis, the rate of death from any cause at 1 year was significantly lower in the TAVR group than in the surgical group (14.2% vs. 19.1%), with an absolute reduction in risk of 4.9 percentage points (upper boundary of the 95% confidence interval, -0.4; P<0.001 for noninferiority; P = 0.04 for superiority). The results were similar in the intention-to-treat analysis. In a hierarchical testing procedure, TAVR was noninferior with respect to echocardiographic indexes of valve stenosis, functional status, and quality of life. Exploratory analyses suggested a reduction in the rate of major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and no increase in the risk of stroke. In patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at increased surgical risk, TAVR with a self-expanding transcatheter aortic-valve bioprosthesis was associated with a significantly higher rate of survival at 1 year than surgical aortic-valve replacement. (Funded by Medtronic; U.S. CoreValve High Risk Study ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01240902.).

  1. Flow measurement at the aortic root

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Litten; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Køber, Lars

    2016-01-01

    during CMR and aortic stenosis were excluded from the analyses. Stroke volumes were measured volumetrically (SVref) from steady-state free precision short axis images covering the entire left ventricle, excluding the papillary muscles and including the left ventricular outflow tract. Flow sequences......BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the gold standard of cardiac volumetric measurements. Flow in the aortic root is often measured at the sinotubular junction, even though placing the slice just above valve level may be more precise. It is unknown how much flow...... theoretically be equal to flow measurements, SVV and SVST were compared to SVref. RESULTS: Initially, 152 patients were included. 22 were excluded because of arrhythmias during scans and 9 were excluded for aortic stenosis. Accordingly, data from 121 patients were analysed and of these 63 had visually evident...

  2. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Bieliauskas, Gintautas

    2017-01-01

    AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a “gothic aortic arch”; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled...

  3. Tracheal Compression Caused by a Mediastinal Hematoma After Interrupted Aortic Arch Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Qingwang; Lin, Zhiyong; Hu, Xingti; Zhao, Qifeng

    2017-08-03

    Congenital abnormalities of the aortic arch include interrupted aortic arch (IAA), coarctation of the aorta (CoA), and double aortic arch (DAA). Aortic arch repair is difficult and postoperative complications are common. However, postoperative tracheobronchial stenosis with respiratory insufficiency is an uncommon complication and is usually caused by increased aortic anastomotic tension. We report here a case of tracheal compression by a mediastinal hematoma following IAA surgery. The patient underwent a repeat operation to remove the hematoma and was successfully weaned off the ventilator.In cases of tracheobronchial stenosis after aortic arch surgery, airway compression by increased aortic anastomotic tension is usually the first diagnosis considered by clinicians. Other causes, such as mediastinal hematomas, are often ignored. However, the severity of symptoms with mediastinal hematomas makes this an important entity.

  4. Impact of mild patient prosthesis mismatch on quality of life in patients with preserved ejection fraction after isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reskovic Luksic, Vlatka; Dosen, D; Pasalic, M; Separovic Hanzevacki, Jadranka

    2017-01-15

    To analyze whether PPM affects QOL and functional status in patients after isolated AVR for aortic stenosis (AS) with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Consecutive patients who underwent AVR in University Hospital Center Zagreb for isolated severe symptomatic AS and preserved EF were enrolled. Echo data was obtained from complete transthoracic examinations prior and after surgery by offline analysis. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of PPM (effective orifice area (EOA)/body surface area (BSA)<0,85cm 2 /m 2 ). QOL was assessed by telephone interview using Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) along with functional NYHA status estimation. A total of 45 pts were included (23 female), and divided in PPM (n=26), and non-PPM group (n=19). Both groups were similar in pts age, LVEF, AVA/BSA prior surgery. After surgery, 57% of pts had PPM categorized as mild PPM. During follow-up of 2,5years, 3 pts had died and 10 were lost from following. There was no difference in NYHA status after surgery between groups (p=0,758). SF36 results showed no difference between groups. However, there was a significant improvement in Physical functioning (47,50% vs 75,47%,p=0,000) and Role limitation due to physical health (41,41% vs 81,25%, p=0,007) scores in the whole study population after AVR. Males had significantly better Energy/fatigue (p=0,034), Social functioning (p=0,004) and Pain (p=0,017) scores. Mild to moderate PPM showed no clinical relevance. All patients revealed improvement in QOL after AVR, while male sex was related to better functioning scores irrespectively of PPM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of body mass index and visceral fat with aortic valve calcification and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: the obesity paradox in severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Mancio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that metabolic syndrome is associated with aortic valve calcification (AVC and poor outcomes in aortic stenosis (AS. However, if these associations change and how body fat impacts the prognosis of patients in late stage of the disease have been not yet explored. Aims To determine the association of body mass index (BMI and visceral fat with AVC and mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. Methods This was a prospective cohort of 170 severe AS patients referred to TAVR. We quantified AVC mass score and fat depots including epicardial adipose tissue, intrathoracic fat, and abdominal visceral (VAF and subcutaneous fats by computed tomography. Fat depots were indexed to body surface area. All-cause and cardiovascular-related deaths after TAVR were recorded over a median follow-up of 1.2 years. Results Higher AVC mass was independently associated with low BMI and low VAF. All-cause mortality risk increased with the decrease of BMI and increment of VAF. A stratified analysis by obesity showed that in non-obese, VAF was inversely associated with mortality, whereas in obese, high VAF was associated with higher mortality (p value for interaction < 0.05. At long-term, hazard ratio [HR] with non-obese/low VAF was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–4.9; p = 0.021 and HR with obese/high VAF was 2.5 (95% CI 1.1–5.8; p = 0.031 compared with obese/low VAF patients. Conclusions In AS patients submitted to TAVR, BMI and VAF were inversely associated with AVC. Pre-intervention assessment of VAF by computed tomography may provide a better discrimination of mortality than BMI alone.

  6. Effect of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on flow dynamics in an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shivam; Usmani, Abdullah Y.; Muralidhar, K.

    2017-06-01

    Physiological flows in rigid diseased arterial flow phantoms emulating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under rest conditions with aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis are examined in vitro through 2D PIV measurements. Flow characteristics are first established in the model resembling a symmetric AAA with a straight outlet tube. The influence of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on AAA flow dynamics is then explored through a comparison of the nature of flow patterns, vorticity evolution, vortex core trajectory and hemodynamic factors against the reference configuration. Specifically, wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index in the bulge portion of the models are of interest. The results of this investigation indicate overall phenomenological similarity in AAA flow patterns across the models. The pattern is characterized by a central jet and wall-bounded vortices whose strength increases during the deceleration phase as it moves forward. The central jet impacts the wall of AAA at its distal end. In the presence of an aorto-iliac bifurcation as well as iliac stenosis, the flow patterns show diminished strength, expanse and speed of propagation of the primary vortices. The positions of the instantaneous vortex cores, determined using the Q-function, correlate with flow separation in the bulge, flow resistance due to a bifurcation, and the break in symmetry introduced by a stenosis in one of the legs of the model. Time-averaged WSS in a healthy aorta is around 0.70 N m-2 and is lowered to the range ±0.2 N m-2 in the presence of the downstream bifurcation with a stenosed common iliac artery. The consequence of changes in the flow pattern within the aneurysm on disease progression is discussed.

  7. Effect of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on flow dynamics in an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Shivam; Usmani, Abdullah Y; Muralidhar, K

    2017-01-01

    Physiological flows in rigid diseased arterial flow phantoms emulating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under rest conditions with aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis are examined in vitro through 2D PIV measurements. Flow characteristics are first established in the model resembling a symmetric AAA with a straight outlet tube. The influence of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on AAA flow dynamics is then explored through a comparison of the nature of flow patterns, vorticity evolution, vortex core trajectory and hemodynamic factors against the reference configuration. Specifically, wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index in the bulge portion of the models are of interest. The results of this investigation indicate overall phenomenological similarity in AAA flow patterns across the models. The pattern is characterized by a central jet and wall-bounded vortices whose strength increases during the deceleration phase as it moves forward. The central jet impacts the wall of AAA at its distal end. In the presence of an aorto-iliac bifurcation as well as iliac stenosis, the flow patterns show diminished strength, expanse and speed of propagation of the primary vortices. The positions of the instantaneous vortex cores, determined using the Q -function, correlate with flow separation in the bulge, flow resistance due to a bifurcation, and the break in symmetry introduced by a stenosis in one of the legs of the model. Time-averaged WSS in a healthy aorta is around 0.70 N m −2 and is lowered to the range ±0.2 N m −2 in the presence of the downstream bifurcation with a stenosed common iliac artery. The consequence of changes in the flow pattern within the aneurysm on disease progression is discussed. (paper)

  8. Effect of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on flow dynamics in an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Shivam; Usmani, Abdullah Y; Muralidhar, K, E-mail: kmurli@iitk.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Physiological flows in rigid diseased arterial flow phantoms emulating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under rest conditions with aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis are examined in vitro through 2D PIV measurements. Flow characteristics are first established in the model resembling a symmetric AAA with a straight outlet tube. The influence of aorto-iliac bifurcation and iliac stenosis on AAA flow dynamics is then explored through a comparison of the nature of flow patterns, vorticity evolution, vortex core trajectory and hemodynamic factors against the reference configuration. Specifically, wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index in the bulge portion of the models are of interest. The results of this investigation indicate overall phenomenological similarity in AAA flow patterns across the models. The pattern is characterized by a central jet and wall-bounded vortices whose strength increases during the deceleration phase as it moves forward. The central jet impacts the wall of AAA at its distal end. In the presence of an aorto-iliac bifurcation as well as iliac stenosis, the flow patterns show diminished strength, expanse and speed of propagation of the primary vortices. The positions of the instantaneous vortex cores, determined using the Q -function, correlate with flow separation in the bulge, flow resistance due to a bifurcation, and the break in symmetry introduced by a stenosis in one of the legs of the model. Time-averaged WSS in a healthy aorta is around 0.70 N m{sup −2} and is lowered to the range ±0.2 N m{sup −2} in the presence of the downstream bifurcation with a stenosed common iliac artery. The consequence of changes in the flow pattern within the aneurysm on disease progression is discussed. (paper)

  9. Role of Myocardial Collagen in Severe Aortic Stenosis With Preserved Ejection Fraction and Symptoms of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echegaray, Kattalin; Andreu, Ion; Lazkano, Ane; Villanueva, Iñaki; Sáenz, Alberto; Elizalde, María Reyes; Echeverría, Tomás; López, Begoña; Garro, Asier; González, Arantxa; Zubillaga, Elena; Solla, Itziar; Sanz, Iñaki; González, Jesús; Elósegui-Artola, Alberto; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Díez, Javier; Ravassa, Susana; Querejeta, Ramón

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the anatomical localization, biomechanical properties, and molecular phenotype of myocardial collagen tissue in 40 patients with severe aortic stenosis with preserved ejection fraction and symptoms of heart failure. Two transmural biopsies were taken from the left ventricular free wall. Mysial and nonmysial regions of the collagen network were analyzed. Myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF) was measured by picrosirius red staining. Young's elastic modulus (YEM) was measured by atomic force microscopy in decellularized slices to assess stiffness. Collagen types I and III were measured as C I VF and C III VF, respectively, by confocal microscopy in areas with YEM evaluation. Compared with controls, patients exhibited increased mysial and nonmysial CVF and nonmysial:mysial CVF ratio (P < .05). In patients, nonmysial CVF (r = 0.330; P = .046) and the nonmysial:mysial CVF ratio (r = 0.419; P = .012) were directly correlated with the ratio of maximal early transmitral flow velocity in diastole to early mitral annulus velocity in diastole. Both the C I VF:C III VF ratio and YEM were increased (P ≤ .001) in nonmysial regions compared with mysial regions in patients, with a direct correlation (r = 0.895; P < .001) between them. These findings suggest that, in patients with severe aortic stenosis with preserved ejection fraction and symptoms of heart failure, diastolic dysfunction is associated with increased nonmysial deposition of collagen, predominantly type I, resulting in increased extracellular matrix stiffness. Therefore, the characteristics of collagen tissue may contribute to diastolic dysfunction in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Intra-operative Vector Flow Imaging Using Ultrasound of the Ascending Aorta among 40 Patients with Normal, Stenotic and Replaced Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve gives rise to more complex blood flows with increased velocities. The angleindependent vector flow ultrasound technique transverse oscillation was employed intra-operatively on the ascending aorta of (I) 20 patients with a healthy aortic valve and 20 patients with aor...... replacement corrects some of these changes. Transverse oscillation may be useful for assessment of aortic stenosis and optimization of valve surgery. (E-mail: lindskov@gmail.com) 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology...... with aortic stenosis before (IIa) and after (IIb) valve replacement. The results indicate that aortic stenosis increased flow complexity (p , 0.0001), induced systolic backflow (p , 0.003) and reduced systolic jet width (p , 0.0001). After valve replacement, the systolic backflow and jet width were normalized...

  11. Iatrogenic coronary ostial stenosis of left main stem following aortic valve replacement: Visualization with optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad A. [Department of Cardiology, Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, M13 9WL Manchester (United Kingdom); Prati, Francesco [Interventional Cardiology, San Giovanni Hospital, Via dell’Amba Aradam 8, 00184 Rome (Italy); El-Omar, Magdi, E-mail: magdi.el-omar@cmft.nhs.uk [Department of Cardiology, Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, M13 9WL Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    Iatrogenic coronary ostial stenosis following aortic valve replacement (AVR) occurs in up to 3.4% of cases and usually presents within the first 6 months following surgery. We present the case of an 85 year old man who developed an acute coronary syndrome 2 months following AVR. Coronary angiography revealed a severe de novo lesion in the left main stem, which, on optical coherence tomography, was shown to be due to severe intimal hyperplasia. The most likely underlying mechanism is vessel wall trauma caused by the rigid tip cannula used for administration of cardioplegia solution. Surgeons should be aware of this possibility when administering this solution via the antegrade approach.

  12. Efficacy and safety of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in aortic stenosis patients at low to moderate surgical risk: a comprehensive meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmaraezy, Ahmed; Ismail, Ammar; Abushouk, Abdelrahman Ibrahim; Eltoomy, Moutaz; Saad, Soha; Negida, Ahmed; Abdelaty, Osama Mahmoud; Abdallah, Ahmed Ramadan; Aboelfotoh, Ahmed Magdy; Hassan, Hossam Mahmoud; Elmaraezy, Aya Gamal; Morsi, Mahmoud; Althaher, Farah; Althaher, Moath; AlSafadi, Ammar M

    2017-08-24

    Recently, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has become the procedure of choice in high surgical risk patients with aortic stenosis (AS). However, its value is still debated in operable AS cases. We performed this meta-analysis to compare the safety and efficacy of TAVR to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in low-to-moderate surgical risk patients with AS. A systematic search of five authentic databases retrieved 11 eligible studies (20,056 patients). Relevant Data were pooled as risk ratios (RRs) or standardized mean differences (SMD), with their 95% confidence interval, using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis and RevMan software for windows. At one-year of follow-up, the pooled effect-estimates showed no significant difference between TAVR and SAVR groups in terms of all-cause mortality (RR 1.02, 95% CI [0.83, 1.26], stroke (RR 0.83, 95%CI [0.56, 1.21]), myocardial infarction (RR 0.82, 95% CI [0.57, 1.19]), and length of hospital stay (SMD -0.04, 95% CI [-0.34, 0.26]). The incidence of major bleeding (RR 0.45, 95% CI [0.24, 0.86]) and acute kidney injury (RR 0.52, 95% CI [0.30, 0.88]) was significantly lower in the TAVR group, compared to the SAVR group. However, TAVR was associated with a higher risk of permanent pacemaker implantation (RR 2.57, 95% CI [1.36, 4.86]), vascular-access complications at 1 year (RR 1.99, 95%CI [1.04, 3.80]), and paravalvular aortic regurgitation at 30 days (RR 3.90, 95% CI [1.25, 12.12]), compared to SAVR. Due to the comparable mortality rates in SAVR and TAVR groups and the lower risk of life-threatening complications in the TAVR group, TAVR can be an acceptable alternative to SAVR in low-to-moderate risk patients with AS. However, larger trials with longer follow-up periods are required to compare the long-term outcomes of both techniques.

  13. Effect of Renin-Angiotensin Blockers on Left Ventricular Remodeling in Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Serene Si-Ning; Sia, Ching-Hui; Ngiam, Nicholas Jinghao; Tan, Benjamin Yong-Qiang; Lee, Poay Sian; Tay, Edgar Lik-Wui; Kong, William Kok-Fai; Yeo, Tiong Cheng; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2017-06-01

    Studies have shown that medical therapy with renin-angiotensin blockers (RABs) may benefit patients with aortic stenosis (AS). However, its use and efficacy remains controversial, including in patients with low flow (LF) with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). We examined the effects of RAB use on LV remodeling in patients with severe AS with preserved LVEF, analyzing the differential effects in patients with LF compared with normal flow (NF). This is a retrospective study of 428 consecutive subjects from 2005 to 2014 with echocardiographic diagnosis of severe AS and preserved LVEF. Clinical and echocardiographic parameters were systematically collected and analyzed. Two hundred forty-two (57%) patients had LF. Sixty-four LF patients (26%) were treated with RAB. Patients on RAB treatment had a higher incidence of hyperlipidemia (69% vs 44%) and diabetes mellitus (53% vs 34%). Severity of AS in terms of valve area, transvalvular mean pressure gradient, and aortic valve resistance were similar between both groups as was the degree of LV diastolic function. The RAB group demonstrated significantly lower LV mass index with a correspondingly lower incidence of concentric LV hypertrophy. Regardless of the duration of RAB therapy, patients had increased odds of having a preserved LV mass index compared with those without RAB therapy. In conclusion, RAB therapy may be associated with less LV pathological remodeling and have a role in delaying patients from developing cardiovascular complications of AS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation After Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  15. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation...... (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy...

  16. Wingspan stent-assisted coiling of intracranial aneurysms with symptomatic parent artery stenosis: Experience in 35 patients with mid-term follow-up results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xu; Liang Guobiao; Li Zhiqing; Wei Xuezhong; Wang Xiaogang; Zhang Haifeng; Feng Sizhe; Lin Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a potential risk of aneurysm rupture after parent artery revascularization because of increased blood flow. The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of Wingspan stent-assisted coil embolization in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms with symptomatic parent artery stenosis. Methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients (19 men, 16 women; age range, 48–79 years; mean age, 60.4 years) harboring 35 unruptured wide-necked or fusiform intracranial aneurysms (mean size 6.8 mm; range 2.5–18 mm.) with symptomatic parent artery stenosis (mean degree 71.1%; range 50–92%) were treated with the Wingspan stent-assisted coiling. Twenty-four lesions were located in the anterior circulation and eleven in the posterior circulation. Patients were premedicated with antiplatelet therapy consisting of aspirin 300 mg and clopidogrel 75 mg for at least 3 days before the procedure. Following pre-dilatation and stent placement, a coiling microcatheter entered the aneurysm through the interstices of the stent, and then coiling was performed. After the procedure, clopidogrel 75 mg daily was recommended for an additional 30 days, and aspirin 100 mg was recommended throughout follow-up. For all patients, clinical follow-up was conducted by clinic visitation, or telephone interview. Angiographic follow-up with DSA was recommended at 6 months and 1 year after the procedure. Angiography follow-up (mean time 10.6 months) was obtained in 31 cases (88.6%). The technical feasibility of the procedure, procedure-related complications, angiographic results, clinical outcome and follow-up angiography were evaluated. Results: In every case, technical success was achieved. The degree of stenosis was reduced from 71.1% to 17.4% after balloon angioplasty and stenting. Immediate angiography demonstrated complete occlusion in 25 cases (71.4%), neck remnant in 7 cases (20.0%), and incomplete occlusion in 3 cases (8.6%). Procedure-related morbidity occurred in two

  17. Acute Symptomatic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Secondary to Endovascular Stent Graft Associated Type II Endoleak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ka Leung Chan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR is popular because of its low invasiveness and feasibility for high-risk patients. Endoleak is common after EVAR and is characterized by blood flow within the aneurysm sac but outside the stent graft. Type II or collateral endoleak commonly results from retrograde filling of the aneurysm from collateral visceral vessels, lumbar, inferior mesenteric, accessory renal or sacral arteries. Collateral leaks are generally thought to be benign and over half of the early leaks will seal spontaneously. Sporadically, collateral endoleak could lead to aneurysm sac pressurization and place the patient at ongoing risk of rupture. Herein, we report an uncommon case of early post-stent graft placement symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with type II endoleak.

  18. The JUPITER registry: 1-year results of transapical aortic valve implantation using a second-generation transcatheter heart valve in patients with aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaschi, Miriam; Treede, Hendrik; Rastan, Ardawan J; Baumbach, Hardy; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Kappert, Utz; Eichinger, Walter; Rüter, Florian; de Kroon, Thomas L; Lange, Rüdiger; Ensminger, Stephan; Wendler, Olaf

    2016-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an established therapy for patients with aortic stenosis (AS) at high surgical risk. The JenaValve™ is a second-generation, self-expanding transcatheter heart valve (THV), implanted through transapical access (TA). During stent deployment, a specific 'clipping-mechanism' engages native aortic valve cusps for fixation. We present 1-year outcomes of the JUPITER registry, a post-market registry of the JenaValve for TA-TAVR. The JUPITER registry is a prospective, multicentre, uncontrolled and observational European study to evaluate the long-term safety and effectiveness of the Conformité Européenne-marked JenaValve THV. A total of 180 patients with AS were enrolled between 2012 and 2014. End-points were adjudicated in accordance with the valve academic research consortium document no. 1 definitions. The mean age was 80.4 ± 5.9 years and the mean logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation I 21.2 ± 14.7%. The procedure was successful in 95.0% (171/180), implantation of a second THV (valve-in-valve) was performed in 2.2% (4/180) and conversion to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) was necessary in 2.8% (5/180). No annular rupture or coronary ostia obstruction occurred. Two patients required SAVR after the day of index procedure (1.1%). All-cause mortality at 30 days was 11.1% (20/180), being cardiovascular in 7.2% (13/180). A major stroke occurred in 1.1% (2/180) at 30 days, no additional major strokes were observed during 1 year. All-cause mortality after 30 days was 13.1% (21/160) and combined efficacy at 1 year was 80.8% (122/151). At 1-year follow-up, no patient presented with more than moderate paravalvular leakage, while 2 patients (3.2%) showed moderate, 12 (19.0%) mild and 49 (82.4%) trace/none paravalvular regurgitation. In a high-risk cohort of patients undergoing TA-TAVR for AS, the use of the JenaValve THV is safe and effective. In patients at higher risk for coronary ostia

  19. Effects of Restoration of Blood Flow on the Development of Aortic Atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- Mice With Unilateral Renal Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Alokkumar S; Huang, Jianhua; Rojas, Mauricio; Bazemore, Taylor C; Zhou, Ruihai; Stouffer, George A

    2016-04-03

    Chronic unilateral renal artery stenosis (RAS) causes accelerated atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice, but effects of restoration of renal blood flow on aortic atherosclerosis are unknown. Male ApoE(-/-) mice underwent sham surgery (n=16) or had partial ligation of the right renal artery (n=41) with the ligature being removed 4 days later (D4LR; n=6), 8 days later (D8LR; n=11), or left in place for 90 days (chronic RAS; n=24). Ligature removal at 4 or 8 days resulted in improved renal blood flow, decreased plasma angiotensin II levels, a return of systolic blood pressure to baseline, and increased plasma levels of neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin. Chronic RAS resulted in increased lipid staining in the aortic arch (33.2% [24.4, 47.5] vs 11.6% [6.1, 14.2]; Prenal blood flow at either 4 or 8 days after unilateral RAS had a beneficial effect on systolic blood pressure, aortic lipid deposition, and atheroma inflammation. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. Results of aortic valve repair using decellularized bovine pericardium in congenital surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmeyer, Sarah; Murin, Peter; Schulz, Antonia; Danne, Friederike; Nordmeyer, Johannes; Kretzschmar, Johanna; Sumbadze, Daria; Schmitt, Katharina Rose Luise; Miera, Oliver; Cho, Mi-Young; Sinzobahamvya, Nicodeme; Berger, Felix; Ovroutski, Stanislav; Photiadis, Joachim

    2018-04-30

    The search for an optimal patch material for aortic valve reconstruction (AVR) is an ongoing challenge. In this study, we report our experience of AVR using decellularized bovine pericardial patch material in congenital heart surgery. Data of 40 consecutive patients who underwent AVR using the CardioCel® patch (Admedus Regen Pty Ltd, Perth, WA, Australia) between February 2014 and August 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age of the patients at operation was 9 (2-34) years, and 18 patients were younger than 7 years. Twenty-six patients initially presented with aortic valve insufficiency (AI) and 14 with stenosis. Clinical and echocardiographic data were available until August 2017 for a median postoperative follow-up (FU) of 22 (6-42) months. Nine of 40 (23%) patients experienced an event during FU (death: n = 1, 2.5%; reoperation: n = 8, 20%). Overall, the probability of freedom from reoperation or death was 97 ± 3%, 76 ± 9% and 57 ± 12% at 12, 24 and 36 months of FU, respectively. Reason for reoperation was stenosis in 3 (37.5%) patients, insufficiency in 4 (50%) patients and 1 (12.5%) patient was diagnosed with aortic valve endocarditis. Of the remaining 31 patients, 2 patients are scheduled for reoperation (aortic valve stenosis: n = 1 and AI: n = 1) and 9 patients exhibit worsening of aortic valve function with moderate AI. Freedom from developing combined end point [death/reoperation/moderate degree of aortic valve dysfunction (aortic valve stenosis, AI)] after AVR was 92 ± 5%, 55 ± 9% and 28 ± 9% at 12, 24 and 36 months, respectively. AVR using decellularized bovine pericardial patch material in patients with congenital aortic valve disease show unsatisfactory results within the first 3 years of FU.

  1. Prognostic Value of Exercise-Stress Echocardiography in Asymptomatic Patients With Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goublaire, Coppelia; Melissopoulou, Maria; Lobo, David; Kubota, Naozumi; Verdonk, Constance; Cimadevilla, Claire; Codogno, Isabelle; Brochet, Eric; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2017-07-19

    This study sought to evaluate the prognostic value of mean pressure gradient (MPG) increase and peak systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) measured during exercise stress echocardiography in asymptomatic patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Exercise testing is recommended in asymptomatic AS patients, but the additional value of exercise-stress echocardiography, especially the prognostic value of MPG increase and peak SPAP, is still debated. We enrolled all consecutive patients with pure, isolated, asymptomatic AS and preserved ejection fraction ≥50% and normal SPAP (20 mm Hg and/or SPAP at peak exercise >60 mm Hg). These 112 patients were managed conservatively. During a mean follow-up of 14 ± 8 months, an AS-related event occurred in 30 patients, and 25 patients underwent surgery. Neither MPG increase >20 mm Hg nor peak SPAP >60 mm Hg was predictive of occurrence of AS-related events or aortic valve replacement (all p > 0.20). In contrast, baseline AS severity was an important prognostic factor (all p < 0.01). In this observational study including 148 patients with asymptomatic AS, we confirmed and extended the importance of exercise testing for unveiling functional limitation. More importantly, neither the increase in MPG nor in SPAP at peak exercise was predictive of outcome. Our results do not support the use of these parameters in risk-stratification and clinical management of asymptomatic AS patients. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [ESC guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease. What has changed and what is new?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangner, N; Schuler, G

    2013-12-01

    In 2012 the new and collaborative "Guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease (version 2012)" were published by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS). These guidelines emphasize that decision-making in patients with valvular heart disease should ideally be carried out by a"heart team" with particular expertise in valvular heart disease. In aortic regurgitation pathologies of the aortic root are frequent and in patients with Marfan syndrome, surgery is indicated when the maximal ascending aortic diameter is ≥50 mm, while the threshold for intervention should be lower in patients with risk factors for progression. Regarding aortic stenosis, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) should be performed only in hospitals with on-site cardiac surgery and with a"heart team" available to assess patient risks. The TAVI procedure is indicated in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are judged by the"heart team" to be unsuitable for surgery but have sufficient life expectancy. It should be considered for high-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis based on the individual risk profile assessed by the"heart team". Furthermore, low flow - low gradient aortic stenosis with normal ejection fraction and the difficult topic of asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis and the indications for aortic valve replacement are discussed. With respect to mitral regurgitation, valve repair should be the preferred technique when it is expected to be durable. The topics of asymptomatic mitral regurgitation as well as percutaneous mitral valve repair using the edge to edge technique as an alternative for high risk patients are discussed. Tricuspid disease should not be forgotten and during left-sided valve surgery, tricuspid valve surgery should be considered in the presence of mild to moderate secondary regurgitation if there is significant annular dilatation. Last but not least

  3. Ventricular perforation as a complication of percutaneous valve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most commonly encountered valvular disease in developed countries. Once symptomatic, this disease carries a dismal prognosis. Patients unfit for surgical valve replacement may require transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI). We present a complication of this novel approach where a ...

  4. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for surgical complications: summary assessment of the California Technology Assessment Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Jeffrey A; Sellke, Frank W; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2014-08-01

    The California Technology Assessment Forum is dedicated to assessment and public reporting of syntheses of available data on medical technologies. In this assessment, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) was evaluated for patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who are at high risk for complications. In this assessment, 5 criteria were used: Regulatory approval, sufficient scientific evidence to allow conclusions on effectiveness, evidence that the technology improves net health outcomes, evidence that the technology is as beneficial as established methods, and availability of the technology outside investigational settings. In this assessment, all 5 criteria were judged to have been met. The primary benefit of TAVR is the ability to treat AS in patients who would otherwise be ineligible for surgical aortic valve replacement. It may also be useful for patients at high surgical risk by potentially reducing periprocedural complications and avoiding the morbidity and recovery from undergoing heart surgery. Potential harms include the need for conversion to an open procedure, perioperative death, myocardial infarction, stroke, bleeding, valve embolization, aortic regurgitation, heart block that requires a permanent pacemaker, renal failure, pulmonary failure, and major vascular complications such as cardiac perforation or arterial dissection. Potential long-term harms include death, stroke, valve failure or clotting, and endocarditis. As highlighted at the February 2012 California Technology Assessment Forum meeting, the dispersion of this technology to new centers across the United States must proceed with careful thought given to training and proctoring multidisciplinary teams to become new centers of excellence. TAVR is a potentially lifesaving procedure that may improve quality of life for patients at high risk for surgical AVR. However, attention needs to be paid to appropriate patient selection, their preoperative evaluation, surgical techniques, and

  5. Automated Normalized Cut Segmentation of Aortic Root in CT Angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, Mustafa; Wiegerinck, Esther; Planken, Nils; VanBavel, Ed; van Assen, Hans; Baan, Jan Jr; Marquering, Henk

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is a new minimal-invasive intervention for implanting prosthetic valves in patients with aortic stenosis. This procedure is associated with adverse effects like paravalvular leakage, stroke, and coronary obstruction. Accurate automated sizing for

  6. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide measurement is useful in predicting left ventricular hypertrophy regression after aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mirae; Choi, Jin-Oh; Park, Sung-Ji; Kim, Eun Young; Park, PyoWon; Oh, Jae K; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The predictive factors for early left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) regression after aortic valve replacement (AVR) have not been fully elucidated. This study was conducted to investigate which preoperative parameters predict early LVH regression after AVR. 87 consecutive patients who underwent AVR due to isolated severe aortic stenosis (AS) were analysed. Patients with ejection fraction regression of LVH at the midterm follow-up was determined. In multivariate analysis, including preoperative echocardiographic parameters, only E/e' ratio was associated with midterm LVH regression (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.22; p=0.035). When preoperative NT-proBNP was added to the analysis, logNT-proBNP was found to be the single significant predictor of midterm LVH regression (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.71; p=0.028). By receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, a cut-off value of 440 pg/mL for NT-proBNP yielded a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 77% for the prediction of LVH regression after AVR. Preoperative NT-proBNP was an independent predictor for early LVH regression after AVR in patients with isolated severe AS.

  7. Evaluation of Tp-E Interval and Tp-E/QT Ratio in Patients with Aortic Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayla, Çağrı; Bilgin, Murat; Akboğa, Mehmet Kadri; Gayretli Yayla, Kadriye; Canpolat, Uğur; Dinç Asarcikli, Lale; Doğan, Mehmet; Turak, Osman; Çay, Serkan; Özeke, Özcan; Akyel, Ahmet; Yeter, Ekrem; Aydoğdu, Sinan

    2016-05-01

    The risk of syncope and sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias increased in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Recently, it was shown that Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT, and Tp-e/QTc ratio can be novel indicators for prediction of ventricular arrhythmias and mortality. We aimed to investigate the association between AS and ventricular repolarization using Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio. Totally, 105 patients with AS and 60 control subjects were enrolled to this study. The severity of AS was defined by transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT, and Tp-e/QTc ratios were measured from the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT, and Tp-e/QTc ratios were significantly increased in parallel to the severity of AS (P ratio had significant positive correlation with mean aortic gradient (r = 0.192, P = 0.049). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, Tp-e/QTc ratio and left ventricular mass were found to be independent predictors of severe AS (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively). Our study showed that Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT, and Tp-e/QTc ratios were increased in patients with severe AS. Tp-e/QTc ratio and left ventricular mass were found as independent predictors of severe AS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Outcome of Carotid Artery Stenting for Radiation-Induced Stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorresteijn, Lucille; Vogels, Oscar; Leeuw, Frank-Erik de; Vos, Jan-Albert; Christiaans, Marleen H.; Ackerstaff, Rob; Kappelle, Arnoud C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Patients who have been irradiated at the neck have an increased risk of symptomatic stenosis of the carotid artery during follow-up. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) can be a preferable alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy, which is associated with increased operative risks in these patients. Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective cohort study of 24 previously irradiated patients who underwent CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis. We assessed periprocedural and nonprocedural events including transient ischemic attack (TIA), nondisabling stroke, disabling stoke, and death. Patency rates were evaluated on duplex ultrasound scans. Restenosis was defined as a stenosis of >50% at the stent location. Results: Periprocedural TIA rate was 8%, and periprocedural stroke (nondisabling) occurred in 4% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 0.3-11.0 years), only one ipsilateral incident event (TIA) had occurred (4%). In 12% of patients, a contralateral incident event was present: one TIA (4%) and two strokes (12%, two disabling strokes). Restenosis was apparent in 17%, 33%, and 42% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively, although none of the patients with restenosed vessels became symptomatic. The length of the irradiation to CAS interval proved the only significant risk factor for restenosis. Conclusions: The results of CAS for radiation-induced carotid stenosis are favorable in terms of recurrence of cerebrovascular events at the CAS site.

  9. Long-Term Health Benefit of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Chronic Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestanello, Juan A; Popma, Jeffrey J; Adams, David H; Deeb, G Michael; Mumtaz, Mubashir; George, Barry; Huang, Jian; Reardon, Michael J

    2017-11-27

    This study sought to characterize the long-term effect of chronic lung disease (CLD) on mortality, clinical outcomes, quality of life, and health benefits after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) with a self-expanding bioprosthesis. The long-term effect of CLD after TAVR is unknown. Prevalence and severity of CLD was determined at baseline in high- and extreme-risk patients with aortic stenosis from the CoreValve US Pivotal Trial. Clinical outcomes and health status were assessed using the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire overall summary score (KCCQ-OS). A favorable health benefit was defined as alive with a KCCQ-OS ≥60 and stability (CLD was present in 55% (20% mild, 13% moderate, 22% severe) of the 1,030 patients studied. All-cause mortality was higher in patients with moderate and severe CLD at 1 year (19.6% mild, 28.1% moderate, 26.9% severe CLD vs. 19.2% non-CLD; p = 0.030) and 3 years (44.8% mild, 53.0% moderate, 51.9% severe vs. 37.7% non-CLD; p CLD at 1 and 3 years. All patients had a nearly 20-point improvement in KCCQ-OS at 1 and 3 years. However, only 43.3% of patients with CLD had a favorable health benefit at 1 year and 22.5% at 3 years. Moderate and severe CLD increases 1- and 3-year mortality after TAVR. Although functional status and quality of life were improved in CLD at 1 and 3 years after TAVR, a favorable health benefit was only achieved in selected patients. (Safety and Efficacy Study of the Medtronic CoreValve System in the Treatment of Symptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis in High Risk and Very High Risk Subjects Who Need Aortic Valve Replacement; NCT01240902). Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Left main coronary artery obstruction by dislodged native-valve calculus after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, Tahir; Ayhan, Huseyin; Keles, Telat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Erdogan, Kemal Esref; Sari, Cenk; Bilen, Emine; Akcay, Murat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement can be an effective, reliable treatment for severe aortic stenosis in surgically high-risk or ineligible patients. However, various sequelae like coronary artery obstruction can occur, not only in the long term, but also immediately after the procedure. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman whose left main coronary artery became obstructed with calculus 2 hours after the transfemoral implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT aortic valve. Despite percutaneous coronary intervention in that artery, the patient died. This case reminds us that early recognition of acute coronary obstruction and prompt intervention are crucial in patients with aortic stenosis who have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

  11. Primary Infrarenal Aortic Stenting With or Without Iliac Stenting for Isolated and Aortoiliac Stenoses: Single-Centre Experience With Long-Term Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapping, C. R.; Ahmed, M.; Scott, P. M.; Lakshminarayan, R.; Robinson, G. J.; Ettles, D. F.; Shrivastava, V., E-mail: vivek.shrivastava@hey.nhs.uk [Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical success, complications, long-term clinical outcome, and patency after primary infrarenal aortic stenting for aortic and aortoiliac stenosis. Between January 1999 and January 2006, 22 consecutive patients underwent endovascular treatment because of infrarenal aortic stenosis with and without common iliac stenosis (10 men; mean age 64 {+-} 14 years). Eleven (11 of 22) patients had an isolated aortic stenosis, whereas 11 of 22 had aortic stenosis that extended into the common iliac arteries (CIAs). Thirteen patients were Rutherford classification type 3, and 9 patients were type 4. Statistical analysis included paired Student t test and Kaplan-Meier life table analysis; p < 0.05 was considered significant. Technical and initial clinical success was achieved in all patients. There were three (14 %) procedure-related complications, which included two access-point pseudoaneurysms and one non-flow-limiting left external iliac dissection. Patients were followed-up for a mean period of 88 months (range 60-132). Mean preprocedure ankle brachial pressure indexes (ABPI) were 0.60 {+-} -0.15 (right) and 0.61 {+-} -0.16 (left). After the procedure they were 0.86 {+-} -0.07 (right) and 0.90 {+-} -0.09 (left). The increase in ABPI was significant (p < 0.05), and this continued throughout follow-up. Four (18 %) patients had recurrence of symptoms during follow-up. These occurred at 36, 48, 48, and 50 months after the original procedure. All four patients were successfully treated with repeat angioplasty procedures. There was a significant difference in primary patency between isolated aortic stenosis (100 %) and aortoiliac stenosis (60 %) (p = 0.031). Cumulative follow-up was 1920 months yielding a reintervention rate of 0.025/events/year. Primary stenting of infrarenal stenosis is safe and successful with a low reintervention rate. It should be considered as first-line treatment for patients with infrarenal aortic stenotic

  12. Prognostic value of B-type natriuretic peptide in elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis: the COFRASA-GENERAC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimadevilla, Claire; Cueff, Caroline; Hekimian, Guillaume; Dehoux, Monique; Lepage, Laurent; Iung, Bernard; Duval, Xavier; Huart, Virginie; Tubach, Florence; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies suggested an independent prognostic value of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in aortic valve stenosis (AS) but were impeded by small sample sizes and inclusion of relatively selected young patients. We aimed to evaluate the relationship among N-terminal fragment of proBNP (Nt-proBNP), AS severity, symptoms and outcome in a large cohort of elderly patients with AS. Observational cohort study, COhorte Française de Retrecissement Aortique du Sujet Agé (clinicalTrial.gov number-NCT00338676) and GENEtique du Retrecissement Aortique (clinicalTrial.gov number-NCT00647088). Single-centre study. Patients older than 70 years with at least mild AS. None. A comprehensive clinical, biological and echocardiographic evaluation was performed at study entry. Asymptomatic patients were prospectively followed on a 6-months basis and AS-related events (sudden death, congestive heart failure or new onset of AS-related symptoms) collected. We prospectively enrolled 361 patients (79±6 years, 230 severe AS). Nt-proBNP increased with the grade of AS severity and the NYHA class (all pvalue of Nt-proBNP for the diagnosis of severe symptomatic AS was only modest (area under the curve of the receiver operator characteristic analysis=0.73). At 2 years, 28 AS-related events occurred among 142 asymptomatic patients prospectively followed. Nt-proBNP was associated with outcome in univariate analysis (p=0.04) but not after adjustment for age, gender and AS severity (p=0.40). The present study clearly highlights the limitations of Nt-proBNP for the evaluation and management of AS patients. Our results suggest that Nt-proBNP should be considered cautiously, at least as a single criterion, in the decision-making process of AS patients especially in the elderly population.

  13. Bronchoscopic management of benign bronchial stenosis by electrocautery and balloon dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, M; Gogia, Pratibha; Manoria, P; Goyal, R

    2012-01-01

    Benign bronchial stenosis is managed by surgical or bronchoscopic methods. Although surgical approach is definitive, it is technically demanding and is costlier than bronchoscopic treatment. Here, we report the case of a 27-year-old female patient with symptomatic benign bronchial stenosis of the left main bronchus. The stenosis was dilated successfully through a fibreoptic bronchoscope by electrocautery followed by balloon bronchoplasty and application of mitomycin-C. On follow up, there was no evidence of re-stenosis.

  14. Aortic valve ochronosis: a rare manifestation of alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christina Maria

    2011-07-28

    Alkaptonuric ochronosis is a heritable disorder of tyrosine metabolism, with various systemic abnormalities related to pigment deposition and degeneration of collagen and other tissues, including the heart and aorta. A 65-year-old woman with alkaptonuric ochronosis and a history of four joint replacements required aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis. Operative findings included ochronosis of a partly calcified aortic valve and the aortic intima. The aortic valve was removed at surgery and histologically investigated. Light microscopic examination of the aortic valve revealed intracellular and extracellular deposits of ochronotic pigment and a chronic inflammatory infiltrate. Beside the case representation, the disease history, aetiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment of aortic valve ochronosis are reviewed.

  15. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen...

  16. Severe aortic stenosis patients with preserved ejection fraction according to flow and gradient classification: Prevalence and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Gómez, Ariana; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Monteagudo, Juan Manuel; Izurieta, Carlos; Hinojar, Rocío; García, Ana; Casas, Eduardo; Jiménez-Nacher, José Julio; Moya, José Luis; Ruiz, Soledad; Zamorano, José Luis

    2017-12-01

    Clinicians often encounter patients with apparently discordant echocardiographic findings, severe aortic stenosis (SAS) defined by aortic valve area (AVA) despite a low mean gradient. A new classification according to flow state and pressure gradient has been proposed. We sought to assess the prevalence, characteristics and outcomes of patients with asymptomatic SAS with preserved left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) according to flow and gradient. In total 442 patients with SAS (AVAigradient (≥ or Gradient (LF/LG): 21.3%(n=94); Normal Flow/Low Gradient (NF/LG): 32.1%(n=142); Low Flow/High Gradient (LF/HG): 6.8%(n=30); Normal Flow/High Gradient (NF/HG): 39,8%(n=176). Mean follow-up time was 20.5months (SD=10.3). Primary combined endpoint was cardiovascular mortality and hospital admission for SAS related symptom, secondary endpoint was aortic valve replacement (AVR), comparing HG group to LF/LG group. During follow-up 17 (18%) of LF/LG patients and 21 (10.2%) of HG patients met the primary endpoint. A lower free of event survival (cardiovascular mortality and hospital admission) was observed in patients with LF/LG AS (Breslow, p=0.002). Significant differences were noted between groups with a lower AVR free survival in the LF/LG group compared to HG groups (Breslow, p=0.002). Our study confirms the high prevalence and worse prognosis of LF/LG SAS. Clinicians must be aware of this entity to ensure appropriate patient management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A tetrad of bicuspid aortic valve association: A single-stage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, A. N.; Mishra, Ramesh C.; Kumari, N. Rama; Gulati, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a 27 years old male who presented with a combination of both congenital and acquired cardiac defects. This syndrome complex includes congenital bicuspid aortic valve, Seller's grade II aortic regurgitation, juxta- subclavian coarctation, stenosis of ostium of left subclavian artery and ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm without any evidence of infective endocarditis. This type of constellation is extremely rare. Neither coarctation of aorta with left subclavian artery stenosis nor the rupture of sinus Valsalva had a favorable pathology for percutaneus intervention. Taking account into morbidity associated with repeated surgery and anesthesia patient underwent a single stage surgical repair of both the defects by two surgical incisions. The approaches include median sternotomy for rupture of sinus of Valsalva and lateral thoracotomy for coarctation with left subclavian artery stenosis. The surgery was uneventful. After three months follow up echocardiography showed mild residual gradient across the repaired coarctation segment, mild aortic regurgitation and no residual left to right shunt. This patient is under follow up. This is an extremely rare case of single stage successful repair of coarctation and rupture of sinus of Valsalva associated with congenital bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:22629035

  18. Genetics Home Reference: supravalvular aortic stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and narrower than usual. A thickened aorta is less flexible and resilient to the stress of constant blood flow and pumping of the heart. Over time, the wall of the aorta can become damaged. Aortic narrowing causes the heart to work harder to pump blood through the aorta, resulting ...

  19. Quantification of Aortic Valve Calcifications Detected During Lung Cancer-Screening CT Helps Stratify Subjects Necessitating Echocardiography for Aortic Stenosis Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Young; Kim, Sung Mok; Lee, Kyung Soo; Park, Seung Woo; Chung, Myung Jin; Cho, Hyoun; Jung, Jung Im; Jang, Hye Won; Jung, Sin-Ho; Goo, Juna

    2016-05-01

    No study has been published on aortic valve calcification (AVC) extent at lung cancer screening low-dose CT (LDCT) and its relationship with aortic stenosis (AS). The purpose of this study was to estimate the cutoff value of AVC on LDCT for detecting AS in asymptomatic Asian subjects. Six thousand three hundred thirty-eight subjects (mean age, 55.9 years ± 8.6) self-referred to health-promotion center underwent LDCT, coronary calcium scoring CT (CSCT), and echocardiography. AVC was quantified using Agatston methods on CT. AVC extent on LDCT was compared with that on CSCT, and AVC threshold for diagnosing AS was calculated. Clinical factors associated with AS and AVC were sought.AVC was observed in 403 subjects (64.9 years ± 8.7) on LDCT (6.4%), and AVC score measured from LDCT showed strong positive correlation with that from CSCT (r = 0.83, P AVC score for detecting AS was 138.37 with sensitivity of 90.0% and specificity 83.2%. On multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.09-1.12) and hypertension (OR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.10-1.76) were associated with the presence of AVC, whereas AVC extent at LDCT (OR = 104.32, 95% CI: 16.16-673.70) was the only significant clinical factor associated with AS; AVC extent on LDCT (OR = 104.32, 95% CI: 16.16-673.70) was the significant clinical factor associated with AS.The AVC extent on LDCT is significantly related to the presence of AS, and we recommend echocardiography for screening AS based on quantified AVC values on LDCT.

  20. Clinical predictors of prosthesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Astudillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to ascertain predictors of Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, an independent predictor of mortality, in patients with aortic stenosis using bioprosthetic valves. METHOD: We analyzed 2,107 sequential surgeries. Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was calculated using the effective orifice area of the prosthesis divided by the patient's body surface area. We defined nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch as effective orifice area indexes of .0.85 cm²/m, 0.85-0.66 cm²/m², and <0.65 cm²/m², respectively. RESULTS: A total of 311 bioprosthetic patients were identified. The incidence of nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was 41%, 42, and 16%, respectively. Severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was significantly more prevalent in females (82%. In severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch, the perfusion and the crossclamp times were considerably lower when compared with nonsignificant Patient Prosthesis Mismatch and moderate Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. Patients with severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch had a significantly higher likelihood of spending time in the intensive care unit and a significantly longer length of stay in the hospital. Body surface area was not different in severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch when compared with nonsignificant Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. In-hospital mortality in patients with nonsignificant, moderate, and severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch was 2.3%, 6.1%, and 8%, respectively. Minimally invasive surgery was significantly associated with moderate Patient Prosthesis Mismatch in 49% of the patients, but not with severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch. CONCLUSION: Severe Patient Prosthesis Mismatch is more common in females, but not in those with minimal available body surface area. Though operative times were shorter in these patients, intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay were longer. Surgeons and cardiologists should be cognizant of these clinical

  1. Relation of osteoprotegerin in severe aortic valve stenosis to postoperative outcome and left ventricular function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jordi S; Videbæk, Lars; Poulsen, Mikael K

    2013-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily and is known to be among the mediators of the calcification process that has been shown to increase in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). The aim of this study was to characterize the association of OPG with left......, 41 patients died of a presumed cardiovascular cause or remained in New York Heart Association functional class III or IV. The risk of a poor postoperative outcome after AVR increased with increasing OPG tertiles (15% vs 33% vs 51%, p = 0.002). In a multivariate model containing age, ejection fraction......, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and left atrial volume index, OPG was still significantly associated with postoperative outcome. In addition, OPG levels associated with cardiovascular mortality during follow-up. In conclusion, OPG is associated with LV and left atrial remodeling in patients...

  2. Prognostic Utility of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio on Adverse Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Severe Calcific Aortic Stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Im Cho

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis (AS. We aimed to evaluate the association between an inflammatory marker, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE in patients with severe calcific AS.A total of 336 patients with isolated severe calcific AS newly diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 were enrolled in this study. Using Cox proportional hazards (PH regression models, we investigated the prognostic value of NLR adjusted for baseline covariates including logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score (EuroSCORE-I and undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR. We also evaluated the clinical relevance of NLR risk groups (divided into low, intermediate, high risk as categorized by NLR cutoff values. MACE was defined as a composite of all-cause mortality, cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction during the follow-up period.The inflammatory marker NLR was an independent prognostic factor most significantly associated with MACE [hazard ratio (HR, 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.04-1.09; p-value 9, respectively.The findings of the present study demonstrate the potential utility of NLR in risk stratification of patients with severe calcific AS.

  3. Outcomes of patients with chronic lung disease and severe aortic stenosis treated with transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement or standard therapy: insights from the PARTNER trial (placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Danny; Waksman, Ron; Barbash, Israel M; Kodali, Susheel K; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat; Xu, Ke; Minha, Sa'ar; Alu, Maria C; Szeto, Wilson Y; Thourani, Vinod H; Makkar, Raj; Kapadia, Samir; Satler, Lowell F; Webb, John G; Leon, Martin B; Pichard, Augusto D

    2014-01-28

    The study aimed to evaluate the impact of chronic lung disease (CLD) on outcomes of severe aortic stenosis patients across all treatment modalities. Outcomes of patients with CLD undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) have not been systematically examined. All patients who underwent TAVR in the PARTNER (Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve) trial, including the continued access registry (n = 2,553; 1,108 with CLD), were evaluated according to CLD clinical severity. Additionally, outcomes of CLD patients included in the randomization arms of the PARTNER trial were compared: Cohort A patients (high-risk operable) treated by either TAVR (n = 149) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR); (n = 138); and Cohort B patients (inoperable) treated by either TAVR (n = 72) or standard therapy only (n = 95). Among all TAVR-treated patients, at 1-year follow-up, patients with CLD had higher mortality than those without it (23.4% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.02). Baseline characteristics of CLD patients who underwent TAVR were similar to respective controls. In Cohort A, 2-year all-cause death rates were similar (TAVR 35.2% and SAVR 33.6%, p = 0.92), whereas in Cohort B, the death rate was lower after TAVR (52.0% vs. 69.6% after standard therapy only, p = 0.04). Independent predictors for mortality in CLD patients undergoing TAVR included poor mobility (6-min walk test CLD patients undergoing TAVR have worse outcomes than patients without CLD, TAVR is better in these patients than standard therapy and is similar to SAVR. Although patients with CLD undergoing TAVR had worse outcomes than patients without CLD, TAVR performed better in these patients than standard therapy and was similar to SAVR. However, CLD patients who were either poorly mobile or oxygen-dependent had poor outcomes. (THE PARTNER TRIAL: Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial; NCT00530894). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Mesh-covered (Roadsaver stent as a new treatment modality for symptomatic or high-risk carotid stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Machnik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Prevention of periprocedural stroke has a crucial role in carotid artery stenting (CAS procedures. Aim : To assess retrospectively 30-day safety and effectiveness of 41 procedures of internal and common carotid artery stenting using the Roadsaver double nitinol layer micromesh stent in 40 non-consecutive patients with symptomatic or high-risk carotid artery stenosis. Material and methods : The patients were men (n = 31 and women (n = 9; mean age was 67.8 ±7.9 years. Femoral access was used in 39 cases, whereas radial access was used in 2. Proximal (n = 27 or distal (n = 14 embolic neuroprotection was used. Results : The Roadsaver stents (nominal diameter 7, 8 or 9 mm, length 25 or 30 mm were implanted successfully in all cases. One minor stroke occurred after common carotid artery intubation with a guiding catheter (before stent deployment and one transient postprocedural ischemic attack (TIA of the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere was observed. Internal/common carotid artery stenosis severity was evaluated by duplex Doppler. Maximal peak systolic velocity (PSV before CAS was in the range: 2.0–7.0 m/s, mean: 3.9 ±1.0 m/s, at 24–48 h after stenting mean PSV was 1.1 ±0.4 m/s (p < 0.05, and at 30 days 1.1 ±0.3 m/s (p < 0.05. Maximal end-diastolic velocity (EDV was 0.85–3.5 m/s, mean 1.4 ±0.5 m/s, at 24–48 h after stenting mean EDV was 0.3 ±0.1 m/s (p < 0.05, and at 30 days 0.4 ±0.1 m/s (p < 0.05. No restenosis or thrombosis was observed. Angiographic stenosis decreased from 82.9 ±9.1% (range: 61–97% to 19.3 ±7.3% (range: 0–34% (p < 0.05. Conclusions : The CAS using the Roadsaver stent seems to be safe and effective. Further studies involving larger patient populations and longer follow-up are needed.

  5. Commercial versus PARTNER study experience with the transfemoral Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendyala, Lakshmana K; Minha, Sa'ar; Barbash, Israel M; Torguson, Rebecca; Magalhaes, Marco A; Okubagzi, Petros; Loh, Joshua P; Chen, Fang; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2014-01-15

    In patients with aortic stenosis who cannot have surgery, transcatheter aortic valve replacement using the Edwards SAPIEN valve has been shown to improve survival rate and is approved for commercial use in the United States. This study aims to assess the clinical profile, procedural characteristics, and in-hospital complications in patients treated with a commercial SAPIEN valve outside the clinical trial context. We retrospectively analyzed 69 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a commercial SAPIEN valve compared with 55 Placement of AoRTic traNscathetER valves (PARTNER) trial patients from cohort B enrolled in the same institution by the same Heart Team. Compared with the commercial group, patients in the PARTNER cohort B had higher mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score (10 ± 5 vs 9 ± 4, p = 0.04) and a lower rate of peripheral arterial disease (19% vs 44%, p = 0.004). Most patients in the commercial group had the procedure under conscious sedation (83% vs 66%, p = 0.03). Planned surgical cut down for vascular access was rare in the commercial group (1.4% vs 46%, p commercial group (7.2% vs 27%, p = 0.003; 2.9% vs 16%, p = 0.01; and 28% vs 60%, p commercial group. In conclusion, transfemoral commercial use of the Edwards SAPIEN valve for inoperable patients shows similar in-hospital mortality and stroke rates compared with PARTNER cohort B. The refinements in the procedure such as more conscious sedation, experience of the operators, and careful vascular planning in the commercial group led to lesser vascular and bleeding complications and shorter length of stay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sequential transcatheter aortic valve implantation due to valve dislodgement - a Portico valve implanted over a CoreValve bioprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campante Teles, Rui; Costa, Cátia; Almeida, Manuel; Brito, João; Sondergaard, Lars; Neves, José P; Abecasis, João; M Gabriel, Henrique

    2017-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an important treatment in high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), whose complications need to be managed promptly. The authors report the case of an 86-year-old woman presenting with severe symptomatic AS, rejected for surgery due to advanced age and comorbidities. The patient underwent a first TAVI, with implantation of a Medtronic CoreValve ® , which became dislodged and migrated to the ascending aorta. Due to the previous balloon valvuloplasty, the patient's AS became moderate, and her symptoms improved. After several months, she required another intervention, performed with a St. Jude Portico ® repositionable self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve. There was a good clinical response that was maintained at one-year follow-up. The use of a self-expanding transcatheter bioprosthesis with repositioning features is a solution in cases of valve dislocation to avoid suboptimal positioning of a second implant, especially when the two valves have to be positioned overlapping or partially overlapping each other. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of permanent pacemaker on mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engborg, Jonathan; Riechel-Sarup, Casper; Gerke, Oke

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established treatment for high-grade aortic valve stenosis in patients found unfit for open heart surgery. The method may cause cardiac conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation, and the long-term effect...

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis: Prognostic Impact After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients Undergoing TAVR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alushi, Brunilda; Beckhoff, Frederik; Leistner, David; Franz, Marcus; Reinthaler, Markus; Stähli, Barbara E; Morguet, Andreas; Figulla, Hans R; Doenst, Torsten; Maisano, Francesco; Falk, Volkmar; Landmesser, Ulf; Lauten, Alexander

    2018-04-13

    The authors investigated the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH), predictors of PH regression, and its prognostic impact on short, mid-, and long-term outcomes in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). PH represents a common finding in patients with AS. Although TAVR is frequently associated with regression of PH, the predictors of reversible PH and its prognostic significance remain uncertain. In this study, 617 consecutive patients undergoing TAVR between 2009 and 2015 were stratified per baseline tertiles of pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) as follows: normal (PASP 40% (odds ratio [OR]: 3.56, 95% CI: 2.24 to 5.65; p < 0.001), baseline PASP ≥46 mm Hg (OR: 3.26, 95% CI: 2.07 to 5.12; p < 0.001), absence of concomitant tricuspid regurgitation (TR) ≥ moderate (OR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.84; p < 0.001), and logistic EuroSCORE <25% (OR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.04 to 2.45; p = 0.03) were independent predictors of PASP reduction. In most patients with PH and AS, TAVR is associated with a significant early and late reduction of PASP. Patients with reversible PH after TAVR are at lower risk of all-cause mortality at early, mid-, and long-term follow-up. Therefore, the presence of PH should not preclude treatment with TAVR. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  10. Silent myocardial ischemia in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis: associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Juan F; Candell-Riera, Jaume; Romero-Farina, Guillermo; Molina, Carlos A; Chacón, Pilar; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago; Montaner, Joan; de León, Gustavo; Castell-Conesa, Joan; Alvarez-Sabín, José

    2005-06-01

    Optimization of coronary risk evaluation in stroke patients has been encouraged. The relationship between symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis and occult coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been evaluated sufficiently. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of silent myocardial ischemia in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis and to identify factors associated with its presence. From 186 first-ever transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke patients with intracranial stenoses, 65 fulfilled selection criteria, including angiographic confirmation of a symptomatic atherosclerotic stenosis and absence of known CAD. All patients underwent a maximal-stress myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], C-reactive protein, and homocysteine (Hcy) levels were determined before SPECT. Stress-rest SPECT detected reversible myocardial perfusion defects in 34 (52%) patients. Vascular risk factors associated with a pathologic SPECT were hypercholesterolemia (P=0.045), presence of >2 risk factors (P=0.004) and high Lp(a) (P=0.023) and Hcy levels (P=0.018). Ninety percent of patients with high Lp(a) and Hcy levels had a positive SPECT. Existence of a stenosed intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA; odds ratio [OR], 7.22, 2.07 to 25.23; P=0.002) and location of the symptomatic stenosis in vertebrobasilar arteries (OR, 4.89, 1.19 to 20.12; P=0.027) were independently associated with silent myocardial ischemia after adjustment by age, sex, and risk factors. More than 50% of the patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis and not overt CAD show myocardial perfusion defects on stress-rest SPECT. Stenosed intracranial ICA, symptomatic vertebrobasilar stenosis and presence of high Lp(a) and Hcy levels may characterize the patients at a higher risk for occult CAD.

  11. Primary Infrarenal Aortic Stenting With or Without Iliac Stenting for Isolated and Aortoiliac Stenoses: Single-Centre Experience With Long-Term Follow-Up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, C. R.; Ahmed, M.; Scott, P. M.; Lakshminarayan, R.; Robinson, G. J.; Ettles, D. F.; Shrivastava, V.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical success, complications, long-term clinical outcome, and patency after primary infrarenal aortic stenting for aortic and aortoiliac stenosis. Between January 1999 and January 2006, 22 consecutive patients underwent endovascular treatment because of infrarenal aortic stenosis with and without common iliac stenosis (10 men; mean age 64 ± 14 years). Eleven (11 of 22) patients had an isolated aortic stenosis, whereas 11 of 22 had aortic stenosis that extended into the common iliac arteries (CIAs). Thirteen patients were Rutherford classification type 3, and 9 patients were type 4. Statistical analysis included paired Student t test and Kaplan–Meier life table analysis; p < 0.05 was considered significant. Technical and initial clinical success was achieved in all patients. There were three (14 %) procedure-related complications, which included two access-point pseudoaneurysms and one non–flow-limiting left external iliac dissection. Patients were followed-up for a mean period of 88 months (range 60–132). Mean preprocedure ankle brachial pressure indexes (ABPI) were 0.60 ± −0.15 (right) and 0.61 ± −0.16 (left). After the procedure they were 0.86 ± −0.07 (right) and 0.90 ± −0.09 (left). The increase in ABPI was significant (p < 0.05), and this continued throughout follow-up. Four (18 %) patients had recurrence of symptoms during follow-up. These occurred at 36, 48, 48, and 50 months after the original procedure. All four patients were successfully treated with repeat angioplasty procedures. There was a significant difference in primary patency between isolated aortic stenosis (100 %) and aortoiliac stenosis (60 %) (p = 0.031). Cumulative follow-up was 1920 months yielding a reintervention rate of 0.025/events/year. Primary stenting of infrarenal stenosis is safe and successful with a low reintervention rate. It should be considered as first-line treatment for patients with infrarenal aortic

  12. Expression of uPA, tPA, and PAI-1 in Calcified Aortic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najlah Kochtebane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Our physiopathological assumption is that u-PA, t-PA, and PAI-1 are released by calcified aortic valves and play a role in the calcification of these valves. Methods. Sixty-five calcified aortic valves were collected from patients suffering from aortic stenosis. Each valve was incubated for 24 hours in culture medium. The supernatants were used to measure u-PA, t-PA, and PAI-1 concentrations; the valve calcification was evaluated using biphotonic absorptiometry. Results. Aortic stenosis valves expressed normal plasminogen activators concentrations and overexpressed PAI-1 (u-PA, t-PA, and PAI-1 mean concentrations were, resp., 1.69 ng/mL ± 0.80, 2.76 ng/mL ± 1.33, and 53.27 ng/mL ± 36.39. There was no correlation between u-PA and PAI-1 (r=0.3 but t-PA and PAI-1 were strongly correlated with each other (r=0.6. Overexpression of PAI-1 was proportional to the calcium content of the AS valves. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate a consistent increase of PAI-1 proportional to the calcification. The overexpression of PAI-1 may be useful as a predictive indicator in patients with aortic stenosis.

  13. Intermittent, noncyclic dysfunction of a mechanical aortic prosthesis by pannus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Sylvie K; Labinaz, Marino X; Grisoli, Dominique; Klug, Andrew P; Veinot, John P; Burwash, Ian G

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical aortic prosthesis dysfunction can result from thrombosis or pannus formation. Pannus formation usually restricts systolic excursion of the occluding disk, resulting in progressive stenosis of the aortic prosthesis. Intermittent dysfunction of a mechanical aortic prosthesis is usually ascribed to thrombus formation. We describe an unusual case of intermittent, noncyclic dysfunction of a mechanical aortic prosthesis due to pannus formation in the absence of systolic restriction of disk excursion that presented with intermittent massive aortic regurgitation, severe ischemia, and shock. Pannus formation should be considered as a potential cause of acute intermittent severe aortic regurgitation in a patient with a mechanical aortic prosthesis.

  14. Reduction mammoplasty as a treatment for symptomatic central venous stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Seok Fun Fok

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Central venous stenosis is a rare cause of unilateral breast edema occurring in hemodialysis patients that needs to be differentiated from other differential diagnoses, including, but not limited to, inflammatory breast carcinoma, mastitis, lymphedema, and congestive heart failure. All reports of similar cases in the available literature have described improvement or resolution of the edema after treatment. Herein, we report and discuss the pathophysiology of breast edema formation in a patient who presented with massive left-sided breast edema 7 years after being diagnosed with central venous stenosis. Medical and minimally invasive therapy had not been successful, so she underwent reduction mammoplasty to relieve the symptoms.

  15. Left ventricular global longitudinal strain is predictive of all-cause mortality independent of aortic stenosis severity and ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Arnold C T; Prihadi, Edgard A; Antoni, M Louisa; Bertini, Matteo; Ewe, See Hooi; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Leung, Dominic Y; Delgado, Victoria; Bax, Jeroen J

    2017-07-28

    Left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) may identify subclinical myocardial dysfunction in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). The aims of the present retrospective single centre study were to determine the independent prognostic value of LV GLS over LV ejection fraction (EF) and the role of LV GLS to further risk stratify severe AS patients before aortic valve replacement. A total of 688 patients (median age 72 years, 61.2% men) with mild (n = 130), moderate (n = 264) and severe AS (n = 294) were included. LV GLS was determined by 2D speckle tracking echocardiography. A total of 114 (16.6%) patients died before surgery during the study. When patients with severe AS and normal LVEF were dichotomized based on the median LV GLS value (-14.0%), patients with normal LVEF and 'preserved' LV GLS of ≤ -14% had significantly higher survival than patients with 'impaired' LV GLS of > -14%. There was no difference in survival between patients with normal LVEF but 'impaired' LV GLS ( > -14%) and patients with impaired LVEF (log-rank P = 0.34). LV GLS was independently associated with all-cause mortality on multivariable Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.09-1.26; P optimal timing of aortic valve replacement. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Interobserver variability of CT angiography for evaluation of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidkonz, C., E-mail: christian.schmidkonz@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Marwan, M.; Klinghammer, L.; Mitschke, M.; Schuhbaeck, A.; Arnold, M. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Lell, M. [Radiological Institute, University of Erlangen, Maximiliansplatz 1, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany); Achenbach, S.; Pflederer, T. [Department of Internal Medicine 2 (Cardiology), University of Erlangen, Ulmenweg 18, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Cardiac CT provides highly reproducible measurements of aortic annulus and root dimensions prior to TAVI. • The perimeter-derived aortic annulus diameter shows the lowest interobserver variability. • If all three CT sizing methods are considered and stated as a “consensus result”, mismatches in prosthesis size selection can be further reduced. - Abstract: Objective: Assessment of aortic annulus dimensions prior to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is crucial for accurate prosthesis sizing in order to avoid prosthesis–annulus-mismatch possibly resulting in complications like valve dislodgement, paravalvular regurgitation or annulus rupture. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography allows 3-dimensional assessment of aortic annulus dimensions. Only limited data exist about its interobserver variability. Methods: In 100 consecutive patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (51 male, BMI 27 ± 5 kg/m{sup 2}, age 81 ± 7 years, heart rate 72 ± 15 bpm, Logistic Euroscore 31 ± 14%, STS-Score 7 ± 4%), pre-interventional aortic annulus assessment was performed by dual source computed tomography (collimation 2 × 128 × 0.6 mm, high pitch spiral data acquisition mode, 40–60 ml contrast agents, radiation dose 3.5 ± 0.9 mSv). The following aortic annulus characteristics were determined by three independent observers: aortic annulus maximum, minimum and mean diameters (D{sub max}, D{sub min}, D{sub mean}), eccentricity index (EI), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its circumference (D{sub circ}), effective aortic annulus diameter according to its area (D{sub area}), distance from the aortic annulus plane to the left (LCA) and right coronary artery (RCA) ostia, maximum (D{sub max}AR) and minimum aortic root diameter (D{sub min}AR), maximum (D{sub max}STJ) and minimum diameter of the sinotubular junction (D{sub min}STJ). Subsequently, interobserver variabilities were assessed. Results: Correlation between

  17. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypochondroplasia with Foramen Magnum Stenosis: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazik Aşılıoğlu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypochondroplasia was first reported in the English literature by Beals (1969. The features are similar to those of achondroplasia but are less severe and are usually reported not to involve the skull. The foramen magnum and whole spinal canal are reduced in diameter in achondroplasia, but less so in hypochondroplasia. In this study, we present an unique case of a seven month old child with hypochondroplasia with symptomatic foramen magnum stenosis which required surgical decompression. This 7-month-old child with hypochondroplasia presented with hypotonia and severe respiratory disabilities, including apneic episodes requiring continuous positive airway pressure. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed marked foramen magnum stenosis. Foramen magnum decompression was performed. Postoperatively, steady motor improvement has been observed and the patient no longer requires ventilatory support. To the our knowledge, this is the first report of hypochondroplasia and symptomatic foramen magnum stenosis. In this case we wish to emphasize the necessity of the radiological imaging of foramen magnum and spinal cord for the patient who has respiratory distress and hypotonia with skeletal dysplasia.

  19. Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechtel, Klaus; Ketelsen, Dominik; Endisch, Andrea; Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin; Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay

    2012-01-01

    PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

  20. Management of stenosis lesions during the period of endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-xing HAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the management of stenosis lesions during endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke. Methods A total of 36 acute ischemic stroke patients combined with intracranial/extracranial arterial stenosis were treated with endovascular treatment or bridging treatment. Time from aggravation on admission or in hospital stay to femoral artery puncture, from femoral arterypuncture to recanalization were recorded. Modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (mTICI was usedto assess the recanalization immediately after operation. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS was used to evaluate prognosis at 90 d after operation. Occurrence rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and mortality were recorded. Results Among 36 patients, 13 patients (36.11% underwent intravenous thrombolysis and then endovascular thrombectomy. In all patients, there were 21 (58.33% with intracranial stenosis and 15 (41.67% with extracranial stenosis, 16 (44.44% with anterior circulation stenosis and 20 (55.56% with posterior circulation stenosis. Stent thrombectomy was used in 25 patients (69.44% , while balloon dilatation and/or stent implantation was used in 11 patients (30.56% . For 21 patients with intracranial arterial stenosis, 4 were treated with balloon dilatation only, 9 with Wingspan self-expandable stents and 8 with Apollo balloon-expandable stents. Fifteen patients with extracranial arterial stenosis were treated with balloon dilatation and stent implantation. A total of 33 patients (91.67% achieved recanalization (mTICI 2b-3 grade, 21 patients (58.33% had good outcomes (mRS ≤ 2 score, while symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 2 patients (5.56% and 5 (13.89% died. There were no statistically significant differences in the rate of good prognosis, symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and mortality between intracranial and extracranial arterial stenosis, anterior and posterior circulation stenosis (Fisher exact probability: P > 0.05, for

  1. Aortic anomalies in an adolescent with the Williams' elfin facies syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.L.; Azouz, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    An adolescent with classical Williams' syndrome who presented with hypertensive encephalopathy is described. He had the unusual combination of supravalvular aortic stenosis, long segment coarctation of the aorta, aortic hypoplasia and a high bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. Surgical resection of the coarctation was required; however, the patient has remained moderately hypertensive. The aortic anomalies in this syndrome are reviewed and their frequency and importance examined. (orig.)

  2. Platelet activation, function, and reactivity in atherosclerotic carotid artery stenosis: a systematic review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, J A

    2012-09-27

    An important proportion of transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke is attributable to moderate or severe (50-99%) atherosclerotic carotid stenosis or occlusion. Platelet biomarkers have the potential to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular events in this patient population. A detailed systematic review was performed to collate all available data on ex vivo platelet activation and platelet function\\/reactivity in patients with carotid stenosis. Two hundred thirteen potentially relevant articles were initially identified; 26 manuscripts met criteria for inclusion in this systematic review. There was no consistent evidence of clinically informative data from urinary or soluble blood markers of platelet activation in patients with symptomatic moderate or severe carotid stenosis who might be considered suitable for carotid intervention. Data from flow cytometry studies revealed evidence of excessive platelet activation in patients in the early, sub-acute, or late phases after transient ischemic attack or stroke in association with moderate or severe carotid stenosis and in asymptomatic moderate or severe carotid stenosis compared with controls. Furthermore, pilot data suggest that platelet activation may be increased in recently symptomatic than in asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis. Excessive platelet activation and platelet hyperreactivity may play a role in the pathogenesis of first or subsequent transient ischemic attack or stroke in patients with moderate or severe carotid stenosis. Larger longitudinal studies assessing platelet activation status with flow cytometry and platelet function\\/reactivity in symptomatic vs. asymptomatic carotid stenosis are warranted to improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for transient ischemic attack or stroke.

  3. Beneficial Effects of High-Density Lipoproteins on Acquired von Willebrand Syndrome in Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, C; Maafi, F; Stähli, B E; Bonnefoy, A; Gebhard, C E; Nachar, W; de Oliveira Moraes, A Benjamim; Mecteau, M; Mihalache-Avram, T; Lavoie, V; Kernaleguen, A E; Shi, Y; Busseuil, D; Chabot-Blanchet, M; Perrault, L P; Rhainds, D; Rhéaume, E; Tardif, J C

    2018-02-01

     Infusions of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), the major protein component of high-density lipoproteins (HDL), result in aortic valve stenosis (AVS) regression in experimental models. Severe AVS can be complicated by acquired von Willebrand syndrome, a haemorrhagic disorder associated with loss of high-molecular-weight von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimers (HMWM), the latter being a consequence of increased shear stress and enhanced vWF-cleaving protease (ADAMTS-13) activity. Although antithrombotic actions of HDL have been described, its effects on ADAMTS-13 and vWF in AVS are unknown.  We assessed ADAMTS-13 activity in plasma derived from a rabbit model of AVS ( n  = 29) as well as in plasma collected from 64 patients with severe AVS (age 65.0 ± 10.4 years, 44 males) undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). In both human and rabbit AVS plasma, ADAMTS-13 activity was higher than that in controls ( p  AVS patients had less HMWM than controls (66.3 ± 27.2% vs. 97.2 ± 24.1%, p  AVS rabbits as compared with the placebo group (2.0 ± 0.5 RFU/sec vs. 3.8 ± 0.4 RFU/sec, p  AVS ( r  = -0.3, p  = 0.045).  Our data indicate that HDL levels are associated with reduced ADAMTS-13 activity and increased HMWM. HDL-based therapies may reduce the haematologic abnormalities of the acquired von Willebrand syndrome in AVS. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  4. Sex Differences in Phenotypes of Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Aortopathy: Insights From a Large Multicenter, International Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, William K F; Regeer, Madelien V; Ng, Arnold C T; McCormack, Louise; Poh, Kian Keong; Yeo, Tiong Cheng; Shanks, Miriam; Parent, Sarah; Enache, Roxana; Popescu, Bogdan A; Yip, James W; Ma, Lawrence; Kamperidis, Vasileios; van der Velde, Enno T; Mertens, Bart; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Delgado, Victoria; Bax, Jeroen J

    2017-03-01

    This large multicenter, international bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) registry aimed to define the sex differences in prevalence, valve morphology, dysfunction (aortic stenosis/regurgitation), aortopathy, and complications (endocarditis and aortic dissection). Demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic data at first presentation of 1992 patients with BAV (71.5% men) were retrospectively analyzed. BAV morphology and valve function were assessed; aortopathy configuration was defined as isolated dilatation of the sinus of Valsalva or sinotubular junction, isolated dilatation of the ascending aorta distal to the sinotubular junction, or diffuse dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta. New cases of endocarditis and aortic dissection were recorded. There were no significant sex differences regarding BAV morphology and frequency of normal valve function. When presenting with moderate/severe aortic valve dysfunction, men had more frequent aortic regurgitation than women (33.8% versus 22.2%, P <0.001), whereas women were more likely to have aortic stenosis (34.5% versus 44.1%, P <0.001). Men had more frequently isolated dilatation of the sinus of Valsalva or sinotubular junction (14.2% versus 6.7%, P <0.001) and diffuse dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta (16.2% versus 7.3%, P <0.001) than women. Endocarditis (4.5% versus 2.5%, P =0.037) and aortic dissections (0.5% versus 0%, P <0.001) occurred more frequently in men. Although there is a male predominance among patients with BAV, men with BAV had more frequently moderate/severe aortic regurgitation at first presentation compared with women, whereas women presented more often with moderate/severe aortic stenosis compared with men. Furthermore, men had more frequent aortopathy than women. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Collateral circulation alters downstream hemodynamic stress caused by intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Dornbos, David; Pu, Yuehua; Leng, Xinyi; Song, Ligang; Jia, Baixue; Pan, Yuesong; Wang, David; Miao, Zhongrong; Wang, Yilong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-06-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) accurately predicts the degree of stenosis and is now widely used to identify clinically significant severe coronary artery lesions. In the current study, we utilized a similar indicator, fractional flow (FF), to determine the hemodynamic impact of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) and to assess the correlation of FF with the severity of stenosis and collateral circulation. Patients with symptomatic ICAS (70-99% stenosis) confirmed on digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were consecutively recruited. FF was obtained during DSA examination with the use of pressure sensors and was measured as a ratio, comparing measurements distal to an ICAS lesion (Pd) and within the aorta (Pa). The degree of leptomeningeal collateralization was graded from zero (absent) to four (complete compensatory). The correlation between FF, anatomical stenosis, and collateral status was then analyzed. Twenty-five patients with a mean age of 55.6 years were analyzed. The median percentage of stenosis and median FF were 82.3 and 0.68%, respectively. Eleven patients were found to have poor collateralization (grade 0-2), and fourteen patients were identified with good collateral circulation (grade 3-4). Overall, the hemodynamic impact of an atherosclerotic lesions worsened (decreased FF) as the percentage of stenosis increased, although this did not reach statistical significance (r = -0.398, p = 0.06). However, the status of collateralization significantly altered this correlation, worsening the hemodynamic impact in patients with poor collateral circulation (r = -0.677, p = 0.032). There was no difference in patients with good collateral circulation (r = -0.279, p = 0.356). An anatomically severe (70-99%) symptomatic ICAS lesion may generate significant hemodynamic stress downstream as assessed by the indicator FF, particularly in patients with poor collateral circulation. Further, good collateralization may mitigate this

  6. The 'obesity paradox' does exist in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenyu; Li, Shuangjiang; Liao, Yanbiao; Zhao, Zhengang; Che, Guowei; Chen, Mao; Feng, Yuan

    2017-10-01

    Most recent studies have proposed the paradoxical benefits of obesity in surgical populations. For patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for aortic stenosis, the prognostic roles of obesity and high body mass index remain controversial. Therefore, the objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate whether the 'obesity paradox' exists in patients undergoing TAVI. We searched in PubMed and EMBASE to identify the eligible articles. Odds ratios and hazard ratios with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were adopted for synthesizing short-term and long-term survival outcomes, respectively. The level of heterogeneity and the publication bias between studies were also estimated. Finally, there were 16 studies with 12 330 patients who met the eligibility criteria and who were thus included in this review. When body mass index was analysed as a continuous variable, each increase of 1 kg/m2 was significantly associated with the lower 30-day mortality rate (odds ratio = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.93-0.97; P obese patients had a significantly lower risk of 30-day mortality after TAVI than did normal patients (odds ratio = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.50-0.95; P = 0.024). Further analyses indicated that the obesity could be predictive of more favourable long-term overall survival of TAVI (hazard ratio = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.72-0.97; P = 0.021). However, we found no difference in procedural complications between the obese and normal patients. In conclusion, higher body mass index and obesity seem to have protective benefits on both short-term and long-term survival of TAVI patients. Current evidence suggests that the 'obesity paradox' may really exist in TAVI. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  7. Contrast induced nephropathy after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Kranin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic stenosis ranks the third in the structure of all cardiovascular diseases, conceding only to arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI is a promising area of interventional endovascular surgery that enables to provide surgical care to a significant group of the patients with severe aortal stenosis.Aim: To assess the efficacy of prevention of the contrast induced nephropathy (CIN in patients who underwent TAVI under general anesthesia.Materials and methods: We evaluated incidence of CIN in 19 patients who underwent surgery for aortic valve stenosis under general anesthesia with hemodilution and intravenous magnesium sulfate 1 g before administration of the contrast.Results: Laboratory signs of nephropathy within the first 72 hours after the intervention were found in 8/19 (42.1% of patients. In 4 (50% of patients with CIN, its risk had been very high, in 3 (38%, high, and in 1 (12%, moderate. The results obtained are compatible with the contrast-induced acute kidney injury risk estimated from the Mehran-Barrett-Parfrey scale.Conclusion: The used technique of hemodilution and magnesium-based prevention can be considered a safe method of CIN prophylaxis in TAVI patients.

  8. Coronary artery narrowing after aortic root reconstruction with resorcin-formalin glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, L; Graffigna, A; Guarnerio, M; Bonmassari, R; Disertori, M

    2000-11-01

    Severe stenosis of right and left main coronary artery ostia developed after aortic root reconstruction with gelatin-resorcin-formol glue for correction of acute type A aortic dissection. Surgical treatment of this condition required grafting of the right and left anterior descending arteries with bilateral mammary arteries on the beating heart.

  9. Integration of 3D imaging data in the assessment of aortic stenosis: impact on classification of disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Bridget; Schoenhagen, Paul; Kapadia, Samir R; Svensson, Lars G; Rodriguez, Leonardo; Griffin, Brian P; Tuzcu, E Murat; Desai, Milind Y

    2011-09-01

    In patients with aortic stenosis (AS), precise assessment of severity is critical for treatment decisions. Estimation of aortic valve area (AVA) with transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE)-continuity equation (CE) assumes a circular left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT). We evaluated incremental utility of 3D multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) over TTE assessment of AS severity. We included 51 patients (age, 81±8 years; 61% men; mean gradient, 42 ± 12 mm Hg) with calcific AS who underwent evaluation for treatment options. TTE parameters included systolic LVOT diameter (D) and continuous and pulsed wave (CW and PW) velocity-time integrals (VTI) through the LVOT and mean transaortic gradient. MDCT parameters included systolic LVOT area, ratio of maximal to minimal LVOT diameter (eccentricity index), and aortic planimetry (AVA(p)). TTE-CE AVA [(D(2)×0.786×VTIpw)/VTIcw] and dimensionless index (DI) [VTIpw/VTIcw] were calculated. Corrected AVA was calculated by substituting MDCT LVOT area into CE. The majority (96%) of patients had eccentric LVOT. LVOT area, measured on MDCT, was higher than on TTE (3.84 ± 0.8 cm(2) versus 3.03 ± 0.5 cm(2), P<0.01). TTE-AVA was smaller than AVA(p) and corrected AVA (0.67 ± 0.1cm(2), 0.82 ± 0.3 cm(2), and 0.86 ± 0.3 cm(2), P<0.01). Using TTE measurements alone, 73% of patients had congruence for severe AS (DI ≤0.25 and CE AVA <0.8 cm(2)), which increased to 92% using corrected CE. In patients with suspected severe AS, incorporation of MDCT-LVOT area into CE improves congruence for AS severity.

  10. Incidence, Prognostic Impact, and Predictive Factors of Readmission for Heart Failure After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Eric; Doutriaux, Maxime; Bettinger, Nicolas; Tron, Christophe; Fauvel, Charles; Bauer, Fabrice; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Bouhzam, Najime; Litzler, Pierre-Yves; Cribier, Alain; Eltchaninoff, Hélène

    2017-12-11

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, prognostic impact, and predictive factors of readmission for congestive heart failure (CHF) in patients with severe aortic stenosis treated by transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). TAVR is indicated in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis in whom surgery is considered high risk or is contraindicated. Readmission for CHF after TAVR remains a challenge, and data on prognostic and predictive factors are lacking. All patients who underwent TAVR from January 2010 to December 2014 were included. Follow-up was achieved for at least 1 year and included clinical and echocardiographic data. Readmission for CHF was analyzed retrospectively. This study included 546 patients, 534 (97.8%) of whom were implanted with balloon-expandable valves preferentially via the transfemoral approach in 87.8% of cases. After 1 year, 285 patients (52.2%) had been readmitted at least once, 132 (24.1%) for CHF. Patients readmitted for CHF had an increased risk for death (p < 0.0001) and cardiac death (p < 0.0001) compared with those not readmitted for CHF. On multivariate analysis, aortic mean gradient (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79 to 0.99; p = 0.03), post-procedural blood transfusion (HR: 2.27; 95% CI: 1.13 to 5.56; p = 0.009), severe post-procedural pulmonary hypertension (HR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.07; p < 0.0001), and left atrial diameter (HR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.08 to 2.01; p = 0.02) were independently associated with CHF readmission at 1 year. Readmission for CHF after TAVR was frequent and was strongly associated with 1-year mortality. Low gradient, persistent pulmonary hypertension, left atrial dilatation, and transfusions were predictive of readmission for CHF. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aortic root geometry in aortic stenosis patients (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahlmann, Edda; Nienaber, Christoph A; Cramariuc, Dana

    2011-01-01

    -specified requirements for the aortic root geometry for current available prostheses, CoreValve and Edwards-Sapien. The ratio of sinus of Valsalva height to sinus width was 1:2. In multivariate linear regression analysis, larger sinus of Valsalva height was associated with older age, larger sinus of Valsalva diameter......, lower ejection fraction and smaller supracoronary diameter (multiple R(2) = 0.19, PSapien prosthesis in 66.9%. Overall, annular dimension feasible for TAVI using any available prosthesis was found...

  12. Prevalence and Outcomes of Mitral Stenosis in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Findings From the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapies Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Lee; Bashir, Mohammad; Xiang, Qun; Yerokun, Babatunde A; Matsouaka, Roland Albert; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Kapadia, Samir; Cigarroa, Joaquin E; Zahr, Firas

    2018-04-09

    This study sought to examine the prevalence of mitral stenosis (MS) and its impact on in-hospital and 1-year clinical outcomes among patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Patients with coexisting severe aortic stenosis and MS are increasingly being considered for TAVR. The study cohort included 44,755 patients (age ≥18 years) who underwent TAVR during November 1, 2011, to September 30, 2015, and were registered in Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapies (TVT) Registry. One-year outcomes were assessed by linking TVT registry data of this cohort to patient-specific Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services administrative claims data (n = 31,453). The primary outcome was the composite of death, stroke, heart failure-related hospitalization, and mitral valve intervention at 1 year. MS was present in 11.6% of cohort (mean age, 82 years; 52% males), being severe in 2.7%. Severe MS was associated with higher in-hospital mortality rates (5.6% vs. 3.9% for nonsevere MS and 4.1% for no MS; p = 0.02). In contrast to those without MS, severe MS group had significantly higher risk for the primary outcome, mortality (1 year), and heart failure-related hospitalization (1 year) (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.2 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1 to 1.4], 1.2 [95% CI: 1.0 to 1.4], and 1.3 [95% CI: 1.1 to 1.5], respectively; p < 0.05 for all). Approximately one-tenth of patients undergoing TAVR have concomitant MS. Severe MS is an independent predictor of 1-year adverse clinical outcomes following TAVR. The higher risk for long-term adverse events must be considered when evaluating patients with combined aortic stenosis and MS for TAVR. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Expanding TAVI options: elective rotational atherectomy during trans-catheter aortic valve implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccoli, Anna; Lunardi, Mattia; Ariotti, Sara; Ferrero, Valeria; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in the elderly is frequently associated to coronary artery disease (CAD). In patients with significant coronary stenosis surgical valve replacement is associated to coronary bypass grafting, but whether coronary angioplasty is needed in patients receiving trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Given the frequent complexity of CAD in the elderly with calcific AVS, rotational atherectomy (RA) may be needed in some cases. No data are available about feasibility and safety of RA during TAVI. The need for myocardial revascularization in TAVI candidates is discussed, and a series of RA cases performed during TAVI is described

  14. Expanding TAVI options: elective rotational atherectomy during trans-catheter aortic valve implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccoli, Anna; Lunardi, Mattia; Ariotti, Sara; Ferrero, Valeria; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio, E-mail: flavio.ribichini@univr.it

    2015-01-15

    Summary: Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in the elderly is frequently associated to coronary artery disease (CAD). In patients with significant coronary stenosis surgical valve replacement is associated to coronary bypass grafting, but whether coronary angioplasty is needed in patients receiving trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. Given the frequent complexity of CAD in the elderly with calcific AVS, rotational atherectomy (RA) may be needed in some cases. No data are available about feasibility and safety of RA during TAVI. The need for myocardial revascularization in TAVI candidates is discussed, and a series of RA cases performed during TAVI is described.

  15. Modificação técnica na cirurgia da estenose aórtica supravalvar Technical modifications in the surgery of supravalvar aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magaly Arrais dos Santos

    1996-12-01

    íodo pós-operatório de 3 meses a 4 anos e 5 meses, não houve óbito; todos os pacientes estão assintomáticos, evoluindo satisfatoriamente, sem gradiente entre a cavidade livre do ventrículo esquerdo e aorta ascendente, conforme ecocardiograma, Doppler, ressonância nuclear magnética e estudo hemodinâmico. Estes resultados nos permitem concluir ser esta técnica adequada para a correção cirúrgica da estenose supravalvar aórtica localizada, por não utilizar enxertos artificiais e realizar a sutura da aorta em uma linha sinusoidal, evitando, assim, reestenose.A technical modification in the surgery of supravalvar aortic stenosis has been developed since October 1991 to December 1995, without using artificial grafts, but only healthy tissue of the ascending aorta thus permitting a suitable enlargement of the aortic root. The aim of this technique is to avoid complications of re-estenosis of aortic root in the late evolution of patientes submitted to surgical treatment of localized supravalvar aortic stenosis which was provoked by calcification and hardening of prosthetic material used for the enlargement of one or more Valsalva sinuses, with or whitout transversal section of the aorta. Ten patients underwent a surgery in this meantime, with clinical and hemodynamic diagnosis of localized supravalvar aortic stenosis. Their ages varied from 11 months to 38 years (mean = 13.2 years, the weight varied from 7.500 kg to 56 kg (mean = 29.1 kg, and the height varied from 72 cm to 1.68 m (mean = 1.5 m. Six of these patients were male. Three of them were asymptomatic; 4 had dyspnea, 2 were tired at efforts, 2 had palpitations, 1 had paresthesia in the lower limbs, and 1 cyanosis at crying; 6 of them bore Williams syndrome. The systolic gradient between free cavity of left ventricle and aorta varied from 50 to 100 mmHg (mean = 73.5.The patients were operated on with extracorporeal circulation, moderate hypothermia, crystalloid cardioplegia in the 7 first cases and bloody

  16. Long-Term Follow-Up After Endovascular Treatment of Acute Aortic Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitton, M. B.; Herber, S.; Schmiedt, W.; Neufang, A.; Dorweiler, B.; Dueber, C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the long-term outcome and efficacy of emergency treatment of acute aortic diseases with endovascular stent-grafts. Methods. From September 1995 to April 2007, 37 patients (21 men, 16 women; age 53.9 ± 19.2 years, range 18-85 years) with acute complications of diseases of the descending thoracic aorta were treated by endovascular stent-grafts: traumatic aortic ruptures (n = 9), aortobronchial fistulas due to penetrating ulcer or hematothorax (n = 6), acute type B dissections with aortic wall hematoma, penetration, or ischemia (n = 13), and symptomatic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta (n = 9) with pain, penetration, or rupture. Diagnosis was confirmed by contrast-enhanced CT. Multiplanar reformations were used for measurement of the landing zones of the stent-grafts. Stent-grafts were inserted via femoral or iliac cut-down. Two procedures required aortofemoral bypass grafting prior to stent-grafting due to extensive arteriosclerotic stenosis of the iliac arteries. In this case the bypass graft was used for introduction of the stent-graft. Results. A total of 46 stent-grafts were implanted: Vanguard/Stentor (n = 4), Talent (n = 31), and Valiant (n = 11). Stent-graft extension was necessary in 7 cases. In 3 cases primary graft extension was done during the initial procedure (in 1 case due to distal migration of the graft during stent release, in 2 cases due to the total length of the aortic aneurysm). In 4 cases secondary graft extensions were performed-for new aortic ulcers at the proximal stent struts (after 5 days) and distal to the graft (after 8 months) and recurrent aortobronchial fistulas 5 months and 9 years after the initial procedure-resulting in a total of 41 endovascular procedures. The 30-day mortality rate was 8% (3 of 37) and the overall follow-up was 29.9 ± 36.6 months (range 0-139 months). All patients with traumatic ruptures demonstrated an immediate sealing of bleeding. Patients with aortobronchial fistulas also demonstrated a

  17. Oriental Medical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis results from the progressive combined narrowing of the central spinal canal, the neurorecesses, and the neuroforaminal canals. In the absence of prior surgery, tumor, or infection, the spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposis posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins, or a combination of two or more of the above factors. Patients with spinal stenosis become symptomatic when pain, motor weakness, paresthesia, or other neurologic compromise causes distress. In one case, we administrated oriental medical treatment with acupuncture treatment and herb-medicine. Oriental medical treatment showed desirable effect on lumbar spinal stenosis.

  18. Prognostic Implications of Raphe in Bicuspid Aortic Valve Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, William K F; Delgado, Victoria; Poh, Kian Keong; Regeer, Madelien V; Ng, Arnold C T; McCormack, Louise; Yeo, Tiong Cheng; Shanks, Miriam; Parent, Sarah; Enache, Roxana; Popescu, Bogdan A; Liang, Michael; Yip, James W; Ma, Lawrence C W; Kamperidis, Vasileios; van Rosendael, Philippe J; van der Velde, Enno T; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Bax, Jeroen J

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about the association between bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) morphologic findings and the degree of valvular dysfunction, presence of aortopathy, and complications, including aortic valve surgery, aortic dissection, and all-cause mortality. To investigate the association between BAV morphologic findings (raphe vs nonraphe) and the degree of valve dysfunction, presence of aortopathy, and prognosis (including need for aortic valve surgery, aortic dissection, and all-cause mortality). In this large international multicenter registry of patients with BAV treated at tertiary referral centers, 2118 patients with BAV were evaluated. Patients referred for echocardiography from June 1, 1991, through November 31, 2015, were included in the study. Clinical and echocardiographic data were analyzed retrospectively. The morphologic BAV findings were categorized according to the Sievers and Schmidtke classification. Aortic valve function was divided into normal, regurgitation, or stenosis. Patterns of BAV aortopathy included the following: type 1, dilation of the ascending aorta and aortic root; type 2, isolated dilation of the ascending aorta; and type 3, isolated dilation of the sinus of Valsalva and/or sinotubular junction. Association between the presence and location of raphe and the risk of significant (moderate and severe) aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dilation and/or dissection. Of the 2118 patients (mean [SD] age, 47 [18] years; 1525 [72.0%] male), 1881 (88.8%) had BAV with fusion raphe, whereas 237 (11.2%) had BAV without raphe. Bicuspid aortic valves with raphe had a significantly higher prevalence of valve dysfunction, with a significantly higher frequency of aortic regurgitation (622 [33.1%] vs 57 [24.1%], P < .001) and aortic stenosis (728 [38.7%] vs 51 [21.5%], P < .001). Furthermore, aortic valve replacement event rates were significantly higher among patients with BAV with raphe (364 [19.9%] at 1 year, 393 [21.4%] at 2 years, and 447

  19. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and incidence of aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, S C; Wolk, A; Bäck, M

    2017-10-01

    Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are modifiable lifestyle factors with important impact on public health. It is unclear whether these factors influence the risk of aortic valve stenosis (AVS). To investigate the associations of alcohol consumption and smoking, including smoking intensity and time since cessation, with AVS incidence in two prospective cohorts. This analysis was based on data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men, comprising 69 365 adults without cardiovascular disease at baseline. Participants were followed for AVS incidence and death by linkage to the Swedish National Patient and Causes of Death Registers. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression. Over a mean follow-up of 15.3 years, 1249 cases of AVS (494 in women and 755 in men) were recorded. Compared with never drinkers of alcohol (lifelong abstainers), the risk of AVS was significantly lower in current light drinkers (1-6 drinks per week [1 drink = 12 g alcohol]; multivariable HR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.68-0.99). The risk of AVS increased with increasing smoking intensity. Compared with never smokers, the HR was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.16-1.85) in current smokers of ≥30 pack-years. Former smokers who had quit smoking 10 or more years previously had similar risk for AVS as never smokers. This study suggests that current light alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of AVS, and indicates that the association between smoking and AVS risk is reversible. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of Internal Medicine.

  20. Percutaneous valved stent repair of a failed homograft: implications for the Ross procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Victor; Jones, Alan; Taylor, Dylan; Coe, Yashu; Ross, David B

    2008-08-01

    A case of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation following a failed homograft in the pulmonary position is reported. A 16-year-old boy developed infective endocarditis of his pulmonary homograft, which was implanted four years earlier during a Ross procedure for congenital aortic stenosis. Following successful medical therapy, the boy was symptomatic due to pulmonary stenosis and regurgitation. A 22 mm Melody valve (Medtronic, USA) was successfully implanted percutaneously. His symptoms resolved and he was discharged home one day after the procedure. Echocardiography at the six-month follow-up demonstrated a normally functioning pulmonary valve. Percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement may make the Ross procedure a more attractive option for patients with aortic stenosis, particularly in the pediatric population.

  1. 16-Detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography in patients undergoing evaluation for aortic valve replacement: comparison with catheter angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manghat, N.E.; Morgan-Hughes, G.J.; Broadley, A.J.; Undy, M.B.; Wright, D.; Marshall, A.J.; Roobottom, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 16-detector row computed tomography (CT) in assessing haemodynamically significant coronary artery stenoses in patients under evaluation for aortic stenosis pre-aortic valve replacement. Subjects and methods: Forty consecutive patients under evaluation for severe aortic stenosis and listed for cardiac catheterization before potential aortic valve replacement underwent coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring and retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector row computed tomographic coronary angiography (MDCTA) using a GE Lightspeed 16-detector row CT within 1 month of invasive coronary angiography (ICA) for comparative purposes. All 13 major coronary artery segments of the American Heart Association model were evaluated for the presence of ≥50% stenosis and compared to the reference standard. Data were analysed on a segment-by-segment basis and also in 'whole patient' terms. Results: A total of 412/450 segments from 35 patients were suitable for analysis. The overall accuracy of MDCTA for detection of segments with ≥50% stenosis was high, with a sensitivity of 81.3%, specificity 95.0%, positive predictive value (PPV) 57.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 98.4%. On a 'whole-patient' basis, 100% (19/19) of patients with significant coronary disease were correctly identified and there were no false-negatives. Excluding patients with CAC >1000 from the analysis improved the accuracy of MDCTA to: sensitivity 90%, specificity 98.1%, PPV 60%, NPV 99.7%. Conclusion: Non-invasive 16-detector row MDCTA accurately excludes significant coronary disease in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing evaluation before aortic valve replacement and in whom ICA can therefore be avoided. Its segment-by-segment accuracy is improved further if CAC > 1000 is used as a gatekeeper to MDCTA

  2. Cirurgia de preservação da valva aórtica em idosos com estenose aórtica Aortic valve preservation surgery in elderly patients with aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Coelho Segalote

    2008-12-01

    (AV in aortic stenosis (AS at elderly people. METHODS: Thirty-two patients operated for pure AS, older than 65 years-old were studied at InCor FMUSP. Early and late results, clinical (ambulatory and phone interview and echocardiographic follow-up were investigated. Actuarial and event-free survival analysis was done using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Four patients (15.4% had presented de novo AV stenosis. Five patients had progressed to moderate and two to serious aortic regurgitation. Demineralization, commissurotomy and rough-hewing were realized in 28, 20 and 16 patients, respectively. Nine patients had presented serious postoperative complications (28.1%. Two hospital-acquired pneumonia sepsis and five late deaths had occurred. Postoperative NYHA functional status were 70.5%, 17.6%, 5.8% and 5.8% for functional classes I, II, III and IV, respectively. Actuarial eight-year survival rate was 66.9 ± 12.1%. Eight-year free thromboembolism and endocarditis rate were 90.9 ± 8.7% and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Aortic valve preservation surgery at the aged with AS was revealed a low morbidity and mortality procedure and presented an eight-year acceptable survival rate and functional status improvement among the studied series of patients.

  3. Cardiac taurine and principal amino acids in right and left ventricles of patients with either aortic valve stenosis or coronary artery disease:the importance of diabetes and gender

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Martin J; Littlejohns, Ben R; Lin, Hua; Angelini, Gianni D; Suleiman, M-Saadeh

    2014-01-01

    Free intracellular taurine and principal α-amino acids (glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, asparagine and alanine) are abundant in human heart. They are cellular regulators and their concentration can change in response to disease and cardiac insults and have been shown to differ between hypertrophic left ventricle (LV) and the relatively "normal" right ventricle (RV) in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AVS). This difference has not been shown for coronary artery disease (CAD) and there are...

  4. Usefulness of abdominal aortic calcification for screening of peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chul Hi; Kim, Jeong Ho; Choi, Soo Jin; Kim, Hyung Sik; Jin, Wook; Yang, Dal Mo

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the value of abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), as detected on CT, as a predictor of atherosclerotic stenotic disease of the lower extremity arteries. One hundred three patients who had CT angiography performed for the evaluation of peripheral vascular disease were enrolled in this retrospective study. The volume (mm 3 ) of the AAC was measured on CT. Each lower extremity was divided into 8 segments. The extent of stenosis of the lower extremity artery was manifested as the sum of the stenosis scores for 16 segments (total stenosis score: TSS). The significant stenosis scores (SSS-50 and SSS-75) were defined as the sum of scores for the lower extremity artery segments that had significant stenosis of more than 50% and 75%, respectively. AAC was correlated to the TSS, SSS-50 and SSS-75 with using Spearman's correlation coefficient. The diagnostic performance of AAC for stenosis of a lower extremity artery of more than 50% and 75%, respectively, was evaluated by using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The Spearman's correlation coefficients were 0.728 (AAC vs. TSS), 0.662 (AAC vs. SSS-50), and 0.602 (AAC vs. SSS-75), respectively. For significant stenosis more than 50% and 75%, the areas under the ROC curve were 0.898 and 0.866, respectively. The cutoff value, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were 1030 mm 3 , 87%, 88%, 89%. 86% and 87% for stenosis more than 50% and 1030 mm 3 , 87%, 80%, 79%, 88% and 84% for stenosis more than 75%, respectively. Abdominal aortic calcification detected on CT may be a useful predictor of atherosclerotic stenotic disease of lower extremity arteries

  5. Prevalence, predictors, and prognostic implications of residual impairment of functional capacity after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Abdelghani (Mohammad); R. Cavalcante (Rafael); Y. Miyazaki (Yosuke); R.J. de Winter (Robbert); R. Sarmento-Leite (Rogerio); J.A. Mangione (José A.); A.C. Abizaid (Alexandre); P.A. Lemos Neto (Pedro); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); F.S. De Brito Jr. (Fabio)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractBackground: Patients with degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) typically have advanced cardiac and vascular adverse remodeling and multiple comorbidities and, therefore, might not recover a normal functional capacity after

  6. Left ventricular function in patients with ventricular arrhythmias and aortic valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1983-01-01

    Forty patients having aortic valve replacement were evaluated preoperatively for ventricular arrhythmia and left ventricular ejection fraction. Arrhythmias were classified as complex or simple using the Lown criteria on the 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram; ejection fractions were determined by radionuclide gated blood pool analysis and contrast angiography. The ejection fractions determined by radionuclide angiography were 59.1 +/- 13.1% for 26 patients with simple or no ventricular arrhythmias, and 43.9 +/- 20.3% for 14 patients with complex ventricular arrhythmias (p less than 0.01). Ejection fractions determined by angiography, available for 31 patients, were also lower in patients with complex ventricular arrhythmias (61.1 +/- 16.3% versus 51.4 +/- 13.4%; p less than 0.05). Seven of 9 patients showing conduction abnormalities on the electrocardiogram had complex ventricular arrhythmias. Eight of 20 patients with aortic stenosis had complex ventricular arrhythmias, while 2 of 13 patients with aortic insufficiency had such arrhythmias. It is concluded that decreased left ventricular ejection fraction, intraventricular conduction abnormalities, and aortic stenosis are associated with an increased frequency of complex ventricular arrhythmias in patients with aortic valve disease

  7. Usefulness of 3-Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of aortic stenosis severity in routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Franck; Iacuzio, Laura; Civaia, Filippo; Rusek, Stephane; Dommerc, Carine; Hugues, Nicolas; Alexandrescu, Clara; Dor, Vincent; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Dreyfus, Gilles

    2016-11-01

    Recently, 1.5-Tesla cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) was reported to provide a reliable alternative to transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for the quantification of aortic stenosis (AS) severity. Few data are available using higher magnetic field strength MRI systems in this context. To evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of the assessment of aortic valve area (AVA) using 3-Tesla CMR in routine clinical practice, and to assess concordance between TTE and CMR for the estimation of AS severity. Ninety-one consecutive patients (60 men; mean age 74±10years) with known AS documented by TTE were included prospectively in the study. All patients underwent comprehensive TTE and CMR examination, including AVA estimation using the TTE continuity equation (0.81±0.18cm 2 ), direct CMR planimetry (CMRp) (0.90±0.22cm 2 ) and CMR using Hakki's formula (CMRhk), a simplified Gorlin formula (0.70±0.19cm 2 ). Although significant agreement with TTE was found for CMRp (r=0.72) and CMRhk (r=0.66), CMRp slightly overestimated (bias=0.11±0.18cm 2 ) and CMRhk slightly underestimated (bias=-0.11±0.17cm 2 ) AVA compared with TTE. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibilities of CMR measurements were excellent (r=0.72 and r=0.74 for CMRp and r=0.88 and r=0.92 for peak aortic velocity, respectively). 3-Tesla CMR is a feasible, radiation-free, reproducible imaging modality for the estimation of severity of AS in routine practice, knowing that CMRp tends to overestimate AVA and CMRhk to underestimate AVA compared with TTE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Initial experience of two national centers in transcatheter aortic prosthesis implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluberas, Sebastián; Abizaid, Alexandre; Siqueira, Dimytri; Ramos, Auristela; Costa, J Ribamar; Arrais, Magaly; Kambara, Antônio; Bihan, David Le; Sousa, Amanda; Sousa, J Eduardo

    2014-04-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an effective alternative to surgical treatment of severe aortic stenosis in patients who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. To report the immediate and follow-up clinical and echocardiographic results of the initial experience of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. From 2009 June to 2013 February, 112 patients underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Mean age was 82.5 ± 6.5 years, and the logistic EuroSCORE was 23.6 ± 13.5. Procedural success was 84%. After the intervention, a reduction in the mean systolic gradient was observed (pre: 54.7 ± 15.3 vs. post: 11.7 ± 4.0 mmHg; p < 0.01). Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 3.6%, vascular complications in 19% and permanent pacemaker was required by 13% of the patients. Thirty-day mortality and at follow-up of 16 ± 11 months was 14% and 8.9% respectively. The presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the only predictor of mortality at 30 days and at follow-up. During follow up, aortic valve area and mean systolic gradient did not change significantly. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an effective and safe procedure for the treatment of aortic stenosis in high-surgical risk or inoperable patients. The presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the only independent predictor of mortality identified both in the first month post-intervention and at follow-up.

  9. Prevalence, predictors, and prognostic implications of residual impairment of functional capacity after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdelghani, Mohammad; Cavalcante, Rafael; Miyazaki, Yosuke; de Winter, Robbert J.; Sarmento-Leite, Rogério; Mangione, José A.; Abizaid, Alexandre; Lemos, Pedro A.; Serruys, Patrick W.; de Brito, Fabio S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) typically have advanced cardiac and vascular adverse remodeling and multiple comorbidities and, therefore, might not recover a normal functional capacity after valve replacement. We

  10. 3D echocardiographic analysis of aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve replacement using novel aortic valve quantification software: Comparison with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediratta, Anuj; Addetia, Karima; Medvedofsky, Diego; Schneider, Robert J; Kruse, Eric; Shah, Atman P; Nathan, Sandeep; Paul, Jonathan D; Blair, John E; Ota, Takeyoshi; Balkhy, Husam H; Patel, Amit R; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS), computed tomography (CT) remains the standard for annulus sizing. However, 3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been an alternative in patients with contraindications to CT. We sought to (1) test the feasibility, accuracy, and reproducibility of prototype 3DTEE analysis software (Philips) for aortic annular measurements and (2) compare the new approach to the existing echocardiographic techniques. We prospectively studied 52 patients who underwent gated contrast CT, procedural 3DTEE, and TAVR. 3DTEE images were analyzed using novel semi-automated software designed for 3D measurements of the aortic root, which uses multiplanar reconstruction, similar to CT analysis. Aortic annulus measurements included area, perimeter, and diameter calculations from these measurements. The results were compared to CT-derived values. Additionally, 3D echocardiographic measurements (3D planimetry and mitral valve analysis software adapted for the aortic valve) were also compared to the CT reference values. 3DTEE image quality was sufficient in 90% of patients for aortic annulus measurements using the new software, which were in good agreement with CT (r-values: .89-.91) and small (software can accurately measure aortic annulus in patients with severe AS undergoing TAVR, in better agreement with CT than the existing methodology. Accordingly, intra-procedural TEE could potentially replace CT in patients where CT carries significant risk. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Coronary heart disease risk assessment and characterization of coronary artery disease using coronary CT angiography: comparison of asymptomatic and symptomatic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.; Kim, Y.; Chung, I.-M.; Ryu, J.; Park, H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in relation to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and assess plaque characteristics from coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Materials and methods: Three hundred and ninety consecutive patients [asymptomatic group, n = 138; symptomatic group (atypical or non-anginal chest pain), n = 252] were retrospectively enrolled. They were subsequently classified into three CHD risk categories, based on the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines, and 10 year risks of coronary events were calculated using Framingham risk score. CT was evaluated for stenosis, plaque composition, and coronary calcium scores. Results: CAD was observed in 42% of the asymptomatic group and 62% of the symptomatic group. In the former, the prevalence of CAD in low-, moderate- and high-risk subgroups was 21.4, 47.4 and 65%, respectively, and was 33.3, 74.4, and 72.4% in the symptomatic group. Framingham 10-year risks of coronary events were significantly higher in patients with CAD than in normal participants, and receiver operating characteristics curves showed that discriminatory power was poor in the asymptomatic group and symptomatic men, and good in symptomatic women. Of the participants in the asymptomatic group, 12% exhibited only non-calcified plaques and of the symptomatic group, 7% exhibited only non-calcified plaques. The coronary calcium score was significantly higher for significant stenosis than for non-significant stenosis in both groups. Conclusions: The prevalence of CAD was not negligible even in subgroups with low-to-moderate CHD risk. Additionally, the Framingham risk score was effective for predicting CAD only in symptomatic women. Coronary calcium scores correlated with significant stenosis; however, a sizeable percentage of both groups had only non-calcified plaques.

  12. The effect of varying degrees of stenosis on the characteristics of turbulent pulsatile flow through heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestein, D; Einav, S

    1995-08-01

    Many problems and complications associated with heart valves are related to the dynamic behavior of the valve and the resultant unsteady flow patterns. An accurate depiction of the spatial and temporal velocity and rms distributions imparts better understanding of flow related valve complications, and may be used as a guideline in valve design. While the generalized correlation between increased turbulence level and the severity of the stenosis is well established, few studies addressed the issue of the intermittent nature of turbulence and its timing in the cardiac cycle, and almost none assessed the effect of a progressive stenosis on the flow characteristics through heart valves. In this experimental work we simulated the type of flow which is present in normal and stenosed valves and conducted a comprehensive investigation of valve hemodynamics, valvular turbulence and morphology under varying degrees of stenosis. The characteristics of valves and stenoses were simulated closely, to achieve the flow conditions that initiate turbulent flow conditions. Laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were carried out in a pulse duplicator system distal to trileaflet polyurethane prosthetic heart valves, installed at mitral and aortic positions. The effect of the degree of the stenosis was comparatively studied through the structure of the turbulent jets emerging from normal and stenotic heart valves. Maximum turbulence level was achieved during the decelerating phase and correlated to the severity of the stenosis, followed by relaminarization of the flow during the acceleration phase. The intermittent nature of the turbulence emphasized the importance of realizing the timing of the turbulence production and its spatial location for optimizing current valve designs. The plug flow through the normal aortic valve prosthesis was replaced by jet like behavior for a 65% stenosis, with the jet becoming narrower and stronger for a 90% stenosis. The morphology of the velocity

  13. Hoarseness —As a presenting feature of aortic arch aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Mathai, John; Swapna, U. P.

    2006-01-01

    Hoarseness due to left recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (LRLN) caused by identifiable cardiovascular disease is described as Ortner’s syndrome or Cardiovocal syndrome. This was first described by Ortner in 1897 to describe left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy secondary to Mitral Stenosis. The common conditions which gave rise to Ortners’ syndrome include mitral stenosis, mitral valve prolapse, aortic aneurysm, septal defect, following cardiothoracic surgery, high altitude pulmonary hyperte...

  14. Morphological and Functional Evaluation of Quadricuspid Aortic Valves Using Cardiac Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Inyoung; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Ko, Sung Min [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV.

  15. Morphological and functional evaluation of quadricuspid aortic valves using cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, In Young; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Ko, Sung Min; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; KIm, Jun Seok [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV.

  16. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations may...... be atypical causing a delay in the diagnosis and treatment. The management is also complicated by their comorbidities, and surgical treatment may not be feasible leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of an 85-year-old man with TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis successfully...

  17. Investigation into drivers of cost of stenting for carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Brinjikji, Waleed; Cloft, Harry; DeMartino, Randall R; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to identify factors associated with cost of carotid artery stenting (CAS). Patient and hospital characteristics affecting cost of admission for CAS were identified using the Vizient national database of hospital-reported outcomes. Patients who underwent CAS for either asymptomatic or symptomatic carotid stenosis were identified using surgical Medicare Severity-Diagnosis Related Groups and appropriate International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision and Tenth Revision codes. There were 166 hospitals that reported outcomes from 7369 inpatient admissions for CAS. Each institution reported a mean value for cost related to patient care per admission for CAS; the average cost across all reporting institutions was $12,834.14 (standard error of the mean [SEM], 492.88). Institutions in the lowest 25th percentile with respect to frequency of intensive care unit admission after CAS had lower cost of admission than institutions above the 75th percentile ($10,971.30 [SEM, 460.67] vs $14,992.90 [964.29]; P = .002), without any differences in incidence of stroke during admission (2.2% [SEM, 0.3] vs 2.0% [0.4]; P = .877) or 30-day readmission (1.9% [SEM, 0.4] vs 2.5 [0.6]; P = .329). Admissions for patients with symptomatic stenosis were more expensive than those with asymptomatic stenosis ($20,462.10 [SEM, 819.93] vs $11,285.20 [347.11]; P costs of admission ($14,176.20 [SEM, 597.13] vs $12,287.10 [395.73]; P care unit, symptomatic stenosis, and obesity were associated with increased costs in patients undergoing CAS. These data may aid in identifying opportunities to improve the cost-effectiveness of this procedure. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fully Covered Metallic Stents for the Treatment of Benign Airway Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlqvist, Caroline; Ocak, Sebahat; Gourdin, Maximilien; Dincq, Anne Sophie; Putz, Laurie; d’Odémont, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We herein report our experience with new fully covered self-expanding metallic stents in the setting of inoperable recurrent benign tracheobronchial stenosis. Methods. Between May 2010 and July 2014, 21 Micro-Tech® FC-SEMS (Nanjing Co., Republic of Korea) were placed in our hospital in 16 patients for inoperable, recurrent (after dilatation), and symptomatic benign airway stenosis. Their medical files were retrospectively reviewed in December 2014, with focus on stent’s toleranc...

  19. Could circulating fetuin A be a biomarker of aortic valve stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Minno, Alessandro; Zanobini, Marco; Myasoedova, Veronika A; Valerio, Vincenza; Songia, Paola; Saccocci, Matteo; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Tremoli, Elena; Poggio, Paolo

    2017-12-15

    Aortic valve stenosis (AVS) is a multifactorial-progressive pathological process. In the past decades, many studies have focus their attention on circulating biomarkers able to identify AVS and/or to predict its progression. One of the many biomarkers studied is the fetuin A. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the correlation between fetuin A levels and end-stage AVS. A systematic search was performed in three electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus), looking for studies that compared control subjects with AVS patients and that have measured fetuin A circulating levels in both groups. The main outcome was to evaluate the difference in circulating fetuin A concentration in the two groups. Seven studies, enrolling 2283 AVS patients and 1549 controls, were included. Differences between control subjects and AVS patients were expressed as standardized mean difference (SMD) with pertinent 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) and standard deviation (SD), analysing the data using a random effect model. We found significantly lower circulating levels of fetuin A in AVS patients compared to healthy subjects (SMD: -0.96μg/mL, 95% CI: -1.62, -0.30; p=0.004). In addition, meta-regression analyses showed that several cardiovascular risk factors were significantly associated with circulating levels of fetuin A between patients affected by AVS and healthy controls. In conclusion, our meta-analysis shows that AVS patients have significant lower circulating levels of fetuin A compared to control subjects. However, dedicated studies with large and matched cohorts are needed to validate these findings, evaluating if there is a real link or just a mere association. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A study on the risk of subaortic and pulmonic stenosis and on genetic aspects of echocardiography measurements in the Italian Boxer dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bittante

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subaortic and pulmonic stenosis are congenital cardiac defects affecting several dog breeds (Jacobs, 1990; Buchanan, 1992; Tidholm, 1997. Subaortic stenosis (SAS is characterized by a fibrous ring of tissue placed immediately below the aortic valve.

  1. Single-center experience using the Freedom SOLO aortic bioprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Dimitrios C; Deveja, Aris Rezar; Androutsopoulou, Vasiliki; Filias, Vasilios; Kastelanos, Eleftherios; Satratzemis, Vasilios; Khalpey, Zain; Koudoumas, Dimitrios

    2013-07-01

    This study reviews a single institution experience with the Freedom SOLO (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy) aortic bioprosthesis. Between October 2006 and February 2010, 128 patients (64 men, 64 women; mean age, 75.8 ± 5.1 years) underwent aortic valve replacement using the Freedom SOLO stentless aortic valve. The follow-up time was 36.7 ± 1.2 months and 100% complete. Concomitant procedures were performed in 77 patients (60%). The mean standard European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation was 9 ± 2.7. Grade 3 aortic stenosis was present in 73% of patients, mixed aortic stenosis and regurgitation were present in 40% of patients, and mitral regurgitation was present in 46% of patients. The mean crossclamp time was 53 ± 12 minutes for isolated Freedom SOLO aortic valve implantation and 80 ± 28 minutes for concomitant procedures, and the mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 103 ± 31 minutes. The mean implanted valve size was 22.6 ± 1.4 mm. The mean intensive care unit and hospital stays were 2.4 ± 1.1 days and 8.8 ± 2.6 days, respectively. Three patients underwent reoperation for bleeding. The 15-day, 30-day, and perioperative mortality were all 4.6%. The 36-month survival was 95.4% ± 1.6% for the cohort with a low European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (9). Echocardiographic data preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively showed peak transvalvular gradients of 75 ± 23, 17 ± 6, 18 ± 6.5, 16 ± 6, and 16 ± 9 mm Hg, respectively (P SOLO stentless aortic valve has excellent early and intermediate-term results. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  2. Arch reconstruction with autologous pulmonary artery patch in interrupted aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Young; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique.

  3. Impact of Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch on Long-term Functional Capacity After Mechanical Aortic Valve Replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petit-Eisenmann, H.; Epailly, E.; Velten, M.; Radojevic, J.; Eisenmann, B.; Kremer, H.; Kindo, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis on exercise capacity remains controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term impact of PPM after mechanical AVR on maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). METHODS: The study

  4. LV reverse remodeling imparted by aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis; is it durable? A cardiovascular MRI study sponsored by the American Heart Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caruppannan Ketheswaram

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS, long-term data tracking surgically induced effects of afterload reduction on reverse LV remodeling are not available. Echocardiographic data is available short term, but in limited fashion beyond one year. Cardiovascular MRI (CMR offers the ability to serially track changes in LV metrics with small numbers due to its inherent high spatial resolution and low variability. Hypothesis We hypothesize that changes in LV structure and function following aortic valve replacement (AVR are detectable by CMR and once triggered by AVR, continue for an extended period. Methods Tweny-four patients of which ten (67 ± 12 years, 6 female with severe, but compensated AS underwent CMR pre-AVR, 6 months, 1 year and up to 4 years post-AVR. 3D LV mass index, volumetrics, LV geometry, and EF were measured. Results All patients survived AVR and underwent CMR 4 serial CMR's. LVMI markedly decreased by 6 months (157 ± 42 to 134 ± 32 g/m2, p 2. Similarly, EF increased pre to post-AVR (55 ± 22 to 65 ± 11%,(p 2. LV stroke volume increased rapidly from pre to post-AVR (40 ± 11 to 44 ± 7 ml, p Conclusion After initial beneficial effects imparted by AVR in severe AS patients, there are, as expected, marked improvements in LV reverse remodeling. Via CMR, surgically induced benefits to LV structure and function are durable and, unexpectedly express continued, albeit markedly incomplete improvement through 4 years post-AVR concordant with sustained improved clinical status. This supports down-regulation of both mRNA and MMP activity acutely with robust suppression long term.

  5. Association of aortic and main left coronary aneurysms with severe aortic insufficiency in Takayasu’s arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ferraz de Freitas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu’s arteritis is a granulomatous vasculitis of unknown etiology that affects mainly the aorta and its branches. As a result of intimal fibroproliferation, segmental stenosis, occlusion, dilatation, and aneurysmal formation of the involved vessels may develop. It is an uncommon disease and usually affects young Asian female patients during the second and third decades of life. Coronary arteries are exceptionally affected and coronary aneurysm formation is a very rare finding. We describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old Caucasian female whose Takayasu’s arteritis presented as a previously undescribed association of aortic and main left coronary aneurysms with severe aortic insufficiency.

  6. Association of aortic and main left coronary aneurysms with severe aortic insufficiency in Takayasu’s arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli; Ferraz de Freitas, Marcelo; Valladão de Carvalho, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Takayasu’s arteritis is a granulomatous vasculitis of unknown etiology that affects mainly the aorta and its branches. As a result of intimal fibroproliferation, segmental stenosis, occlusion, dilatation, and aneurysmal formation of the involved vessels may develop. It is an uncommon disease and usually affects young Asian female patients during the second and third decades of life. Coronary arteries are exceptionally affected and coronary aneurysm formation is a very rare finding. We describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old Caucasian female whose Takayasu’s arteritis presented as a previously undescribed association of aortic and main left coronary aneurysms with severe aortic insufficiency. PMID:24765288

  7. Mid-term study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation in an Asian population with severe aortic stenosis: two-year Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Nicholas; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Yip, Wei Luen James; Chan, Siew Pang; Poh, Kian-Keong; Kong, William Kok-Fai; Teoh, Kristine Leok Kheng; Yeo, Tiong Cheng; Tan, Huay Cheem; Tay, Edgar Lik Wui

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an effective treatment for high-risk or inoperative patients with severe aortic stenosis. Given the unique characteristics of Asian populations, questions regarding mid-term outcomes in Asians undergoing TAVI have yet to be addressed. We evaluated the two-year clinical outcomes of TAVI in an Asian population using Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definitions. This prospective study recruited 59 patients from a major academic medical centre in Singapore. The main outcomes were two-year survival rates, peri-procedural complications, symptom improvement, valvular function and assessment of learning curve. Mean age was 76.8 years (61.0% male), mean body surface area 1.6 m 2 and mean logistic EuroSCORE 18.7%. Survival was 93.2%, 86.0% and 79.1% at 30 days, one year and two years, respectively. At 30 days post TAVI, the rate of stroke was 1.7%, life-threatening bleeding 5.1%, acute kidney injury 25.0%, major vascular complication 5.1%, and new permanent pacemaker implantation 6.8%. 29.3% of TAVI patients were rehospitalised (47.1% cardiovascular-related) within one year. These composite outcomes were measured: device success (93.2%); early safety (79.7%); clinical efficacy (66.1%); and time-related valve safety (84.7%). Univariate analysis found these predictors of two-year all-cause mortality: logistic EuroSCORE (hazard ratio [HR] 1.07; p < 0.001); baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (HR 0.97; p = 0.048); and acute kidney injury (HR 5.33; p = 0.022). Multivariate analysis identified non-transfemoral TAVI as a predictor of cardiovascular-related two-year mortality (HR 14.64; p = 0.008). Despite the unique clinical differences in Asian populations, this registry demonstrated favourable mid-term clinical and safety outcomes in Asians undergoing TAVI. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  8. Symptomatic carotid stenosis and stroke risk in patients with transient ischemic attack according to the tissue-based definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaled, Mohamed; Scheef, Björn

    2016-10-01

    Symptomatic carotid stenosis (sCS), a common cause of transient ischemic attack (TIA), is correlated with higher stroke risk. We investigated the frequency and associated factors of sCS in patients with TIA and the association between sCS and stroke risk following TIA. Over a three-year period (2011-2013), 861 consecutive patients with TIA, who were admitted to the Department of Neurology at the University of Lübeck, Germany, were included in a monocenter study and prospectively evaluated. Diagnosis of TIA was in accordance with the tissue-based definition (transient neurological symptoms without evidence of infarction by brain imaging). Of 827 patients (mean age, 70 ± 13.2 years; 49.7% women), 64 patients (7.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9%-9.7%) exhibited sCS and 3 patients (0.3%) showed an occlusion of the corresponding internal carotid artery. Logistic regression revealed that sCS was associated with male sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2-3.6; p = 0.012), amaurosis fugax (OR, 8.1; 95% CI, 3.4-19-4; p definition.

  9. Renal artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desberg, A.; Paushter, D.M.; Lammert, G.K.; Hale, J.; Troy, R.; Novic, A.; Nally, J. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Renal artery disease is a potentially correctable cause of hypertension. Previous studies have suggested the utility of duplex sonography in accurately detecting and grading the severity of renal artery stenosis. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate color flow Doppler for this use. Forty-three kidneys were examined by color-flow Doppler and conventional duplex sampling in patients with suspected renovascular hypertension or those undergoing aortography for unrelated reasons. Doppler tracings were obtained from the renal arteries and aorta with calculation of the renal aortic ratio (RAR) and resistive index (RI). Results of Doppler sampling with color flow guidance were compared with aortograms in a blinded fashion

  10. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ULTRASOUND AND STENOSIS OF INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Flis

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Elucidation of the ultrasound structure of the atherosclerotic plaque in stenosis of internal carotid artery may have important implications for carotid surgery. This study compares the ability of computer derived 3D ultrasound gray scale volumetric measurements to diferentiate between ultrasonic structure of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid plaque causing more than 70% stenosis.Methods. Eightysix internal carotid artery stenoses (70–99%, 45 symptomatic, 41 asymptomatic were imaged with 3D ultrasound to obtain the whole volume of the atherosclerotic plaque. Digitalized sonograms were computerized and normalized to the gray scale median (GSM of blood (0 and vessel adventitia (200. Plaque GSM was obtained for the whole volume by computing the volume ratio between echolucent and echogenic areas. The plaque heterogeneity was obtained by computing the density of echogenic areas per volume unit. Parametric t test was used for statistic analysis.Results. Minimum volume GSM ratio (determining echolucency was higher for asymptomatic plaque (0.6 – CI 0.48– 0.91 versus 0.3 – CI 0.21–0.75: p = 0.002. Greater GSM heterogeneity was present in symptomatic plaque (6.8 – CI 2.5– 18.3 versus 0.41 – CI 0.2–3.4;.p = 0.0001.Conclusions. Volume ultrasound imaging that enables objective assessment of whole ultrasonic plaque structure is more sensitive that single longitudinal view sonography for differentiating between ultrasonic structure of symptomatic and asymptomatic plaque.

  11. Intracranial arterial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marta; Oliveira, Ana; Azevedo, Elsa; Bastos-Leite, António J

    2014-04-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS) is usually attributable to atherosclerosis and corresponds to the most common cause of stroke worldwide. It is very prevalent among African, Asian, and Hispanic populations. Advancing age, systolic hypertension, diabetes mellitus, high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and metabolic syndrome are some of its major risk factors. IAS may be associated with transient or definite neurological symptoms or can be clinically asymptomatic. Transcranial Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography are the most frequently used ancillary examinations for screening and follow-up. Computed tomography angiography can either serve as a screening tool for the detection of IAS or increasingly as a confirmatory test approaching the diagnostic accuracy of catheter digital subtraction angiography, which is still considered the gold (confirmation) standard. The risk of stroke in patients with asymptomatic atherosclerotic IAS is low (up to 6% over a mean follow-up period of approximately 2 years), but the annual risk of stroke recurrence in the presence of a symptomatic stenosis may exceed 20% when the degree of luminal narrowing is 70% or more, recently after an ischemic event, and in women. It is a matter of controversy whether there is a specific type of treatment other than medical management (including aggressive control of vascular risk factors and antiplatelet therapy) that may alter the high risk of stroke recurrence among patients with symptomatic IAS. Endovascular treatment has been thought to be helpful in patients who fail to respond to medical treatment alone, but recent data contradict such expectation. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: correlation with Oswestry Disability Index and MR Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Sirvanci, Mustafa; Bhatia, Mona; Ganiyusufoglu, Kursat Ali; Duran, Cihan; Tezer, Mehmet; Ozturk, Cagatay; Aydogan, Mehmet; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2008-01-01

    Because neither the degree of constriction of the spinal canal considered to be symptomatic for lumbar spinal stenosis nor the relationship between the clinical appearance and the degree of a radiologically verified constriction is clear, a correlation of patient’s disability level and radiographic constriction of the lumbar spinal canal is of interest. The aim of this study was to establish a relationship between the degree of radiologically established anatomical stenosis and the severity o...

  13. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; De Backer, Ole; Thyregod, Hans G H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an advancing mode of treatment for inoperable or high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) after TAVI is a serious complication, but only limited data exist on its incidence, outcome, and procedural......%) were treated conservatively and 1 with surgery. Four patients (22%) died from endocarditis or complications to treatment, 2 of those (11%) during initial hospitalization for PVE. An increased risk of TAVI-PVE was seen in patients with low implanted valve position (hazard ratio, 2.8 [1.1-7.2]), moderate...

  14. [Pannus Formation Two Years after Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Implantation;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kimiyo; Kuroda, Hiroaki

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of early deterioration of the bioprosthetic aortic valve 23 months postoperatively. A 77-year-old man who had undergone aortic valve replacement with a 23-mm Epic valve( St. Jude Medical [SJM])presented to us after a syncopal episode. Echocardiography revealed severe aortic stenosis, and redo aortic valve replacement with a 21-mm SJM mechanical valve was performed. All 3 cusps of the tissue valve were thickened by fibrous pannus overgrowth. Neither calcification nor invasion of inflammatory cells was observed. The cause of pannus formation at such an early stage after implantation remains unknown.

  15. The German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY): a nationwide registry for patients undergoing invasive therapy for severe aortic valve stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, A; Hamm, C; Figulla, H R; Cremer, J; Kuck, K H; Lange, R; Zahn, R; Sack, S; Schuler, G C; Walther, T; Beyersdorf, F; Böhm, M; Heusch, G; Funkat, A K; Meinertz, T; Neumann, T; Papoutsis, K; Schneider, S; Welz, A; Mohr, F W

    2012-07-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of severe aortic valve defects correlates with the increase of life expectancy. For decades, surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR), under the use of extracorporeal circulation, has been the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic valve diseases. In Germany ~12,000 patients receive isolated aortic valve surgery per year. For some time, percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty has been used as a palliative therapeutic option for very few patients. Currently, alternatives for the established surgical procedures such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have become available, but there are only limited data from randomized studies or low-volume registries concerning long-time outcome. In Germany, the implementation of this new technology into hospital care increased rapidly in the past few years. Therefore, the German Aortic Valve Registry (GARY) was founded in July 2010 including all available therapeutic options and providing data from a large quantity of patients.Methods The GARY is assembled as a complete survey for all invasive therapies in patients with relevant aortic valve diseases. It evaluates the new therapeutic options and compares them to surgical AVR. The model for data acquisition is based on three data sources: source I, the mandatory German database for external performance measurement; source II, a specific registry dataset; and source III, a follow-up data sheet (generated by phone interview). Various procedures will be compared concerning observed complications, mortality, and quality of life up to 5 years after the initial procedure. Furthermore, the registry will enable a compilation of evidence-based indication criteria and, in addition, also a comparison of all approved operative procedures, such as Ross or David procedures, and the use of different mechanical or biological aortic valve prostheses.Results Since the launch of data acquisition in July 2010, almost all institutions performing

  16. The JUPITER registry: One-year outcomes of transapical aortic valve implantation using a second generation transcatheter heart valve for aortic regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaschi, Miriam; Conradi, Lenard; Wendler, Olaf; Schlingloff, Friederike; Kappert, Utz; Rastan, Ardawan J; Baumbach, Hardy; Holzhey, David; Eichinger, Walter; Bader, Ralf; Treede, Hendrik

    2018-06-01

    We present 1-year outcomes of the post-market registry of a next-generation transcatheter heart valve used for aortic regurgitation (AR). Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is routine in high-risk patients with aortic stenosis but is not recommended for AR. The JenaValve™ (JenaValve Technology GmbH, Munich, Germany) overcomes technical challenges in AR patients through a leaflet clipping mechanism. The JenaValve EvalUation of Long Term Performance and Safety In PaTients with SEvere Aortic Stenosis oR Aortic Insufficiency (JUPITER) Registry is a European study to evaluate safety and effectiveness of this THV. From 2012-2015, 30 patients with AR were enrolled. Mean age was 74.4 ± 9.3 years. Procedural success was 96.7% (29/30). One patient was converted to open surgery. No annular rupture or coronary ostia obstruction occurred. Mortality at 30 days was 10.0% (3/30). Combined safety endpoint was met in 13.3% (4/30). Paravalvular regurgitation was not present/trivial in 84.6% (22/26) and mild in 15.4% (4/26). Rate of permanent pacemaker implantation was 3.8% (1/26). One-year Kaplan-Meier survival was 79.9%, one-year combined efficacy was 73.1% (19/30). No further strokes were observed during 1 year of follow-up. The JenaValve overcomes technical challenges of TAVR in AR through a clipping mechanism. We report satisfactory outcomes of a multicenter registry using the JenaValve for predominant AR, as rate of THV embolization, residual AR and permanent pacemaker implantation was low. One-year results using the JenaValve for AR encourage its use for this indication. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of the temporary placement of a self-expandable metallic stent in benign pyloric stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Jae; Park, Jong-Jae; Park, Jain; Lim, Eun-Hye; Joo, Moon Kyung; Yun, Jae-Won; Noh, Hyejin; Kim, Sung Ho; Choi, Woo Seok; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Kim, Jae Seon; Byun, Kwan Soo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2013-07-01

    The use of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) is an established palliative treatment for malignant stenosis in the gastrointestinal tract; therefore, its application to benign stenosis is expected to be beneficial because of the more gradual and sustained dilatation in the stenotic portion. We aimed in this prospective observational study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of temporary SEMS placement in benign pyloric stenosis. Twenty-two patients with benign stenosis of the prepylorus, pylorus, and duodenal bulb were enrolled and underwent SEMS placement. We assessed symptom improvement, defined as an increase of at least 1 degree in the gastric-outlet-obstruction scoring system after stent insertion. No major complications were observed during the procedures. After stent placement, early symptom improvement was achieved in 18 of 22 patients (81.8%). During the follow-up period (mean 10.2 months), the stents remained in place successfully for 6 to 8 weeks in seven patients (31.8%). Among the 15 patients (62.5%) with stent migration, seven (46.6%) showed continued symptomatic improvement without recurrence of obstructive symptoms. Despite the symptomatic improvement, temporary SEMS placement is premature as an effective therapeutic tool for benign pyloric stenosis unless a novel stent is developed to prevent migration.

  18. Aortic coarctation diagnosed by renal Doppler flow patterns in a hypertensive young patient: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, S.; Kara, K.; Verim, S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Aortic coarctation is a congenital malformation, which can cause systemic hypertension and subsequent complications, and causes of secondary hypertension, affecting in differential pressures in the upper and lower extremities. Because hypertension is caused by aortic coarctation, tends to be resistant to medical therapy, early recognition and surgical rectification are important. Objectives and tasks: In this article, we aimed to point out that renal Doppler sonography is a beneficial and frequently used to evaluate secondary hypertension, if there are bilateral tardus-parvus wave patterns are detected. Thus, bilateral renal artery stenosis, aortic stenosis, and coarctation should be considered in this condition. Materials and methods: A 23-year-old male who has six-month history of hypertension. He was referred by a cardiologist for investigation of his secondary hypertension. There was an ascending aortic dilatation, left ventricular hypertrophy in his echocardiography. Results: The patient's blood pressure was measured as 160/90 mm Hg in his both arms. Renal Doppler sonography was performed to identify the potential cause of secondary hypertension, specifically renal artery stenosis, after tardus-parvus pulse waves were noted in both renal intralobar-arteries. Aortic coarctation is suspected and then a chest computed tomography (CT) was performed to evaluate supra-diaphragmatic vessel abnormalities. The CT exposed a stenotic lesion in the isthmus of the aorta. The patient was transferred to cardiovascular surgery department for treatment. Conclusion: Careful physical examination should be performed in all hypertensive patients. If bilateral tardus-parvus wave pattern are seen in patients who has been referred for Doppler evaluation on suspicion of renovascular hypertension, aortic coarctation should be considered as differential diagnosis

  19. Carotid stenosis measurement on colour Doppler ultrasound: Agreement of ECST, NASCET and CCA methods applied to ultrasound with intra-arterial angiographic stenosis measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Lewis, Steff

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Carotid stenosis is usually determined on Doppler ultrasound from velocity readings. We wondered if angiography-style stenosis measurements applied to ultrasound images improved accuracy over velocity readings alone, and if so, which measure correlated best with angiography. Materials and methods: We studied prospectively patients undergoing colour Doppler ultrasound (CDU) for TIA or minor stroke. Those with 50%+ symptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis had intra-arterial angiography (IAA). We measured peak systolic ICA velocity, and from the ultrasound image, the minimal residual lumen, the original lumen (ECST), ICA diameter distal (NASCET) and CCA diameter proximal (CCA method) to the stenosis. The IAAs were measured by ECST, NASCET and CCA methods also, blind to CDU. Results: Amongst 164 patients (328 arteries), on CDU the ECST, NASCET and CCA stenosis measures were similarly related to each other (ECST = 0.54 NASCET + 46) as on IAA (ECST = 0.6 NASCET + 40). Agreement between CDU- and IAA-measured stenosis was similar for ECST (r = 0.51), and CCA (r = 0.48) methods, and slightly worse for NASCET (r = 0.41). Adding IAA-style stenosis to the peak systolic ICA velocity did not improve agreement with IAA over peak systolic velocity alone. Conclusion: Angiography-style stenosis measures have similar inter-relationships when applied to CDU, but do not improve accuracy of ultrasound over peak systolic ICA velocity alone

  20. The value of MRI of the thorax in congenital stenosis of the trachea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.; Wilimzig, C.; Lissner, J.; Hofmann, U.; Hofmann, D.; Hecker, W.

    1989-01-01

    MRI of the thorax was performed in 24 children aged between six weeks and five years, in whom a tracheal stenosis had been demonstrated by bronchoscopy. Since bronchoscopy can only demonstrate the interior of the trachea, various imaging methods, such as CT and angiography, were used to demonstrate the topography and cause of the tracheal stenosis. MRI has shown that the most common cause of a stenosis in the central section of the trachea is focal compression by an aberrant bracheocephalic trunk (10 cases). Stenosis of the distal trachea could be due to anomalies of the aortic arch (5 cases), a dilated pulmonary artery (4 cases) or a soft tissue mass (3 cases). In all these patients, MRI was greatly superior to the conventional methods. By using a special technique, MRI made it possible to clarify the cause and localisation of a tracheal stenosis by a non-invasive examination. (orig.) [de

  1. Cardiovascular Structure and Function in Children With Middle Aortic Syndrome and Renal Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumman, Rawan K; Slorach, Cameron; Hui, Wei; Matsuda-Abedini, Mina; Langlois, Valerie; Radhakrishnan, Seetha; Lorenzo, Armando J; Amaral, Joao; Mertens, Luc; Parekh, Rulan S

    2017-12-01

    Middle aortic syndrome (MAS) is a narrowing of the abdominal aorta, often in conjunction with renal artery stenosis (RAS). Structure and function of the cardiovascular system are not well understood. In a prospective cross-sectional study, 35 children with MAS or RAS or both (MAS/RAS) were compared with 140 age-, sex-, and body surface area-matched healthy children. Vascular assessment included carotid intima-media thickness and carotid distensibility using B-mode ultrasound and central and peripheral pulse wave velocities using applanation tonometry. Left ventricular structure and function were assessed by 2-dimensional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. Children with MAS or RAS were 12.5±3.0 years old at enrollment, and 50% were men. Carotid intima-media thickness (0.54±0.10 versus 0.44±0.05 mm; P function (lower E/a ratio and lower e' velocities). Systolic parameters, including ejection fraction, global longitudinal and circumferential strain, were similar to controls. Our findings demonstrate that children with MAS or RAS have evidence of carotid and left ventricular remodeling, without peripheral arterial involvement, which suggests a localized disease process. Left ventricular systolic function is preserved; however, subtle changes in diastolic function are observed. Carotid vessel changes are consistent with a 5- to 10-year aging, which underscores the importance of blood pressure control. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Simulation of Exercise-Induced Syncope in a Heart Model with Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Sever

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS can cause an exercise-induced reflex syncope (RS. The precise mechanism of this syncope is not known. The changes in hemodynamics are variable, including arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia, and one of the few consistent changes is a sudden fall in systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures (suggesting a reduced vascular resistance followed by a decline in heart rate. The contribution of the cardioinhibitory and vasodepressor components of the RS to hemodynamics was evaluated by a computer model. This lumped-parameter computer simulation was based on equivalent electronic circuits (EECs that reflect the hemodynamic conditions of a heart with severe AVS and a concomitantly decreased contractility as a long-term detrimental consequence of compensatory left ventricular hypertrophy. In addition, the EECs model simulated the resetting of the sympathetic nervous tone in the heart and systemic circuit during exercise and exercise-induced syncope, the fluctuating intra-thoracic pressure during respiration, and the passive relaxation of ventricle during diastole. The results of this simulation were consistent with the published case reports of exertional syncope in patients with AVS. The value of the EEC model is its ability to quantify the effect of a selective and gradable change in heart rate, ventricular contractility, or systemic vascular resistance on the hemodynamics during an exertional syncope in patients with severe AVS.

  3. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis and Epigenetic Variations Associated with Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis (AVS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppala Radhakrishna

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defect (CHD is the most common cause of death from congenital anomaly. Among several candidate epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation may play an important role in the etiology of CHDs. We conducted a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using an Illumina Infinium 450k human methylation assay in a cohort of 24 newborns who had aortic valve stenosis (AVS, with gestational-age matched controls. The study identified significantly-altered CpG methylation at 59 sites in 52 genes in AVS subjects as compared to controls (either hypermethylated or demethylated. Gene Ontology analysis identified biological processes and functions for these genes including positive regulation of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Consistent with prior clinical data, the molecular function categories as determined using DAVID identified low-density lipoprotein receptor binding, lipoprotein receptor binding and identical protein binding to be over-represented in the AVS group. A significant epigenetic change in the APOA5 and PCSK9 genes known to be involved in AVS was also observed. A large number CpG methylation sites individually demonstrated good to excellent diagnostic accuracy for the prediction of AVS status, thus raising possibility of molecular screening markers for this disorder. Using epigenetic analysis we were able to identify genes significantly involved in the pathogenesis of AVS.

  4. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis and Epigenetic Variations Associated with Congenital Aortic Valve Stenosis (AVS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Uppala; Albayrak, Samet; Alpay-Savasan, Zeynep; Zeb, Amna; Turkoglu, Onur; Sobolewski, Paul; Bahado-Singh, Ray O

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common cause of death from congenital anomaly. Among several candidate epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation may play an important role in the etiology of CHDs. We conducted a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using an Illumina Infinium 450k human methylation assay in a cohort of 24 newborns who had aortic valve stenosis (AVS), with gestational-age matched controls. The study identified significantly-altered CpG methylation at 59 sites in 52 genes in AVS subjects as compared to controls (either hypermethylated or demethylated). Gene Ontology analysis identified biological processes and functions for these genes including positive regulation of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Consistent with prior clinical data, the molecular function categories as determined using DAVID identified low-density lipoprotein receptor binding, lipoprotein receptor binding and identical protein binding to be over-represented in the AVS group. A significant epigenetic change in the APOA5 and PCSK9 genes known to be involved in AVS was also observed. A large number CpG methylation sites individually demonstrated good to excellent diagnostic accuracy for the prediction of AVS status, thus raising possibility of molecular screening markers for this disorder. Using epigenetic analysis we were able to identify genes significantly involved in the pathogenesis of AVS.

  5. Aortic valve replacement and prosthesis-patient mismatch in the era of trans-catheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Shigeki

    2016-08-01

    The treatment strategy for aortic stenosis (AS) has been changing due to newly developed valvular prostheses and trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). To determine the role of new modalities for AS with a small aortic root, papers using the concept of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) were reviewed. First, to determine the cut-off value of the indexed effective orifice area (IEOA) for defining PPM, the studies of surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) with a follow-up longer than 5 years and a patient number larger than 500 were reviewed. Second, the papers comparing TAVI and SAVR were reviewed. Furthermore, the prevalence of PPM was reviewed, with the addition of papers on aortic root enlargement, sutureless AVR, and aortic valve reconstruction with autologous pericardium. The results of the long-term survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) have indicated that an IEOA less than 0.65 cm(2)/m(2) should be avoided in all cases, whereas the indications for patients with an IEOA between 065 and 0.85 cm(2)/m(2) should be determined by considering multiple factors. A large body size and younger age have a significantly negative influence on the long-term survival. In Asian population, the prevalence of PPM was low, despite the fact that the size of the aortic annulus was small. The IEOA after TAVI was larger than after surgical AVR in population-matched studies. To evaluate the role of TAVI and other modalities for a small aortic root, studies with a longer follow-up and larger volume are thus warranted.

  6. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Quantification of Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis in Symptomatic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddarth Ragupathi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low backache is a common condition to occur in the middle age. It is mainly caused by the degeneration of the intervertebral disc which forms the main support to the vertebral column. Lumbar spinal canal stenosis results in the compression of spinal cord and nerves at the level of lumbar vertebra. Aim: The purpose of this study is to measure the spinal canal dimensions and correlate with the clinical symptoms to establish a radiological criterion based on MRI for diagnosis of lumbar canal stenosis. This study is done to improve the diagnostic accuracy of lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Materials and Methods: Two hundred subjects with complaints of low backache without a traumatic history underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI after assessment of pain by two methods: 1. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI scoring and 2. Wong Baker Facial Expression scale. All the images were qualitatively analyzed to obtain the MRI grading for central canal at various levels from L1 to S1 vertebra after making sure that the neural foramina is not involved. Anteroposterior (AP and transverse diameter of spinal canal at intervertebral disc and upper part of vertebral body levels and spinal canal area are measurements that are taken. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis has been carried out in the present study. Results on continuous measurements are presented on mean±SD (min-max and results on categorical measurements are presented in number (%. Significance is assessed at 5% level of significance. Results: The spinal canal diameter measured along its AP and transverse direction is found to be correlating with the severity of low backache complained by the patient. Comparing the two methods of clinical assessment, ODI scoring was found to be more significant. Conclusion: The spinal canal measurements can be used as a radiologic criterion for diagnosis of acquired lumbar spinal canal stenosis. This will improve the diagnostic accuracy. However

  8. Introduction of an interdisciplinary heart team-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation programme: short and mid-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, G J; Seco, M; Jaijee, S K; Adams, M R; Cartwright, B L; Forrest, P; Celermajer, D S; Vallely, M P; Wilson, M K; Ng, M K C

    2014-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been developed to treat symptomatic aortic stenosis in patients deemed too high risk for open-heart surgery. To address this complex population, an interdisciplinary heart team approach was proposed. Present the short- and mid-term outcomes of the first 100 patients in the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital multidisciplinary TAVI programme. Single-centre registry. Baseline and procedural data were prospectively recorded. Outcomes were recorded according to Valve Academic Research Consortium - version 2 guidelines. All patients underwent a comprehensive interdisciplinary pre-procedural evaluation. Sixty-eight transfemoral and 32 transapical implantations were performed. Mean age was 82 (±8.9) years old with an average logistic EuroSCORE of 33. Although 13 procedures had major complications, there was no intraprocedural mortality. During the first month, 9% of patients were re-admitted due to heart failure and 13% had a permanent pacemaker implanted. A 3% 30-day and 8% follow-up (mean 17 months) mortalities were recorded. While no significant differences in the rate of complications were found between the first and second half of the experience, all cases of mortality within 30 days (n = 3) occurred in the initial half. Sustained haemodynamic results were obtained with TAVI (immediate mean aortic valve gradient reduction from 47 to 9 mmHg; 1-year echocardiographic gradient 9.9 mmHg, with no moderate or severe aortic regurgitation). Excellent results can be achieved with TAVI in very high-risk patients at an Australian institution. A comprehensive evaluation based on a heart team can overcome most of the difficulties imposed by this challenging population. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  9. Extracellular Matrix Biomarker, Fibulin-1, Is Closely Related to NT-proBNP and Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor in Patients with Aortic Valve Stenosis (The SEAS Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruger, Ruan; Rasmussen, Lars M; Argraves, William S

    2014-01-01

    associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. Therefore, we aimed to explore the interplay between these biomarkers and mild to moderate aortic valve stenosis (AS). METHODS: In 374 patients with mild to moderate AS, we investigated the relationship of fibulin-1 with NT-proBNP, levels of suPAR and the degree.......01), and suPAR (βyear0 = 0.09, p = 0.26, βyear1 = 0.23, βyear4 = 0.21, both plevels of fibulin-1 were independently associated with higher levels of suPAR and NT-proBNP especially in patients with lower AVAI, suggesting...

  10. Interruption or congenital stenosis of the inferior vena cava: Prevalence, imaging, and clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Zafer; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To present the prevalence, clinical, and imaging findings of interruption or congenital stenotic lesions of the inferior vena cava (IVC), associated malformations, and their clinical relevance. Materials and methods: Between March 2004 and March 2006, 7972 patients who had undergone consecutive routine abdominal multidetector row computed tomography were analyzed for interruption or stenotic lesion of the IVC. Results: Prevalence of interruption (n = 8) or congenital stenosis (n = 4) of the IVC occurred in 12 (0.15%) of 7972 patients. Four patients with interruption and four patients with congenital stenosis of the IVC were symptomatic with DVT (n = 4), leg swelling (n = 4), leg pain (n = 2), lower extremity varices (n = 2), hepatic vein thrombosis (n = 1), and hematochezia (n = 1). All four of the asymptomatic patients were from the interruption group, and these patients had interrupted IVC with well-developed azygos/hemiazygos continuation. Eight symptomatic patients did not have a well-developed azygos/hemiazygos continuation, and drainage of lower extremity was mainly from collateral veins. Additional findings in eight symptomatic patients were abdominal venous collaterals (n = 8), venous aneurysm (n = 2), lower extremity varices (n = 2), varicocele (n = 2), and pelvic varices (n = 1). Conclusion: Interruption or stenosis of the IVC are rare on routine abdominal CT examinations and may cause different clinical findings depending on the variant drainage patterns or collaterals. Interrupted IVC is commonly asymptomatic if associated with well-developed azygos/hemiazygos continuation, whereas commonly symptomatic if well-developed azygos/hemiazygos continuation is not present

  11. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of the flow through a stenotic aortic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hoda; Labrosse, Michel R.; Durand, Louis-Gilles; Kadem, Lyes

    2009-11-01

    In Europe and North America, aortic stenosis (AS) is the most frequent valvular heart disease and cardiovascular disease after systemic hypertension and coronary artery disease. Understanding blood flow through an aortic stenosis and developing new accurate non-invasive diagnostic parameters is, therefore, of primarily importance. However, simulating such flows is highly challenging. In this study, we considered the interaction between blood flow and the valve leaflets and compared the results obtained in healthy valves with stenotic ones. One effective method to model the interaction between the fluid and the structure is to use Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach. Our two-dimensional model includes appropriate nonlinear and anisotropic materials. It is loaded during the systolic phase by applying pressure curves to the fluid domain at the inflow. For modeling the calcified stenotic valve, calcium will be added on the aortic side of valve leaflets. Such simulations allow us to determine the effective orifice area of the valve, one of the main parameters used clinically to evaluate the severity of an AS, and to correlate it with changes in the structure of the leaflets.

  12. Case report of a rarely seen long-segment middle aortic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakut, Kahraman; Erdoğan, İlkay

    2017-03-01

    Middle aortic syndrome (MAS) follows a course with distal thoracic and abdominal aorta stenosis. It is a rare disease that is usually diagnosed after the first decade of life. Clinical reflection of MAS is often in the form of hypertension and claudication in the lower extremities. Its etiology is unclear, but is known to be associated with congenital or acquired diseases. This pathology, which is accompanied by malignant hypertension, often does not respond to medical treatment. In patients with MAS, surgical treatment is first line recommendation to prevent complications such as hypertension, heart failure, intracranial bleeding, or aortic rupture. In order to draw attention to this disease, presently described is case of high blood pressure detected during routine examination of a child who had no complaint, and discovery of long-segment stenosis in the abdominal aorta identified with echocardiography and conventional angiography.

  13. Aortic annulus eccentricity before and after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Comparison of balloon-expandable and self-expanding prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhbaeck, Annika; Weingartner, Christina; Arnold, Martin; Schmid, Jasmin; Pflederer, Tobias; Marwan, Mohamed; Rixe, Johannes; Nef, Holger; Schneider, Christian; Lell, Michael; Uder, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan; Feyrer, Richard; Weyand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses is influenced by aortic valve calcification. • Balloon-expandable prostheses are more circular as compared to self-expanding prostheses. • The impact of post-implant geometry on valve function needs to be investigated. - Abstract: Introduction: The geometry of the aortic annulus and implanted transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis might influence valve function. We investigated the influence of valve type and aortic valve calcification on post-implant geometry of catheter-based aortic valve prostheses. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (mean age 82 ± 6 years) underwent computed tomography before and after TAVI. Aortic annulus diameters were determined. Influence of prosthesis type and degree of aortic valve calcification on post-implant eccentricity were analysed. Results: Aortic annulus eccentricity was reduced in patients after TAVI (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.08 ± 0.06, p < 0.0001). Post-TAVI eccentricity was significantly lower in 65 patients following implantation of a balloon-expandable prosthesis as compared to 15 patients who received a self-expanding prosthesis (0.06 ± 0.05 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07, p < 0.0001), even though the extent of aortic valve calcification was not different. After TAVI, patients with a higher calcium amount retained a significantly higher eccentricity compared to patients with lower amounts of calcium. Conclusions: Patients undergoing TAVI with a balloon-expandable prosthesis show a more circular shape of the implanted prosthesis as compared to patients with a self-expanding prosthesis. Eccentricity of the deployed prosthesis is affected by the extent of aortic valve calcification

  14. An unexpected evolution of symptomatic mild middle cerebral artery (MCA stenosis: asymptomatic occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malferrari Giovanni

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intracranial localization of large artery disease is recognized as the main cause of ischemic stroke in the world, considering all countries, although its global burden is widely underestimated. Indeed it has been reported more frequently in Asians and African-American people, but the finding of intracranial stenosis as a cause of ischemic stroke is relatively common also in Caucasians. The prognosis of patients with stroke due to intracranial steno-occlusion is strictly dependent on the time of recanalization. Moreover, the course of the vessel involvement is highly dynamic in both directions, improvement or worsening, although several data are derived from the atherosclerotic subtype, compared to other causes. Case description We report the clinical, neurosonological and neuroradiological findings of a young woman, who came to our Stroke Unit because of the abrupt onset of aphasia during her work. An urgent neurosonological examination showed a left M1 MCA stenosis, congruent with the presenting symptoms; magnetic resonance imaging confirmed this finding and identified an acute ischemic lesion on the left MCA territory. The past history of the patient was significant only for a hyperinsulinemic condition, treated with metformine, and a mild overweight. At this time a selective cerebral angiography was not performed because of the patient refusal and she was discharged on antiplatelet and lipid-lowering therapy, having failed to identify autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. Within 1 month, she went back to our attention because of the recurrence of aphasia, lasting about ten minutes. Neuroimaging findings were unchanged, but the patient accepted to undergo a selective cerebral angiography, which showed a mild left distal M1 MCA stenosis. During the follow-up the patient did not experienced any recurrence, but a routine neurosonological examination found an unexpected evolution of the known MCA stenosis, i.e. left M1 MCA

  15. Anesthetic Management and Complications of Percutaneous Aortic Valve Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tailur Alberto Grando

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Aortic stenosis is a highly prevalent and life-threatening disease. In elderly patients with comorbidities, percutaneous valve implantation is an option. The aim of the study was to describe the anesthetic management and complications of general anesthesia Method: Case series with 30-day and 24-month follow-ups after implantation of the CoreValve device performed at the Institute of Cardiology/University Foundation of Cardiology between December 2008 and January 2012. The patients underwent general anesthesia monitored with mean arterial pressure (PAM, electrocardiogram (ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography, transesophageal echocardiography, thermometry, and transvenous pacemaker. Results: Twenty-eight patients, mean age 82.46 years, 20.98% mean EuroSCORE, functional class III/IV, successfully underwent valve implantation. Nine patients required permanent pacemaker implantation. During follow-up, two patients died: one during surgery due to LV perforation and the other on the third day of unknown causes. At 24 months, one patient diagnosed with multiple myeloma died. This anesthetic technique proved to be safe. Conclusion: The initial experience with percutaneous aortic valve implantation under general anesthesia has proven to be safe and effective, with no significant anesthetic complications during this procedure. Keywords: Aesthesia, General, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Aortic Valve Stenosis, Aged.

  16. Computed tomography angiography reveals stenosis and aneurysmal dilation of an aberrant right subclavian artery causing systemic blood pressure misreading in an old Pekinese dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Eom, Kidong; Yoon, Hakyoung

    2017-06-16

    A 14-year-old dog weighing 4 kg presented with hypotension only in the right forelimb. Thoracic radiography revealed a round soft tissue opacity near the aortic arch and below the second thoracic vertebra on a lateral view. Three-dimensional computed tomography angiography clearly revealed stenosis and aneurysmal dilation of an aberrant right subclavian artery. Stenosis and aneurysm of an aberrant subclavian artery should be included as a differential diagnosis in dogs showing a round soft tissue opacity near the aortic arch and below the thoracic vertebra on the lateral thoracic radiograph.

  17. Impact of Chronic Kidney Disease on the Presence and Severity of Aortic Stenosis in Patients at High Risk for Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Chiaki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective We evaluated the impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD on the presence and severity of aortic stenosis (AS in patients at high risk for coronary artery disease (CAD. Methods One hundred and twenty consecutive patients who underwent invasive coronary angiography were enrolled. Aortic valve area (AVA was calculated by the continuity equation using transthoracic echocardiography, and was normalized by body surface area (AVA index. Results Among all 120 patients, 78% had CAD, 55% had CKD (stage 3: 81%; stage 4: 19%, and 34% had AS (AVA 2. Patients with AS were older, more often female, and had a higher frequency of CKD than those without AS, but the prevalence of CAD and most other coexisting conventional risk factors was similar between patients with and without AS. Multivariate linear regression analysis indicated that only CKD and CAD were independent determinants of AVA index with standardized coefficients of -0.37 and -0.28, respectively. When patients were divided into 3 groups (group 1: absence of CKD and CAD, n = 16; group 2: presence of either CKD or CAD, n = 51; and group 3: presence of both CKD and CAD, n = 53, group 3 had the smallest AVA index (1.19 ± 0.30*# cm2/m2, *p 2/m2, and #p 2/m2 and the highest peak velocity across the aortic valve (1.53 ± 0.41*# m/sec; *p Conclusion CKD, even pre-stage 5 CKD, has a more powerful impact on the presence and severity of AS than other conventional risk factors for atherosclerosis in patients at high risk for CAD.

  18. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Zakkar; Mustafa Zakkar; Vito Domanico Bruno; Alexandru Ciprian Visan; Stephanie Curtis; Gianni Angelini; Emmanuel Lansac; Serban Stoica

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population...

  19. Low permanent pacemaker rates following Lotus device implantation for transcatheter aortic valve replacement due to modified implantation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krackhardt, Florian; Kherad, Behrouz; Krisper, Maximilian; Pieske, Burkert; Laule, Michael; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Conduction disturbances requiring permanent pacemaker implantation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are a common problem. Pacemaker implantation rates after TAVR appear to be higher compared to conventional aortic valve replacement. The aim of this study was to analyze whether a high annulus implantation conveys the benefit of a decreased rate of permanent pacemaker implantation while being safe and successful according to Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 (VARC2)-criteria. A total of 23 patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis, an aortic annulus of 19-27 mm and at high risk for surgery were treated with the Lotus valve. In all patients the valve was implanted in a high annulus position via femoral access. The primary device performance endpoint was VARC2-defined device success after 30 days and the primary safety endpoint was the need for permanent pacemaker implantation. The mean age was 73.23 ± 7.65 years, 46% were female, 38% were New York Heart Association class III/IV at baseline. Thirty-day follow-up data were available for all patients. The VARC2-defined device success rate after 30 days was 22/23 (96%). 2/21 (10%) patients required a newly implanted pacemaker due to 3rd degree atrioventricular block. 25% of the patients developed a new left bundle branch block after valvuloplasty or device implantation. 21 of the 23 patients (96%) had no other signs of conduction disturbances after 30 days. The approach of the modified implantation technique of Lotus TAVR device was safe and effective. The incidence of need for a permanent pacemaker following TAVR could be significantly reduced due to adopted implantation protocol.

  20. Aortic embolization of an Edwards SAPIEN prosthesis due to sigmoid left ventricular hypertrophy: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Isa Öner; Koklu, Erkan; Arslan, Sakir; Cagirci, Goksel; Kucukseymen, Selcuk

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is considered an alternative therapy in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Although a minimally invasive procedure, it is not free from complications, one of which is valve embolization at the time of TAVI. We present a case of embolization of a balloon-expandable aortic valve due to sigmoid left ventricular hypertrophy and managed with a second valve without surgery. The embolized valve was repositioned in the aortic arch between the left common carotid artery and the brachiocephalic trunk. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Calcific aortic valve damage as a risk factor for cardiovascular events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasilewski, Jarosław; Mirota, Kryspin; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Głowacki, Jan; Poloński, Lech

    2012-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common disease of the elderly. It is a progressive disease ranging from mild valve thickening to severe calcification with aortic valve stenosis. Risk factors for AVC are similar to those for atherosclerosis: age, gender, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and renal failure. AVC shares many similarities to atherosclerosis, including inflammatory cells and calcium deposits, and correlates with coronary plaque burden. Presence of AVC is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The objective for this review is to discuss the clinical features, natural history and prognostic significance of aortic valve calcifications, including mechanical and hemodynamic factors of flow distribution

  2. Optimal Treatment of the ‘High-Risk’ Patient with Carotid Artery Stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Four landmark randomized trials have clearly validated the use of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) for the management of asymptomatic and symptomatic significant carotid artery stenosis. However, its risk-to-benefit ratio is variable for different patients. With the advent of carotid artery stenting

  3. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of supra-aortic arteries especially the internal carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachel, R.; Basche, S. (Medizinische Akademie, Erfurt (Germany, F.R.). Radiologische Klinik); Heerklotz, I.; Grossmann, K. (Medizinische Akademie, Erfurt (Germany, F.R.). Klinik fuer Innere Medizin); Endler, S. (Medizinische Akademie, Erfurt (Germany, F.R.). Klinik fuer Neurologie und Psychiatrie)

    1991-06-01

    We present our experience with 105 patients in whom percutaneous transluminal angioplasty was performed in 112 stenosed or occluded supra-aortic arteries. Symtoms of cerebrovascular and/or vertebrobasilar insufficiency were present in 104 of the 105 patients. The angioplasty was successful in 35 stenoses of the internal carotid artery, 2 stenoses of the common carotid artery, 1 stenosis of the external carotid artery, 15 stenoses of the vertebral artery, 3 stenoses of the innominate artery and 44 stenoses of the subclavian artery. There were only 4 minor-complications (2 haematomas, 1 transient ischemic attack, 1 small thrombus of the internal carotid artery which was detected by 111-indium platelet scintigraphy and treated by thrombendarterectomy before the appearance of neurological symptoms). All patients were symptom free after angioplasty. During the observations period of 3 to 109 months (average 58 months) there were only two cases with re-stenosis after subclavian angioplasty. The results of more than 700 personal and international published percutaneous transluminal angioplasties of supra-aortic arteries are presented. The results suggest that angioplasty of supra-aortic arteries is an effective method. On strict definition of the indications, the complication rate for angioplasty of the supra-aortic arteries is not likely to be higher than that for operative treatment. (orig.).

  4. Predictors of Paravalvular Regurgitation After Implantation of the Fully Repositionable and Retrievable Lotus Transcatheter Aortic Valve (from the REPRISE II Trial Extended Cohort).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Daniel J; Meredith, Ian T; Dumonteil, Nicolas; Tchétché, Didier; Hildick-Smith, David; Spence, Mark S; Walters, Darren L; Harnek, Jan; Worthley, Stephen G; Rioufol, Gilles; Lefèvre, Thierry; Houle, Vicki M; Allocco, Dominic J; Dawkins, Keith D

    2017-07-15

    Paravalvular leak (PVL) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with worse long-term outcomes. The Lotus Valve incorporates an innovative Adaptive Seal designed to minimize PVL. This analysis evaluated the incidence and predictors of PVL after implantation of the Lotus transcatheter aortic valve. The REPRISE II (REpositionable Percutaneous Replacement of Stenotic Aortic Valve through Implantation of Lotus Valve System - Evaluation of Safety and Performance) Study With Extended Cohort enrolled 250 high-surgical risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Aortic regurgitation was assessed by echocardiography pre-procedure, at discharge and 30 days, by an independent core laboratory. Baseline and procedural predictors of mild or greater PVL at 30 days (or at discharge if 30-day data were not available) were determined using a multivariate regression model (n = 229). Of the 229 patients, 197 (86%) had no/trace PVL, 30 had mild, and 2 had moderate PVL; no patient had severe PVL. Significant predictors of mild/moderate PVL included device:annulus area ratio (odds ratio [OR] 0.87; 95% CI 0.83 to 0.92; p 10% annular oversizing by area were 17.5% (11 of 63), 2.9% (2 of 70), and 3.2% (2 of 63), respectively. Significant independent predictors of PVL included device:annulus area ratio and left ventricular outflow tract calcium volume. When the prosthetic valve was oversized by ≥5%, the rate of mild or greater PVL was only 3%. In conclusion, the overall rates of PVL with the Lotus Valve are low and predominantly related to device/annulus areas and calcium; these findings have implications for optimal device sizing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Life-threatening subdural hematoma after aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tetsuro; Hamasaki, Azumi; Ohba, Eiichi; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hayashi, Jun; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2017-08-08

    Heyde syndrome is known as a triad of calcific aortic stenosis, anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding from angiodysplasia, and acquired type 2A von Willebrand disease. This acquired hemorrhagic disorder is characterized by the loss of the large von Willebrand factor multimers due to the shear stress across the diseased aortic valve. The most frequently observed type of bleeding in these patients is mucosal or skin bleeding, such as epistaxis, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding. On the other hand, intracranial hemorrhage complicating Heyde syndrome is extremely rare. A 77-year-old woman presented to our hospital with severe aortic stenosis and severe anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with Heyde syndrome. Although aortic valve replacement was performed without recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, postoperative life-threatening acute subdural hematoma occurred with a marked midline shift. Despite prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma, she did not recover consciousness and she died 1 month after the operation. Postoperative subdural hematoma is rare, but it should be kept in mind as a devastating hemorrhagic complication, especially in patients with Heyde syndrome.

  6. Clinical Comparison of Outcomes of Early versus Delayed Carotid Artery Stenting for Symptomatic Cerebral Watershed Infarction due to Stenosis of the Proximal Internal Carotid Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huakun Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of early versus delayed carotid artery stenting (CAS for symptomatic cerebral watershed infarction (sCWI patients due to stenosis of the proximal internal carotid artery. We retrospectively collected clinical data of those who underwent early or delayed CAS from March 2011 to April 2014. The time of early CAS and delayed CAS was within a week of symptom onset and after four weeks from symptom onset. Clinical data such as second stroke, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NHISS score, and modified Rankin Scale (mRS score and periprocedural complications were collected. The rate of second stroke in early CAS group is lower when compared to that of delayed CAS group. There was no significant difference regarding periprocedural complications in both groups. There was a significant difference regarding mean NHISS score 90 days after CAS in two groups. Early CAS group had a significant better good outcome (mRS score ≤ 2 than delayed CAS group. We suggest early CAS for sCWI due to severe proximal internal carotid artery stenosis as it provides lower rate of second stroke, comparable periprocedural complications, and better functional outcomes compared to that of delayed CAS.

  7. Diagnostic accuracies of MR enterography and CT enterography in symptomatic Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Kjeldsen, Jens; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2011-01-01

    diagnostic accuracies for detection of small bowel CD and stenosis. In symptomatic patients with CD and high disease prevalence, positive predictive values are favorable but negative predictive values are low. Consequently, MRE and CTE can be relied upon, if a positive result is obtained whereas a negative...

  8. Efficacy of stent angioplasty for symptomatic stenoses of the proximal vertebral artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W. [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Alfried Krupp Hospital, Essen (Germany); Mayer, T.E. [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich (Germany); Henkes, H. [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Alfried Krupp Hospital, Essen (Germany); Kis, B. [Department of Neurology, Alfried Krupp Hospital, Essen (Germany) and Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Duisburg-Essen, Virchow Street 174, D-45147 Essen (Germany)]. E-mail: bernhard.kis@uni-duisburg-essen.de; Hamann, G.F. [Department of Neurology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich (Germany); Holtmannspoetter, M. [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich (Germany); Brueckmann, H. [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich (Germany); Kuehne, D. [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Alfried Krupp Hospital, Essen (Germany)

    2005-11-01

    Background: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stent angioplasty in the treatment of symptomatic arteriosclerotic stenoses of the proximal vertebral artery (VA). Methods: Thirty-eight symptomatic stenoses of the vertebral origin were treated with flexible balloon-expandable coronary stents. Angiographic and clinical follow-up examinations were obtained in 26 patients at a mean of 11 months. Results: The immediate post-procedural angiographic results showed no residual stenosis in 33 vessels and mild residual stenoses in five vessels. Periprocedurally, there were two asymptomatic technical complications and one TIA. During follow-up re-stenosis could be detected in 10 cases (36%), and vessel occlusions in two patients. Two stents were broken. One of the restenosis caused a TIA within the follow-up period. Conclusions: Flexible balloon-expandable coronary stents proved to be save and effective in preventing vertebrobasilar stroke but were incapable to preserve the proximal vertebral artery lumen. For the VA origine an adequate stent, self-expanding, bioresorbable, or drug-eluting has to be found.

  9. Efficacy of stent angioplasty for symptomatic stenoses of the proximal vertebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.; Mayer, T.E.; Henkes, H.; Kis, B.; Hamann, G.F.; Holtmannspoetter, M.; Brueckmann, H.; Kuehne, D.

    2005-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stent angioplasty in the treatment of symptomatic arteriosclerotic stenoses of the proximal vertebral artery (VA). Methods: Thirty-eight symptomatic stenoses of the vertebral origin were treated with flexible balloon-expandable coronary stents. Angiographic and clinical follow-up examinations were obtained in 26 patients at a mean of 11 months. Results: The immediate post-procedural angiographic results showed no residual stenosis in 33 vessels and mild residual stenoses in five vessels. Periprocedurally, there were two asymptomatic technical complications and one TIA. During follow-up re-stenosis could be detected in 10 cases (36%), and vessel occlusions in two patients. Two stents were broken. One of the restenosis caused a TIA within the follow-up period. Conclusions: Flexible balloon-expandable coronary stents proved to be save and effective in preventing vertebrobasilar stroke but were incapable to preserve the proximal vertebral artery lumen. For the VA origine an adequate stent, self-expanding, bioresorbable, or drug-eluting has to be found

  10. Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty in mitral stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Oh, Byung Hee; Park, Kyung Ju; Kim, Seung Hyup; Lee, Young Woo; Han, Man Chung

    1989-01-01

    Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty(PBV) was successfully performed in 8 mitral stenosis patients for recent 3 months. Five patients have aortic insufficiencies also and two patients have mitral regurgitations below grade II/IV. All patients showed sinus rhythm on EKG, and had no mitral valvular calcification on echocardiography and fluoroscopy. PBV resulted in an increase in mitral valve area from 1.22±0.22 to 2.57±0.86 cm 2 , a decrease in mean left atrial pressure from 23.4±9.6 to 7.5±3.4 mmHg and a decrease in mean mitral pressure gradient from 21.3±9.4 to 6.8±3.1 mmHg. There were no significant complications except 2 cases of newly appeared and mildly aggravated mitral regurgitation. We believe that PBV will become a treatment modality of choice replacing surgical commissurotomy or valve replacement in a group of mitral stenosis patients, because of its effectiveness and safety

  11. Hemodynamic function of the standard St. Jude bileaflet disc valve has no clinical impact 10 years after aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Dorup, Inge; Emmertsen, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    in the survivors of a prospective series 10 years after AVR for aortic stenosis. DESIGN: Forty-three survivors aged 32-90 years from a prospective series attended a follow-up study with Doppler echo and radionuclide cardiography 10 years after AVR for aortic stenosis. Six patients with significant left sided valve...... to St. Jude valve geometric orifice area (GOA) indexed for either body surface area or left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD). The gradients correlated directly with LVEDD but not with LVEF or LVMi. Eleven patients with hypertension had higher peak gradients (31+/-13 versus 22+/-8 mmHg, p

  12. Global longitudinal strain and its dynamics after replacement of aortal valve in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Ponych

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to determine factors that may influence the global longitudinal strain (GLS and its dynamics after replacement aortic valve (RAV in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS. Materials and methods. In a one-center prospective study, 30 patients with severe AS were sequentially screened for RAV surgery. Among them there were 16 (53,3 % men and 14 (46,7 % women. The median age was 63 (range from 46 to 77, quartiles 57–69 years. All patients underwent clinical and instrumental study, including transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and coronary angiography. In the early postoperative period and 6–12 months after surgery, all patients performed a repeat TTE according to a standard protocol that included an assessment of the GLS. GLS data and their dynamics was performed in the groups of patients with preserved (n = 18 and low (n = 12 left ventricular ejection fraction (LV EF. Results. In patients with preserved LV EF, the median of the preoperative GLS was –12 % (in the quartiles from –15 to –11 %, postoperative GLS –11 % (quartiles from –11 to –9 %. In patients with reduced LV EF, the median of the preoperative GLS was –6 % (from –8.5 to –4 % for quartiles, –8.5 % for postoperative GLS (from –10 to –6 % for quartiles (p < 0.001 for comparison of baseline and p < 0.05 relative to differences in dynamics of GLS in comparable groups. In the examined patients, significant correlations were found between baseline GLS with functional class of heart failure, concomitant tricuspid insufficiency, atrial fibrillation, duration of QRS complex, LV EF, end-diastolic, endsystolic volume index (EDV, ESV and volume left atrium (LA, left ventricular myocardial mass index, aortic valve orifice area index, E/A ratio, and Thei index. In turn, the positive dynamics of GLS significantly depended on the initial functional class of heart failure, the stage of arterial hypertension, the degree of tricuspid insufficiency, LV EF, the index

  13. Surgical repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis in children with williams syndrome: a 30-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Tyson A; d'Udekem, Yves; Brizard, Christian P; Wheaton, Gavin; Weintraub, Robert G; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2015-04-01

    Williams syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder associated with supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) in childhood. We reviewed outcomes of children with Williams syndrome who underwent repair of SVAS during a 30-year period at a single institution. Between 1982 and 2012, 28 patients with Williams syndrome were operated on for SVAS. Mean age at operation was 5.2 years (range, 3 months to 13 years), and mean weight at operation was 18.6 kg (range, 4.1 to 72.4 kg). Associated cardiac lesions in 11 patients (39.3%) were repaired at the time of the SVAS repair. The most common associated cardiac lesion was main pulmonary artery stenosis (8 of 28 [28%]). A 3-patch repair was performed in 10 patients, a Doty repair in 17, and a McGoon repair in 1 (3.6%). There were no early deaths. Follow-up was 96% complete (27 of 28). Overall mean follow-up was 11.2 years (range, 1 month to 27.3 years). Mean follow-up was 5 years (range, 1 month to 14.3 years) for the 3-patch repair patients and 14.7 years (range, 6 weeks to 27 years) for the Doty repair patients. Of the 17 Doty patients, there were 4 (24%) late deaths, occurring at 6 weeks, 3.5 years, 4 years, and 16 years after the initial operation. There were no late deaths in the 3-patch repair patients. Overall survival was 86% at 5, 10, and 15 years after repair. Survival was 82% at 5, 10 and 15 years for the Doty repair patients. Overall, 6 of 27 patients (22%) patients required late reoperation at a mean of 11.2 years (range, 3.6 to 23 years). No 3-patch repair patients required reoperation. Overall freedom from reoperation was 91% at 5 years and 73% at 10 and 15 years. Freedom from reoperation for the Doty repair patients was 93% at 5 years and 71% at 10 and 15 years. Surgical repair of SVAS in children Williams syndrome has excellent early results. However, significant late mortality and morbidity warrants close follow-up. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  14. Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Their Relation to Future Surgery for Valvular Heart Disease or Ascending Aortic Disease: A Case-Referent Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Johan; Johansson, Bengt; Engström, Karl Gunnar; Albertsson, Elin; Holmer, Paul; Norberg, Margareta; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Söderberg, Stefan

    2017-05-05

    Risk factors for developing heart valve and ascending aortic disease are based mainly on retrospective data. To elucidate these factors in a prospective manner, we have performed a nested case-referent study using data from large, population-based surveys. A total of 777 patients operated for heart valve disease or disease of the ascending aorta had previously participated in population-based health surveys in Northern Sweden. Median time (interquartile range) from survey to surgery was 10.5 (9.0) years. Primary indications for surgery were aortic stenosis (41%), aortic regurgitation (12%), mitral regurgitation (23%), and dilatation/dissection of the ascending aorta (17%). For each case, referents were allocated, matched for age, sex, and geographical area. In multivariable models, surgery for aortic stenosis was predicted by hypertension, high cholesterol levels, diabetes mellitus, and active smoking. Surgery for aortic regurgitation was associated with a low cholesterol level, whereas a high cholesterol level predicted surgery for mitral regurgitation. Hypertension, blood pressure, and previous smoking predicted surgery for disease of the ascending aorta whereas diabetes mellitus was associated with reduced risk. After exclusion of cases with coronary atherosclerosis, only the inverse associations between cholesterol and aortic regurgitation and between diabetes mellitus and disease of the ascending aorta remained. This is the first truly prospective study of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and their association with valvular heart disease and disease of the ascending aorta. We confirm the strong association between traditional risk factors and aortic stenosis, but only in patients with concomitant coronary artery disease. In isolated valvular heart disease, the impact of traditional risk factors is varying. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  15. Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with increased wall and turbulence shear stress levels compared to trileaflet aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Mirabella, Lucia; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-06-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are associated with accelerated disease progression, such as leaflet calcification and ascending aorta dilatation. Although common underlying genetic factors have been implicated in accelerated disease in BAV patients, several studies have suggested that altered hemodynamics also play a role in this disease process. The present study compares turbulence and wall shear stress (WSS) measurements between various BAV and trileaflet aortic valve (TAV) models to provide information for mechanobiological models of BAV disease. BAV and TAV models were constructed from excised porcine aortic valves to simulate parametric variations in BAV stenosis, hemodynamics and geometry. Particle image velocimetry experiments were conducted at physiological pressure conditions to characterize velocity fields in the ascending aorta. The velocity fields were post-processed to calculate turbulence, viscous and wall shear stresses in the ascending aorta. Stenosed BAV models showed the presence of eccentric systolic jets, causing increased WSS. Lower cardiac output resulted in a narrower jet, lower turbulence and lower viscous shear stress (VSS). The specific severe stenosis BAV model studied here showed reduced WSS due to reduction in non-fused leaflet mobility. Dilation of the aorta did not affect any turbulence or VSS, but reduced the WSS. In comparison with BAVs, TAVs have similar VSS values, but much smaller WSS and turbulence levels. These increased turbulence  and WSS levels in BAVs may play a key role in amplifying the biological responses of the ascending aorta wall and valvular leaflets, and support the hemodynamic underpinnings of BAV disease processes.

  16. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zakkar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population. Moreover; the utilisation of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves can significantly impact on quality and is linked to increased rates of morbidities. Other available options such as stentless valve, homografts, valve reconstruction and Ross operation can be an appealing alternative to conventional valve replacement. Young patients should be fully informed about all the options available - shared decision making is now part of modern informed consent. This can be achieved when referring physicians have a better understanding of the short and long term outcomes associated with every intervention, in terms of survival and quality of life. This review presents up to date evidence for available surgical options for young adults with aortic stenosis and mixed disease not amenable to repair.

  17. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Bruno, Vito Domanico; Visan, Alexandru Ciprian; Curtis, Stephanie; Angelini, Gianni; Lansac, Emmanuel; Stoica, Serban

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population. Moreover; the utilisation of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves can significantly impact on quality and is linked to increased rates of morbidities. Other available options such as stentless valve, homografts, valve reconstruction and Ross operation can be an appealing alternative to conventional valve replacement. Young patients should be fully informed about all the options available - shared decision making is now part of modern informed consent. This can be achieved when referring physicians have a better understanding of the short and long term outcomes associated with every intervention, in terms of survival and quality of life. This review presents up to date evidence for available surgical options for young adults with aortic stenosis and mixed disease not amenable to repair.

  18. Contemporary management of isolated chronic infrarenal abdominal aortic dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faries, Christopher M; Tadros, Rami O; Lajos, Paul S; Vouyouka, Ageliki G; Faries, Peter L; Marin, Michael L

    2016-11-01

    mortality rate for endovascular intervention was 0%. The only open surgical repair performed was on a patient with a ruptured AAA, which the patient did not survive. Angioplasty with stent or stent graft placement was performed in four patients for the treatment of symptomatic arterial insufficiency resulting from aortic dissection. No patients experienced restenosis, and no reinterventions were performed. Isolated infrarenal aortic dissection is an uncommon vascular disease that is related to hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis and may be associated with infrarenal AAA formation. The presence of dissection does not appear to increase the risk of complication or mortality for repair of concomitant aneurysm or for treatment of stenosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Risk of Stroke or Death Is Associated With the Timing of Carotid Artery Stenting for Symptomatic Carotid Stenosis: A Secondary Data Analysis of the German Statutory Quality Assurance Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsantilas, Pavlos; Kuehnl, Andreas; Kallmayer, Michael; Knappich, Christoph; Schmid, Sofie; Breitkreuz, Thorben; Zimmermann, Alexander; Eckstein, Hans-Henning

    2018-03-27

    Subgroup analyses from randomized trials indicate that the time interval between the neurologic index event and carotid artery stenting is associated with periprocedural stroke and death rates in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. The aim of this article is to analyze whether this observation holds true under routine conditions in Germany. Secondary data analysis was done on 4717 elective carotid artery stenting procedures that were performed for symptomatic carotid stenosis. The patient cohort was divided into 4 groups according to the time interval between the index event and intervention (group I 0-2, II 3-7, III 8-14, and IV 15-180 days). Primary outcome was any in-hospital stroke or death. For risk-adjusted analyses, a multilevel multivariable regression model was used. The in-hospital stroke or death rate was 3.7% in total and 6.0%, 4.4%, 2.4%, and 3.0% in groups I, II, III, and IV, respectively. Adjusted analysis showed a decreased risk for any stroke or death in group III, a decreased risk for any major stroke or death in groups III and IV, and a decreased risk for any death in groups II and III compared to the reference group I. A short time interval between the neurologic index event and carotid artery stenting of up to 7 days is associated with an increased risk for stroke or death under routine conditions in Germany. Although results cannot prove causal relationships, carotid artery stenting may be accompanied by an increased risk of stroke or death during the early period after the index event. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  20. Aortic root, not valve, calcification correlates with coronary artery calcification in patients with severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henein, Michael; Hällgren, Peter; Holmgren, Anders

    2015-01-01

    calcification (AVC), due to tissue similarity between the two types of vessel rather than with the valve leaflet tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 212 consecutive patients (age 72.5 ± 7.9 years, 91 females) with AS requiring aortic valve replacement (AVR) in two Heart Centers, who underwent multidetector...... cardiac CT preoperatively. CAC, AVC and ARC were quantified using Agatston scoring. Correlations were tested by Spearman's test and Mann-Whitney U-test was used for comparing different subgroups; bicuspid (BAV) vs tricuspid (TAV) aortic valve. RESULTS: CAC was present in 92%, AVC in 100% and ARC in 82......% of patients. CAC correlated with ARC (rho = 0.51, p AVC. The number of calcified coronary arteries correlated with ARC (rho = 0.45, p AVC. 29/152 patients had echocardiographic evidence of BAV and 123 TAV, who were older (p

  1. Implante percutâneo de valva aórtica: mito ou realidade? Percutaneous aortic aortic valve replacement: myth or reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Keller Saadi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A substituição valvar por prótese metálica ou biológica com o auxílio de circulação extracorpórea é o procedimento padrã