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Sample records for sympathetic nerve activity

  1. Mechanisms of insulin action on sympathetic nerve activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntzel, Martin S.; Anderson, Erling A.; Johnson, Alan Kim; Mark, Allyn L.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia may contribute to the development of arterial hypertension. Although insulin may elevate arterial pressure, in part, through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the sites and mechanisms of insulin-induced sympathetic excitation remain uncertain. While sympathoexcitation during insulin may be mediated by the baroreflex, or by modulation of norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve endings, it has been shown repeatedly that insulin increases sympathetic outflow by actions on the central nervous system. Previous studies employing norepinephrine turnover have suggested that insulin causes sympathoexcitation by acting in the hypothalamus. Recent experiments from our laboratory involving direct measurements of regional sympathetic nerve activity have provided further evidence that insulin acts in the central nervous system. For example, administration of insulin into the third cerebralventricle increased lumbar but not renal or adrenal sympathetic nerve activity in normotensive rats. Interestingly, this pattern of regional sympathetic nerve responses to central neural administration of insulin is similar to that seen with systemic administration of insulin. Further, lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle hypothalamic (AV3V) region abolished increases in sympathetic activity to systemic administration of insulin with euglycemic clamp, suggesting that AV3V-related structures are critical for insulin-induced elevations in sympathetic outflow.

  2. Role of sympathetic nerve activity in the process of fainting

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    Satoshi eIwase

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness and postural tone, characterized by rapid onset, short duration, and spontaneous recovery, and the process of syncope progression will be described with two types of sympathetic change. Simultaneous recordings of microneurographically recorded MSNA and continuous and noninvasive blood pressure measurement have disclose what is going on in the course of progression of the syncope. Vasovagal or neurally mediated syncope, three stages are identified in the course of syncope onset, oscillation, imbalance, and catastrophe phases. The vasovagal syncope is characterized by the sympathoexcitation, followed by vagal overcome via the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. Orthostatic syncope is caused by the response failure or lack of sympathetic nerve activity toward the orthostatic challenge followed by the fluid shift, and subsequent cerebral low perfusion. Four causes are considered for the compensatory failure, which triggers the orthostatic syncope; hypovolemia, increased pooling in the lower body, failure to activate the sympathetic activity, and failure of vasoconstriction against sympathetic vasoconstrictive stimulation. Many pathophysiological conditions were described in the viewpoint of 1 exaggerated sympathoexcitation and 2 failure to activate the sympathetic nerve. We conclude that the sympathetic nervous system can control the cardiovascular function, and its failure resulted syncope, however, responses of the system by microneurographically recorded MSNA would determine the pathophysiology of the onset and progression of syncope, explaining the treatment effect that could be achieved by the analysis of this mechanism.

  3. Baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity after carotid body tumor resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Henri J. L. M.; Karemaker, John M.; Wieling, Wouter; Marres, Henri A. M.; Lenders, Jacques W. M.

    2003-01-01

    Bilateral carotid body tumor resection causes a permanent attenuation of vagal baroreflex sensitivity. We retrospectively examined the effects of bilateral carotid body tumor resection on the baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve traffic. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded in 5

  4. Hysteresis in the sympathetic baroreflex: role of baseline nerve activity

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    Hart, Emma C; Wallin, B Gunnar; Curry, Timothy B; Joyner, Michael J; Karlsson, Tomas; Charkoudian, Nisha

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is greater during decreasing compared to increasing diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in young men and women. In older men and women there is no difference in sympathetic BRS to increasing and decreasing DBP. We investigated whether the sensitivity of the central nervous system to increasing and decreasing DBP is dependent upon baseline muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). We hypothesised that the difference in sympathetic BRS between falling and rising segments of DBP would be positively related to baseline MSNA in 30 young men, 21 young women, 14 older men and 14 postmenopausal women. MSNA was measured using peroneal microneurography and BRS was measured using the spontaneous baroreflex threshold technique. On average, sympathetic BRS was greater during decreasing compared to increasing DBP in young men (P 0.05). In summary, baseline MSNA plays a role in determining sympathetic BRS to falling and rising DBP in young and older men and postmenopausal women, but not in young women. This relationship is consistent with a decreased potential for sympathoexcitation in people with higher resting MSNA. Furthermore, the lack of relationship in young women suggests important contributions of sex hormones to differential responses of MSNA to falling and rising pressures. PMID:21540345

  5. Sympathetic nerve activity and whole body heat stress in humans

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    Low, David A.; Keller, David M.; Wingo, Jonathan E.; Brothers, R. Matthew; Crandall, Craig G.

    2011-01-01

    We and others have shown that moderate passive whole body heating (i.e., increased internal temperature ∼0.7°C) increases muscle (MSNA) and skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA). It is unknown, however, if MSNA and/or SSNA continue to increase with more severe passive whole body heating or whether these responses plateau following moderate heating. The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that MSNA and SSNA continue to increase from a moderate to a more severe heat stress. Th...

  6. Study of sympathetic nerve activity in young Indian obese individuals

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    B Kalpana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is the culmination of a chronic imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. This energy balance can be potentially affected by the activity of autonomic nervous system (ANS. Altered sympathetic nerve function may be of importance in obesity. Objective: The present study is an attempt to pinpoint the defect (if any in the activity of sympathetic limb of the ANS in obesity, by subjecting to isometric exercise stress. Materials and Methods: A total of 81 females belonging to the age group of 18-22 years were recruited for the study. The participants were divided into two groups as normal weight and obese based on WHO guidelines for Asia Pacific region. After recording the resting blood pressure, they were subjected to isometric exercise by Handgrip dynamometer. Blood pressure was recorded again, and the difference was noted down. All recorded parameters were compared between two groups using unpaired t test. The relationship between body mass index (BMI and rise in diastolic pressure was quantified by Pearson′s correlation test. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In obese, the diastolic pressure was significantly higher at rest, but showed reduced rise during handgrip test in comparison with normal weight individuals. Also, the rise in diastolic pressure exhibited a negative relation with BMI. Conclusion: The result is suggestive of impaired autonomic function at rest and reduced sympathetic activity in the group of obese when subjected to stress. This could make them more prone for future development of hypertension or other cardiovascular disorders.

  7. Baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity: a nonpharmacological measure of baroreflex sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Emma C.; Joyner, Michael J.; Wallin, B. Gunnar; Karlsson, Tomas; Curry, Timothy B.; Charkoudian, Nisha

    2009-01-01

    The sensitivity of baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) represents the responsiveness of SNA to changes in blood pressure. In a slightly different analysis, the baroreflex threshold measures the probability of whether a sympathetic burst will occur at a given diastolic blood pressure. We hypothesized that baroreflex threshold analysis could be used to estimate the sensitivity of the sympathetic baroreflex measured by the pharmacological modified Oxford test. We compared four...

  8. Sympathetic nerve activity and whole body heat stress in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, David A; Keller, David M; Wingo, Jonathan E; Brothers, R Matthew; Crandall, Craig G

    2011-11-01

    We and others have shown that moderate passive whole body heating (i.e., increased internal temperature ∼0.7°C) increases muscle (MSNA) and skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA). It is unknown, however, if MSNA and/or SSNA continue to increase with more severe passive whole body heating or whether these responses plateau following moderate heating. The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that MSNA and SSNA continue to increase from a moderate to a more severe heat stress. Thirteen subjects, dressed in a water-perfused suit, underwent at least one passive heat stress that increased internal temperature ∼1.3°C, while either MSNA (n = 8) or SSNA (n = 8) was continuously recorded. Heat stress significantly increased mean skin temperature (Δ∼5°C, P heat stress (Δ core temperature 0.63 ± 0.01°C) when expressed as burst frequency (26 ± 14 to 45 ± 16 bursts/min, P = 0.001), burst incidence (39 ± 13 to 48 ± 14 bursts/100 cardiac cyles, P = 0.03), or total activity (317 ± 170 to 489 ± 150 units/min, P = 0.02) and continued to increase until the end of heat stress (burst frequency: 61 ± 15 bursts/min, P = 0.01; burst incidence: 56 ± 11 bursts/100 cardiac cyles, P = 0.04; total activity: 648 ± 158 units/min, P = 0.01) relative to the mid-heating stage. Similarly, SSNA (total activity) increased midway through the heat stress (normothermia; 1,486 ± 472 to mid heat stress 6,467 ± 5,256 units/min, P = 0.03) and continued to increase until the end of heat stress (11,217 ± 6,684 units/min, P = 0.002 vs. mid-heat stress). These results indicate that both MSNA and SSNA continue to increase as internal temperature is elevated above previously reported values.

  9. Visceral afferent activation-induced changes in sympathetic nerve activity and baroreflex sensitivity.

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    Saleh, T M; Connell, B J; Allen, G V

    1999-06-01

    The following experiments were done to determine whether changes in baroreflex sensitivity evoked by cervical vagus nerve stimulation are due to sympathoexcitation mediated by the parabrachial nucleus. The relative contribution of cardiopulmonary and general gastric afferents within the cervical vagus nerve to the depression in baroreflex sensitivity are also investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats anesthetized with thiobutabarbital sodium (50 mg/kg) were instrumented to measure blood pressure and heart rate or for the continuous monitoring of renal sympathetic nerve activity. Baroreflex sensitivity was measured using bolus injections of phenylephrine. Electrical stimulation of the cervical vagus (with or without the aortic depressor nerve) or the abdominal vagus nerve produced a significant increase in renal nerve activity and a decrease in baroreflex sensitivity. Both of these effects were blocked after the microinjection of lidocaine into the parabrachial nucleus before nerve stimulation. Therefore, we conclude that an increase in the activity of cardiac, pulmonary, or general gastric afferents mediated the increased sympathetic output and decreased baroreflex sensitivity via a pathway involving the parabrachial nucleus.

  10. Sex Comparisons in Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Arterial Pressure Oscillations During Progressive Central Hypovolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Specifically, the ‘reserve’ for autonomic responses associated with blood pressure-sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) coherence and vasoconstrictor reserves has...134. Convertino, V. A., C. A. Rickards, and K. L. Ryan. 2012. Autonomic mechanisms associated with heart rate and vasoconstrictor reserves. Clin. Auton

  11. Catheter-Based Renal Nerve Ablation and Centrally Generated Sympathetic Activity in Difficult-to-Control Hypertensive Patients: Prospective Case Series

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    Brinkmann, J.; Heusser, K.; Schmidt, B.M.; Menne, J.; Klein, G.; Bauersachs, J.; Haller, H.; Sweep, F.C.; Diedrich, A.; Jordan, J.; Tank, J.

    2012-01-01

    Endovascular renal nerve ablation has been developed to treat resistant hypertension. In addition to lowering efferent renal sympathetic activation, the intervention may attenuate central sympathetic outflow through decreased renal afferent nerve traffic, as evidenced by a recent case report. We

  12. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity is related to a surrogate marker of endothelial function in healthy individuals.

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    Yrsa Bergmann Sverrisdóttir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence from animal studies indicates the importance of an interaction between the sympathetic nervous system and the endothelium for cardiovascular regulation. However the interaction between these two systems remains largely unexplored in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate whether directly recorded sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow is related to a surrogate marker of endothelial function in healthy individuals. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 10 healthy normotensive subjects (3 f/7 m, (age 37+/-11 yrs, (BMI 24+/-3 kg/m(2 direct recordings of sympathetic action potentials to the muscle vascular bed (MSNA were performed and endothelial function estimated with the Reactive Hyperaemia- Peripheral Arterial Tonometry (RH-PAT technique. Blood samples were taken and time spent on leisure-time physical activities was estimated. In all subjects the rate between resting flow and the maximum flow, the Reactive Hyperemic index (RH-PAT index, was within the normal range (1.9-3.3 and MSNA was as expected for age and gender (13-44 burst/minute. RH-PAT index was inversely related to MSNA (r = -0.8, p = 0.005. RH-PAT index and MSNA were reciprocally related to time (h/week spent on physical activity (p = 0.005 and p = 0.006 respectively and platelet concentration (PLT (p = 0.02 and p = 0.004 respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that sympathetic nerve activity is related to a surrogate marker of endothelial function in healthy normotensive individuals, indicating that sympathetic outflow may be modulated by changes in endothelial function. In this study time spent on physical activity is identified as a predictor of sympathetic nerve activity and endothelial function in a group of healthy individuals. The results are of importance in understanding mechanisms underlying sympathetic activation in conditions associated with endothelial dysfunction and emphasise the importance of a daily exercise routine for maintenance of cardiovascular

  13. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity is related to a surrogate marker of endothelial function in healthy individuals.

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    Sverrisdóttir, Yrsa Bergmann; Jansson, Linda Marie; Hägg, Ulrika; Gan, Li-Ming

    2010-02-17

    Evidence from animal studies indicates the importance of an interaction between the sympathetic nervous system and the endothelium for cardiovascular regulation. However the interaction between these two systems remains largely unexplored in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate whether directly recorded sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow is related to a surrogate marker of endothelial function in healthy individuals. In 10 healthy normotensive subjects (3 f/7 m), (age 37+/-11 yrs), (BMI 24+/-3 kg/m(2)) direct recordings of sympathetic action potentials to the muscle vascular bed (MSNA) were performed and endothelial function estimated with the Reactive Hyperaemia- Peripheral Arterial Tonometry (RH-PAT) technique. Blood samples were taken and time spent on leisure-time physical activities was estimated. In all subjects the rate between resting flow and the maximum flow, the Reactive Hyperemic index (RH-PAT index), was within the normal range (1.9-3.3) and MSNA was as expected for age and gender (13-44 burst/minute). RH-PAT index was inversely related to MSNA (r = -0.8, p = 0.005). RH-PAT index and MSNA were reciprocally related to time (h/week) spent on physical activity (p = 0.005 and p = 0.006 respectively) and platelet concentration (PLT) (p = 0.02 and p = 0.004 respectively). Our results show that sympathetic nerve activity is related to a surrogate marker of endothelial function in healthy normotensive individuals, indicating that sympathetic outflow may be modulated by changes in endothelial function. In this study time spent on physical activity is identified as a predictor of sympathetic nerve activity and endothelial function in a group of healthy individuals. The results are of importance in understanding mechanisms underlying sympathetic activation in conditions associated with endothelial dysfunction and emphasise the importance of a daily exercise routine for maintenance of cardiovascular health.

  14. Carotid baroreflex regulation of sympathetic nerve activity during dynamic exercise in humans

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    Fadel, P. J.; Ogoh, S.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Wasmund, W.; Olivencia-Yurvati, A.; Smith, M. L.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    We sought to determine whether carotid baroreflex (CBR) control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was altered during dynamic exercise. In five men and three women, 23.8 +/- 0.7 (SE) yr of age, CBR function was evaluated at rest and during 20 min of arm cycling at 50% peak O(2) uptake using 5-s periods of neck pressure and neck suction. From rest to steady-state arm cycling, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly increased from 90.0 +/- 2.7 to 118.7 +/- 3.6 mmHg and MSNA burst frequency (microneurography at the peroneal nerve) was elevated by 51 +/- 14% (P baroreflex sensitivity for the control of MSNA at rest was the same as during exercise (P = 0.74) across the range of neck chamber pressures. Thus CBR control of sympathetic nerve activity appears to be preserved during moderate-intensity dynamic exercise.

  15. Advances in sympathetic nerve recording in humans

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    Elisabeth eLambert

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic nerve recording is commonly assessed by measuring the firing activity of a number of neurones. While the estimation of overall sympathetic nervous activity using this multiunit recording approach has advanced our understanding of sympathetic regulation in health and disease no information is gained regarding the underling mechanisms generating the bursts of sympathetic activity. The introduction of single-unit recording has been a major step forward, enabling the examination of specific sympathetic firing patterns in diverse clinical conditions. Disturbances in sympathetic nerve firing, including high firing probabilities, high firing rates or high incidence of multiple firing, or a combination of both, may have clinical implications with regards to the development and progression of target organ damage. Understanding the mechanisms and consequences of specific firing patterns would permit the development of therapeutic strategies targeting these nuances of sympathetic overdrive.

  16. Baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity in early heart failure assessed by the sequence method.

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    Lataro, Renata Maria; Silva, Luiz Eduardo Virgilio; Silva, Carlos Alberto Aguiar; Salgado, Helio Cesar; Fazan, Rubens

    2017-06-01

    The integrity of the baroreflex control of sympathetic activity in heart failure (HF) remains under debate. We proposed the use of the sequence method to assess the baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). The sequence method assesses the spontaneous arterial pressure (AP) fluctuations and their related changes in heart rate (or other efferent responses), providing the sensitivity and the effectiveness of the baroreflex. Effectiveness refers to the fraction of spontaneous AP changes that elicits baroreflex-mediated variations in the efferent response. Using three different approaches, we showed that the baroreflex sensitivity between AP and RSNA is not altered in early HF rats. However, the sequence method provided evidence that the effectiveness of baroreflex in changing RSNA in response to AP changes is markedly decreased in HF. The results help us better understand the baroreflex control of the sympathetic nerve activity. In heart failure (HF), the reflex control of the heart rate is known to be markedly impaired; however, the baroreceptor control of the sympathetic drive remains under debate. Applying the sequence method to a series of arterial pressure (AP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), we demonstrated a clear dysfunction in the baroreflex control of sympathetic activity in rats with early HF. We analysed the baroreflex control of the sympathetic drive using three different approaches: AP vs. RSNA curve, cross-spectral analysis and sequence method between AP and RSNA. The sequence method also provides the baroreflex effectiveness index (BEI), which represents the percentage of AP ramps that actually produce a reflex response. The methods were applied to control rats and rats with HF induced by myocardial infarction. None of the methods employed to assess the sympathetic baroreflex gain were able to detect any differences between the control and the HF group. However, rats with HF exhibited a lower BEI compared to the

  17. A Hypothalamic Leptin-Glutamate Interaction in the Regulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity

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    Hong Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated evidence indicates that obesity-induced type 2 diabetes (T2D is associated with enhanced sympathetic activation. The present study was conducted to investigate the role for leptin-glutamate signaling within the hypothalamus in regulating sympathetic nerve activity. In anesthetized rats, microinjections of leptin (5 ng ~ 100 ng into the arcuate nucleus (ARCN and paraventricular nucleus (PVN induced increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA, blood pressure (BP, and heart rate (HR. Prior microinjections of NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 (16 pmol into the ARCN or PVN reduced leptin-induced increases in RSNA, BP, and HR in both ARCN and PVN. Knockdown of a leptin receptor with siRNA inhibited NMDA-induced increases in RSNA, BP, and HR in the ARCN but not in the PVN. Confocal calcium imaging in the neuronal NG108 and astrocytic C6 cells demonstrated that preincubation with leptin induced an increase in intracellular calcium green fluorescence when the cells were challenged with glutamate. In high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin-induced T2D rats, we found that leptin receptor and NMDA NR1 receptor expressions in the ARCN and PVN were significantly increased. In conclusion, these studies provide evidence that within the hypothalamic nuclei, leptin-glutamate signaling regulates the sympathetic activation. This may contribute to the sympathoexcitation commonly observed in obesity-related T2D.

  18. Jugular venous overflow of noradrenaline from the brain: a neurochemical indicator of cerebrovascular sympathetic nerve activity in humans

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    Mitchell, D.A.; Lambert, G.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    A novel neurochemical method was applied for studying the activity of sympathetic nerves in the human cerebral vascular system. The aim was to investigate whether noradrenaline plasma kinetic measurements made with internal jugular venous sampling reflect cerebrovascular sympathetic activity. A d...

  19. Heart rate variability and muscle sympathetic nerve activity response to acute stress: the effect of breathing

    OpenAIRE

    DeBeck, Lindsay D.; Petersen, Stewart R.; Jones, Kelvin E.; Stickland, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested a relationship between low-frequency power of heart rate variability (HRV; LF in normalized units, LFnu) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). However, investigations have not systematically controlled for breathing, which can modulate both HRV and MSNA. Accordingly, the aims of this experiment were to investigate the possibility of parallel responses in MSNA and HRV (LFnu) to selected acute stressors and the effect of controlled breathing. After data w...

  20. Acute electromyostimulation decreases muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients with advanced chronic heart failure (EMSICA Study.

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    Marc Labrunée

    Full Text Available Muscle passive contraction of lower limb by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES is frequently used in chronic heart failure (CHF patients but no data are available concerning its action on sympathetic activity. However, Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS is able to improve baroreflex in CHF. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of TENS and NMES compared to Sham stimulation on sympathetic overactivity as assessed by Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity (MSNA.We performed a serie of two parallel, randomized, double blinded and sham controlled protocols in twenty-two CHF patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA Class III. Half of them performed stimulation by TENS, and the others tested NMES.Compare to Sham stimulation, both TENS and NMES are able to reduce MSNA (63.5 ± 3.5 vs 69.7 ± 3.1 bursts / min, p < 0.01 after TENS and 51.6 ± 3.3 vs 56.7 ± 3.3 bursts / min, p < 0, 01 after NMES. No variation of blood pressure, heart rate or respiratory parameters was observed after stimulation.The results suggest that sensory stimulation of lower limbs by electrical device, either TENS or NMES, could inhibit sympathetic outflow directed to legs in CHF patients. These properties could benefits CHF patients and pave the way for a new non-pharmacological approach of CHF.

  1. Attenuated baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity after cardiovascular deconditioning in rats

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    Moffitt, J. A.; Foley, C. M.; Schadt, J. C.; Laughlin, M. H.; Hasser, E. M.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of cardiovascular deconditioning on baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system was evaluated after 14 days of hindlimb unloading (HU) or the control condition. Rats were chronically instrumented with catheters and sympathetic nerve recording electrodes for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) and recording of lumbar (LSNA) or renal (RSNA) sympathetic nerve activity. Experiments were conducted 24 h after surgery, with the animals in a normal posture. Baroreflex function was assessed using a logistic function that related HR and LSNA or RSNA to MAP during infusion of phenylephrine and nitroprusside. Baroreflex influence on HR was not affected by HU. Maximum baroreflex-elicited LSNA was significantly reduced in HU rats (204 +/- 11.9 vs. 342 +/- 30.6% baseline LSNA), as was maximum reflex gain (-4.0 +/- 0.6 vs. -7.8 +/- 1.3 %LSNA/mmHg). Maximum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (259 +/- 10.8 vs. 453 +/- 28.0% baseline RSNA), minimum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (-2 +/- 2.8 vs. 13 +/- 4.5% baseline RSNA), and maximum gain (-5.8 +/- 0.5 vs. -13.6 +/- 3.1 %RSNA/mmHg) were significantly decreased in HU rats. Results demonstrate that baroreflex modulation of sympathetic nervous system activity is attenuated after cardiovascular deconditioning in rodents. Data suggest that alterations in the arterial baroreflex may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after a period of bedrest or spaceflight in humans.

  2. Cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity are absent in familial dysautonomia

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    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (Riley–Day syndrome) is an hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN type III), expressed at birth, that is associated with reduced pain and temperature sensibilities and absent baroreflexes, causing orthostatic hypotension as well as labile blood pressure that increases markedly during emotional excitement. Given the apparent absence of functional baroreceptor afferents, we tested the hypothesis that the normal cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) are absent in patients with familial dysautonomia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into muscle or cutaneous fascicles of the common peroneal nerve in 12 patients with familial dysautonomia. Spontaneous bursts of MSNA were absent in all patients, but in five patients we found evidence of tonically firing sympathetic neurones, with no cardiac rhythmicity, that increased their spontaneous discharge during emotional arousal but not during a manoeuvre that unloads the baroreceptors. Conversely, skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), recorded in four patients, appeared normal. We conclude that the loss of phasic bursts of MSNA and the loss of baroreflex modulation of muscle vasoconstrictor drive contributes to the poor control of blood pressure in familial dysautonomia, and that the increase in tonic firing of muscle vasoconstrictor neurones contributes to the increase in blood pressure during emotional excitement. PMID:23165765

  3. Impact of Non-Invasive Ventilation on Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

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    Haarmann, Helge; Folle, Jan; Nguyen, Xuan Phuc; Herrmann, Peter; Heusser, Karsten; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Andreas, Stefan; Raupach, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with elevated sympathetic nerve activity, which is probably linked to an increased cardiovascular risk, and may contribute to muscle dysfunction by heightened muscle vasoconstrictor drive. We hypothesized that resistive unloading of respiratory muscles by intermittent non-invasive ventilation (NIV) reduces sympathetic tone at rest and during subsequent handgrip exercise in patients with COPD. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in the peroneal nerve, heart rate, blood pressure, CO 2 , and SpO 2 were continuously recorded in 5 COPD patients with intermittent NIV and 11 control COPD patients without NIV. Static and dynamic handgrip exercises were performed before and after NIV. At baseline, heart rate-adjusted MSNA (bursts/100 heart beats) did not differ between groups. NIV did not significantly affect MSNA levels at rest. However, during handgrip exercises directly following NIV, MSNA was lower than before, which was significant for dynamic handgrip (67.00 ± 3.70 vs. 62.13 ± 4.50 bursts/100 heart beats; p = 0.035 in paired t test). In contrast, MSNA (non-significantly) increased in the control group during repeated dynamic or static handgrip. During dynamic handgrip, tCO 2 was lower after NIV than before (change by -5.04 ± 0.68 mmHg vs. -0.53 ± 0.64 in the control group; p = 0.021), while systolic and diastolic blood pressure did not change significantly. NIV reduces sympathetic activation during subsequent dynamic handgrip exercise and thereby may elicit positive effects on the cardiovascular system as well as on muscle function in patients with COPD.

  4. Differentiated baroreflex modulation of sympathetic nerve activity during deep brain stimulation in humans.

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    Sverrisdóttir, Yrsa B; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu Z; Bahuri, Nor Faizal A; Hyam, Jonathan; Basnayake, Shanika D; Paterson, David J

    2014-05-01

    Targeted electric deep brain stimulation in midbrain nuclei in humans alters cardiovascular parameters, presumably by modulating autonomic and baroreflex function. Baroreflex modulation of sympathetic outflow is crucial for cardiovascular regulation and is hypothesized to occur at 2 distinct brain locations. The aim of this study was to evaluate sympathetic outflow in humans with deep brain stimulating electrodes during ON and OFF stimulation of specific midbrain nuclei known to regulate cardiovascular function. Multiunit muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded in 17 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for treatment of chronic neuropathic pain (n=7) and Parkinson disease (n=10). Sympathetic outflow was recorded during ON and OFF stimulation. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory frequency were monitored during the recording session, and spontaneous vasomotor and cardiac baroreflex sensitivity were assessed. Head-up tilt testing was performed separately in the patients with Parkinson disease postoperatively. Stimulation of the dorsal most part of the subthalamic nucleus and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray resulted in improved vasomotor baroreflex sensitivity, decreased burst frequency and blood pressure, unchanged burst amplitude distribution, and a reduced fall in blood pressure after tilt. Stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray resulted in a shift in burst amplitude distribution toward larger amplitudes, decreased spontaneous beat-to-beat blood pressure variability, and unchanged burst frequency, baroreflex sensitivity, and blood pressure. Our results indicate that a differentiated regulation of sympathetic outflow occurs in the subthalamic nucleus and periaqueductal gray. These results may have implications in our understanding of abnormal sympathetic discharge in cardiovascular disease and provide an opportunity for therapeutic targeting.

  5. Increased sympathetic nerve activity and reduced cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Adlan, Ahmed M; Paton, Julian F R; Lip, Gregory Y H; Kitas, George D; Fisher, James P

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Increased sympathetic nerve activity and reduced cardiac baroreflex sensitivity heighten cardiovascular risk, althogh whether such autonomic dysfunction is present in RA is not known. In the present study, we observed an increased sympathetic nerve activity and reduced cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in patients with RA compared to matched controls. Pain was positively correlated with sympathetic nerve activity and negatively correlated with cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. The pattern of autonomic dysfunction that we describe may help to explain the increased cardiovascular risk in RA, and raises the possibility that optimizing pain management may resolve autonomic dysfunction in RA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity/mortality and an incompletely understood pathophysiology. In animal studies, central and blood borne inflammatory cytokines that can be elevated in RA evoke pathogenic increases in sympathetic activity and reductions in baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). We hypothesized that muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was increased and BRS decreased in RA. MSNA, blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were recorded in age- and sex-matched RA-normotensive (n = 13), RA-hypertensive patients (RA-HTN; n = 17), normotensive (NC; n = 17) and hypertensive controls (HTN; n = 16). BRS was determined using the modified Oxford technique. Inflammation and pain were determined using serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and a visual analogue scale (VAS), respectively. MSNA was elevated similarly in RA, RA-HTN and HTN patients (32 ± 9, 35 ± 14, 37 ± 8 bursts min -1 ) compared to NC (22 ± 9 bursts min -1 ; P = 0.004). Sympathetic BRS was similar between groups (P = 0.927), whereas cardiac BRS (cBRS) was reduced in RA, RA-HTN and HTN

  6. The pedunculopontine tegmentum controls renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiorespiratory activities in nembutal-anesthetized rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Fink

    Full Text Available Elevated renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA accompanies a variety of complex disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Understanding pathophysiologic renal mechanisms is important for determining why hypertension is both a common sequelae and a predisposing factor of these disorders. The role of the brainstem in regulating RSNA remains incompletely understood. The pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT is known for regulating behaviors including alertness, locomotion, and rapid eye movement sleep. Activation of PPT neurons in anesthetized rats was previously found to increase splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure, in addition to altering breathing. The present study is the first investigation of the PPT and its potential role in regulating RSNA. Microinjections of DL-homocysteic acid (DLH were used to probe the PPT in 100-μm increments in Nembutal-anesthetized rats to identify effective sites, defined as locations where changes in RSNA could be evoked. A total of 239 DLH microinjections were made in 18 rats, which identified 20 effective sites (each confirmed by the ability to evoke a repeatable sympathoexcitatory response. Peak increases in RSNA occurred within 10-20 seconds of PPT activation, with RSNA increasing by 104.5 ± 68.4% (mean ± standard deviation from baseline. Mean arterial pressure remained significantly elevated for 30 seconds, increasing from 101.6 ± 18.6 mmHg to 135.9 ± 36.4 mmHg. DLH microinjections also increased respiratory rate and minute ventilation. The effective sites were found throughout the rostal-caudal extent of the PPT with most located in the dorsal regions of the nucleus. The majority of PPT locations tested with DLH microinjections did not alter RSNA (179 sites, suggesting that the neurons that confer renal sympathoexcitatory functions comprise a small component of the PPT. The study also underscores the importance of further investigation to

  7. Insulin enhances the gain of arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin N; Deo, Shekhar H; Chaudhary, Kunal; Thyfault, John P; Fadel, Paul J

    2010-09-15

    Recent animal studies indicate that insulin increases arterial baroreflex control of lumbar sympathetic nerve activity; however, the extent to which these findings can be extrapolated to humans is unknown. To begin to address this, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and arterial blood pressure were measured in 19 healthy subjects (27 ± 1 years) before, and for 120 min following, two common methodologies used to evoke sustained increases in plasma insulin: a mixed meal and a hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp. Weighted linear regression analysis between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was used to determine the gain (i.e. sensitivity) of arterial baroreflex control of MSNA. Plasma insulin was significantly elevated within 30 min following meal intake (34 ± 6 uIU ml(1); P gain for burst incidence and total MSNA was increased and remained elevated for the duration of the protocol (e.g. burst incidence gain: 3.29 ± 0.54 baseline vs. 5.64 ± 0.67 bursts (100 heart beats)(1) mmHg(1) at 120 min; P gain was similarly enhanced (e.g. burst incidence gain: 2.44 ± 0.29 baseline vs. 4.74 ± 0.71 bursts (100 heart beats)(1) mmHg(1) at 120 min; P gain remained unchanged. These findings demonstrate, for the first time in healthy humans, that increases in plasma insulin enhance the gain of arterial baroreflex control of MSNA.

  8. Resting sympathetic nerve activity is related to age, sex and arterial pressure but not to α2-adrenergic receptor subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Azhar; West, Robert M; Galloway, Stacey L; Drinkhill, Mark J; Mary, David A S G; Greenwood, John P; Ball, Stephen G

    2010-10-01

    Sympathetic nerve hyperactivity has been associated with hypertension and heart failure and their cardiovascular complications. The α2-adrenergic receptors have been proposed to play a prominent role in the control of sympathetic neural output, and their malfunction to constitute a potential central mechanism for sympathetic hyperactivity of essential hypertension. Reports on the relationship between variant alleles of α2-adrenergic receptor subtypes and sympathetic drive or its effects, however, have not been consistent. Therefore, this study was planned to test the hypothesis that variant alleles of subtypes of α2-adrenergic receptors are associated with raised muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in man. One hundred and seventy-two individuals, with a wide range of arterial pressure, were prospectively examined. Resting MSNA was quantified from multiunit bursts and from single units, and α2-adrenergic receptor subtypes were genotyped from DNA extracted from leucocytes and quantified by spectrophotometry. No significant relationships between variant alleles of any of the α2A, α2B or α2C subtypes and raised muscle sympathetic activity were found. In contrast, MSNA showed a marked significant curvilinear relationship with age and systolic pressure; sex had a small but statistically significant effect. The α2-adrenergic receptor variants had a similar frequency when hypertensive and normotensive individuals were compared. Variant alleles of three α2-adrenergic receptor subtypes were not related to resting muscle sympathetic nerve hyperactivity, indicating that their functional differences shown in vitro are not reflected in sympathetic activity in man. Age had a marked effect likely influencing arterial pressure through sympathetic activity.

  9. Entrainment pattern between sympathetic and phrenic nerve activities in the Sprague-Dawley rat: hypoxia-evoked sympathetic activity during expiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Thomas E; Hsieh, Y-H; Morrison, Shaun; Coles, Sharon K; Prabhakar, Nanduri

    2004-06-01

    Sympathetic and respiratory motor activities are entrained centrally. We hypothesize that this coupling may partially underlie changes in sympathetic activity evoked by hypoxia due to activity-dependent changes in the respiratory pattern. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) expresses a short-term potentiation in activity after hypoxia similar to that expressed in phrenic nerve activity (PNA). Adult male, Sprague-Dawley (Zivic Miller) rats (n = 19) were anesthetized (Equithesin), vagotomized, paralyzed, ventilated, and pneumothoracotomized. We recorded PNA and splanchnic SNA (sSNA) and generated cycle-triggered averages (CTAs) of rectified and integrated sSNA before, during, and after exposures to hypoxia (8% O(2) and 92% N(2) for 45 s). Inspiration (I) and expiration (E) were divided in half, and the average and area of integrated sSNA were calculated and compared at the following time points: before hypoxia, at the peak breathing frequency during hypoxia, immediately before the end of hypoxia, immediately after hypoxia, and 60 s after hypoxia. In our animal model, sSNA bursts consistently followed the I-E phase transition. With hypoxia, sSNA increased in both halves of E, but preferentially in the second rather than the first half of E, and decreased in I. After hypoxia, sSNA decreased abruptly, but the coefficient of variation in respiratory modulation of sSNA was significantly less than that at baseline. The hypoxic-evoked changes in sympathetic activity and respiratory pattern resulted in sSNA in the first half of E being correlated negatively to that in the second half of E (r = -0.65, P hypoxia, the variability in the entrainment pattern had returned to baseline. The preferential recruitment of late expiratory sSNA during hypoxia results from either activation by expiratory-modulated neurons or by non-modulated neurons whose excitatory drive is not gated during late E.

  10. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M Salman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n=16 were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2 and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2 activation and acute stress (open-field exposure, were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro and creatinine (Ucr levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2±0.1 vs. 0.6±0.1 µV, p<0.05 and MAP (151±8 vs. 97±2 mmHg, p<0.05 compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with Ucr (r=-0.80, p=0.002 and positively correlated with RSNA (r=0.66, p=0.014, with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p<0.05. This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways.

  11. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during cold pressor test in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that baroreceptor modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and heart rate is altered during the cold pressor test. Ten subjects were exposed to a cold pressor test by immersing a hand in ice water for 3 min while arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and MSNA were recorded. During the second and third minute of the cold pressor test, blood pressure was lowered and then raised by intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was more negative (P baroreflex modulation of MSNA is elevated without altering the sensitivity of baroreflex control of heart rate.

  12. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during posthandgrip muscle ischemia in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Wilson, T. E.; Shibasaki, M.; Hodges, N. A.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    To identify whether muscle metaboreceptor stimulation alters baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), MSNA, beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure (Finapres), and electrocardiogram were recorded in 11 healthy subjects in the supine position. Subjects performed 2 min of isometric handgrip exercise at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2.5 min of posthandgrip muscle ischemia. During muscle ischemia, blood pressure was lowered and then raised by intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was more negative (P baroreflex modulation of MSNA is elevated by muscle metaboreceptor stimulation, whereas the sensitivity of baroreflex of modulate heart rate is unchanged during posthandgrip muscle ischemia.

  13. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiradentes, R.V. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Pires, J.G.P. [Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Silva, N.F. [Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Ramage, A.G. [Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Santuzzi, C.H. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Futuro, H.A. Neto [Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Vitória, Vitória, ES (Brazil)

    2014-05-30

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33±4.7 and -31±5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35±5.4 and -31±5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3±2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4±8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central.

  14. Augmented supraorbital skin sympathetic nerve activity responses to symptom trigger events in rosacea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler-Wilson, Kristen; Toma, Kumika; Sammons, Dawn L; Mann, Sarah; Jurovcik, Andrew J; Demidova, Olga; Wilson, Thad E

    2015-09-01

    Facial flushing in rosacea is often induced by trigger events. However, trigger causation mechanisms are currently unclear. This study tested the central hypothesis that rosacea causes sympathetic and axon reflex-mediated alterations resulting in trigger-induced symptomatology. Twenty rosacea patients and age/sex-matched controls participated in one or a combination of symptom triggering stressors. In protocol 1, forehead skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA; supraorbital microneurography) was measured during sympathoexcitatory mental (2-min serial subtraction of novel numbers) and physical (2-min isometric handgrip) stress. In protocol 2, forehead skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and transepithelial water loss/sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured during sympathoexcitatory heat stress (whole body heating by perfusing 50°C water through a tube-lined suit). In protocol 3, cheek, forehead, forearm, and palm skin blood flow were measured during nonpainful local heating to induce axon reflex vasodilation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded via finger photoplethysmography to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; flux·100/MAP). Higher patient transepithelial water loss was observed (rosacea 0.20 ± 0.02 vs. control 0.10 ± 0.01 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P rosacea and controls, respectively) stress was augmented in rosacea (both P rosacea compared with controls. No axon reflex vasodilation differences were observed between groups. These data indicate that rosacea affects SSNA and that hyperresponsiveness to trigger events appears to have a sympathetic component. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Effects of Spinal Cord Stimulation on Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Patients with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naar, Jan; Jaye, Deborah; Linde, Cecilia; Neužil, Petr; Doškář, Petr; Málek, Filip; Braunschweig, Frieder; Lund, Lars H; Mortensen, Lars; Linderoth, Bengt; Lind, Göran; Bone, Dianna; Scholte, Arthur J; Kueffer, Fred; Koehler, Jodi; Shahgaldi, Kambiz; Lang, Otto; Ståhlberg, Marcus

    2017-05-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) reduces sympathetic activity in animal models of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF) but limited data exist of SCS in patients with HF. The aim of the present study was to test the primary hypothesis that SCS reduces cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in HF patients. Secondary hypotheses were that SCS improves left ventricular function and dimension, exercise capacity, and clinical variables relevant to HF. HF patients with a SCS device previously participating in the DEFEAT-HF trial were included in this crossover study with 6-week intervention periods (SCS-ON and SCS-OFF). SCS (50 Hz, 210-μs pulse duration, aiming at T2-T4 segments) was delivered for 12 hours daily. Indices of myocardial sympathetic neuronal function (heart-to-mediastinum ratio, HMR) and activity (washout rate, WR) were assessed using 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. Echocardiography, exercise testing, and clinical data collection were also performed. We included 13 patients (65.3 ± 8.0 years, nine males) and MIBG scintigraphy data were available in 10. HMR was not different comparing SCS-ON (1.37 ± 0.16) and SCS-OFF (1.41 ± 0.21, P = 0.46). WR was also unchanged comparing SCS-ON (41.5 ± 5.3) and SCS-OFF (39.1 ± 5.8, P = 0.30). Similarly, average New York Heart Association class (2.4 ± 0.5 vs 2.3 ± 0.6, P = 0.34), quality of life score (24 ± 16 vs 24 ± 16, P = 0.94), and left ventricular dimension and function as well as exercise capacity were all unchanged comparing SCS-ON and SCS-OFF. In patients with HF, SCS (12 hours daily, targeting the T2-T4 segments of the spinal cord) does not appear to influence cardiac sympathetic neuronal activity or function as assessed by MIBG scintigraphy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Leptin differentially increases sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation in female rats: role of oestrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-01-01

    Key points Leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, which contributes to obesity-induced hypertension; however, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. We report that leptin does increase SNA and heart rate in female rats; however, for lumbar and renal SNA, this action is only evident in pro-oestrus and in oestrogen-treated ovariectomized rats, but not in ovariectomized or dioestrus rats. Leptin increases SNA and heart rate similarly in male and pro-oestrus female rats; however, leptin increases arterial pressure only in males. Blockade of MC3/4 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) with SHU9119 decreases SNA in leptin-treated pro-oestrus rats, suggesting that leptin increases SNA in part by increasing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone drive of PVN presympathetic neurons. Our data establish sex differences in leptin's effects to increase SNA and arterial pressure, which emphasizes the need for enhanced recognition and investigation of sex differences in obesity-induced sympathoexcitation and hypertension. Abstract Obesity and hypertension are commonly associated, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system is considered to be a major contributor, at least in part due to the central actions of leptin. However, while leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) leptin increases lumbar (LSNA) and renal (RSNA) SNA and baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA in α-chloralose anaesthetized female rats, but only during pro-oestrus. In contrast, i.c.v. leptin increased basal and baroreflex control of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats in both the pro-oestrus and dioestrus states. The effects of leptin on basal LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR were similar in males and pro-oestrus females; however, i.c.v. leptin increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) only in males. Leptin did not alter LSNA or HR

  17. Muscle sympathetic nerve responses to passive and active one-legged cycling: insights into the contributions of central command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Connor J; Incognito, Anthony V; Notay, Karambir; Burns, Matthew J; Slysz, Joshua T; Seed, Jeremy D; Nardone, Massimo; Burr, Jamie F; Millar, Philip J

    2018-01-01

    The contribution of central command to the peripheral vasoconstrictor response during exercise has been investigated using primarily handgrip exercise. The purpose of the present study was to compare muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responses during passive (involuntary) and active (voluntary) zero-load cycling to gain insights into the effects of central command on sympathetic outflow during dynamic exercise. Hemodynamic measurements and contralateral leg MSNA (microneurography) data were collected in 18 young healthy participants at rest and during 2 min of passive and active zero-load one-legged cycling. Arterial baroreflex control of MSNA burst occurrence and burst area were calculated separately in the time domain. Blood pressure and stroke volume increased during exercise ( P cycling ( P > 0.05). In contrast, heart rate, cardiac output, and total vascular conductance were greater during the first and second minute of active cycling ( P cycling ( P 0.05). Reductions in total MSNA were attenuated during the first ( P cycling, in concert with increased MSNA burst amplitude ( P = 0.02 and P = 0.005, respectively). The sensitivity of arterial baroreflex control of MSNA burst occurrence was lower during active than passive cycling ( P = 0.01), while control of MSNA burst strength was unchanged ( P > 0.05). These results suggest that central feedforward mechanisms are involved primarily in modulating the strength, but not the occurrence, of a sympathetic burst during low-intensity dynamic leg exercise. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Muscle sympathetic nerve activity burst frequency decreased equally during passive and active cycling, but reductions in total muscle sympathetic nerve activity were attenuated during active cycling. These results suggest that central command primarily regulates the strength, not the occurrence, of a muscle sympathetic burst during low-intensity dynamic leg exercise.

  18. Arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, Seth W; Vianna, Lauro C; Restaino, Robert M; Chaudhary, Kunal; Young, Colin N; Fadel, Paul J

    2016-11-01

    Despite greater blood pressure reactivity to acute cardiovascular stressors and a higher prevalence of hypertension in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients, limited information is available regarding arterial baroreflex (ABR) control in T2D. We hypothesized that ABR control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and heart rate (HR) are attenuated in T2D patients. Seventeen T2D patients (50 ± 2 yr; 31 ± 1 kg/m 2 ), 9 weight-matched controls (WM-CON, 46 ± 2 yr; 32 ± 2 kg/m 2 ) and 10 lean controls (Lean-CON, 49 ± 3 yr; 23 ± 1 kg/m 2 ), underwent bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside (100 μg) followed 60 s later by phenylephrine (150 μg) and weighted linear regression performed. No group differences in overall sympathetic baroreflex gain were observed (T2D: -2.5 ± 0.3 vs. WM-CON: -2.6 ± 0.2 vs. Lean-CON: -2.7 ± 0.4 arbitrary units·beat·mmHg -1 , P > 0.05) or in sympathetic baroreflex gain when derived separately during blood pressure (BP) falls (nitroprusside) and BP rises (phenylephrine). In contrast, overall cardiac baroreflex gain was reduced in T2D patients compared with Lean-CON (T2D: 8.2 ± 1.5 vs. Lean-CON: 15.6 ± 2.9 ms·mmHg -1 , P baroreflex gain was reduced in T2D patients and weight-matched controls compared with lean controls (P 0.05). Sympathetic and cardiac ABR gains were comparable between normotensive and hypertensive T2D patients (P > 0.05). These findings suggest preserved ABR control of MSNA in T2D patients compared with both obese and lean age-matched counterparts, with a selective impairment in ABR HR control in T2D that may be related to obesity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Contributions of central command and muscle feedback to sympathetic nerve activity in contracting human skeletal muscle

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    Daniel eBoulton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During voluntary contractions, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA to contracting muscles increases in proportion to force but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. To shed light on these mechanisms, particularly the influences of central command and muscle afferent feedback, the present study tested the hypothesis that MSNA is greater during voluntary compared with electrically-evoked contractions. Seven male subjects performed a series of 1-minute isometric dorsiflexion contractions (left leg separated by 2-minute rest periods, alternating between voluntary and electrically-evoked contractions at similar forces (5-10 % of maximum. MSNA was recorded continuously (microneurography from the left peroneal nerve and quantified from cardiac-synchronised, negative-going spikes in the neurogram. Compared with pre-contraction values, MSNA increased by 51 ± 34 % (P 0.05. MSNA analysed at 15-s intervals revealed that this effect of voluntary contraction appeared 15-30 s after contraction onset (P < 0.01, remained elevated until the end of contraction, and disappeared within 15 s after contraction. These findings suggest that central command, and not feedback from contracting muscle, is the primary mechanism responsible for the increase in MSNA to contracting muscle. The time-course of MSNA suggests that there is a longer delay in the onset of this effect compared with its cessation after contraction.

  20. Deciphering the Neural Control of Sympathetic Nerve Activity: Status Report and Directions for Future Research

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    Susan M. Barman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA contributes appreciably to the control of physiological function, such that pathological alterations in SNA can lead to a variety of diseases. The goal of this review is to discuss the characteristics of SNA, briefly review the methodology that has been used to assess SNA and its control, and to describe the essential role of neurophysiological studies in conscious animals to provide additional insights into the regulation of SNA. Studies in both humans and animals have shown that SNA is rhythmic or organized into bursts whose frequency varies depending on experimental conditions and the species. These rhythms are generated by brainstem neurons, and conveyed to sympathetic preganglionic neurons through several pathways, including those emanating from the rostral ventrolateral medulla. Although rhythmic SNA is present in decerebrate animals (indicating that neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord are adequate to generate this activity, there is considerable evidence that a variety of supratentorial structures including the insular and prefrontal cortices, amygdala, and hypothalamic subnuclei provide inputs to the brainstem regions that regulate SNA. It is also known that the characteristics of SNA are altered during stress and particular behaviors such as the defense response and exercise. While it is a certainty that supratentorial structures contribute to changes in SNA during these behaviors, the neural underpinnings of the responses are yet to be established. Understanding how SNA is modified during affective responses and particular behaviors will require neurophysiological studies in awake, behaving animals, including those that entail recording activity from neurons that generate SNA. Recent studies have shown that responses of neurons in the central nervous system to most sensory inputs are context-specific. Future neurophysiological studies in conscious animals should also ascertain whether this general

  1. Autonomic markers of emotional processing: skin sympathetic nerve activity in humans during exposure to emotionally-charged images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael eBrown

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic innervation of the skin primarily subserves thermoregulation, but the system has also been commandeered as a means of expressing emotion. While it is known that the level of skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA is affected by anxiety, the majority of emotional studies have utilized the galvanic skin response as a means of inferring increases in SSNA. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the changes in SSNA when showing subjects neutral or emotionally-charged images from the International Affective Picture System. Skin sympathetic nerve activity was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into cutaneous fascicles of the common peroneal nerve in ten subjects. Neutral images, positively-charged images (erotica or negatively-charged images (mutilation were presented in blocks of fifteen images of a specific type, each block lasting two minutes. Images of erotica or mutilation were presented in a quasi-random fashion, each block following a block of neutral images. Both images of erotica or images of mutilation caused significant increases in SSNA, but the increases in SSNA were greater for mutilation. The increases in SSNA were often coupled with sweat release and cutaneous vasoconstriction, however, these markers were not always consistent with the SSNA increases. We conclude that SSNA, comprising cutaneous vasoconstrictor and sudomotor activity, increases with both positively-charged and negatively-charged emotional images. Measurement of SSNA provides a more comprehensive assessment of sympathetic outflow to the skin than does the use of sweat release alone as a marker of emotional processing.

  2. Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation in healthy humans reduces sympathetic nerve activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Clancy, JA; Mary, DA; Witte, KK; Greenwood, JP; Deuchars, SA; Deuchars, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is currently used to treat refractory epilepsy and is being investigated as a potential therapy for a range of conditions, including heart failure, tinnitus, obesity and Alzheimer's disease. However, the invasive nature and expense limits the use of VNS in patient populations and hinders the exploration of the mechanisms involved. Objective: We investigated a non-invasive method of VNS through electrical stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagu...

  3. Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity During Intense Lower Body Negative Pressure to Presyncope in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-24

    maximal LBNP tolerance. Using this approach , absolute LBNP levels corresponded well to these ranges of percentages if subjects were able to continue at... patients with spinal cord injury display spontaneous bursts of MSNA, but activity is significantly lower than that of neurologically intact patients , and is...over sympathetic neural activity, and that this reduced baroreflex sensitivity is associated with syncope . We reasoned that if sympathetic baroreflexes

  4. Local heat application to the leg reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriyo; Nakamura, Takeshi; Kanno, Nami; Kimura, Kenichi; Toge, Yasushi; Lee, Kyu-Ha; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2011-09-01

    The study was designed to assess the effects of local heat (LH) application on postganglionic muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) measured by microneurography in healthy men. In the first protocol, MSNA of the left peroneal nerve, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and skin temperature of the shin (TSK) were recorded in nine men. In the second protocol, leg blood flow (LBF) was measured in the same subjects by strain-gauge plethysmography. In both protocols, after 10 min of rest in the supine position, a heated hydrocollator pack was applied to the shin and anterior foot for 15 min and recovery was monitored over a period of 20 min. TSK gradually increased from 31.7 ± 0.1 to 41.9 ± 0.5°C (mean ± SEM) during LH. No subject complained of pain, and BP and HR remained constant. The MSNA burst rate (16.1 ± 2.1 beats/min) during the control period decreased significantly (P < 0.05) to 72.0 ± 2.3% during LH. Total MSNA also decreased to 59.2 ± 2.6% (P < 0.05) during LH, but both immediately returned to baseline at recovery. In contrast, LBF in the left leg significantly and immediately increased (P < 0.05) after LH application and remained significantly elevated until the end of the recovery period. These results suggest that: (1) LH application significantly attenuates MSNA without any changes in HR and BP. (2) Other factors in addition to MSNA seem to control regional blood flow in the lower extremity during LH.

  5. Skin sympathetic nerve activity in humans during exposure to emotionally-charged images: sex differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael eBrown

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While it is known that anxiety or emotional arousal affects skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA, the galvanic skin response (GSR is the most widely used parameter to infer increases in SSNA during stress or emotional studies. We recently showed that SSNA provides a more sensitive measure of emotional state than effector-organ responses. The aim of the present study was to assess whether there are gender differences in the responses of SSNA and other physiological parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, skin blood flow and sweat release, while subjects viewed neutral or emotionally-charged images from the International Affective Picture System. Changes in SSNA were assessed using microneurography in twenty subjects (ten male and ten female. Blocks of positively-charged (erotica or negatively-charge images (mutilation were presented in a quasi-random fashion, following a block of neutral images, with each block containing fifteen images and lasting two minutes. Images of both erotica and mutilation caused significant increases in SSNA, with increases being greater for males viewing erotica and greater for females viewing mutilation. The increases in SSNA were often coupled with sweat release and cutaneous vasoconstriction; however, these markers were not significantly different than those produced by viewing neutral images and were not always consistent with the SSNA increases. We conclude that SSNA increases with both positively-charged and negatively-charged emotional images, yet sex differences are present.

  6. Exercise training reduces sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure patients treated with carvedilol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Raffael; Franco, Fábio G; Roveda, Fabiana; de Matos, Luciana N J; Braga, Ana M F W; Rondon, Maria U P B; Rotta, Daniel R; Brum, Patricia C; Barretto, Antonio C P; Middlekauff, Holly R; Negrão, Carlos E

    2007-01-01

    Evidence suggests that carvedilol decreases muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in patients with heart failure (HF) but carvedilol fails to improve forearm vascular resistance and overall functional capacity. Exercise training in HF reduces MSNA and improves forearm vascular resistance and functional capacity. To investigate whether the beneficial effects exercise training on MSNA are maintained in the presence of carvedilol. Twenty seven HF patients, NYHA Class II-III, EF <35%, peak VO(2) <20 ml/kg/min, treated with carvedilol were randomly divided into two groups: exercise training (n=15) and untrained (n=12). MSNA was recorded by microneurography. Forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. The four-month training program consisted of three 60-min exercise/week on a cycloergometer. Baseline parameters were similar between groups. Exercise training reduced MSNA (-14+/-3.3 bursts/100 HB, p=0.001) and increased forearm blood flow (0.6+/-0.1 mL/min/100 g, p<0.001) in HF patients on carvedilol. In addition, exercise training improved peak VO(2) in HF patients (20+/-6%, p=0.002). MSNA, FBF and peak VO(2) were unchanged in untrained HF patients on carvedilol. Exercise training reduces MSNA in heart failure patients treated with carvedilol. In addition, the beneficial effects of exercise training on muscle blood flow and functional capacity are still realized in patients on carvedilol.

  7. Arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity during acute hypotension: effect of fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, P. J.; Stromstad, M.; Hansen, J.; Sander, M.; Horn, K.; Ogoh, S.; Smith, M. L.; Secher, N. H.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    We examined arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during abrupt decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and evaluated whether endurance training alters baroreflex function. Acute hypotension was induced nonpharmacologically in 14 healthy subjects, of which 7 were of high fitness (HF) and 7 were of average fitness (AF), by releasing a unilateral arterial thigh cuff after 9 min of resting ischemia under two conditions: control, which used aortic and carotid baroreflex (ABR and CBR, respectively) deactivation; and suction, which used ABR deactivation alone. The application of neck suction to counteract changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure during cuff release significantly attenuated the MSNA response (which increased 134 +/- 32 U/14 s) compared with control (which increased 195 +/- 43 U/14 s) and caused a greater decrease in MAP (19 +/- 2 vs. 15 +/- 2 mmHg; P control of MSNA. These data indicate that the CBR contributes importantly to the MSNA response during acute systemic hypotension. Additionally, we suggest that an impaired control of vascular reactivity hinders blood pressure regulation in HF subjects.

  8. Neuropeptide Y acts in the paraventricular nucleus to suppress sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Li, Baoxin; Reis, Wagner L; Clute-Reinig, Nicholas M; Stern, Javier E; Brooks, Virginia L

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a brain neuromodulator that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of energy balance, also acts centrally to inhibit sympathetic nerve activity (SNA); however, the site and mechanism of action are unknown. In chloralose-anaesthetized female rats, nanoinjection of NPY into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) dose-dependently suppressed lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation, and these effects were blocked by prior inhibition of NPY Y1 or Y5 receptors. Moreover, PVN injection of Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists in otherwise untreated rats increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA, indicating that endogenous NPY tonically inhibits PVN presympathetic neurons. The sympathoexcitation following blockade of PVN NPY inhibition was eliminated by prior PVN nanoinjection of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor inhibitor SHU9119. Moreover, presympathetic neurons, identified immunohistochemically using cholera toxin b neuronal tract tracing from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), express NPY Y1 receptor immunoreactivity, and patch-clamp recordings revealed that both NPY and α–melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) inhibit and stimulate, respectively, PVN–RVLM neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that PVN NPY inputs converge with α-MSH to influence presympathetic neurons. Together these results identify endogenous NPY as a novel and potent inhibitory neuromodulator within the PVN that may contribute to changes in SNA that occur in states associated with altered energy balance, such as obesity and pregnancy. PMID:24535439

  9. Baroreflex modulation of sympathetic nerve activity to muscle in heat-stressed humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    To identify whether whole body heating alters arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), MSNA and beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure were recorded in seven healthy subjects during acute hypotensive and hypertensive stimuli in both normothermic and heat stress conditions. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature (P 0.05). During both normothermic and heat stress conditions, MSNA increased and then decreased significantly when blood pressure was lowered and then raised via intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure during heat stress (-128.3 +/- 13.9 U x beats(-1) x mmHg(-1)) was similar (P = 0.31) with normothermia (-140.6 +/- 21.1 U x beats(-1) x mmHg(-1)). Moreover, no significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. These data suggest that arterial baroreflex modulation of MSNA and heart rate are not altered by whole body heating, with the exception of an upward shift of these baroreflex curves to accommodate changes in these variables that occur with whole body heating.

  10. Arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity during acute hypotension: effect of fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, P. J.; Stromstad, M.; Hansen, J.; Sander, M.; Horn, K.; Ogoh, S.; Smith, M. L.; Secher, N. H.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    We examined arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during abrupt decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and evaluated whether endurance training alters baroreflex function. Acute hypotension was induced nonpharmacologically in 14 healthy subjects, of which 7 were of high fitness (HF) and 7 were of average fitness (AF), by releasing a unilateral arterial thigh cuff after 9 min of resting ischemia under two conditions: control, which used aortic and carotid baroreflex (ABR and CBR, respectively) deactivation; and suction, which used ABR deactivation alone. The application of neck suction to counteract changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure during cuff release significantly attenuated the MSNA response (which increased 134 +/- 32 U/14 s) compared with control (which increased 195 +/- 43 U/14 s) and caused a greater decrease in MAP (19 +/- 2 vs. 15 +/- 2 mmHg; P baroreflex control of MSNA. These data indicate that the CBR contributes importantly to the MSNA response during acute systemic hypotension. Additionally, we suggest that an impaired control of vascular reactivity hinders blood pressure regulation in HF subjects.

  11. Slow and deep respiration suppresses steady-state sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure: from modeling to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Daisuke; Asanoi, Hidetsugu; Takagawa, Junya; Ishise, Hisanari; Ueno, Hiroshi; Oda, Yoshitaka; Goso, Yukiko; Joho, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2014-10-15

    Influences of slow and deep respiration on steady-state sympathetic nerve activity remain controversial in humans and could vary depending on disease conditions and basal sympathetic nerve activity. To elucidate the respiratory modulation of steady-state sympathetic nerve activity, we modeled the dynamic nature of the relationship between lung inflation and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in 11 heart failure patients with exaggerated sympathetic outflow at rest. An autoregressive exogenous input model was utilized to simulate entire responses of MSNA to variable respiratory patterns. In another 18 patients, we determined the influence of increasing tidal volume and slowing respiratory frequency on MSNA; 10 patients underwent a 15-min device-guided slow respiration and the remaining 8 had no respiratory modification. The model predicted that a 1-liter, step increase of lung volume decreased MSNA dynamically; its nadir (-33 ± 22%) occurred at 2.4 s; and steady-state decrease (-15 ± 5%), at 6 s. Actually, in patients with the device-guided slow and deep respiration, respiratory frequency effectively fell from 16.4 ± 3.9 to 6.7 ± 2.8/min (P steady-state MSNA was decreased by 31% (P steady-state MSNA. Thus slow and deep respiration suppresses steady-state sympathetic nerve activity in patients with high levels of resting sympathetic tone as in heart failure. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Mindfulness meditation lowers muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure in African-American males with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeanie; Lyles, Robert H; Bauer-Wu, Susan

    2014-07-01

    Mindfulness meditation (MM) is a stress-reduction technique that may have real biological effects on hemodynamics but has never previously been tested in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the potential blood pressure (BP)-lowering effects of MM are unknown. We sought to determine whether MM acutely lowers BP in CKD patients, and whether these hemodynamic changes are mediated by a reduction in sympathetic nerve activity. In 15 hypertensive African-American (AA) males with CKD, we conducted a randomized, crossover study in which participants underwent 14 min of MM or 14 min of BP education (control intervention) during two separate random-order study visits. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), beat-to-beat arterial BP, heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) were continuously measured at baseline and during each intervention. A subset had a third study visit to undergo controlled breathing (CB) to determine whether a reduction in RR alone was sufficient in exacting hemodynamic changes. We observed a significantly greater reduction in systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and HR, as well as a significantly greater reduction in MSNA, during MM compared with the control intervention. Participants had a significantly lower RR during MM; however, in contrast to MM, CB alone did not reduce BP, HR, or MSNA. MM acutely lowers BP and HR in AA males with hypertensive CKD, and these hemodynamic effects may be mediated by a reduction in sympathetic nerve activity. RR is significantly lower during MM, but CB alone without concomitant meditation does not acutely alter hemodynamics or sympathetic activity in CKD.

  13. Matured Hop Bittering Components Induce Thermogenesis in Brown Adipose Tissue via Sympathetic Nerve Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumie Morimoto-Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Obesity is the principal symptom of metabolic syndrome, which refers to a group of risk factors that increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis. In recent decades there has been a sharp rise in the incidence of obesity throughout the developed world. Iso-α-acids, the bitter compounds derived from hops in beer, have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity by increasing lipid oxidation in the liver and inhibition of lipid absorption from the intestine. Whereas the sharp bitterness induced by effective dose of iso-α-acids precludes their acceptance as a nutrient, matured hop bittering components (MHB appear to be more agreeable. Therefore, we tested MHB for an effect on ameliorating diet-induced body fat accumulation in rodents. MHB ingestion had a beneficial effect but, compared to iso-α-acids and despite containing structurally similar compounds, acted via different mechanisms to reduce body fat accumulation. MHB supplementation significantly reduced body weight gain, epididymal white adipose tissue weight, and plasma non-esterified free fatty acid levels in diet-induced obese mice. We also found that uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT was significantly increased in MHB-fed mice at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, MHB administration in rats induced the β-adrenergic signaling cascade, which is related to cAMP accumulation in BAT, suggesting that MHB could modulate sympathetic nerve activity innervating BAT (BAT-SNA. Indeed, single oral administration of MHB elevated BAT-SNA in rats, and this elevation was dissipated by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Single oral administration of MHB maintained BAT temperature at a significantly higher level than in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that MHB ameliorates diet-induced body fat accumulation, at least partly, by enhancing thermogenesis in BAT via BAT-SNA activation. Our data suggests that MHB is a useful tool for developing functional

  14. Role of endothelin-1 in mediating changes in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukar, Yonis; May, Clive N; Ramchandra, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with increased sympathetic nerve activity to the heart (CSNA), which is directly linked to mortality in HF patients. Previous studies indicate that HF is associated with high levels of plasma endothelin-1 (ET-1), which correlates with the severity of the disease. We hypothesized that blockade of endothelin receptors would decrease CSNA. The effects of intravenous tezosentan (a nonselective ETA and ETB receptor antagonist) (8 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1)) on resting levels of CSNA, arterial pressure, and heart rate were determined in conscious normal sheep (n = 6) and sheep with pacing-induced HF (n = 7). HF was associated with a significant decrease in ejection fraction (from 74 ± 2% to 38 ± 1%, P < 0.001) and a significant increase in resting levels of CSNA burst incidence (from 56 ± 11 to 87 ± 2 bursts/100 heartbeats, P < 0.01). Infusion of tezosentan for 60 min significantly decreased resting mean aterial pressure (MAP) in both normal and HF sheep (-8 ± 4 mmHg and -4 ± 3 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). This was associated with a significant decrease in CSNA (by 25 ± 26% of control) in normal sheep, but there was no change in CSNA in HF sheep. Calculation of spontaneous baroreflex gain indicated significant impairment of the baroreflex control of HR after intravenous tezosentan infusion in normal animals but no change in HF animals. These data suggest that endogenous levels of ET-1 contribute to the baseline levels of CSNA in normal animals, but this effect is absent in HF. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Influence of age on respiratory modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure and baroreflex function in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantsila, Alena; McIntyre, David B; Lip, Gregory Y H; Fadel, Paul J; Paton, Julian F R; Pickering, Anthony E; Fisher, James P

    2015-09-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does ageing influence the respiratory-related bursting of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the association between the rhythmic fluctuations in MSNA and blood pressure (Traube-Hering waves) that occur with respiration? What is the main finding and its importance? Despite the age-related elevation in MSNA, the cyclical inhibition of MSNA during respiration is similar between young and older individuals. Furthermore, central respiratory-sympathetic coupling plays a role in the generation of Traube-Hering waves in both young and older humans. Healthy ageing and alterations in respiratory-sympathetic coupling have been independently linked with heightened sympathetic neural vasoconstrictor activity. We investigated how age influences the respiratory-related modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the association between the rhythmic fluctuations in MSNA and blood pressure that occur with respiration (Traube-Hering waves; THW). Ten young (22 ± 2 years; mean ± SD) and 10 older healthy men (58 ± 6 years) were studied while resting supine and breathing spontaneously. MSNA, blood pressure and respiration were recorded simultaneously. Resting values were ascertained and respiratory cycle-triggered averaging of MSNA and blood pressure measurements performed. The MSNA burst incidence was higher in older individuals [22.7 ± 9.2 versus 42.2 ± 13.7 bursts (100 heart beats)(-1), P respiratory-related MSNA and the magnitude of Traube-Hering waves was observed in all young (100%) and most older subjects (80%). These data suggest that the strength of the cyclical inhibition of MSNA during respiration is similar between young and older individuals; thus, alterations in respiratory-sympathetic coupling appear not to contribute to the age-related elevation in MSNA. Furthermore, central respiratory-sympathetic coupling plays a role in the generation of Traube-Hering waves in both healthy young and older

  16. A technique for estimating activity in whole nerve trunks applied to the cervical sympathetic trunk, in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, F; Roatta, S; Johansson, H; Passatore, M

    1999-12-24

    The changes in sympathetic outflow may be evaluated from the amplitude of the antidromic compound action potential (ACAP) according to the collision technique described by Douglas and Ritchie (Douglas, W.W. and Ritchie J.M., A technique for recording functional activity in specific groups of medullated and non-medullated fibers in whole nerve trunks. J. Physiol., 138(1957) 19-30). This technique was revised, taking into account the depressant action exerted by antidromic stimulation on sympathetic preganglionic neurones (SPNs). Cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) of rabbits was used as experimental model. Stimulation frequencies of 0.2-0.5 Hz were found to be sufficiently low to avoid depressant actions on CSN spontaneous activity; they were employed to test the sensitivity of the technique during different experimental manoeuvres, such as changes in pulmonary-ventilation, baroreceptor unloading and arousal stimuli. In addition a procedure was devised to calibrate the ACAP amplitude: high frequency antidromic stimulation was used to induce a complete and transient inhibition of SPNs which allows to record the ACAP maximum amplitude. ACAPs recorded in various experimental conditions can then be expressed as percentage of this value.

  17. Effects of L-arginine and L-lysine mixtures on splenic sympathetic nerve activity and tumor proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiao; Horii, Yuko; Fujisaki, Yoshiyuki; Nagai, Katsuya

    2009-05-11

    Oral supplementations of L-arginine and L-lysine show tumor inhibition abilities. The splenic sympathetic nerve is involved in central modulation of cellular immunity and suppresses splenic natural killer cell activity in rats. An intravenous administration of a mixture of 10 mM L-arginine and L-lysine decreased splenic sympathetic nerve activity (splenic-SNA). We examined the effect of L-arginine and L-lysine mixtures on splenic-SNA in urethane-anesthetized rats by administration of 1 ml mixtures of 2 mM, 10 mM, and 50 mM L-arginine and L-lysine. We also studied the effect of the above mixtures on human colon cancer cell proliferation in athymic nude mice. An increase in splenic-SNA and tumor volume (2 mM), no effect (10 mM), and a decrease in both values (50 mM) were seen. Bivariate correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation between changes in splenic-SNA and tumor volume, indicating the tumor suppressing ability of weakened splenic-SNA.

  18. Effect of cortisol on muscle sympathetic nerve activity in Pima Indians and Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vozarova, Barbora; Weyer, Christian; Snitker, Soren

    2003-01-01

    . Although glucocorticoids inhibit SNS activity, Pima Indians are not hypercortisolemic compared with Caucasians. This does not exclude the possibility that the SNS is more responsive to an inhibitory effect of cortisol in the former than in the latter group. We measured fasting plasma ACTH and cortisol...... and muscle SNS activity [muscle sympathetic nervous system activity (MSNA), microneurography] in 58 males [27 Pimas/31 Caucasians]. Seven Pimas and 12 Caucasians were randomized to a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to examine the effect of overnight partial chemical adrenalectomy...... to a tonic inhibitory effect of cortisol. However, an acute release of cortisol is likely to more effectively contain sympathoexcitation during stress in Pima Indians than in Caucasians, which may be an important mechanism of cardioprotection in this Native American population....

  19. Effect of cortisol on muscle sympathetic nerve activity in Pima Indians and Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vozarova, Barbora; Weyer, Christian; Snitker, Soren

    2003-01-01

    to a tonic inhibitory effect of cortisol. However, an acute release of cortisol is likely to more effectively contain sympathoexcitation during stress in Pima Indians than in Caucasians, which may be an important mechanism of cardioprotection in this Native American population.......The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) interact to maintain cardiovascular and metabolic homeostasis, especially during stress. Pima Indians have a low SNS activity, which may contribute to both their increased risk of obesity and reduced risk of hypertension....... Although glucocorticoids inhibit SNS activity, Pima Indians are not hypercortisolemic compared with Caucasians. This does not exclude the possibility that the SNS is more responsive to an inhibitory effect of cortisol in the former than in the latter group. We measured fasting plasma ACTH and cortisol...

  20. Abnormal central control underlies impaired baroreflex control of heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity in female Lewis polycystic kidney rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ibrahim M; Phillips, Jacqueline K; Ameer, Omar Z; Hildreth, Cara M

    2015-07-01

    Why baroreflex dysfunction occurs in females with chronic kidney disease is unknown. We therefore aimed to examine whether temporal changes in baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) occur in female Lewis polycystic kidney (LPK) rats and whether this is associated with any changes in afferent, central or efferent processing of the reflex pathway. Using urethane-anaesthetized juvenile and adult LPK and Lewis control rats (n = 40), baroreflex-mediated changes in HR, RSNA and aortic depressor nerve activity (ADNA) were examined. Reflex changes to aortic depressor and vagal efferent nerve stimulation were also determined. In the juvenile LPK rats, except for a slight reduction in the gain of the normalized HR and RSNA baroreflex function curves, no difference in baroreflex control of HR, RSNA or ADNA was observed. Responses to aortic depressor and vagal efferent nerve stimulation were also comparable. In the adult hypertensive LPK rats, the range of both HR (35 ± 8 vs. 78 ± 9  bpm, P ≤ 0.05 LPK vs. Lewis) and RSNA (60 ± 7 vs. 80 ± 3%, P ≤ 0.05 LPK vs. Lewis) was also reduced. This was not associated with any change in the ADNA baroreflex function curves or reflex HR responses to vagal efferent nerve stimulation, but was associated with a reduction in the reflex bradycardic (-21 ± 4 vs. -34 ± 8 bpm, P baroreflex dysfunction results from impaired central processing of the reflex.

  1. Role of small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels expressed in PVN in regulating sympathetic nerve activity and arterial blood pressure in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gui, Le; LaGrange, Lila P.; Larson, Robert A.; Gu, Mingjun; Zhu, Jianhua; Chen, Qing-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels regulate membrane properties of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) projecting hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons and inhibition of SK channels increases in vitro excitability. Here, we determined in vivo the role of PVN SK channels in regulating sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In anesthetized rats, bilateral PVN microinjection of SK channel blocker with peptide apamin (0, 0.125, 1.25, 3.75, ...

  2. Insulin acts in the arcuate nucleus to increase lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and baroreflex function in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Hermes, Sam M; Aicher, Sue A; Brooks, Virginia L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Although the central effects of insulin to activate the sympathetic nervous system and enhance baroreflex gain are well known, the specific brain site(s) at which insulin acts has not been identified. We tested the hypotheses that (1) the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the arcuate nucleus (ArcN) are necessary brain sites and (2) insulin initiates its effects directly in the PVN and/or the ArcN. In α-chloralose anaesthetised female Sprague–Dawley rats, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) were recorded continuously, and baroreflex gain of HR and LSNA were measured before and during a hyperinsulinaemic–euglycaemic clamp. After 60 min, intravenous infusion of insulin (15 mU kg−1 min−1), but not saline, significantly increased (P baroreflex control of LSNA (from 3.8 ± 1.1 to 7.4 ± 2.4% control mmHg−1). These effects were reversed (P baroreflex gain (in % control mmHg−1 from 4.3 ± 1.2 to 6.9 ± 1.0, 0.6 nU; 7.7 ± 1.2, 6 nU; and 7.8 ± 1.3, 60 nU). None of the treatments altered MAP, HR, or baroreflex control of HR. Our findings identify the ArcN as the site at which insulin acts to activate the sympathetic nervous system and increase baroreflex gain, via a neural pathway that includes the PVN. PMID:21300750

  3. Exercise training prevents the deterioration in the arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in chronic heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groehs, Raphaela V; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M; Trevizan, Patrícia F; Rondon, Maria Urbana P B; Oliveira, Patrícia; Alves, Maria J N N; Almeida, Dirceu R; Middlekauff, Holly R; Negrão, Carlos E

    2015-05-01

    Arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (ABRMSNA) is impaired in chronic systolic heart failure (CHF). The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that exercise training would improve the gain and reduce the time delay of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. Twenty-six CHF patients, New York Heart Association Functional Class II-III, EF ≤ 40%, peak V̇o2 ≤ 20 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) were divided into two groups: untrained (UT, n = 13, 57 ± 3 years) and exercise trained (ET, n = 13, 49 ± 3 years). Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was directly recorded by microneurography technique. Arterial pressure was measured on a beat-to-beat basis. Time series of MSNA and systolic arterial pressure were analyzed by autoregressive spectral analysis. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA was obtained by bivariate autoregressive analysis. Exercise training was performed on a cycle ergometer at moderate intensity, three 60-min sessions per week for 16 wk. Baseline MSNA, gain and time delay of ABRMSNA, and low frequency of MSNA (LFMSNA) to high-frequency ratio (HFMSNA) (LFMSNA/HFMSNA) were similar between groups. ET significantly decreased MSNA. MSNA was unchanged in the UT patients. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA were unchanged in the ET patients. In contrast, the gain of ABRMSNA was significantly reduced [3.5 ± 0.7 vs. 1.8 ± 0.2, arbitrary units (au)/mmHg, P = 0.04] and the time delay of ABRMSNA was significantly increased (4.6 ± 0.8 vs. 7.9 ± 1.0 s, P = 0.05) in the UT patients. LFMSNA-to-HFMSNA ratio tended to be lower in the ET patients (P training prevents the deterioration of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Enhanced sympathetic nerve activity induced by neonatal colon inflammation induces gastric hypersensitivity and anxiety-like behavior in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, John H; Sarna, Sushil K

    2016-07-01

    Gastric hypersensitivity (GHS) and anxiety are prevalent in functional dyspepsia patients; their underlying mechanisms remain unknown largely because of lack of availability of live visceral tissues from human subjects. Recently, we demonstrated in a preclinical model that rats subjected to neonatal colon inflammation show increased basal plasma norepinephrine (NE), which contributes to GHS through the upregulation of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the gastric fundus. We tested the hypothesis that neonatal colon inflammation increases anxiety-like behavior and sympathetic nervous system activity, which upregulates the expression of NGF to induce GHS in adult life. Chemical sympathectomy, but not adrenalectomy, suppressed the elevated NGF expression in the fundus muscularis externa and GHS. The measurement of heart rate variability showed a significant increase in the low frequency-to-high frequency ratio in GHS vs. the control rats. Stimulus-evoked release of NE from the fundus muscularis externa strips was significantly greater in GHS than in the control rats. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased in the celiac ganglia of the GHS vs. the control rats. We found an increase in trait but not stress-induced anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats in an elevated plus maze. We concluded that neonatal programming triggered by colon inflammation upregulates tyrosine hydroxylase in the celiac ganglia, which upregulates the release of NE in the gastric fundus muscularis externa. The increase of NE release from the sympathetic nerve terminals concentration dependently upregulates NGF, which proportionately increases the visceromotor response to gastric distention. Neonatal programming concurrently increases anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Jugular venous overflow of noradrenaline from the brain: a neurochemical indicator of cerebrovascular sympathetic nerve activity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, D.A.; Lambert, G.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    )) overflow rates were measured. These measurements were also made following ganglion blockade (trimethaphan, n = 6), central sympathetic inhibition (clonidine, n = 4) and neuronal noradrenaline uptake blockade (desipramine, n = 13) and in a group of patients (n = 9) with pure autonomic failure (PAF...... = 0.3). Neuronal noradrenaline uptake block with desipramine lowered the transcranial plasma extraction of tritiated noradrenaline (P = 0.001). The PAF patients had 77% lower brain noradrenaline spillover than healthy recruits (P = 0.06), indicating that in them sympathetic nerve degeneration extended...

  6. Trigger point-related sympathetic nerve activity in chronic sciatic leg pain: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Rychlik, Michał; Pawelec, Wiktoria; Bednarek, Agata; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2014-10-01

    Sciatica has classically been associated with irritation of the sciatic nerve by the vertebral disc and consequent inflammation. Some authors suggest that active trigger points in the gluteus minimus muscle can refer pain in similar way to sciatica. Trigger point diagnosis is based on Travel and Simons criteria, but referred pain and twitch response are significant confirmatory signs of the diagnostic criteria. Although vasoconstriction in the area of a latent trigger point has been demonstrated, the vasomotor reaction of active trigger points has not been examined. We report the case of a 22-year-old Caucasian European man who presented with a 3-year history of chronic sciatic-type leg pain. In the third year of symptoms, coexistent myofascial pain syndrome was diagnosed. Acupuncture needle stimulation of active trigger points under infrared thermovisual camera showed a sudden short-term vasodilatation (an autonomic phenomenon) in the area of referred pain. The vasodilatation spread from 0.2 to 171.9 cm(2) and then gradually decreased. After needling, increases in average and maximum skin temperature were seen as follows: for the thigh, changes were +2.6°C (average) and +3.6°C (maximum); for the calf, changes were +0.9°C (average) and +1.4°C (maximum). It is not yet known whether the vasodilatation observed was evoked exclusively by dry needling of active trigger points. The complex condition of the patient suggests that other variables might have influenced the infrared thermovision camera results. We suggest that it is important to check if vasodilatation in the area of referred pain occurs in all patients with active trigger points. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Effects of nicorandil on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity after reperfusion therapy in patients with first anterior acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko [Gunma University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Kumakura, Hisao; Takayama, Yoshiaki; Ichikawa, Shuichi [Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan, Gunma (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    Ischaemic preconditioning (PC) is a cardioprotective phenomenon in which short periods of myocardial ischaemia result in resistance to decreased contractile dysfunction during a subsequent period of sustained ischaemia. Nicorandil, an ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener, can induce PC effects on sympathetic nerves during myocardial ischaemia. However, its effects on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and left ventricular remodelling have not been determined. In this study, we sought to determine whether nicorandil administration improves CSNA in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We studied 58 patients with first anterior AMI, who were randomly assigned to receive nicorandil (group A) or isosorbide dinitrate (group B) after primary coronary angioplasty. The nicorandil or isosorbide dinitrate was continuously infused for >48 h. The extent score (ES) was determined from {sup 99m}Tc-pyrophosphate scintigraphy, and the total defect score (TDS) was determined from {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy 3-5 days after primary angioplasty. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were determined by left ventriculography 2 weeks later. The delayed heart/mediastinum count (H/M) ratio, delayed TDS and washout rate (WR) were determined from {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) images 3 weeks later. The left ventriculography results were re-examined 6 months after treatment. Fifty patients originally enrolled in the trial completed the entire protocol. After treatment, no significant differences were observed in ES or left ventricular parameters between the two groups. However, in group A (n=25), the TDSs determined from {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-MIBG were significantly lower (26{+-}6 vs 30{+-}5, P<0.01, and 32{+-}8 vs 40{+-}6, P<0.0001, respectively), the H/M ratio significantly higher (1.99{+-}0.16 vs 1.77{+-}0.30, P<0.005) and the WR significantly lower (36%{+-}8% vs 44%{+-}12%, P<0.005) than in group B

  8. Arterial pressure oscillations are not associated with muscle sympathetic nerve activity in individuals exposed to central hypovolaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    this ‘next step’ approach for investigation of non-invasive surrogates to ensure clinical utility in individual patients . This study is not without...blood pressure in health and disease. Therefore, knowing the level of sympathetic activation is important to treat patients with abnormal sympathetic...haemodynamic decompensation (i.e. pre- syncope ). Haemodynamic decompensation was identified by the attending investigator by a precipitous fall in

  9. Assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure using quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Kensuke; Ayusawa, Mamoru; Noto, Nobutaka; Sumitomo, Naokata; Okada, Tomoo; Harada, Kensuke

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in children with chronic heart failure was examined by quantitative iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial imaging in 33 patients aged 7.5±6.1 years (range 0-18 years), including 8 with cardiomyopathy, 15 with congenital heart disease, 3 with anthracycrine cardiotoxicity, 3 with myocarditis, 3 with primary pulmonary hypertension and 1 with Pompe's disease. Anterior planar images were obtained 15 min and 3 hr after the injection of iodine-123 MIBG. The cardiac iodine-123 MIBG uptake was assessed as the heart to upper mediastinum uptake activity ratio of the delayed image (H/M) and the cardiac percentage washout rate (%WR). The severity of chronic heart failure was class I (no medication) in 8 patients, class II (no symptom with medication) in 9, class III (symptom even with medication) in 10 and class IV (late cardiac death) in 6. H/M was 2.33±0.22 in chronic heart failure class I, 2.50±0.34 in class II, 1.95±0.61 in class III, and 1.39±0.29 in class IV (p<0.05). %WR was 24.8±12.8% in chronic heart failure class I, 23.3±10.2% in class II, 49.2±24.5% in class III, and 66.3±26.5% in class IV (p<0.05). The low H/M and high %WR were proportionate to the severity of chronic heart failure. Cardiac iodine-123 MIBG showed cardiac adrenergic neuronal dysfunction in children with severe chronic heart failure. Quantitative iodine-123 MIBG myocardial imaging is clinically useful as a predictor of therapeutic outcome and mortality in children with chronic heart failure. (author)

  10. Bradykinin receptor blockade restores the baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity in cisplatin-induced renal failure rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, M H; Duff, M; Swanton, H; Johns, E J

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of renal bradykinin B1 and B2 receptor blockade on the high- and low-pressure baroreceptor reflex regulation of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in rats with cisplatin-induced renal failure. Cisplatin (5 mg/kg) or saline was given intraperitoneally 4 days prior to study. Following chloralose/urethane anaesthesia, rats were prepared for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate and RSNA and received intrarenal infusions of either Lys-[des-Arg 9 , Leu 8 ]-bradykinin (LBK), a bradykinin B1 receptor blocker, or bradyzide (BZ), a bradykinin B2 receptor blocker. RSNA baroreflex gain curves and renal sympatho-inhibitory responses to volume expansion (VE) were obtained. In the control and renal failure groups, basal MAP (89 ± 3 vs. 80 ± 8 mmHg) and RSNA (2.0 ± 0.3 vs. 1.7 ± 0.6 μV.s) were similar but HR was lower in the latter group (331 ± 8 vs. 396 ± 9 beats/min). The baroreflex gain for RSNA in the renal failure rats was 39% (P renal failure rats. Intrarenal LBK infusion in the renal failure rats normalized the VE induced renal sympatho-inhibition whereas BZ only partially restored the response. These findings suggest that pro-inflammatory bradykinin acting at different receptors within the kidney generates afferent neural signals which impact differentially within the central nervous system on high- and low-pressure regulation of RSNA. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Regulation of the renal sympathetic nerves in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit eRamchandra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a serious debilitating condition with poor survival rates and an increasing level of prevalence. Heart failure is associated with an increase in renal norepinephrine spillover, which is an independent predictor of mortality in HF patients. The excessive sympatho-excitation that is a hallmark of heart failure has long-term effects that contribute to disease progression. An increase in directly recorded renal sympathetic nerve activity has also been recorded in animal models of heart failure. This review will focus on the mechanisms controlling sympathetic nerve activity to the kidney during normal conditions and alterations in these mechanisms during heart failure. In particular the roles of afferent reflexes and central mechanisms will be discussed.

  12. Leptin acts in the forebrain to differentially influence baroreflex control of lumbar, renal and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoxin; Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A.; Brooks, Virginia L.

    2013-01-01

    While leptin is known to increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), we tested the hypothesis that leptin also enhances baroreflex control of SNA and HR. Using α-chloralose anesthetized male rats, mean arterial pressure (MAP), HR, lumbar SNA (LSNA), splanchnic SNA (SSNA), and renal SNA (RSNA) were recorded before and for 2 hr after lateral cerebroventricular (LV) leptin or aCSF administration. Baroreflex function was assessed using a four parameter sigmoidal fit of HR and SNA responses to slow ramp (3-5 min) changes in MAP, induced by iv infusion of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Leptin (3 μg) increased (Pbaroreflex maxima. Leptin also increased gain of baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA, but not of SSNA or HR. The elevations in HR were eliminated by pretreatment with methscopalamine, to block parasympathetic nerve activity; however, after cardiac sympathetic blockade with atenolol, leptin still increased basal HR and MAP and the HR baroreflex maximum and minimum. Leptin (1.5 μg) also increased LSNA and enhanced LSNA baroreflex gain and maximum, but did not alter MAP, HR, or the HR baroreflex. LV aCSF had no effects. Finally, to test if leptin acts in the brainstem, leptin (3 μg) was infused into the 4th ventricle; however, no significant changes were observed. In conclusion, leptin acts in the forebrain to differentially influence baroreflex control of LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR, with the latter action mediated via suppression of parasympathetic nerve activity. PMID:23424232

  13. Evaluation of sympathetic nerve system activity with MIBG. Comparison with heart rate variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Chinori; Wakabayashi, Yasushi; Shouda, Sakae; Mikami, Tadashi; Tawarahara, Kei; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Suzuki, Toshihiko.

    1997-01-01

    Authors attempted to elucidate the relations of plasma concentration of norepinephrine (pNE) and findings of heart rate variability and MIBG myocardial scintigraphy and evaluated cardiac autonomic nervous activity in chronic renal failure. Subjects were 211 patients with various heart diseases (coronary artery lesion, cardiomyopathy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal failure and so on), 60 patients with artificial kidney due to chronic renal failure, 13 of whom were found to have coronary arterial disease by Tl myocardial scintigraphy, and 14 normal volunteers. ECG was recorded with the portable recorder for heart rate variability. Together with collection of blood for pNE measurement, myocardial scintigraphy was done at 15 and 150 min after intravenous administration of 111 MBq of MIBG for acquisition of early and delayed, respectively, images of the frontal breast. Accumulation at and elimination during the time points of MIBG were computed in cps unit. Variability of heart rate was found to have the correlation positive with MIBG delayed accumulation and negative with the elimination, and pNE, negative with heart rate variability and the delayed accumulation and positive with the elimination. Thus cardiac autonomic nervous abnormality was suggested to occur before uremic cardiomyopathy. (K.H.)

  14. Prediction of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac functional outcome after treatment in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Examination using dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Iwasaki, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Tadashi [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi; Oshima, Shigeru; Taniguchi, Koichi; Nagai, Ryozo

    2000-07-01

    This study evaluated whether dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy can predict improvement of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac function. Sixteen patients (10 men and 6 women, mean age 59{+-}13 years) with dilated cardiomyopathy underwent dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy to measure left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) using tracer at 0, 5, 10 and 15 {mu}g/kg/min before treatment. Patients were divided into good responders (LVEF increase {>=}15%) 8 patients (GR Group) and poor responders (LVEF increase <15%) 8 patients (PR Group) after treatment with {beta}-blocker or amiodarone with a background treatment of digitalis, diuretics and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging to evaluate cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and echocardiography were performed before and at one year after treatment. MIBG imaging was obtained 4 hours after tracer injection, and the heart/mediastinum count ratio (H/M ratio) calculated from the anterior planar image and the total defect score (TDS) from the single photon emission computed tomography image. LVEF and left ventricular endo-diastolic dimension (LVDd) were measured by echocardiography and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was evaluated. The GR Group showed TDS decreased from 28{+-}6 to 17{+-}12 (p<0.05), H/M ratio increased from 1.79{+-}0.26 to 2.07{+-}0.32 (p<0.05), LVEF increased from 29{+-}8% to 48{+-}10% (p<0.01), and LVDd decreased from 65{+-}4 mm to 58{+-}5 mm (p<0.05). In contrast, the PR group showed no significant changes in TDS. H/M ratio, LVEF and LVDd. NYHA functional class improved in both groups. The improvement was better in the GR Group than in the PR group. Dobutamine gated blood pool scintigraphy is useful to predict the improvement of the cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac function, and symptoms after treatment in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. (author)

  15. Effects of perindopril on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with congestive heart failure: comparison with enalapril

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko [Gunma University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Kumakura, Hisao; Takayama, Yoshiaki; Ichikawa, Shuichi [Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan, Department of Internal Medicine, Gunma (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    The production of aldosterone in the heart is suppressed by the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor perindopril in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Moreover, perindopril has been reported to have more cardioprotective effects than enalapril. Forty patients with CHF [left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <45%; mean 33{+-}7%] were randomly assigned to perindopril (2 mg/day; n=20) or enalapril (5 mg/day; n=20). All patients were also treated with diuretics. The delayed heart/mediastinum count (H/M) ratio, delayed total defect score (TDS) and washout rate (WR) were determined from {sup 123}I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) images, and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations were measured before and 6 months after treatment. The left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV) and LVEF were also determined by echocardiography. After treatment, in patients receiving perindopril, TDS decreased from 39{+-}10 to 34{+-}9 (P<0.01), H/M ratios increased from 1.62{+-}0.27 to 1.76{+-}0.29 (P<0.01), WR decreased from 50{+-}14% to 42{+-}14% (P<0.05) and plasma BNP concentrations decreased from 226{+-}155 to 141{+-}90 pg/ml (P<0.0005). In addition, the LVEDV decreased from 180{+-}30 to 161{+-}30 ml (P<0.05) and the LVESV decreased from 122{+-}35 to 105{+-}36 ml (P<0.05). Although the LVEF tended to increase, the change was not statistically significant (from 33{+-}8% to 36{+-}12%; P=NS). On the other hand, there were no significant changes in these parameters in patients receiving enalapril. Plasma BNP concentrations, {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphic and echocardiographic parameters improved after 6 months of perindopril treatment. These findings indicate that perindopril treatment can ameliorate the cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and the left ventricular performance in patients with CHF. (orig.)

  16. The effect of residential exercise training on baroreflex control of heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Jun; Yuasa, Fumio; Yuyama, Reisuke; Kawamura, Akihiro; Iwasaki, Masayoshi; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Iwasaka, Toshiji

    2005-04-01

    Exercise training has been shown to favorably affect the prognosis after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but the mechanisms of such favorable effects remain speculative. The aim of this study was to determine whether exercise training improves baroreflex control of heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in patients with AMI. Prospective randomized clinical study. Thirty patients with an uncomplicated AMI were randomized into trained or untrained groups. Arterial BP, heart rate, and MSNA were measured at rest, and during baroreceptor stimulation (phenylephrine infusion) and baroreceptor deactivation (nitroprusside infusion). These measurements were performed at baseline and after 4 weeks of exercise training. Peak oxygen uptake increased significantly (12.3 +/- 10.7% [mean +/- SD]) with exercise training. Resting MSNA reduced from 34 +/- 12 to 27 +/- 8 bursts/min in the trained group but not in the untrained group. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) [from 8.9 +/- 3.0 to 10.3 +/- 3.0 ms/mm Hg, p trained group, but not in the untrained group. Despite baroreceptor deactivation improving MSNA response in both groups, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Exercise training increased arterial BRS and decreased sympathetic nerve traffic after AMI, which indicate that the sympathoinhibitory effect of exercise training may, at least in part, contribute to the beneficial effect of exercise training in patients with AMI.

  17. Central command does not suppress baroreflex control of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity at the onset of spontaneous motor activity in the decerebrate cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Asahara, Ryota; Idesako, Mitsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Our laboratory has reported that central command blunts the sensitivity of the aortic baroreceptor-heart rate (HR) reflex at the onset of voluntary static exercise in animals. We have examined whether baroreflex control of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and/or cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity are altered at the onset of spontaneously occurring motor behavior, which was monitored with tibial nerve activity in paralyzed, decerebrate cats. CSNA exhibited a peak increase (126 ± 17%) immediately after exercise onset, followed by increases in HR and mean arterial pressure (MAP). With development of the pressor response, CSNA and HR decreased near baseline, although spontaneous motor activity was not terminated. Atropine methyl nitrate (0.1-0.2 mg/kg iv) with little central influence delayed the initial increase in HR but did not alter the response magnitudes of HR and CSNA, while atropine augmented the pressor response. The baroreflex-induced decreases in CSNA and HR elicited by brief occlusion of the abdominal aorta were challenged at the onset of spontaneous motor activity. Spontaneous motor activity blunted the baroreflex reduction in HR by aortic occlusion but did not alter the baroreflex inhibition of CSNA. Similarly, atropine abolished the baroreflex reduction in HR but did not influence the baroreflex inhibition of CSNA. Thus it is likely that central command increases CSNA and decreases cardiac vagal outflow at the onset of spontaneous motor activity while preserving baroreflex control of CSNA. Accordingly, central command must attenuate cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity against an excess rise in MAP as estimated from the effect of muscarinic blockade. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Study of nerve fibers nature reinforcing duodenal contractions by electrical stimulation of sympathetic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveshnikov D.S.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the article is to investigate the mechanism of increased reactions by electrical stimulation of the sympathetic nerve. Materials and methods: Experiments on dogs have shown that stimulant reactions during blockade of a-adrenergic by phentolamine and (3-adrenergic receptors with propranolol were completely eliminated by lizer-gol —the blocker of 5-HT12-receptors. Results: Infusion of lizergol did not influence on duodenal motor activity and the function of the vagus nerve. Conclusion: Effector neuron is found out to be serotonergic and its action is provided by 5-HT1 2 receptors

  19. Effect of 4G-alpha-glucopyranosyl hesperidin on brown fat adipose tissue- and cutaneous-sympathetic nerve activity and peripheral body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiao; Nakamura, Hiroyasu; Fujisaki, Yoshiyuki; Tanida, Mamoru; Horii, Yuko; Fuyuki, Risa; Takumi, Hiroko; Shiraishi, Koso; Kometani, Takashi; Nagai, Katsuya

    2009-09-11

    Changes in the activity of the autonomic nervous system are good indicators of alterations in physiological phenomena such as the body temperature, blood glucose, blood pressure. Hesperidin, a flavanone known as vitamin P, has been shown to reduce the levels of serum lipids, cholesterol, and blood pressure. However, hesperidin is not water-soluble and is not well absorbed from the intestine. G-hesperidin (4G-alpha-glucopyranosyl hesperidin) is more water-soluble and more rapidly absorbed than hesperidin. In order to clarify the functions of G-hesperidin, we examined the effects of oral administration of G-hesperidin on interscapular brown adipose tissue-sympathetic nerve activity (BAT-SNA) and cutaneous sympathetic nerve activity (CASNA) in rats weighing about 300 g. In this study, we found that oral administration of 60 mg of G-hesperidin increased the BAT-SNA but decreased the CASNA in urethane-anesthetized rats. Since an elevation in BAT-SNA increases heat production (i.e. body temperature (BT)) and a decrease in CASNA increases cutaneous perfusion, we examined whether oral administration of G-hesperidin had an effect on the peripheral BT in rats. Consequently, we observed that the subcutaneous BT at the caudal end of the back after oral administration of 60 mg of G-hesperidin was significantly higher than the subcutaneous BT after oral administration of water in conscious rats. These findings suggest that G-hesperidin enhances the BAT-SNA and suppresses the CASNA resulting in an increase in the peripheral BT, probably by an increase in the thermogenesis in the BAT and an elevation in the cutaneous blood flow.

  20. Alterations of sympathetic nerve fibers in avascular necrosis of femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deqiang; Liu, Peilai; Zhang, Yuankai; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) was mainly due to alterations of bone vascularity. And noradrenaline (NA), as the neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), leads to the vasoconstriction by activating its α-Receptor. This study was to explore the nerve fiber density of the femoral head in the rabbit model of ANFH. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. The rabbit model of ANFH was established by the injection of methylprednisolone acetate. The nerve fiber density and distribution in the femoral head was determined using an Olympus BH2 microscope. Significant fewer sympathetic nerve fibers was found in the ANFH intertrochanteric bone samples (P = 0.036) with osteonecrosis. The number of sympathetic nerve fibers was compared between the two groups. And less sympathetic nerve fibers were found in later stage ANFH samples in comparison with those of early stages. ANFH might be preceded by an inflammatory reaction, and an inflammatory response might lead to arthritic changes in tissue samples, which in turn reduces the number of sympathetic nerve fibers.

  1. Obesity depresses baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate in Sprague Dawley rats: role of the renal innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S A; Sattar, M Z A; Abdullah, N A; Rathore, H A; Abdulla, M H; Ahmad, A; Johns, E J

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the role of the renal innervation in arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex regulation of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats fed a high-fat diet to induce obesity. Rats received either a normal (12% kcal) or high (45% kcal) fat diet for 60 days. On day 61, rats were anesthetized and prepared for recording left RSNA. In one group, the renal nerves remained intact, while in the other, both kidneys were denervated. Baroreflex gain curves for RSNA and HR were generated by increasing and decreasing blood pressure. Low-pressure baroreceptors were challenged by infusing a saline load. Mean blood pressure was 135 mmHg in the fat-fed and 105 mmHg (P baroreflex sensitivities were reduced by 73 and 72% (both P baroreflexes which was dependent on an intact renal innervation. This suggests that in obese states neural signals arising from the kidney contribute to a deranged autonomic control. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Nitric oxide impacts on angiotensin AT2 receptor modulation of high-pressure baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, M H; Johns, E J

    2014-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) interacts with the local brain renin-angiotensin system to modulate sympathetic outflow and cardiovascular homoeostasis. This study investigated whether NO influenced the ability of angiotensin AT2 receptor activation to modify the high-pressure baroreceptor regulation of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and heart rate (HR). Anaesthetized (chloralose/urethane) rats were prepared to allow generation of baroreflex gain curves for RSNA or HR following intracerebroventricular (I.C.V.) CGP42112 (AT2 receptor agonist), PD123319 (AT2 receptor antagonist) or losartan (AT1 receptor antagonist), and then in combination with L-NAME (NO synthase inhibitor). I.C.V. PD123319, CGP42112, and Losartan did not change baseline mean arterial pressure, HR or RSNA. Baroreflex sensitivities for RSNA and HR were increased following AT2 receptor activation with CGP42112 by 112 and 157%, respectively, but were reduced following PD123319 by 20% (all P baroreflex sensitivity for both RSNA and HR, by 62 and 158%, respectively, but when co-infused with either CGP42112 or PD123319, the baroreflex sensitivity fell to values comparable to those obtained during I.C.V. saline infusion. The baroreflex sensitivities for RSNA and HR were increased by losartan by 92% and 192%, respectively, but in the presence of L-NAME were no different from those obtained during I.C.V. saline infusion. There is an important facilitatory role for AT2 receptors in the high-pressure baroreflex regulation of RSNA and HR which is dependent on a functional NO/NOS system. Conversely, AT1 receptors have an inhibitory effect on the baroreflex, an action that relies on a tonic inhibition of NO. © 2013 The Authors. Acta Physiologica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  3. Renal denervation in male rats with heart failure improves ventricular sympathetic nerve innervation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Loftus, Michael T; Amirapu, Satya; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Quill, Gina; Woodward, William R; Habecker, Beth A; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is characterized by the loss of sympathetic innervation to the ventricles, contributing to impaired cardiac function and arrhythmogenesis. We hypothesized that renal denervation (RDx) would reverse this loss. Male Wistar rats underwent myocardial infarction (MI) or sham surgery and progressed into heart failure for 4 wk before receiving bilateral RDx or sham RDx. After additional 3 wk, left ventricular (LV) function was assessed, and ventricular sympathetic nerve fiber density was determined via histology. Post-MI heart failure rats displayed significant reductions in ventricular sympathetic innervation and tissue norepinephrine content (nerve fiber density in the LV of MI+sham RDx hearts was 0.31 ± 0.05% vs. 1.00 ± 0.10% in sham MI+sham RDx group, P renal nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic nerve innervation in heart failure. Our findings show denervating the renal nerves improves cardiac sympathetic innervation and function in the post-MI failing heart. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Renal sympathetic nerve, blood flow, and epithelial transport responses to thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thad E

    2017-05-01

    Thermal stress is a profound sympathetic stress in humans; kidney responses involve altered renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renal blood flow, and renal epithelial transport. During mild cold stress, RSNA spectral power but not total activity is altered, renal blood flow is maintained or decreased, and epithelial transport is altered consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with central volume loaded state. Hypothermia decreases RSNA, renal blood flow, and epithelial transport. During mild heat stress, RSNA is increased, renal blood flow is decreased, and epithelial transport is increased consistent with a sympathetic stress coupled with a central volume unloaded state. Hyperthermia extends these directional changes, until heat illness results. Because kidney responses are very difficult to study in humans in vivo, this review describes and qualitatively evaluates an in vivo human skin model of sympathetically regulated epithelial tissue compared to that of the nephron. This model utilizes skin responses to thermal stress, involving 1) increased skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), decreased skin blood flow, and suppressed eccrine epithelial transport during cold stress; and 2) increased SSNA, skin blood flow, and eccrine epithelial transport during heat stress. This model appears to mimic aspects of the renal responses. Investigations of skin responses, which parallel certain renal responses, may aid understanding of epithelial-sympathetic nervous system interactions during cold and heat stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of ghrelin on regulation of splenic sympathetic nerve discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai; Pawar, Hitesh N; Montgomery, Shawnee; Kenney, Michael J

    2016-12-01

    Ghrelin influences immune system function and modulates the sympathetic nervous system; however, the contribution of ghrelin to neural-immune interactions is not well-established because the effect of ghrelin on splenic sympathetic nerve discharge (SND) is not known. This study tested the hypothesis that central ghrelin administration would inhibit splenic SND in anesthetized rats. Rats received intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of ghrelin (1nmol/kg) or aCSF. Lumbar SND recordings provided a non-visceral nerve control. The ICV ghrelin administration significantly increased splenic and lumbar SND, whereas mean arterial pressure (MAP) was not altered. These findings provide fundamental information regarding the nature of sympathetic-immune interactions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Contribution of α-adrenoceptors to depolarization and contraction evoked by continuous asynchronous sympathetic nerve activity in rat tail artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, J A; McLachlan, E M; Rayner, S E

    1997-01-01

    The effects of continuous but asynchronous nerve activity induced by ciguatoxin (CTX-1) on the membrane potential and contraction of smooth muscle cells have been investigated in rat proximal tail arteries isolated in vitro. These effects have been compared with those produced by the continuous application of phenylephrine (PE).CTX-1 (0.4 nM) and PE (10 μM) produced a maintained depolarization of the arterial smooth muscle that was almost completely blocked by α-adrenoceptor blockade. In both cases, the depolarization was more sensitive to the selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, idazoxan (0.1 μM), than to the selective α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (0.01 μM).In contrast, the maintained contraction of the tail artery induced by CTX-1 (0.2 nM) and PE (2 and 10 μM) was more sensitive to prazosin (0.01) μM, than to idazoxan (0.01 μM). In combination, these antagonists almost completely inhibited contraction to both agents.Application of the calcium channel antagonist, nifedipine (1 μM), had no effect on the depolarization induced by either CTX-1 or PE but maximally reduced the force of the maintained contraction to both agents by about 50%.We conclude that the constriction of the tail artery induced by CTX-1, which mimics the natural discharge of postganglionic perivascular axons, is due almost entirely to α-adrenoceptor activation. The results indicate that neuronally released noradrenaline activates more than one α-adrenoceptor subtype. The depolarization is dependent primarily on α2-adrenoceptor activation whereas the contraction is dependent primarily on α1-adrenoceptor activation. The links between α-adrenoceptor activation and the voltage-dependent and voltage-independent mechanisms that deliver Ca2+ to the contractile apparatus appear to be complex. PMID:9113373

  7. Adaptive servo-ventilation therapy improves cardiac sympathetic nerve activity, cardiac function, exercise capacity, and symptom in patients with chronic heart failure and Cheyne-Stokes respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Takuji; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi; Kasama, Shu; Miyaishi, Yusuke; Kan, Hakuken; Yamashita, Eiji; Kawaguti, Ren; Adachi, Hitoshi; Ohsima, Shigeru

    2017-12-01

    Adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) therapy has been reported to be effective for improving central sleep apnea (CSA) and chronic heart failure (CHF). The purpose of this study was to clarify whether ASV is effective for CSA, cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA), cardiac symptoms/function, and exercise capacity in CHF patients with CSA and Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR-CSA). In this study, 31 CHF patients with CSR-CSA and a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 40% were randomized into an ASV group and a conservative therapy (non-ASV) group for 6 month. Nuclear imagings with 123 I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and 99m Tc-Sestamibi were performed. Exercise capacity using a specific activity scale (SAS) and the New York Heart Association (NYHA) class were evaluated. CSNA was evaluated by 123 I-MIBG imaging, with the delayed heart/mediastinum activity ratio (H/M), delayed total defect score (TDS), and washout rate (WR). The ASV group had significantly better (P improvement of CSR-CSA, CSNA, cardiac symptoms/function, and exercise capacity in CHF patients with CSR-CSA.

  8. Effectiveness of nocturnal home oxygen therapy to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure and central sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Takuji; Seki, Ryotaro; Kasama, Shu; Isobe, Naoki; Sakurai, Shigeki; Adachi, Hitoshi; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi; Oshima, Shigeru; Taniguchi, Koichi

    2009-02-01

    Central sleep apnea, often found in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), has a high risk of poor prognosis. This study involved 20 patients with CHF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 5 times/h who were divided into 2 groups: 10 patients treated with nocturnal home oxygen therapy (HOT) and 10 patients without HOT (non-HOT). All patients had dilated cardiomyopathy and underwent overnight polysomnography, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and nuclear cardiac examinations to evaluate AHI, exercise capacity according to the specific activity scale and oxygen uptake at anaerobic threshold and peak exercise (peak VO(2)). Cardiac function according to (99m)Tc-MIBI QGS, and the total defect score (TDS), H/M ratio and the washout rate (WR) on (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging were calculated for all patients. As compared with the non-HOT group, the HOT group demonstrated a greater reduction in AHI (26.1+/-9.1 to 5.1+/-3.4), (123)I-MIBG TDS (31+/-8 to 25+/-9), and (123)I-MIBG WR (48+/-8% to 41+/-5%) and a greater increase in the specific activity scale (4.0+/-0.9 to 5.8+/-1.2 Mets), peak VO(2) (16.0+/-3.8 to 18.3+/-4.7 ml . min(-1) . kg(-1)), and LVEF (27+/-9% to 37+/-10%). HOT improves exercise capacity, cardiac function, and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with CHF and central sleep apnea.

  9. Heat stress enhances arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity via increased sensitivity of burst gating, not burst area, in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, D M; Cui, J; Davis, S L; Low, D A; Crandall, C G

    2006-06-01

    The relationship between muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and diastolic blood pressure has been used to describe two sites for arterial baroreflex control of MSNA. By determining both the likelihood of occurrence for sympathetic bursts and the area of each burst for a given diastolic blood pressure, both a 'gating' and an 'area' control site has been described in normothermic humans. Assessing the effect of heat stress on these mechanisms will improve the understanding of baroreflex control of arterial blood pressure under this thermal condition. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that heat stress enhances arterial baroreflex control of burst gating and area. In 10 normotensive subjects (age, 32+/-2 years; mean+/-s.e.m.), MSNA (peroneal) was assessed using standard microneurographic techniques. Five minute periods of data were examined during normothermic and whole-body heating conditions. The burst incidence (i.e. number of sympathetic bursts per 100 cardiac cycles) and the area of each burst were determined for each cardiac cycle and were placed into 3 mmHg intervals of diastolic blood pressure. During normotheric conditions, there was a moderate, negative relationship between burst incidence and diastolic blood pressure (slope=-2.49+/-0.38; r(2)=0.73+/-0.06; mean+/-s.e.m.), while area per burst relative to diastolic blood pressure exhibited a less strong relationship (slope=-1.13+/-0.46; r(2)=0.45+/-0.09). During whole-body heating there was an increase in the slope of the relationship between burst incidence and diastolic blood pressure (slope=-4.69+/-0.44; r(2)=0.84+/-0.03) compared to normothermia (Pburst and diastolic blood pressure was unchanged (slope=-0.92+/-0.29; r(2)=0.41+/-0.08) (P=0.50). The primary finding of this investigation is that, at rest, whole-body heating enhanced arterial baroreflex control of MSNA through increased sensitivity of a 'gating' mechanism, as indicated by an increase in the slope of the

  10. [Role of renal sympathetic nerve and oxidative stress in foot shock-induced hypertension in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ren-Di; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Jian-Bing; Dong, Tao; Zhang, Guo-Xing

    2015-06-25

    The present study was aimed to investigate the roles of renal sympathetic nerve and oxidative stress in the development of foot shock-induced hypertension. Ninety rats were divided into 6 groups (the number of each group was 15): control group, foot shock group, denervation of renal sympathetic nerve group, denervation of renal sympathetic nerve + foot shock group, Tempol treatment + foot shock group, denervation of renal sympathetic nerve + Tempol treatment + foot shock group. Rats were received electrical foot shock for 14 days (2-4 mA, 75 V, shocks of 50-100 ms every 30 s, for 4 h each session through an electrified grid floor every day). Renal sympathetic ablation was used to remove bilateral renal sympathetic nerve in rats (rats were allowed to recover for one week before the beginning of the foot shock procedure). The antioxidant Tempol was injected intraperitoneally at 1 h before foot shock. Systolic blood pressure was measured at 1 h after foot shock on day 0, 3, 7, 10 and 14. Contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), renin, angiotensin II (AngII) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in plasma were measured by ELISA after 14-day foot shock. The results showed that systolic blood pressure of foot shock group was significantly increased (P blood pressure induced by foot shock. Levels of TBARS, renin and AngII in plasma were increased significantly in foot shock group compared with that of control group (P oxidative stress and directly or indirectly activate renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, so the foot shock-induced high blood pressure may be maintained and hypertension may therefore be produced.

  11. [Hemopneumothorax after thoracic sympathetic nerve block; report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takehiro; Sano, Atsushi; Matsukura, Akira; Kikuchi, Junko; Taguchi, Taizo; Tanizaki, Yuji; Hamashima, Hideki; Kimura, Daisuke; Hatanaka, Ryo; Yamada, Yoshitsugu; Tsushima, Takao; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2014-07-01

    A 72-year-old man, who had been treated pneumothorax 50 years ago, visited a physician complaining of dyspnea after thoracic sympathetic nerve block for postherpetic neuralgia. The patient was diagnosed as pneumothorax, and was consulted to our hospital. Clinical sign and the chest radiography suggested tension hemopneumothorax, and the chest drainage was immediately performed. Although bloody fluid of 1,100 ml was initially drained, no further increase was noted. The patient was discharged on the 21st hospital day.

  12. Effectiveness of nocturnal home oxygen therapy to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure and central sleep apnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Takuji; Seki, Ryotaro; Isobe, Naoki; Sakurai, Shigeki; Adachi, Hitoshi; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi; Oshima, Shigeru; Taniguchi, Koichi; Kasama, Shu

    2009-01-01

    Central sleep apnea, often found in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), has a high risk of poor prognosis. This study involved 20 patients with CHF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 5 times/h who were divided into 2 groups: 10 patients treated with nocturnal home oxygen therapy (HOT) and 10 patients without HOT (non-HOT). All patients had dilated cardiomyopathy and underwent overnight polysomnography, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and nuclear cardiac examinations to evaluate AHI, exercise capacity according to the specific activity scale and oxygen uptake at anaerobic threshold and peak exercise (peak VO 2 ). Cardiac function according to 99m Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) QGS, and the total defect score (TDS), H/M ratio and the washout rate (WR) on 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging were calculated for all patients. As compared with the non-HOT group, the HOT group demonstrated a greater reduction in AHI (26.1±9.1 to 5.1±3.4), 123 I-MIBG TDS (31±8 to 25±9), and 123 I-MIBG WR (48±8% to 41±5%) and a greater increase in the specific activity scale (4.0±0.9 to 5.8±1.2 Mets), peak VO 2 (16.0±3.8 to 18.3±4.7 ml·min -1 ·kg -1 ), and LVEF (27±9% to 37±10%). HOT improves exercise capacity, cardiac function, and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with CHF and central sleep apnea. (author)

  13. [Progressive hemifacial atrophy with sympathetic nerve dysfunction of central origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, I; Sahashi, K; Ibi, T; Iwase, S; Mano, T

    1989-09-01

    A 37-year-old unmarried man was admitted because of gait disturbance and right hemifacial atrophy. Family history was unremarkable. He had an unconscious attack at age 13 and had writer's cramp since age 15. He was thin and lipodystrophic. In reviewing his portraits, hemifacial atrophy was considered to develop in his early teens and to be progressive since then. Pigmented gum, high arched palate, mild mental retardation, pseudo-Argyll Robertson's pupil, sexual impotence, amyotrophy of the left thigh and the right calf, and a limp due to bony abnormalities was detected. Serological tests for syphilis were negative. Bone X-rays disclosed coxa-deformance. Cerebrospinal fluid. EMG, EEG, muscle biopsy and brain CT were normal. Hearing was decreased to 20-35 dB bilaterally. Plasma norepinephrine levels were 450 pg/ml in the supine position and 539 pg/ml in standing. Plasma renin activity was 5.1-5.4 ng/ml/hr. Microneurography revealed highly accentuated muscle and skin sympathetic nerve activities. Hypothermia on the feet, reduced CVR-R and decreased mydriatic response to 5% cocaine instillation were present. Intravenous infusion of norepinephrine and intradermal injection of either acetylcholine or histamine revealed normal results. In the case, sympathicotonia due to dysfunction in the central nervous system is considered to be related to the pathogenesis of hemifacial atrophy.

  14. Evaluation of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and aldosterone suppression in patients with acute decompensated heart failure on treatment containing intravenous atrial natriuretic peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Iwasaki, Toshiya; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Kumakura, Hisao; Minami, Kazutomo; Ichikawa, Shuichi; Matsumoto, Naoya; Nakata, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    Aldosterone prevents the uptake of norepinephrine in the myocardium. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a circulating hormone of cardiac origin, inhibits aldosterone synthase gene expression in cultured cardiocytes. We evaluated the effects of intravenous ANP on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and aldosterone suppression in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). We studied 182 patients with moderate nonischemic ADHF requiring hospitalization and treated with standard therapy containing intravenous ANP and 10 age-matched normal control subjects. ANP was continuously infused for >96 h. In all subjects, delayed total defect score (TDS), heart to mediastinum ratio, and washout rate were determined by 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and ejection fraction were determined by echocardiography. All patients with acute heart failure (AHF) were examined once within 3 days and then 4 weeks after admission, while the control subjects were examined only once (when their hemodynamics were normal). Moreover, for 62 AHF patients, plasma aldosterone concentrations were measured at admission and 1 h before stopping ANP infusion. 123 I-MIBG scintigraphic and echocardiographic parameters in normal subjects were more favorable than those in patients with AHF (all p < 0.001). After treatment, all these parameters improved significantly in AHF patients (all p < 0.001). We also found significant correlation between percent changes of TDS and aldosterone concentrations (r = 0.539, p < 0.001) in 62 AHF patients. The CSNA and LV performance were all improved in AHF patients. Furthermore, norepinephrine uptake of myocardium may be ameliorated by suppressing aldosterone production after standard treatment containing intravenous ANP. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and aldosterone suppression in patients with acute decompensated heart failure on treatment containing intravenous atrial natriuretic peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Toyama, Takuji; Kurabayashi, Masahiko [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiya; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Kumakura, Hisao; Minami, Kazutomo; Ichikawa, Shuichi [Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Matsumoto, Naoya [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nakata, Tomoaki [Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Second (Cardiology) Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Aldosterone prevents the uptake of norepinephrine in the myocardium. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a circulating hormone of cardiac origin, inhibits aldosterone synthase gene expression in cultured cardiocytes. We evaluated the effects of intravenous ANP on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and aldosterone suppression in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). We studied 182 patients with moderate nonischemic ADHF requiring hospitalization and treated with standard therapy containing intravenous ANP and 10 age-matched normal control subjects. ANP was continuously infused for >96 h. In all subjects, delayed total defect score (TDS), heart to mediastinum ratio, and washout rate were determined by {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and ejection fraction were determined by echocardiography. All patients with acute heart failure (AHF) were examined once within 3 days and then 4 weeks after admission, while the control subjects were examined only once (when their hemodynamics were normal). Moreover, for 62 AHF patients, plasma aldosterone concentrations were measured at admission and 1 h before stopping ANP infusion. {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphic and echocardiographic parameters in normal subjects were more favorable than those in patients with AHF (all p < 0.001). After treatment, all these parameters improved significantly in AHF patients (all p < 0.001). We also found significant correlation between percent changes of TDS and aldosterone concentrations (r = 0.539, p < 0.001) in 62 AHF patients. The CSNA and LV performance were all improved in AHF patients. Furthermore, norepinephrine uptake of myocardium may be ameliorated by suppressing aldosterone production after standard treatment containing intravenous ANP. (orig.)

  16. Intracranial Pressure Is a Determinant of Sympathetic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eric A; Despas, Fabien; Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Czosnyka, Zofia; Pickard, John D; Rahmouni, Kamal; Pathak, Atul; Senard, Jean M

    2018-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure within the cranium . ICP rise compresses brain vessels and reduces cerebral blood delivery. Massive ICP rise leads to cerebral ischemia, but it is also known to produce hypertension, bradycardia and respiratory irregularities due to a sympatho-adrenal mechanism termed Cushing response. One still unresolved question is whether the Cushing response is a non-synaptic acute brainstem ischemic mechanism or part of a larger physiological reflex for arterial blood pressure control and homeostasis regulation. We hypothesize that changes in ICP modulates sympathetic activity. Thus, modest ICP increase and decrease were achieved in mice and patients with respectively intra-ventricular and lumbar fluid infusion. Sympathetic activity was gauged directly by microneurography, recording renal sympathetic nerve activity in mice and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients, and gauged indirectly in both species by heart-rate variability analysis. In mice ( n = 15), renal sympathetic activity increased from 29.9 ± 4.0 bursts.s -1 (baseline ICP 6.6 ± 0.7 mmHg) to 45.7 ± 6.4 bursts.s -1 (plateau ICP 38.6 ± 1.0 mmHg) and decreased to 34.8 ± 5.6 bursts.s -1 (post-infusion ICP 9.1 ± 0.8 mmHg). In patients ( n = 10), muscle sympathetic activity increased from 51.2 ± 2.5 bursts.min -1 (baseline ICP 8.3 ± 1.0 mmHg) to 66.7 ± 2.9 bursts.min -1 (plateau ICP 25 ± 0.3 mmHg) and decreased to 58.8 ± 2.6 bursts.min -1 (post-infusion ICP 14.8 ± 0.9 mmHg). In patients 7 mmHg ICP rise significantly increases sympathetic activity by 17%. Heart-rate variability analysis demonstrated a significant vagal withdrawal during the ICP rise, in accordance with the microneurography findings. Mice and human results are alike. We demonstrate in animal and human that ICP is a reversible determinant of efferent sympathetic outflow, even at relatively low ICP levels. ICP is a biophysical stress related to the forces within the brain. But ICP has also to be

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress increases brain MAPK signaling, inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity and sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Yu, Yang; Weiss, Robert M; Felder, Robert B

    2016-10-01

    We previously reported that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is induced in the subfornical organ (SFO) and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of heart failure (HF) rats and is reduced by inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. The present study further examined the relationship between brain MAPK signaling, ER stress, and sympathetic excitation in HF. Sham-operated (Sham) and HF rats received a 4-wk intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of vehicle (Veh) or the ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA, 10 μg/day). Lower mRNA levels of the ER stress biomarkers GRP78, ATF6, ATF4, and XBP-1s in the SFO and PVN of TUDCA-treated HF rats validated the efficacy of the TUDCA dose. The elevated levels of phosphorylated p44/42 and p38 MAPK in SFO and PVN of Veh-treated HF rats, compared with Sham rats, were significantly reduced in TUDCA-treated HF rats as shown by Western blot and immunofluorescent staining. Plasma norepinephrine levels were higher in Veh-treated HF rats, compared with Veh-treated Sham rats, and were significantly lower in the TUDCA-treated HF rats. TUDCA-treated HF rats also had lower mRNA levels for angiotensin converting enzyme, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, cyclooxygenase-2, and NF-κB p65, and a higher mRNA level of IκB-α, in the SFO and PVN than Veh-treated HF rats. These data suggest that ER stress contributes to the augmented sympathetic activity in HF by inducing MAPK signaling, thereby promoting inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in key cardiovascular regulatory regions of the brain.

  18. Effects of adding intravenous nicorandil to standard therapy on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and myocyte dysfunction in patients with acute decompensated heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Toyama, Takuji; Funada, Ryuichi; Takama, Noriaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Ichikawa, Shuichi [Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Naoya [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, Yuichi [Health Park Clinic, Department of Imaging, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, improves cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) in ischemic heart disease or chronic heart failure. However, its effects on CSNA and myocyte dysfunction in acute heart failure (AHF) remain unclear. We investigated the effects of adding intravenous nicorandil to standard therapy on CSNA and myocyte dysfunction in AHF. We selected 70 patients with mild to moderate nonischemic AHF who were treated with standard conventional therapy soon after admission. Thirty-five patients were assigned to additionally receive intravenous nicorandil (4-12 mg/h; group A), whereas the remaining patients continued their current drug regimen (group B). Delayed total defect score (TDS), delayed heart to mediastinum count (H/M) ratio, and washout rate (WR) were determined by {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy within 3 days of admission and 4 weeks later. High sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT) level was also measured at the same time points. After treatment, MIBG scintigraphic parameters significantly improved in both groups. However, the extent of the changes in these parameters in group A significantly exceeded the extent of the changes in group B [TDS -11.3 ± 4.3 in group A vs -4.0 ± 6.0 in group B (p < 0.01); H/M ratio 0.31 ± 0.16 vs 0.14 ± 0.16 (p < 0.01); WR -13.8 ± 7.8 % vs -6.1 ± 8.9 % (p < 0.01)]. The hs-TnT level decreased significantly from 0.052 ± 0.043 to 0.041 ± 0.033 ng/ml (p < 0.05) in group A, but showed no significant change in group B. Moreover, in both groups, no relationships between the extent of changes in MIBG parameters and hs-TnT level were observed. Adding intravenous nicorandil to standard therapy provides additional benefits for CSNA and myocyte dysfunction over conventional therapy alone in AHF patients. Furthermore, the mechanisms of improvement in CSNA and myocyte dysfunction after nicorandil treatment in AHF patients were distinct. (orig.)

  19. Change in sympathetic nerve firing pattern associated with dietary weight loss in the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Annie Lambert

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic activation in subjects with the metabolic syndrome (MS plays a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease development. Diet-induced weight loss decreases sympathetic outflow. However the mechanisms that account for sympathetic inhibition are not known. We sought to provide a detailed description of the sympathetic response to diet by analyzing the firing behavior of single-unit sympathetic nerve fibres. Fourteen subjects (57±2 years, 9 men, 5 females fulfilling ATP III criteria for the MS underwent a 3-month low calorie diet. Metabolic profile, hemodynamic parameters and multi-unit and single unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, microneurography were assessed prior to and at the end of the diet. Patients’ weight dropped from 96±4 to 88±3 kg (P<0.001. This was associated with a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (-12 ±3 and -5±2 mmHg, P<0.05, and in heart rate (-7±2 bpm, P<0.01 and an improvement in all metabolic parameters (fasting glucose: -0.302.1±0.118 mmol/l, total cholesterol: -0.564±0.164 mmol/l, triglycerides: -0.414±0.137 mmol/l, P<0.05. Multi-unit MSNA decreased from 68±4 to 59±5 bursts per 100 heartbeats (P<0.05. Single-unit MSNA indicated that the firing rate of individual vasoconstrictor fibres decreased from 59±10 to 32±4 spikes per 100 heart beats (P<0.05. The probability of firing decreased from 34±5 to 23±3 % of heartbeats (P<0.05, and the incidence of multiple firing decreased from 14±4 to 6±1 % of heartbeats (P<0.05. Cardiac and sympathetic baroreflex function were significantly improved (cardiac slope: 6.57±0.69 to 9.57±1.20 msec.mmHg-1; sympathetic slope: -3.86±0.34 to -5.05±0.47 bursts per 100 heartbeats.mmHg-1 P<0.05 for both. Hypocaloric diet decreased sympathetic activity and improved hemodynamic and metabolic parameters. The sympathoinhibition associated with weight loss involves marked changes, not only in the rate but also in the firing pattern of

  20. Three Weeks of Overload Training Increases Resting Muscle Sympathetic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Alexandra M; Incognito, Anthony V; Seed, Jeremy D; Doherty, Connor J; Millar, Philip J; Burr, Jamie F

    2018-05-01

    Overload training is hypothesized to alter autonomic regulation, although interpretations using indirect measures of heart rate variability are conflicting. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of overload training on muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), a direct measure of central sympathetic outflow, in recreational endurance athletes. Measurements of heart rate variability, cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), MSNA (microneurography), and sympathetic BRS were obtained in 17 healthy triathletes and cyclists after 1 wk of reduced training (baseline) and again after 3 wk of either regular (n = 7) or overload (n = 10) training. After training, the changes (Δ) in peak power output (10 ± 10 vs -12 ± 9 W, P 0.05). Overload training increased MSNA and attenuated increases in cardiac BRS and heart rate variability observed with regular training. These results support neural adaptations after overload training and suggest that increased central sympathetic outflow may be linked with decreased exercise performance.

  1. Effects of cervical sympathetic nerve stimulation on the cerebral microcirculation: possible clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passatore, M; Deriu, F; Roatta, S; Grassi, C; Micieli, G

    1996-01-01

    The action of bilateral cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) stimulation on mean cerebral blood flow (CBF) and on its rhythmical fluctuations was studied in normotensive rabbits by using laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). A reduction in mean CBF, mediated by alpha-adrenoceptors, was the predominant effect; it was more often present and larger in size in the vascular beds supplied by the carotid than in those supplied by the vertebro-basilar system. This suggests that the sympathetic action facilitates a redistribution of blood flow to the brain stem. The effect induced by CSN stimulation on CBF spontaneous oscillations was a consistent decrease in amplitude and an increase in frequency, irrespective of the changes produced on the mean level of CBF. The possible implications of the sympathetic action on the state of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are discussed. Experimental and clinical data dealing with the influence of sympathetic activation on the cerebrovascular system have been compared. As a result the possibility of analysing the spontaneous oscillations of CBF for clinical purposes is suggested.

  2. A search for activation of C-nociceptors by sympathetic fibers in complex regional pain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campero, Mario; Bostock, Hugh; Baumann, Thomas K.; Ochoa, José L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Although the term ‘reflex sympathetic dystrophy’ has been replaced by ‘complex regional pain syndrome’ (CRPS) type I, there remains a widespread presumption that the sympathetic nervous system is actively involved in mediating chronic neuropathic pain [“sympathetically maintained pain” (SMP)], even in the absence of detectable neuropathophysiology. Methods We have used microneurography to evaluate possible electrophysiological interactions in 24 patients diagnosed with CRPS I (n=13), or CRPS II (n=11) by simultaneously recording from single identified sympathetic efferent fibers and C nociceptors, while provoking sympathetic neural discharges in cutaneous nerves. Results We assessed potential effects of sympathetic activity upon 35 polymodal nociceptors and 19 mechano-insensitive nociceptors, recorded in CRPS I (26 nociceptors) and CRPS II patients (28 nociceptors). No evidence of activation of nociceptors related to sympathetic discharge was found, although nociceptors in 6 CRPS II patients exhibited unrelated spontaneous pathological nerve impulse activity. Conclusion We conclude that activation of nociceptors by sympathetic efferent discharges is not a cardinal pathogenic event in either CRPS I or CRPS II patients. Significance This study shows that sympathetic-nociceptor interactions, if they exist in patients communicating chronic neuropathic pain, must be the exception. PMID:20359942

  3. Chronic baroreflex activation effects on sympathetic nerve traffic, baroreflex function, and cardiac haemodynamics in heart failure: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronda, Edoardo; Seravalle, Gino; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Costantino, Giuseppe; Casini, Andrea; Alsheraei, Ali; Lovett, Eric G; Mancia, Giuseppe; Grassi, Guido

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) pathophysiology is believed to be mediated by autonomic dysfunction, including chronic sympathoexcitation and diminished baroreflex sensitivity, which correlate with mortality risk. Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) is a device-based treatment providing chronic baroreflex activation through electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus. BAT chronically reduces sympathetic activity in resistant hypertension. The purpose of this investigation is to determine BAT effects in clinical HF. In a single-centre, open-label evaluation, patients with NYHA class III HF, EF baroreflex sensitivity, EF, NYHA class, quality of life and 6 min hall walk (6 MHW) distance (P ≤ 0.05 each). On an observational basis, hospitalization and emergency department visits for worsening HF were markedly reduced. One complication, perioperative anaemia requiring transfusion, occurred during the study. BAT was safe and provided chronic improvement in MSNA and clinical variables. Based on present understanding of HF pathophysiology, these results suggest that BAT may improve outcome in HF by modulating autonomic balance. Prospective, randomized trials to test the hypothesis are warranted. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  4. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P INE can elicit marked increases in MSNA and cardiovascular responses but that it evokes lower peak responses as compared to IHG. We speculate that possible differences in muscle fiber type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  5. Loss of Sympathetic Nerves in Spleens from Patients with End Stage Sepsis

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    Donald B. Hoover

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The spleen is an important site for central regulation of immune function by noradrenergic sympathetic nerves, but little is known about this major region of neuroimmune communication in humans. Experimental studies using animal models have established that sympathetic innervation of the spleen is essential for cholinergic anti-inflammatory responses evoked by vagal nerve stimulation, and clinical studies are evaluating this approach for treating inflammatory diseases. Most data on sympathetic nerves in spleen derive from rodent studies, and this work has established that remodeling of sympathetic innervation can occur during inflammation. However, little is known about the effects of sepsis on spleen innervation. Our primary goals were to (i localize noradrenergic nerves in human spleen by immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, a specific noradrenergic marker, (ii determine if nerves occur in close apposition to leukocytes, and (iii determine if splenic sympathetic innervation is altered in patients who died from end stage sepsis. Staining for vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT was done to screen for cholinergic nerves. Archived paraffin tissue blocks were used. Control samples were obtained from trauma patients or patients who died after hemorrhagic stroke. TH + nerves were associated with arteries and arterioles in all control spleens, occurring in bundles or as nerve fibers. Individual TH + nerve fibers entered the perivascular region where some appeared in close apposition to leukocytes. In marked contrast, spleens from half of the septic patients lacked TH + nerves fibers and the average abundance of TH + nerves for the septic group was only 16% of that for the control group (control: 0.272 ± 0.060% area, n = 6; sepsis: 0.043 ± 0.026% area, n = 8; P < 0.005. All spleens lacked cholinergic innervation. Our results provide definitive evidence for the distribution of noradrenergic

  6. Influence of the polyol pathway on norepinephrine transporter reduction in diabetic cardiac sympathetic nerves: implications for heterogeneous accumulation of MIBG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyono, Yasushi; Kajiyama, Satomi; Fujiwara, Hiromi; Kanegawa, Naoki; Saji, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac scintigraphic studies using 123 I-labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine ([ 123 I]MIBG) have demonstrated heterogeneous myocardial accumulation of MIBG in diabetes. The accumulation has been found to correlate with a heterogeneous decrease in the expression of norepinephrine transporter (NET). In diabetic peripheral nerve tissue, polyol pathways are activated and cause nerve dysfunction and degeneration. However, there has been little research on the polyol pathway and cardiac sympathetic nerves. Therefore, to assess the influence of the polyol pathway on cardiac sympathetic nervous function, we investigated the regional accumulation of MIBG and NET protein expression in diabetic model rats treated with aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) for the blockade of polyol pathways. Rats were given a single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (n=76, STZ-D rats). Starting the day after STZ injection, ARI was administered daily to 42 of the rats for 4 weeks (ARI-D rats). To assess the cardiac sympathetic nervous function, [ 125 I]MIBG autoradiographic experiments were carried out. Finally, NET protein expression was assessed with a saturation binding assay. The myocardial sorbitol concentration was significantly higher in STZ-D rats than in ARI-D rats. There was no heterogeneous accumulation of MIBG in ARI-D rats. There was a heterogeneous decrease of NET expression in STZ-D rats, but not in ARI-D or control rats. The gathered data indicate that the enhanced polyol pathway correlates with the decrease in regional cardiac sympathetic nervous function, and this impairment may lead to the reduction of NET protein in cardiac sympathetic nerves of the diabetic inferior wall. (orig.)

  7. Effect of Switching from Cilnidipine to Azelnidipine on Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Function in Patients with Heart Failure Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Shunsuke; Hisatake, Shinji; Kabuki, Takayuki; Oka, Takashi; Dobashi, Shintaro; Fujii, Takahiro; Ikeda, Takanori

    2018-01-27

    Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity is known to play a key role in the development and progression of heart failure (HF). Azelnidipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB), inhibits the sympathetic nerve activity of the central system. In contrast, cilnidipine, an N-type CCB, inhibits the sympathetic nerve activity of the peripheral system. CCBs are recommended as class IIa in patients with HF preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF); however, there are no comparative data on the difference in effect of cilnidipine and azelnidipine in patients with HFpEF and hypertension. We investigated the difference in effect of azelnidipine compared with cilnidipine in patients with HFpEF. Twenty-four consecutive HF patients who received angiotensin II type1a receptor blocker and beta blocker from April 2013 to January 2015 were enrolled. Cilnidipine was switched to azelnidipine during the follow-up period. Blood pressures, heart rate, blood tests, echocardiography, and 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) cardiac-scintigraphy were measured before and after 6 months from azelnidipine administration. B-type natriuretic peptide tended to decrease after switching to azelnidipine; however, there were no significant differences between the pre-state and post-state (pre-state: 118.5 pg/mL and post-state: 78.4 pg/mL, P = 0.137). Other laboratory findings, including catecholamine, also did not change significantly. In echocardiography, there were no significant differences in systolic and diastolic functions at the pre-state and post-state. As for MIBG, there were no significant changes in heart/mediastinum ratio. However, washout rate was significantly reduced (pre-state: 42.9 and post-state: 39.6, P = 0.030). Azelnidipine improved the dysfunction of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity compared with cilnidipine in patients with HFpEF.

  8. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats.

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    Jie Song

    Full Text Available During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group: (1 non-sensitized, (2 anaphylaxis, (3 anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS and (4 anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP, heart rate (HR, central venous pressure (CVP, FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats.

  9. Relevance of Sympathetic Nervous System Activation in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia A. Thorp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic tone is well recognised as being implicit in cardiovascular control. It is less readily acknowledged that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is integral in energy homeostasis and can exert profound metabolic effects. Accumulating data from animal and human studies suggest that central sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in the aetiology and complications of several metabolic conditions that can cluster to form the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS. Given the known augmented risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality associated with the MetS understanding the complex pathways underlying the metabolic derangements involved has become a priority. Many factors have been proposed to contribute to increased sympathetic nerve activity in metabolic abnormalities including obesity, impaired baroreflex sensitivity, hyperinsulinemia, and elevated adipokine levels. Furthermore there is mounting evidence to suggest that chronic sympathetic overactivity can potentiate two of the key metabolic alterations of the MetS, central obesity and insulin resistance. This review will discuss the regulatory role of the sympathetic nervous system in metabolic control and the proposed pathophysiology linking sympathetic overactivity to metabolic abnormalities. Pharmacological and device-based approaches that target central sympathetic drive will also be discussed as possible therapeutic options to improve metabolic control in at-risk patient cohorts.

  10. Effect of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with severe heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiming; Lu, Jing; Wang, Benwen; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility and effects of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation in patients with heart failure. A total of 20 patients with heart failure were enrolled, aged from 47 to 75 years (63±10 years). They were divided into the standard therapy (n = 10), and renal nerve radiofrequency ablation groups (n = 10). There were 15 males and 5 female patients, including 8 ischemic cardiomyopathy, 8 dilated cardiomyopathy, and 8 hypertensive cardiopathy. All of the patients met the criteria of New York Heart Association classes III-IV cardiac function. Patients with diabetes and renal failure were excluded. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation was performed on the renal artery wall under X-ray guidance. Serum electrolytes, neurohormones, and 24 h urine volume were recorded 24 h before and after the operation. Echocardiograms were performed to obtain left ventricular ejection fraction at baseline and 6 months. Heart rate, blood pressure, symptoms of dyspnea and edema were also monitored. After renal nerve ablation, 24 h urine volume was increased, while neurohormone levels were decreased compared with those of pre-operation and standard therapy. No obvious change in heart rate or blood pressure was recorded. Symptoms of heart failure were improved in patients after the operation. No complications were recorded in the study. Percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation may be a feasible, safe, and effective treatment for the patients with severe congestive heart failure.

  11. The sympathetic nerve--an integrative interface between two supersystems: the brain and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elenkov, I J; Wilder, R L; Chrousos, G P; Vizi, E S

    2000-12-01

    The brain and the immune system are the two major adaptive systems of the body. During an immune response the brain and the immune system "talk to each other" and this process is essential for maintaining homeostasis. Two major pathway systems are involved in this cross-talk: the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). This overview focuses on the role of SNS in neuroimmune interactions, an area that has received much less attention than the role of HPA axis. Evidence accumulated over the last 20 years suggests that norepinephrine (NE) fulfills the criteria for neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in lymphoid organs. Thus, primary and secondary lymphoid organs receive extensive sympathetic/noradrenergic innervation. Under stimulation, NE is released from the sympathetic nerve terminals in these organs, and the target immune cells express adrenoreceptors. Through stimulation of these receptors, locally released NE, or circulating catecholamines such as epinephrine, affect lymphocyte traffic, circulation, and proliferation, and modulate cytokine production and the functional activity of different lymphoid cells. Although there exists substantial sympathetic innervation in the bone marrow, and particularly in the thymus and mucosal tissues, our knowledge about the effect of the sympathetic neural input on hematopoiesis, thymocyte development, and mucosal immunity is extremely modest. In addition, recent evidence is discussed that NE and epinephrine, through stimulation of the beta(2)-adrenoreceptor-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway, inhibit the production of type 1/proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma by antigen-presenting cells and T helper (Th) 1 cells, whereas they stimulate the production of type 2/anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta. Through this mechanism, systemically, endogenous catecholamines may cause a selective

  12. Sympathetic activity during passive heat stress in healthy aged humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Daniel; Schlader, Zachary J; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular adjustments to heat stress are attenuated in healthy aged individuals, which could contribute to their greater prevalence of heat-related illnesses and deaths during heat waves. The attenuated cardiovascular adjustments in the aged could be due to lower increases in sympathetic nerve activity during heat stress. We examined muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and plasma catecholamine concentrations in healthy young and aged individuals during whole-body passive heat stress. The main finding of this study is that increases in MSNA and plasma catecholamine concentrations did not differ between young and aged healthy individuals during passive heating. Furthermore, the increase in these variables did not differ when a cold pressor test and lower body negative pressure were superimposed upon heating. These findings suggest that attenuated cardiovascular adjustments to heat stress in healthy aged individuals are unlikely to be related to attenuated increases in sympathetic activity. Cardiovascular adjustments during heat stress are generally attenuated in healthy aged humans, which could be due to lower increases in sympathetic activity compared to the young. We compared muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) between 11 young (Y: 28 ± 4 years) and 10 aged (A: 70 ± 5 years) subjects prior to and during passive heating. Furthermore, MSNA responses were compared when a cold pressor test (CPT) and lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were superimposed upon heating. Baseline MSNA burst frequency (Y: 15 ± 4 vs. A: 31 ± 3 bursts min(-1) , P ≤ 0.01) and burst incidence (Y: 26 ± 8 vs. A: 50 ± 7 bursts (100 cardiac cycles (CC))(-1) , P ≤ 0.01) were greater in the aged. Heat stress increased core temperature to a similar extent in both groups (Y: +1.2 ± 0.1 vs. A: +1.2 ± 0.0°C, P = 0.99). Absolute levels of MSNA remained greater in the aged during heat stress (burst frequency: Y: 47 ± 6 vs. A: 63 ± 11

  13. Sympathetic nerve-derived ATP regulates renal medullary blood flow via vasa recta pericytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott S Wildman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pericyte cells are now known to be a novel locus of blood flow control, being able to regulate capillary diameter via their unique morphology and expression of contractile proteins. We have previously shown that exogenous ATP causes constriction of vasa recta via renal pericytes, acting at a variety of membrane bound P2 receptors on descending vasa recta, and therefore may be able to regulate medullary blood flow (MBF. Regulation of MBF is essential for appropriate urine concentration and providing essential oxygen and nutrients to this region of high, and variable, metabolic demand. Various sources of endogenous ATP have been proposed, including from epithelial, endothelial and red blood cells in response to stimuli such as mechanical stimulation, local acidosis, hypoxia, and exposure to various hormones. Extensive sympathetic innervation of the nephron has previously been shown, however the innervation reported has focused around the proximal and distal tubules, and ascending loop of Henle. We hypothesise that sympathetic nerves are an additional source of ATP acting at renal pericytes and therefore regulate MBF. Using a rat live kidney slice model in combination with video imaging and confocal microscopy techniques we firstly show sympathetic nerves in close proximity to vasa recta pericytes in both the outer and inner medulla. Secondly, we demonstrate pharmacological stimulation of sympathetic nerves in situ (by tyramine evokes pericyte-mediated vasoconstriction of vasa recta capillaries; inhibited by the application of the P2 receptor antagonist suramin. Lastly, tyramine-evoked vasoconstriction of vasa recta by pericytes is significantly less than ATP-evoked vasoconstriction. Sympathetic innervation may provide an additional level of functional regulation in the renal medulla that is highly localized. It now needs to be determined under which physiological/pathophysiological circumstances that sympathetic innervation of renal pericytes is

  14. Recovery of sympathetic nerve function after lumbar sympathectomy is slower in the hind limbs than in the torso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi-Fang; Liu, Yi-Shu; Min, Xuan; Tang, Jian-Bing; Liu, Hong-Wei; Cheng, Biao

    2017-07-01

    Local sympathetic denervation by surgical sympathectomy is used in the treatment of lower limb ulcers and ischemia, but the restoration of cutaneous sympathetic nerve functions is less clear. This study aims to explore the recovery of cutaneous sympathetic functions after bilateral L 2-4 sympathectomy. The skin temperature of the left feet, using a point monitoring thermometer, increased intraoperatively after sympathectomy. The cytoplasm of sympathetic neurons contained tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine β-hydroxylase, visualized by immunofluorescence, indicated the accuracy of sympathectomy. Iodine starch test results suggested that the sweating function of the hind feet plantar skin decreased 2 and 7 weeks after lumbar sympathectomy but had recovered by 3 months. Immunofluorescence and western blot assay results revealed that norepinephrine and dopamine β-hydroxylase expression in the skin from the sacrococcygeal region and hind feet decreased in the sympathectomized group at 2 weeks. Transmission electron microscopy results showed that perinuclear space and axon demyelination in sympathetic cells in the L 5 sympathetic trunks were found in the sympathectomized group 3 months after sympathectomy. Although sympathetic denervation occurred in the sacrococcygeal region and hind feet skin 2 weeks after lumbar sympathectomy, the skin functions recovered gradually over 7 weeks to 3 months. In conclusion, sympathetic functional recovery may account for the recurrence of hyperhidrosis after sympathectomy and the normalization of sympathetic nerve trunks after incomplete injury. The recovery of sympathetic nerve function was slower in the limbs than in the torso after bilateral L 2-4 sympathectomy.

  15. Recovery of sympathetic nerve function after lumbar sympathectomy is slower in the hind limbs than in the torso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-fang Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Local sympathetic denervation by surgical sympathectomy is used in the treatment of lower limb ulcers and ischemia, but the restoration of cutaneous sympathetic nerve functions is less clear. This study aims to explore the recovery of cutaneous sympathetic functions after bilateral L2–4 sympathectomy. The skin temperature of the left feet, using a point monitoring thermometer, increased intraoperatively after sympathectomy. The cytoplasm of sympathetic neurons contained tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine β-hydroxylase, visualized by immunofluorescence, indicated the accuracy of sympathectomy. Iodine starch test results suggested that the sweating function of the hind feet plantar skin decreased 2 and 7 weeks after lumbar sympathectomy but had recovered by 3 months. Immunofluorescence and western blot assay results revealed that norepinephrine and dopamine β-hydroxylase expression in the skin from the sacrococcygeal region and hind feet decreased in the sympathectomized group at 2 weeks. Transmission electron microscopy results showed that perinuclear space and axon demyelination in sympathetic cells in the L5 sympathetic trunks were found in the sympathectomized group 3 months after sympathectomy. Although sympathetic denervation occurred in the sacrococcygeal region and hind feet skin 2 weeks after lumbar sympathectomy, the skin functions recovered gradually over 7 weeks to 3 months. In conclusion, sympathetic functional recovery may account for the recurrence of hyperhidrosis after sympathectomy and the normalization of sympathetic nerve trunks after incomplete injury. The recovery of sympathetic nerve function was slower in the limbs than in the torso after bilateral L2–4 sympathectomy.

  16. Baroreflex dysfunction and augmented sympathetic nerve responses during mental stress in veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeanie; Marvar, Paul J; Liao, Peizhou; Kankam, Melanie L; Norrholm, Seth D; Downey, Ryan M; McCullough, S Ashley; Le, Ngoc-Anh; Rothbaum, Barbara O

    2017-07-15

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at a significantly higher risk of developing hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms underlying this increased risk are not known. Studies have suggested that PTSD patients have an overactive sympathetic nervous system (SNS) that could contribute to cardiovascular risk; however, sympathetic function has not previously been rigorously evaluated in PTSD patients. Using direct measurements of sympathetic nerve activity and pharmacological manipulation of blood pressure, we show that veterans with PTSD have augmented SNS and haemodynamic reactivity during both combat-related and non-combat related mental stress, impaired sympathetic and cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity, and increased inflammation. Identifying the mechanisms contributing to increased cardiovascular (CV) risk in PTSD will pave the way for developing interventions to improve sympathetic function and reduce CV risk in these patients. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. We tested the hypothesis that PTSD patients have augmented sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and haemodynamic reactivity during mental stress, as well as impaired arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Fourteen otherwise healthy Veterans with combat-related PTSD were compared with 14 matched Controls without PTSD.  Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), continuous blood pressure (BP) and electrocardiography were measured at baseline, as well as during two types of mental stress:  combat-related mental stress using virtual reality combat exposure (VRCE) and non-combat related stress using mental arithmetic (MA). A cold pressor test (CPT) was administered for comparison. BRS was tested using pharmacological manipulation of BP via the Modified Oxford technique at rest and during VRCE. Blood samples were analysed for inflammatory biomarkers. Baseline characteristics, MSNA and haemodynamics were similar between

  17. Histamine H3 receptors mediate inhibition of noradrenaline release from intestinal sympathetic nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Blandizzi, Corrado; Tognetti, Martina; Colucci, Rocchina; Tacca, Mario Del

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigates whether presynaptic histamine receptors regulate noradrenaline release from intestinal sympathetic nerves. The experiments were performed on longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations of guinea-pig ileum, preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline.In the presence of rauwolscine, electrically-induced [3H]-noradrenaline release was inhibited by histamine or R-α-methylhistamine, whereas it was unaffected by pyridylethylamine, impromidine, pyrilamine, cimetidine, t...

  18. Loss of sympathetic nerve fibers in vital intertrochanteric bone cylinders lateral to osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Johannes; Knödl, Matthias; Bauser, Eva; Tingart, Markus; Grifka, Joachim; Straub, Rainer H

    2013-03-01

    Although etiology in osteonecrosis of the femoral head mainly depends on alterations of bone blood flow, vasoregulatory nerve fibers of the sympathetic and sensory nervous system have never been investigated in bone of osteonecrosis patients. This study aimed to demonstrate density of sympathetic and sensory nerve fibers in femoral head and, for comparison, adjacent periosteum, and synovium of the hip joint in patients with osteonecrosis. Immunofluorescence staining techniques were applied using specific nerve fiber markers. A total of 10 patients with early femoral head osteonecrosis (ARCO I-II), 10 with late femoral head osteonecrosis (ARCO III-IV), and 10 patients with osteoarthritis of the hip were investigated. In the bone of the femoral head, density of sympathetic nerve fibers was lower in early and late osteonecrosis compared to osteoarthritis. There was a marked preponderance of sympathetic over sensory nerve fibers in bone of osteoarthritis patients, which was opposite in early and late femoral head osteonecrosis. In periosteum, density of sympathetic nerve fibers was similar in all three groups but density of sensory nerve fibers and cellularity were higher in early osteonecrosis compared to the other two groups. Due to the different affinity of norepinephrine for α-adrenoceptors (high affinity) and β-adrenoceptors (low affinity), the loss of sympathetic nerve fibers relative to sensory nerve fibers in femoral head osteonecrosis might change the femoral head blood flow (towards α-adrenergic vasoconstriction). Higher density of sensory nerve fibers and cellularity in periosteum might indicate an inflammatory response in early osteonecrosis. Copyright © 2012 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Sympathetic nerve traffic and blood pressure changes after bilateral renal denervation in resistant hypertension: a time-integrated analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seravalle, Gino; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Tripepi, Giovanni; Mallamaci, Francesca; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Mancia, Giuseppe; Grassi, Guido; Zoccali, Carmine

    2017-08-01

    Renal denervation reduces blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic drive in experimental animal models, but the effect of this intervention on sympathetic activity in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension is still unclear. In an incident series of 29 patients with treatment-resistant hypertension, we performed serial measurements (n = 123) of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, microneurography) and standardized BP measurements. Data were analysed by mixed linear modelling (MLM) and by regression analysis of time-integrated changes of both MSNA and synchronous, standardized (in-lab) BP measurements. Bilateral renal denervation was accompanied by a marked reduction in MSNA (P = 0.01 by MLM), which was parallelled by a reduction in systolic (from 175 ± 14 to 156 ± 16 mmHg) and, to a lesser extent, in diastolic (from 96 ± 12 to 87 ± 6 mmHg) BP over time. Neither systolic nor diastolic BP associated to a significant extent with corrected MSNA (MSNAC) in the MLM analysis (systolic BP versus MSNAC: β = -0.08, P = 0.08; diastolic BP versus MSNAC: β = -0.007, P = 0.75). However, the study of time-integrated changes in MSNA and BP showed a robust association between proportional changes in MSNA over time and simultaneous changes in systolic and diastolic BP (β = 0.61, P hypertension and in the BP-lowering effect of the procedure.

  20. Mechanisms involved in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-induced neurotransmitter release from sympathetic nerve terminals in the mouse vas deferens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Williams

    Full Text Available Prejunctional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs amplify postganglionic sympathetic neurotransmission, and there are indications that intraterminal Ca(2+ stores might be involved. However, the mechanisms by which nAChR activation stimulates neurotransmitter release at such junctions is unknown. Rapid local delivery (picospritzing of the nAChR agonist epibatidine was combined with intracellular sharp microelectrode recording to monitor spontaneous and field-stimulation-evoked neurotransmitter release from sympathetic nerve terminals in the mouse isolated vas deferens. Locally applied epibatidine (1 µM produced 'epibatidine-induced depolarisations' (EIDs that were similar in shape to spontaneous excitatory junction potentials (SEJPs and were abolished by nonselective nAChR antagonists and the purinergic desensitizing agonist α,β-methylene ATP. The amplitude distribution of EIDs was only slightly shifted towards lower amplitudes by the selective α7 nAChR antagonists α-bungarotoxin and methyllcaconitine, the voltage-gated Na(+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin or by blocking voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels with Cd(2+. Lowering the extracellular Ca(2+ concentration reduced the frequency of EIDs by 69%, but more surprisingly, the Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release blocker ryanodine greatly decreased the amplitude (by 41% and the frequency of EIDs by 36%. Ryanodine had no effect on electrically-evoked neurotransmitter release, paired-pulse facilitation, SEJP frequency, SEJP amplitude or SEJP amplitude distribution. These results show that activation of non-α7 nAChRs on sympathetic postganglionic nerve terminals induces high-amplitude junctional potentials that are argued to represent multipacketed neurotransmitter release synchronized by intraterminal Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release, triggered by Ca(2+ influx directly through the nAChR. This nAChR-induced neurotransmitter release can be targeted pharmacologically without affecting spontaneous or electrically

  1. Electroacupuncture Improved the Function of Myocardial Ischemia Involved in the Hippocampus-Paraventricular Nucleus-Sympathetic Nerve Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Cui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the hippocampus-paraventricular nucleus- (PVN- sympathetic nerve pathway in electroacupuncture (EA at the heart meridian for the treatment of myocardial ischemia by observing PVN neuronal discharge, sympathetic nerve discharge, and hemodynamics parameters. Sprague Dawley (SD rats were equally divided into four groups: Sham, Model, Model + EA, and Model + EA + Lesion. The model rat was established by ligating the left anterior descending branch of the coronary artery. Changes in the sympathetic nerve discharge and hemodynamic parameters were observed. The Model + EA exhibited a significantly lower discharge frequency of PVN neurons compared with the Model. The Model + EA + Lesion had a significantly higher discharge frequency compared with the Model + EA. The total discharge frequency of PVN neurons and interneurons were positively correlated with the sympathetic nerve discharge. The total discharge frequency of PVN neurons was positively correlated with heart rate (HR and negatively correlated with mean arterial pressure (MAP and rate pressure product (RPP. The discharge frequency of interneurons was positively correlated with HR and negatively correlated with MAP and RPP. The hippocampus-PVN-sympathetic nerve pathway is involved in electroacupuncture at the heart meridian and interneurons are the key neurons in PVNs.

  2. Effect of sympathetic nerve block on acute inflammatory pain and hyperalgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Rung, G W; Kehlet, H

    1997-01-01

    . The duration and quality of blocks were evaluated by the sympatogalvanic skin response and skin temperature. Bilateral heat injuries were produced on the medial surfaces of the calves with a 50 x 25 mm thermode (47 degrees C, 7 min) 45 min after the blocks. Pain intensity induced by heat, pain thresholds....... METHODS: The study was made as a randomized, single blinded investigation, in which the volunteers served as their own controls. A lumbar sympathetic nerve block and a contralateral placebo block were performed in 24 persons by injecting 10 ml bupivacaine (0.5%) and 10 ml saline, respectively...... acute inflammatory pain or hyperalgesia after a heat injury in human skin....

  3. Sympathetic nervous system and spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, William H.; Convertino, Victor A.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Orthostatic stability on Earth is maintained through sympathetic nerve activation sufficient to increase peripheral vascular resistance and defend against reductions of blood pressure. Orthostatic instability in astronauts upon return from space missions has been linked to blunted vascular resistance responses to standing, introducing the possibility that spaceflight alters normal function between sympathetic efferent traffic and vascular reactivity. Methods: We evaluated published results of spaceflight and relevant ground-based microgravity simulations in an effort to determine responses of the sympathetic nervous system and consequences for orthostatic stability. Results: Direct microneurographic recordings from humans in space revealed that sympathetic nerve activity is increased and preserved in the upright posture after return to Earth (STS-90). However, none of the astronauts studied during STS-90 presented with presyncope postflight, leaving unanswered the question of whether postflight orthostatic intolerance is associated with blunted sympathetic nerve responses or inadequate translation into vascular resistance. Conclusions: There is little evidence to support the concept that spaceflight induces fundamental sympathetic neuroplasticity. The available data seem to support the hypothesis that regardless of whether or not sympathetic traffic is altered during flight, astronauts return with reduced blood volumes and consequent heightened baseline sympathetic activity. Because of this, the ability to withstand an orthostatic challenge postflight is directly proportional to an astronaut's maximal sympathetic activation capacity and remaining sympathetic reserve.

  4. Responses of muscle spindles in feline dorsal neck muscles to electrical stimulation of the cervical sympathetic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, F; Roatta, S; Thunberg, J; Passatore, M; Djupsjöbacka, M

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies performed in jaw muscles of rabbits and rats have demonstrated that sympathetic outflow may affect the activity of muscle spindle afferents (MSAs). The resulting impairment of MSA information has been suggested to be involved in the genesis and spread of chronic muscle pain. The present study was designed to investigate sympathetic influences on muscle spindles in feline trapezius and splenius muscles (TrSp), as these muscles are commonly affected by chronic pain in humans. Experiments were carried out in cats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose. The effect of electrical stimulation (10 Hz for 90 s or 3 Hz for 5 min) of the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) was investigated on the discharge of TrSp MSAs (units classified as Ia-like and II-like) and on their responses to sinusoidal stretching of these muscles. In some of the experiments, the local microcirculation of the muscles was monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry. In total, 46 MSAs were recorded. Stimulation of the CSN at 10 Hz powerfully depressed the mean discharge rate of the majority of the tested MSAs (73%) and also affected the sensitivity of MSAs to sinusoidal changes of muscle length, which were evaluated in terms of amplitude and phase of the sinusoidal fitting of unitary activity. The amplitude was significantly reduced in Ia-like units and variably affected in II-like units, while in general the phase was affected little and not changed significantly in either group. The discharge of a smaller percentage of tested units was also modulated by 3-Hz CSN stimulation. Blockade of the neuromuscular junctions by pancuronium did not induce any changes in MSA responses to CSN stimulation, showing that these responses were not secondary to changes in extrafusal or fusimotor activity. Further data showed that the sympathetically induced modulation of MSA discharge was not secondary to the concomitant reduction of muscle blood flow induced by the stimulation. Hence

  5. Angiotensin-(1-7 in Paraventricular Nucleus Contributes to the Enhanced Cardiac Sympathetic Afferent Reflex and Sympathetic Activity in Chronic Heart Failure Rats

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    Xingsheng Ren

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR enhancement contributes to exaggerated sympathetic activation in chronic heart failure (CHF. The current study aimed to investigate the roles of angiotensin (Ang-(1-7 in CSAR modulation and sympathetic activation and Ang-(1-7 signaling pathway in paraventricular nucleus of CHF rats. Methods: CHF was induced by coronary artery ligation. Responses of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP to epicardial application of capsaicin were used to evaluate CSAR in rats with anesthesia. Results: Ang-(1-7 increased RSNA, MAP, CSAR activity, cAMP level, NAD(PH oxidase activity and superoxide anion level more significantly in CHF than in sham-operated rats, while Mas receptor antagonist A-779 had the opposite effects. Moreover, Ang-(1-7 augmented effects of Ang II in CHF rats. The effects of Ang-(1-7 were blocked by A-779, adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ22536, protein kinase A inhibitor Rp-cAMP, superoxide anion scavenger tempol and NAD(PH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Mas and AT1 receptor protein expressions, Ang-(1-7 and Ang II levels in CHF increased. Conclusions: These results indicate that Ang-(1-7 in paraventricular nucleus enhances CSAR and sympathetic output not only by exerting its own effects but also by augmenting the effects of Ang II through Mas receptor in CHF. Endogenous Ang-(1-7/Mas receptor activity contributes to CSAR enhancement and sympathetic activation in CHF, and NAD(PH oxidase-derived superoxide anions and the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway are involved in mediating the effects of Ang-(1-7 in CHF.

  6. Effects of short-term continuous positive airway pressure on myocardial sympathetic nerve function and energetics in patients with heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Allison B; Ziadi, Maria C; Leech, Judith A; Chen, Shin-Yee; Burwash, Ian G; Renaud, Jennifer; deKemp, Robert A; Haddad, Haissam; Mielniczuk, Lisa M; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Guo, Ann; Chen, Li; Walter, Olga; Garrard, Linda; DaSilva, Jean N; Floras, John S; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2014-09-09

    Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 2 states of increased metabolic demand and sympathetic nervous system activation, often coexist. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which alleviates OSA, can improve ventricular function. It is unknown whether this is due to altered oxidative metabolism or presynaptic sympathetic nerve function. We hypothesized that short-term (6-8 weeks) CPAP in patients with OSA and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction would improve myocardial sympathetic nerve function and energetics. Forty-five patients with OSA and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (left ventricular ejection fraction 35.8±9.7% [mean±SD]) were evaluated with the use of echocardiography and 11C-acetate and 11C-hydroxyephedrine positron emission tomography before and ≈6 to 8 weeks after randomization to receive short-term CPAP (n=22) or no CPAP (n=23). Work metabolic index, an estimate of myocardial efficiency, was calculated as follows: (stroke volume index×heart rate×systolic blood pressure÷Kmono), where Kmono is the monoexponential function fit to the myocardial 11C-acetate time-activity data, reflecting oxidative metabolism. Presynaptic sympathetic nerve function was measured with the use of the 11C-hydroxyephedrine retention index. CPAP significantly increased hydroxyephedrine retention versus no CPAP (Δretention: +0.012 [0.002, 0.021] versus -0.006 [-0.013, 0.005] min(-1); P=0.003). There was no significant change in work metabolic index between groups. However, in those with more severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index>20 events per hour), CPAP significantly increased both work metabolic index and systolic blood pressure (Penergetics. In those with more severe OSA, CPAP may improve cardiac efficiency. Further outcome-based investigation of the consequences of CPAP is warranted. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00756366. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Functional imaging of sympathetic activation during mental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechir, M; Gamer, M; Blasius, I; Bauermann, T; Breimhorst, M; Schlindwein, P; Schlereth, T; Birklein, F

    2010-04-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is essential in adapting to environmental stressors and in maintaining homeostasis. This reaction can also turn into maladaptation, associated with a wide spectrum of stress-related diseases. Up to now, the cortical mechanisms of sympathetic activation in acute mental stress have not been sufficiently characterized. We therefore investigated cerebral activation applying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance of a mental stress task with graded levels of difficulty, i.e. four versions of a Stroop task (Colour Word Interference Test, CWT) in healthy subjects. To analyze stress-associated sympathetic activation, skin conductance and heart rate were continuously recorded. The results show that sympathetic activation through mental stress is associated with distinct cerebral regions being immediately involved in task performance (visual, motor, and premotor areas). Other activated regions (right insula, dorsolateral superior frontal gyrus, cerebellar regions) are unrelated to task performance. These latter regions have previously been considered to be involved in mediating different stress responses. The results might furthermore serve as a basis for future investigations of the connection between these cortical regions in the generation of stress-related diseases. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Causes and consequences of increased sympathetic activity in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joles, JA; Koomans, HA

    Much evidence indicates increased sympathetic nervous activity (SNA) in renal disease. Renal ischemia is probably a primary event leading to increased SNA. Increased SNA often occurs in association with hypertension. However, the deleterious effect of increased SNA on the diseased kidney is not only

  9. Baroreflex control of sympathetic activity in experimental hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C.C. Irigoyen

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The arterial baroreceptor reflex system is one of the most powerful and rapidly acting mechanisms for controlling arterial pressure. The purpose of the present review is to discuss data relating sympathetic activity to the baroreflex control of arterial pressure in two different experimental models: neurogenic hypertension by sinoaortic denervation (SAD and high-renin hypertension by total aortic ligation between the renal arteries in the rat. SAD depresses baroreflex regulation of renal sympathetic activity in both the acute and chronic phases. However, increased sympathetic activity (100% was found only in the acute phase of sinoaortic denervation. In the chronic phase of SAD average discharge normalized but the pattern of discharges was different from that found in controls. High-renin hypertensive rats showed overactivity of the renin angiotensin system and a great depression of the baroreflexes, comparable to the depression observed in chronic sinoaortic denervated rats. However, there were no differences in the average tonic sympathetic activity or changes in the pattern of discharges in high-renin rats. We suggest that the difference in the pattern of discharges may contribute to the increase in arterial pressure lability observed in chronic sinoaortic denervated rats.

  10. Baroreflex activation in conscious rats modulates the joint inflammatory response via sympathetic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Gabriel S; Brognara, Fernanda; Castania, Jaci A; Talbot, Jhimmy; Cunha, Thiago M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Ulloa, Luis; Kanashiro, Alexandre; Dias, Daniel P Martins; Salgado, Helio C

    2015-10-01

    The baroreflex is a critical physiological mechanism controlling cardiovascular function by modulating both the sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. Here, we report that electrical activation of the baroreflex attenuates joint inflammation in experimental arthritis induced by the administration of zymosan into the femorotibial cavity. Baroreflex activation combined with lumbar sympathectomy, adrenalectomy, celiac subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or splenectomy dissected the mechanisms involved in the inflammatory modulation, highlighting the role played by sympathetic inhibition in the attenuation of joint inflammation. From the immunological standpoint, baroreflex activation attenuates neutrophil migration and the synovial levels of inflammatory cytokines including TNF, IL-1β and IL-6, but does not affect the levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The anti-inflammatory effects of the baroreflex system are not mediated by IL-10, the vagus nerve, adrenal glands or the spleen, but by the inhibition of the sympathetic drive to the knee. These results reveal a novel physiological neuronal network controlling peripheral local inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A new function for ATP: activating cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    2010-12-01

    Myocardial ischemia activates cardiac sympathetic afferents leading to chest pain and reflex cardiovascular responses. Brief myocardial ischemia leads to ATP release in the interstitial space. Furthermore, exogenous ATP and α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP), a P2X receptor agonist, stimulate cutaneous group III and IV sensory nerve fibers. The present study tested the hypothesis that endogenous ATP excites cardiac afferents during ischemia through activation of P2 receptors. Nerve activity of single unit cardiac sympathetic afferents was recorded from the left sympathetic chain or rami communicates (T(2)-T(5)) in anesthetized cats. Single fields of 45 afferents (conduction velocities = 0.25-4.92 m/s) were identified in the left ventricle with a stimulating electrode. Five minutes of myocardial ischemia stimulated 39 of 45 cardiac afferents (8 Aδ, 37 C fibers). Epicardial application of ATP (1-4 μmol) stimulated six ischemically sensitive cardiac afferents in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, epicardial ATP (2 μmol), ADP (2 μmol), a P2Y agonist, and α,β-meATP (0.5 μmol) significantly activated eight other ischemically sensitive afferents. Third, pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid, a P2 receptor antagonist, abolished the responses of six afferents to epicardial ATP (2 μmol) and attenuated the ischemia-related increase in activity of seven other afferents by 37%. In the absence of P2 receptor blockade, cardiac afferents responded consistently to repeated application of ATP (n = 6) and to recurrent myocardial ischemia (n = 6). Finally, six ischemia-insensitive cardiac spinal afferents did not respond to epicardial ATP (2-4 μmol), although these afferents did respond to epicardial bradykinin. Taken together, these data indicate that, during ischemia, endogenously released ATP activates ischemia-sensitive, but not ischemia-insensitive, cardiac spinal afferents through stimulation of P2 receptors likely located on the cardiac sensory

  12. Reactive oxygen species in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus alter sympathetic activity during metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSIANE CAMPOS CRUZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN contains heterogeneous populations of neurons involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation. The PVN plays an important role in the sympathoexcitatory response to increasing circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang-II, which activates AT1 receptors in the circumventricular organs (OCVs, mainly in the subfornical organ (SFO. Circulating Ang-II induces a de novo synthesis of Ang-II in SFO neurons projecting to pre-autonomic PVN neurons. Activation of AT1 receptors induces intracellular increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to increases in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. Chronic sympathetic nerve activation promotes a series of metabolic disorders that characterizes the metabolic syndrome (MetS: dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, hyperleptinemia and elevated plasma hormone levels, such as noradrenaline, glucocorticoids, leptin, insulin and Ang-II. This review will discuss the contribution of our laboratory and others regarding the sympathoexcitation caused by peripheral Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species along the subfornical organ and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize that this mechanism could be involved in metabolic disorders underlying MetS.

  13. Sympathetic Response to Insulin is Mediated by Melanocortin 3/4 Receptors in the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Kathryn R.; Bardgett, James F.; Wolfgang, Lawrence; Stocker, Sean D.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia increases sympathetic nerve activity and contributes to cardiovascular dysfunction in obesity and diabetes. Neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus regulate sympathetic nerve activity through mono- and poly-synaptic connections to preganglionic neurons in the spinal cord. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons mediate the sympathetic response to insulin. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were perform...

  14. Sympathetic nerve damage and restoration after ischemia-reperfusion injury as assessed by {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Rudolf A.; Higuchi, Takahiro [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); University of Wuerzburg, Comprehensive Heart Failure Center, Wuerzburg (Germany); Maya, Yoshifumi [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Nihon Medi-Physics Co., Ltd., Research Centre, Chiba (Japan); Rischpler, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Javadi, Mehrbod S. [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fukushima, Kazuhito [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hyogo (Japan); Lapa, Constantin [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Herrmann, Ken [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    An altered state of the cardiac sympathetic nerves is an important prognostic factor in patients with coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to investigate regional sympathetic nerve damage and restoration utilizing a rat model of myocardial transient ischemia and a catecholamine analog PET tracer, {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine ({sup 11}C-HED). Transient myocardial ischemia was induced by coronary occlusion for 20 min and reperfusion in male Wistar rats. Dual-tracer autoradiography was performed subacutely (7 days) and chronically (2 months) after ischemia, and in control rats without ischemia using {sup 11}C-HED as a marker of sympathetic innervation and {sup 201}TI for perfusion. Additional serial in vivo cardiac {sup 11}C-HED and {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans were performed in the subacute and chronic phases after ischemia. After transient ischemia, the {sup 11}C-HED uptake defect areas in both the subacute and chronic phases were clearly larger than the perfusion defect areas in the midventricular wall. The subacute {sup 11}C-HED uptake defect showed a transmural pattern, whereas uptake recovered in the subepicardial portion in the chronic phase. Tyrosine hydroxylase antibody nerve staining confirmed regional denervation corresponding to areas of decreased {sup 11}C-HED uptake. Serial in vivo PET imaging visualized reductions in the area of the {sup 11}C-HED uptake defects in the chronic phase consistent with autoradiography and histology. Higher susceptibility of sympathetic neurons compared to myocytes was confirmed by a larger {sup 11}C-HED defect with a corresponding histologically identified region of denervation. Furthermore, partial reinnervation was observed in the chronic phase as shown by recovery of subepicardial {sup 11}C-HED uptake. (orig.)

  15. Sympathetic nerve damage and restoration after ischemia-reperfusion injury as assessed by 11C-hydroxyephedrine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Rudolf A.; Higuchi, Takahiro; Maya, Yoshifumi; Rischpler, Christoph; Javadi, Mehrbod S.; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Lapa, Constantin; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    An altered state of the cardiac sympathetic nerves is an important prognostic factor in patients with coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to investigate regional sympathetic nerve damage and restoration utilizing a rat model of myocardial transient ischemia and a catecholamine analog PET tracer, 11 C-hydroxyephedrine ( 11 C-HED). Transient myocardial ischemia was induced by coronary occlusion for 20 min and reperfusion in male Wistar rats. Dual-tracer autoradiography was performed subacutely (7 days) and chronically (2 months) after ischemia, and in control rats without ischemia using 11 C-HED as a marker of sympathetic innervation and 201 TI for perfusion. Additional serial in vivo cardiac 11 C-HED and 18 F-FDG PET scans were performed in the subacute and chronic phases after ischemia. After transient ischemia, the 11 C-HED uptake defect areas in both the subacute and chronic phases were clearly larger than the perfusion defect areas in the midventricular wall. The subacute 11 C-HED uptake defect showed a transmural pattern, whereas uptake recovered in the subepicardial portion in the chronic phase. Tyrosine hydroxylase antibody nerve staining confirmed regional denervation corresponding to areas of decreased 11 C-HED uptake. Serial in vivo PET imaging visualized reductions in the area of the 11 C-HED uptake defects in the chronic phase consistent with autoradiography and histology. Higher susceptibility of sympathetic neurons compared to myocytes was confirmed by a larger 11 C-HED defect with a corresponding histologically identified region of denervation. Furthermore, partial reinnervation was observed in the chronic phase as shown by recovery of subepicardial 11 C-HED uptake. (orig.)

  16. Effects of inhaled citronella oil and related compounds on rat body weight and brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batubara, Irmanida; Suparto, Irma H; Sa'diah, Siti; Matsuoka, Ryunosuke; Mitsunaga, Tohru

    2015-03-12

    Citronella oil is one of the most famous Indonesian essential oils, having a distinctive aroma. As with other essential oils, it is crucial to explore the effects of inhalation of this oil. Therefore, the aim of this research was to elucidate the effects of inhalation of citronella oil and its components isolated from Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae), Indonesian local name: "Sereh Wangi" on the body weight, blood lipid profile, and liver function of rats, as well as on the sympathetic nerve activity and temperature of brown adipose tissue. Sprague-Dawley male adult rats fed with high fat diet (HFD) were made to inhale citronella oil, R-(+)-citronellal, and β-citronellol for five weeks, and the observations were compared to those of HFD rats that were not subjected to inhalation treatment. The results showed that inhalation of β-citronellol decreased feed consumption. As a consequence, the percentage of weight gain decreased compared with that in control group and the blood cholesterol level in the β-citronellol group was significantly lowered. Concentration of liver function enzymes were not significantly different among the groups. In conclusion, inhalation of citronella oil, specifically β-citronellol, decreased body weight by decreasing appetite, without any marked changes in liver enzyme concentrations.

  17. Effects of Inhaled Citronella Oil and Related Compounds on Rat Body Weight and Brown Adipose Tissue Sympathetic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmanida Batubara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Citronella oil is one of the most famous Indonesian essential oils, having a distinctive aroma. As with other essential oils, it is crucial to explore the effects of inhalation of this oil. Therefore, the aim of this research was to elucidate the effects of inhalation of citronella oil and its components isolated from Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae, Indonesian local name: “Sereh Wangi” on the body weight, blood lipid profile, and liver function of rats, as well as on the sympathetic nerve activity and temperature of brown adipose tissue. Sprague-Dawley male adult rats fed with high fat diet (HFD were made to inhale citronella oil, R-(+-citronellal, and β-citronellol for five weeks, and the observations were compared to those of HFD rats that were not subjected to inhalation treatment. The results showed that inhalation of β-citronellol decreased feed consumption. As a consequence, the percentage of weight gain decreased compared with that in control group and the blood cholesterol level in the β-citronellol group was significantly lowered. Concentration of liver function enzymes were not significantly different among the groups. In conclusion, inhalation of citronella oil, specifically β-citronellol, decreased body weight by decreasing appetite, without any marked changes in liver enzyme concentrations.

  18. The Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation of Sympathetic Ganglions and Acupuncture Points on Distal Blood Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Kamali

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS is a widely-practiced method to increase blood flow in clinical practice. The best location for stimulation to achieve optimal blood flow has not yet been determined. We compared the effect of TENS application at sympathetic ganglions and acupuncture points on blood flow in the foot of healthy individuals. Seventy-five healthy individuals were randomly assigned to three groups. The first group received cutaneous electrical stimulation at the thoracolumbar sympathetic ganglions. The second group received stimulation at acupuncture points. The third group received stimulation in the mid-calf area as a control group. Blood flow was recorded at time zero as baseline and every 3 minutes after baseline during stimulation, with a laser Doppler flow-meter. Individuals who received sympathetic ganglion stimulation showed significantly greater blood flow than those receiving acupuncture point stimulation or those in the control group (p<0.001. Data analysis revealed that blood flow at different times during stimulation increased significantly from time zero in each group. Therefore, the application of low-frequency TENS at the thoracolumbar sympathetic ganglions was more effective in increasing peripheral blood circulation than stimulation at acupuncture points.

  19. Phase Difference in the Induction of Tyrosine Hydroxylase in Cell Body and Nerve Terminals of Sympathetic Neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoenen, Hans; Mueller, Robert A.; Axelrod, Julius

    1970-01-01

    The induction of tyrosine hydroxylase in the nerve terminals of the rat heart by reserpine lags behind that in the stellate ganglion by two to three days. Cycloheximide given three days after reserpine blocks the further rise of the enzyme in the nerve terminals. The increase in tyrosine hydroxylase activity of the lumbar ganglion is as marked as that in the stellate ganglion. The increase of enzyme activity in the sciatic nerve after reserpine administration resembles that found in the heart nerve terminals. Determination of enzyme activity in segments of sciatic nerves indicates a two-day lag and then a proximal-distal transport of enzyme, but the apparent rate is not sufficient to account for the increase in enzyme in the nerve terminals. These findings are compatible with the local synthesis of induced tyrosine hydroxylase in the nerve terminals rather than the peripheral movement of the completed enzyme. PMID:4189989

  20. Transvenous stimulation of the renal sympathetic nerves increases systemic blood pressure: a potential new treatment option for neurocardiogenic syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Malini; Desimone, Christopher V; Ebrille, Elisa; Mulpuru, Siva K; Mikell, Susan B; Johnson, Susan B; Suddendorf, Scott H; Ladewig, Dorothy J; Gilles, Emily J; Danielsen, Andrew J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2014-10-01

    Neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS) is a common and sometimes debilitating disorder, with no consistently effective treatment. NCS is due to a combination of bradycardia and vasodilation leading to syncope. Although pacemaker devices have been tried in treating the bradycardic aspect of NCS, no device-based therapy exists to treat the coexistent vasodilation that occurs. The renal sympathetic innervation has been the target of denervation to treat hypertension. We hypothesized that stimulation of the renal sympathetic nerves can increase blood pressure and counteract vasodilation in NCS. High-frequency stimulation (800-900 pps, 10 V, 30-200 seconds) was performed using a quadripolar catheter in the renal vein of 7 dogs and 1 baboon. A significant increase in blood pressure (BP; mean [SD] systolic BP 117 [±28] vs. 128 [±33], diastolic BP 75 [±19] vs. 87 [±29] mmHg) was noted during the stimulation, which returned to baseline after cessation of stimulation. The mean increase in systolic and diastolic BP was 13.0 (±3.3) (P = 0.006) and 10.2 (±4.6) (P = 0.08), respectively. We report the first ever study of feasibility and safety of high-frequency electrical stimulation of the renal sympathetic innervation to increase BP in animal models. This has potential applications in the treatment of hypotensive states such as NCS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Resetting of the Baroreflex Control of Sympathetic Vasomotor Activity during Natural Behaviors: Description and Conceptual Model of Central Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger A. L. Dampney

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The baroreceptor reflex controls arterial pressure primarily via reflex changes in vascular resistance, rather than cardiac output. The vascular resistance in turn is dependent upon the activity of sympathetic vasomotor nerves innervating arterioles in different vascular beds. In this review, the major theme is that the baroreflex control of sympathetic vasomotor activity is not constant, but varies according to the behavioral state of the animal. In contrast to the view that was generally accepted up until the 1980s, I argue that the baroreflex control of sympathetic vasomotor activity is not inhibited or overridden during behaviors such as mental stress or exercise, but instead is reset under those conditions so that it continues to be highly effective in regulating sympathetic activity and arterial blood pressure at levels that are appropriate for the particular ongoing behavior. A major challenge is to identify the central mechanisms and neural pathways that subserve such resetting in different states. A model is proposed that is capable of simulating the different ways in which baroreflex resetting is occurred. Future studies are required to determine whether this proposed model is an accurate representation of the central mechanisms responsible for baroreflex resetting.

  2. Resetting of the Baroreflex Control of Sympathetic Vasomotor Activity during Natural Behaviors: Description and Conceptual Model of Central Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dampney, Roger A. L.

    2017-01-01

    The baroreceptor reflex controls arterial pressure primarily via reflex changes in vascular resistance, rather than cardiac output. The vascular resistance in turn is dependent upon the activity of sympathetic vasomotor nerves innervating arterioles in different vascular beds. In this review, the major theme is that the baroreflex control of sympathetic vasomotor activity is not constant, but varies according to the behavioral state of the animal. In contrast to the view that was generally accepted up until the 1980s, I argue that the baroreflex control of sympathetic vasomotor activity is not inhibited or overridden during behaviors such as mental stress or exercise, but instead is reset under those conditions so that it continues to be highly effective in regulating sympathetic activity and arterial blood pressure at levels that are appropriate for the particular ongoing behavior. A major challenge is to identify the central mechanisms and neural pathways that subserve such resetting in different states. A model is proposed that is capable of simulating the different ways in which baroreflex resetting is occurred. Future studies are required to determine whether this proposed model is an accurate representation of the central mechanisms responsible for baroreflex resetting. PMID:28860965

  3. Usefulness of cardiac 125I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake for evaluation of cardiac sympathetic nerve abnormalities in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Nanami; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Shigeta, Yukio

    1992-01-01

    We investigated cardiac sympathetic nerve abnormalities in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats using 125 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). The radioactivity ratio of cardiac tissue to 1 ml blood (H/B) was used as an index of cardiac MIBG uptake. Cardiac 125 I-MIBG uptake (H/B) in 4-, 8- and 20-wk diabetic rats was 48% lower than that in control rats. Similar results were obtained even when the data were corrected for g wet tissue weight. Although there was no improvement in H/B following 2-wk insulin treatment, the H/B ratio increased significantly, to 85% of control levels, following 4 wk insulin treatment indicating the reversibility of impaired MIBG uptake in diabetic rats. In vivo reserpine treatment resulted in a 50% reduction in the H/B value in control rats. However, the treatment did not significantly suppress uptake in diabetic rats. Cardiac norepinephrine content in both * 4- and ** 8-wk diabetic rats was significantly ( * p ** p 125 I-MIBG in diabetic rats is significantly impaired due to cardiac sympathetic nerve abnormalities. These abnormalities are reversible, however, dependent on the diabetic state. (author)

  4. Coping with dehydration: sympathetic activation and regulation of glutamatergic transmission in the hypothalamic PVN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardgett, Megan E.; Chen, Qing-Hui; Guo, Qing; Calderon, Alfredo S.; Andrade, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic and endocrine profiles of chronic hypertension and heart failure resemble those of acute dehydration. Importantly, all of these conditions are associated with exaggerated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) driven by glutamatergic activation of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Here, studies sought to gain insight into mechanisms of disease by determining the role of PVN ionotropic glutamate receptors in supporting SNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP) during dehydration and by elucidating mechanisms regulating receptor activity. Blockade of PVN N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors reduced (P dehydrated (DH) (48 h water deprivation) rats, but had no effect in euhydrated (EH) controls. Blockade of PVN α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors had no effect in either group. NMDA in PVN caused dose-dependent increases of renal SNA and MAP in both groups, but the maximum agonist evoked response (Emax) of the renal SNA response was greater (P dehydration increases excitatory NMDA receptor tone in PVN. Reduced glial-mediated glutamate uptake was identified as a key contributing factor. Defective glutamate uptake in PVN could therefore be an important, but as yet unexplored, mechanism driving sympathetic hyperactivity in chronic cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24671240

  5. Changes in the Skin Conductance Monitor as an End Point for Sympathetic Nerve Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Semih; Rana, Bhumika; Fields, Kara; Bae, James J; Mount, Lauren; Buschiazzo, Valeria; Storm, Hanne

    2017-11-01

    There is a lack of objective methods for determining the achievement of sympathetic block. This study validates the skin conductance monitor (SCM) as an end point indicator of successful sympathetic blockade as compared with traditional monitors. This interventional study included 13 patients undergoing 25 lumbar sympathetic blocks to compare time to indication of successful blockade between the SCM indices and traditional measures, clinically visible hyperemia, clinically visible engorgement of veins, subjective skin temperature difference, unilateral thermometry monitoring, bilateral comparative thermometry monitoring, and change in waveform amplitude in pulse oximetry plethysmography, within a 30-minute observation period. Differences in the SCM indices were studied pre- and postblock to validate the SCM. SCM showed substantially greater odds of indicating achievement of sympathetic block in the next moment (i.e., hazard rate) compared with all traditional measures (clinically visible hyperemia, clinically visible engorgement of veins, subjective temperature difference, unilateral thermometry monitoring, bilateral comparative thermometry monitoring, and change in waveform amplitude in pulse oximetry plethysmography; P ≤ 0.011). SCM indicated successful block for all (100%) procedures, while the traditional measures failed to indicate successful blocks in 16-84% of procedures. The SCM indices were significantly higher in preblock compared with postblock measurements (P SCM is a more reliable and rapid response indicator of a successful sympathetic blockade when compared with traditional monitors. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Sympathetic nervous activity in cirrhosis. A survey of plasma catecholamine studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Ring-Larsen, H; Christensen, N J

    1985-01-01

    This review summarizes recent progress in the knowledge of catecholamines in cirrhosis. Compensated patients have normal plasma concentration of noradrenaline. Highly elevated plasma noradrenaline concentration in decompensated patients indicates that the sympathetic nervous system is enhanced...... in this condition. This may especially apply to the sympathetic tone in the kidney, as evaluated by regional measurements of noradrenaline overflow. Hepatic elimination of catecholamines is only slightly reduced. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system seems to play an important role in the avid sodium...

  7. Sympathetic activation and baroreflex function during intradialytic hypertensive episodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvora Rubinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanisms of intradialytic increases in blood pressure are not well defined. The present study was undertaken to assess the role of autonomic nervous system activation during intradialytic hypertensive episodes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Continuous interbeat intervals (IBI and systolic blood pressure (SBP were monitored during hemodialysis in 108 chronic patients. Intradialytic hypertensive episodes defined as a period of at least 10 mmHg increase in SBP between the beginning and the end of a dialysis session or hypertension resistant to ultrafiltration occurring during or immediately after the dialysis procedure, were detected in 62 out of 113 hemodialysis sessions. SBP variability, IBI variability and baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS in the low (LF and high (HF frequency ranges were assessed using the complex demodulation technique (CDM. Intradialytic hypertensive episodes were associated with an increased (n = 45 or decreased (n = 17 heart rate. The maximal blood pressure was similar in both groups. In patients with increased heart rate the increase in blood pressure was associated with marked increases in SBP and IBI variability, with suppressed BRS indices and enhanced sympatho-vagal balance. In contrast, in those with decreased heart rate, there were no significant changes in the above parameters. End-of-dialysis blood pressure in all sessions associated with hypertensive episode was significantly higher than in those without such episodes. In logistic regression analysis, predialysis BRS in the low frequency range was found to be the main predictor of intradialytic hypertension. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data point to sympathetic overactivity with feed-forward blood pressure enhancement as an important mechanism of intradialytic hypertension in a significant proportion of patients. The triggers of increased sympathetic activity during hemodialysis remain to be determined. Intradialytic hypertensive episodes

  8. Impact of lung inflation cycle frequency on rat muscle and skin sympathetic activity recorded using suction electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunhua; Marina, Nephtali; Gilbey, Michael P

    2009-10-05

    Microneurography has been used in humans to study sympathetic activity supplying targets within skeletal muscle and skin. Comparable animal studies are relatively few, probably due to the technical demands of traditional fibre picking techniques. Here we apply a simple suction electrode technique to record cutaneous (CVC) and muscle (MVC) vasoconstrictor activities and describe and investigate the basis of the frequency dependence of lung inflation related modulation. Hindlimb MVC and CVC activities were recorded concurrently. The magnitude of MVC and CVC activities at the lung inflation cycle frequency was significantly less at 2.0 Hz than at lung inflation cycle frequencies inflation cycle frequency was increased the coherence between lung inflation cycle or BP and MVC or CVC waveforms decreased. Consistent with the hypothesis that much of the coherence between lung inflation cycle and nerve activity waveforms is secondary to oscillating baroreceptor activity attributable to BP waves, partialization with the BP waveform significantly decreased the coherence between lung inflation cycle and nerve waveforms, and there was an absence of coherence between these waveforms following sinus and aortic denervation. Our data extend findings from other laboratories and establish the value of a suction electrode technique for recording MVC and CVC activities. Furthermore, our observations describe the rates of positive pressure ventilation that avoid strong and regular gating of sympathetic activity.

  9. Limb venous distension evokes sympathetic activation via stimulation of the limb afferents in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; McQuillan, Patrick M.; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently shown that a saline infusion in the veins of an arterially occluded human forearm evokes a systemic response with increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure. In this report, we examined whether this response was a reflex that was due to venous distension. Blood pressure (Finometer), heart rate, and MSNA (microneurography) were assessed in 14 young healthy subjects. In the saline trial (n = 14), 5% forearm volume normal saline was infused in an arterially occluded arm. To block afferents in the limb, 90 mg of lidocaine were added to the same volume of saline in six subjects during a separate visit. To examine whether interstitial perfusion of normal saline alone induced the responses, the same volume of albumin solution (5% concentration) was infused in 11 subjects in separate studies. Lidocaine abolished the MSNA and blood pressure responses seen with saline infusion. Moreover, compared with the saline infusion, an albumin infusion induced a larger (MSNA: Δ14.3 ± 2.7 vs. Δ8.5 ± 1.3 bursts/min, P blood pressure responses. These data suggest that venous distension activates afferent nerves and evokes a powerful systemic sympathoexcitatory reflex. We posit that the venous distension plays an important role in evoking the autonomic adjustments seen with postural stress in human subjects. PMID:22707559

  10. Sympathetic nervous activity in cirrhosis. A survey of plasma catecholamine studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Ring-Larsen, H; Christensen, N J

    1985-01-01

    in this condition. This may especially apply to the sympathetic tone in the kidney, as evaluated by regional measurements of noradrenaline overflow. Hepatic elimination of catecholamines is only slightly reduced. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system seems to play an important role in the avid sodium-water...

  11. Superoxide anions in paraventricular nucleus modulate adipose afferent reflex and sympathetic activity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ding

    Full Text Available Adipose afferent reflex (AAR is a sympatho-excitatory reflex induced by chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT. Ionotropic glutamate receptors including NMDA receptors (NMDAR and non-NMDA receptors (non-NMDAR in paraventricular nucleus (PVN mediate the AAR. Enhanced AAR contributes to sympathetic activation and hypertension in obesity rats. This study was designed to investigate the role and mechanism of superoxide anions in PVN in modulating the AAR.Renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP were recorded in anesthetized rats. AAR was evaluated by the RSNA and MAP responses to injections of capsaicin into four sites of right inguinal WAT (8.0 nmol in 8.0 µl for each site. Microinjection of polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD, the superoxide anion scavenger tempol or the NAD(PH oxidase inhibitor apocynin into the PVN decreased the baseline RSNA and MAP, and attenuated the AAR. Unilateral WAT injection of capsaicin increased superoxide anions in bilateral PVN, which was prevented by the WAT denervation. WAT injection of capsaicin increased superoxide anion level and NAD(PH oxidase activity in the PVN, which was abolished by the PVN pretreatment with the combined NMDAR antagonist AP5 and non-NMDAR antagonist CNQX. Microinjection of the NMDAR agonist NMDA or the non-NMDAR agonist AMPA increased superoxide anion level and NAD(PH oxidase activity in the PVN.NAD(PH oxidase-derived superoxide anions in the PVN contributes to the tonic modulation of AAR. Activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the PVN is involved in the AAR-induced production of superoxide anions in the PVN.

  12. Sympathetic Responses to Central Hypovolemia: New Insights from Microneurographic Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    reviewed and approved by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Institutional Review Board and in accor- dance with the approved protocols...C. (2007b). Sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate vari- ability during severe hemorrhagic shock in sheep.Auton. Neurosci . 136, 43–51. Billman, G...A. (2002). Syncopal attack alters the burst properties of muscle sympathetic nerve activity in humans. Auton. Neurosci . 95, 141–145. Iwase, S

  13. Bioelectronic block of paravertebral sympathetic nerves mitigates post-myocardial infarction ventricular arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Ray W; Buckley, Una; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Vrabec, Tina; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2017-11-01

    Autonomic dysfunction contributes to induction of ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VT). To determine the efficacy of charge-balanced direct current (CBDC), applied to the T1-T2 segment of the paravertebral sympathetic chain, on VT inducibility post-myocardial infarction (MI). In a porcine model, CBDC was applied in acute animals (n = 7) to optimize stimulation parameters for sympathetic blockade and in chronic MI animals (n = 7) to evaluate the potential for VTs. Chronic MI was induced by microsphere embolization of the left anterior descending coronary artery. At termination, in anesthetized animals and following thoracotomy, an epicardial sock array was placed over both ventricles and a quadripolar carousel electrode positioned underlying the right T1-T2 paravertebral chain. In acute animals, the efficacy of CBDC carousel (CBDCC) block was assessed by evaluating cardiac function during T2 paravertebral ganglion stimulation with and without CBDCC. In chronic MI animals, VT inducibility was assessed by extrasystolic (S1-S2) stimulations at baseline and under >66% CBDCC blockade of T2-evoked sympathoexcitation. CBDCC demonstrated a current-dependent and reversible block without impacting basal cardiac function. VT was induced at baseline in all chronic MI animals. One animal died after baseline induction. Of the 6 remaining animals, only 1 was reinducible with simultaneous CBDCC application (P block of the T1-T2 paravertebral chain with CBDCC reduced VT in a chronic MI model. CBDCC prolonged VERP, without altering baseline cardiac function, resulting in improved electrical stability. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of the noradrenergic sympathetic nerve contribution during local skin heating at forearm and leg sites in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozzi, Andrew T; Hodges, Gary J

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the role of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves in the cutaneous circulation at rest and in response to local heating. Dorsal forearm and lateral leg sites were each instrumented with 2 microdialysis fibers, 2 local skin heaters, and 2 laser-Doppler probes. All sites were heated from 33° to 42 °C. Each limb had 1 skin site treated with bretylium tosylate (BT) to block noradrenergic sympathetic neurotransmitter release and 1 site infused with lactated Ringer's (Control). During baseline (33 °C), cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler flux/blood pressure) at control (24 ± 2 %max) and BT-treated (29 ± 4 %max) sites in the leg was significantly higher than the forearm (control: 12 ± 1 %max; BT-treated: 17 ± 2 %max) (P = 0.032 and P = 0.042). At 42 °C local skin temperature, the initial peak CVC response with BT decreased compared to control at both forearm (62 ± 3 vs. 86 ± 6 %max, P leg (67 ± 3 vs. 77 ± 2 %max, P = 0.035) sites. CVC at the forearm with BT was lower than that of the leg (P = 0.02). With control, plateau phase (~35 min at 42 °C) CVC was greater in the leg (98 ± 2 %max) than the forearm (89 ± 4 %max) (P = 0.027). BT reduced the peak CVC in the leg (90 ± 4 %max, P = 0.027) and in the forearm (69 ± 5 %max, P legs (P leg and forearm at rest and with skin heating.

  15. Racemic ketamine decreases muscle sympathetic activity but maintains the neural response to hypotensive challenges in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienbaum, P.; Heuter, T.; Michel, M. C.; Peters, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular stimulation and increased catecholamine plasma concentrations during ketamine anesthesia have been attributed to increased central sympathetic activity as well as catecholamine reuptake inhibition in various experimental models. However, direct recordings of efferent

  16. The Nucleus of the Solitary Tract and the coordination of respiratory and sympathetic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B. Zoccal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that breathing introduces rhythmical oscillations in the heart rate and arterial pressure levels. Sympathetic oscillations coupled to the respiratory activity have been suggested as an important homeostatic mechanism optimizing tissue perfusion and blood gas uptake/delivery. This respiratory-sympathetic coupling is strengthened in conditions of blood gas challenges (hypoxia and hypercapnia as a result of the synchronized activation of brainstem respiratory and sympathetic neurons, culminating with the emergence of entrained cardiovascular and respiratory reflex responses. Studies have proposed that the ventrolateral region of the medulla oblongata is a major site of synaptic interaction between respiratory and sympathetic neurons. However, other brainstem regions also play a relevant role in the patterning of respiratory and sympathetic motor outputs. Recent findings suggest that the neurons of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, in the dorsal medulla, are essential for the processing and coordination of respiratory and sympathetic responses to hypoxia. The NTS is the first synaptic station of the cardiorespiratory afferent inputs, including peripheral chemoreceptors, baroreceptors and pulmonary stretch receptors. The synaptic profile of the NTS neurons receiving the excitatory drive from afferent inputs is complex and involves distinct neurotransmitters, including glutamate, ATP and acetylcholine. In the present review we discuss the role of the NTS circuitry in coordinating sympathetic and respiratory reflex responses. We also analyze the neuroplasticity of NTS neurons and their contribution for the development of cardiorespiratory dysfunctions, as observed in neurogenic hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic disorders.

  17. Differential effects of defibrillation on systemic and cardiac sympathetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, F; Wiegand, U; Raasch, W; Richardt, G; Potratz, J

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the effect of defibrillation shocks on cardiac and circulating catecholamines.
Design—Prospective examination of myocardial catecholamine balance during dc shock by simultaneous determination of arterial and coronary sinus plasma concentrations. Internal countershocks (10-34 J) were applied in 30 patients after initiation of ventricular fibrillation for a routine implantable cardioverter defibrillator test. Another 10 patients were externally cardioverted (50-360 J) for atrial fibrillation.
Main outcome measures—Transcardiac noradrenaline, adrenaline, and lactate gradients immediately after the shock.
Results—After internal shock, arterial noradrenaline increased from a mean (SD) of 263 (128) pg/ml at baseline to 370 (148) pg/ml (p = 0.001), while coronary sinus noradrenaline fell from 448 (292) to 363 (216) pg/ml (p = 0.01), reflecting a shift from cardiac net release to net uptake. After external shock delivery, there was a similar increase in arterial noradrenaline, from 260 (112) to 459 (200) pg/ml (p = 0.03), while coronary sinus noradrenaline remained unchanged. Systemic adrenaline increased 11-fold after external shock (p = 0.01), outlasting the threefold rise following internal shock (p = 0.001). In both groups, a negative transmyocardial adrenaline gradient at baseline decreased further, indicating enhanced myocardial uptake. Cardiac lactate production occurred after ventricular fibrillation and internal shock, but not after external cardioversion, so the neurohumoral changes resulted from the defibrillation process and not from alterations in oxidative metabolism.
Conclusions—A dc shock induces marked systemic sympathoadrenal and sympathoneuronal activation, but attenuates cardiac sympathetic activity. This might promote the transient myocardial depression observed after electrical discharge to the heart.

 Keywords: defibrillation;  autonomic cardiac function;  catecholamines;  lactate

  18. Pulmonary Stress Induced by Hyperthermia: Role of Airway Sensory Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    sympathetic nerves via the white rami communicants to the spinal cord. The spe- cific role of these “sympathetic afferents” in the regulation of respiratory...subtypes and afferent properties Sympathetic sensory activity has been recorded in stellate ganglia (160) and white rami of T2 to T4 (198). This activity...Coleridge JC, Kidd C. Proceedings: Multi- terminal afferent fibres from the thoracic viscera in sympathetic rami communicantes of cats and dogs. J

  19. Local conduction during acute myocardial infarction in rats: Interplay between central sympathetic activation and endothelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofilos M. Kolettis, MD, PhD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of autonomic dysfunction and endothelin on local conduction and arrhythmogenesis during myocardial infarction. We recorded ventricular tachyarrhythmias, monophasic action potentials, and activation sequences in wild-type and ETB-deficient rats displaying high endothelin levels. Central sympathetic inputs were examined after clonidine administration. Clonidine mitigated early and delayed arrhythmogenesis in ETB-deficient and wild-type rats, respectively. The right ventricular activation delay increased in clonidine-treated ETB-deficient rats and slightly decreased in wild-type rats. The left ventricular voltage rise decreased in all groups, whereas the activation delay increased mainly in clonidine-treated ETB-deficient rats. Central sympathetic activation and endothelin modulate ischemia-induced arrhythmogenesis. Ischemia alters excitability, whereas endothelin impairs local conduction, an action partly counterbalanced by central sympathetic activity.

  20. Carotid body (Thermoreceptors, sympathetic neural activation, and cardiometabolic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Iturriaga

    Full Text Available The carotid body (CB is the main peripheral chemoreceptor that senses the arterial PO2, PCO2 and pH. In response to hypoxemia, hypercapnia and acidosis, carotid chemosensory discharge elicits reflex respiratory, autonomic and cardiovascular adjustments. The classical construct considers the CB as the main peripheral oxygen sensor, triggering reflex physiological responses to acute hypoxemia and facilitating the ventilatory acclimation to chronic hypoxemia at high altitude. However, a growing body of experimental evidence supports the novel concept that an abnormally enhanced CB chemosensory input to the brainstem contributes to overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system, and consequent pathology. Indeed, the CB has been implicated in several diseases associated with increases in central sympathetic outflow. These include hypertension, heart failure, sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and metabolic syndrome. Indeed, ablation of the CB has been proposed for the treatment of severe and resistant hypertension in humans. In this review, we will analyze and discuss new evidence supporting an important role for the CB chemoreceptor in the progression of autonomic and cardiorespiratory alterations induced by heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and metabolic syndrome.

  1. Effect of amine uptake inhibitors on the uptake of 14C-bretylium in intact and degenerating sympathetic nerves of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almgren, O.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of different amine uptake inhibitors on the accumulation of 14 C-bretylium in sympathetically denervated or decentralized salivary glands were studied in vivo in rats 11-14 hours after the surgical intervention. The time period chosen is known to be critical for the delaying effect of bretylium on the degeneration transmitter release in sympathetically innervated organs. Cocaine, desmethylimipramine (DMI), protriptyline or reserpine all depressed the uptake of 14 C-bretylium in both denervated and decentralized salivary glands, cocaine being the most efficient one. DMI and protriptyline, but not cocaine inhibit the degeneration delaying effect of bretylium, while all three agents inhibit amine uptake at level of the nerve cell membrane. Apparently, bretylium reaches the critical sites of its degeneration delaying action by the axonal amine pump but only a small fraction of the drug entering the degenerating adrenergic nerve terminal is needed at the critical sites to interact with the degeneration processes. The difference between the tricyclic antidepressants on one hand and cocaine on the other with respect to the effect on the degeneration delaying action of bretylium, must depend on some action different from the axonal membrane uptake inhibition. Reserpine which is known not to interfere with the delaying effect of bretylium on the denervation degeneration did reduce the uptake of 14 C-bretylium. This fact seems to indicate that the site of action of bretylium is located outside the adrenergic nerve granules. (author)

  2. Changes of Sympathetic Activity in Patient with Chronic Atrial Fibrillation and Severe Congestive Heart Failure Treated with Biventricular Pacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Matsushita, MD

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient was a 64-year-old man with chronic atrial fibrillation with bradycardia. Left ventricular ejection fraction was 34%. He was treated with biventricular pacing. Heart failure improved from NYHA class III to II. Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. was recorded during 6 minutes of biventricular (BV, right ventricular apical (RVA. and left ventricular (LV. pacing. SNA was significantly lower during biventricular pacing (49.5 ± 4.0/min. compared with RVA (58.8 ±6:9/min, p = 0.016. and LV (63.3 ± 4.3/min, p = 0.002. pacing. BV pacing improves hemodynamics and decreases SNA compared with RVA or LV pacing.

  3. Exuberant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in nonhealed bone fractures and the generation and maintenance of chronic skeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Stephane R; Thompson, Michelle L; Longo, Geraldine; Fealk, Michelle N; Majuta, Lisa A; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2014-11-01

    Skeletal injury is a leading cause of chronic pain and long-term disability worldwide. While most acute skeletal pain can be effectively managed with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates, chronic skeletal pain is more difficult to control using these same therapy regimens. One possibility as to why chronic skeletal pain is more difficult to manage over time is that there may be nerve sprouting in nonhealed areas of the skeleton that normally receive little (mineralized bone) to no (articular cartilage) innervation. If such ectopic sprouting did occur, it could result in normally nonnoxious loading of the skeleton being perceived as noxious and/or the generation of a neuropathic pain state. To explore this possibility, a mouse model of skeletal pain was generated by inducing a closed fracture of the femur. Examined animals had comminuted fractures and did not fully heal even at 90+days post fracture. In all mice with nonhealed fractures, exuberant sensory and sympathetic nerve sprouting, an increase in the density of nerve fibers, and the formation of neuroma-like structures near the fracture site were observed. Additionally, all of these animals exhibited significant pain behaviors upon palpation of the nonhealed fracture site. In contrast, sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers or significant palpation-induced pain behaviors was never observed in naïve animals. Understanding what drives this ectopic nerve sprouting and the role it plays in skeletal pain may allow a better understanding and treatment of this currently difficult-to-control pain state. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Marital Conflict and Children's Externalizing Behavior: Interactions between Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Nervous System Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Erath, Stephen; Cummings, E. Mark; Keller, Peggy; Staton, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Toward greater specificity in the prediction of externalizing problems in the context of interparental conflict, interactions between children's parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system (PNS and SNS) activity were examined as moderators. PNS activity was indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA reactivity (RSA-R) to lab…

  5. Beta secretase activity in peripheral nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Tallon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While the peripheral nervous system has the capacity to regenerate following a nerve injury, it is often at a slow rate and results in unsatisfactory recovery, leaving patients with reduced function. Many regeneration associated genes have been identified over the years, which may shed some insight into how we can manipulate this intrinsic regenerative ability to enhance repair following peripheral nerve injuries. Our lab has identified the membrane bound protease beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, or beta secretase, as a potential negative regulator of peripheral nerve regeneration. When beta secretase activity levels are abolished via a null mutation in mice, peripheral regeneration is enhanced following a sciatic nerve crush injury. Conversely, when activity levels are greatly increased by overexpressing beta secretase in mice, nerve regeneration and functional recovery are impaired after a sciatic nerve crush injury. In addition to our work, many substrates of beta secretase have been found to be involved in regulating neurite outgrowth and some have even been identified as regeneration associated genes. In this review, we set out to discuss BACE1 and its substrates with respect to axonal regeneration and speculate on the possibility of utilizing BACE1 inhibitors to enhance regeneration following acute nerve injury and potential uses in peripheral neuropathies.

  6. Impact of sympathetic nervous system activity on post-exercise flow-mediated dilatation in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, C.L.; Lewis, N.C.; Carter, H.H.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Ainslie, P.N.; Green, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    KEY POINTS: Previous studies indicate a transient reduction in arterial function following large muscle group exercise, but the mechanisms involved are unknown. Sympathetic nervous system activation may contribute to such reductions through direct effects in the artery wall, or because of decreases

  7. Cortisol and Children's Adjustment: The Moderating Role of Sympathetic Nervous System Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Erath, Stephen A.; Buckhalt, Joseph A.; Granger, Douglas A.; Mize, Jacquelyn

    2008-01-01

    We examined relations among cortisol, markers of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity (including salivary alpha-amylase and skin conductance level), and children's adjustment. We also tested the Bauer et al. ("Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics," 23(2), 102-113, 2002) hypothesis that interactions between the SNS and cortisol…

  8. Voluntary activation of the sympathetic nervous system and attenuation of the innate immune response in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, M.; Eijk, L.T.G.J. van; Zwaag, J.; Wildenberg, J. van den; Sweep, F.C.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive or persistent proinflammatory cytokine production plays a central role in autoimmune diseases. Acute activation of the sympathetic nervous system attenuates the innate immune response. However, both the autonomic nervous system and innate immune system are regarded as systems that cannot

  9. Adolescent sympathetic activity and salivary C-reactive protein: The effects of parental behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Benjamin W; Byrne, Michelle L; Simmons, Julian G; Whittle, Sarah; Schwartz, Orli S; Reynolds, Eric C; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Sheeber, Lisa; Allen, Nicholas B

    2017-10-01

    This study utilized a novel multisystem approach to investigate the effect of observed parental behavior on the relationship between biological mechanisms associated with disease processes (i.e., autonomic physiology and immune response) among their adolescent children. Thirty-three adolescents (23 males), aged 11-13, and their parents participated in a laboratory session in which adolescents provided baseline measures of autonomic (sympathetic) activity, and adolescents and 1 parent participated in a laboratory based dyadic conflict resolution interaction task. This included 3 male parent/male adolescent dyads, 20 female parent/male adolescent dyads, 3 male parent/female adolescent dyads, and 7 female parent/female adolescent dyads. Approximately 3 years later, adolescents provided a salivary measure of C-Reactive Protein (sCRP) to index inflammation. Analyses revealed a positive association between sympathetic activity and sCRP, as well as a moderating role of positive parental behavior in this relationship, such that the association between sympathetic activity and sCRP was greater among adolescents whose parents displayed shorter duration of positive affect. Overall findings indicate parental behavior may influence the association between adolescent sympathetic activity and inflammatory processes. These findings have important implications for understanding the impact of psychosocial factors on biological mechanisms of disease. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Central sympathetic activation and arrhythmogenesis during acute myocardial infarction: modulating effects of endothelin-B receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofilos M Kolettis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic activation during acute myocardial infarction is an important arrhythmogenic mechanism, but the role of central autonomic inputs and their modulating factors remain unclear. Using the in vivo rat-model, we examined the effects of clonidine, a centrally-acting sympatholytic agent, in the presence or absence of myocardial endothelin-B (ETB receptors. We studied wild-type (n=20 and ETB-deficient rats (n=20 after permanent coronary ligation, with or without pretreatment with clonidine. Cardiac rhythm was continuously recorded for 24 hours by implantable telemetry devices, coupled by the assessment of autonomic and heart failure indices. Sympathetic activation and arrhythmogenesis were more prominent in ETB-deficient rats during the early phase post-ligation. Clonidine improved these outcomes throughout the observation period in ETB-deficient rats, but only during the delayed phase in wild-type rats. However, this benefit was counterbalanced by atrioventricular conduction abnormalities and by higher incidence of heart failure, the latter particularly evident in ETB-deficient rats. Myocardial ETB-receptors attenuate the arrhythmogenic effects of central sympathetic activation during acute myocardial infarction. ETB-receptor deficiency potentiates the sympatholytic effects of clonidine and aggravates heart failure. The interaction between endothelin and sympathetic responses during myocardial ischemia/infarction and its impact on arrhythmogenesis and left ventricular dysfunction merit further investigation.

  11. Enhanced sympathetic arousal in response to FMRI scanning correlates with task induced activations and deactivations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Muehlhan

    Full Text Available It has been repeatedly shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI triggers distress and neuroendocrine response systems. Prior studies have revealed that sympathetic arousal increases, particularly at the beginning of the examination. Against this background it appears likely that those stress reactions during the scanning procedure may influence task performance and neural correlates. However, the question how sympathetic arousal elicited by the scanning procedure itself may act as a potential confounder of fMRI data remains unresolved today. Thirty-seven scanner naive healthy subjects performed a simple cued target detection task. Levels of salivary alpha amylase (sAA, as a biomarker for sympathetic activity, were assessed in samples obtained at several time points during the lab visit. SAA increased two times, immediately prior to scanning and at the end of the scanning procedure. Neural activation related to motor preparation and timing as well as task performance was positively correlated with the first increase. Furthermore, the first sAA increase was associated with task induced deactivation (TID in frontal and parietal regions. However, these effects were restricted to the first part of the experiment. Consequently, this bias of scanner related sympathetic activation should be considered in future fMRI investigations. It is of particular importance for pharmacological investigations studying adrenergic agents and the comparison of groups with different stress vulnerabilities like patients and controls or adolescents and adults.

  12. Scintigraphic evaluation of regional myocardial sympathetic activity in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eno, Shin; Takeo, Eiichiro; Katsumoto, Masayuki; Sasaki, Satoshi; Fujii, Hideaki; Kanazawa, Ikuo [Chugoku Rosai General Hospital, Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of sympathetic activity of heart and nervous sympathetic dysfunction in myocardium were investigated by using {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy. Twelve normal persons (4 males, 8 females, mean age 61.3{+-}7.4) and 13 cases of dilated cardiomyopathy (11 males, 2 females, mean age 62.5{+-}14.2) were selected. Decrease of uptake rate to myocardium of I-MIBG (delayed image) and increase of washout rate were observed. Myocardial sympathetic hyperactivity was regarded as a main reason of these phenomena. Low uptake rate to myocardium of I-MIBG (delayed image) and high washout rate were observed in the whole left ventricle, and no difference of sympathetic activity according to locus of left ventricle was found. Correlation coefficient of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension with the washout rate of I-MIBG was 0.52 (p<0.05). It was suggested that washout rate may increase with progress of disease stage. (K.H.)

  13. Sympathetic activation by the cold pressor test does not increase the muscle force generation capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, Silvestro; Farina, Dario

    2011-06-01

    A positive inotropic action by the sympathetic nervous system on skeletal muscles has been observed and investigated in animal and in vitro studies. This action provided a theoretical basis for the putative ergogenic action of catecholamines and adrenergic agonists, although there is no clear evidence of this effect in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of inotropic effects associated to physiological sympathetic activation in healthy subjects. The muscle force capacity was investigated in the tibialis anterior (n = 9 subjects) and in the soleus (n = 9) muscles electrically stimulated with single pulses and double pulses with variable interspike interval (4-1,000 ms) and short pulse trains (frequency: 5-14 Hz) before, during, and after sympathetic activation by the cold pressor test (CPT). CPT significantly decreased by 10.4 ± 7.2 and 10.6 ± 4.4% the force produced by single and double pulse stimulation, respectively, and produced smaller decreases in the force obtained by train stimulation in the tibialis anterior, while no significant changes were observed in either type of contraction in the soleus muscle. CPT failed to induce any increase in the force capacity of the investigated muscles. The prevalent decrease in force evidenced in this study supports the concept that the weakening sympathetic action on type I fiber, already shown to occur in humans, prevails over the putative potentiating action.

  14. Direct evidences for sympathetic hyperactivity and baroreflex impairment in Tako Tsubo cardiopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Vaccaro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exact pathophysiology of Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC remains unknown but a role for sympathetic hyperactivity has been suggested. Up to now, no direct evidence of sympathetic nerve hyperactivity has been established nor involvement of sympathetic baroreflex identified. The aim of our study was to determine, by direct sympathetic nerve activity (SNS recording if sympathetic nervous system activity is increased and spontaneous baroreflex control of sympathetic activity reduced in patients with TTC. METHODS: We included 13 patients who presented with TTC and compared their SNS activity and spontaneous baroreflex control of sympathetic activity with that of 13 control patients with acutely decompensated chronic heart failure. SNS activity was evaluated by microneurography, a technique assessing muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA. Spontaneous baroreflex control of sympathetic activity was evaluated as the absolute value of the slope of the regression line representing the relationship between spontaneous diastolic blood pressure values and concomitant SNS activity. Control patients were matched for age, sex, left ventricular ejection fraction and creatinine clearance. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients with TTC was 80 years, all patients were women. There were no significant differences between the two groups of patients for blood pressure, heart rate or oxygen saturation level. TTC patients presented a significant increase in sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA median 63.3 bursts/min [interquartile range 61.3 to 66.0] vs median 55.7 bursts/min [interquartile range 51.0 to 61.7]; p = 0.0089 and a decrease in spontaneous baroreflex control of sympathetic activity compared to matched control patients (spontaneous baroreflex control of sympathetic activity median 0.7%burst/mmHg [interquartile range 0.4 to 1.9] vs median 2.4%burst/mmHg [interquartile range 1.8 to 2.9]; p = 0.005. CONCLUSIONS: We report for the first time, through

  15. Direct evidences for sympathetic hyperactivity and baroreflex impairment in Tako Tsubo cardiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Angelica; Despas, Fabien; Delmas, Clement; Lairez, Olivier; Lambert, Elisabeth; Lambert, Gavin; Labrunee, Marc; Guiraud, Thibaut; Esler, Murray; Galinier, Michel; Senard, Jean Michel; Pathak, Atul

    2014-01-01

    The exact pathophysiology of Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) remains unknown but a role for sympathetic hyperactivity has been suggested. Up to now, no direct evidence of sympathetic nerve hyperactivity has been established nor involvement of sympathetic baroreflex identified. The aim of our study was to determine, by direct sympathetic nerve activity (SNS) recording if sympathetic nervous system activity is increased and spontaneous baroreflex control of sympathetic activity reduced in patients with TTC. We included 13 patients who presented with TTC and compared their SNS activity and spontaneous baroreflex control of sympathetic activity with that of 13 control patients with acutely decompensated chronic heart failure. SNS activity was evaluated by microneurography, a technique assessing muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). Spontaneous baroreflex control of sympathetic activity was evaluated as the absolute value of the slope of the regression line representing the relationship between spontaneous diastolic blood pressure values and concomitant SNS activity. Control patients were matched for age, sex, left ventricular ejection fraction and creatinine clearance. The mean age of the patients with TTC was 80 years, all patients were women. There were no significant differences between the two groups of patients for blood pressure, heart rate or oxygen saturation level. TTC patients presented a significant increase in sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA median 63.3 bursts/min [interquartile range 61.3 to 66.0] vs median 55.7 bursts/min [interquartile range 51.0 to 61.7]; p = 0.0089) and a decrease in spontaneous baroreflex control of sympathetic activity compared to matched control patients (spontaneous baroreflex control of sympathetic activity median 0.7%burst/mmHg [interquartile range 0.4 to 1.9] vs median 2.4%burst/mmHg [interquartile range 1.8 to 2.9]; p = 0.005). We report for the first time, through direct measurement of sympathetic nerve activity, that

  16. Absence of arterial baroreflex modulation of skin sympathetic activity and sweat rate during whole-body heating in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    1. Prior findings suggest that baroreflexes are capable of modulating skin blood flow, but the effects of baroreceptor loading/unloading on sweating are less clear. Therefore, this project tested the hypothesis that pharmacologically induced alterations in arterial blood pressure in heated humans would lead to baroreflex-mediated changes in both skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) and sweat rate. 2. In seven subjects mean arterial blood pressure was lowered (approximately 8 mmHg) and then raised (approximately 13 mmHg) by bolus injections of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively. Moreover, in a separate protocol, arterial blood pressure was reduced via steady-state administration of sodium nitroprusside. In both normothermia and heat-stress conditions the following responses were monitored: sublingual and mean skin temperatures, heart rate, beat-by-beat blood pressure, skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry), local sweat rate and SSNA (microneurography from peroneal nerve). 3. Whole-body heating increased skin and sublingual temperatures, heart rate, cutaneous blood flow, sweat rate and SSNA, but did not change arterial blood pressure. Heart rate was significantly elevated (from 74 +/- 3 to 92 +/- 4 beats x min(-1); P baroreflex function in these subjects. 4. Neither SSNA nor sweat rate was altered by rapid (bolus infusion) or sustained (steady-state infusion) changes in blood pressure regardless of the thermal condition. 5. These data suggest that SSNA and sweat rate are not modulated by arterial baroreflexes in normothermic or moderately heated individuals.

  17. Bradykinin Contributes to Sympathetic and Pressor Responses Evoked by Activation of Skeletal Muscle Afferents P2X in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Xing

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Published data suggest that purinergic P2X receptors of muscle afferent nerves contribute to the enhanced sympathetic nervous activity (SNA and blood pressure (BP responses during static exercise in heart failure (HF. In this study, we examined engagement of bradykinin (BK in regulating responses of SNA and BP evoked by P2X stimulation in rats with HF. We further examined cellular mechanisms responsible for BK. We hypothesized that BK potentiates P2X currents of muscle dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons, and this effect is greater in HF due to upregulation of BK kinin B2 and P2X3 receptor. As a result, BK amplifies muscle afferents P2X-mediated SNA and BP responses. Methods: Renal SNA and BP responses were recorded in control rats and rats with HF. Western Blot analysis and patch-clamp methods were employed to examine the receptor expression and function of DRG neurons involved in the effects of BK. Results: BK injected into the arterial blood supply of the hindlimb muscles heightened the reflex SNA and BP responses induced by P2X activation with α,β-methylene ATP to a greater degree in HF rats. In addition, HF upregulated the protein expression of kinin B2 and P2X3 in DRG and the prior application of BK increased the magnitude of α,β-methylene ATP-induced currents in muscle DRG neurons from HF rats. Conclusion: BK plays a facilitating role in modulating muscle afferent P2X-engaged reflex sympathetic and pressor responses. In HF, P2X responsivness is augmented due to increases in expression of kinin B2 and P2X3 receptors and P2X current activity.

  18. Increased Feeding Speed Is Associated with Higher Subsequent Sympathetic Activity in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtani, Nobuyo; Okamoto, Yuta; Tateishi, Kanako; Uchiyama, Hidehiko; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2015-01-01

    Although the domestication process has altered the feeding behavior of dogs, some breeds still demonstrate a remarkable ability to gorge, and will eat exceptionally large quantities of food whenever it is available. Lesions in the ventromedial hypothalamus increase appetite and lead to obesity, suggesting that the autonomic nervous system plays an important role in feeding. Focusing on the autonomic activities closely involved in food intake, we investigated sympathetic activities before and ...

  19. Effects of enalapril maleate on blood pressure, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and peripheral sympathetic activity in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasola, G; Cottone, S; D'Ignoto, G; Grasso, L; Carone, M B; Carapelle, E; Contorno, A

    1987-01-01

    Recent experimental studies showed that inhibition of angiotensin II synthesis may reduce sympathetic activity as evaluated by plasma catecholamine assay, sharing in the antihypertensive effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Fifteen patients with essential hypertension were studied. Blood pressure and heart rate were evaluated both at rest and after stressor laboratory tests, before and four hours after administration of 20 mg of enalapril maleate and on the 14th and 120th days of continued administration. At the same time, blood samples were drawn for determinations of plasma renin activity, ACE, angiotensin II, plasma aldosterone concentration, and plasma norepinephrine levels. Enalapril in a dosage of 20 mg/day significantly and progressively lowered systolic and diastolic blood pressure at rest, with maximal decreases observed on the 120th day of the study period (P less than 0.001). Heart rate at rest and after exercise showed no significant differences throughout the study period. Good blood pressure control was observed during stressor laboratory tests. The greatest impact of blood pressure was observed on the 120th day during dynamic exercise (mean blood pressure from 139 +/- 3.9 to 111.5 +/- 6.3 mmHg; P less than 0.01) and on the 14th day during the cold pressure test (mean blood pressure from 133.3 +/- 3.9 to 111.2 +/- 4.7 mmHg; P less than 0.005). A marked and persistent ACE inhibition and a gradual and progressive decrease of angiotensin II (from 12.42 +/- 2.15 to 5.45 +/- 1.68 pg/ml; P less than 0.005) characterized the humoral activity of enalapril maleate. Moreover, a significant decrease of plasma norepinephrine levels was observed during the follow-up period with maximal reduction on the 120th day (from 311 +/- 34 to 197 +/- 33 pg/ml; P less than 0.01). It has been demonstrated that the pressor effect of angiotensin II was blunted during exercise. Our hemodynamic and humoral results appear to confirm the hypothesis that

  20. Theobromine inhibits sensory nerve activation and cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Omar S; Belvisi, Maria G; Patel, Hema J; Crispino, Natascia; Birrell, Mark A; Korbonits, Márta; Korbonits, Dezso; Barnes, Peter J

    2005-02-01

    Cough is a common and protective reflex, but persistent coughing is debilitating and impairs quality of life. Antitussive treatment using opioids is limited by unacceptable side effects, and there is a great need for more effective remedies. The present study demonstrates that theobromine, a methylxanthine derivative present in cocoa, effectively inhibits citric acid-induced cough in guinea-pigs in vivo. Furthermore, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in man, theobromine suppresses capsaicin-induced cough with no adverse effects. We also demonstrate that theobromine directly inhibits capsaicin-induced sensory nerve depolarization of guinea-pig and human vagus nerve suggestive of an inhibitory effect on afferent nerve activation. These data indicate the actions of theobromine appear to be peripherally mediated. We conclude theobromine is a novel and promising treatment, which may form the basis for a new class of antitussive drugs.

  1. Intracellular mechanism of action of sympathetic hepatic nerves on glucose and lactate balance in perfused rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballé, C.; Beuers, U.; ENGELHARDT, R.; JUNGERMANN, K.

    1987-01-01

    In rat liver perfused in situ stimulation of the nerve plexus around the hepatic artery and the portal vein caused an increase in glucose output and a shift from lactate uptake to output. The effects of nerve stimulation on some key enzymes, metabolites and effectors of carbohydrate metabolism were

  2. Liver Afferents Contribute to Water Drinking-Induced Sympathetic Activation in Human Subjects: A Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Marcus; Gueler, Faikah; Barg-Hock, Hannelore; Heiringhoff, Karl-Heinz; Engeli, Stefan; Heusser, Karsten; Diedrich, André; Brandt, André; Strassburg, Christian P.; Tank, Jens; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Jordan, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Water drinking acutely increases sympathetic activity in human subjects. In animals, the response appears to be mediated through transient receptor potential channel TRPV4 activation on osmosensitive hepatic spinal afferents, described as osmopressor response. We hypothesized that hepatic denervation attenuates water drinking-induced sympathetic activation. We studied 20 liver transplant recipients (44±2.6 years, 1.2±0.1 years post transplant) as model of hepatic denervation and 20 kidney transplant recipients (43±2.6 years, 0.8±0.1 years post transplant) as immunosuppressive drug matched control group. Before and after 500 ml water ingestion, we obtained venous blood samples for catecholamine analysis. We also monitored brachial and finger blood pressure, ECG, and thoracic bioimpedance. Plasma norepinephrine concentration had changed by 0.01±0.07 nmol/l in liver and by 0.21±0.07 nmol/l in kidney transplant recipients (pwater drinking. While blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance increased in both groups, the responses tended to be attenuated in liver transplant recipients. Our findings support the idea that osmosensitive hepatic afferents are involved in water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01237431 PMID:22016786

  3. Liver afferents contribute to water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects: a clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus May

    Full Text Available Water drinking acutely increases sympathetic activity in human subjects. In animals, the response appears to be mediated through transient receptor potential channel TRPV4 activation on osmosensitive hepatic spinal afferents, described as osmopressor response. We hypothesized that hepatic denervation attenuates water drinking-induced sympathetic activation. We studied 20 liver transplant recipients (44±2.6 years, 1.2±0.1 years post transplant as model of hepatic denervation and 20 kidney transplant recipients (43±2.6 years, 0.8±0.1 years post transplant as immunosuppressive drug matched control group. Before and after 500 ml water ingestion, we obtained venous blood samples for catecholamine analysis. We also monitored brachial and finger blood pressure, ECG, and thoracic bioimpedance. Plasma norepinephrine concentration had changed by 0.01±0.07 nmol/l in liver and by 0.21±0.07 nmol/l in kidney transplant recipients (p<0.05 between groups after 30-40 minutes of water drinking. While blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance increased in both groups, the responses tended to be attenuated in liver transplant recipients. Our findings support the idea that osmosensitive hepatic afferents are involved in water drinking-induced sympathetic activation in human subjects.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01237431.

  4. Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Kong, Ying-Yee; Michalewski, Henry J; Starr, Arnold

    2005-06-01

    Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity were systematically studied in 21 subjects who had been clinically diagnosed with auditory neuropathy (AN), a recently defined disorder characterized by normal outer hair cell function but disrupted auditory nerve function. Neurological and electrophysical evidence suggests that disrupted auditory nerve activity is due to desynchronized or reduced neural activity or both. Psychophysical measures showed that the disrupted neural activity has minimal effects on intensity-related perception, such as loudness discrimination, pitch discrimination at high frequencies, and sound localization using interaural level differences. In contrast, the disrupted neural activity significantly impairs timing related perception, such as pitch discrimination at low frequencies, temporal integration, gap detection, temporal modulation detection, backward and forward masking, signal detection in noise, binaural beats, and sound localization using interaural time differences. These perceptual consequences are the opposite of what is typically observed in cochlear-impaired subjects who have impaired intensity perception but relatively normal temporal processing after taking their impaired intensity perception into account. These differences in perceptual consequences between auditory neuropathy and cochlear damage suggest the use of different neural codes in auditory perception: a suboptimal spike count code for intensity processing, a synchronized spike code for temporal processing, and a duplex code for frequency processing. We also proposed two underlying physiological models based on desynchronized and reduced discharge in the auditory nerve to successfully account for the observed neurological and behavioral data. These methods and measures cannot differentiate between these two AN models, but future studies using electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant might. These results not only show the unique

  5. Beta blocker dose and markers of sympathetic activation in heart failure patients: interrelationships and prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Solal, Alain; Jacobson, Arnold F; Piña, Ileana L

    2017-11-01

    Extent of cardiac sympathetic activation can be estimated from physiological parameters, blood biomarkers, and imaging findings. This study examined the prognostic value of three markers of sympathetic activity and their relationship to beta blocker dose in heart failure patients. A post hoc analysis of 858 heart failure subjects in the ADMIRE-HF trial was performed. Variables related to sympathetic activity were plasma norepinephrine, baseline heart rate, the heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio of 123 I-mIBG uptake, and beta blocker dose. Univariate and multivariate analyses for occurrence of mortality (all-cause and cardiac) and arrhythmic events were performed. Beta blocker dose was significantly related to age, heart rate, b-type natriuretic peptide (negatively), body mass index, body weight and plasma norepinephrine. Univariate predictors of all-cause and cardiac mortality were baseline heart rate (χ 2  = 4.5, P = 0.029 and χ 2  = 5 .2, P = 0.022, respectively), plasma norepinephrine level (χ 2  = 8.9, P = 0.0006 and χ 2  = 8.6, P = 0.003, respectively), and H/M (χ = 22.4, P heart rate, mean heart rate >67 b.p.m. was associated with significantly higher cardiac mortality. Higher beta blocker dose was associated with lower mortality, but of the variables associated with sympathetic activity examined, cardiac 123 I-mIBG uptake was the most powerful prognostic marker in heart failure patients. Elevated heart rate was associated with greater risk for cardiac death. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  6. Effect of generalised sympathetic activation by cold pressor test on cerebral haemodynamics in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Micieli, G; Bosone, D; Losano, G; Bini, R; Cavallini, A; Passatore, M

    1998-07-15

    There is no general agreement regarding several aspects of the role of the sympathetic system on cerebral haemodynamics such as extent of effectiveness, operational range and site of action. This study was planned to identify the effect of a generalised sympathetic activation on the cerebral haemodynamics in healthy humans before it is masked by secondary corrections, metabolic or myogenic in nature. A total of 35 healthy volunteers aged 20-35 underwent a 5 min lasting cold pressor test (CPT) performed on their left hand. The cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in the middle cerebral arteries and arterial blood pressure were recorded with transcranial Doppler sonography and with a non-invasive finger-cuff method, respectively. The ratio of arterial blood pressure to mean blood velocity (ABP/Vm) and Pulsatility Index (PI) were calculated throughout each trial. CPT induced an increase in mean ABP (range 2-54 mmHg depending on the subject) and only a slight, though significant, increase in blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (+2.4 and +4.4% on ipsi- and contralateral side, respectively). During CPT, the ratio ABP/Vm increased and PI decreased in all subjects on both sides. These changes began simultaneously with the increase in blood pressure. The increase in ABP/Vm ratio is attributed to an increase in the cerebrovascular resistance, while the concomitant reduction in PI is interpreted as due to the reduction in the compliance of the middle cerebral artery. The results suggest that generalised increases in the sympathetic discharge, causing increases in ABP, can prevent concomitant increases in CBF by acting on both small resistance and large compliant vessels. This effect is also present when a slight increase in blood pressure occurs, which suggests a moderate increase in the sympathetic discharge, i.e. when ABP remains far below the upper limit of CBF autoregulation.

  7. Regional sympathetic denervation after myocardial infarction in humans detected noninvasively using I-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton, M.S.; Tuli, M.M.; Radtke, N.L.; Heger, J.J.; Miles, W.M.; Mock, B.H.; Burt, R.W.; Wellman, H.N.; Zipes, D.P. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, IN (USA))

    1989-11-15

    Transmural myocardial infarction in dogs produces denervation of sympathetic nerves in viable myocardium apical to the infarct that may be arrhythmogenic. It is unknown whether sympathetic denervation occurs in humans. The purpose of this study was to use iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiolabeled guanethidine analog that is actively taken up by sympathetic nerve terminals, to image noninvasively the cardiac sympathetic nerves in patients with and without ventricular arrhythmias after myocardial infarction. Results showed that 10 of 12 patients with spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias after myocardial infarction exhibited regions of thallium-201 uptake indicating viable perfused myocardium, with no MIBG uptake. Such a finding is consistent with sympathetic denervation. One patient had frequent episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia induced at exercise testing that was eliminated by beta-adrenoceptor blockade. Eleven of the 12 patients had ventricular tachycardia induced at electrophysiologic study and metoprolol never prevented induction. Sympathetic denervation was also detected in two of seven postinfarction patients without ventricular arrhythmias. Normal control subjects had no regions lacking MIBG uptake. This study provides evidence that regional sympathetic denervation occurs in humans after myocardial infarction and can be detected noninvasively by comparing MIBG and thallium-201 images. Although the presence of sympathetic denervation may be related to the onset of spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias in some patients, it does not appear to be related to sustained ventricular tachycardia induced at electrophysiologic study.

  8. Arrhythmogenic effect of sympathetic histamine in mouse hearts subjected to acute ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gonghao; Hu, Jing; Li, Teng; Ma, Xue; Meng, Jingru; Jia, Min; Lu, Jun; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Chen, Zhong; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2012-02-10

    The role of histamine as a newly recognized sympathetic neurotransmitter has been presented previously, and its postsynaptic effects greatly depended on the activities of sympathetic nerves. Cardiac sympathetic nerves become overactivated under acute myocardial ischemic conditions and release neurotransmitters in large amounts, inducing ventricular arrhythmia. Therefore, it is proposed that cardiac sympathetic histamine, in addition to norepinephrine, may have a significant arrhythmogenic effect. To test this hypothesis, we observed the release of cardiac sympathetic histamine and associated ventricular arrhythmogenesis that was induced by acute ischemia in isolated mouse hearts. Mast cell-deficient mice (MCDM) and histidine decarboxylase knockout (HDC(-/-)) mice were used to exclude the potential involvement of mast cells. Electrical field stimulation and acute ischemia-reperfusion evoked chemical sympathectomy-sensitive histamine release from the hearts of both MCDM and wild-type (WT) mice but not from HDC(-/-) mice. The release of histamine from the hearts of MCDM and WT mice was associated with the development of acute ischemia-induced ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. The incidence and duration of induced ventricular arrhythmias were found to decrease in the presence of the selective histamine H(2) receptor antagonist famotidine. Additionally, the released histamine facilitated the arrhythmogenic effect of simultaneously released norepinephrine. We conclude that, under acute ischemic conditions, cardiac sympathetic histamine released by overactive sympathetic nerve terminals plays a certain arrhythmogenic role via H(2) receptors. These findings provided novel insight into the pathophysiological roles of sympathetic histamine, which may be a new therapeutic target for acute ischemia-induced arrhythmias.

  9. Suppressed sympathetic outflow to skeletal muscle, muscle thermogenesis, and activity energy expenditure with calorie restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almundarij, Tariq I; Gavini, Chaitanya K; Novak, Colleen M

    2017-02-01

    During weight loss, adaptive thermogenesis occurs where energy expenditure (EE) is suppressed beyond that predicted for the smaller body size. Here, we investigated the contributions of resting and nonresting EE to the reduced total EE seen after 3 weeks of 50% calorie restriction (CR) in rats, focusing on activity-associated EE, muscle thermogenesis, and sympathetic outflow. Prolonged food restriction resulted in a 42% reduction in daily EE, through a 40% decrease in resting EE, and a 48% decline in nonresting EE These decreases in EE were significant even when the reductions in body weight and lean mass were taken into account. Along with a decreased caloric need for low-to-moderate-intensity treadmill activity with 50% CR, baseline and activity-related muscle thermogenesis were also suppressed, though the ability to increase muscle thermogenesis above baseline levels was not compromised. When sympathetic drive was measured by assessing norepinephrine turnover (NETO), 50% CR was found to decrease NETO in three of the four muscle groups examined, whereas elevated NETO was found in white adipose tissue of food-restricted rats. Central activation of melanocortin 4 receptors in the ventromedial hypothalamus stimulated this pathway, enhancing activity EE; this was not compromised by 50% CR These data suggest that suppressed activity EE contributes to adaptive thermogenesis during energy restriction. This may stem from decreased sympathetic drive to skeletal muscle, increasing locomotor efficiency and reducing skeletal muscle thermogenesis. The capacity to increase activity EE in response to central stimuli is retained, however, presenting a potential target for preventing weight regain. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  10. Sympathetic Neurotransmitters Modulate Osteoclastogenesis and Osteoclast Activity in the Context of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschter, Dominique; Schäfer, Nicole; Stangl, Hubert; Straub, Rainer H.; Grässel, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Excessive synovial osteoclastogenesis is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concomitantly, local synovial changes comprise neuronal components of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Here, we wanted to analyze if collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) alters bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM) osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, and how sympathetic neurotransmitters participate in this process. Therefore, BMMs from Dark Agouti rats at different CIA stages were differentiated into osteoclasts in vitro and osteoclast number, cathepsin K activity, matrix resorption and apoptosis were analyzed in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh), noradrenaline (NA) vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and assay-dependent, adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477. We observed modulation of neurotransmitter receptor mRNA expression in CIA osteoclasts without affecting protein level. CIA stage-dependently altered marker gene expression associated with osteoclast differentiation and activity without affecting osteoclast number or activity. Neurotransmitter stimulation modulated osteoclast differentiation, apoptosis and activity. VIP, NA and adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477 inhibited cathepsin K activity and osteoclastogenesis (NKH477, 10-6M NA) whereas ACh mostly acted pro-osteoclastogenic. We conclude that CIA alone does not affect metabolism of in vitro generated osteoclasts whereas stimulation with NA, VIP plus specific activation of adenylyl cyclase induced anti-resorptive effects probably mediated via cAMP signaling. Contrary, we suggest pro-osteoclastogenic and pro-resorptive properties of ACh mediated via muscarinic receptors. PMID:26431344

  11. Increased Feeding Speed Is Associated with Higher Subsequent Sympathetic Activity in Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyo Ohtani

    Full Text Available Although the domestication process has altered the feeding behavior of dogs, some breeds still demonstrate a remarkable ability to gorge, and will eat exceptionally large quantities of food whenever it is available. Lesions in the ventromedial hypothalamus increase appetite and lead to obesity, suggesting that the autonomic nervous system plays an important role in feeding. Focusing on the autonomic activities closely involved in food intake, we investigated sympathetic activities before and after feeding in dogs. The subjects were 56 healthy dogs of 21 different breeds (29 males and 27 females. Based on feeding habits, the 56 dogs were divided into three groups: Fast (n = 19, Slow (n = 24 and Leftover (n = 13. The feeding speed and the amount of food per mouthful of the Fast dogs were significantly greater than those of the Slow and the Leftover dogs. The plasma norepinephrine level in dogs of the Fast group was significantly increased after feeding, while those in the Slow and Leftover groups were significantly decreased after feeding, compared with the pre-feeding concentrations. The low frequency/high frequency ratio of heart rate variability is a good indicator of sympathetic activity and was also significantly higher in the Fast group than in the other groups. Delayed feeding using automatic feeding equipment decreased the plasma norepinephrine concentration and low frequency/high frequency ratio observed after feeding in dogs of the Fast group. In conclusion, dogs eating rapidly with less chewing, which indicates increased sympathetic activity during feeding, may benefit from delayed feeding. The slow eating may activate the parasympathetic nervous system after feeding, which could enhance the activity of the digestive system.

  12. Increased Feeding Speed Is Associated with Higher Subsequent Sympathetic Activity in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Nobuyo; Okamoto, Yuta; Tateishi, Kanako; Uchiyama, Hidehiko; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2015-01-01

    Although the domestication process has altered the feeding behavior of dogs, some breeds still demonstrate a remarkable ability to gorge, and will eat exceptionally large quantities of food whenever it is available. Lesions in the ventromedial hypothalamus increase appetite and lead to obesity, suggesting that the autonomic nervous system plays an important role in feeding. Focusing on the autonomic activities closely involved in food intake, we investigated sympathetic activities before and after feeding in dogs. The subjects were 56 healthy dogs of 21 different breeds (29 males and 27 females). Based on feeding habits, the 56 dogs were divided into three groups: Fast (n = 19), Slow (n = 24) and Leftover (n = 13). The feeding speed and the amount of food per mouthful of the Fast dogs were significantly greater than those of the Slow and the Leftover dogs. The plasma norepinephrine level in dogs of the Fast group was significantly increased after feeding, while those in the Slow and Leftover groups were significantly decreased after feeding, compared with the pre-feeding concentrations. The low frequency/high frequency ratio of heart rate variability is a good indicator of sympathetic activity and was also significantly higher in the Fast group than in the other groups. Delayed feeding using automatic feeding equipment decreased the plasma norepinephrine concentration and low frequency/high frequency ratio observed after feeding in dogs of the Fast group. In conclusion, dogs eating rapidly with less chewing, which indicates increased sympathetic activity during feeding, may benefit from delayed feeding. The slow eating may activate the parasympathetic nervous system after feeding, which could enhance the activity of the digestive system.

  13. Increased Feeding Speed Is Associated with Higher Subsequent Sympathetic Activity in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Nobuyo; Okamoto, Yuta; Tateishi, Kanako; Uchiyama, Hidehiko; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2015-01-01

    Although the domestication process has altered the feeding behavior of dogs, some breeds still demonstrate a remarkable ability to gorge, and will eat exceptionally large quantities of food whenever it is available. Lesions in the ventromedial hypothalamus increase appetite and lead to obesity, suggesting that the autonomic nervous system plays an important role in feeding. Focusing on the autonomic activities closely involved in food intake, we investigated sympathetic activities before and after feeding in dogs. The subjects were 56 healthy dogs of 21 different breeds (29 males and 27 females). Based on feeding habits, the 56 dogs were divided into three groups: Fast (n = 19), Slow (n = 24) and Leftover (n = 13). The feeding speed and the amount of food per mouthful of the Fast dogs were significantly greater than those of the Slow and the Leftover dogs. The plasma norepinephrine level in dogs of the Fast group was significantly increased after feeding, while those in the Slow and Leftover groups were significantly decreased after feeding, compared with the pre-feeding concentrations. The low frequency/high frequency ratio of heart rate variability is a good indicator of sympathetic activity and was also significantly higher in the Fast group than in the other groups. Delayed feeding using automatic feeding equipment decreased the plasma norepinephrine concentration and low frequency/high frequency ratio observed after feeding in dogs of the Fast group. In conclusion, dogs eating rapidly with less chewing, which indicates increased sympathetic activity during feeding, may benefit from delayed feeding. The slow eating may activate the parasympathetic nervous system after feeding, which could enhance the activity of the digestive system. PMID:26569112

  14. Sympathetic baroreflex gain in normotensive pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Charlotte W; Skow, Rachel J; Matenchuk, Brittany A; Chari, Radha S; Julian, Colleen G; Stickland, Michael K; Davenport, Margie H; Steinback, Craig D

    2015-09-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity is increased during normotensive pregnancy while mean arterial pressure is maintained or reduced, suggesting baroreflex resetting. We hypothesized spontaneous sympathetic baroreflex gain would be reduced in normotensive pregnant women relative to nonpregnant matched controls. Integrated muscle sympathetic burst incidence and total sympathetic activity (microneurography), blood pressure (Finometer), and R-R interval (ECG) were assessed at rest in 11 pregnant women (33 ± 1 wk gestation, 31 ± 1 yr, prepregnancy BMI: 23.5 ± 0.9 kg/m(2)) and 11 nonpregnant controls (29 ± 1 yr; BMI: 25.2 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)). Pregnant women had elevated baseline sympathetic burst incidence (43 ± 2 vs. 33 ± 2 bursts/100 heart beats, P = 0.01) and total sympathetic activity (1,811 ± 148 vs. 1,140 ± 55 au, P baroreflex set point with pregnancy. Baroreflex gain, calculated as the linear relationship between sympathetic burst incidence and DBP, was reduced in pregnant women relative to controls (-3.7 ± 0.5 vs. -5.4 ± 0.5 bursts·100 heart beats(-1)·mmHg(-1), P = 0.03), as was baroreflex gain calculated with total sympathetic activity (-294 ± 24 vs. -210 ± 24 au·100 heart beats(-1)·mmHg(-1); P = 0.03). Cardiovagal baroreflex gain (sequence method) was not different between nonpregnant controls and pregnant women (49 ± 8 vs. 36 ± 8 ms/mmHg; P = 0.2). However, sympathetic (burst incidence) and cardiovagal gains were negatively correlated in pregnant women (R = -0.7; P = 0.02). Together, these data indicate that the influence of the sympathetic nervous system over arterial blood pressure is reduced in normotensive pregnancy, in terms of both long-term and beat-to-beat regulation of arterial pressure, likely through a baroreceptor-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Effects of tiotropium on sympathetic activation during exercise in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kenji; Maekura, Ryoji; Hiraga, Toru; Kitada, Seigo; Miki, Keisuke; Miki, Mari; Tateishi, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    Tiotropium partially relieves exertional dyspnea and reduces the risk of congestive heart failure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. However, its effect on the sympathetic activation response to exercise is unknown. This study aimed to determine whether tiotropium use results in a sustained reduction in sympathetic activation during exercise. We conducted a 12-week, open-label (treatments: tiotropium 18 μg or oxitropium 0.2 mg × 3 mg), crossover study in 17 COPD patients. Treatment order was randomized across subjects. The subjects underwent a pulmonary function test and two modes of cardiopulmonary exercise (constant work rate and incremental exercise) testing using a cycle ergometer, with measurement of arterial catecholamines after each treatment period. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity were significantly larger in the tiotropium treatment group. In constant exercise testing, exercise endurance time was longer, with improvement in dyspnea during exercise and reduction in dynamic hyperinflation in the tiotropium treatment group. Similarly, in incremental exercise testing, exercise time, carbon dioxide production, and minute ventilation at peak exercise were significantly higher in the tiotropium treatment group. Plasma norepinephrine concentrations and dyspnea intensity were also lower during submaximal isotime exercise and throughout the incremental workload exercise in the tiotropium treatment group. Tiotropium suppressed the increase of sympathetic activation during exercise at the end of the 6-week treatment, as compared with the effect of oxipropium. This effect might be attributed to improvement in lung function and exercise capacity and reduction in exertional dyspnea, which were associated with decreases in respiratory frequency and heart rate and reduced progression of arterial acidosis.

  16. Inspiratory muscle training reduces sympathetic nervous activity and improves inspiratory muscle weakness and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure: a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Priscila R; Guerra, Grazi M; Borile, Suellen; Rondon, Maria U; Alves, Maria J; Negrão, Carlos E; Dal Lago, Pedro; Mostarda, Cristiano; Irigoyen, Maria C; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda M

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on cardiac autonomic modulation and on peripheral nerve sympathetic activity in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Functional capacity, low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components of heart rate variability, muscle sympathetic nerve activity inferred by microneurography, and quality of life were determined in 27 patients with CHF who had been sequentially allocated to 1 of 2 groups: (1) control group (with no intervention) and (2) IMT group. Inspiratory muscle training consisted of respiratory exercises, with inspiratory threshold loading of seven 30-minute sessions per week for a period of 12 weeks, with a monthly increase of 30% in maximal inspiratory pressure (PI(max)) at rest. Multivariate analysis was applied to detect differences between baseline and followup period. Inspiratory muscle training significantly increased PI(max) (59.2 ± 4.9 vs 87.5 ± 6.5 cmH(2)O, P = .001) and peak oxygen uptake (14.4 ± 0.7 vs 18.9 ± 0.8 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), P = .002); decreased the peak ventilation (VE)/carbon dioxide production (VCO(2)) ratio (35.8 ± 0.8 vs 32.5 ± 0.4, P = .001) and the VE/VCO(2) slope (37.3 ± 1.1 vs 31.3 ± 1.1, P = .004); increased the HF component (49.3 ± 4.1 vs 58.4 ± 4.2 normalized units, P = .004) and decreased the LF component (50.7 ± 4.1 vs 41.6 ± 4.2 normalized units, P = .001) of heart rate variability; decreased muscle sympathetic nerve activity (37.1 ± 3 vs 29.5 ± 2.3 bursts per minute, P = .001); and improved quality of life. No significant changes were observed in the control group. Home-based IMT represents an important strategy to improve cardiac and peripheral autonomic controls, functional capacity, and quality of life in patients with CHF.

  17. Cardiac sympathetic activity in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschure, Derk O; Boot, Erik; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse A; Booij, Jan; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Somsen, G Aernout; Verberne, Hein J

    2016-06-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) affects catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT), which involves the degradation of norepinephrine (NE). Clinically, adults with 22q11.2DS are at increased risk for sudden unexpected death. Although the causes are likely multifactorial, increased cardiac sympathetic activity with subsequent fatal arrhythmia, due to increased levels of NE, should be considered as a possible mechanism predisposing to this premature death. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cardiac sympathetic activity is increased in 22q11.2DS, both at baseline and following an acute NE depletion with alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT). Five adults with 22q11.2DS and five age- and sex-matched healthy controls underwent 2 sessions with either AMPT or placebo administration before (123)I-mIBG scintigraphy. Heart-to-mediastinum ratios (H/M) were determined from the images 15min (early) and 4h (late) after administration of (123)I-mIBG and the washout (WO) was calculated as an indicator of adrenergic drive. At baseline there were no significant differences in both early and late H/M between 22q11.2DS and controls. However, there was a significant difference in WO between 22q11.2DS and controls (-4.92±2.8 and -10.44±7.2, respectively; p=0.027), but a "negative WO" does not support an increased sympathetic drive. In addition there was a trend towards a higher late H/M after AMPT administration compared to baseline which was more pronounced in 22q11.2DS. This study for the first time suggests normal cardiac sympathetic activity in adults with 22q11.2DS assessed by (123)I-mIBG scintigraphy. Although there is a small difference in adrenergic drive compared to healthy subjects, this most likely does not explain the increased unexpected death rate in the 22q11.2 DS population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bursting into space: alterations of sympathetic control by space travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Astronauts return to Earth with reduced red cell masses and hypovolaemia. Not surprisingly, when they stand, their heart rates may speed inordinately, their blood pressures may fall, and some may experience frank syncope. We studied autonomic function in six male astronauts (average +/- SEM age: 40 +/- 2 years) before, during, and after the 16-day Neurolab space shuttle mission. METHOD: We recorded electrocardiograms, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressures, respiration, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity, plasma noradrenaline and noradrenaline kinetics, and cardiac output, and we calculated stroke volume and total peripheral resistance. We perturbed autonomic function before and during spaceflight with graded Valsalva manoeuvres and lower body suction, and before and after the mission with passive upright tilt. RESULTS: In-flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre-flight levels (by 10-33%) in three subjects, in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance also were increased. Valsalva straining provoked greater reductions of arterial pressure, and proportionally greater sympathetic responses in space than on Earth. Lower body suction elicited greater increases of sympathetic nerve activity, plasma noradrenaline, and noradrenaline spillover in space than on Earth. After the Neurolab mission, left ventricular stroke volume was lower and heart rate was higher during tilt, than before spaceflight. No astronaut experienced orthostatic hypotension or pre-syncope during 10 min of post-flight tilting. CONCLUSION: We conclude that baseline sympathetic outflow, however measured, is higher in space than on earth, and that augmented sympathetic nerve responses to Valsalva straining, lower body suction, and post-flight upright tilt represent normal adjustments to greater haemodynamic stresses associated with hypovolaemia.

  19. Prognostic value of myocardial sympathetic activity in patients with asymptomatic myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Sindoh, Takashi; Sawada, Yoshihiro [Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    To clarify the significance of myocardial sympathetic activity in patients with asymptomatic myocardial infarction (MI), we performed {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzyl-guanidine (MIBG) and {sup 201}Tl imaging at rest. We calculated the ratio of cardiac uptake of the isotope to the total injected dose (%Uptake), percent washout of MIBG over 3 hours and the Uptake Ratio (UR, %Uptake of MIBG divided by %Uptake of {sup 201}Tl). We compared these indices with clinical findings, exercise stress-rest myocardial perfusion imaging with {sup 99}Tc-methoxy-2-isobutyl isonitrile, coronary angiography, echocardiography and neurohumoral findings. During the follow-up period of 19.9{+-}10.3 months in 32 patients, events (heart failure or cardiac death) developed in 10 (31%). In univariate analysis, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVDd) greater than 54 mm, and the %Uptake of MIBG and UR differed significantly between event and event-free groups. Cox proportional hazard model showed that the UR was a predictor of events (p=0.0007). In patients with UR less than 0.58, the relative risk of events was 19.1 times greater than in patients with an UR greater than 0.58. UR was closely correlated to LVDd (r=-0.578, p=0.01) suggesting that myocardial sympathetic activity is related to LV remodeling after MI. MIBG imaging provides important information regarding the prognosis and the pathophysiologic process of asymptomatic MI. (author)

  20. Mineralocorticoid Receptors, Inflammation and Sympathetic Drive in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Appreciation for the role of aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptors in cardiovascular disease is accelerating rapidly. Recent experimental work has unveiled a strong relationship between brain mineralocorticoid receptors and sympathetic drive, an important determinant of outcome in heart failure and hypertension. Two putative mechanisms are explored in this manuscript. First, brain mineralocorticoid receptors may influence sympathetic discharge by regulating the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into the circulation. Blood-borne pro-inflammatory cytokines act upon receptors in the microvasculature of the brain to induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity and the production of prostaglandin E2, which penetrates the blood-brain barrier to activate the sympathetic nervous system. Second, brain mineralocorticoid receptors may influence sympathetic drive by upregulating the activity of the brain renin-angiotensin system, resulting in NAD(P)H oxidase dependent superoxide production. A potential role for superoxide dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in the regulation of sympathetic nerve activity is also considered. Other potential downstream signaling mechanisms contributing to mineralocorticoid receptor mediated sympathetic excitation are under investigation. PMID:19648480

  1. Correlation between endogenous noradrenaline and glucose released from the liver upon hepatic sympathetic nerve stimulation in anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garceau, D; Yamaguchi, N; Goyer, R; Guitard, F

    1984-09-01

    The metabolic role of neurally released noradrenaline (NA) was studied in the liver of anesthetized dogs. Sustained stimulation with various frequencies was directly applied on the anterior plexus of hepatic nerves. Stimulation-induced changes in plasma concentrations of endogenous catecholamines in hepatic venous blood were determined in correlation with concomitant changes in those of glucose (GL). Mean basal values for hepatic venous NA, adrenaline, dopamine, and GL were 0.062, 0.022, 0.032 ng/mL, and 97.9 mg%, respectively. Among these catecholamines, NA was the only one being released significantly during stimulation. While hepatic venous NA increased rapidly during stimulation, being maximum within 3 min, hepatic venous GL increased gradually, reaching a maximum value 5 min after the onset of stimulation. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.90, P less than 0.001) was found between changes in hepatic venous NA and GL concentrations observed during stimulation at various frequencies (2-16 Hz). However, hepatic vasoconstricting responses to stimulation were not correlated with increased hepatic venous GL. An alpha-blockade with phentolamine (2 mg/kg, iv) resulted in diminished release of GL by approximately 50% (P less than 0.05) and reduced hepatic arterial vasoconstriction by approximately 47% (P less than 0.01) upon stimulation (8 Hz, 5 min), even though NA release was markedly enhanced. We conclude that in the dog, NA is the sole catecholamine released within the liver in response to direct hepatic nerve stimulation, and NA thus released mediates the hepatic glycogenolysis via alpha-adrenoceptors.

  2. Sleep-Disordered Breathing Exacerbates Muscle Vasoconstriction and Sympathetic Neural Activation in Patients with Systolic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Denise M L; Trevizan, Patricia F; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Oliveira, Patricia A; Piveta, Rafael B; Almeida, Dirceu R; Mady, Charles; Bocchi, Edimar A; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Middlekauff, Holly R; Negrão, Carlos E

    2016-11-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is common in patients with heart failure (HF), and hypoxia and hypercapnia episodes activate chemoreceptors stimulating autonomic reflex responses. We tested the hypothesis that muscle vasoconstriction and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in response to hypoxia and hypercapnia would be more pronounced in patients with HF and SDB than in patients with HF without SDB (NoSBD). Ninety consecutive patients with HF, New York Heart Association functional class II-III, and left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40% were screened for the study. Forty-one patients were enrolled: NoSDB (n=13, 46 [39-53] years) and SDB (n=28, 57 [54-61] years). SDB was characterized by apnea-hypopnea index ≥15 events per hour (polysomnography). Peripheral (10% O 2 and 90% N 2 , with CO 2 titrated) and central (7% CO 2 and 93% O 2 ) chemoreceptors were stimulated for 3 minutes. Forearm and calf blood flow were evaluated by venous occlusion plethysmography, MSNA by microneurography, and blood pressure by beat-to-beat noninvasive technique. Baseline forearm blood flow, forearm vascular conductance, calf blood flow, and calf vascular conductance were similar between groups. MSNA was higher in the SDB group. During hypoxia, the vascular responses (forearm blood flow, forearm vascular conductance, calf blood flow, and calf vascular conductance) were significantly lower in the SDB group compared with the NoSDB group (Phypoxia (P=0.024) and tended to be higher to hypercapnia (P=0.066) in the SDB group. Patients with HF and SDB have more severe muscle vasoconstriction during hypoxia and hypercapnia than HF patients without SDB, which seems to be associated with endothelial dysfunction and, in part, increased MSNA response. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Sympathetic chain Schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mashat, Faisal M.

    2009-01-01

    Schwannomas are rare, benign, slowly growing tumors arising from Schwann cells that line nerve sheaths. Schwannomas arising from the cervical sympathetic chain are extremely rare. Here, we report a case of a 70-year-old man who presented with only an asymptomatic neck mass. Physical examination revealed a left sided Horner syndrome and a neck mass with transmitted pulsation and anterior displacement of the carotid artery. Computed tomography (CT) showed a well-defined non-enhancing mass with vascular displacement. The nerve of origin of this encapsulated tumor was the sympathetic chain. The tumor was excised completely intact. The pathologic diagnosis was Schwannoma (Antoni type A and Antoni type B). The patient has been well and free of tumor recurrence for 14 months with persistence of asymptomatic left sided Horner syndrome. The clinical, radiological and pathological evaluations, therapy and postoperative complications of this tumor are discussed. (author)

  4. Subcellular storage and release mode of the novel18F-labeled sympathetic nerve PET tracer LMI1195.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinyu; Werner, Rudolf A; Lapa, Constantin; Nose, Naoko; Hirano, Mitsuru; Javadi, Mehrbod S; Robinson, Simon; Higuchi, Takahiro

    2018-02-06

    18 F-N-[3-bromo-4-(3-fluoro-propoxy)-benzyl]-guanidine ( 18 F-LMI1195) is a new class of PET tracer designed for sympathetic nervous imaging of the heart. The favorable image quality with high and specific neural uptake has been previously demonstrated in animals and humans, but intracellular behavior is not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study is to verify whether it is taken up in storage vesicles and released in company with vesicle turnover. Both vesicle-rich (PC12) and vesicle-poor (SK-N-SH) norepinephrine-expressing cell lines were used for in vitro tracer uptake studies. After 2 h of 18 F-LMI1195 preloading into both cell lines, effects of stimulants for storage vesicle turnover (high concentration KCl (100 mM) or reserpine treatment) were measured at 10, 20, and 30 min. 131 I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ( 131 I-MIBG) served as a reference. Both high concentration KCl and reserpine enhanced 18 F-LMI1195 washout from PC12 cells, while tracer retention remained stable in the SK-N-SH cells. After 30 min of treatment, 18 F-LMI1195 releasing index (percentage of tracer released from cells) from vesicle-rich PC12 cells achieved significant differences compared to cells without treatment condition. In contrast, such effect could not be observed using vesicle-poor SK-N-SH cell lines. Similar tracer kinetics after KCl or reserpine treatment were also observed using 131 I-MIBG. In case of KCl exposure, Ca 2 +-free buffer with the calcium chelator, ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA), could suppress the tracer washout from PC12 cells. This finding is consistent with the tracer release being mediated by Ca 2 + influx resulting from membrane depolarization. Analogous to 131 I-MIBG, the current in vitro tracer uptake study confirmed that 18 F-LMI1195 is also stored in vesicles in PC12 cells and released along with vesicle turnover. Understanding the basic kinetics of 18 F-LMI1195 at a subcellular level is important for the design of clinical imaging protocols

  5. Experimental study of vascularized nerve graft: evaluation of nerve regeneration using choline acetyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, M; Tamai, S; Yajima, H; Kawanishi, K

    2001-01-01

    A comparative study of nerve regeneration was performed on vascularized nerve graft (VNG) and free nerve graft (FNG) in Fischer strain rats. A segment of the sciatic nerve with vascular pedicle of the femoral artery and vein was harvested from syngeneic donor rat for the VNG group and the sciatic nerve in the same length without vascular pedicle was harvested for the FNG group. They were transplanted to a nerve defect in the sciatic nerve of syngeneic recipient rats. At 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks after operation, the sciatic nerves were biopsied and processed for evaluation of choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activity, histological studies, and measurement of wet weight of the muscle innervated by the sciatic nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation of the grafted nerve was also performed before sacrifice. The average CAT activity in the distal to the distal suture site was 383 cpm in VNG and 361 cpm in FNG at 2 weeks; 6,189 cpm in VNG and 2,264 cpm in FNG at 4 weeks; and 11,299 cpm in VNG and 9,424 cpm in FNG at 6 weeks postoperatively. The value of the VNG group was statistically higher than that of the FNG group at 4 weeks postoperatively. Electrophysiological and histological findings also suggested that nerve regeneration in the VNG group was superior to that in the FNG group during the same period. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups after 6 weeks postoperatively in any of the evaluations. The CAT measurement was useful in the experiments, because it was highly sensitive and reproducible. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Burst Activity and Heart Rhythm Modulation in the Sympathetic Outflow to the Heart

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baselli, G

    2001-01-01

    In 13 decerebrate, artificially ventilated cats preganglionic sympathetic outflow to the heart was recorded with ECG and ventilation signal, A novel algorithm was implemented that extracts weighted...

  7. Marital conflict and children's externalizing behavior: interactions between parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Beauchaine, Theodore P; Moore, Ginger A

    2009-01-01

    "Toward greater specificity in the prediction of externalizing problems in the context of interparental conflict, interactions between children's parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system (PNS and SNS...

  8. Differential effects of adrenergic antagonists (Carvedilol vs Metoprolol on parasympathetic and sympathetic activity: a comparison of clinical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Bloom

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN is recognized as a significant health risk, correlating with risk of heart disease, silent myocardial ischemia or sudden cardiac death. Beta-blockers are often prescribed to minimize risk. Objectives In this second of two articles, the effects on parasympathetic and sympathetic activity of the alpha/beta-adrenergic blocker, Carvedilol, are compared with those of the selective beta-adrenergic blocker, Metoprolol. Methods Retrospective, serial autonomic nervous system test data from 147 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients from eight ambulatory clinics were analyzed. Patients were grouped according to whether a beta-blocker was (1 introduced, (2 discontinued or (3 continued without adjustment. Group 3 served as the control. Results Introducing Carvedilol or Metoprolol decreased heart rate and blood pressure, and discontinuing them had the opposite effect. Parasympathetic activity increased with introducing Carvedilol. Sympathetic activity increased more after discontinuing Carvedilol, suggesting better sympathetic suppression. With ongoing treatment, resting parasympathetic activity decreased with Metoprolol but increased with Carvedilol. Conclusion Carvedilol has a more profound effect on sympathovagal balance than Metoprolol. While both suppress sympathetic activity, only Carvedilol increases parasympathetic activity. Increased parasympathetic activity may underlie the lower mortality risk with Carvedilol.

  9. Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Ayvaz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (chronic regional pain syndrome isn’t frequently encountered in practical pediatrics and childhood. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD is a disorder characterized by widespread localized pain, often along with swelling, discoloration, trophic changes and autonomic abnormalities such as vasomotor disorders. Its etio-pathogenesis hasn’t been completely determined.The disease can form in an area innerved by a partially damaged nerve and usually follows minor injury or trauma. In this paper, two girl patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy are discussed along with the laboratory and clinic finding by accompaniment the literature as it is rarely seen in childhood.

  10. Structure-activity relationship of nerve-highlighting fluorophores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer L Gibbs

    Full Text Available Nerve damage is a major morbidity associated with numerous surgical interventions. Yet, nerve visualization continues to challenge even the most experienced surgeons. A nerve-specific fluorescent contrast agent, especially one with near-infrared (NIR absorption and emission, would be of immediate benefit to patients and surgeons. Currently, there are only three classes of small molecule organic fluorophores that penetrate the blood nerve barrier and bind to nerve tissue when administered systemically. Of these three classes, the distyrylbenzenes (DSBs are particularly attractive for further study. Although not presently in the NIR range, DSB fluorophores highlight all nerve tissue in mice, rats, and pigs after intravenous administration. The purpose of the current study was to define the pharmacophore responsible for nerve-specific uptake and retention, which would enable future molecules to be optimized for NIR optical properties. Structural analogs of the DSB class of small molecules were synthesized using combinatorial solid phase synthesis and commercially available building blocks, which yielded more than 200 unique DSB fluorophores. The nerve-specific properties of all DSB analogs were quantified using an ex vivo nerve-specific fluorescence assay on pig and human sciatic nerve. Results were used to perform quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR modeling and to define the nerve-specific pharmacophore. All DSB analogs with positive ex vivo fluorescence were tested for in vivo nerve specificity in mice to assess the effect of biodistribution and clearance on nerve fluorescence signal. Two new DSB fluorophores with the highest nerve to muscle ratio were tested in pigs to confirm scalability.

  11. Effects of salt loading on sympathetic activity and blood pressure in anesthetized two-kidney, one clip hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besim Özaykan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of salt loading on sympathetic pressor activity, cardiac autonomic activity, mean arterial pressure (MAP, heart rate (HR and on the relations between them in anesthetized two-kidney, one clip (2K1C hypertensive rats. We submitted rats to either renal artery clipping or sham operation. Distilled water or 0.5 % NaCl was given orally to the clipped and sham-operated control rats for 4 weeks. Then, MAP and HR differences between pre- and post- autonomic blockade were evaluated as indexes of sympathetic pressor and cardiac autonomic activity, respectively. The autonomic blockade decreased MAP to the similar levels in all groups (between 81.7±7.6 -87.3±7.1 mmHg. Sympathetic pressor activity was greater in the clipped rats than in its sham-operated controls only under salt loading (55.3±6.2 vs. 37.0±4.1 mmHg, p<0.05. Cardiac autonomic activity was, predominantly, sympathetic and more in the clipped group than in the sham-operated rats under distilled water (48.3±8.6 vs. 19.7±7.0 beats/min, p<0.05 but not under salt loading. Salt loading inverted the relationship between HR and cardiac autonomic activity in 2K1C hypertensive rats (r=-0.76, p=0.046 vs. r=0.89, p=0.019. These results suggest that salt loading may have augmented the effect of renovascular constriction on MAP by affecting the sympathetic pressor activity and the relation between cardiac autonomic activity and HR in 2K1C hypertensive rats.

  12. Scintigraphic evaluation of regional myocardial sympathetic activity in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Comparison between asymmetrical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and apical hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eno, Shin; Takeo, Eiichiro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Matsuda, Keiji; Fujii, Hideaki; Kanazawa, Ikuo [Chugoku Rosai General Hospital, Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    Using {sup 123}I-MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidine) and {sup 201}Tl imagings, an examination concerning the relation between the hypertrophic region and its sympathetic nervous function was done. Subjects were 12 normal adults (4 males and 8 females, mean age 61.3 yr), 13 patients with asymmetrical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (10 males and 3 females, 63.9 yr) and 13 patients with apical hypertrophy (9 males and 4 females, 67.2 yr). The SPECT apparatus was Toshiba two-gated gamma camera GCA 7200A. At 20 min and 3 hr after intravenous injection of 111 MBq of {sup 123}I-MIBG, myocardial SPECT and planar images were obtained with collimator LEHR under following conditions: photoelectric peak 159 KeV, window width 20%, matrix size 64 x 64 (256 x 256 for the planar image), step angle 6deg, 40 sec/step and 180deg for 1 camera. In another day, {sup 201}Tl SPECT and planar imagings were performed 10 min after intravenous injection of 111 MBq of {sup 201}Tl for the photoelectric peak 72 KeV under similar conditions to above. SPECT images were reconstructed using Butterworth filter and Shepp and Logan filter. Images were examined for the defect score, myocardium/mediastinum ratio, whole heart washout rate and regional washout rate. In the asymmetrical hypertrophic myopathy, abnormal sympathetic nerve function was recognized on the regions regardless of their disease severity while in the apical hypertrophy, abnormality was restricted on the apical region. Therefore, the two diseases were found different from each other from the aspect of sympathetic nerve functions. (K.H.)

  13. Physiological and pathophysiological interactions between the respiratory central pattern generator and the sympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zoccal, Daniel B; Baekey, David M; Abdala, Ana P L; Machado, Benedito H; Dick, Thomas E; Paton, Julian F R; Rybak, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory modulation seen in the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) implies that the respiratory and sympathetic networks interact. During hypertension elicited by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the SNA displays an enhanced respiratory modulation reflecting strengthened interactions between the networks. In this chapter, we review a series of experimental and modeling studies that help elucidate possible mechanisms of sympatho-respiratory coupling. We conclude that this coupling significantly contributes to both the sympathetic baroreflex and the augmented sympathetic activity after exposure to CIH. This conclusion is based on the following findings. (1) Baroreceptor activation results in perturbation of the respiratory pattern via transient activation of postinspiratory neurons in the Bötzinger complex (BötC). The same BötC neurons are involved in the respiratory modulation of SNA, and hence provide an additional pathway for the sympathetic baroreflex. (2) Under hypercapnia, phasic activation of abdominal motor nerves (AbN) is accompanied by synchronous discharges in SNA due to the common source of this rhythmic activity in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). CIH conditioning increases the CO2 sensitivity of central chemoreceptors in the RTN which results in the emergence of AbN and SNA discharges under normocapnic conditions similar to those observed during hypercapnia in naïve animals. Thus, respiratory-sympathetic interactions play an important role in defining sympathetic output and significantly contribute to the sympathetic activity and hypertension under certain physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and the theoretical framework presented may be instrumental in understanding of malfunctioning control of sympathetic activity in a variety of disease states. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Meal-Induced Increases in Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Activity Elicit Simultaneous Rises in Plasma Insulin and Free Fatty Acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steffens, A.B.; Gugten, J. van der; Godeke, J.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Strubbe, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate sympathetic and parasympathetic activity during food intake in rats by measuring plasma norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), insulin, free fatty acids (FFA), glycerol and blood glucose. Therefore male Wistar rats were implanted with silastic jugular vein

  15. Nerve-muscle activation by rotating permanent magnet configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Peter A; Nicholson, Graham M

    2016-04-01

    The standard method of magnetic nerve activation using pulses of high current in coils has drawbacks of high cost, high electrical power (of order 1 kW), and limited repetition rate without liquid cooling. Here we report a new technique for nerve activation using high speed rotation of permanent magnet configurations, generating a sustained sinusoidal electric field using very low power (of order 10 W). A high ratio of the electric field gradient divided by frequency is shown to be the key indicator for nerve activation at high frequencies. Activation of the cane toad sciatic nerve and attached gastrocnemius muscle was observed at frequencies as low as 180 Hz for activation of the muscle directly and 230 Hz for curved nerves, but probably not in straight sections of nerve. These results, employing the first prototype device, suggest the opportunity for a new class of small low-cost magnetic nerve and/or muscle stimulators. Conventional pulsed current systems for magnetic neurostimulation are large and expensive and have limited repetition rate because of overheating. Here we report a new technique for nerve activation, namely high-speed rotation of a configuration of permanent magnets. Analytical solutions of the cable equation are derived for the oscillating electric field generated, which has amplitude proportional to the rotation speed. The prototype device built comprised a configuration of two cylindrical magnets with antiparallel magnetisations, made to rotate by interaction between the magnets' own magnetic field and three-phase currents in coils mounted on one side of the device. The electric field in a rectangular bath placed on top of the device was both numerically evaluated and measured. The ratio of the electric field gradient on frequency was approximately 1 V m(-2) Hz(-1) near the device. An exploratory series of physiological tests was conducted on the sciatic nerve and attached gastrocnemius muscle of the cane toad (Bufo marinus). Activation was

  16. Activation of hypothalamic RIP-Cre neurons promotes beiging of WAT via sympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baile; Li, Ang; Li, Xiaomu; Ho, Philip Wl; Wu, Donghai; Wang, Xiaoqi; Liu, Zhuohao; Wu, Kelvin Kl; Yau, Sonata Sy; Xu, Aimin; Cheng, Kenneth Ky

    2018-04-01

    Activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and beige fat by cold increases energy expenditure. Although their activation is known to be differentially regulated in part by hypothalamus, the underlying neural pathways and populations remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that activation of rat-insulin-promoter-Cre (RIP-Cre) neurons in ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) preferentially promotes recruitment of beige fat via a selective control of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) outflow to subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT), but has no effect on BAT Genetic ablation of APPL2 in RIP-Cre neurons diminishes beiging in sWAT without affecting BAT, leading to cold intolerance and obesity in mice. Such defects are reversed by activation of RIP-Cre neurons, inactivation of VMH AMPK, or treatment with a β3-adrenergic receptor agonist. Hypothalamic APPL2 enhances neuronal activation in VMH RIP-Cre neurons and raphe pallidus, thereby eliciting SNS outflow to sWAT and subsequent beiging. These data suggest that beige fat can be selectively activated by VMH RIP-Cre neurons, in which the APPL2-AMPK signaling axis is crucial for this defending mechanism to cold and obesity. © 2018 The Authors.

  17. Vagus nerve stimulation increases energy expenditure: relation to brown adipose tissue activity.

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    Guy H E J Vijgen

    Full Text Available Human brown adipose tissue (BAT activity is inversely related to obesity and positively related to energy expenditure. BAT is highly innervated and it is suggested the vagus nerve mediates peripheral signals to the central nervous system, there connecting to sympathetic nerves that innervate BAT. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS is used for refractory epilepsy, but is also reported to generate weight loss. We hypothesize VNS increases energy expenditure by activating BAT.Fifteen patients with stable vns therapy (age: 45 ± 10 yrs; body mass index; 25.2 ± 3.5 kg/m(2 were included between January 2011 and June 2012. Ten subjects were measured twice, once with active and once with inactivated VNS. Five other subjects were measured twice, once with active VNS at room temperature and once with active VNS under cold exposure in order to determine maximal cold-induced BAT activity. BAT activity was assessed by 18-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose-Positron-Emission-Tomography-and-Computed-Tomography. Basal metabolic rate (BMR was significantly higher when VNS was turned on (mean change; +2.2%. Mean BAT activity was not significantly different between active VNS and inactive VNS (BAT SUV(Mean; 0.55 ± 0.25 versus 0.67 ± 0.46, P = 0.619. However, the change in energy expenditure upon VNS intervention (On-Off was significantly correlated to the change in BAT activity (r = 0.935, P<0.001.VNS significantly increases energy expenditure. The observed change in energy expenditure was significantly related to the change in BAT activity. This suggests a role for BAT in the VNS increase in energy expenditure. Chronic VNS may have a beneficial effect on the human energy balance that has potential application for weight management therapy.The study was registered in the Clinical Trial Register under the ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01491282.

  18. Vibration sense and sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity in patients with occlusive arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre-Jepsen, K; Henriksen, O; Parm, Martin Lehnsbo

    1983-01-01

    The function of sympathetic vasoconstrictor fibres was studied in 18 patients with occlusive arterial disease of the legs and somatic neuropathy, as evidenced as an increased vibration perception threshold. Nine patients suffered from long-term diabetes mellitus. Sympathetic vasoconstrictor...... of vibration sense, abnormal vasoconstrictor function was found. In three of these patients, the abnormal response most likely could be ascribed to impaired function of the vascular smooth muscle cells. Neither in diabetics nor in non-diabetics could an abnormal vibration sense be taken as evidence for loss...... of sympathetic vasoconstrictor function. It is suggested that this is studied by a simple postural test as used in the present study....

  19. Lowering of blood pressure by chronic suppression of central sympathetic outflow: insight from prolonged baroreflex activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, Radu

    2012-01-01

    Device-based therapy for resistant hypertension by electrical activation of the carotid baroreflex is currently undergoing active clinical investigation, and initial findings from clinical trials have been published. The purpose of this mini-review is to summarize the experimental studies that have provided a conceptual understanding of the mechanisms that account for the long-term lowering of arterial pressure with baroreflex activation. The well established mechanisms mediating the role of the baroreflex in short-term regulation of arterial pressure by rapid changes in peripheral resistance and cardiac function are often extended to long-term pressure control, and the more sluggish actions of the baroreflex on renal excretory function are often not taken into consideration. However, because clinical, experimental, and theoretical evidence indicates that the kidneys play a dominant role in long-term control of arterial pressure, this review focuses on the mechanisms that link baroreflex-mediated reductions in central sympathetic outflow with increases in renal excretory function that lead to sustained reductions in arterial pressure. PMID:22797307

  20. Hypoxia mediated pulmonary edema: potential influence of oxidative stress, sympathetic activation and cerebral blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Shadi; Frye, Melinda A; Jeckel, Kimberly M; Schroeder, Thies; Monnet, Eric; Irwin, Dave C; Cole, Patricia A; Bell, Christopher; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-10-09

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a non-cardiogenic form of pulmonary edema that can occur consequent to central neurologic insults including stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure. NPE is a public health concern due to high morbidity and mortality, yet the mechanism(s) are unknown. We hypothesized that NPE, evoked by cerebral hypoxia in the presence of systemic normoxia, would be accompanied by sympathetic activation, oxidative stress, and compensatory antioxidant mechanisms. Thirteen Walker hounds were assigned to cerebral hypoxia (SaO2 ~ 55 %) with systemic normoxia (SaO2 ~ 90 %) (CH; n = 6), cerebral and systemic (global) hypoxia (SaO2 ~ 60 %) (GH; n = 4), or cerebral and systemic normoxia (SaO2 ~ 90 %) (CON; n = 3). Femoral venous (CH and CON) perfusate was delivered via cardiopulmonary bypass to the brain and GH was induced by FiO2 = 10 % to maintain the SaO2 at ~60 %. Lung wet to lung dry weight ratios (LWW/LDW) were assessed as an index of pulmonary edema in addition to hemodynamic measurements. Plasma catecholamines were measured as markers of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Total glutathione, protein carbonyls, and malondialdehyde were assessed as indicators of oxidative stress. Brain and lung compensatory antioxidants were measured with immunoblotting. Compared to CON, LWW/LDW and pulmonary artery pressure were greater in CH and GH. Expression of hemeoxygenase-1 in brain was higher in CH compared to GH and CON, despite no group differences in oxidative damage in any tissue. Catecholamines tended to be higher in CH and GH. Cerebral hypoxia, with systemic normoxia, is not systematically associated with an increase in oxidative stress and compensatory antioxidant enzymes in lung, suggesting oxidative stress did not contribute to NPE in lung. However, increased SNS activity may play a role in the induction of NPE during hypoxia.

  1. BLOCKADE OF ROSTRAL VENTROLATERAL MEDULLA (RVLM BOMBESIN RECEPTOR TYPE 1 DECREASES BLOOD PRESSURE AND SYMPATHETIC ACTIVITY IN ANESTHETIZED SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Silva De Jesus Pinto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available IIntrathecal injection of bombesin (BBS promoted hypertensive and sympathoexcitatory effects in normotensive (NT rats. However, the involvement of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM in these responses is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated: (1 the effects of BBS injected bilaterally into RVLM on cardiorespiratory and sympathetic activity in NT and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR; (2 the contribution of RVLM bombesin type 1 receptors (BB1 to the maintenance of hypertension in SHR. Urethane-anesthetized rats (1.2 g · kg−1, i.v. were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure (MAP, diaphragm (DIA motor and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA. In NT rats and SHR, BBS (0.3 mM nanoinjected into RVLM increased MAP (33.9 ± 6.6 mmHg and 37.1 ± 4.5 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.05 and RSNA (97.8 ± 12.9 % and 84.5 ± 18.1 %, respectively; p < 0.05. In SHR, BBS also increased DIA burst amplitude (115.3 ± 22.7 %; p < 0.05. BB1 receptors antagonist (BIM-23127; 3 mM reduced MAP (-19.9 ± 4.4 mmHg; p < 0.05 and RSNA (-17.7 ± 3.8 %; p < 0.05 in SHR, but not in NT rats (-2.5 ± 2.8 mmHg; -2.7 ± 5.6 %, respectively. These results show that BBS can evoke sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses by activating RVLM BB1 receptors. This pathway might be involved in the maintenance of high levels of arterial blood pressure in SHR.

  2. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitija Garde

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation, currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative on-dependent multi-electrode arrays of open design allow the early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. .

  3. Consciously controlled breathing decreases the high-frequency component of heart rate variability by inhibiting cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Konosuke; Maruyama, Ryoko

    2014-07-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat alterations in heart rate, comprises sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activities of the heart. HRV analysis is used to quantify cardiac autonomic regulation. Since respiration could be a confounding factor in HRV evaluation, some studies recommend consciously controlled breathing to standardize the method. However, it remains unclear whether controlled breathing affects HRV measurement. We compared the effects of controlled breathing on HRV with those of spontaneous breathing. In 20 healthy volunteers, we measured respiratory frequency (f), tidal volume, and blood pressure (BP) and recorded electrocardiograms during spontaneous breathing (14.8 ± 0.7 breaths/min) and controlled breathing at 15 (0.25 Hz) and 6 (0.10 Hz) breaths/min. Compared to spontaneous breathing, controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz showed a higher heart rate and a lower high-frequency (HF) component, an index of parasympathetic nerve activity, although the f was the same. During controlled breathing at 0.10 Hz, the ratio of the low frequency (LF) to HF components (LF/HF), an index of sympathetic nerve activity, increased greatly and HF decreased, while heart rate and BP remained almost unchanged. Thus, controlled breathing at 0.25 Hz, which requires mental concentration, might inhibit parasympathetic nerve activity. During controlled breathing at 0.10 Hz, LF/HF increases because some HF subcomponents are synchronized with f and probably move into the LF band. This increment leads to misinterpretation of the true autonomic nervous regulation. We recommend that the respiratory pattern of participants should be evaluated before spectral HRV analysis to correctly understand changes in autonomic nervous regulation.

  4. Human muscle sympathetic neural and haemodynamic responses to tilt following spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Benjamin D.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Ertl, Andrew C.; Cox, James F.; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Ray, Chester A.; Smith, Michael L.; Iwase, Satoshi; hide

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is common when astronauts return to Earth: after brief spaceflight, up to two-thirds are unable to remain standing for 10 min. Previous research suggests that susceptible individuals are unable to increase their systemic vascular resistance and plasma noradrenaline concentrations above pre-flight upright levels. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that adaptation to the microgravity of space impairs sympathetic neural responses to upright posture on Earth. We studied six astronauts approximately 72 and 23 days before and on landing day after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. We measured heart rate, arterial pressure and cardiac output, and calculated stroke volume and total peripheral resistance, during supine rest and 10 min of 60 deg upright tilt. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded in five subjects, as a direct measure of sympathetic nervous system responses. As in previous studies, mean (+/- S.E.M.) stroke volume was lower (46 +/- 5 vs. 76 +/- 3 ml, P = 0.017) and heart rate was higher (93 +/- 1 vs. 74 +/- 4 beats min(-1), P = 0.002) during tilt after spaceflight than before spaceflight. Total peripheral resistance during tilt post flight was higher in some, but not all astronauts (1674 +/- 256 vs. 1372 +/- 62 dynes s cm(-5), P = 0.32). No crew member exhibited orthostatic hypotension or presyncopal symptoms during the 10 min of postflight tilting. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was higher post flight in all subjects, in supine (27 +/- 4 vs. 17 +/- 2 bursts min(-1), P = 0.04) and tilted (46 +/- 4 vs. 38 +/- 3 bursts min(-1), P = 0.01) positions. A strong (r(2) = 0.91-1.00) linear correlation between left ventricular stroke volume and muscle sympathetic nerve activity suggested that sympathetic responses were appropriate for the haemodynamic challenge of upright tilt and were unaffected by spaceflight. We conclude that after 16 days of spaceflight, muscle sympathetic nerve responses to upright tilt are normal.

  5. Neural and sympathetic activity associated with exploration in decision-making: Further evidence for involvement of insula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eOhira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that sympathetic activity was associated with exploration in decision-making indexed by entropy, which is a concept in information theory and indexes randomness of choices or the degree of deviation from sticking to recent experiences of gains and losses, and that activation of the anterior insula mediated this association. The current study aims to replicate and to expand these findings in a situation where contingency between options and outcomes is manipulated. Sixteen participants performed a stochastic decision-making task in which we manipulated a condition with low uncertainty of gain/loss (contingent-reward condition and a condition with high uncertainty of gain/loss (random-reward condition. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured by 15O-water positron emission tomography (PET, and cardiovascular parameters and catecholamine in the peripheral blood were measured, during the task. In the contingent-reward condition, norepinephrine as an index of sympathetic activity was positively correlated with entropy indicating exploration in decision-making. Norepinephrine was negatively correlated with neural activity in the right posterior insula, rostral anterior cingulate cortex, and dorsal pons, suggesting neural bases for detecting changes of bodily states. Furthermore, right anterior insular activity was negatively correlated with entropy, suggesting influences on exploration in decision-making. By contrast, in the random-reward condition, entropy correlated with activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal cortices but not with sympathetic activity. These findings suggest that influences of sympathetic activity on exploration in decision-making and its underlying neural mechanisms might be dependent on the degree of uncertainty of situations.

  6. Increased sympathetic activity during sleep and nocturnal hypertension in Type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F S; Hansen, H P; Jacobsen, P

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: To elucidate the putative factors involved in the blunted nocturnal blood pressure reduction in hypertensive Type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: Extracellular fluid volume and fluid shift from interstitial to plasma volume (haematocrit), sympathetic nervous activity...... with the patients lying awake in bed from 21:30 to 23:00 h (baseline) and during sleep from 23:00 to 07:00 h. Using the median nocturnal blood pressure reduction (8.4%) as a guide, the patients were divided into groups; group 1 with the highest and group 2 with the lowest nocturnal blood pressure reduction. RESULTS......: Haematocrit decreased from baseline to the sleep period in group 1 by a mean (95% confidence interval (CI)) of 1.7 (0.3-3.1)%, but it increased by 0.5 (-1.0-1.9)% in group 2, mean difference (95% CI), -2.1 (-4.0 to -0.2)% (P = 0.029). Noradrenaline decreased from baseline to the sleep period, mean (95% CI...

  7. Activation of ATP/UTP-selective receptors increases blood flow and blunts sympathetic vasoconstriction in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yegutkin, G.G.; Gonzalez-Alonso, J.; Rosenmeier, Jaya Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    /UTP-selective receptors. To this aim, we first measured leg blood flow (LBF), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output , leg arterial-venous (a-v) O(2) difference, plasma ATP and soluble nucleotidase activities during intrafemoral artery infusion of adenosine, AMP, ADP, ATP or UTP in nine healthy males. Comparison.......8) > ADP (2.7) > AMP (1.7). The infusions did not cause any shifts in plasma ATP level or soluble serum nucleotidase activities. Combined infusion of the vasodilatory compounds and the sympathetic vasoconstrictor drug tyramine increased plasma noradrenaline in all hyperaemic conditions, but only caused leg......Sympathetic vasoconstriction is blunted in the vascular beds of contracting skeletal muscle in humans, presumably due to the action of vasoactive metabolites (functional sympatholysis). Recently, we demonstrated that infusion of ATP into the arterial circulation of the resting human leg increases...

  8. Expression of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels in rats with cirrhosis: correlationship with sympathetic activity and renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Martins Monte

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to perform a direct analysis ofKATP mRNA expression by RT-PCR in kidney and isolated aorta fromrats with cirrhosis (induced by carbon tetrachloride and controls.The present study also analyses the relation between induced cirrhosisand urinary excretion of sodium and sympathetic activity in cirrhoticrats. Methods: Rats were placed in metabolic cages and allowedfree access to food and water. Cirrhosis was induced by repeateddoses of carbon tetrachloride by gastric gavage. After some weeks,the kidney and aorta were dissected and utilized for RNA extraction.Blood and urine were analyzed for electrolytes. Renal function wasestimated by creatinine clearance and sodium urinary excretion.Serum catecholamines were measured by HPLC analysis. Results:First, RT-PCR analysis showed that KATP mRNA is expressed in liverwith cirrhosis and intense fibrosis, but not with moderate fibrosis.Second, RT-PCR analysis revealed that KATP mRNA was detectedonly in aorta dissected from rats with cirrhosis. Finally, an enhancedreabsorption of sodium without renal failure suggests a potentialmediator would increase the activity of the sympathetic system.Conclusion: These results suggest that KATP mRNA is expressed incirrhotic rats with sympathetic activation and renal dysfunction. Thischannel might be involved in another route where the vascular tonecan be modulated in cirrhosis.

  9. Midazolam more effectively suppresses sympathetic activations and reduces stress feelings during mental arithmetic task than propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugayasu, Rie; Handa, Toshiyuki; Kaneko, Yuzuru; Ichinohe, Tatsuya

    2010-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of intravenous midazolam and propofol sedation on autonomic nervous activities during psychological stress, and whether these results are associated with changes in subjective stress feelings. Seven healthy male volunteers were included in a randomized crossover manner. The heart rate (HR), HR variability, arterial oxygen saturation, and bispectral index value were continuously monitored. A mental arithmetic task for 7 minutes was given with or without intravenous sedation with midazolam or propofol. A bispectral index value of 75 to 85 and an Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation score of 4 were the targeted sedation level in both groups. HR variability was assessed using the power spectral analysis (low-frequency [LF] and high-frequency [HF] components and LF/HF ratio). The faces anxiety scale was used to grade their stress feelings after each mental arithmetic task. During the mental arithmetic task with intravenous sedation, no differences were found in the bispectral index values, arterial oxygen saturation, or the results of the mental arithmetic task between the 2 groups. The HR, LF/HF ratio, and normalized unit LF increased, and the normalized unit HF decreased in both groups. However, the percentage of changes in LF/HF ratio, normalized unit LF, and normalized unit HF were smaller in the midazolam group. In addition, the reduction in faces anxiety scale was greater in the midazolam group. These results suggest that midazolam more effectively suppresses sympathetic nervous activation and reduces subjective stress feelings during a mental arithmetic task than propofol. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Turo (Qi Dance Training Attenuates Psychological Symptoms and Sympathetic Activation Induced by Mental Stress in Healthy Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa-Jin Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vagal withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity accompany various types of stress. Qi training is reported to reduce sympathetic hyper-reactivity in a stressful situation. Turo, which is a type of dance that uses the Meridian Qi System, may reduce the psychological symptoms induced by an imbalance of the autonomic nervous system (ANS. We observed whether Turo training alters psychopathological and psychological symptoms using the Symptom Checklist 90-Revision (SCL-90-R and examined whether it attenuates the stress response to mental stress in healthy adolescent females using the power spectrum analysis of heart rate variability (HRV. Twenty-one subjects received Turo training and 27 subjects were trained with mimicking movements. The SCL-90-R was measured before and after the 2-month training period. Heart rate (HR, total power (TP and the LF/HF ratio of HRV were compared between the Turo and control groups during and after mental stress. The somatization and hostility subscales of the SCL-90-R of the Turo group were significantly lower than those of the control group after 2 months. The increases in HR and the LF/HF ratio of HRV induced by the stress test were significantly lower in the Turo group than in the control group. The TP of the Turo group was significantly higher than that of the control group. The psychological symptoms and sympathetic activation induced by the artificial stress were significantly reduced by the Turo training. These findings suggest that Turo training can play a critical role in attenuating psychological symptoms and stress-induced sympathetic activation.

  11. Turo (qi dance) training attenuates psychological symptoms and sympathetic activation induced by mental stress in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa-Jin; Chae, Younbyoung; Park, Hi-Joon; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; An, Kyungeh; Lee, Hyejung

    2009-09-01

    Vagal withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity accompany various types of stress. Qi training is reported to reduce sympathetic hyper-reactivity in a stressful situation. Turo, which is a type of dance that uses the Meridian Qi System, may reduce the psychological symptoms induced by an imbalance of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). We observed whether Turo training alters psychopathological and psychological symptoms using the Symptom Checklist 90-Revision (SCL-90-R) and examined whether it attenuates the stress response to mental stress in healthy adolescent females using the power spectrum analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Twenty-one subjects received Turo training and 27 subjects were trained with mimicking movements. The SCL-90-R was measured before and after the 2-month training period. Heart rate (HR), total power (TP) and the LF/HF ratio of HRV were compared between the Turo and control groups during and after mental stress. The somatization and hostility subscales of the SCL-90-R of the Turo group were significantly lower than those of the control group after 2 months. The increases in HR and the LF/HF ratio of HRV induced by the stress test were significantly lower in the Turo group than in the control group. The TP of the Turo group was significantly higher than that of the control group. The psychological symptoms and sympathetic activation induced by the artificial stress were significantly reduced by the Turo training. These findings suggest that Turo training can play a critical role in attenuating psychological symptoms and stress-induced sympathetic activation.

  12. Standardization of I-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine myocardial sympathetic activity imaging: phantom calibration and clinical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Verschure, Derk O.; Okuda, Koichi; Verberne, Hein J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Myocardial sympathetic imaging with I-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (I-123-mIBG) has gained clinical momentum. Although the need for standardization of I-123-mIBG myocardial uptake has been recognized, the availability of practical clinical standardization approaches is limited. The need for

  13. Cardiac sympathetic activity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, Derk O.; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L. F.; Somsen, G. Aernout; Verberne, Hein J.

    2015-01-01

    (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-mIBG) scintigraphy has been established as an important technique to evaluate cardiac sympathetic function and it has been shown to be of clinical value, especially for the assessment of prognosis, in many cardiac diseases. The majority of (123)I-mIBG

  14. Normal sympathetic nervous system response in reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuerola, María de Lourdes; Levin, Gloria; Bertotti, Alicia; Ferreiro, Jorge; Barontini, Marta

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated sympathetic nervous system activity by sympathetic skin response (SSR) recording and we further investigated sympathetic and opioid outflow indirectly in patients with features of reflex sympathetic dystrophy by measuring concentrations of plasma catecholamines (CAs) and their metabolites and plasma metenkephalin (ME), before and after corticoid treatment. Six patients were studied. Basal SSR latencies, morphologies and amplitudes were normal in five patients. In one woman, latency and amplitude were also normal but the morphology was disturbed. Basal plasma ME, CA and metabolite levels were similar in the affected and non-affected limbs and a significant increase in plasma ME concentrations was observed in both affected and non-affected limbs after two weeks of steroid treatment. Altogether these results point to an adaptive supersensitivity rather than a sympathetic hyperactivity in this syndrome; also, they indicate that the therapeutic effect of steroids adds, to their known anti-inflammatory action, a stimulatory action on the endogenous opioid system.

  15. Nerve Growth Factor Activation of the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway Is Modulated by Ca2+ and Calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Joaquim; Espinet, Carme; Soler, Rosa M.; Peiró, Sandra; Rocamora, Nativitat; Comella, Joan X.

    2000-01-01

    Nerve growth factor is a member of the neurotrophin family of trophic factors that have been reported to be essential for the survival and development of sympathetic neurons and a subset of sensory neurons. Nerve growth factor exerts its effects mainly by interaction with the specific receptor TrkA, which leads to the activation of several intracellular signaling pathways. Once activated, TrkA also allows for a rapid and moderate increase in intracellular calcium levels, which would contribute to the effects triggered by nerve growth factor in neurons. In this report, we analyzed the relationship of calcium to the activation of the Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway in PC12 cells. We observed that calcium and calmodulin are both necessary for the acute activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases after TrkA stimulation. We analyzed the elements of the pathway that lead to this activation, and we observed that calmodulin antagonists completely block the initial Raf-1 activation without affecting the function of upstream elements, such as Ras, Grb2, Shc, and Trk. We have broadened our study to other stimuli that activate extracellular signal-regulated kinases through tyrosine kinase receptors, and we have observed that calmodulin also modulates the activation of such kinases after epidermal growth factor receptor stimulation in PC12 cells and after TrkB stimulation in cultured chicken embryo motoneurons. Calmodulin seems to regulate the full activation of Raf-1 after Ras activation, since functional Ras is necessary for Raf-1 activation after nerve growth factor stimulation and calmodulin-Sepharose is able to precipitate Raf-1 in a calcium-dependent manner. PMID:10688641

  16. Sympathetic activity of S-(+-ketamine low doses in the epidural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Mihaljevic

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: S-(+-ketamine is an intravenous anaesthetic and sympathomimetic with properties of local anaesthetic. It has an effect of an analgetic and local anaesthetic when administered epidurally, but there are no data whether low doses of S-(+-ketamine have sympathomimetic effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether low doses of S-(+-ketamine, given epidurally together with local anaesthetic, have any effect on sympathetic nervous system, both systemic and below the level of anaesthetic block. METHODS: The study was conducted on two groups of patients to whom epidural anaesthesia was administered to. Local anaesthesia (0.5% bupivacaine was given to one group (control group while local anaesthesia and S-(+-ketamine were given to other group. Age, height, weight, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure were measured. Non-competitive enzyme immunochemistry method (Cat Combi ELISA was used to determine the concentrations of catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline. Immunoenzymometric determination with luminescent substrate on a machine called Vitros Eci was used to determine the concentration of cortisol. Pulse transit time was measured using photoplethysmography. Mann-Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon test and Friedman ANOVA were the statistical tests. Blood pressure, pulse, adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol concentrations were measured in order to estimate systemic sympathetic effects. RESULTS: 40 patients in the control group were given 0.5% bupivacaine and 40 patients in the test group were given 0.5% bupivacaine with S-(+-ketamine. Value p < 0.05 has been taken as a limit of statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: Low dose of S-(+-ketamine administered epidurally had no sympathomimetic effects; it did not change blood pressure, pulse, serum hormones or pulse transit time. Low dose of S-(+-ketamine administered epidurally did not deepen sympathetic block. Adding 25 mg of S-(+-ketamine to 0

  17. Sensorimotor peripheral nerve function and physical activity in older men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange-Maia, B. S.; Cauley, J A; Newman, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether sensorimotor peripheral nerve (PN) function was associated with physical activity (PA) in older men. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study Pittsburgh, PA, site (n = 328, age 78.8 ± 4.7 years) conducted PN testing, including: peroneal motor and sural sensory nerve conduction...... (latencies, amplitudes: CMAP and SNAP for motor and sensory amplitude, respectively), 1.4g/10g monoflament (dorsum of the great toe), and neuropathy symptoms. ANOVA and multivariate linear regression modeled PN associations with PA (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly [PASE] and SenseWear Armband). After...

  18. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system mediates hypophagic and anxiety-like effects of CB₁ receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellocchio, Luigi; Soria-Gómez, Edgar; Quarta, Carmelo; Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Cardinal, Pierre; Binder, Elke; Cannich, Astrid; Delamarre, Anna; Häring, Martin; Martín-Fontecha, Mar; Vega, David; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Bartsch, Dusan; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat; Chaouloff, Francis; Pagotto, Uberto; Guzman, Manuel; Cota, Daniela; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2013-03-19

    Complex interactions between periphery and the brain regulate food intake in mammals. Cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor antagonists are potent hypophagic agents, but the sites where this acute action is exerted and the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. To dissect the mechanisms underlying the hypophagic effect of CB1 receptor blockade, we combined the acute injection of the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant with the use of conditional CB1-knockout mice, as well as with pharmacological modulation of different central and peripheral circuits. Fasting/refeeding experiments revealed that CB1 receptor signaling in many specific brain neurons is dispensable for the acute hypophagic effects of rimonabant. CB1 receptor antagonist-induced hypophagia was fully abolished by peripheral blockade of β-adrenergic transmission, suggesting that this effect is mediated by increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Consistently, we found that rimonabant increases gastrointestinal metabolism via increased peripheral β-adrenergic receptor signaling in peripheral organs, including the gastrointestinal tract. Blockade of both visceral afferents and glutamatergic transmission in the nucleus tractus solitarii abolished rimonabant-induced hypophagia. Importantly, these mechanisms were specifically triggered by lipid-deprivation, revealing a nutrient-specific component acutely regulated by CB1 receptor blockade. Finally, peripheral blockade of sympathetic neurotransmission also blunted central effects of CB1 receptor blockade, such as fear responses and anxiety-like behaviors. These data demonstrate that, independently of their site of origin, important effects of CB1 receptor blockade are expressed via activation of peripheral sympathetic activity. Thus, CB1 receptors modulate bidirectional circuits between the periphery and the brain to regulate feeding and other behaviors.

  19. Peripheral nerve injury induces glial activation in primary motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Troncoso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary evidence suggests that peripheral facial nerve injuries are associated with sensorimotor cortex reorganization. We have characterized facial nerve lesion-induced structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with glial cell density using a rodent facial paralysis model. First, we used adult transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in pyramidal neurons which were subjected to either unilateral lesion of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1. It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Pyramidal cells’ dendritic arborization underwent overall shrinkage and transient spine pruning. Moreover, microglial cell density surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons was significantly increased with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. Additionally, we induced facial nerve lesion in Wistar rats to evaluate the degree and extension of facial nerve lesion-induced reorganization processes in central nervous system using neuronal and glial markers. Immunoreactivity to NeuN (neuronal nuclei antigen, GAP-43 (growth-associated protein 43, GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein, and Iba 1 (Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 were evaluated 1, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 35 days after either unilateral facial nerve lesion or sham surgery. Patches of decreased NeuN immunoreactivity were found bilaterally in vM1 as well as in primary somatosensory cortex (CxS1. Significantly increased GAP-43 immunoreactivity was found bilaterally after the lesion in hippocampus, striatum, and sensorimotor cortex. One day after lesion GFAP immunoreactivity increased bilaterally in hippocampus, subcortical white

  20. [ Sudeck's bone atrophy (reflex sympathetic dystrophy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasufumi

    2008-07-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a disease clinically characterized severe pain, allodynia (severe pain caused by a touch) and over-reaction of pain sensation after a minor injury. In 1994, reflex sympathetic dystrophy was given a name of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 by a international congress, because local blockade of the sympathetic nerve has not been found to be invariably effective. Treatment system for reflex sympathetic dystrophy is composed of medicament therapy including oral administration and/or injection of drug, physical therapy such as thermotherapy and gently passive movement, surgical treatment and psychotherapy. Treatment with injection of pamidronate for 23 patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy revealed to reduced the grade of pain to two third compared to pre-treatment period, and local intravenous block with local anesthetic drug and steroid hormone disappeared the almost symptoms in cases of early phase.

  1. Acute inhibition of glial cells in the NTS does not affect respiratory and sympathetic activities in rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Kauê M; Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H

    2013-02-16

    Recent studies suggest that neuron-glia interactions are involved in multiple aspects of neuronal activity regulation. In the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neuron-glia interactions are thought to participate in the integration of autonomic responses to physiological challenges. However, it remains to be shown whether NTS glial cells might influence breathing and cardiovascular control, and also if they could be integral to the autonomic and respiratory responses to hypoxic challenges. Here, we investigated whether NTS glia play a tonic role in the modulation of central respiratory and sympathetic activities as well as in the changes in respiratory-sympathetic coupling induced by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a model of central autonomic and respiratory plasticity. We show that bilateral microinjections of fluorocitrate (FCt), a glial cell inhibitor, into the caudal and intermediate subnuclei of the NTS did not alter baseline respiratory and sympathetic parameters in in situ preparations of juvenile rats. Similar results were observed in rats previously exposed to CIH. Likewise, CIH-induced changes in respiratory-sympathetic coupling were unaffected by FCt-mediated inhibition. However, microinjection of FCt into the ventral medulla produced changes in respiratory frequency. Our results show that acute glial inhibition in the NTS does not affect baseline respiratory and sympathetic control. Additionally, we conclude that NTS glial cells may not be necessary for the continuous manifestation of sympathetic and respiratory adaptations to CIH. Our work provides evidence that neuron-glia interactions in the NTS do not participate in baseline respiratory and sympathetic control. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. (In)activity-related neuroplasticity in brainstem control of sympathetic outflow: unraveling underlying molecular, cellular, and anatomical mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischel, Nicholas A.; Subramanian, Madhan; Dombrowski, Maryetta D.; Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J.

    2015-01-01

    More people die as a result of physical inactivity than any other preventable risk factor including smoking, high cholesterol, and obesity. Cardiovascular disease, the number one cause of death in the United States, tops the list of inactivity-related diseases. Nevertheless, the vast majority of Americans continue to make lifestyle choices that are creating a rapidly growing burden of epidemic size and impact on the United States healthcare system. It is imperative that we improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which physical inactivity increases the incidence of cardiovascular disease and how exercise can prevent or rescue the inactivity phenotype. The current review summarizes research on changes in the brain that contribute to inactivity-related cardiovascular disease. Specifically, we focus on changes in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a critical brain region for basal and reflex control of sympathetic activity. The RVLM is implicated in elevated sympathetic outflow associated with several cardiovascular diseases including hypertension and heart failure. We hypothesize that changes in the RVLM contribute to chronic cardiovascular disease related to physical inactivity. Data obtained from our translational rodent models of chronic, voluntary exercise and inactivity suggest that functional, anatomical, and molecular neuroplasticity enhances glutamatergic neurotransmission in the RVLM of sedentary animals. Collectively, the evidence presented here suggests that changes in the RVLM resulting from sedentary conditions are deleterious and contribute to cardiovascular diseases that have an increased prevalence in sedentary individuals. The mechanisms by which these changes occur over time and their impact are important areas for future study. PMID:25957223

  3. Sympathetic block by metal clips may be a reversible operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lars L; Mikkelsen, Rasmus T; Derejko, Miroslawa

    2014-01-01

    the sympathetic chain vary tremendously. Most surgeons transect or resect the sympathetic chain, but application of a metal clip that blocks transmission of nerve impulses in the sympathetic chain is used increasingly worldwide. This approach offers potential reversibility if patients regret surgery......, but the question of reversibility remains controversial. Two recent experimental studies found severe histological signs of nerve damage 4-6 weeks after clip removal, but they only used conventional histopathological staining methods. METHODS: Thoracoscopic clipping of the sympathetic trunk was performed in adult...... sheep, and the clip was removed thoracoscopically after 7 days. Following another 4 weeks (n = 6) or 12 weeks (n = 3), the sympathetic trunks were harvested and analysed by conventional and specific nerve tissue immunohistochemical stains (S100, neurofilament protein and synaptophysin...

  4. Sympathetic Overactivity in Chronic Kidney Disease: Consequences and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep Kaur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing worldwide, with more than 26 million people suffering from CKD in the United States alone. More patients with CKD die of cardiovascular complications than progress to dialysis. Over 80% of CKD patients have hypertension, which is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Another common, perhaps underappreciated, feature of CKD is an overactive sympathetic nervous system. This elevation in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA not only contributes to hypertension but also plays a detrimental role in the progression of CKD independent of any increase in blood pressure. Indeed, high SNA is associated with poor prognosis and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality independent of its effect on blood pressure. This brief review will discuss some of the consequences of sympathetic overactivity and highlight some of the potential pathways contributing to chronically elevated SNA in CKD. Mechanisms leading to chronic sympathoexcitation in CKD are complex, multifactorial and to date, not completely understood. Identification of the mechanisms and/or signals leading to sympathetic overactivity in CKD are crucial for development of effective therapeutic targets to reduce the increased cardiovascular risk in this patient group.

  5. A comparative study of changes operated by sympathetic nervous system activation on spindle afferent discharge and on tonic vibration reflex in rabbit jaw muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passatore, M; Deriu, F; Grassi, C; Roatta, S

    1996-03-07

    The effect of sympathetic activation on the spindle afferent response to vibratory stimuli eliciting the tonic vibration reflex in jaw closing muscles was studied in precollicularly decerebrate rabbits. Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk, at frequencies within the physiologic range, consistently induced a decrease in spindle response to muscle vibration, which was often preceded by a transient enhancement. Spindle discharge was usually correlated with the EMG activity in the masseter muscle and the tension reflexly developed by jaw muscles. The changes in spindle response to vibration were superimposed on variations of the basal discharge which exhibited different patterns in the studied units, increases in the firing rate being more frequently observed. These effects were mimicked by close arterial injection of the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Data presented here suggest that sympathetically-induced modifications of the tonic vibration reflex are due to changes exerted on muscle spindle afferent information.

  6. The human sympathetic nervous system: its relevance in hypertension and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Esler, Murray

    2012-05-01

    Evidence assembled in this review indicates that sympathetic nervous system dysfunction is crucial in the development of heart failure and essential hypertension. This takes the form of persistent and adverse activation of sympathetic outflows to the heart and kidneys in both conditions. An important goal for clinical scientists is translation of the knowledge of pathophysiology, such as this, into better treatment for patients. The achievement of this 'mechanisms to management' transition is at different stages of development with regard to the two disorders. Clinical translation is mature in cardiac failure, knowledge of cardiac neural pathophysiology having led to the introduction of beta-adrenergic blockers, an effective therapy. With essential hypertension perhaps we are on the cusp of effective translation, with recent successful testing of selective catheter-based renal sympathetic nerve ablation in patients with resistant hypertension, an intervention firmly based on the demonstration of activation of the renal sympathetic outflow. Additional evidence in this regard is provided by the results of pilot studies exploring the possibility to reduce blood pressure in resistant hypertensives through electrical stimulation of the area of carotid baroreceptors. Despite the general importance of the sympathetic nervous system in blood pressure regulation, and the specific demonstration that the blood pressure elevation in essential hypertension is commonly initiated and sustained by sympathetic nervous activation, drugs antagonizing this system are currently underutilized in the care of patients with hypertension. Use of beta-adrenergic blocking drugs is waning, given the propensity of this drug class to have adverse metabolic effects, including predisposition to diabetes development. The blood pressure lowering achieved with carotid baroreceptor stimulation and with the renal denervation device affirms the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in

  7. Sympathetic activity induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal is blocked in genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-02-15

    There is large body evidence indicating that stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the exact brain areas and the mechanisms involved remain to be revealed. Here, we performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the stress response induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. The experiments were performed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) ventrolateral medulla (VLM), brain regions involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, and in the right ventricle by using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1R levels (KO). Mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine and withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone administration. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, c-Fos, expression, PKA and TH phosphorylated at serine 40, was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Morphine withdrawal induced an enhancement of NA turnover in PVN in parallel with an increase in TH neurons expressing c-Fos in VLM in wild-type mice. In addition we have demonstrated an increase in NA turnover, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA levels in heart. The main finding of the present study was that NA turnover, TH positive neurons that express c-Fos, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA expression observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in CRF1R KO mice. Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1R activation may contribute to the adaptive changes induced by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in the heart and in the brain areas which modulate the cardiac sympathetic function and suggest that CRF/CRF1R pathways could be contributing to cardiovascular disease associated to opioid addiction. - Highlights: • Naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal increases sympathetic activity in the PVN and heart. • Co-localization of TH phosphorylated at serine 40/c-Fos in the VLM after morphine withdrawal • Naloxone

  8. Sympathetic activity induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal is blocked in genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    There is large body evidence indicating that stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the exact brain areas and the mechanisms involved remain to be revealed. Here, we performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the stress response induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. The experiments were performed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) ventrolateral medulla (VLM), brain regions involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, and in the right ventricle by using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1R levels (KO). Mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine and withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone administration. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, c-Fos, expression, PKA and TH phosphorylated at serine 40, was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Morphine withdrawal induced an enhancement of NA turnover in PVN in parallel with an increase in TH neurons expressing c-Fos in VLM in wild-type mice. In addition we have demonstrated an increase in NA turnover, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA levels in heart. The main finding of the present study was that NA turnover, TH positive neurons that express c-Fos, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA expression observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in CRF1R KO mice. Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1R activation may contribute to the adaptive changes induced by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in the heart and in the brain areas which modulate the cardiac sympathetic function and suggest that CRF/CRF1R pathways could be contributing to cardiovascular disease associated to opioid addiction. - Highlights: • Naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal increases sympathetic activity in the PVN and heart. • Co-localization of TH phosphorylated at serine 40/c-Fos in the VLM after morphine withdrawal • Naloxone

  9. Sympathetic Prions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Glatzel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are a group of invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases. The infectious agent is termed prion and is thought to be composed of a modified protein (PrPSc or PrPRES, a protease-resistant conformer of the normal host-encoded membrane glycoprotein, PrPC[1]. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy, scrapie of sheep, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are among the most notable transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Prions are most efficiently propagated trough intracerebral inoculation, yet the entry point of the infectious agent is often through peripheral sites like the gastrointestinal tract[2,3]. The process by which prions invade the brain is termed neuroinvasion[4]. We and others have speculated that, depending on the amount of infectious agent injected, the injection site, and the strain of prions employed, neuroinvasion can occur either directly via peripheral nerves or first through the lymphoreticular system and then via peripheral nerves[5].

  10. REFRACTORY HYPERTENSION: EVIDENCE OF HEIGHTENED SYMPATHETIC ACTIVITY AS A CAUSE OF ANTIHYPERTENSIVE TREATMENT FAILURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudenbostel, Tanja; Acelajado, Maria C.; Pisoni, Roberto; Li, Peng; Oparil, Suzanne; Calhoun, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Refractory hypertension is an extreme phenotype of treatment failure defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) in spite of ≥5 classes of antihypertensive agents, including chlorthalidone and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. A prospective evaluation of possible mechanisms of refractory hypertension has not been done. The goal of this study was to test for evidence of heightened sympathetic tone as indicated by 24-hr urinary (U-) normetanephrine levels, clinic and ambulatory heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV), arterial stiffness as indexed by pulse wave velocity (PWV), and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) compared to patients with controlled resistant hypertension. Forty-four consecutive patients, 15 with refractory and 29 with controlled resistant hypertension, were evaluated prospectively. Refractory hypertensive patients were younger (48±13.3 vs. 56.5±14.1 years, p=0.038) and more likely female (80.0 vs 51.9 %, p=0.047) compared to patients with controlled resistant hypertension. They also had higher U-normetanephrine levels (464.4±250.2 vs. 309.8±147.6 μg/24h, p=0.03), higher clinic HR (77.8±7.7 vs. 68.8±7.6 bpm, p=0.001) and 24-hr ambulatory HR (77.8±7.7 vs 68.8±7.6, p=0.0018), higher PWV (11.8±2.2 vs. 9.4±1.5 m/s, p=0.009), reduced HRV (4.48 vs. 6.11, p=0.03), and higher SVR (3795±1753 vs. 2382±349 dyne·sec·cm5·m2, p=0.008). These findings are consistent with heightened sympathetic tone being a major contributor to antihypertensive treatment failure and highlight the need for effective sympatholytic therapies in patients with refractory hypertension. PMID:25987662

  11. Imbalance between sympathetic and sensory innervation in peritoneal endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Julia; Barcena de Arellano, Maria L; Rüster, Carola; Vercellino, Giuseppe F; Chiantera, Vito; Schneider, Achim; Mechsner, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    To investigate possible mechanisms of pain pathophysiology in patients with peritoneal endometriosis, a clinical study on sensory and sympathetic nerve fibre sprouting in endometriosis was performed. Peritoneal lesions (n=40) and healthy peritoneum (n=12) were immunostained and analysed with anti-protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), anti-substance P (SP) and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), specific markers for intact nerve fibres, sensory nerve fibres and sympathetic nerve fibres, respectively, to identify the ratio of sympathetic and sensory nerve fibres. In addition, immune cell infiltrates in peritoneal endometriotic lesions were analysed and the nerve growth factor (NGF) and interleukin (IL)-1β expression was correlate with the nerve fibre density. Peritoneal fluids from patients with endometriosis (n=40) and without endometriosis (n=20) were used for the in vitro neuronal growth assay. Cultured chicken dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and sympathetic ganglia were stained with anti-growth associated protein 43 (anti-GAP 43), anti-SP and anti-TH. We could detect an increased sensory and decreased sympathetic nerve fibres density in peritoneal lesions compared to healthy peritoneum. Peritoneal fluids of patients with endometriosis compared to patients without endometriosis induced an increased sprouting of sensory neurites from DRG and decreased neurite outgrowth from sympathetic ganglia. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an imbalance between sympathetic and sensory nerve fibres in peritoneal endometriosis, as well as an altered modulation of peritoneal fluids from patients with endometriosis on sympathetic and sensory innervation which might directly be involved in the maintenance of inflammation and pain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Electric sympathetic block: a review of electrotherapy physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R G

    1991-01-01

    Electric sympathetic block is the procedure whereby blockage of the sympathetic nerve fiber is achieved by applying controlled electrical pulses via electrodes placed on the skin. An electric block of the sympathetic fiber can occur with a direct monophasic current to achieve an anodal block, a middle-frequency or Endosan current to effect sustained depolarization, or an interferential current to achieve a fatiguing effect. The physics and theoretical framework underlying the currents used in this procedure will be reviewed.

  13. Sympathetic and sensory innervation of small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells in rat superior cervical ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Fumiya; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Kusakabe, Tatsumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    The sympathetic ganglion contains small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells derived from the neural crest. We morphologically characterize SIF cells and focus on their relationship with ganglionic cells, preganglionic nerve fibers and sensory nerve endings. SIF cells stained intensely for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), with a few cells also being immunoreactive for dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH). Vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)-immunoreactive puncta were distributed around some clusters of SIF cells, whereas some SIF cells closely abutted DBH-immunoreactive ganglionic cells. SIF cells contained bassoon-immunoreactive products beneath the cell membrane at the attachments and on opposite sites to the ganglionic cells. Ganglion neurons and SIF cells were immunoreactive to dopamine D2 receptors. Immunohistochemistry for P2X3 revealed ramified nerve endings with P2X3 immunoreactivity around SIF cells. Triple-labeling for P2X3, TH and VAChT allowed the classification of SIF cells into three types based on their innervation: (1) with only VAChT-immunoreactive puncta, (2) with only P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings, (3) with both P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings and VAChT-immunoreactive puncta. The results of retrograde tracing with fast blue dye indicated that most of these nerve endings originated from the petrosal ganglion. Thus, SIF cells in the superior cervical ganglion are innervated by preganglionic fibers and glossopharyngeal sensory nerve endings and can be classified into three types. SIF cells might modulate sympathetic activity in the superior cervical ganglion.

  14. Role of the Sympathetic Nervous System and Its Modulation in Renal Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Sata

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The kidneys are densely innervated with renal efferent and afferent nerves to communicate with the central nervous system. Innervation of major structural components of the kidneys, such as blood vessels, tubules, the pelvis, and glomeruli, forms a bidirectional neural network to relay sensory and sympathetic signals to and from the brain. Renal efferent nerves regulate renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, tubular reabsorption of sodium and water, as well as release of renin and prostaglandins, all of which contribute to cardiovascular and renal regulation. Renal afferent nerves complete the feedback loop via central autonomic nuclei where the signals are integrated and modulate central sympathetic outflow; thus both types of nerves form integral parts of the self-regulated renorenal reflex loop. Renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA is commonly increased in pathophysiological conditions such as hypertension and chronic- and end-stage renal disease. Increased RSNA raises blood pressure and can contribute to the deterioration of renal function. Attempts have been made to eliminate or interfere with this important link between the brain and the kidneys as a neuromodulatory treatment for these conditions. Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation has been successfully applied in patients with resistant hypertension and was associated with significant falls in blood pressure and renal protection in most studies performed. The focus of this review is the neural contribution to the control of renal and cardiovascular hemodynamics and renal function in the setting of hypertension and chronic kidney disease, as well as the specific roles of renal efferent and afferent nerves in this scenario and their utility as a therapeutic target.

  15. Modulation of the sympathetic nerve action on carbohydrate and ketone body metabolism by fatty acids, glucagon und insulin in perfused rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Küster, J.; Beuers, U.; JUNGERMANN, K.

    1989-01-01

    Rat liver was perfused in situ via the portal vein without recirculation: 1) Nerve stimulation (20 Hz, 2 ms, 20 V) increased glucose output and shifted lactate uptake to output; the alterations were diminished by oleate but not octanoate. 2) Glucagon (1nM) stimulated glucose output maximally also in

  16. Macrophage depletion suppresses sympathetic hyperinnervation following myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wernli, G.; Hasan, W.; Bhattacherjee, A.; Rooijen, van N.; Smith, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Myocardial infarction induces sympathetic axon sprouting adjacent to the necrotic region, and this has been implicated in the etiology of arrhythmias resulting in sudden cardiac death. Previous studies show that nerve growth factor (NGF) is essential for enhanced post-infarct sympathetic sprouting,

  17. Psychobiology of PTSD in the acute aftermath of trauma: Integrating research on coping, HPA function and sympathetic nervous system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Matthew C; Rao, Uma

    2013-02-01

    Research on the psychobiological sequelae of trauma has typically focused on long-term alterations in individuals with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Far less is known about the nature and course of psychobiological risk factors for PTSD during the acute aftermath of trauma. In this review, we summarize data from prospective studies focusing on the relationships among sympathetic nervous system activity, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function, coping strategies and PTSD symptoms during the early recovery (or non-recovery) phase. Findings from pertinent studies are integrated to inform psychobiological profiles of PTSD-risk in children and adults in the context of existing models of PTSD-onset and maintenance. Data regarding bidirectional relations between coping strategies and stress hormones is reviewed. Limitations of existing literature and recommendations for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Activation of ATP/UTP-selective receptors increases blood flow and blunts sympathetic vasoconstriction in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yegutkin, G.G.; Gonzalez-Alonso, J.; Rosenmeier, Jaya Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstriction is blunted in the vascular beds of contracting skeletal muscle in humans, presumably due to the action of vasoactive metabolites (functional sympatholysis). Recently, we demonstrated that infusion of ATP into the arterial circulation of the resting human leg increases....../UTP-selective receptors. To this aim, we first measured leg blood flow (LBF), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output , leg arterial-venous (a-v) O(2) difference, plasma ATP and soluble nucleotidase activities during intrafemoral artery infusion of adenosine, AMP, ADP, ATP or UTP in nine healthy males. Comparison...... of the doses of nucleotides and adenosine required for a similar increase in LBF from approximately 0.5 l min(-1) at baseline to approximately 3.5 l min(-1) (without altering MAP but increasing Q significantly) revealed the following rank order of vasoactive potency: ATP (100) = UTP (100) >> adenosine (5...

  19. Sympathetic Activity, Assessed by Power Spectral Analysis of Heart Rate Variability, in White-Coat, Masked and Sustained Hypertension Versus True Normotension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fagard, R.H.; Stolarz, K.; Kuznetsova, T.; Seidlerová, J.; Tikhonoff, V.; Grodzicki, T.; Nikitin, Y.; Filipovský, J.; Peleška, Jan; Casiglia, E.; Thijs, L.; Staessen, J.A.; Kawecka-Jaszcz, K.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 11 (2007), s. 2280-2285 ISSN 0263-6352 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : heart rate variability * masked hypertension * power spectral analysis * sympathetic activity * white-coat hypertension Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 4.364, year: 2007

  20. The assessment of sympathetic activity using iPPG based inter-limb coherence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoy, Maria O.; Rogatina, Kristina V.; Stiukhina, Elena S.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2017-04-01

    Photoplethysmography is an optical technique that can be used to detect blood volume changes and to measure important physiological parameters. This is low cost and non-invasive technique. However, one has to apply sensor directly to the skin. In this regard, the development on remote mothods receives the growing attention, such as imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG). Note, most of public-available iPPG systems are based on smartphone-embedded cameras, and thus have a sample frequency about 30-60 frames per second, which is enough for heart rate measurements, but may be too low for some more advanced usages of this technique. In our work, we describe the attempt to use smartphone-based iPPG technique aimed to measure the tiny mismatch in RR interval data series recorded from left and right arms. We use the transmission mode iPPG, in which the light transmitted through the medium of finger is detected by a web-camera opposite the LED source. The computational scheme by processing and analysis of the received signal was implemented using MATLAB language (MathWork Inc. in the United States). We believe that further development of our approach may lead to fast and low cost method to access the state of the sympathetic nervous system.

  1. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ruth L S

    2003-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy, also known as complex regional pain syndrome type I, is a multisymptom syndrome usually affecting one or more extremities. It is inadequately understood and, therefore, often frustrating to treat. This article presents a case study of a 23-year career nurse who developed reflex sympathetic dystrophy of the left knee. It also reviews the rationale for reflex sympathetic dystrophy, treatment, and life-care planning for a patient with reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

  2. Activation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and sympathetic nervous system in women with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Galiano-Castillo, Noelia; Valverde-Herreros, Lis; Martínez-Martín, Javier; Pareja, Juan A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the differences in salivary cortisol (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical [HPA] axis), α-amylase activity (sympathetic nervous system [SNS]), and immunoglobulin A (IgA; immune system) concentrations between women with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and healthy women. A cross-sectional study. Activation of HPA, SNS, and immune system in CTS has not been clearly determined. One hundred two women (age: 45 ± 7 years) with electrodiagnostic and clinical diagnosis of CTS and 102 matched healthy women. The intensity of the pain was assessed with a Numerical Pain Rating Scale (0-10), and disability was determined with Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Salivary cortisol concentration, α-amylase activity, salivary flow rate, and IgA concentration were collected from nonstimulated saliva. Women with CTS exhibited lower salivary flow rate (P  0.2) were found between groups as a total. Women with severe CTS exhibited lower salivary flow rate (P < 0.001), higher α-amylase activity (P = 0.002), and higher cortisol concentration (P = 0.03) than healthy women and than those with minimal/moderate CTS (P < 0.05). Within women with CTS, significant positive associations between α-amylase activity and the intensity of pain were found: the highest the level of pain, the higher the α-amylase activity, i.e., higher SNS activation. These results suggest that women with severe CTS exhibit changes in activation in the HPA axis and SNS but not in the humoral immune system. Activation of the SNS was associated with the intensity of pain. Future studies are needed to elucidate the direction of this relationship. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of sympathetic histamine on vasomotor responses of blood vessels in rabbit ear to electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Ying; Lv, Jun; Xue, Xiao-Yan; He, Gong-Hao; Zhou, Ying; Jia, Min; Luo, Xiao-Xing

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the effects of histamine receptor antagonists on vasoconstriction induced by electrical stimulation (ES) on posterior auricular nerve, and to explore the pre- and post-synaptic effects of sympathetic histamine on the vasomotor responses of vascular smooth muscle in rabbit ear. ES was applied to posterior auricular nerves of the whole rabbit ear at 10 Hz, 20 Hz and 40 Hz, respectively. Besides, the whole ear was perfused with different histamine receptor antagonists under constant perfusion pressure, and the changes in the flow rate of perfusate were observed. The flow rate of venous outflow was decreased by ES at all the 3 frequencies. The ES-induced vasoconstriction at 20 Hz and 40 Hz could be partly inhibited by H(1) receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (P functions of sympathetic histamine vary from pre-synaptic modulation to post-synaptic vasoconstriction or vasodilatation, via activation of different histamine receptors.

  4. Age-related weakening of baroreflex-mediated sympathetic activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats in response to blood pressure reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, P; Santa, T; Fukushima, T; Homma, H; Kasai, C; Martin, M A; del Castillo, B; Imai, K

    1998-09-01

    Nicardipine, a dihydropyridine type calcium channel blocker, was infused into 4-, 6-, and 23-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats (under sodium thiobutabarbital anesthesia and ventilation, n = 4) through the left femoral vein, resulting in the reduction of blood pressure. In each rat, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and the concentration of plasma catecholamines (CAs), norepinephrine (NE), and epinephrine (E) were concomitantly determined, and the correlations between these three variables were studied. During the infusion of nicardipine, the plasma concentration of CAs was measured with an automatic detection system in blood samples collected from the right femoral artery of each rat. The reduction in blood pressure induced by nicardipine brought about an increase in plasma CA levels. The blood pressure correlated well with the logarithm of plasma NE or E concentration according to the formula Y= -alpha log (X) + m (Y, blood pressure; X, concentration of plasma NE or E; a, slope; and m, intercept). The slopes (as) of 6-wk-old and 23-wk-old SH rats were significantly greater than those of aged-matched WKY rats, meaning that the increment in plasma CAs in response to a decrease in blood pressure was smaller in SH than in WKY rats of similar ages. However, no significant differences were found between the as of 4-wk-old SH and WKY rats. We conclude that the increment in the baroreflex-mediated sympathetic activity in response to a drop in blood pressure induced by nicardipine is similar or greater in prehypertensive SH than in normotensive WKY 4-wk-old rats, while the increment becomes smaller in SH rats with the onset of hypertension (6-wk-old rats), and is much less in fully hypertensive adult (23-wk-old) SH rats than in age-matched WKY rats. On the basis of these findings and previous data obtained by neurography, we conclude that plasma CAs can be used to evaluate baroreflex-mediated sympathetic

  5. Anatomic Variation of Rami Communicantes in the Upper Thoracic Sympathetic Chain: A Human Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Elliot; Ashrafi, Mohammed; Greaves, Nicholas; Gouldsborough, Ingrid; Baguneid, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Hyperhidrosis is secondary to over activation of the sympathetic nervous system and surgical sympathectomy is the treatment of choice when other modalities have failed. This study investigated anatomic variation in the upper thoracic sympathetic chain and associated rami communicantes among cadaveric specimens. It considers the implications of these findings on surgical techniques to treat hyperhidrosis. The upper 4 thoracic sympathetic ganglia, intercostal nerves, and connecting rami were dissected, measured and mapped in 40 sides of 20 adult human cadavers. Ganglia location was recorded. The incidence, orientation, and distance travelled by rami communicantes was compared across different ganglionic levels and between sides. The percentage of ganglia located below their associated intercostal space was 6.25% with stellate ganglions present in 70% of specimens and Kuntz fibers noted in 40%. There was a stepwise reduction in incidence of rami from superior to inferior placed ganglia. The number of rami identified across all levels was significantly greater on the right (P = 0.03). The horizontal distance between the sympathetic chain and union of the rami on the intercostal nerves was significantly greater on the right across all levels (P = 0.04). There was substantial variation in the rami communicantes across the upper 4 ganglia and between right and left sides. Consideration of this variation should be given when planning surgical sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis particularly to avoid symptom recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sympathetic neurotransmitters promote the process of recellularization in decellularized liver matrix via activating the IL-6/Stat3 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xudong; Huan, Hongbo; Wang, Xiaojun; Chen, Xuejiao; Wu, Lili; Zhang, Yujun; Liu, Weihui; Bie, Ping; Xia, Feng

    2016-11-04

    Recellularized liver, as an approach for hepatic tissue engineering, is an effective alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation for end-stage hepatic failure. When compared with normal liver, recellularized liver has a disparity in hepatocyte viability and function, owing to the difficulty of fully simulating the microenvironment of liver. Although the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is considered an important constituent of liver function, few studies have examined the effect of the SNS on hepatic tissue engineering. It is imperative to explore the regulation of the SNS on a tissue-like configuration to obtain an intact recellularized liver with better hepatic function. We have observed that various subtypes of adrenergic receptors (ARs) are expressed on the hepatocyte membrane. Salbutamol, an agonist of β2-AR, promoted cell proliferation, albumin secretion and urea synthesis in the recellularized liver. Cytokines were screened in isoprenaline/salbutamol-treated recellularized liver, and the expression of IL-6 was significantly increased. Isoprenaline or salbutamol especially promoted the expression of Stat 3 and phosphorylated Stat 3, contributing to the activation of IL-6/Stat 3 signalling in promoting hepatocyte proliferation and recellularized liver function. This study suggests that activation of β2-AR accelerated hepatocyte proliferation and improved recellularized liver function by mediating the IL-6/Stat 3 signalling pathway, indicating that nervous system regulation may be an essential component contributing to the complexity of recellularized liver in tissue engineering.

  7. Sympathetic actions on the skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, Silvestro; Farina, Dario

    2010-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) modulates several functions in skeletal muscle fibers, including metabolism, ionic transport across the membrane, and contractility. These actions, together with the sympathetic control of other organ systems, support intense motor activity. However, some SNS actions on skeletal muscles may not always be functionally advantageous. Implications for motor control and sport performance are discussed.

  8. Sympathetic nervous system activity measured by skin conductance quantifies the challenge of walking adaptability tasks after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David J; Chatterjee, Sudeshna A; McGuirk, Theresa E; Porges, Eric C; Fox, Emily J; Balasubramanian, Chitralakshmi K

    2018-02-01

    Walking adaptability tasks are challenging for people with motor impairments. The construct of perceived challenge is typically measured by self-report assessments, which are susceptible to subjective measurement error. The development of an objective physiologically-based measure of challenge may help to improve the ability to assess this important aspect of mobility function. The objective of this study to investigate the use of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity measured by skin conductance to gauge the physiological stress response to challenging walking adaptability tasks in people post-stroke. Thirty adults with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis performed a battery of seventeen walking adaptability tasks. SNS activity was measured by skin conductance from the palmar surface of each hand. The primary outcome variable was the percent change in skin conductance level (ΔSCL) between the baseline resting and walking phases of each task. Task difficulty was measured by performance speed and by physical therapist scoring of performance. Walking function and balance confidence were measured by preferred walking speed and the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, respectively. There was a statistically significant negative association between ΔSCL and task performance speed and between ΔSCL and clinical score, indicating that tasks with greater SNS activity had slower performance speed and poorer clinical scores. ΔSCL was significantly greater for low functioning participants versus high functioning participants, particularly during the most challenging walking adaptability tasks. This study supports the use of SNS activity measured by skin conductance as a valuable approach for objectively quantifying the perceived challenge of walking adaptability tasks in people post-stroke. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. [Mechanism of post-stroke reflex sympathetic dystrophy: study with needle electromyography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Tong; Li, Jing

    2006-10-10

    To explore the mechanism of post-stroke reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) patients electromyographic abnormality and confirm its clinical value. Fifty patients with first-onset stroke, aged 33 - 78, including 30 with RSD and 20 without RSD, underwent needle electromyography (EMG) to test the nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV) of bilateral median nerves, and the number and position of spontaneous EMG activity of bilateral short abductor muscles of thumb and abductor muscles little finger. The median nerve compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude of the affected upper extremities of the RSD group was 8.6 mV +/- 2.9 mV, significantly lower than that of the non-RSD group (13.2 mV +/- 4.6 mV, P < 0.01). The incidence of spontaneous electrical potential of the RSD group was 100%; significantly higher than hat of the non-RSD group (65%, P < 0.001). The quantity of spontaneous EMG activity on the short abductor muscles of thumb and abductor muscles little finger was increased in the RSD group (P < 0.01). The motor nerve conduction velocity and electrophysiological presentation of sensory nerve of these 2 groups were all normal and without significant differences between them. Partial axonal degeneration occurs on the distal motor never fibers of the affected upper extremity of the RSD patients, which may be related to subsequent peripheral nerve injury after central nerve system impairment.

  10. Evaluation of sympathetic activity by 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy in dilated cardiomyopathy patients with sleep breathing disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanjo, Shuji; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Yamashiro, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    Because increased sympathetic nervous activity (SNA) in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) associated with sleep breathing disorder (SBD) is known to deteriorate the prognosis of cardiac failure, 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy was used as the investigative tool in the present study. The study group comprised 53 patients (47 men, 6 women; mean age 56±3 years) with chronic stable DCM. Patients were divided into SBD(+) or SBD(-) group according to 24-h pulse oximetry results. SBD(+) was defined when the 3% oxygen desaturation index was more than 15/h during sleep. In total, 32 patients were SBD(-) and 21 were SBD(+). In both groups, pulse oximetry were performed during sleep and awakening pulse rate, and measurement of the blood levels of catecholamines and B-type natriuretic peptide was performed. MIBG myocardial scintigraphy and echocardiography were performed at the same time. No significant difference was found between the 2 groups in catecholamine levels or left ventricular ejection fraction. However, MIBG had a significantly increased washout rate and a significantly decreased delayed heart to mediastinum ratio in the SBD(+) group compared with the SBD(-) group. SNA is increased in DCM patients when associated with SBD. MIBG myocardial scintigraphy may be a sensitive method of detecting increased SNA. (author)

  11. [Mechanisms of sympathetic activity in rats exposed to different patterns of hypoxia and the correlation with blood pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruoxi; Su, Xiaoli; Xiang, Yonghong; Hu, Chengping; Luo, Yingquan

    2011-10-01

    To observe the effects of two different hypoxia patterns on blood pressure and the underlying mechanisms. Eighteen male SD rats were randomly divided into three groups: the intermittent hypoxia group (IH group), the continuous hypoxia group (CH group) and the normal control group (NC group). The rats of the IH and CH group were subjected to intermittent hypoxia (7 h/d) and continuous hypoxia (7 h/d) for 42 days respectively. The NC group rats were untreated. The levels of arteria caudilis systolic pressure (ACSP) were measured with noninvasive rats arteria caudilis gauge before the experiment, at the end of 3rd, 6th week of the experiment. The concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) in serum and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in plasma were respectively measured by enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay. The contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the ability of inhibiting hydroxyl free radical in serum were analyzed by thiobarbituric acid colorimetric analysis (TBAR) at the end of 6th week. At the end of 3rd week, the levels of ACSP were considerably higher than those before the treatment (P0.05). The levels of NE, NPY and MDA were positively related with ACSP (r=0.873, Phigh blood pressure, which may be related to the sympathetic over-activity and the oxidative stress.

  12. Perceived stress status and sympathetic nervous system activation in young male patients with coronary artery disease in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, You; Bi, Minghui; Xiao, Lin; Chen, Qiaopin; Chen, Wenron; Li, Wensheng; Wu, Yanxian; Hu, Yunzhao; Huang, Yuli

    2015-11-01

    Young Chinese male adults have faced increasing psychological stress. Whether this is associated with the increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in young Chinese males remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the correlation and underlying mechanisms of perceived stress and CAD in young male patients. A total of 178 male patients diagnosed as young CAD (aged ≤ 55 years) by coronary angiography (CAG) were enrolled, and 181 age-matched non-CAD individuals were set as control group. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors and levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine were measured, and perceived stress status was accessed by Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). The PSS score was correlated with levels of epinephrine (r=0.45), norepinephrine (r=0.41), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (r=0.38, pPSS score (OR, 1.81; 95%CI, 1.23-2.66) were independently correlated with CAD in young patients. The association between PSS score and risk of CAD become insignificant (OR, 1.43; 95%CI, 0.96-2.13) when further adjusted for the levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine. After adjustment for multiple cardiovascular risk factors, high perceived stress was an independent risk factor for CAD in young Chinese male patients. Abnormal activation of the sympathetic nervous system may play an important role linking perceived stress with the risk of CAD. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Proteomic Evaluation of Sympathetic Activity Biomarkers of the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis by Western Blotting Technique Following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toklu, Hale Zerrin; Sakarya, Yasemin; Tümer, Nihal

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine disorders and autonomic dysfunction are common paradigms following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis following TBI may result in impaired vasopressor response, energy imbalance, fatigue, depression, or neurological disorders. Autonomic dysfunction is a common disorder following TBI. The sympathetic activity markers on HPA axis can be measured by Western blot protein analysis. Tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine beta hydroxylase are the key enzymes for the synthesis of norepinephrine; and neuropeptide Y (NPY) is the peptide that is co-stored and co-released with norepinephrine. Thus, the present chapter reviews the experimental protocols for Western blot protein analysis for the measurement of biomarkers that indicate sympathetic activity in brain regions (hypothalamus, pituitary, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum) following TBI.

  14. Sympathetic nervous system activation reduces contraction-induced rapid vasodilation in the leg of humans independent of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William E; Kruse, Nicholas T; Casey, Darren P

    2017-07-01

    Contraction-induced rapid vasodilation is attenuated similarly in the upper and lower limbs of older adults. In the forearm, this attenuation is in part due to a greater sympathetic vasoconstriction. We examined whether the age-related reduction in contraction-induced vasodilation in the leg is also due to a sympathetic vasoconstrictive mechanism. Thirteen young (24 ± 1 yr) and twelve older adults (67 ± 1 yr) performed single-leg knee extension at 20 and 40% of work-rate maximum (WR max ) during control and cold-pressor test (CPT) conditions. Femoral artery diameter and blood velocity were measured using Doppler ultrasound. Vascular conductance (VC; ml·min -1 ·mmHg -1 ) was calculated using blood flow (ml/min) and mean arterial pressure (mmHg). Peak (ΔVC from baseline) and total VC were blunted in older adults during control conditions across exercise intensities ( P ROV). Within the forearm, this attenuation is partially due to enhanced sympathetic vasoconstriction. In the current study, we found that sympathetic vasoconstriction reduces contraction-induced ROV within the leg of both young and older adults, with the magnitude of change being similar between age groups. Our current results suggest that age-related attenuations in contraction-induced ROV within the leg are not fully explained by a sympathetic vasoconstrictor mechanism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Sympathetic nervous activity decreases during head-down bed rest but not during microgravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels J; Heer, Martina; Ivanova, Krassimira

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that sympathoadrenal activity in humans is low during spaceflight and that this effect can be simulated by head-down bed rest (HDBR). Platelet norepinephrine and epinephrine were measured as indexes of long-term changes in sympathoadrenal activity. Ten normal healthy...

  16. Kidney Rehabilitation Technology by Improving Blood Flow and Nerve Activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Jamil Hashim

    2016-01-01

    The rehabilitation of kidney is impossible from doctors point of view. Kidney failure happens when nephron in kidney fail to filter blood and water. Two major causes of kidney failure. First is the shrinkage of kidney and the second is the blockage of kidney medulla. Kidney shrinkage is because nephron damage due to long term diabetes (Nephrology expert point of view). Whereas blockage of kidney is due to food consume which in turn build up deposit at the blood duct connecting to the medulla. Experiment specimen own body. The rehabilitation methodology is to build up your blood flow system and nerve activation. Result from the study is through analyzing blood components such as creatinine, hemoglobin, urea and potassium. Conclusion, creatinine value has lowered and kidney shrinkage has normalize to its original size. It is hopeful I regain my health 100 % when my GFR reading achieved below 100. (author)

  17. Sympathetic skin responses in reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolel, K; Hizmetli, S; Akyüz, A

    2006-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the utility of sympathetic skin response (SSR) in evaluating the sympathetic function and to follow up the effects of sympathetic blockade in reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD). Thirty patients having RSD with upper extremity involvement were randomly divided into two groups. Besides medical therapy and exercise, physical therapy agents were applied to both the groups. In addition to this treatment protocol, stellar ganglion blockade was done by diadynamic current in Group II. The normal sides of the patients were used for the control group. SSRs were measured in all the patients before and after the therapy. The amplitude was found to be increased and the latency was found to be decreased in the affected side in both the groups before the therapy. After the therapy, the amplitude was decreased and latency was increased in both the groups. But, the differences in amplitude (P = 0.001) and latency (P = 0.002) before and after the therapy were significantly higher in Group II. (Before the treatment, SSRs were significantly different between the normal and the affected sides in both the groups. The observed change in SSRs after the treatment was higher in Group II.) It was concluded that, SSR can be a useful and noninvasive method in diagnosing the sympathetic dysfunction in RSD and can be used for evaluating the response to sympathetic blockade and other treatment modalities.

  18. Magnitude of Morning Surge in Blood Pressure Is Associated with Sympathetic but Not Cardiac Baroreflex Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aaron W; Hissen, Sarah L; Macefield, Vaughan G; Brown, Rachael; Taylor, Chloe E

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the arterial baroreflex to regulate blood pressure may influence the magnitude of the morning surge in blood pressure (MSBP). The aim was to investigate the relationships between sympathetic and cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and the morning surge. Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure was recorded in 14 young individuals. The morning surge was defined via the pre-awakening method, which is calculated as the difference between mean blood pressure values 2 h before and 2 h after rising from sleep. The mean systolic morning surge, diastolic morning surge, and morning surge in mean arterial pressures were 15 ± 2, 13 ± 1, and 11 ± 1 mmHg, respectively. During the laboratory protocol, continuous measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were made over a 10-min period of rest. Sympathetic BRS was quantified by plotting MSNA burst incidence against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRSinc), and by plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRStotal). Cardiac BRS was quantified using the sequence method. The mean values for sympathetic BRSinc, sympathetic BRStotal and cardiac BRS were -1.26 ± 0.26 bursts/100 hb/mmHg, -1.60 ± 0.37 AU/beat/mmHg, and 13.1 ± 1.5 ms/mmHg respectively. Significant relationships were identified between sympathetic BRSinc and the diastolic morning surge (r = 0.62, p = 0.02) and the morning surge in mean arterial pressure (r = 0.57, p = 0.03). Low sympathetic BRS was associated with a larger morning surge in mean arterial and diastolic blood pressure. Trends for relationships were identified between sympathetic BRStotal and the diastolic morning surge (r = 0.52, p = 0.066) and the morning surge in mean arterial pressure (r = 0.48, p = 0.095) but these did not reach significance. There were no significant relationships between cardiac BRS and the morning surge. These findings indicate that the ability of the baroreflex to buffer increases in blood pressure

  19. Altered differential control of sympathetic outflow following sedentary conditions: Role of subregional neuroplasticity in the RVLM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhan Subramanian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the classically held belief of an all-or-none activation of the sympathetic nervous system, differential responses in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA can occur acutely at varying magnitudes and in opposing directions. Sympathetic nerves also appear to contribute differentially to various disease states including hypertension and heart failure. Previously we have reported that sedentary conditions enhanced responses of splanchnic SNA (SSNA but not lumbar SNA (LSNA to activation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM in rats. Bulbospinal RVLM neurons from sedentary rats also exhibit increased dendritic branching in rostral regions of the RVLM. We hypothesized that regionally specific structural neuroplasticity would manifest as enhanced SSNA but not LSNA following activation of the rostral RVLM. To test this hypothesis, groups of physically active (10-12 weeks on running wheels or sedentary, male Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure, LSNA and SSNA under Inactin anesthesia and during microinjections of glutamate (30 nl, 10 mM into multiple sites within the RVLM. Sedentary conditions enhanced SSNA but not LSNA responses and SSNA responses were enhanced at more central and rostral sites. Results suggest that enhanced SSNA responses in rostral RVLM coincide with enhanced dendritic branching in rostral RVLM observed previously. Identifying structural and functional neuroplasticity in specific populations of RVLM neurons may help identify new treatments for cardiovascular diseases, known to be more prevalent in sedentary individuals.

  20. Altered Differential Control of Sympathetic Outflow Following Sedentary Conditions: Role of Subregional Neuroplasticity in the RVLM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Madhan; Mueller, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the classically held belief of an “all-or-none” activation of the sympathetic nervous system, differential responses in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) can occur acutely at varying magnitudes and in opposing directions. Sympathetic nerves also appear to contribute differentially to various disease states including hypertension and heart failure. Previously we have reported that sedentary conditions enhanced responses of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) but not lumbar SNA (LSNA) to activation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in rats. Bulbospinal RVLM neurons from sedentary rats also exhibit increased dendritic branching in rostral regions of the RVLM. We hypothesized that regionally specific structural neuroplasticity would manifest as enhanced SSNA but not LSNA following activation of the rostral RVLM. To test this hypothesis, groups of physically active (10–12 weeks on running wheels) or sedentary, male Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure, LSNA and SSNA under Inactin anesthesia and during microinjections of glutamate (30 nl, 10 mM) into multiple sites within the RVLM. Sedentary conditions enhanced SSNA but not LSNA responses and SSNA responses were enhanced at more central and rostral sites. Results suggest that enhanced SSNA responses in rostral RVLM coincide with enhanced dendritic branching in rostral RVLM observed previously. Identifying structural and functional neuroplasticity in specific populations of RVLM neurons may help identify new treatments for cardiovascular diseases, known to be more prevalent in sedentary individuals. PMID:27486405

  1. Autonomic Nervous System Responses to Viewing Green and Built Settings: Differentiating Between Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M.M.H.E.; Maas, J.; Muller, R.; Braun, A.; Kaandorp, W.; van Lien, R.; van Poppel, M.N.M.; van Mechelen, W.; van den Berg, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    This laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded

  2. Selective activation of heterologously expressed G protein-gated K+ channels by M2 muscarinic receptors in rat sympathetic neurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Jose M; Wanaverbecq, Nicolas; Halley, Pam; Caulfield, Malcolm P; Brown, David A

    1999-01-01

    G protein-regulated inward rectifier K+ (GIRK) channels were over-expressed in dissociated rat superior cervical sympathetic (SCG) neurones by co-transfecting green fluorescent protein (GFP)-, GIRK1- and GIRK2-expressing plasmids using the biolistic technique. Membrane currents were subsequently recorded with whole-cell patch electrodes.Co-transfected cells had larger Ba2+-sensitive inwardly rectifying currents and 13 mV more negative resting potentials (in 3 mm[K+]o) than non-transfected cells, or cells transfected with GIRK1 or GIRK2 alone.Carbachol (CCh, 1–30 μm) increased the inwardly rectifying current in 70% of GIRK1+ GIRK2-transfected cells by 261 ± 53% (n = 6, CCh 30 μm) at −120 mV, but had no effect in non-transfected cells or in cells transfected with GIRK1 or GIRK2 alone. Pertussis toxin prevented the effect of carbachol but had no effect on basal currents.The effect of CCh was antagonized by 6 nm tripitramine but not by 100 nm pirenzepine, consistent with activation of endogenous M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.In contrast, inhibition of the voltage-activated Ca2+ current by CCh was antagonized by 100 nm pirenzepine but not by 6 nm tripitramine, indicating that it was mediated by M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.We conclude that endogenous M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors selectively couple to GIRK currents and Ca2+ currents respectively, with negligible cross-talk. PMID:10066893

  3. Relief of fecal incontinence by sacral nerve stimulation linked to focal brain activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Lilli; Møller, Arne; Buntzen, Steen

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis that sacral nerve stimulation affects afferent vagal projections to the central nervous system associated with frontal cortex activation in patients with fecal incontinence.......This study aimed to test the hypothesis that sacral nerve stimulation affects afferent vagal projections to the central nervous system associated with frontal cortex activation in patients with fecal incontinence....

  4. Snoring, sympathetic activity and cardiovascular risk factors in a 70 year old population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, P; Schultz-Larsen, K; Christensen, Niels Juel

    1993-01-01

    In order to describe the relation between snoring, cardiovascular risk factors, metabolic factors and sympathetitic activity, 804 70-year-old males and females were classified according to snoring habits and life-style factors (alcohol and tobacco consumption), blood pressure, body mass index (BMI....... Self-reported snoring was associated with gender (males showed higher prevalence than females, p ... with tobacco consumption (p = 0.08). No associations were found between snoring and fasting glucose, plasma lipids, plasma epinephrine or in the use of antihypertensive medication. In multivariate analysis, with forced entry of gender, BMI, physical activity, alcohol and tobacco consumption, the relation...

  5. Autonomic nervous system responses to viewing green and built settings: : differentiating between sympathetic and parasympathetic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Magdalena; Maas, Jolanda; Mulder, Rianne; Braun, Anoek; Kaandorp, Wendy; van Lien, René; van Poppel, Mireille; van Mechelen, Willem; van den Berg, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    his laboratory study explored buffering and recovery effects of viewing urban green and built spaces on autonomic nervous system activity. Forty-six students viewed photos of green and built spaces immediately following, and preceding acute stress induction. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram

  6. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal and Sympathetic Nervous System Activity and Children's Behavioral Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisonbee, Jared A.; Pendry, Patricia; Mize, Jacquelyn; Gwynn, Eugenia Parrett

    2010-01-01

    Self-regulation ability is an important component of children's academic success. Physiological reactivity may relate to brain activity governing attention and behavioral regulation. Saliva samples collected from 186 preschool children (101 boys, mean age = 53 months, 34% minority) before and after a series of mildly challenging games and again 30…

  7. Sympathetic responses during saline infusion into the veins of an occluded limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; McQuillan, Patrick; Moradkhan, Raman; Pagana, Charles; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2009-07-15

    Animal studies have shown that the increased intravenous pressure stimulates the group III and IV muscle afferent fibres, and in turn induce cardiovascular responses. However, this pathway of autonomic regulation has not been examined in humans. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that infusion of saline into the venous circulation of an arterially occluded vascular bed evokes sympathetic activation in healthy individuals. Blood pressure, heart rate, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responses were assessed in 19 young healthy subjects during local infusion of 40 ml saline into a forearm vein in the circulatory arrested condition. From baseline (11.8 +/- 1.2 bursts min(-1)), MSNA increased significantly during the saline infusion (22.5 +/- 2.6 bursts min(-1), P Blood pressure also increased significantly during the saline infusion. Three control trials were performed during separate visits. The results from the control trial show that the observed MSNA and blood pressure responses were not due to muscle ischaemia. The present data show that saline infusion into the venous circulation of an arterially occluded vascular bed induces sympathetic activation and an increase in blood pressure. We speculate that the infusion under such conditions stimulates the afferent endings near the vessels, and evokes the sympathetic activation.

  8. Snoring, sympathetic activity and cardiovascular risk factors in a 70 year old population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, P; Schultz-Larsen, K; Christensen, Niels Juel

    1993-01-01

    . Self-reported snoring was associated with gender (males showed higher prevalence than females, p pressure, glucose tolerance test (p ...In order to describe the relation between snoring, cardiovascular risk factors, metabolic factors and sympathetitic activity, 804 70-year-old males and females were classified according to snoring habits and life-style factors (alcohol and tobacco consumption), blood pressure, body mass index (BMI...... between snoring and blood pressure ceased; only systolic blood pressure was associated with snoring (p

  9. Effects of sympathetic stimulation on the rhythmical jaw movements produced by electrical stimulation of the cortical masticatory areas of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Windhorst, U; Djupsjöbacka, M; Lytvynenko, S; Passatore, M

    2005-03-01

    The somatomotor and sympathetic nervous systems are intimately linked. One example is the influence of peripheral sympathetic fibers on the discharge characteristics of muscle spindles. Since muscle spindles play important roles in various motor behaviors, including rhythmic movements, the working hypothesis of this research was that changes in sympathetic outflow to muscle spindles can change rhythmic movement patterns. We tested this hypothesis in the masticatory system of rabbits. Rhythmic jaw movements and EMG activity induced by long-lasting electrical cortical stimulation were powerfully modulated by electrical stimulation of the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN). This modulation manifested itself as a consistent and marked reduction in the excursion of the mandibular movements (often preceded by a transient modest enhancement), which could be attributed mainly to corresponding changes in masseter muscle activity. These changes outlasted the duration of CSN stimulation. In some of the cortically evoked rhythmic jaw movements (CRJMs) changes in masticatory frequency were also observed. When the jaw-closing muscles were subjected to repetitive ramp-and-hold force pulses, the CRMJs changed characteristics. Masseter EMG activity was strongly enhanced and digastric EMG slightly decreased. This change was considerably depressed during CSN stimulation. These effects of CSN stimulation are similar in sign and time course to the depression exerted by sympathetic activity on the jaw-closing muscle spindle discharge. It is suggested that the change in proprioceptive information induced by an increase in sympathetic outflow (a) has important implications even under normal conditions for the control of motor function in states of high sympathetic activity, and (b) is one of the mechanisms responsible for motor impairment under certain pathological conditions such as chronic musculoskeletal head-neck disorders, associated with stress conditions.

  10. Inhibition of N-type Ca2+ channels ameliorates an imbalance in cardiac autonomic nerve activity and prevents lethal arrhythmias in mice with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuko; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Minami, Takeya; Yamada, Chinatsu; Shibata, Junko; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Cho, Kosai; Arai, Yuji; Yasuno, Shinji; Nishikimi, Toshio; Ueshima, Kenji; Kamakura, Shiro; Nishida, Motohiro; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Mori, Yasuo; Kimura, Takeshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2014-10-01

    Dysregulation of autonomic nervous system activity can trigger ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death in patients with heart failure. N-type Ca(2+) channels (NCCs) play an important role in sympathetic nervous system activation by regulating the calcium entry that triggers release of neurotransmitters from peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals. We have investigated the ability of NCC blockade to prevent lethal arrhythmias associated with heart failure. We compared the effects of cilnidipine, a dual N- and L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, with those of nitrendipine, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, in transgenic mice expressing a cardiac-specific, dominant-negative form of neuron-restrictive silencer factor (dnNRSF-Tg). In this mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy leading to sudden arrhythmic death, cardiac structure and function did not significantly differ among the control, cilnidipine, and nitrendipine groups. However, cilnidipine dramatically reduced arrhythmias in dnNRSF-Tg mice, significantly improving their survival rate and correcting the imbalance between cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity. A β-blocker, bisoprolol, showed similar effects in these mice. Genetic titration of NCCs, achieved by crossing dnNRSF-Tg mice with mice lacking CACNA1B, which encodes the α1 subunit of NCCs, improved the survival rate. With restoration of cardiac autonomic balance, dnNRSF-Tg;CACNA1B(+/-) mice showed fewer malignant arrhythmias than dnNRSF-Tg;CACNA1B(+/+) mice. Both pharmacological blockade of NCCs and their genetic titration improved cardiac autonomic balance and prevented lethal arrhythmias in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy and sudden arrhythmic death. Our findings suggest that NCC blockade is a potentially useful approach to preventing sudden death in patients with heart failure. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A model of blood pressure, heart rate, and vaso-vagal responses produced by vestibulo-sympathetic activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore eRaphan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood Pressure (BP, comprised of recurrent systoles and diastoles, is controlled by central mechanisms to maintain blood flow. Periodic behavior of BP was modeled to study how peak amplitudes and frequencies of the systoles are modulated by vestibular activation. The model was implemented as a relaxation oscillator, driven by a central signal related to Desired BP. Relaxation oscillations were maintained by a second order system comprising two integrators and a threshold element in the feedback loop. The output signal related to BP was generated as a nonlinear function of the derivative of the first state variable, which is a summation of an input related to desired BP, feedback from the states, and an input from the vestibular system into one of one of the feedback loops. This nonlinear function was structured to best simulate the shapes of systoles and diastoles, the relationship between BP and Heart Rate (HR as well as the amplitude modulations of BP and Pulse Pressure. Increases in threshold in one of the feedback loops produced lower frequencies of HR, but generated large pulse pressures to maintain orthostasis, without generating a VasoVagal Response (VVR. Pulse pressures were considerably smaller in the anesthetized rats than during the simulations, but simulated pulse pressures were lowered by including saturation in the feedback loop. Stochastic changes in Threshold maintained the compensatory Baroreflex Sensitivity. Sudden decreases in Desired BP elicited non-compensatory VVRs with smaller pulse pressures, consistent with experimental data. The model suggests that the Vestibular Sympathetic Reflex modulates BP and HR of an oscillating system by manipulating parameters of the baroreflex feedback and the signals that maintain the oscillations. It also shows that a VVR is generated when the vestibular input triggers a marked reduction in Desired BP.

  12. Foxo1 regulates Dbh expression and the activity of the sympathetic nervous system in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kajimura

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor FoxO1 regulates multiple physiological processes. Here, we show that FoxO1 is highly expressed in neurons of the locus coeruleus and of various sympathetic ganglions, but not in the adrenal medulla. Consistent with this pattern of expression, mice lacking FoxO1 only in sympathetic neurons (FoxO1Dbh−/− display a low sympathetic tone without modification of the catecholamine content in the adrenal medulla. As a result, FoxO1Dbh−/− mice demonstrate an increased insulin secretion, improved glucose tolerance, low energy expenditure, and high bone mass. FoxO1 favors catecholamine synthesis because it is a potent regulator of the expression of Dbh that encodes the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of these neurotransmitters. By identifying FoxO1 as a transcriptional regulator of the sympathetic tone, these results advance our understanding of the control of some aspects of metabolism and of bone mass accrual.

  13. Enriching the Housing Environment for Mice Enhances Their NK Cell Antitumor Immunity via Sympathetic Nerve-Dependent Regulation of NKG2D and CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanfang; Gan, Yu; Wang, Qing; Meng, Zihong; Li, Guohua; Shen, Yuling; Wu, Yufeng; Li, Peiying; Yao, Ming; Gu, Jianren; Tu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Mice housed in an enriched environment display a tumor-resistant phenotype due to eustress stimulation. However, the mechanisms underlying enriched environment-induced protection against cancers remain largely unexplained. In this study, we observed a significant antitumor effect induced by enriched environment in murine pancreatic cancer and lung cancer models. This effect remained intact in T/B lymphocyte-deficient Rag1 -/- mice, but was nearly eliminated in natural killer (NK) cell-deficient Beige mice or in antibody-mediated NK-cell-depleted mice, suggesting a predominant role of NK cells in enriched environment-induced tumor inhibition. Exposure to enriched environment enhanced NK-cell activity against tumors and promoted tumoral infiltration of NK cells. Enriched environment increased the expression levels of CCR5 and NKG2D (KLRK1) in NK cells; blocking their function effectively blunted the enriched environment-induced enhancement of tumoral infiltration and cytotoxic activity of NK cells. Moreover, blockade of β-adrenergic signaling or chemical sympathectomy abolished the effects of enriched environment on NK cells and attenuated the antitumor effect of enriched environment. Taken together, our results provide new insight into the mechanism by which eustress exerts a beneficial effect against cancer. Cancer Res; 77(7); 1611-22. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy activates the vocal folds maximally at therapeutic levels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardesch, J.J.; Sikken, J.R.; Veltink, Petrus H.; van der Aa, H.E.; Hageman, G.; Buschman, H.P.J.

    Purpose Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for medically refractory epilepsy can give hoarseness due to stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. For a group of VNS-therapy users this side-effect interferes severely with their daily activities. Our goal was to investigate the severity of

  15. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno......Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...

  16. Short-Term Red Wine Consumption Promotes Differential Effects on Plasma Levels of High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Sympathetic Activity, and Endothelial Function in Hypercholesterolemic, Hypertensive, and Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ana CM; Cesena, Fernando HY; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda M; Coimbra, Silmara R; Benjó, Alexandre M; Krieger, Eduardo M; da Luz, Protasio Lemos

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the metabolic, hemodynamic, autonomic, and endothelial responses to short-term red wine consumption in subjects with hypercholesterolemia or arterial hypertension, and healthy controls. METHODS: Subjects with hypercholesterolemia (n=10) or arterial hypertension (n=9), or healthy controls (n=7) were given red wine (250 mL/night) for 15 days. Analyses were performed before and after red wine intake. RESULTS: Red wine significantly increased the plasma levels of HDL-cholesterol in the controls, but not in the other groups. The effects on hemodynamic measurements were mild, non-significantly more prominent in healthy subjects, and exhibited high interindividual variability. Across all participants, mean blood pressure decreased 7 mmHg (p <0.01) and systemic vascular resistance decreased 7% (p = 0.05). Heart rate and cardiac output did not significantly change in any group. Red wine enhanced muscle sympathetic fibular nerve activity in hypercholesterolemic and hypertensive patients, but not in controls. At baseline, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation was impaired in patients with hypercholesterolemia and arterial hypertension; red wine restored the dilation in the hypercholesterolemic group but not in the hypertensive group. CONCLUSIONS: Red wine elicits different metabolic, autonomic, and endothelial responses among individuals with hypercholesterolemia or arterial hypertension and healthy controls. Our findings highlight the need to consider patient characteristics when evaluating the response to red wine. PMID:19488610

  17. Short-term red wine consumption promotes differential effects on plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, sympathetic activity, and endothelial function in hypercholesterolemic, hypertensive, and healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana CM Andrade

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the metabolic, hemodynamic, autonomic, and endothelial responses to short-term red wine consumption in subjects with hypercholesterolemia or arterial hypertension, and healthy controls. METHODS: Subjects with hypercholesterolemia (n=10 or arterial hypertension (n=9, or healthy controls (n=7 were given red wine (250 mL/night for 15 days. Analyses were performed before and after red wine intake. RESULTS: Red wine significantly increased the plasma levels of HDL-cholesterol in the controls, but not in the other groups. The effects on hemodynamic measurements were mild, non-significantly more prominent in healthy subjects, and exhibited high interindividual variability. Across all participants, mean blood pressure decreased 7 mmHg (p <0.01 and systemic vascular resistance decreased 7% (p = 0.05. Heart rate and cardiac output did not significantly change in any group. Red wine enhanced muscle sympathetic fibular nerve activity in hypercholesterolemic and hypertensive patients, but not in controls. At baseline, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation was impaired in patients with hypercholesterolemia and arterial hypertension; red wine restored the dilation in the hypercholesterolemic group but not in the hypertensive group. CONCLUSIONS: Red wine elicits different metabolic, autonomic, and endothelial responses among individuals with hypercholesterolemia or arterial hypertension and healthy controls. Our findings highlight the need to consider patient characteristics when evaluating the response to red wine.

  18. Influence of Different Geometric Representations of the Volume Conductor on Nerve Activation during Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gómez-Tames

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volume conductor models with different geometric representations, such as the parallel layer model (PM, the cylindrical layer model (CM, or the anatomically based model (AM, have been employed during the implementation of bioelectrical models for electrical stimulation (FES. Evaluating their strengths and limitations to predict nerve activation is fundamental to achieve a good trade-off between accuracy and computation time. However, there are no studies aimed at clarifying the following questions. (1 Does the nerve activation differ between CM and PM? (2 How well do CM and PM approximate an AM? (3 What is the effect of the presence of blood vessels and nerve trunk on nerve activation prediction? Therefore, in this study, we addressed these questions by comparing nerve activation between CM, PM, and AM models by FES. The activation threshold was used to evaluate the models under different configurations of superficial electrodes (size and distance, nerve depths, and stimulation sites. Additionally, the influences of the sciatic nerve, femoral artery, and femoral vein were inspected for a human thigh. The results showed that the CM and PM had a high error rate, but the variation of the activation threshold followed the same tendency for electrode size and interelectrode distance variation as AM.

  19. Acute effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition versus angiotensin II receptor blockade on cardiac sympathetic activity in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Eduardo R; Mak, Susanna; Floras, John S; Parker, John D

    2017-10-01

    The beneficial effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor antagonists in patients with heart failure secondary to reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) are felt to result from prevention of the adverse effects of ANG II on systemic afterload and renal homeostasis. However, ANG II can activate the sympathetic nervous system, and part of the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors and ANG II antagonists may result from their ability to inhibit such activation. We examined the acute effects of the ACE inhibitor captopril (25 mg, n = 9) and the ANG II receptor antagonist losartan (50 mg, n = 10) on hemodynamics as well as total body and cardiac norepinephrine spillover in patients with chronic HFrEF. Hemodynamic and neurochemical measurements were made at baseline and at 1, 2, and 4 h after oral dosing. Administration of both drugs caused significant reductions in systemic arterial, cardiac filling, and pulmonary artery pressures ( P < 0.05 vs. baseline). There was no significant difference in the magnitude of those hemodynamic effects. Plasma concentrations of ANG II were significantly decreased by captopril and increased by losartan ( P < 0.05 vs. baseline for both). Total body sympathetic activity increased in response to both captopril and losartan ( P < 0.05 vs. baseline for both); however, there was no change in cardiac sympathetic activity in response to either drug. The results of the present study do not support the hypothesis that the acute inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system has sympathoinhibitory effects in patients with chronic HFrEF. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Role of myocardial hypertrophy in trophic stimulation of indices of sympathetic cardiac innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindpaintner, K; Lund, D D; Schmid, P G

    1987-01-01

    Indices of cardiac sympathetic innervation have commonly been found depressed in the failing, hypertrophied heart. In contrast, we have recently demonstrated that hemodynamically compensated, very gradually developing right ventricular hypertrophy is associated with an increase in sympathetic nervous markers. The present experiments were performed to corroborate these findings in a model of acutely induced right ventricular hypertrophy, and to further characterize changes in markers of autonomic innervation associated with cardiac hypertrophy. Male guinea pigs underwent either pulmonary artery banding (P) with an acutely constricting ligature, or bilateral stellate ganglionectomy (S), or both (PS). Appropriate sham procedures were performed in animals subjected to only one intervention; controls (C) underwent sham-S and sham-P. Groups of animals were sacrificed at 10 and 20 days after surgery. Cardiac tissues were weighed and subsequently analyzed for activities of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), two enzymes catalyzing the biosynthesis of catecholamines (CAs), and of choline acetyltransferase (CAT), a marker of parasympathetic activity, as well as for norepinephrine (NE). S resulted in profound depletions of cardiac NE of 88-92% and in significant decreases in the activities of DBH and TH. Marked right ventricular hypertrophy developed rapidly following P, and was not modified by S. Similar to our previous results, acute right ventricular hypertrophy was associated with moderate increases (10-20%) of sympathetic markers; following S, these increases (of presumably residual sympathetic innervation) were greatly enhanced, amounting to 171% and 105% for NE at 10 and 20 days, respectively. In contrast, sympathetic markers in the left ventricle of stellatectomized animals were not affected by P. Activity of CAT remained unaltered by the experimental interventions. Our experiments indicate that increases in markers of sympathetic

  1. A comparison between complete immobilisation and protected active mobilisation in sensory nerve recovery following isolated digital nerve injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Henry, F P

    2012-06-01

    Post-operative immobilisation following isolated digital nerve repair remains a controversial issue amongst the microsurgical community. Protocols differ from unit to unit and even, as evidenced in our unit, may differ from consultant to consultant. We undertook a retrospective review of 46 patients who underwent isolated digital nerve repair over a 6-month period. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 18 months. Twenty-four were managed with protected active mobilisation over a 4-week period while 22 were immobilised over the same period. Outcomes such as return to work, cold intolerance, two-point discrimination and temperature differentiation were used as indicators of clinical recovery. Our results showed that there was no significant difference noted in either clinical assessment of recovery or return to work following either post-operative protocol, suggesting that either regime may be adopted, tailored to the patient\\'s needs and resources of the unit.

  2. Sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve function in alcoholic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Andersen, K; Smith, T

    1984-01-01

    % decrease in tissue blood flow, when the ankle is lowered 40 cm below heart level in the supine individual. The patients with moderate to severe polyneuropathy, taken as a group, did not differ significantly from the group of patients with no or only mild polyneuropathy, although a lesser response was seen...

  3. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno......Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...... skeletal muscle, cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues of the limbs indicate that the situation is more complex. Measurements have been carried out during acute as well as chronic sympathetic denervation. Spinal sympathetic reflex mechanisms have been evaluated in tetraplegic patients, where supraspinal...

  4. The Potential Role of Catheter-Based Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Yusuke; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-07-01

    Sympathetic activation is a hallmark of chronic and end-stage renal disease and adversely affects cardiovascular prognosis. Hypertension is present in the vast majority of these patients and plays a key role in the progressive deterioration of renal function and the high rate of cardiovascular events in this patient cohort. Augmentation of renin release, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renal vascular resistance are direct consequences of efferent renal sympathetic nerve stimulation and the major components of neural regulation of renal function. Renal afferent nerve activity directly influences sympathetic outflow to the kidneys and other highly innervated organs involved in blood pressure control via hypothalamic integration. Renal denervation of the kidney has been shown to reduce blood pressure in many experimental models of hypertension. Targeting the renal nerves directly may therefore be specifically useful in patients with chronic and end-stage renal disease. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with impaired kidney function and also reflect on the potential impact on other cardiovascular conditions commonly associated with chronic kidney disease such as heart failure and arrhythmias. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Coordinated Respiratory Motor Activity in Nerves Innervating the Upper Airway Muscles in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Tachikawa

    Full Text Available Maintaining the patency of the upper airway during breathing is of vital importance. The activity of various muscles is related to the patency of the upper airway. In the present study, we examined the respiratory motor activity in the efferent nerves innervating the upper airway muscles to determine the movements of the upper airway during respiration under normocapnic conditions (pH = 7.4 and in hypercapnic acidosis (pH = 7.2. Experiments were performed on arterially perfused decerebrate rats aged between postnatal days 21-35. We recorded the efferent nerve activity in a branch of the cervical spinal nerve innervating the infrahyoid muscles (CN, the hypoglossal nerve (HGN, the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN, and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN with the phrenic nerve (PN. Inspiratory nerve discharges were observed in all these nerves under normocapnic conditions. The onset of inspiratory discharges in the CN and HGN was slightly prior to those in the SLN and RLN. When the CO2 concentration in the perfusate was increased from 5% to 8% to prepare for hypercapnic acidosis, the peak amplitudes of the inspiratory discharges in all the recorded nerves were increased. Moreover, hypercapnic acidosis induced pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, SLN, and RLN. The onset of pre-inspiratory discharges in the CN, HGN, and SLN was prior to that of discharges in the RLN. These results suggest that the securing of the airway that occurs a certain time before dilation of the glottis may facilitate ventilation and improve hypercapnic acidosis.

  6. Sympathetic nervous system overactivity and its role in the development of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpas, Simon C

    2010-04-01

    This review examines how the sympathetic nervous system plays a major role in the regulation of cardiovascular function over multiple time scales. This is achieved through differential regulation of sympathetic outflow to a variety of organs. This differential control is a product of the topographical organization of the central nervous system and a myriad of afferent inputs. Together this organization produces sympathetic responses tailored to match stimuli. The long-term control of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) is an area of considerable interest and involves a variety of mediators acting in a quite distinct fashion. These mediators include arterial baroreflexes, angiotensin II, blood volume and osmolarity, and a host of humoral factors. A key feature of many cardiovascular diseases is increased SNA. However, rather than there being a generalized increase in SNA, it is organ specific, in particular to the heart and kidneys. These increases in regional SNA are associated with increased mortality. Understanding the regulation of organ-specific SNA is likely to offer new targets for drug therapy. There is a need for the research community to develop better animal models and technologies that reflect the disease progression seen in humans. A particular focus is required on models in which SNA is chronically elevated.

  7. Comparable attenuation of sympathetic nervous system activity in obese subjects with normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance and treatment naïve type 2 diabetes following equivalent weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora E. Straznicky

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Elevated sympathetic nervous system (SNS activity is a characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D that contributes to target organ damage and cardiovascular risk. In this study we examined whether baseline metabolic status influences the degree of sympathoinhibition attained following equivalent dietary weight loss. Methods: Un-medicated obese individuals categorized as normal glucose tolerant (NGT, n=15, impaired glucose tolerant (IGT, n=24 and newly-diagnosed T2D (n=15 consumed a hypocaloric diet (29% fat, 23% protein, 45% carbohydrate for 4-months. The three groups were matched for baseline age (56 + 1 years, body mass index (BMI, 32.9 + 0.7 kg/m2 and gender. Clinical measurements included whole-body norepinephrine kinetics, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, by microneurography, spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS and oral glucose tolerance test. Results: Weight loss averaged -7.5 + 0.8, -8.1 + 0.5 and -8.0 + 0.9 % of body weight in NGT, IGT and T2D groups, respectively. T2D subjects had significantly greater reductions in fasting glucose, 2-h glucose and glucose area under the curve (AUC0-120 compared to NGT and IGT (group effect, P<0.001. Insulinogenic index decreased in IGT and NGT groups and increased in T2D (group x time, P=0.04. The magnitude of reduction in MSNA (-7 + 3, -8 + 4, -15 + 4 burst/100hb, respectively and whole-body norepinephrine spillover rate (-28 + 8, -18 + 6 and -25 + 7 %, respectively, time effect both P<0.001, did not differ between groups. After adjustment for age and change in body weight, ∆ insulin AUC0-120 was independently associated with reduction in arterial norepinephrine concentration, whilst ∆ LDL-cholesterol and improvement in BRS were independently associated with decrease in MSNA. Conclusions: Equivalent weight loss through hypocaloric diet is accompanied by similar sympathoinhibition in matched obese subjects with different baseline glucose tolerance

  8. Nerve agent hydrolysis activity designed into a human drug metabolism enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Hemmert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus (OP nerve agents are potent suicide inhibitors of the essential neurotransmitter-regulating enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Due to their acute toxicity, there is significant interest in developing effective countermeasures to OP poisoning. Here we impart nerve agent hydrolysis activity into the human drug metabolism enzyme carboxylesterase 1. Using crystal structures of the target enzyme in complex with nerve agent as a guide, a pair of histidine and glutamic acid residues were designed proximal to the enzyme's native catalytic triad. The resultant variant protein demonstrated significantly increased rates of reactivation following exposure to sarin, soman, and cyclosarin. Importantly, the addition of these residues did not alter the high affinity binding of nerve agents to this protein. Thus, using two amino acid substitutions, a novel enzyme was created that efficiently converted a group of hemisubstrates, compounds that can start but not complete a reaction cycle, into bona fide substrates. Such approaches may lead to novel countermeasures for nerve agent poisoning.

  9. Vagal nerve stimulation therapy: what is being stimulated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Kember

    Full Text Available Vagal nerve stimulation in cardiac therapy involves delivering electrical current to the vagal sympathetic complex in patients experiencing heart failure. The therapy has shown promise but the mechanisms by which any benefit accrues is not understood. In this paper we model the response to increased levels of stimulation of individual components of the vagal sympathetic complex as a differential activation of each component in the control of heart rate. The model provides insight beyond what is available in the animal experiment in as much as allowing the simultaneous assessment of neuronal activity throughout the cardiac neural axis. The results indicate that there is sensitivity of the neural network to low level subthreshold stimulation. This leads us to propose that the chronic effects of vagal nerve stimulation therapy lie within the indirect pathways that target intrinsic cardiac local circuit neurons because they have the capacity for plasticity.

  10. Selective detrusor activation by electrical sacral nerve root stimulation in spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkhoff, N. J.; Wijkstra, H.; van Kerrebroeck, P. E.; Debruyne, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    Electrical sacral nerve root stimulation can be used in spinal cord injury patients to induce urinary bladder contraction. However, existing stimulation methods activate simultaneously both the detrusor muscle and the urethral sphincter. Urine evacuation is therefore only possible using poststimulus

  11. Time-course of Changes in Activation Among Facial Nerve Injury: A Functional Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fu-Long; Gao, Pei-Yi; Sui, Bin-Bin; Wan, Hong; Lin, Yan; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Qian, Tian-Yi; Wang, Shiwei; Li, Dezhi; Liu, Song

    2015-10-01

    Patients suffering different intervals of facial nerve injury were investigated by functional magnetic resonance imaging to study changes in activation within cortex.Forty-five patients were divided into 3 groups based on intervals of facial nerve injury. Another 16 age and sex-matched healthy participants were included as a control group. Patients and healthy participants underwent task functional magnetic resonance imaging (eye blinking and lip pursing) examination.Functional reorganization after facial nerve injury is dynamic and time-dependent. Correlation between activation in sensorimotor area and intervals of facial nerve injury was significant, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of -0.951 (P nerve injury could be found in late stage of facial dysfunction compared with normal individuals. Dysfunction in the facial nerve has devastating effects on the activity of sensorimotor areas, whereas enhanced intensity in the sensorimotor area ipsilateral to the facial nerve injury in middle stage of facial dysfunction suggests the possible involvement of interhemispheric reorganization. Behavioral or brain stimulation technique treatment in this stage could be applied to alter reorganization within sensorimotor area in the rehabilitation of facial function, monitoring of therapeutic efficacy, and improvement in therapeutic intervention along the course of recovery.

  12. Activity-dependent, homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release from auditory nerve fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Ngodup, Tenzin; Goetz, Jack A.; McGuire, Brian C.; Sun, Wei; Lauer, Amanda M.; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses with high probability of neurotransmitter release (Pr) depress during prolonged activity, which reduces the faithful transfer of information. Auditory nerve synapses onto bushy cells show particularly strong depression at physiologically relevant rates of activity, which raises the question of how bushy cells transmit information when sound levels are high for a prolonged period. After rearing mice in constant, nondamaging noise, auditory nerve synapses changed from high to low Pr, w...

  13. Development of Kinematic Graphs of Median Nerve during Active Finger Motion: Implications of Smartphone Use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi-Chi Woo

    Full Text Available Certain hand activities cause deformation and displacement of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel due to the gliding motion of tendons surrounding it. As smartphone usage escalates, this raises the public's concern whether hand activities while using smartphones can lead to median nerve problems.The aims of this study were to 1 develop kinematic graphs and 2 investigate the associated deformation and rotational information of median nerve in the carpal tunnel during hand activities.Dominant wrists of 30 young adults were examined with ultrasonography by placing a transducer transversely on their wrist crease. Ultrasound video clips were recorded when the subject performing 1 thumb opposition with the wrist in neutral position, 2 thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation and 3 pinch grip with the wrist in neutral position. Six still images that were separated by 0.2-second intervals were then captured from the ultrasound video for the determination of 1 cross-sectional area (CSA, 2 flattening ratio (FR, 3 rotational displacement (RD and 4 translational displacement (TD of median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and these collected information of deformation, rotational and displacement of median nerve were compared between 1 two successive time points during a single hand activity and 2 different hand motions at the same time point. Finally, kinematic graphs were constructed to demonstrate the mobility of median nerve during different hand activities.Performing different hand activities during this study led to a gradual reduction in CSA of the median nerve, with thumb opposition together with the wrist in ulnar deviation causing the greatest extent of deformation of the median nerve. Thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation also led to the largest extent of TD when compared to the other two hand activities of this study. Kinematic graphs showed that the motion pathways of median nerve during different hand activities were complex

  14. Development of Kinematic Graphs of Median Nerve during Active Finger Motion: Implications of Smartphone Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hoi-Chi; White, Peter; Ng, Ho-Kwan; Lai, Christopher W K

    2016-01-01

    Certain hand activities cause deformation and displacement of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel due to the gliding motion of tendons surrounding it. As smartphone usage escalates, this raises the public's concern whether hand activities while using smartphones can lead to median nerve problems. The aims of this study were to 1) develop kinematic graphs and 2) investigate the associated deformation and rotational information of median nerve in the carpal tunnel during hand activities. Dominant wrists of 30 young adults were examined with ultrasonography by placing a transducer transversely on their wrist crease. Ultrasound video clips were recorded when the subject performing 1) thumb opposition with the wrist in neutral position, 2) thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation and 3) pinch grip with the wrist in neutral position. Six still images that were separated by 0.2-second intervals were then captured from the ultrasound video for the determination of 1) cross-sectional area (CSA), 2) flattening ratio (FR), 3) rotational displacement (RD) and 4) translational displacement (TD) of median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and these collected information of deformation, rotational and displacement of median nerve were compared between 1) two successive time points during a single hand activity and 2) different hand motions at the same time point. Finally, kinematic graphs were constructed to demonstrate the mobility of median nerve during different hand activities. Performing different hand activities during this study led to a gradual reduction in CSA of the median nerve, with thumb opposition together with the wrist in ulnar deviation causing the greatest extent of deformation of the median nerve. Thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation also led to the largest extent of TD when compared to the other two hand activities of this study. Kinematic graphs showed that the motion pathways of median nerve during different hand activities were complex

  15. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  16. IKK/NF-κB-dependent satellite glia activation induces spinal cord microglia activation and neuropathic pain after nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyoungsub; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Noh, Kyungchul; Lee, Sung Joong

    2017-09-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that both microglia and satellite glial cell (SGC) activation play causal roles in neuropathic pain development after peripheral nerve injury; however, the activation mechanisms and their contribution to neuropathic pain remain elusive. To address this issue, we generated Ikkβ conditional knockout mice (Cnp-Cre/Ikkβ; cIkkβ) in which IKK/NF-κB-dependent proinflammatory SGC activation was abrogated. In these mice, nerve injury-induced spinal cord microglia activation and pain hypersensitivity were significantly attenuated compared to those in control mice. In addition, nerve injury-induced proinflammatory gene expression and macrophage infiltration into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were severely compromised. However, macrophages recruited into the DRG had minimal effects on spinal cord microglia activation, suggesting a causal effect for SGC activation on spinal cord microglia activation. In an effort to elucidate the molecular mechanisms, we measured Csf1 expression in the DRG, which is implicated in spinal cord microglia activation after nerve injury. In cIkkβ mice, nerve injury-induced Csf1 upregulation was ameliorated indicating that IKK/NF-κΒ-dependent SGC activation induced Csf1 expression in sensory neurons. Taken together, our data suggest that nerve injury-induced SGC activation triggers Csf1 induction in sensory neurons, spinal cord microglia activation, and subsequent central pain sensitization.

  17. The Sympathetic Release Test: A Test Used to Assess Thermoregulation and Autonomic Control of Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, E. A.; Roe, S. M.; Johnson, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    When a subject is heated, the stimulation of temperature-sensitive nerve endings in the skin, and the raising of the central body temperature, results in the reflex release of sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone in the skin of the extremities, causing a measurable temperature increase at the site of release. In the sympathetic release test, the…

  18. The effect of a high-carbohydrate meal on postprandial thermogenesis and sympathetic nervous system activity in boys with a recent onset of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Narumi; Sakane, Naoki; Hamada, Taku; Kimura, Tetsuya; Moritani, Toshio

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the thermic effect of food (TEF) and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity in obese boys. Ten obese (9.2+/-0.4 years) and 13 lean boys (8.8+/-0.4 years) were examined for energy expenditure and fat oxidation measured via indirect calorimetry for 3 hours after a high-carbohydrate (HC; 70% carbohydrate, 20% fat, and 10% protein) or a high-fat (HF; 20% carbohydrate, 70% fat, and 10% protein) meal served on 2 different days at random. The activity of the SNS was assessed by means of a power spectral analysis of the heart rate variability. The TEF, expressed as a percentage of the consumed energy, was significantly lower in obese boys than in lean boys after the HC meal; however, such a difference was not observed after the HF meal. Multiple regression analysis revealed that obesity was a significant variable contributing to the variances in the TEF induced by the HC meal. Moreover, after the HC meal, the boys with a recent onset of obesity (duration, frequency component of the heart rate variability, an index of thermoregulatory SNS functions, compared with the remaining obese and lean boys. In conclusion, obese boys possessed normal metabolic and sympathetic responses to the HF meal but showed a diminished thermogenic response to the HC meal, especially during the early phase of obesity.

  19. Modulation of pineal activity during the 23rd sunspot cycle: melatonin rise during the ascending phase of the cycle is accompanied by an increase of the sympathetic tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Christian; Bartsch, Hella; Seebald, Eckhard; Küpper, Heinz; Mecke, Dieter

    2014-05-01

    In two groups of female CD-rats nocturnal urine (19-23 h, 23-3 h, 3-7 h) was collected at monthly intervals over 658 days (I: 1997-1999) and 494 days (II: 1999-2000) coinciding with the ascending limb (1996-2000) of the 23rd sunspot cycle (1996-2008). The excretion of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s: I, II) was determined as well as the ratio of noradrenaline/adrenaline (NA/A: I) reflecting the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. AMT6s was higher in II than I (19-7 h: +24%; P sunspot cycle accompanied by growing geomagnetic disturbances (Ap) which elevate the sympathetic tone and thus affect the pineal gland, initially stimulating the activity of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase and subsequently fostering the expression of N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (rate-limiting enzyme for melatonin biosynthesis) if Ap increases further. The potential (patho) physiological significance of these findings is discussed and the need for a systematic continuation of such studies is emphasized.

  20. Sympathetic skin response in acute sensory ataxic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunodaya, G R; Taly, A B; Swamy, H S

    1995-05-01

    Sympathetic skin response (SSR) is a recently described objective method of studying sudomotor sympathetic nerve function and has been studied in a variety of peripheral neuropathies. We report SSR changes in nine patients with acute sensory ataxic neuropathy (ASAN). All had severe sensory and mild motor nerve conduction abnormalities; five had dysautonomia. SSR, elicited by electric shock and cough stimuli, was absent in three patients. Latency was normal in all when SSR was present. Two patients had SSR amplitude of 0.2 mV or less. Absence of SSR did not correlate with dysautonomia, absence of sensory nerve action potential or motor nerve conduction abnormalities. Follow up SSR studies revealed return of absent SSR in one patient over a period of 3 months, despite persistence of ataxia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of SSR changes in ASAN.

  1. Subfornical Organ Mediates Sympathetic and Hemodynamic Responses to Blood-borne Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G.; Yu, Yang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play an important role in regulating autonomic and cardiovascular function in hypertension and heart failure. Peripherally administered pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) act upon the brain to increase blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and sympathetic nerve activity. These molecules are too large to penetrate blood brain barrier (BBB), and so the mechanisms by which they elicit these responses remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the subfornical organ (SFO), a forebrain circumventricular organ that lacks a BBB, plays a major role in mediating the sympathetic and hemodynamic responses to circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intracarotid artery (ICA) injection of TNF-α (200 ng) or IL-1β (200 ng) dramatically increased mean BP (MBP), HR and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in rats with sham lesions of the SFO (SFO-s). These excitatory responses to ICA TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly attenuated in SFO-lesioned (SFO-x) rats. Similarly, the increases in MBP, HR and RSNA in response to intravenous (IV) injections of TNF-α (500 ng) or IL-1β (500 ng) in SFO-s rats were significantly reduced in the SFO-x rats. Immunofluorescent staining revealed a dense distribution of the p55 TNF-α receptor and the IL-1 receptor accessory protein, a subunit of the IL-1 receptor, in the SFO. These data suggest that SFO is a predominant site in the brain at which circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines act to elicit cardiovascular and sympathetic responses. PMID:23670302

  2. Hyperpolarizing `α2'-adrenoceptors in rat sympathetic ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D.A.; Caulfield, M.P.

    1979-01-01

    1 Receptors mediating catecholamine-induced hyperpolarization of isolated superior cervical sympathetic ganglia of the rat have been characterized by means of an extracellular recording method. 2 (-)-Noradrenaline (EC50, 1.7 ± 0.6 μM) produced an immediate low-amplitude (oxymetazoline (0.01 to 1 μM) and ergometrine (0.1 to 10 μM) produced a persistent, low-amplitude hyperpolarization, as though they were partial agonists. Responses to the agonists were blocked by yohimbine (1 μM) but not be prazosin (1 μM). 7 It is concluded that the adrenergic cell bodies in the ganglion were hyperpolarized through activation of the same type of α-receptor (`α2-receptors') as those present at adrenergic nerve terminals. PMID:218668

  3. Nerve transection repair using laser-activated chitosan in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Neel K; Khan, Taleef R; Mejias, Christopher; Paniello, Randal C

    2017-08-01

    Cranial nerve transection during head and neck surgery is conventionally repaired with microsuture. Previous studies have demonstrated recovery with laser nerve welding (LNW), a novel alternative to microsuture. LNW has been reported to have poorer tensile strength, however. Laser-activated chitosan, an adhesive biopolymer, may promote nerve recovery while enhancing the tensile strength of the repair. Using a rat posterior tibial nerve injury model, we compared four different methods of nerve repair in this pilot study. Animal study. Animals underwent unilateral posterior tibial nerve transection. The injury was repaired by potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser alone (n = 20), KTP + chitosan (n = 12), microsuture + chitosan (n = 12), and chitosan alone (n = 14). Weekly walking tracks were conducted to measure functional recovery (FR). Tensile strength (TS) was measured at 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, KTP laser alone had the best recovery (FR = 93.4% ± 8.3%). Microsuture + chitosan, KTP + chitosan, and chitosan alone all showed good FR (87.4% ± 13.5%, 84.6% ± 13.0%, and 84.1% ± 10.0%, respectively). One-way analysis of variance was performed (F(3,56) = 2.6, P = .061). A TS threshold of 3.8 N was selected as a control mean recovery. Three groups-KTP alone, KTP + chitosan, and microsuture + chitosan-were found to meet threshold 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23.1%-88.3%), 75% (95% CI: 46.8%-91.1%), and 100% (95% CI: 75.8%-100.0%), respectively. In the posterior tibial nerve model, all repair methods promoted nerve recovery. Laser-activated chitosan as a biopolymer anchor provided good TS and appears to be a novel alternative to microsuture. This repair method may have surgical utility following cranial nerve injury during head and neck surgery. NA Laryngoscope, 127:E253-E257, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Muscle afferent receptors engaged in augmented sympathetic responsiveness in peripheral artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua eLi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The exercise pressor reflex (EPR is a neural control mechanism responsible for the cardiovascular responses to exercise. As exercise is initiated, thin fiber muscle afferent nerves are activated by mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising in the contracting muscles. This leads to reflex increases in arterial blood pressure and heart rate primarily through activation of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. Studies of humans and animals have indicated that the EPR is exaggerated in a number of cardiovascular diseases. For the last several years, studies have specifically employed a rodent model to examine the mechanisms at receptor and cellular levels by which responses of SNA and blood pressure to static exercise are heightened in peripheral artery disease (PAD, one of the most common cardiovascular disorders. A rat model of this disease has well been established. Specifically, femoral artery occlusion is used to study intermittent claudication that is observed in human PAD. The receptors on thin fiber muscle afferents that are engaged in this disease include transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1, purinergic P2X and acid sensing ion channel (ASIC. The role played by nerve growth factor (NGF in regulating those sensory receptors in the processing of amplified EPR was also investigated. The purpose of this review is to focus on a theme namely that PAD accentuates autonomic reflex responses to exercise and further address regulatory mechanisms leading to abnormal sympathetic responsiveness. This review will present some of recent results in regard with several receptors in muscle sensory neurons in contribution to augmented autonomic reflex responses in PAD. Review of the findings from recent studies would lead to a better understanding in integrated processing of sympathetic nervous system in PAD.

  5. Computation of induced electric field for the sacral nerve activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Hattori, Junya; Laakso, Ilkka; Takagi, Airi; Shimada, Takuo

    2013-01-01

    The induced electric field/current in the sacral nerve by stimulation devices for the treatment of bladder overactivity is investigated. Implanted and transcutaneous electrode configurations are considered. The electric field induced in the sacral nerve by the implanted electrode is largely affected by its surrounding tissues, which is attributable to the variation in the input impedance of the electrode. In contrast, the electric field induced by the transcutaneous electrode is affected by the tissue conductivity and anatomical composition of the body. In addition, the electric field induced in the subcutaneous fat in close proximity of the electrode is comparable with the estimated threshold electric field for pain. These computational findings explain the clinically observed weakness and side effect of each configuration. For the transcutaneous stimulator, we suggest that the electrode contact area be increased to reduce the induced electric field in the subcutaneous fat. (paper)

  6. Selective recovery of fascicular activity in peripheral nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodlinger, B.; Durand, D. M.

    2011-10-01

    The peripheral nerves of an amputee's residual limb still carry the information required to provide the robust, natural control signals needed to command a dexterous prosthetic limb. However, these signals are mixed in the volume conductor of the body and extracting them is an unmet challenge. A beamforming algorithm was used to leverage the spatial separation of the fascicular sources, recovering mixed pseudo-spontaneous signals with normalized mean squared error of 0.14 ± 0.10 (n = 12) in an animal model. The method was also applied to a human femoral nerve model using computer simulations and recovered all five fascicular-group signals simultaneously with R2 = 0.7 ± 0.2 at a signal-to-noise ratio of 0 dB. This technique accurately separated peripheral neural signals, potentially providing the voluntary, natural and robust command signals needed for advanced prosthetic limbs.

  7. Electrophysiological study in the infraorbital nerve of the rat: Spontaneous and evoked activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlbarracIn, A L [Catedra de Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Av. Roca 2200, PC 4000 (Argentina); Farfan, F D [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, INSIBIO - CONICET, CC 327, PC 4000 (Argentina); Felice, C J [Departamento de BioingenierIa, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, INSIBIO - CONICET, CC 327, PC 4000 (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    In this work we present some studies in the afferent nerve of the rat vibrissae. Studies on spontaneous activity (SA) in this sensorial system are of long data. Nevertheless, SA recordings in the nerve of a single vibrissa have not been made until present. In this work, we use an algorithm based on signal decomposition with Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyse the discharges of two nerves. The action potentials of both nerves were detected and the firing rates were calculated. These results suggest that the firing rate of one vibrissa innervation is low considering that this nerve contains hundred of fibers. In addition, we present preliminary studies suggesting important effects of the hair shaft length in the afferent discharge during the vibrissae movements. The experiments consisted in recording the nerve activity after the vibrissae were sectioned at two different levels. The results showed important differences in the signal energy contents. It suggests that the hair shaft length would produce a differential activation of the mechanoreceptors located in the vibrissae follicle.

  8. Vagal nerve stimulation protects against burn-induced intestinal injury through activation of enteric glia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Todd W; Bansal, Vishal; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Putnam, James G; Peterson, Carrie Y; Loomis, William H; Wolf, Paul; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P; Coimbra, Raul

    2010-12-01

    The enteric nervous system may have an important role in modulating gastrointestinal barrier response to disease through activation of enteric glia cells. In vitro studies have shown that enteric glia activation improves intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering the expression of tight junction proteins. We hypothesized that severe injury would increase expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of enteric glial activation. We also sought to define the effects of vagal nerve stimulation on enteric glia activation and intestinal barrier function using a model of systemic injury and local gut mucosal involvement. Mice with 30% total body surface area steam burn were used as model of severe injury. Vagal nerve stimulation was performed to assess the role of parasympathetic signaling on enteric glia activation. In vivo intestinal permeability was measured to assess barrier function. Intestine was collected to investigate changes in histology; GFAP expression was assessed by quantitative PCR, by confocal microscopy, and in GFAP-luciferase transgenic mice. Stimulation of the vagus nerve prevented injury-induced intestinal barrier injury. Intestinal GFAP expression increased at early time points following burn and returned to baseline by 24 h after injury. Vagal nerve stimulation prior to injury increased GFAP expression to a greater degree than burn alone. Gastrointestinal bioluminescence was imaged in GFAP-luciferase transgenic animals following either severe burn or vagal stimulation and confirmed the increased expression of intestinal GFAP. Injection of S-nitrosoglutathione, a signaling molecule released by activated enteric glia cells, following burn exerts protective effects similar to vagal nerve stimulation. Intestinal expression of GFAP increases following severe burn injury. Stimulation of the vagus nerve increases enteric glia activation, which is associated with improved intestinal barrier function. The vagus nerve may mediate the

  9. Increased sympathetic tone in forearm subcutaneous tissue in primary hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagn Nielsen, H; Hasselström, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    1987-01-01

    Sympathetic reflex regulation of subcutaneous blood flow (SBF) in the forearm was studied in eight patients with primary hypothyroidism. Diastolic arterial pressure was greater than or equal to 95 mmHg in five patients. SBF was determined by local clearance of Na99mTcO4. Sympathetic vasoconstrict......Sympathetic reflex regulation of subcutaneous blood flow (SBF) in the forearm was studied in eight patients with primary hypothyroidism. Diastolic arterial pressure was greater than or equal to 95 mmHg in five patients. SBF was determined by local clearance of Na99mTcO4. Sympathetic.......02)). In conclusion sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity in adipose tissue is markedly increased in primary hypothyroidism. Sympathetic tone and arterial pressure are reduced during treatment....

  10. Morning blood pressure surge is associated with arterial stiffness and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity in hypertensive seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshiyuki; Galbreath, M. Melyn; Shibata, Shigeki; Jarvis, Sara S.; Bivens, Tiffany B.; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Levine, Benjamin D.

    2013-01-01

    Morning blood pressure (BP) surge is considered to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We tested the hypothesis that increased large-artery stiffness and impaired sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) contribute to augmented morning surge in elderly hypertensive subjects. Morning surge was assessed as morning systolic BP averaged for 2 h just after waking up minus minimal sleeping systolic BP by using ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) in 40 untreated hypertensive [68 ± 1 (SE) yr] and 30 normotensive (68 ± 1 yr) subjects. Beat-by-beat finger BP and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were recorded in the supine position and at 60° upright tilt. We assessed arterial stiffness with carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and sympathetic BRS during spontaneous breathing. Awake and asleep ABPM-BPs and morning surge were higher in hypertensive than normotensive subjects (all P morning surge ≥35 mmHg (median value) had higher cfPWV (11.9 ± 0.5 vs. 9.9 ± 0.4 m/s, P = 0.002) and lower sympathetic BRS (supine: −2.71 ± 0.25 vs. −3.73 ± 0.29, P = 0.011; upright: −2.62 ± 0.22 vs. −3.51 ± 0.35 bursts·100 beats−1·mmHg−1, P = 0.052) than those with morning surge 0.05), while upright total peripheral resistance was higher in hypertensive subjects with greater morning surge than those with lesser morning surge (P = 0.050). Morning surge was correlated positively with cfPWV (r = 0.59, P morning BP surge is associated with arterial stiffness and sympathetic BRS, as well as vasoreactivity during orthostasis in hypertensive seniors. PMID:23832695

  11. The MEK-ERK pathway negatively regulates bim expression through the 3' UTR in sympathetic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Apoptosis plays a critical role during neuronal development and disease. Developing sympathetic neurons depend on nerve growth factor (NGF) for survival during the late embryonic and early postnatal period and die by apoptosis in its absence. The proapoptotic BH3-only protein Bim increases in level after NGF withdrawal and is required for NGF withdrawal-induced death. The regulation of Bim expression in neurons is complex and this study describes a new mechanism by which an NGF-activated signalling pathway regulates bim gene expression in sympathetic neurons. Results We report that U0126, an inhibitor of the prosurvival MEK-ERK pathway, increases bim mRNA levels in sympathetic neurons in the presence of NGF. We find that this effect is independent of PI3-K-Akt and JNK-c-Jun signalling and is not mediated by the promoter, first exon or first intron of the bim gene. By performing 3' RACE and microinjection experiments with a new bim-LUC+3'UTR reporter construct, we show that U0126 increases bim expression via the bim 3' UTR. We demonstrate that this effect does not involve a change in bim mRNA stability and by using PD184352, a specific MEK1/2-ERK1/2 inhibitor, we show that this mechanism involves the MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathway. Finally, we demonstrate that inhibition of MEK/ERK signalling independently reduces cell survival in NGF-treated sympathetic neurons. Conclusions These results suggest that in sympathetic neurons, MEK-ERK signalling negatively regulates bim expression via the 3' UTR and that this regulation is likely to be at the level of transcription. This data provides further insight into the different mechanisms by which survival signalling pathways regulate bim expression in neurons. PMID:21762482

  12. Control plasma renin activity and changes in sympathetic tone as determinants of minoxidil-induced increase in plasma renin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, K; Velasco, M; Wells, J; McNay, J L

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the possible mechanism(s) underlying minoxidil-induced increase in plasma renin activity (PRA). 10 patients with essential hypertension were treated with minoxidil and subsequently with a combination of minoxidil plus propranolol. Minoxidil lowered mean arterial pressure 31.6 plus or minus 3.3 mm Hg, mean plus or minus SEM. There was an associated increase in both PRA, 6.26 plus or minus 2.43 NG/ML/H, and heart rate, 21.4 plus or minus 2.7 beats/min. The changes in PRA and heart rate were positively correlated, r, 0.79. Addition of propranolol reduced mean arterial pressure by a further 10.1 plus or minus 1.5 mm Hg and returned heart rate to control levels. Propranolol reduced PRA significantly but not to control levels. Control PRA positively correlated with PRA on minoxidil, r, 0.97, and with PRA on minoxidil plus propranolol, r, 0.98. We conclude that control PRA is a major determinant of change in PRA with minoxidil. Minoxidil increased PRA by at least two mechanisms: (a) an adrenergic mechanism closely related to change in heart rate and blocked by propranolol, and (b) a mechanism(s) not sensitive to propranolol and possibly related to decrease in renal perfusion pressure. PMID:1127099

  13. Evaluation of Na+/K+ pump function following repetitive activity in mouse peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Krarup, Christian

    2006-01-01

    After conduction of prolonged trains of impulses the increased Na+/K+ pump activity leads to hyperpolarization. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model to investigate the Na+/K+ pump function in peripheral nerve by measuring the decrease in excitability during activity...... change after repetitive stimulation of the mouse tibial nerve is an indicator of the Na+/K+ pump function in vivo. Evaluation of activity-dependent hyperpolarization may be an important indicator of axonal ability to cope with Na+ load....

  14. Auditory driving of the autonomic nervous system: Listening to theta-frequency binaural beats post-exercise increases parasympathetic activation and sympathetic withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Patrick A; Froeliger, Brett; Garland, Eric L; Ives, Jeffrey C; Sforzo, Gary A

    2014-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory illusion perceived when two or more pure tones of similar frequencies are presented dichotically through stereo headphones. Although this phenomenon is thought to facilitate state changes (e.g., relaxation), few empirical studies have reported on whether binaural beats produce changes in autonomic arousal. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of binaural beating on autonomic dynamics [heart rate variability (HRV)] during post-exercise relaxation. Subjects (n = 21; 18-29 years old) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study during which binaural beats and placebo were administered over two randomized and counterbalanced sessions (within-subjects repeated-measures design). At the onset of each visit, subjects exercised for 20-min; post-exercise, subjects listened to either binaural beats ('wide-band' theta-frequency binaural beats) or placebo (carrier tones) for 20-min while relaxing alone in a quiet, low-light environment. Dependent variables consisted of high-frequency (HF, reflecting parasympathetic activity), low-frequency (LF, reflecting sympathetic and parasympathetic activity), and LF/HF normalized powers, as well as self-reported relaxation. As compared to the placebo visit, the binaural-beat visit resulted in greater self-reported relaxation, increased parasympathetic activation and increased sympathetic withdrawal. By the end of the 20-min relaxation period there were no observable differences in HRV between binaural-beat and placebo visits, although binaural-beat associated HRV significantly predicted subsequent reported relaxation. Findings suggest that listening to binaural beats may exert an acute influence on both LF and HF components of HRV and may increase subjective feelings of relaxation.

  15. Auditory driving of the autonomic nervous system: Listening to theta-frequency binaural beats post-exercise increases parasympathetic activation and sympathetic withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eMcConnell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Binaural beats are an auditory illusion perceived when two or more pure tones of similar frequencies are presented dichotically through stereo headphones. Although this phenomenon is thought to facilitate state changes (e.g., relaxation, few empirical studies have reported on whether binaural beats produce changes in autonomic arousal. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of binaural beating on autonomic dynamics (heart-rate variability (HRV during post-exercise relaxation. Subjects (n = 21; 18-29 years old participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study during which binaural beats and placebo were administered over two randomized and counterbalanced sessions (within-subjects repeated-measures design. At the onset of each visit, subjects exercised for 20-min; post-exercise, subjects listened to either binaural beats (‘wide-band’ theta-frequency binaural beats or placebo (carrier tone for 20-min while relaxing alone in a quiet, low-light environment. Dependent variables consisted of high frequency (HF, reflecting parasympathetic activity, low frequency (LF, reflecting sympathetic and parasympathetic activity and LF/HF normalized powers, as well as self-reported relaxation. As compared to the placebo visit, the binaural beat visit resulted in greater self-reported relaxation, as well as increased parasympathetic activation and sympathetic withdrawal. By the end of the 20-min relaxation period there were no observable differences in HRV between binaural beat and placebo visits, although binaural-beat associated HRV significantly predicted subsequent reported relaxation. Findings suggest that listening to binaural beats may exert an acute influence on both LF and HF components of HRV and may increase subjective feelings of relaxation.

  16. Sympathetic modulation of muscle spindle afferent sensitivity to stretch in rabbit jaw closing muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Windhorst, U; Ljubisavljevic, M; Johansson, H; Passatore, M

    2002-04-01

    Previous reports showed that sympathetic stimulation affects the activity of muscle spindle afferents (MSAs). The aim of the present work is to study the characteristics of sympathetic modulation of MSA response to stretch: (i) on the dynamic and static components of the stretch response, and (ii) on group Ia and II MSAs to evaluate potentially different effects. In anaesthetised rabbits, the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) was stimulated at 10 impulses s(-1) for 45-90 s. The responses of single MSAs to trapezoidal displacement of the mandible were recorded from the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus. The following characteristic parameters were determined from averaged trapezoidal responses: initial frequency (IF), peak frequency at the end of the ramp (PF), and static index (SI). From these, other parameters were derived: dynamic index (DI = PF - SI), dynamic difference (DD = PF - IF) and static difference (SD = SI - IF). The effects of CSN stimulation were also evaluated during changes in the state of intrafusal muscle fibre contraction induced by succinylcholine and curare. In a population of 124 MSAs, 106 units (85.4 %) were affected by sympathetic stimulation. In general, while changes in resting discharge varied among different units (Ia vs. II) and experimental conditions (curarised vs. non-curarised), ranging from enhancement to strong depression of firing, the amplitude of the response to muscle stretches consistently decreased. This was confirmed and detailed in a quantitative analysis performed on 49 muscle spindle afferents. In both the non-curarised (23 units) and curarised (26 units) condition, stimulation of the CSN reduced the response amplitude in terms of DD and SD, but hardly affected DI. The effects were equally present in both Ia and II units; they were shown to be independent from gamma drive and intrafusal muscle tone and not secondary to muscle hypoxia. Sympathetic action on the resting discharge (IF) was less

  17. Tonic aortic depressor nerve stimulation does not impede baroreflex dynamic characteristics concomitantly mediated by the stimulated nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Toru; Turner, Michael J; Shimizu, Shuji; Kamiya, Atsunori; Shishido, Toshiaki; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2018-03-01

    Although electrical activation of the carotid sinus baroreflex (baroreflex activation therapy) is being explored as a device therapy for resistant hypertension, possible effects on baroreflex dynamic characteristics of interaction between electrical stimulation and pressure inputs are not fully elucidated. To examine whether the electrical stimulation of the baroreceptor afferent nerve impedes normal short-term arterial pressure (AP) regulation mediated by the stimulated nerve, we electrically stimulated the right aortic depressor nerve (ADN) while estimating the baroreflex dynamic characteristics by imposing pressure inputs to the isolated baroreceptor region of the right ADN in nine anesthetized rats. A Gaussian white noise signal with a mean of 120 mmHg and standard deviation of 20 mmHg was used for the pressure perturbation. A tonic ADN stimulation (2 or 5 Hz, 10 V, 0.1-ms pulse width) decreased mean sympathetic nerve activity (367.0 ± 70.9 vs. 247.3 ± 47.2 arbitrary units, P ADN stimulation did not affect the slope of dynamic gain in the neural arc transfer function from pressure perturbation to sympathetic nerve activity (16.9 ± 1.0 vs. 14.7 ± 1.6 dB/decade, not significant). These results indicate that electrical stimulation of the baroreceptor afferent nerve does not significantly impede the dynamic characteristics of the arterial baroreflex concomitantly mediated by the stimulated nerve. Short-term AP regulation by the arterial baroreflex may be preserved during the baroreflex activation therapy.

  18. Human in vivo study of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the sympathetic activity after 8 weeks daily intake of fermented milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usinger, Lotte; Ibsen, Hans; Linneberg, Allan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Milk fermented by lactic acid bacteria is suggested to have antihypertensive effect in humans. In vitro and animal studies have established an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor effect of peptides in fermented milk. However, other modes of action must be considered, because...... until today no human studies have confirmed an ACE inhibition in relation to the intake of fermented milk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We undertook a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study including 94 borderline-hypertensive persons to study the effect on human physiology of Lactobacillus...... helveticus fermented milk. The subjects were randomized into three groups: Cardi04-300 ml, Cardi04-150 ml or placebo. All components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system were measured several times. Sympathetic activity was estimated by plasma noradrenaline and cardiovascular response to head-up tilt...

  19. Human in vivo study of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the sympathetic activity after 8 weeks daily intake of fermented milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usinger, Lotte; Ibsen, Hans; Linneberg, Allan; Azizi, Michel; Flambard, Bénédicte; Jensen, Lars T

    2010-03-01

    Milk fermented by lactic acid bacteria is suggested to have antihypertensive effect in humans. In vitro and animal studies have established an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor effect of peptides in fermented milk. However, other modes of action must be considered, because until today no human studies have confirmed an ACE inhibition in relation to the intake of fermented milk. We undertook a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study including 94 borderline-hypertensive persons to study the effect on human physiology of Lactobacillus helveticus fermented milk. The subjects were randomized into three groups: Cardi04-300 ml, Cardi04-150 ml or placebo. All components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system were measured several times. Sympathetic activity was estimated by plasma noradrenaline and cardiovascular response to head-up tilt at baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention. No ACE inhibition of the fermented milk was demonstrated, as none of the components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system changed. Plasma noradrenaline response to tilt test after intervention stayed unchanged between groups (P = 0.38), but declined in the group Cardi04-300 from 2.01 +/- 0.93 nmol l(-1) at baseline to 1.49 +/- 0.74 nmol l(-1) after 8 weeks (P = 0.002). There was no change in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure or heart rate between groups. Despite a known ACE inhibitory effect in vitro and in animals, milk fermented with Lb. helveticus did not inhibit ACE in humans. Our results suggest that the intake of fermented milk decreases sympathetic activity, although not to an extent mediating reductions of blood pressure and heart rate in borderline-hypertensive subjects.

  20. Unstable sleep and higher sympathetic activity during late-sleep periods of rats: implication for late-sleep-related higher cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Terry B J; Lai, Chun-Ting; Chen, Chun-Yu; Lee, Guo-She; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2013-02-01

    We proposed that the higher incidence of sleep fragmentation, sympathovagal imbalance and baroreceptor reflex impairment during quiet sleep may play a critical role in late-sleep-related cardiovascular events. Polysomnographic recording was performed through wireless transmission using freely moving Wistar-Kyoto rats over 24 h. The low-frequency power of arterial pressure variability was quantified to provide an index of vascular sympathetic activity. Spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by slope of arterial pressure-RR linear regression. As compared with early-light period (Zeitgeber time 0-6 h), rats during the late-light period (Zeitgeber time 6-12 h) showed lower accumulated quiet sleep time and higher paradoxical sleep time; furthermore, during quiet sleep, the rats showed a lower δ% of electroencephalogram, more incidents of interruptions, higher σ% and higher β% of electroencephalogram, raised low-frequency power of arterial pressure variability value and lower baroreflex sensitivity parameters. During the light period, low-frequency power of arterial pressure variability during quiet sleep had a negative correlation with accumulated quiet sleep time and δ% of electroencephalogram, while it also had a positive correlation with σ% and β% of electroencephalogram and interruption events. However, late-sleep-related raised sympathetic activity and sleep fragmentation diminished when an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist was given to the rats. Our results suggest that the higher incidence of sleep fragmentation and sympathovagal imbalance during quiet sleep may play a critical role in late-sleep-related cardiovascular events. Such sleep fragmentation is coincident with an impairment of baroreflex sensitivity, and is mediated via α1-adernoceptors. © 2012 European Sleep Research Society.

  1. Physiological changes in human cardiac sympathetic innervation and activity assessed by 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Kazuyuki; Iida, Kei; Mochizuki, Nao; Ito, Michitoshi; Nakaya, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    Physiologic changes in the human sympathetic nervous system (SNS) may be associated with cardiovascular diseases, so the present study assessed the age and gender differences in global cardiac SNS in normal subjects. The 163 subjects (74 men, 89 women; age range 40-89 years) whose coronary arteriogram was normal, and who had no other cardiac or neurohormonal diseases, and no medication affecting the autonomic nervous system were included. All study subjects underwent metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging. Both initial and delayed heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratios had a significant gender difference and showed a progressive decrease with aging. In addition, the initial H/M ratio had a significant positive correlation with the delayed H/M ratio (r=0.89, P<0.0001). Females (50-59 years) demonstrated significantly higher delayed H/M ratio than males of the same age. After the age of 60, the delayed H/M ratio in females progressively decreased with aging, similar to males. As for the washout rate, both genders had a significantly progressive increase with aging. In addition, there was a significant decrease in the delayed H/M ratio in 10 females with surgical menopause compared with 15 age-matched females without surgical menopause. Cardiac SNS appears to be regulated by various physiological factors. (author)

  2. Intrathecal Intermittent Orexin-A Causes Sympathetic Long-Term Facilitation and Sensitizes the Peripheral Chemoreceptor Response to Hypoxia in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Jae; Pilowsky, Paul M; Farnham, Melissa M J

    2016-09-01

    Intermittent hypoxia causes a persistent increase in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), which progresses to hypertension in conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea. Orexins (A and B) are hypothalamic neurotransmitters with arousal-promoting and sympathoexcitatory effects. We investigated whether the sustained elevation of SNA, termed sympathetic long-term facilitation, after acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) is caused by endogenous orexin acting on spinal sympathetic preganglionic neurons. The role of orexin in the increased SNA response to AIH was investigated in urethane-anesthetized, vagotomized, and artificially ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 58). A spinally infused subthreshold dose of orexin-A (intermittent; 0.1 nmol × 10) produced long-term enhancement in SNA (41.4% ± 6.9%) from baseline. This phenomenon was not produced by the same dose of orexin-A administered as a bolus intrathecal infusion (1 nmol; 7.3% ± 2.3%). The dual orexin receptor blocker, Almorexant, attenuated the effect of sympathetic long-term facilitation generated by intermittent orexin-A (20.7% ± 4.5% for Almorexant at 30 mg∙kg(-1) and 18.5% ± 1.2% for 75 mg∙kg(-1)), but not in AIH. The peripheral chemoreflex sympathoexcitatory response to hypoxia was greatly enhanced by intermittent orexin-A and AIH. In both cases, the sympathetic chemoreflex sensitization was reduced by Almorexant. Taken together, spinally acting orexin-A is mechanistically sufficient to evoke sympathetic long-term facilitation. However, AIH-induced sympathetic long-term facilitation appears to rely on mechanisms that are independent of orexin neurotransmission. Our findings further reveal that the activation of spinal orexin receptors is critical to enhance peripheral chemoreceptor responses to hypoxia after AIH. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  3. Myocardial adrenergic nerve activity in valvular diseases assessed by iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Yoshihiro; Fukuyama, Takaya

    1997-01-01

    Iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging was used to assess myocardial adrenergic nerve activity in patients with heart failure. MIBG planar images were obtained in 94 patients. The uptake of MIBG, calculated as the heart-to-mediastinum activity ratio in the immediate image (15 min), showed a significant decrease only in patients with severe heart failure due to cardiomyopathy, but was not changed in those with valvular diseases. Storage and release of MIBG, calculated as the percentage myocardial MIBG washout from 15 min to 4 hours after isotope injection, was substantially accelerated in both patients with cardiomyopathy and valvular diseases in proportion to the severity of heart failure. These data suggest that, in severe heart failure associated with cardiomyopathy, norepinephrine uptake is reduced. Also, myocardial adrenergic nerve activity is accelerated in proportion to the severity of heart failure independent of the underlying cause. MIBG images were analyzed in 20 patients with mitral stenosis with the same methods to clarify whether myocardial adrenergic nerve activity is different in patients with heart failure without left ventricular volume or pressure overload. Myocardial uptake of MIBG did not show any significant difference. The percentage myocardial MIBG washout was increased in patients with severe heart failure. The closest correlation was between myocardial washout and cardiac output. In heart failure due to mitral stenosis, myocardial adrenergic nerve activity is intensified. Decrease in cardiac output associated with mitral stenosis acts as a potent stimulus for this intensification. (author)

  4. Polyphenols, Antioxidants and the Sympathetic Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Rosa Maria; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo

    2017-11-14

    A high dietary intake of polyphenols has been associated with a reduced cardiovascular mortality, due to their antioxidant properties. However, growing evidence suggests that counteracting oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease might also reduce sympathetic nervous system overactivity. This article reviews the most commonly used techniques to measure sympathetic activity in humans; the role of sympathetic activation in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases; current evidence demonstrating that oxidative stress is involved in the regulation of sympathetic activity and how antioxidants and polyphenols might counteract sympathetic overactivity, particularly focusing on preliminary data from human studies. The main mechanisms by which polyphenols are cardioprotective are related to the improvement of vascular function and their anti-atherogenic effect. Furthermore, a blood pressure-lowering effect was consistently demonstrated in randomized controlled trials in humans, when the effect of flavonoid-rich foods, such as tea and chocolate, was tested. More recent studies suggest that inhibition of sympathetic overactivity might be one of the mechanisms by which these substances exert their cardioprotective effects. Indeed, an increased adrenergic traffic to the vasculature is a major mechanism of disease in a number of cardiovascular and extra-cardiac diseases, including hypertension, obesity and metabolic syndrome and heart failure. A considerable body of evidence, mostly from experimental studies, support the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species might exert sympatho-excitatory effects both at the central and at the peripheral level. Accordingly, supplementation with antioxidants might reduce adrenergic overdrive to the vasculature and blunt cardiovascular reactivity to stress. While supplementation with "classical" antioxidants such as ROS-scavengers has many limitations, increasing the intake of polyphenol-rich foods seems to be a promising novel

  5. Heart rate response to blood pressure variations: sympathetic activation versus baroreflex response in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapoznikov, Dan; Dranitzki Elhalel, Michal; Rubinger, Dvora

    2013-01-01

    Continuous systolic blood pressure (SBP) and interbeat intervals (IBI) recordings reveal sequences of consecutive beats in which SBP and heart rate change in opposite direction, representing negative feedback baroreflex mechanisms, as well as sequences in which SBP and heart rate change in the same direction (non-baroreflex), believed to represent feedforward control mechanisms. The present study was undertaken to assess the relationship between baroreflex and non-baroreflex sequences in end stage renal insufficiency. Continuous beat-to-beat SBP and IBI monitoring was performed in patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD, n=72), in age-matched patients after renal transplantation (TX, n=41) and healthy (control) individuals (C, n=34). The proportion of baroreflex and nonbaroreflex episodes and the b coefficients (the regression line slope of SBP-IBI correlation) were determined using a newly developed 1 minute sliding window method, the classical sequence technique and the "Z" coefficient method. Analysis using the 1 minute sliding window showed an increased proportion of baroreflex episodes in controls and HD, and predominance of nonbaroreflex episodes in TX. An increased proportion of nonbaroreflex episodes in TX patients relative to HD was also revealed by the "Z" method. Baroreflex and nonbaroreflex b coefficients obtained by all methods were markedly decreased in HD. This alteration was reversed at least partly in TX. In HD, both baroreflex and nonbaroreflex b coefficients were inversely correlated to age and CRP levels; in TX, the nonbaroreflex b coefficient was influenced by the type of calcineurin inhibitor. Renal status affects the contribution of baroreflex and nonbaroreflex mechanisms and the strength of SBP-IBI relationship. The predominant contribution of nonbaroreflex mechanisms in TX may be suggestive of enhanced central sympathetic control. Our data may be relevant for understanding of the pathogenesis and selection of appropriate treatment of post

  6. Advances in recording scattered light changes in crustacean nerve with electrical activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, K. M. (Kathleen M.); Rector, D. M. (David M.); Martinez, A. T. (Anne T.); Guerra, F. M. (Francisco M.); George, J. S. (John S.)

    2002-01-01

    We investigated optical changes associated with crustacean nerve stimulation using birefringent and large angle scattered light. Improved detection schemes disclosed high temporal structure of the optical signals and allowed further investigations of biophysical mechanisms responsible for such changes. Most studies of physiological activity in neuronal tissue use techniques that measure the electrical behavior or ionic permeability of the nerve, such as voltage or ion sensitive dyes injected into cells, or invasive electric recording apparatus. While these techniques provide high resolution, they are detrimental to tissue and do not easily lend themselves to clinical applications in humans. Electrical and chemical components of neural excitation evoke physical responses observed through changes in scattered and absorbed light. This method is suited for in-vivo applications. Intrinsic optical changes have shown themselves to be multifaceted in nature and point to several different physiological processes that occur with different time courses during neural excitation. Fast changes occur concomitantly with electrical events, and slow changes parallel metabolic events including changes in blood flow and oxygenation. Previous experiments with isolated crustacean nerves have been used to study the biophysical mechanisms of fast optical changes. However, they have been confounded by multiple superimposed action potentials which make it difficult to discriminate the temporal signatures of individual optical responses. Often many averages were needed to adequately resolve the signal. More recently, optical signals have been observed in single trials. Initially large angle scattering measurements were used to record these events with much of the signal coming from cellular swelling associated with water influx during activation. By exploiting the birefringent properties derived from the molecular stiucture of nerve membranes, signals appear larger with a greater contrast

  7. Polysialic Acid Regulates Sympathetic Outflow by Facilitating Information Transfer within the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokiniec, Phillip; Shahbazian, Shila; McDougall, Stuart J; Berning, Britt A; Cheng, Delfine; Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J; Burke, Peter G R; McMullan, Simon; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Hildebrandt, Herbert; Braet, Filip; Connor, Mark; Packer, Nicolle H; Goodchild, Ann K

    2017-07-05

    Expression of the large extracellular glycan, polysialic acid (polySia), is restricted in the adult, to brain regions exhibiting high levels of plasticity or remodeling, including the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). The NTS, located in the dorsal brainstem, receives constant viscerosensory afferent traffic as well as input from central regions controlling sympathetic nerve activity, respiration, gastrointestinal functions, hormonal release, and behavior. Our aims were to determine the ultrastructural location of polySia in the NTS and the functional effects of enzymatic removal of polySia, both in vitro and in vivo polySia immunoreactivity was found throughout the adult rat NTS. Electron microscopy demonstrated polySia at sites that influence neurotransmission: the extracellular space, fine astrocytic processes, and neuronal terminals. Removing polySia from the NTS had functional consequences. Whole-cell electrophysiological recordings revealed altered intrinsic membrane properties, enhancing voltage-gated K + currents and increasing intracellular Ca 2+ Viscerosensory afferent processing was also disrupted, dampening low-frequency excitatory input and potentiating high-frequency sustained currents at second-order neurons. Removal of polySia in the NTS of anesthetized rats increased sympathetic nerve activity, whereas functionally related enzymes that do not alter polySia expression had little effect. These data indicate that polySia is required for the normal transmission of information through the NTS and that changes in its expression alter sympathetic outflow. polySia is abundant in multiple but discrete brain regions, including sensory nuclei, in both the adult rat and human, where it may regulate neuronal function by mechanisms identified here. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT All cells are coated in glycans (sugars) existing predominantly as glycolipids, proteoglycans, or glycoproteins formed by the most complex form of

  8. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improves the rest-activity rhythm in midstage Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E. J.; van Someren, E. J.; Swaab, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Nightly restlessness in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is probably due to a disorder of circadian rhythms. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was previously reported to increase the strength of coupling of the circadian rest activity rhythm to Zeitgebers in early stage

  9. Non-dipping blood pressure variations in adult Kazakhs are derived from decreased daytime physical activity and increased nighttime sympathetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Yukio; Izumi, Yoichi; Kasamaki, Yuji; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Mitsubayashi, Hiromi; Ohta, Masakatsu; Ichimaru, Yuhei

    2016-01-01

    Many of the elderly Kazakhs have been found to exhibit non-dipping blood pressure variations (BPV). Such variations are seen in both normotensive and hypertensive Kazakhs. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine whether middle-aged Kazakhs also include large numbers of non-dippers, (2) to compare the characteristics of non-dipping and dipping, and (3) to clarify the mechanisms responsible for non-dipping type BPV by examining the autonomic nervous activity and physical activity. We performed ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring. The subjects were divided into two groups (dipping and non-dipping type). We monitored the subjects' physical activity with accelerometry and assessed their autonomic nerve activity by performing a frequency domain analysis of their heart rate variability (HRV). The power spectral density (PSD) of the HRV was calculated using fast Fourier transformation. We analyzed the systolic blood pressure (SBP) variations with the maximum entropy method (MEM). The dippers and non-dippers accounted for 48% and 52% of the subjects, respectively. MEM analysis revealed that the SBP variations of the non-dippers exhibited a 24 hour periodicity with a very weak PSD as well as an ultradian periodicity. The non-dippers exhibited higher low-frequency/high-frequency (LF/HF) ratio and lower HF/(LF + HF) ratios than the dippers, particularly during the nighttime. In addition, the non-dippers performed less physical activity than the dippers. These differences in cardiac autonomic function and physical activity might contribute to the generation of a weak circadian rhythm in SBP, and thus, ultimately lead to the non-dipping SBP variations observed in non-dipper Kazakhs.

  10. Salivary alpha amylase not chromogranin A reflects sympathetic activity: exercise responses in elite male wheelchair athletes with or without cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht, Christof A; Paulson, Thomas A W; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Bishop, Nicolette C

    2017-12-01

    Salivary alpha amylase (sAA) and chromogranin A (sCgA) have both been suggested as non-invasive markers for sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. A complete cervical spinal cord injury leading to tetraplegia is accompanied with sympathetic dysfunction; the aim of this study was to establish the exercise response of these markers in this in vivo model. Twenty-six elite male wheelchair athletes (C6-C7 tetraplegia: N = 8, T6-L1 paraplegia: N = 10 and non-spinal cord injured controls: N = 8) performed treadmill exercise to exhaustion. Saliva and blood samples were taken pre, post and 30 min post exercise and analysed for sAA, sCgA and plasma adrenaline concentration, respectively. In all three subgroups, sAA and sCgA were elevated post exercise (P < 0.05). Whilst sCgA was not different between subgroups, a group × time interaction for sAA explained the reduced post-exercise sAA activity in tetraplegia (162 ± 127 vs 313 ± 99 (paraplegia) and 328 ± 131 U mL -1 (controls), P = 0.005). The post-exercise increase in adrenaline was not apparent in tetraplegia (P = 0.74). A significant correlation was found between adrenaline and sAA (r = 0.60, P = 0.01), but not between adrenaline and sCgA (r = 0.06, P = 0.79). The blunted post-exercise rise in sAA and adrenaline in tetraplegia implies that both reflect SNS activity to some degree. It is questionable whether sCgA should be used as a marker for SNS activity, both due to the exercise response which is not different between the subgroups and its non-significant relationship with adrenaline.

  11. ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels simultaneously activated in nerve cell and axon after facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Tao; Sun, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Hua-Wei; Ma, Jun-Tao; Hu, Min

    2017-12-01

    The in-vitro study indicated that ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels may play an important role in reparative regeneration process after peripheral nerve injury. But, relevant in-vivo study was infrequent. In particular, there has been no report on simultaneous activation of ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels in facial nerve cell and axon after facial nerve injury. The expression of P-ERK enhanced in nerve cells at the injury side on the 1 d after the rat facial nerve was cut and kept on a higher level until 14 d, but decreased on 28 d. The expression of P-AKT enhanced in nerve cells at the injury side on 1 d after injury, and kept on a higher level until 28 d. The expression of P-ERK enhanced at the near and far sections of the injured axon on 1 d, then increased gradually and reached the maximum on 7 d, but decreased on 14 d, until down to the level before the injury on 28 d. The expression of P-AKT obviously enhanced in the injured axon on 1 d, especially in the axon of the rear section, but decreased in the axon of the rear section on 7 d, while the expression of axon in the far section increased to the maximum and kept on till 14 d. On 28 d, the expression of P-AKT decreased in both rear and far sections of the axon. The facial nerve simultaneously activated ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signal channels in facial nerve cells and axons after the cut injury, but the expression levels of P-ERK and P-AKT varied as the function of the time. In particular, they were quite different in axon of the far section. It has been speculated that two signal channels might have different functions after nerve injury. However, their specific regulating effects should still be testified by further studies in regenerative process of peripheral nerve injury.

  12. Transient sixth cranial nerve palsy following orgasm abrogated by treatment with sympathomimetic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, J H; Katsoff, B

    2014-01-01

    To describe a unique disorder where a transient 6th nerve palsy leading to diploplia following orgasm developed in a 28-year-old woman. This coincided with a weight gain of 100 pounds in a short time without a corresponding change in dietary habits. She was treated with the sympathomimetic amine dextroamphetamine sulfate. Indeed she immediately responded to treatment with dextroamphetamine sulfate sustained release capsules with complete resolution of the episodes of 6th nerve palsy following orgasm. The main importance of this case is that it suggests that orgasm causes a transient generalized decrease in sympathetic nervous system activity and that the achievement of an orgasm may require an increase in the sympathetic nervous system activity.

  13. The Potential of the Bi-Directional Gaze: A Call for Neuroscientific Research on the Simultaneous Activation of the Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Nervous Systems through Tantric Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Lidke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a call for the development of a neuroscientific research protocol for the study of the impact of Tantric practice on the autonomic nervous system. Tantric texts like Abhinavagupta’s Tantrāloka map out a complex meditative ritual system in which inward-gazing, apophatic, sense-denying contemplative practices are combined with outward-gazing, kataphatic sense-activating ritual practices. Abhinavagupta announces a culminating “bi-directional” state (pratimīlana-samādhi as the highest natural state (sahaja-samādhi in which the practitioner becomes a perfected yogi (siddhayogi. This state of maximized cognitive capacities, in which one’s inward gaze and outward world-engagement are held in balance, appears to be one in which the anabolic metabolic processes of the parasympathetic nervous system and the catabolic metabolic processes of the sympathetic nervous systems are simultaneously activated and integrated. Akin to secularized mindfulness and compassion training protocols like Emory’s CBCT, I propose the development of secularized “Tantric protocols” for the development of secular and tradition-specific methods for further exploring the potential of the human neurological system.

  14. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokkaya, Nilufer Kutay Ordu; Aras, Meltem; Yesiltepe, Elcin; Koseoglu, Fusun

    2006-12-01

    There is a high incidence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy of the upper limbs in patients with hemiplegia, and its painful and functional consequences present a problem to specialists in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This study was designed to assess the role of several factors in the occurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in patients with hemiplegia. Ninety-five consecutive stroke patients (63 male and 32 female, mean age 59+/-12 years) admitted to our hospital were evaluated. Of the study group, 29 patients (30.5%) were found to develop reflex sympathetic dystrophy. There were no significant differences between the hemiplegic patient groups with or without reflex sympathetic dystrophy regarding age, gender, etiology, side of involvement, disease duration and the presence of comorbidities. The recovery stages of hemiplegia, as shown by Brunnstrom functional classification, were significantly different between the two groups; patients in lower recovery stages tended to develop reflex sympathetic dystrophy more frequently (Preflex sympathetic dystrophy. Glenohumeral subluxation was present in 37 patients (38.9%) in our study group and the presence of this complication was related to the occurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. The presence of glenohumeral subluxation was significantly higher in patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy (21/29, 72.4%) when compared to the patients without reflex sympathetic dystrophy (16/66, 24.2%) (Preflex sympathetic dystrophy. These results suggest that lower recovery stages, reduced tonus and glenohumeral subluxation significantly contribute to the occurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the hemiplegic patient. We believe that preventive and treatment measures should consider these factors as they seem to have in common a higher risk of traumatizing the paralyzed upper limb and causing reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

  15. Activated eosinophils in association with enteric nerves in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Smyth

    Full Text Available Enteric neural dysfunction leads to increased mucous production and dysmotility in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Prior studies have shown that tissue eosinophilia is related to disease activity. We hypothesized that interactions between eosinophils and nerves contribute to neural dysfunction in IBD. Tissue from patients with intractable IBD, endoscopic biopsies from patients with steroid responsive IBD, both when active and quiescent, and control tissue were studied. Immunohistochemical studies showed that eosinophils localize to nerves in the mucosal layer of patients with Crohn's disease (CD (p<0.001 and ulcerative colitis (UC, (p<0.01. Eosinophils localized to substance P and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT immunostained nerves. Real time PCR of laser capture micro-dissected enteric ganglia demonstrated Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1 mRNA was increased 7-fold in UC (n = 4, (p = 0.03, and 10-fold in CD (n = 3, (p = 0.05. Compared with controls, eotaxin-3 (CCL-26 mRNA was increased 9-fold in UC (p = 0.04 and 15-fold in CD (p = 0.06. Eosinophil numbers correlated with disease activity, while deposition of major basic protein (MBP and eosinophil Transforming Growth Factor β-1 (TGFβ-1 expression were seen in therapeutically responsive disease. These data indicate a significant localization of eosinophils to nerves in IBD, mediated through neurally expressed ICAM-1 and eotaxin-3. This cell/neural interaction may influence the function of nerves and contribute to symptoms in IBD.

  16. Chronic recordings of hypoglossal nerve activity in a dog model of upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, M; Durand, D M; Haxhiu, M A

    1999-12-01

    The activity of the hypoglossal nerve was recorded during pharyngeal loading in sleeping dogs with chronically implanted cuff electrodes. Three self-coiling spiral-cuff electrodes were implanted in two beagles for durations of 17, 7, and 6 mo. During quiet wakefulness and sleep, phasic hypoglossal activity was either very small or not observable above the baseline noise. Applying a perpendicular force on the submental region by using a mechanical device to narrow the pharyngeal airway passage increased the phasic hypoglossal activity, the phasic esophageal pressure, and the inspiratory time in the next breath during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. The phasic hypoglossal activity sustained at the elevated level while the force was present and increased with increasing amounts of loading. The hypoglossal nerve was very active in rapid-eye-movement sleep, especially when the submental force was present. The data demonstrate the feasibility of chronic recordings of the hypoglossal nerve with cuff electrodes and show that hypoglossal activity has a fast and sustained response to the internal loading of the pharynx induced by applying a submental force during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep.

  17. [Autonomic angiotensinergic fibres in the human heart with an efferent sympathetic cophenotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlender, J; Nussberger, J; Tevaearai, H; Imboden, H

    2015-06-01

    The autonomic innervation of the heart consists of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibres, and fibres of the intrinsic ganglionated plexus with noradrenaline and acytylcholine as principal neurotransmitters. The fibres co-release neuropeptides to modulate intracardiac neurotransmission by specific presynaptic and postsynaptic receptors. The coexpression of angiotensin II in sympathetic fibres of the human heart and its role are not known so far. Autopsy specimens of human hearts were studied (n=3; ventricles). Using immunocytological methods, cryostat sections were stained by a murine monoclonal antibody (4B3) directed against angiotensin II and co-stained by polyclonal antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase, a catecholaminergic marker. Visualisation of the antibodies was by confocal light microscopy or laser scanning microscopy. Angiotensin II-positive autonomic fibres with and without a catecholaminergic cophenotype (hydroxylase-positive) were found in all parts of the human ventricles. In the epicardium, the fibres were grouped in larger bundles of up to 100 and more fibres. They followed the preformed anatomic septa and epicardial vessels towards the myocardium and endocardium where the bundles dissolved and the individual fibres spread between myocytes and within the endocardium. Generally, angiotensinergic fibres showed no synaptic enlargements or only a few if they were also catecholaminergic. The exclusively catechalominergic fibres were characterised by multiple beaded synapses. The autonomic innervation of the human heart contains angiotensinergic fibres with a sympathetic efferent phenotype and exclusively angiotensinergic fibers representing probably afferents. Angiotensinergic neurotransmission may modulate intracardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activity and thereby influence cardiac and circulatory function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Revision on Renal Sympathetic Ablation in the Treatment of Resistant Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Ana Filipa

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most prevalent diseases in the world, with about 1 billion people affected and a possible increase to 1.5 billion by 2025. Despite advances in treatment, a proportion of patients remain resistant to conventional treatment and uncontrolled, and this can adversely affect future cardiovascular events and mortality. This alarming growth is already reflected in an important public health problem and one of the largest economic burdens of health, requiring new approaches and development of different strategies to fight this problem. This review will focus on the definition of resistant hypertension and its etiology, as well as in contemporary evidence supporting the usefulness of renal sympathetic denervation while addressing current and emerging devices, potential treatment indications in the future and unresolved issues that need to be addressed before renal sympathetic denervation can be adopted not only as a last resort exclusively for resistant hypertension. Finally an evaluation algorithm for patients with resistant hypertension which should be implemented before the execution of this technique will be proposed. Renal sympathetic denervation is a technique that possibly could have future implications in the population with hypertension, especially those with true resistant hypertension. This technique aims to reduce the renal sympathetic activation (a component in the pathophysiology of hypertension) through the destruction of the renal sympathetic nerves located in the adventitia of the renal arteries. There are several catheters that can be used; each with its specifications and therefore their selection should be made individually depending on the profile of the patient. However, a detailed pre-procedure evaluation is extremely important to exclude the large percentage of individuals with uncontrolled hypertension due to several factors that make it impossible to control blood pressure, but are likely to be corrected and as such should

  19. A new method based on fractal variance function for analysis and quantification of sympathetic and vagal activity in variability of R-R time series in ECG signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, Elio; Federici, Antonio; Zbilut, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    It is known that R-R time series calculated from a recorded ECG, are strongly correlated to sympathetic and vagal regulation of the sinus pacemaker activity. In human physiology it is a crucial question to estimate such components with accuracy. Fourier analysis dominates still to day the data analysis efforts of such data ignoring that FFT is valid under some crucial restrictions that results largely violated in R-R time series data as linearity and stationarity. In order to go over such approach, we introduce a new method, called CZF. It is based on variogram analysis. It is aimed from a profound link with Recurrence Quantification Analysis that is a basic tool for investigation of non linear and non stationary time series. Therefore, a relevant feature of the method is that it finally may be applied also in cases of non linear and non stationary time series analysis. In addition, the method enables also to analyze the fractal variance function, the Generalized Fractal Dimension and, finally, the relative probability density function of the data. The CZF gives very satisfactory results. In the present paper it has been applied to direct experimental cases of normal subjects, patients with hypertension before and after therapy and in children under some different conditions of experimentation.

  20. A randomized controlled study on the effects of bisoprolol and atenolol on sympathetic nervous activity and central aortic pressure in patients with essential hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jun Zhou

    Full Text Available β-blockers (BBs with different pharmacological properties may have heterogeneous effects on sympathetic nervous activity (SNA and central aortic pressure (CAP, which are independent cardiovascular factors for hypertension. Hence, we analyzed the effects of bisoprolol and atenolol on SNA and CAP in hypertensive patients.This was a prospective, randomized, controlled study in 109 never-treated hypertensive subjects randomized to bisoprolol (5 mg or atenolol (50 mg for 4-8 weeks. SNA, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS and heart rate (HR variability (HRV were measured using power spectral analysis using a Finometer. CAP and related parameters were determined using the SphygmoCor device (pulse wave analysis.Both drugs were similarly effective in reducing brachial BP. However, central systolic BP (-14±10 mm Hg vs -6±9 mm Hg; P0.05. BRS was stable when RHR was controlled (RHR≤65 bpm, and the two treatments had similar effects on the low frequency/high frequency (HF ratio and on HF.BBs seem to have different effects on arterial distensibility and compliance in hypertensive subjects. Compared with atenolol, bisoprolol may have a better effect on CAP.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01762436.

  1. Involvement of the peripheral sensory and sympathetic nervous system in the vascular endothelial expression of ICAM-1 and the recruitment of opioid-containing immune cells to inhibit inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Shaaban A; Shaqura, Mohammed; Brendl, Ute; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Fürst, Susanna; Schäfer, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Endogenous opioids are known to be released within certain brain areas following stressful stimuli. Recently, it was shown that also leukocytes are a potential source of endogenously released opioid peptides following stress. They activate sensory neuron opioid receptors and result in the inhibition of local inflammatory pain. An important prerequisite for the recruitment of such leukocytes is the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in blood vessels of inflamed tissue. Here, we investigated the contribution of peripheral sensory and/or sympathetic nerves to the enhanced expression of ICAM-1 simultaneously with the increased recruitment of opioid peptide-containing leukocytes to promote the inhibition of inflammatory pain. Selective degeneration of either peripheral sensory or sympathetic nerve fibers by their respective neurotoxins, capsaicin or 6-hydroxydopamime, significantly reduced the subcutaneous immigration of β-endorphin- (END-) and met-enkephalin- (ENK-)-containing polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) (in the early phase) and mononuclear cells (in the late phase) during painful Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) rat hind paw inflammation. In contrast, this treatment did not alter the percentage of opioid peptide-containing leukocytes in the circulation. Calcitonin gene-related peptide- (CGRP-) and tyrosine hydroxylase- (TH-) immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers were in close contact to ICAM-1 IR blood vessels within inflamed subcutaneous tissue. The selective degeneration of sensory or sympathetic nerve fibers attenuated the enhanced expression of vascular endothelial ICAM-1 after intraplantar (i.pl.) FCA and abolished endogenous opioid peptide-mediated peripheral analgesia. Our results suggest that, during localized inflammatory pain, peripheral sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers augment the expression of vascular endothelial ICAM-1 simultaneously with the increased recruitment of opioid peptide-containing leukocytes which consequently

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Couples Localised Calcium Influx to Activation of Akt in Central Nerve Terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson-Fish, Jessica C; Cousin, Michael A; Smillie, Karen J

    2016-03-01

    The efficient retrieval of synaptic vesicle membrane and cargo in central nerve terminals is dependent on the efficient recruitment of a series of endocytosis modes by different patterns of neuronal activity. During intense neuronal activity the dominant endocytosis mode is activity-dependent endocytosis (ADBE). Triggering of ADBE is linked to calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation since the same stimulation intensities trigger both. Dynamin I dephosphorylation is maximised by a simultaneous inhibition of its kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) by the protein kinase Akt, however it is unknown how increased neuronal activity is transduced into Akt activation. To address this question we determined how the activity-dependent increases in intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) control activation of Akt. This was achieved using either trains of high frequency action potentials to evoke localised [Ca(2+)]i increases at active zones, or a calcium ionophore to raise [Ca(2+)]i uniformly across the nerve terminal. Through the use of either non-specific calcium channel antagonists or intracellular calcium chelators we found that Akt phosphorylation (and subsequent GSK3 phosphorylation) was dependent on localised [Ca(2+)]i increases at the active zone. In an attempt to determine mechanism, we antagonised either phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or calmodulin. Activity-dependent phosphorylation of both Akt and GSK3 was arrested on inhibition of PI3K, but not calmodulin. Thus localised calcium influx in central nerve terminals activates PI3K via an unknown calcium sensor to trigger the activity-dependent phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3.

  3. Effect of nicotine on the pelvic afferent nerve activity and bladder pressure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontani, Hitoshi; Okamura, Takashi; Kimura, Satoko; Ishida, Kazuumi; Takeno, Satoshi

    2009-08-01

    To record afferent nerve activity and bladder pressure in anesthetized male rats and to investigate whether increased afferent nerve activity induced by nicotine is able to evoke reflex bladder contractions. Using continuous infusion cystometrography, bladder pressure was measured via a bladder cannula. Afferent activity was recorded in the uncut L6 dorsal root. Nicotine was injected intra-arterially through a cannula placed near the bifurcation of the internal iliac artery a few minutes after micturition. Nicotine (0.15-1.5 micromol) evoked a marked elevation of afferent discharge without a simultaneous increase in bladder pressure. Bladder contractions appeared about 43 and 19 s after bolus injection of nicotine at 0.45 and 1.5 micromol, respectively. Firing rates of afferent nerves were reduced when the contraction appeared. Continuous infusion of nicotine at 0.75 micromol/min for 20 min evoked marked elevation of afferent discharge, which was maintained during infusion of nicotine and after it had been withdrawn. Repetitive contractions were observed thereafter and disappeared when the L6 dorsal roots were bilaterally resected. A transient increase in afferent discharges induced by bolus injection of nicotine was unable to evoke reflex bladder contraction. Repetitive bladder contractions after withdrawal of continuous nicotine infusion were induced in a reflex manner by the increased afferent activity.

  4. SMN requirement for synaptic vesicle, active zone and microtubule postnatal organization in motor nerve terminals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Torres-Benito

    Full Text Available Low levels of the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN protein produce Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA, a severe monogenetic disease in infants characterized by muscle weakness and impaired synaptic transmission. We report here severe structural and functional alterations in the organization of the organelles and the cytoskeleton of motor nerve terminals in a mouse model of SMA. The decrease in SMN levels resulted in the clustering of synaptic vesicles (SVs and Active Zones (AZs, reduction in the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP, and the recycling pool (RP of synaptic vesicles, a decrease in active mitochondria and limiting of neurofilament and microtubule maturation. We propose that SMN is essential for the normal postnatal maturation of motor nerve terminals and that SMN deficiency disrupts the presynaptic organization leading to neurodegeneration.

  5. Vagus nerve stimulation magnet activation for seizures: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R S; Eggleston, K S; Wright, C W

    2015-01-01

    Some patients receiving VNS Therapy report benefit from manually activating the generator with a handheld magnet at the time of a seizure. A review of 20 studies comprising 859 subjects identified patients who reported on-demand magnet mode stimulation to be beneficial. Benefit was reported in a weighted average of 45% of patients (range 0-89%) using the magnet, with seizure cessation claimed in a weighted average of 28% (range 15-67%). In addition to seizure termination, patients sometimes reported decreased intensity or duration of seizures or the post-ictal period. One study reported an isolated instance of worsening with magnet stimulation (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 157, 2003 and 560). All of the reviewed studies assessed adjunctive magnet use. No studies were designed to provide Level I evidence of efficacy of magnet-induced stimulation. Retrospective analysis of one pivotal randomized trial of VNS therapy showed significantly more seizures terminated or improved in the active stimulation group vs the control group. Prospective, controlled studies would be required to isolate the effect and benefit of magnet mode stimulation and to document that the magnet-induced stimulation is the proximate cause of seizure reduction. Manual application of the magnet to initiate stimulation is not always practical because many patients are immobilized or unaware of their seizures, asleep or not in reach of the magnet. Algorithms based on changes in heart rate at or near the onset of the seizure provide a methodology for automated responsive stimulation. Because literature indicates additional benefits from on-demand magnet mode stimulation, a potential role exists for automatic activation of stimulation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. GTK, a Src-related tyrosine kinase, induces nerve growth factor-independent neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells through activation of the Rap1 pathway. Relationship to Shb tyrosine phosphorylation and elevated levels of focal adhesion kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annerén, C.; Reedquist, K. A.; Bos, J. L.; Welsh, M.

    2000-01-01

    The rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 is extensively used as a model for studies of neuronal cell differentiation. These cells develop a sympathetic neuron-like phenotype when cultured in the presence of nerve growth factor. The present study was performed in order to assess the role of mouse GTK

  7. Activity-based protein profiling reveals broad activity of the nerve agent sarin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuin, A.W.; Mol, M.A.E.; Berg, R.M. van den; Fidder, A.; Marel, G.A. van der; Overkleeft, H.S.; Noort, D.

    2009-01-01

    Elucidation of noncholinesterase protein targets of organophosphates, and nerve agents in particular, may reveal additional mechanisms for their high toxicity as well as clues for novel therapeutic approaches toward intoxications with these agents. Within this framework, we here describe the

  8. Imaging stretch-activated firing of spinal afferent nerve endings in mouse colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee etravis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal afferent neurons play a major role in detecting noxious and innocuous stimuli from visceral organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract. However, all our understanding about spinal afferents has been obtained from recordings of spinal afferent axons, or cell bodies that lie outside the gut wall, or peripheral organ they innervate. No recordings have been made directly from spinal afferent nerve endings, which is where sensory transduction occurs. We developed a preparation whereby recordings could be made from rectal afferent nerve endings in the colon, to characterize mechanisms underlying sensory transduction. Dorsal root ganglia (L6-S2 were removed from mice, whilst retaining neural continuity with the colon. Fluo-4-AM was used to record from rectal afferent nerve endings in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle at 36oC. In slack (unstretched preparations of colon, no calcium transients were recorded from spinal afferent endings. However, in response to a maintained increase in circumferential diameter, a maintained discharge of calcium transients occurred simultaneously in multiple discrete varicosities along single axons of rectal afferents in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle. Stretch-activated calcium transients were resistant to hexamethonium and nifedipine, but were abolished by tetrodotoxin, CPA, BAPTA-AM, cobalt, gadolinium, or replacement of extracellular Na+ with NMDG. In summary, we present a novel preparation in which stretch-activated firing of spinal afferent nerve endings can be recorded, using calcium imaging. We show that circumferential stretch of the colon activates a maintained discharge of calcium transients simultaneously in varicosities along single rectal afferent endings in myenteric ganglia and circular muscle. Non-selective cation channels, TTX-sensitive Na+ channels and both extracellular calcium influx and intracellular Ca2+ stores are required for stretch-activated calcium transients in rectal afferent

  9. AMPUTATION AND REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTZEN, JHB; EISMA, WH

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by chronic burning pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and vasolability. Patients are difficult to treat and the prognosis is very often poor. This report emphasizes that an amputation in case of a reflex sympathetic

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying β-Adrenergic Receptor-Mediated Cross-Talk between Sympathetic Neurons and Immune Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Lorton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cross-talk between the sympathetic nervous system (SNS and immune system is vital for health and well-being. Infection, tissue injury and inflammation raise firing rates of sympathetic nerves, increasing their release of norepinephrine (NE in lymphoid organs and tissues. NE stimulation of β2-adrenergic receptors (ARs in immune cells activates the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA intracellular signaling pathway, a pathway that interfaces with other signaling pathways that regulate proliferation, differentiation, maturation and effector functions in immune cells. Immune–SNS cross-talk is required to maintain homeostasis under normal conditions, to develop an immune response of appropriate magnitude after injury or immune challenge, and subsequently restore homeostasis. Typically, β2-AR-induced cAMP is immunosuppressive. However, many studies report actions of β2-AR stimulation in immune cells that are inconsistent with typical cAMP–PKA signal transduction. Research during the last decade in non-immune organs, has unveiled novel alternative signaling mechanisms induced by β2-AR activation, such as a signaling switch from cAMP–PKA to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways. If alternative signaling occurs in immune cells, it may explain inconsistent findings of sympathetic regulation of immune function. Here, we review β2-AR signaling, assess the available evidence for alternative signaling in immune cells, and provide insight into the circumstances necessary for “signal switching” in immune cells.

  11. Glutamate and GABA in vestibulo-sympathetic pathway neurons

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    Gay R Holstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively. The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. Vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the

  12. Persistence of renal nerve and spinal reflex activities and visceral motility after asphyxial anoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, C Y; Su, C K; Hsieh, J H; Wang, H Y; Yuan, C; Yang, J M; Tseng, C J; Tung, C S; Chen, H I; Yen, M S

    1990-01-01

    Phrenic and renal nerves activities, spinal reflex (knee jerk and the evoked monosynaptic reflex response from the 5th lumbar ventral root), motility of the stomach, duodenum, jejunum and colon, and motility of urinary bladder during and after the lethal asphyxia were studied in cats under intraperitoneal urethane (400 mg/kg) and chloralose (40 mg/kg) anesthesia. Asphyxial anoxia produced one or two peaks of elevation of systemic arterial pressure (SAP) followed by a progressive decrease of SAP and narrowing of pulse pressure and eventual complete cardiovascular arrest. The phrenic nerve activity increased markedly during the final asphyxial SAP elevation; it then decreased along with the decline of SAP and ceased permanently when the SAP reached about 50 mmHg. The renal nerve activity increased along with each phase of pressure elevation. During the terminal stage of progressive SAP fall, the renal nerve activity fluctuated up and down 2-3 times before the SAP dropped to zero, and the activity persisted for an average of 202 sec thereafter. Data suggest that the motoneurons of the phrenic nerve in the cervical spinal cord and medulla oblongata are more vulnerable to asphyxia than the motoneurons responsible for the spinal reflex in the pathway from medulla, the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and the celiac ganglion. During anoxia, the lumbar spinal reflex showed an initial inhibition then potentiation afterward. Even after the SAP had reached zero, the spinal reflex could still be elicited for one to a few minutes. This suggests that the spinal cord can function sometime after complete cardiac arrest subsequent to asphyxia. The motility of the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, colon and urinary bladder usually decreased during the period of pressure elevation. However, the activity was enhanced during the terminal stage of pressure decline. The enhancement of the colon and bladder motility, spasmodic in nature, was particularly prominent, more so than the

  13. Sympathetic Blocks Provided Sustained Pain Relief in a Patient with Refractory Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

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    Jianguo Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system has been implicated in pain associated with painful diabetic neuropathy. However, therapeutic intervention targeted at the sympathetic nervous system has not been established. We thus tested the hypothesis that sympathetic nerve blocks significantly reduce pain in a patient with painful diabetic neuropathy who has failed multiple pharmacological treatments. The diagnosis of small fiber sensory neuropathy was based on clinical presentations and confirmed by skin biopsies. A series of 9 lumbar sympathetic blocks over a 26-month period provided sustained pain relief in his legs. Additional thoracic paravertebral blocks further provided control of the pain in the trunk which can occasionally be seen in severe diabetic neuropathy cases, consequent to extensive involvement of the intercostal nerves. These blocks provided sustained and significant pain relief and improvement of quality of life over a period of more than two years. We thus provided the first clinical evidence supporting the notion that sympathetic nervous system plays a critical role in painful diabetic neuropathy and sympathetic blocks can be an effective management modality of painful diabetic neuropathy. We concluded that the sympathetic nervous system is a valuable therapeutic target of pharmacological and interventional modalities of treatments in painful diabetic neuropathy patients.

  14. MR imaging and T2 measurements in peripheral nerve repair with activation of Toll-like receptor 4 of neurotmesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Liejing; Li, Haojiang; Wen, Xuehua; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2014-05-15

    To investigate the role of MR imaging in neurotmesis combined with surgical repair and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Forty-eight rats received subepineurial microinjection of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n = 24) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, n = 24) immediately after surgical repair of the transected sciatic nerve. Sequential fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging and quantitative T2 measurements were obtained at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after surgery, with histologic assessments performed at regular intervals. T2 relaxation times and histological quantification of the distal stumps were measured and compared. The distal stumps of transected nerves treated with LPS or PBS both showed persistent enlargement and hyperintense signal. T2 values of the distal stumps showed a rapid rise to peak level followed by a rapid decline pattern in nerves treated with LPS, while exhibiting a slow rise to peak value followed by a slow decline in nerves treated with PBS. Nerves treated with LPS exhibited more prominent macrophage recruitment, faster myelin debris clearance and more pronounced nerve regeneration. Nerves treated with TLR4 activation had a characteristic pattern of T2 value change over time. Longitudinal T2 measurements can be used to detect the enhanced repair effect associated with TLR4 activation in the surgical repair of neurotmesis. (orig.)

  15. Hypothalamic CRF and Norepinephrine Mediate Sympathetic and Cardiovascular Responses to Acute Intracarotid Injection of TNF-α in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Felder, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Systemic administration of tumour necrosis factor - alpha (TNF-α) induces the release of norepinephrine (NE) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of hypothalamus and an increase in expression of corticotrophin-releasing-factor (CRF) and CRF type 1 receptors. We explored the hypothesis that CRF and NE in PVN mediate the cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to acute systemic administration of TNF-α. In anaesthetised rats, the increases in arterial pressure and heart rate induced by intracarotid artery injection of TNF-α were attenuated by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of either the α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin or the CRF antagonist α-helical CRF. Prazosin blocked the TNF-α-induced increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), while α-helical CRF substantially reduced the RSNA response. Conversely, CRF and the α1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PE), administered ICV, both elicited increases in PVN neuronal activity, RSNA, arterial pressure and heart rate. Microinjection of CRF and PE directly into PVN evoked smaller responses. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that NE and CRF in the PVN mediate the cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to acute systemic administration of TNF-α. PMID:18777604

  16. Suppression of sympathetic detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C., Jr.; Gunger, M. E.; Craig, B. G.; Parsons, G. H.

    1984-08-01

    There are two basic approaches to suppression of sympathetic detonation. Minimizing the shock sensitivity of the explosive to long duration pressure will obviously reduce interround separation distances. However, given that the explosive sensitivity is fixed, then much can be gained through the use of simple barriers placed between the rounds. Researchers devised calculational methods for predicting shock transmission; experimental methods have been developed to characterize explosive shock sensitivity and observe the response of acceptors to barriers. It was shown that both EAK and tritonal can be initiated to detonation with relatively low pressure shocks of long durations. It was also shown that to be an effective barrier between the donor and acceptor, the material must attenuate shock and defect fragments. Future actions will concentrate on refining the design of barriers to minimize weight, volume, and cost.

  17. Origin and pharmacological response of atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by activation of mediastinal nerves in canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J Andrew; Richer, Louis-Philippe; Pagé, Pierre; Vinet, Alain; Kus, Teresa; Vermeulen, Michel; Nadeau, Réginald; Cardinal, René

    2005-03-31

    We sought to determine the sites of origin of atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by activating mediastinal nerves, as well as the response of such arrhythmias to autonomic modulation. Under general anaesthesia, atrioventricular block was induced after thoracotomy in 19 canines. Brief trains of 5 electrical stimuli were delivered to right-sided mediastinal nerves during the atrial refractory period. Unipolar electrograms were recorded from 191 right and left atrial epicardial sites under several conditions, i.e. (i) with intact nervous systems and following (ii) acute decentralization of the intrathoracic nervous system or administration of (iii) atropine, (iv) timolol, (v) hexamethonium. Concomitant right atrial endocardial mapping was performed in 7 of these dogs. Mediastinal nerve stimulation consistently initiated bradycardia followed by atrial tachyarrhythmias. In the initial tachyarrhythmia beats, early epicardial breakthroughs were identified in the right atrial free wall (28/50 episodes) or Bachmann bundle region (22/50), which corresponded to endocardial sites of origin associated with the right atrial subsidiary pacemaker complex, i.e. the crista terminalis and dorsal locations including the right atrial aspect of the interatrial septum. Neuronally induced responses were eliminated by atropine, modified by timolol and unaffected by acute neuronal decentralization. After hexamethonium, responses to extra-pericardial but not intra-pericardial nerve stimulation were eliminated. It is concluded that concomitant activation of cholinergic and adrenergic efferent intrinsic cardiac neurons induced by right-sided efferent neuronal stimulation initiates atrial tachyarrhythmias that originate from foci anatomically related to the right atrial pacemaker complex and tissues underlying major atrial ganglionated plexuses.

  18. Sympathetic Activation Does Not Affect the Cardiac and Respiratory Contribution to the Relationship between Blood Pressure and Pial Artery Pulsation Oscillations in Healthy Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel J Winklewski

    Full Text Available Using a novel method called near-infrared transillumination backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS that allows for the non-invasive measurement of pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ and subarachnoid width (sas-TQ in humans, we assessed the influence of sympathetic activation on the cardiac and respiratory contribution to blood pressure (BP cc-TQ oscillations in healthy subjects.The pial artery and subarachnoid width response to handgrip (HGT and cold test (CT were studied in 20 healthy subjects. The cc-TQ and sas-TQ were measured using NIR-T/BSS; cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV was measured using Doppler ultrasound of the left internal carotid artery; heart rate (HR and beat-to-beat mean BP were recorded using a continuous finger-pulse photoplethysmography; respiratory rate (RR, minute ventilation (MV, end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2 and end-tidal O2 (EtO2 were measured using a metabolic and spirometry module of the medical monitoring system. Wavelet transform analysis was used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations.HGT evoked an increase in BP (+15.9%; P<0.001, HR (14.7; P<0.001, SaO2 (+0.5; P<0.001 EtO2 (+2.1; P<0.05 RR (+9.2%; P = 0.05 and MV (+15.5%; P<0.001, while sas-TQ was diminished (-8.12%; P<0.001, and a clear trend toward cc-TQ decline was observed (-11.0%; NS. CBFV (+2.9%; NS and EtCO2 (-0.7; NS did not change during HGT. CT evoked an increase in BP (+7.4%; P<0.001, sas-TQ (+3.5%; P<0.05 and SaO2(+0.3%; P<0.05. HR (+2.3%; NS, CBFV (+2.0%; NS, EtO2 (-0.7%; NS and EtCO2 (+0.9%; NS remained unchanged. A trend toward decreased cc-TQ was observed (-5.1%; NS. The sas-TQ response was biphasic with elevation during the first 40 seconds (+8.8% vs. baseline; P<0.001 and subsequent decline (+4.1% vs. baseline; P<0.05. No change with respect to wavelet coherence and wavelet phase coherence was found between the BP and cc-TQ oscillations.Short sympathetic activation does not affect the cardiac and respiratory contribution to the relationship

  19. A combination of P wave electrocardiography and plasma brain natriuretic peptide level for predicting the progression to persistent atrial fibrillation: comparisons of sympathetic activity and left atrial size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Yasushi; Kaneko, Kyouichi; Kodama, Yusuke; Miyoshi, Fumito; Li, Hui-Ling; Watanabe, Norikazu; Asano, Taku; Tanno, Kaoru; Suyama, Jumpei; Namiki, Atsuo; Gokan, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Youichi

    2013-11-01

    Development of atrial fibrillation (AF) is complexly associated with electrical and structural remodeling and other factors every stage of AF development. We hypothesized that P wave electrocardiography with an elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level would be associated with the progression to persistence from paroxysmal AF. P wave electrocardiography such as a maximum P wave duration (MPWD) and dispersion by 12-leads ECG, heart/mediastinum (H/M) ratio by delayed iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphic imaging, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and left atrial dimension (LAD) by echocardiography, and plasma BNP level were measured to evaluate the electrical and structural properties and sympathetic activity in 71 patients (mean ± standard deviation, age: 67 ± 13 years, 63.4 % males) with idiopathic paroxysmal AF. Over a 12.9-year follow-up period, AF developed into persistent AF in 30 patients. A wider MPWD (>129 ms) (p = 0.001), wider P wave dispersion (>60 ms) (p = 0.001), LAD enlargement (>40 mm) (p = 0.001), higher BNP level (>72 pg/mL) (p = 0.002), lower H/M ratio (≤2.7) (p = 0.025), and lower LVEF (≤60 %) (p = 0.035) were associated with the progression to persistent AF, and the wide MPWD was an independently powerful predictor of the progression to persistent AF with a hazard ratio (HR) of 5.49 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.38-12.7, p < 0.0001] after adjusting for potential confounding variables, such as age and sex. The combination of wide MPWD and elevated BNP level was additive and incremental prognostic power with 13.3 [2.16-13, p < 0.0001]. The wide MPWD with elevated BNP level was associated with the progression to persistent AF.

  20. A shift in myocardial substrate, improved endothelial function, and diminished sympathetic activity may contribute to the anti-anginal impact of very-low-fat diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, M F

    2004-01-01

    A new category of anti-anginal drug - exemplified by ranolazine - is believed to work by partially inhibiting cardiac oxidation of fatty acids; oxidation of glucose requires less oxygen per mol of ATP generated, and thus is preferable to fat oxidation when oxygen availability is limiting in underperfused cardiac tissue. Unfortunately, there is no reason to believe that these drugs inhibit fat oxidation selectively in the heart; thus, chronic use of these drugs can be expected to increase body fat stores until the original rate of fat oxidation is restored by mass action - presumably negating the therapeutic benefit in angina, while exacerbating the manifold adverse effects of insulin resistance syndrome. The rational way to decrease cardiac metabolic reliance on fatty acids is to consume a very-low-fat quasi-vegan diet (i.e., 10% fat calories). Indeed, such diets are known to have a rapid and substantial therapeutic impact on anginal symptoms, while concurrently benefiting insulin sensitivity, markedly improving serum lipid profile, promoting leanness, and lessening coronary risk. A reduction in diurnal insulin secretion might also be achieved, which would be expected to decrease sympathetic activity. While reduced myocardial demand for oxygen doubtless contributes to the beneficial impact of such diets on angina, it is likely that improved cardiac perfusion consequent to improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation also plays a role in this regard. Supplemental carnitine, also beneficial in angina, appears to improve utilization of glucose in the ischemic myocardium by lowering elevated acetyl-coA levels and thereby disinhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase. Certain other nutraceuticals may aid control of angina by improving endothelial function. In the longer term, these measures have the potential to slow or reverse the progression of stenotic lesions that underlie most cases of angina. These safe and relatively inexpensive nutritional strategies for coping with

  1. A fine structural localization of the non-specific cholinesterase activity in glomerular nerve formations (endings).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubový, P

    1990-01-01

    Snout glabrous skin (rhinarium) of the cat is innervated not only by typical simple lamellar corpuscles but also glomerular formations. In contrast to simple lamellar corpuscles, glomerular nerve formations are located away the dermal papillae. In cross sections, glomerular nerve formation consists of several axonal profiles enveloped by 1-2 cytoplasmic lamellae of Schwann cells. The space among them is filled by collagenous microfibrils and the basal lamina-like material. Capsule was composed from fibroblast-like cells without definite basal lamina. An electron-dense reaction product due to non-specific cholinesterase activity was associated with Schwann cells and their processes surrounding unmyelinated terminal portion of the sensory axons. Abundant reaction product was bound to the collagenous microfibrils and was deposited in extracellular matrix between Schwann cell processes. These results are further evidence for the presence of the non-specific cholinesterase molecules as integral component of the extracellular matrix in sensory corpuscles. On the basis of histochemical study two possible explanation are considered for functional involving of this enzyme in sensory nerve formations.

  2. Polyamidoamine dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide attenuates nerve injury-induced spinal cord microglia activation and mechanical allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwisung; Choi, Boomin; Lim, Hyoungsub; Min, Hyunjung; Oh, Jae Hoon; Choi, Sunghyun; Cho, Joung Goo; Park, Jong-Sang; Lee, Sung Joong

    2017-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence on the causal role of spinal cord microglia activation in the development of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury suggests that microglial activation inhibitors might be useful analgesics for neuropathic pain. Studies also have shown that polyamidoamine dendrimer may function as a drug delivery vehicle to microglia in the central nervous system. In this regard, we developed polyamidoamine dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide, a previously identified microglial activation inhibitor, and tested its analgesic efficacy in a mouse peripheral nerve injury model. Result Polyamidoamine dendrimer was delivered selectively to spinal cord microglia upon intrathecal administration. Dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide inhibited lipoteichoic acid-induced proinflammatory gene expression in primary glial cells. In addition, dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide administration (intrathecal) inhibited peripheral nerve injury-induced spinal cord microglial activation and the expression of pain-related genes in the spinal cord, including Nox2, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6. Dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide administration right after nerve injury almost completely reversed peripheral nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia for up to three days. Meanwhile, dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide administration 1.5 days post injury significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide inhibits spinal cord microglia activation and attenuates neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury, which has therapeutic implications for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  3. Glycinergic inhibition of BAT sympathetic premotor neurons in rostral raphe pallidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Ellen Paula Santos da; Madden, Christopher J; Morrison, Shaun F

    2017-06-01

    The rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa) contains sympathetic premotor neurons controlling thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT). We sought to determine whether a tonic activation of glycine A receptors (Gly A R) in the rRPa contributes to the inhibitory regulation of BAT sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and of cardiovascular parameters in anesthetized rats. Nanoinjection of the Gly A R antagonist, strychnine (STR), into the rRPa of intact rats increased BAT SNA (peak: +495%), BAT temperature (T BAT , +1.1°C), expired CO 2 , (+0.4%), core body temperature (T CORE , +0.2°C), mean arterial pressure (MAP, +4 mmHg), and heart rate (HR, +57 beats/min). STR into rRPa in rats with a postdorsomedial hypothalamus transection produced similar increases in BAT thermogenic and cardiovascular parameters. Glycine nanoinjection into the rRPa evoked a potent inhibition of the cooling-evoked increases in BAT SNA (nadir: -74%), T BAT (-0.2°C), T CORE (-0.2°C), expired CO 2 (-0.2%), MAP (-8 mmHg), and HR (-22 beats/min) but had no effect on the increases in these variables evoked by STR nanoinjection into rRPa. Nanoinjection of GABA into the rRPa inhibited the STR-evoked BAT SNA (nadir: -86%) and reduced the expired CO 2 (-0.4%). Blockade of glutamate receptors in rRPa reduced the STR-evoked increases in BAT SNA (nadir: -61%), T BAT (-0.5°C), expired CO 2 (-0.3%), MAP (-9 mmHg), and HR (-33 beats/min). We conclude that a tonically active glycinergic input to the rRPa contributes to the inhibitory regulation of the discharge of BAT sympathetic premotor neurons and of BAT thermogenesis and energy expenditure. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Alternating myocardial sympathetic neural function of athlete's heart in professional cycle racers examined with iodine-123-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Keiko; Inoue, Tomio; Hasegawa, Akira; Oriuchi, Noboru; Okamoto, Eiichi; Tomaru, Yumi; Endo, Keigo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-08-01

    Myocardial sympathetic neural function in professional athletes who had the long-term tremendous cardiac load has not been fully investigated by myocardial iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake in comparison with power spectral analysis (PSA) in electrocardiography. Eleven male professional cycle racers and age-matched 11 male healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. The low frequency components in the power spectral density (LF), the high frequency components in the power spectral density (HF), the LF/HF ratio and mean R-R interval were derived from PSA and time-domain analysis of heart rate variability in electrocardiography. The mean heart-to-mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M ratio) of the MIBG uptake, in professional cycle racers was significantly lower than that in healthy volunteers (p<0.01) and HF power in professional cycle racers was significantly higher than that in healthy volunteers (p<0.05). In the group of professional cycle racers, the H/M ratio showed a significant correlation with the R-R interval, as indices of parasympathetic nerve activity (r=0.80, p<0.01), but not with the LF/HF ratio as an index of sympathetic nerve activity. These results may indicate that parasympathetic nerve activity has an effect on MIBG uptake in a cyclist's heart. (author)

  5. Hepatic intestinal uptake and release of catecholamines in alcoholic cirrhosis. Evidence of enhanced hepatic intestinal sympathetic nervous activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Ring-Larsen, H; Christensen, N J

    1987-01-01

    Hepatic intestinal and whole body plasma clearance and appearance of noradrenaline (NA) was quantified in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 12) and in controls (n = 6). As NA may be released as well as removed in the same vascular bed, infusion of tritium labelled NA (3H-NA) was carried out...... during hepatic vein catheterisation in order to determine both flux rates. In alcoholic cirrhosis plasma concentrations of endogenous NA and adrenaline (A) were significantly above control values (NA: median 2.4 v 1.7 nmol/l, p less than 0.02; A: 0.38 v 0.19 nmol/l, p less than 0.01). Whole body...... clearance of 3H-NA equal in the two groups (1.6 v 1.7 l/min, ns), while as the overall appearance rate of NA was significantly higher in alcoholic cirrhosis (4.2 v 2.6 nmol/min, p less than 0.02) indicating an enhanced sympathoadrenal activity in this group. The hepatic intestinal clearances of A, NA, and 3...

  6. Isolated Infraspinatus Atrophy Secondary to Suprascapular Nerve Neuropathy Results in Altered Shoulder Muscles Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contemori, Samuele; Biscarini, Andrea

    2018-01-24

    Isolated infraspinatus atrophy (IIA) is a common condition among overhead-activity athletes, which affects the hitting shoulder and is caused by suprascapular nerve injury. The loss of infraspinatus function could lead to altered activity of the glenohumeral and scapulothoracic muscles and compromise the optimal shoulder function. To assess the surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity patterns, relationships, and response latencies of relevant shoulder girdle muscles in professional volleyball players with IIA and in healthy control players. Cross-sectional study. Research laboratory. Twenty-four male professional volleyball players (12 players with diagnosed IIA and 12 healthy players) recruited from local volleyball teams. sEMG activity of anterior, middle and posterior deltoid, upper, middle and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior was recorded and evaluated during a movement of shoulder abduction in the scapular plane, monitored with an optoelectronic motion capture system. sEMG activity, relationships, and response latencies of the selected muscles were analyzed with ANOVA models, to highlight statistical differences within and between groups. Athletes with IIA demonstrated significant higher deltoid and trapezius muscles activity, and lower serratus anterior activity, compared with the contralateral shoulder and with healthy athletes. The shoulder with IIA also showed a higher activity ratios between the upper trapezius and the other scapulothoracic muscles, in addition to anticipated activation of the upper trapezius and delayed activation of the serratus anterior, with regard to the onset of shoulder movement. The present study highlighted altered shoulder muscle activity levels, scapulothoracic muscles imbalances, and abnormal scapulothoracic recruitment patterns in the hitting shoulder of professional volleyball players with IIA, secondary to suprascapular nerve neuropathy. Such shoulder girdle muscles impairments may compromise the optimal

  7. Sweat pore reactivity as a surrogate measure of sympathetic nervous system activity in trauma-exposed individuals with and without posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familoni, Babajide O; Gregor, Kristin L; Dodson, Thomas S; Krzywicki, Alan T; Lowery, Bobby N; Orr, Scott P; Suvak, Michael K; Rasmusson, Ann M

    2016-09-01

    Stress analysis by FLIR (forward-looking infrared) evaluation (SAFE) has been demonstrated to monitor sweat pore activation (SPA) as a novel surrogate measure of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity in a normal population. SNS responses to a series of 15 1-s, 82 dB, white noise bursts were measured by skin conductance (SC) and SAFE monitoring of SPA on the fingers (FiP) and face (FaP) in 10 participants with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 16 trauma-exposed participants without PTSD (Mage  = 48.92 ± 12.00 years; 26.9% female). Within participants, SC and FiP responses across trials were strongly correlated (r = .92, p < .001). Correlations between SC and FaP (r = .76, p = .001) and between FiP and FaP (r = .47, p = .005) were smaller. The habituation of SNS responses across the 15 trials was substantial (SC: d = -2.97; FiP: d = -2.34; FaP: d = -1.02). There was a strong correlation between habituation effects for SC and FiP (r = .76, p < .001), but not for SC and FaP (r = .15, p = .45) or FiP and FaP (r = .29, p = .16). Participants with PTSD showed larger SNS responses to the first loud noise than those without PTSD. PTSD reexperiencing symptoms assessed by the PTSD Checklist on the day of testing were associated with the SNS responses to the first loud noise measured by SC (d = 1.19) and FiP (d = .99), but not FaP (d = .10). This study confirms convergence of SAFE and SC as valid measures of SNS activity. SAFE FiP and SC responses were highly predictive of self-rated PTSD reexperiencing symptoms. SAFE may offer an attractive alternative for applications in PTSD and similar populations. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Upregulation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Cells by Nerve Injury Contributes to Development of Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, You-Qing; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Nerve injury induces long-term changes in gene expression in the nociceptive circuitry and can lead to chronic neuropathic pain. However, the transcriptional mechanism involved in neuropathic pain is poorly understood. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATc) is a transcriptional factor regulated by the Ca2+-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin. In this study, we determined nerve injury–induced changes in the expression of NFATc1–c4 in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cords an...

  9. Divergent muscle sympathetic responses to dynamic leg exercise in heart failure and age-matched healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarius, Catherine F; Millar, Philip J; Murai, Hisayoshi; Morris, Beverley L; Marzolini, Susan; Oh, Paul; Floras, John S

    2015-02-01

    People with diminished ventricular contraction who develop heart failure have higher sympathetic nerve firing rates at rest compared with healthy individuals of a similar age and this is associated with less exercise capacity. During handgrip exercise, sympathetic nerve activity to muscle is higher in patients with heart failure but the response to leg exercise is unknown because its recording requires stillness. We measured sympathetic activity from one leg while the other leg cycled at a moderate level and observed a decrease in nerve firing rate in healthy subjects but an increase in subjects with heart failure. Because these nerves release noradrenaline, which can restrict muscle blood flow, this observation helps explain the limited exercise capacity of patients with heart failure. Lower nerve traffic during exercise was associated with greater peak oxygen uptake, suggesting that if exercise training attenuated sympathetic outflow functional capacity in heart failure would improve. The reflex fibular muscle sympathetic nerve (MSNA) response to dynamic handgrip exercise is elicited at a lower threshold in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The present aim was to test the hypothesis that the contralateral MSNA response to mild to moderate dynamic one-legged exercise is augmented in HFrEF relative to age- and sex-matched controls. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure and MSNA were recorded in 16 patients with HFrEF (left ventricular ejection fraction = 31 ± 2%; age 62 ± 3 years, mean ± SE) and 13 healthy control subjects (56 ± 2 years) before and during 2 min of upright one-legged unloaded cycling followed by 2 min at 50% of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2,peak). Resting HR and blood pressure were similar between groups whereas MSNA burst frequency was higher (50.0 ± 2.0 vs. 42.3 ± 2.7 bursts min(-1), P = 0.03) and V̇O2,peak lower (18.0 ± 2.0 vs. 32.6 ± 2.8 ml kg(-1) min(-1), P Exercise increased HR (P exercise in the healthy controls but

  10. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marta; Manuela, Manuela; Cantinho, Guilhermina

    2011-01-01

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy is rare in pediatrics. It is a complex regional pain syndrome, of unknown etiology, usually post-traumatic, characterized by dysfunctions of the musculoskeletal, vascular and skin systems: severe persistent pain of a limb, sensory and vascular alterations, associated disability and psychosocial dysfunction. The diagnosis is based in high clinical suspection. In children and adolescents there are aspects that are different from the adult ones. Excessive tests may result in worsening of the clinical symptoms. Bone scintigraphy can help. Pain treatment is difficult, not specific. Physical therapies and relaxation technics give some relief. Depression must be treated. This syndrome includes fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome type I. We present a clinical report of an adolescent girl, referred for pain, cold temperature, pallor and functional disability of an inferior limb, all signals disclosed by a minor trauma. She had been diagnosed depression the year before. The bone scintigraphy was a decisive test. The treatment with gabapentin, C vitamin, physiotherapy and pshycotherapy has been effective.

  11. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  12. Antiepileptic effects of electroacupuncture vs vagus nerve stimulation on cortical epileptiform activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Liang; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Zhang, Hong-Qi

    2008-07-15

    Introduced about two decades ago, vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of refractory epilepsy recently. This study was set out to compare the effects between VNS and electroacupuncture (EA) on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced epileptiform activities in the rat cerebral cortex. Under general anesthesia, the parietal cortex of the rat (n=20) was exposed to record the cortical epileptiform activities. The left vagus nerve was stimulated at 30 Hz, 1 mA or 3 mA for 5 min. For EA, "Dazhui" acupoint (GV14) was stimulated with a pair of acupuncture needles with the same parameters. The results show that both VNS and EA at either 1 mA or 3 mA could inhibit the PTZ-induced cortical epileptiform activities, and higher stimulation (3 mA) was not associated with a greater inhibition. In the cases that showed inhibitory responses, there were no statistically significant differences between the two modalities, implying that EA could be comparable to VNS in the treatment of epilepsy. Thus, under current experimental settings, the antiepileptic effect induced by electrical stimulation appeared not vagal specific, and EA could be a good alternative to VNS in the management of epilepsy.

  13. The relevance of nerve mobility on function and activity in children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsico, Petra; Tal-Akabi, Amir; van Hedel, Hubertus J A

    2016-10-07

    In children with cerebral palsy (CP), stiffness, caused by contractile and non-contractile structures, can influence motor performance. This study sought to determine whether the nerve mobility had a relevant impact on motor performance in children with CP. We hypothesized that a positive Straight Leg Raise (SLR) test, as well as smaller SLR hip angle, would relate to lower leg muscle strength, reduced motor capacity and less motor performance in children with CP. We applied a cross-sectional analysis on data including SLR, leg muscle strength, Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-66) and number of activity counts during daily life from thirty children with CP (6-18 years). We performed receiver operating characteristics and correlation analyses. Positive SLR test could distinguish well between children with low versus high muscle strength and GMFM-66 scores. The SLR hip angle correlated significant with the level of disability and with muscle strength. The correlation with the GMFM-66 and the activity counts was fair. This study suggests that neural restriction of SLR is higher on functional and activity outcome than the measured SLR hip range of motion. Further studies should investigate weather improving nerve mobility can lead to an amelioration of function in children with CP.

  14. Adrenergic innervation of the developing chick heart: neural crest ablations to produce sympathetically aneural hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, M.; Stewart, D.

    1984-01-01

    Ablation of various regions of premigratory trunk neural crest which gives rise to the sympathetic trunks was used to remove sympathetic cardiac innervation. Neuronal uptake of [ 3 H]-norepinephrine was used as an index of neuronal development in the chick atrium. Following ablation of neural crest over somites 10-15 or 15-20, uptake was significantly decreased in the atrium at 16 and 17 days of development. Ablation of neural crest over somites 5-10 and 20-25 caused no decrease in [ 3 H]-norepinephrine uptake. Removal of neural crest over somites 5-25 or 10-20 caused approximately equal depletions of [ 3 H]-norepinephrine uptake in the atrium. Cardiac norepinephrine concentration was significantly depressed following ablation of neural crest over somites 5-25 but not over somites 10-20. Light-microscopic and histofluorescent preparations confirmed the absence of sympathetic trunks in the region of the normal origin of the sympathetic cardiac nerves following neural crest ablation over somites 10-20. The neural tube and dorsal root ganglia were damaged in the area of the neural-crest ablation; however, all of these structures were normal cranial and caudal to the lesioned area. Development of most of the embryos as well as the morphology of all of the hearts was normal following the lesion. These results indicate that it is possible to produce sympathetically aneural hearts by neural-crest ablation; however, sympathetic cardiac nerves account for an insignificant amount of cardiac norepinephrine

  15. Activity Based Protein Profiling Leads to Identification of Novel Protein Targets for Nerve Agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmany, Dan; Walz, Andrew J; Hsu, Fu-Lian; Benton, Bernard; Burnett, David; Gibbons, Jennifer; Noort, Daan; Glaros, Trevor; Sekowski, Jennifer W

    2017-04-17

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents continue to be a threat at home and abroad during the war against terrorism. Human exposure to nerve agents such as VX results in a cascade of toxic effects relative to the exposure level including ocular miosis, excessive secretions, convulsions, seizures, and death. The primary mechanism behind these overt symptoms is the disruption of cholinergic pathways. While much is known about the primary toxicity mechanisms of nerve agents, there remains a paucity of information regarding impacts on other pathways and systemic effects. These are important for establishing a comprehensive understanding of the toxic mechanisms of OP nerve agents. To identify novel proteins that interact with VX, and that may give insight into these other mechanisms, we used activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) employing a novel VX-probe on lysates from rat heart, liver, kidney, diaphragm, and brain tissue. By making use of a biotin linked VX-probe, proteins covalently bound by the probe were isolated and enriched using streptavidin beads. The proteins were then digested, labeled with isobarically distinct tandem mass tag (TMT) labels, and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Quantitative analysis identified 132 bound proteins, with many proteins found in multiple tissues. As with previously published ABPP OP work, monoacylglycerol lipase associated proteins and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) were shown to be targets of VX. In addition to these two and other predicted neurotransmitter-related proteins, a number of proteins involved with energy metabolism were identified. Four of these enzymes, mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2), isocitrate dehydrogenase 3 (IDH3), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and succinyl CoA (SCS) ligase, were assayed for VX inhibition. Only IDH2 NADP+ activity was shown to be inhibited directly. This result is consistent with other work reporting animals exposed to OP compounds exhibit

  16. Persistent alterations in active and passive electrical membrane properties of regenerated nerve fibers of man and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez Herrero, Susana; Rosberg, Mette R.

    2016-01-01

    patients with surgically repaired complete injuries of peripheral nerves of the arm 22 months-26 years prior to investigation, deviation of excitability measures was explained by a hyperpolarizing shift in the resting membrane potential and an increase in the passive 'Barrett and Barrett' conductance (GBB......Excitability of regenerated fibers remains impaired due to changes in both passive cable properties and alterations in the voltage-dependent membrane function. These abnormalities were studied by mathematical modeling in human regenerated nerves and experimental studies in mice. In three adult male...... activity protocol triggered partial Wallerian degeneration in regenerated nerves but not in control nerves from age-matched mice. The current data suggest that the nodal voltage-gated ion channel machinery is restored in regenerated axons, although the electrical separation from the internodal compartment...

  17. Egr3 dependent sympathetic target tissue innervation in the absence of neuron death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available Nerve Growth Factor (NGF is a target tissue derived neurotrophin required for normal sympathetic neuron survival and target tissue innervation. NGF signaling regulates gene expression in sympathetic neurons, which in turn mediates critical aspects of neuron survival, axon extension and terminal axon branching during sympathetic nervous system (SNS development. Egr3 is a transcription factor regulated by NGF signaling in sympathetic neurons that is essential for normal SNS development. Germline Egr3-deficient mice have physiologic dysautonomia characterized by apoptotic sympathetic neuron death and abnormal innervation to many target tissues. The extent to which sympathetic innervation abnormalities in the absence of Egr3 is caused by altered innervation or by neuron death during development is unknown. Using Bax-deficient mice to abrogate apoptotic sympathetic neuron death in vivo, we show that Egr3 has an essential role in target tissue innervation in the absence of neuron death. Sympathetic target tissue innervation is abnormal in many target tissues in the absence of neuron death, and like NGF, Egr3 also appears to effect target tissue innervation heterogeneously. In some tissues, such as heart, spleen, bowel, kidney, pineal gland and the eye, Egr3 is essential for normal innervation, whereas in other tissues such as lung, stomach, pancreas and liver, Egr3 appears to have little role in innervation. Moreover, in salivary glands and heart, two tissues where Egr3 has an essential role in sympathetic innervation, NGF and NT-3 are expressed normally in the absence of Egr3 indicating that abnormal target tissue innervation is not due to deregulation of these neurotrophins in target tissues. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate a role for Egr3 in mediating sympathetic target tissue innervation that is independent of neuron survival or neurotrophin deregulation.

  18. Anatomical variations of rami communicantes in the upper thoracic sympathetic trunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Min; Lee, Doo Yun; Sung, Sook Whan

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clearly delineate the anatomical variations of the communicating rami in the upper thoracic sympathetic nervous system and to help develop better surgical method for essential palmar hyperhidrosis. Anatomical dissections of the upper thoracic sympathetic chains with sympathetic ganglia and communicating rami have been carried out in 42 adult Korean cadavers (male 26, female 16). The rami communicantes were classified into three types (Normal: transverse or oblique rami connected to the intercostal nerve of the same level; AR: ascending rami connected to the higher level; DR: descending rami to the lower level) based on the anatomical relationship of the thoracic sympathetic ganglia to the intercostal nerves. Both sides of the upper thoracic sympathetic nervous system were compared in the same individual. The number of the communicating rami was recorded in 32 cadavers (64 sides). The distance from the rami communicantes to the sympathetic trunk was measured in 26 cadavers (52 sides). The incidence of AR (ascending rami) and DR (descending rami) arising from the second sympathetic ganglion was 53.6% (45/84), 46.4% (39/84). From the third thoracic sympathetic ganglion, the incidence of AR was 5.9% (5/84) and that of DR was 26.2% (22/84). And in the fourth thoracic sympathetic ganglion, the incidence of AR was 4.8% (4/84) and DR was 8.3% (7/84), respectively. When we compared anatomical structures of both sides among the 42 cadavers dissected, only 14.3% (6/42) had similar anatomy of the rami communicantes bilaterally. Among 32 cadavers (64 sides), the mean number of rami communicantes at the second thoracic sympathetic ganglion was 2.1/2.5 in the left and the right side. At the third and the fourth thoracic sympathetic ganglion, the mean number was 1.9/1.6 and 1.7/1.7 in each side. The mean distance from the thoracic sympathetic chain to the most distal communicating rami of the left and right side at the second intercostal nerve was 7

  19. Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Parasympathetic versus sympathetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Akihiko; Kurata, Chinori; Sugi, Toshihiko; Mikami, Tadashi; Shouda, Sakae [Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction often causes lethal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. {sup 123}I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) can evaluate cardiac sympathetic dysfunction, and analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) can reflect cardiac parasympathetic activity. We examined whether cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction assessed by HRV may correlate with sympathetic dysfunction assessed by MIBG in diabetic patients. In 24-hour electrocardiography, we analyzed 4 HRV parameters: high-frequency power (HF), HF in the early morning (EMHF), rMSSD and pNN50. MIBG planar images and SPECT were obtained 15 minutes (early) and 150 minutes (late) after injection and the heart washout rate was calculated. The defect score in 9 left ventricular regions was scored on a 4 point scale (0=normal - 3=severe defect). In 20 selected diabetic patients without congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and renal failure, parasympathetic HRV parameters had a negative correlation with the sum of defect scores (DS) in the late images (R=-0.47 to -0.59, p<0.05) and some parameters had a negative correlation with the washout rate (R=-0.50 to -0.55, p<0.05). In a total of 64 diabetic patients also, these parameters had a negative correlation with late DS (R=-0.28 to -0.35, p<0.05) and early DS (R=-0.27 to -0.32, p<0.05). The progress of diabetic cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction may parallel the sympathetic one. (author)

  20. Lithium Enhances Axonal Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve by Inhibiting Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanxing Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injury often involves traumatic root avulsion resulting in permanent paralysis of the innervated muscles. The lack of sufficient regeneration from spinal motoneurons to the peripheral nerve (PN is considered to be one of the major causes of the unsatisfactory outcome of various surgical interventions for repair of the devastating injury. The present study was undertaken to investigate potential inhibitory signals which influence axonal regeneration after root avulsion injury. The results of the study showed that root avulsion triggered GSK-3β activation in the injured motoneurons and remaining axons in the ventral funiculus. Systemic application of a clinical dose of lithium suppressed activated GSK-3β in the lesioned spinal cord to the normal level and induced extensive axonal regeneration into replanted ventral roots. Our study suggests that GSK-3β activity is involved in negative regulation for axonal elongation and regeneration and lithium, the specific GSK-3β inhibitor, enhances motoneuron regeneration from CNS to PNS.

  1. Sympathetic neural and hemodynamic responses to head-up tilt during isoosmotic and hyperosmotic hypovolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Alexander M; Luippold, Adam J; Mitchell, Katherine M; Bradbury, Karleigh E; Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Charkoudian, Nisha

    2017-10-01

    We hypothesized that muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during head-up tilt (HUT) would be augmented during exercise-induced (hyperosmotic) dehydration but not isoosmotic dehydration via an oral diuretic. We studied 26 young healthy subjects (7 female, 19 male) divided into three groups: euhydrated (EUH, n = 7), previously exercised in 40°C while maintaining hydration; dehydrated (DEH, n = 10), previously exercised in 40°C during which ~3% of body weight was lost via sweat loss; and diuretic (DIUR, n = 9), a group that did not exercise but lost ~3% of body weight via diuresis (furosemide, 80 mg by mouth). We measured MSNA, heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) during supine rest and 30° and 45° HUT. Plasma volume (PV) decreased similarly in DEH (-8.5 ± 3.3%) and DIUR (-11.4 ± 5.7%) ( P > 0.05). Plasma osmolality was similar between DIUR and EUH (288 ± 4 vs. 284 ± 5 mmol/kg, respectively) but was significantly higher in DEH (299 ± 5 mmol/kg) ( P HR and MSNA increased in all subjects during HUT (main effect of position; P HR were higher in DEH compared with DIUR ( P HR with HUT were larger in both hypovolemic groups compared with EUH ( P controlling HR responses during dehydration, and a stronger role for osmolality in control of SNA. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Interactions of volume regulation with control of vascular sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) have important implications for blood pressure regulation. Here, we demonstrate that SNA and heart rate (HR) during hyperosmotic hypovolemia (exercise-induced) were augmented during supine and tilt compared with isoosmotic hypovolemia (diuretic), which primarily augmented the HR response. Our data suggest that hypovolemia per se had a larger role in controlling HR responses, whereas osmolality had a stronger role in control of SNA.

  2. A structure-activity analysis of the variation in oxime efficacy against nerve agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, Donald M.; Koplovitz, Irwin; Worek, Franz; Sweeney, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    A structure-activity analysis was used to evaluate the variation in oxime efficacy of 2-PAM, obidoxime, HI-6 and ICD585 against nerve agents. In vivo oxime protection and in vitro oxime reactivation were used as indicators of oxime efficacy against VX, sarin, VR and cyclosarin. Analysis of in vivo oxime protection was conducted with oxime protective ratios (PR) from guinea pigs receiving oxime and atropine therapy after sc administration of nerve agent. Analysis of in vitro reactivation was conducted with second-order rate contants (k r2 ) for oxime reactivation of agent-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from guinea pig erythrocytes. In vivo oxime PR and in vitro k r2 decreased as the volume of the alkylmethylphosphonate moiety of nerve agents increased from VX to cyclosarin. This effect was greater with 2-PAM and obidoxime (> 14-fold decrease in PR) than with HI-6 and ICD585 ( r2 as the volume of the agent moiety conjugated to AChE increased was consistent with a steric hindrance mechanism. Linear regression of log (PR-1) against log (k r2 · [oxime dose]) produced two offset parallel regression lines that delineated a significant difference between the coupling of oxime reactivation and oxime protection for HI-6 and ICD585 compared to 2-PAM and obidoxime. HI-6 and ICD585 appeared to be 6.8-fold more effective than 2-PAM and obidoxime at coupling oxime reactivation to oxime protection, which suggested that the isonicotinamide group that is common to both of these oximes, but absent from 2-PAM and obidoxime, is important for oxime efficacy

  3. Assessing the strength of cardiac and sympathetic baroreflex controls via transfer entropy during orthostatic challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Alberto; Marchi, Andrea; Bari, Vlasta; De Maria, Beatrice; Esler, Murray; Lambert, Elisabeth; Baumert, Mathias

    2017-05-01

    The study assesses the strength of the causal relation along baroreflex (BR) in humans during an incremental postural challenge soliciting the BR. Both cardiac BR (cBR) and sympathetic BR (sBR) were characterized via BR sequence approaches from spontaneous fluctuations of heart period (HP), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). A model-based transfer entropy method was applied to quantify the strength of the coupling from SAP to HP and from DAP to MSNA. The confounding influences of respiration were accounted for. Twelve young healthy subjects (20-36 years, nine females) were sequentially tilted at 0°, 20°, 30° and 40°. We found that (i) the strength of the causal relation along the cBR increases with tilt table inclination, while that along the sBR is unrelated to it; (ii) the strength of the causal coupling is unrelated to the gain of the relation; (iii) transfer entropy indexes are significantly and positively associated with simplified causality indexes derived from BR sequence analysis. The study proves that causality indexes are complementary to traditional characterization of the BR and suggests that simple markers derived from BR sequence analysis might be fruitfully exploited to estimate causality along the BR. This article is part of the themed issue `Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'.

  4. RESTING SYMPATHETIC BAROREFLEX SENSITIVITY IN SUBJECTS WITH LOW AND HIGH TOLERANCE TO CENTRAL HYPOVOLEMIA INDUCED BY LOWER BODY NEGATIVE PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eHinojosa-Laborde

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central hypovolemia elicited by orthostasis or hemorrhage triggers sympathetically-mediated baroreflex responses to maintain organ perfusion; these reflexes are less sensitive in patients with orthostatic intolerance, and during conditions of severe blood loss, may result in cardiovascular collapse (decompensatory or circulatory shock. The ability to tolerate central hypovolemia is variable and physiological factors contributing to tolerance are emerging. We tested the hypothesis that resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS are attenuated in male and female subjects who have low tolerance (LT to central hypovolemia induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP. MSNA and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP were recorded in 47 human subjects who subsequently underwent LBNP to tolerance (onset of presyncopal symptoms. LT subjects experienced presyncopal symptoms prior to completing LBNP of -60 mm Hg, and subjects with high tolerance (HT experienced presyncopal symptoms after completing LBNP after -60 mmHg. Contrary to our hypothesis, resting MSNA burst incidence was not different between LT and HT subjects, and was not related to time to presyncope. BRS was assessed as the slope of the relationship between spontaneous fluctuations in DAP and MSNA during 5 min of supine rest. MSNA burst incidence/DAP correlations were greater than or equal to 0.5 in 37 subjects (LT: n= 9; HT: n=28, and BRS was not different between LT and HT (-1.8 ± 0.3 vs. -2.2 ± 0.2 bursts•(100 beats-1•mmHg-1, p=0.29. We conclude that tolerance to central hypovolemia is not related to either resting MSNA or sympathetic BRS.

  5. The sympathetic nervous system is controlled by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in the regulation of body temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawi, Khadija M.; Aubdool, Aisah A.; Liang, Lihuan; Wilde, Elena; Vepa, Abhinav; Psefteli, Maria-Paraskevi; Brain, Susan D.; Keeble, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is involved in sensory nerve nociceptive signaling. Recently, it has been discovered that TRPV1 receptors also regulate basal body temperature in multiple species from mice to humans. In the present study, we investigated whether TRPV1 modulates basal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. C57BL6/J wild-type (WT) mice and TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice were implanted with radiotelemetry probes for measurement of core body temperature. AMG9810 (50 mg/kg) or vehicle (2% DMSO/5% Tween 80/10 ml/kg saline) was injected intraperitoneally. Adrenoceptor antagonists or vehicle (5 ml/kg saline) was injected subcutaneously. In WT mice, the TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, caused significant hyperthermia, associated with increased noradrenaline concentrations in brown adipose tissue. The hyperthermia was significantly attenuated by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, the mixed α-/β-adrenoceptor antagonist labetalol, and the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. TRPV1 KO mice have a normal basal body temperature, indicative of developmental compensation. d-Amphetamine (potent sympathomimetic) caused hyperthermia in WT mice, which was reduced in TRPV1 KO mice, suggesting a decreased sympathetic drive in KOs. This study provides new evidence that TRPV1 controls thermoregulation upstream of the SNS, providing a potential therapeutic target for sympathetic hyperactivity thermoregulatory disorders.—Alawi, K. M., Aubdool, A. A., Liang, L., Wilde, E., Vepa, A., Psefteli, M.-P., Brain, S. D., Keeble, J. E. The sympathetic nervous system is controlled by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in the regulation of body temperature. PMID:26136480

  6. Nitric Oxide Orchestrates a Power-Law Modulation of Sympathetic Firing Behaviors in Neonatal Rat Spinal Cords

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Kuei Su

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a diffusible gas and has multifarious effects on both pre- and postsynaptic events. As a consequence of complex excitatory and inhibitory integrations, NO effects on neuronal activities are heterogeneous. Using in vitro preparations of neonatal rats that retain the splanchnic sympathetic nerves and the thoracic spinal cord as an experimental model, we report here that either enhancement or attenuation of NO production in the neonatal rat spinal cords could increase, decrease, or not change the spontaneous firing behaviors recorded from splanchnic sympathetic single fibers. To elucidate the mathematical features of NO-mediated heterogeneous responses, the ratios of changes in firing were plotted against their original firing rates. In log-log plots, a linear data distribution demonstrated that NO-mediated heterogeneity in sympathetic firing responses was well described by a power function. Selective antagonists were applied to test if glycinergic, GABAergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic neurotransmission in the spinal cord are involved in NO-mediated power-law firing modulations (plFM. NO-mediated plFM diminished in the presence of mecamylamine (an open-channel blocker of nicotinic cholinergic receptors, indicating that endogenous nicotinic receptor activities were essential for plFM. Applications of strychnine (a glycine receptor blocker, gabazine (a GABAA receptor blocker, or kynurenate (a broad-spectrum ionotropic glutamate receptor blocker also caused plFM. However, strychnine- or kynurenate-induced plFM was diminished by L-NAME (an NO synthase inhibitor pretreatments, indicating that the involvements of glycine or ionotropic glutamate receptor activities in plFM were secondary to NO signaling. To recapitulate the arithmetic natures of the plFM, the plFM were simulated by firing changes in two components: a step increment and a fractional reduction of their basal firing activities. Ionotropic glutamate receptor

  7. Nitric Oxide Orchestrates a Power-Law Modulation of Sympathetic Firing Behaviors in Neonatal Rat Spinal Cords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun-Kuei; Chen, Yi-Yin; Ho, Chiu-Ming

    2018-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a diffusible gas and has multifarious effects on both pre- and postsynaptic events. As a consequence of complex excitatory and inhibitory integrations, NO effects on neuronal activities are heterogeneous. Using in vitro preparations of neonatal rats that retain the splanchnic sympathetic nerves and the thoracic spinal cord as an experimental model, we report here that either enhancement or attenuation of NO production in the neonatal rat spinal cords could increase, decrease, or not change the spontaneous firing behaviors recorded from splanchnic sympathetic single fibers. To elucidate the mathematical features of NO-mediated heterogeneous responses, the ratios of changes in firing were plotted against their original firing rates. In log-log plots, a linear data distribution demonstrated that NO-mediated heterogeneity in sympathetic firing responses was well described by a power function. Selective antagonists were applied to test if glycinergic, GABAergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic neurotransmission in the spinal cord are involved in NO-mediated power-law firing modulations (plFM). NO-mediated plFM diminished in the presence of mecamylamine (an open-channel blocker of nicotinic cholinergic receptors), indicating that endogenous nicotinic receptor activities were essential for plFM. Applications of strychnine (a glycine receptor blocker), gabazine (a GABA A receptor blocker), or kynurenate (a broad-spectrum ionotropic glutamate receptor blocker) also caused plFM. However, strychnine- or kynurenate-induced plFM was diminished by L-NAME (an NO synthase inhibitor) pretreatments, indicating that the involvements of glycine or ionotropic glutamate receptor activities in plFM were secondary to NO signaling. To recapitulate the arithmetic natures of the plFM, the plFM were simulated by firing changes in two components: a step increment and a fractional reduction of their basal firing activities. Ionotropic glutamate receptor activities were found

  8. Study of the Peripheral Nerve Fibers Myelin Structure Changes during Activation of Schwann Cell Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdiyan, Ekaterina E; Allakhverdiev, Elvin S; Maksimov, Georgy V

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we consider a new type of mechanism by which neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) regulates the properties of peripheral nerve fibers myelin. Our data show the importance of the relationship between the changes in the number of Schwann cell (SC) acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and the axon excitation (different intervals between action potentials (APs)). Using Raman spectroscopy, an effect of activation of SC AChRs on the myelin membrane fluidity was investigated. It was found, that ACh stimulates an increase in lipid ordering degree of the myelin lipids, thus providing evidence for specific role of the "axon-SC" interactions at the axon excitation. It was proposed, that during the axon excitation, the SC membrane K+- depolarization and the Ca2+-influx led to phospholipase activation or exocytosis of intracellular membrane vesicles and myelin structure reorganization.

  9. Evoked bioelectrical activity of efferent fibers of the sciatic nerve of white rats in experimental menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodinsky A.G.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was analysis of the bioelectrical activity of efferent fibers of the sciatic nerve in experimental menopause condition. Experiments were performed on 25 female white rats, divided into experimental and control groups. Menopause was modeled by total ovariohysterectomy. In 120 days after modeling we had recorded evoked action potentials of fibers of isolated ventral root L5 induced by stimulation of sciatic nerve with rectangular pulses. Threshold, chronaxia, latency, amplitude and duration of the action potential (AP were analysed. Refractory phenomenon was investigated by applying paired stimuli at intervals of 2 to 20 ms. In the context of long-term hypoestrogenemy threshold of AP appearance was 55,32±7,69%, chronaxy – 115,09±2,67%, latent period – 112,62±1,74% as compared with the control animals (p<0.01. In conditions of paired stimuli applying the amplitude of response to the testing stimulus in animals with ovariohysterectomy at intervals 3 and 4 ms was 61,25±36,45% and 53,48±18,64% (p<0.05 respectively.

  10. Renal nerves and nNOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Wolff, Helle; Kuczeriszka, Marta

    2008-01-01

    It was hypothesized that renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) are involved in the acute inhibition of renin secretion and the natriuresis following slow NaCl loading (NaLoad) and that RSNA participates in the regulation of arterial blood pressure (MABP......). This was tested by NaLoad after chronic renal denervation with and without inhibition of nNOS by S-methyl-thiocitrulline (SMTC). In addition, the acute effects of renal denervation on MABP and sodium balance were assessed. Rats were investigated in the conscious, catheterized state, in metabolic cages...... of acutely and chronically denervated rats were less than control (15% and 9%, respectively, P renal denervation (14.5 +/- 0.2 vs. 19.3 +/- 1.3 mIU/l, P

  11. [Complex regional pain syndrome. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy and causalgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, R; Binder, A; Ulrich, W; Maier, C

    2002-04-01

    Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS) occur as the inadequate response to painful trauma in a distal extremity. With CRPS I (sympathetic reflex dystrophy), no lesion of the nerve is present. Aside from sensory disturbances, burning deep spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia are characteristic. Disturbances in the skin blood circulation, sweating, edema, and trophic disturbances of the skin, joints, and bones are typical. Reduction in muscle strength, tremor, and late dystonic changes comprise the motor disturbances. All symptoms are distributed in the distal extremity and not limited to the region of the peripheral nerves. Complex regional pain syndrome II (causalgia), develops following a partial peripheral nerve lesion. The distally generalized symptoms are identical. Successful therapy depends on an early start of interdisciplinary treatment. In addition to the pain therapy, physiotherapy plays a decisive role in rehabilitation. During the acute phase, freedom from pain at rest and retrogression of the edema must be achieved. With slight spontaneous pain, a conservative therapeutic method may be applied (analgesics, rest, raised position). In case of insufficient improvement and in difficult cases, the effect of intervention (sympathetic blockade) should be tested and possibly a blockade series performed. After reduced spontaneous pain, physiotherapy should be increased stepwise.

  12. Microarray analysis reveals increased transcriptional repression and reduced metabolic activity but not major changes in the core apoptotic machinery during maturation of sympathetic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikk eRaba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal maturation of the neurons whose main phenotype and basic synaptic contacts are already established includes neuronal growth, refinement of synaptic contacts, final steps of differentiation, programmed cell death period (PCD etc. In the sympathetic neurons, postnatal maturation includes permanent end of the PCD that occurs with the same time schedule in vivo and in vitro suggesting that the process could be genetically determined. Also many other changes in the neuronal maturation could be permanent and thus based on stable changes in the genome expression. However, postnatal maturation of the neurons is poorly studied. Here we compared the gene expression profiles of immature and mature sympathetic neurons using Affymetrix microarray assay. We found 1310 significantly up-regulated and 1151 significantly down-regulated genes in the mature neurons. Gene ontology analysis reveals up-regulation of genes related to neuronal differentiation, chromatin and epigenetic changes, extracellular factors and their receptors, and cell adhesion, whereas many down-regulated genes were related to metabolic and biosynthetic processes. We show that termination of PCD is not related to major changes in the expression of classical genes for apoptosis or cell survival. Our dataset is deposited to the ArrayExpress database and is a valuable source to select candidate genes in the studies of neuronal maturation. As an example, we studied the changes in the expression of selected genes Igf2bp3, Coro1A, Zfp57, Dcx, and Apaf1 in the young and mature sympathetic ganglia by quantitative PCR and show that these were strongly downregulated in the mature ganglia.

  13. Nifedipine-sensitive blood pressure component in hypertensive models characterized by high activity of either sympathetic nervous system or renin-angiotensin system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zicha, Josef; Dobešová, Zdenka; Behuliak, Michal; Pintérová, Mária; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Vaněčková, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2014), s. 13-26 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0336; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : voltage-gated caclium channels * sympathetic nervous system * renin-angiotensin system * nitric oxide Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  14. Antiallodynic Effect of Pregabalin in Rat Models of Sympathetically Maintained and Sympathetic Independent Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong Woo; Kweon, Tae Dong; Lee, Jong Seok

    2007-01-01

    Pregabalin binds to the voltage-dependent calcium channel α2δ subunit and modulates the release of neurotransmitters, resulting in analgesic effects on neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain has both sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) and sympathetic independent pain (SIP) components. We studied the antiallodynic effects of pregabalin on tactile allodynia (TA) and cold allodynia (CA) in SMP-and SIP-dominant neuropathic pain models. Allodynia was induced by ligation of the L5 & L6 spinal nerves (SMP model) or by transection of the tibial and sural nerves (SIP model) in rats. For intrathecal drug administration, a PE-10 catheter was implanted through the atlantooccipital membrane to the lumbar enlargement. Pregabalin was administered either intraperitoneally (IP) or intrathecally (IT) and dosed up incrementally until an antiallodynic effect without sedation or motor impairment was apparent. TA was assessed using von Frey filaments, and CA was assessed using acetone drops. IP-administered pregabalin dose-dependently attenuated TA in both models and CA in the SMP model, but not CA in the SIP model. IT-administered pregabalin dose-dependently attenuated both TA and CA in both models. However, the dose response curve of IT-administered pregabalin in SMP was shifted to left from that of SIP and the ED50 of IT-administered pregabalin for CA in SMP was about 900 times less than that in SIP. These findings suggest that pregabalin exerts its antiallodynic effect mainly by acting at the spinal cord, and that IT-administered pregabalin has more potent antiallodynic effects in SMP. The α2δ subunit might be less involved in the CA in SIP. PMID:17326244

  15. Phrenic and hypoglossal nerve activity during respiratory response to hypoxia in 6-OHDA unilateral model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Kryspin; Budzińska, Krystyna; Kaczyńska, Katarzyna

    2017-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients apart from motor dysfunctions exhibit respiratory disturbances. Their mechanism is still unknown and requires investigation. Our research was designed to examine the activity of phrenic (PHR) and hypoglossal (HG) nerves activity during a hypoxic respiratory response in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD. Male adult Wistar rats were injected unilaterally with 6-OHDA (20μg) or the vehicle into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB). Two weeks after the surgery the activity of the phrenic and hypoglossal nerve was registered in anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated rats under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Lesion effectiveness was confirmed by the cylinder test, performed before the MFB injection and 14days after, before the respiratory experiment. 6-OHDA lesioned animals showed a significant increase in normoxic inspiratory time. Expiratory time and total time of the respiratory cycle were prolonged in PD rats after hypoxia. The amplitude of the PHR activity and its minute activity were increased in comparison to the sham group at recovery time and during 30s of hypoxia. The amplitude of the HG activity was increased in response to hypoxia in 6-OHDA lesioned animals. The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons decreased the pre-inspiratory/inspiratory ratio of the hypoglossal burst amplitude during and after hypoxia. Unilateral MFB lesion changed the activity of the phrenic and hypoglossal nerves. The altered pre-inspiratory hypoglossal nerve activity indicates modifications to the central mechanisms controlling the activity of the HG nerve and may explain respiratory disorders seen in PD, i.e. apnea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of sympathetic nervous system and neuropeptides in obesity hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Hall

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is the most common cause of human essential hypertension in most industrialized countries. Although the precise mechanisms of obesity hypertension are not fully understood, considerable evidence suggests that excess renal sodium reabsorption and a hypertensive shift of pressure natriuresis play a major role. Sympathetic activation appears to mediate at least part of the obesity-induced sodium retention and hypertension since adrenergic blockade or renal denervation markedly attenuates these changes. Recent observations suggest that leptin and its multiple interactions with neuropeptides in the hypothalamus may link excess weight gain with increased sympathetic activity. Leptin is produced mainly in adipocytes and is believed to regulate energy balance by acting on the hypothalamus to reduce food intake and to increase energy expenditure via sympathetic activation. Short-term administration of leptin into the cerebral ventricles increases renal sympathetic activity, and long-term leptin infusion at rates that mimic plasma concentrations found in obesity raises arterial pressure and heart rate via adrenergic activation in non-obese rodents. Transgenic mice overexpressing leptin also develop hypertension. Acute studies suggest that the renal sympathetic effects of leptin may depend on interactions with other neurochemical pathways in the hypothalamus, including the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R. However, the role of this pathway in mediating the long-term effects of leptin on blood pressure is unclear. Also, it is uncertain whether there is resistance to the chronic renal sympathetic and blood pressure effects of leptin in obese subjects. In addition, leptin also has other cardiovascular and renal actions, such as stimulation of nitric oxide formation and improvement of insulin sensitivity, which may tend to reduce blood pressure in some conditions. Although the role of these mechanisms in human obesity has not been elucidated, this

  17. Sacral nerve stimulation increases activation of the primary somatosensory cortex by anal canal stimulation in an experimental model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, K M

    2011-08-01

    Sacral and posterior tibial nerve stimulation may be used to treat faecal incontinence; however, the mechanism of action is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish whether sensory activation of the cerebral cortex by anal canal stimulation was increased by peripheral neuromodulation.

  18. A randomized controlled trial of an implantable 2-channel peroneal nerve stimulator on walking speed and activity in poststroke hemiplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottink, A.I.R.; Kottink, Anke I.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Nene, A.V.; Tenniglo, Martinus Johannes Bernardus; van der Aa, Hans E.; Buschman, H.P.J.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    Objective To determine the effect of a new implantable 2-channel peroneal nerve stimulator on walking speed and daily activities, in comparison with the usual treatment in chronic stroke survivors with a drop foot. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting All subjects were measured 5 times in the

  19. Origins of the sympathetic innervation to the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT): an anatomical substrate for a neuroimmune connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafetti, Lucas E; Romeo, Horacio E

    2014-11-15

    The participation of sympathetic nerve fibers in the innervation of the nasal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT) was investigated in hamsters. Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), an established sympathetic marker, is expressed in all neurons of superior cervical ganglia (SCG). In addition, VMAT2 -immunoreactive nerve fibers were localized in the NALT as well as in adjacent anatomical structures of the upper respiratory tract. Unilateral surgical ablation of the SCG abolished VMAT2 innervation patterns ipsilaterally while the contra lateral side is unaffected. These results provide the anatomical substrate for a neuroimmune connection in the NALT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Activity based protein profiling leads to identification of novel protein targets for nerve agent VX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmany, D.; Walz, A.J.; Hsu, F.L.; Benton, B.; Burnett, D.; Gibbons, J.; Noort, D.; Glaros, T.; Sekowski, J.W.

    2017-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents continue to be a threat at home and abroad during the war against terrorism. Human exposure to nerve agents such as VX results in a cascade of toxic effects relative to the exposure level including ocular miosis, excessive secretions, convulsions, seizures, and

  1. Acute- and late-phase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity is comparable in female and male rats after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacle, Albert G; Hullugundi, Swathi K; Dolkas, Jennifer; Angert, Mila; Chernov, Andrei V; Strongin, Alex Y; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2018-03-20

    In the peripheral nerve, pro-inflammatory matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 performs essential functions in the acute response to injury. Whether MMP-9 activity contributes to late-phase injury or whether MMP-9 expression or activity after nerve injury is sexually dimorphic remains unknown. Patterns of MMP-9 expression, activity and excretion were assessed in a model of painful peripheral neuropathy, sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI), in female and male rats. Real-time Taqman RT-PCR for MMP-9 and its endogenous inhibitor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) of nerve samples over a 2-month time course of CCI was followed by gelatin zymography of crude nerve extracts and purified MMP-9 from the extracts using gelatin Sepharose-beads. MMP excretion was determined using protease activity assay of urine in female and male rats with CCI. The initial upsurge in nerve MMP-9 expression at day 1 post-CCI was superseded more than 100-fold at day 28 post-CCI. The high level of MMP-9 expression in late-phase nerve injury was accompanied by the reduction in TIMP-1 level. The absence of MMP-9 in the normal nerve and the presence of multiple MMP-9 species (the proenzyme, mature enzyme, homodimers, and heterodimers) was observed at day 1 and day 28 post-CCI. The MMP-9 proenzyme and mature enzyme species dominated in the early- and late-phase nerve injury, consistent with the high and low level of TIMP-1 expression, respectively. The elevated nerve MMP-9 levels corresponded to the elevated urinary MMP excretion post-CCI. All of these findings were comparable in female and male rodents. The present study offers the first evidence for the excessive, uninhibited proteolytic MMP-9 activity during late-phase painful peripheral neuropathy and suggests that the pattern of MMP-9 expression, activity, and excretion after peripheral nerve injury is universal in both sexes.

  2. Nerve cell-mimicking liposomes as biosensor for botulinum neurotoxin complete physiological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Oliver G; Loessner, Martin J

    2016-12-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most toxic substances known, and their neurotoxic properties and paralysing effects are exploited for medical treatment of a wide spectrum of disorders. To accurately quantify the potency of a pharmaceutical BoNT preparation, its physiological key activities (binding to membrane receptor, translocation, and proteolytic degradation of SNARE proteins) need to be determined. To date, this was only possible using animal models, or, to a limited extent, cell-based assays. We here report a novel in vitro system for BoNT/B analysis, based on nerve-cell mimicking liposomes presenting motoneuronal membrane receptors required for BoNT binding. Following triggered membrane translocation of the toxin's Light Chain, the endopeptidase activity can be quantitatively monitored employing a FRET-based reporter assay within the functionalized liposomes. We were able to detect BoNT/B physiological activity at picomolar concentrations in short time, opening the possibility for future replacement of animal experimentation in pharmaceutical BoNT testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How a Simple Ankle Sprain Turned Into Neuropathic Pain: Complex Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Versus Erythromelalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurati, Ann Regina

    2018-04-01

    A 36-year-old woman sustained a Grade 2 ankle sprain at work. Two days after the injury, the ankle and foot became red and she complained of "intense burning pain." First diagnosed with complex reflex sympathetic dystrophy, the employee was prescribed medications that provided some pain relief; a subsequent temporary nerve block provided additional relief. However, the symptoms returned and she was treated unsuccessfully with surgical sympathectomy. The employee was referred to a neurologist and diagnosed with primary erythromelalgia, a rare pain disorder that can be mistaken as complex reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

  4. Sustained sympathetic and blood pressure reduction 1 year after renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Dagmara; Marusic, Petra; Walton, Antony S; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Krum, Henry; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Lambert, Gavin W; Esler, Murray D; Schlaich, Markus P

    2014-07-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP) in resistant hypertension. Although a persistent BP-lowering effect has been demonstrated, the long-term effect on MSNA remains elusive. We investigated whether RDN influences MSNA over time. Office BP and MSNA were obtained at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months after RDN in 35 patients with resistant hypertension. Office BP averaged 166±22/88±19 mm Hg, despite the use of an average of 4.8±2.1 antihypertensive drugs. Baseline MSNA was 51±11 bursts/min ≈2- to 3-fold higher than the level observed in healthy controls. Mean office systolic and diastolic BP significantly decreased by -12.6±18.3/-6.5±9.2, -16.1±25.6/-8.6±12.9, and -21.2±29.1/-11.1±12.9 mm Hg (Phypertension and high baseline MSNA. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis of a substantial contribution of afferent renal nerve signaling to increased BP in resistant hypertension and argue against a relevant reinnervation at 1 year after procedure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Propranolol for Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity with Lateralizing Hyperhidrosis after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W. Siefferman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain injury can lead to impaired cortical inhibition of the hypothalamus, resulting in increased sympathetic nervous system activation. Symptoms of paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity may include hyperthermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, vasodilation, and hyperhidrosis. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who suffered from a left middle cerebral artery stroke and subsequently developed central fever, contralateral temperature change, and hyperhidrosis. His symptoms abated with low-dose propranolol and then returned upon discontinuation. Restarting propranolol again stopped his symptoms. This represents the first report of propranolol being used for unilateral dysautonomia after stroke. Propranolol is a lipophilic nonselective beta-blocker which easily crosses the blood-brain barrier and may be used to treat paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity.

  6. Recombinant human nerve growth factor with a marked activity in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Anna M.; Finotti, Nicoletta; Ceriani, Michela; Alberghina, Lilia; Martegani, Enzo; Aloe, Luigi; Lenzi, Laura; Levi-Montalcini, Rita

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant human nerve growth factor (rhNGF) is regarded as the most promising therapy for neurodegeneration of the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as for several other pathological conditions involving the immune system. However, rhNGF is not commercially available as a drug. In this work, we provide data about the production on a laboratory scale of large amounts of a rhNGF that was shown to possess in vivo biochemical, morphological, and pharmacological effects that are comparable with the murine NGF (mNGF), with no apparent side effects, such as allodynia. Our rhNGF was produced by using conventional recombinant DNA technologies combined with a biotechnological approach for high-density culture of mammalian cells, which yielded a production of ≈21.5 ± 2.9 mg/liter recombinant protein. The rhNGF-producing cells were thoroughly characterized, and the purified rhNGF was shown to possess a specific activity comparable with that of the 2.5S mNGF by means of biochemical, immunological, and morphological in vitro studies. This work describes the production on a laboratory scale of high levels of a rhNGF with in vitro and, more important, in vivo biological activity equivalent to the native murine protein. PMID:16339317

  7. Bicarbonate-activated hydrogen peroxide and efficient decontamination of toxic sulfur mustard and nerve gas simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sanping; Xi, Hailing; Zuo, Yanjun; Wang, Qi; Wang, Zhicheng; Yan, Zengyuan

    2018-02-15

    13 C NMR spectra showed that peroxymonocarbonate (HCO 4 - ) was generated in the NaHCO 3 -activated H 2 O 2 solution and pH was a key factor in its production. A cycle for the bicarbonate anion was proposed as HCO 3 - →HCO 3 → (CO 2 ) 2 *→CO 2 (aq)→HCO 4 - (H 2 CO 4 )→HCO 3 - (HCO 3 ) basing on the results of NMR, electron paramagnetic resonance, chemiluminescence analysis. In this cycle, (CO 2 ) 2 * was the key intermediate and (CO 2 ) 2 *→2CO 2 +hv was the rate controlling step. Thioanisole and paraoxon, the simulants of sulfur mustard gas and nerve gas, respectively, were efficiently decontaminated by the NaHCO 3 -activated H 2 O 2 solution. While HCO 4 - was the primary oxidant for the oxidation of thioanisole, O 2 - generated during the decomposition of HCO 4 - or H 2 O 2 led to the secondary oxidation of the sulfide. Paraoxon was degraded in the NaHCO 3 -activated H 2 O 2 solution via nucleophilic substitution by OOH - and OH - , and the degradation rate increased exponentially with increasing pH. Alkali metal ions had a catalytic effect on the degradation of paraoxon. Mustard gas and soman degraded efficiently into nontoxic products in NaHCO 3 -activated H 2 O 2 . A pH range of 9-10 was found to be optimum for the broad-spectrum decontamination of chemical warfare agents and other eco-toxicants using NaHCO 3 -activated H 2 O 2 . Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The clinical value of cardiac sympathetic imaging in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Emil; Kjaer, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the pathology of heart failure. The single-photon emission computed tomography tracer iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123) I-MIBG) can be used to investigate the activity of the predominant neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous...

  9. Modulation of sympathetic outflow by centrally acting antihypertensive drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The modulation of peripheral sympathetic activity by the central nervous system (CNS) has been intensely investigated as a potential target of antihypertensive drugs. In particular, clonidine, guanfacine, and alpha-methyl-DOPA (acting via its metabolite alpha-methylnoradrenaline) have been developed

  10. Modulation of afferent nerve activity by prostaglandin E2 upon urinary bladder distension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Nahoko; Tanioka, Asao; Hagihara, Koichiro; Kawai, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-01

    What is the central question of this study? It has been widely assumed that C fibres innervating the bladder are mainly excited in overactive bladder syndrome. However, it remains unclear whether Aδ fibres are also activated in pathological conditions. What is the main finding and its importance? We found that a certain population of Aδ fibres, which become active specifically at a bladder pressure of more than 15 cmH2 O in normal conditions, showed increased excitability in conditions of prostaglandin E2 -induced overactive bladder. This result suggests that a certain population of Aδ fibres, together with C fibres, triggers pathophysiological activity. In overactive bladder syndrome, afferent C fibres innervating the bladder show an increased activity level. However, it remains unclear whether all C fibres are highly activated and whether Aδ fibres, the other type of bladder afferent fibre, are also involved in pathological conditions. To address these questions, we analysed the relationship between bladder pressure and single-unit firing patterns of afferent nerves in the left L6 dorsal roots in living rats. The recorded fibres were classified as Aδ fibres or C fibres based on the response to 0.3 μm tetrodotoxin. Certain populations of both Aδ fibres and C fibres were activated at bladder pressures below 15 cmH2 O (classified as low-threshold fibres), indicating their potential contribution to detection of normal bladder filling. Intravesical administration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) induced hyperexcitation in approximately half of such C fibres, whereas the activity patterns of low-threshold Aδ fibres were unchanged. All fibres, regardless of type, which were almost silent in control conditions (classified as high-threshold fibres), were activated by application of PGE2 . Notably, the firing patterns of Aδ fibres, rather than C fibres, were highly time locked to PGE2 -induced micro-oscillation of bladder pressure. These modulatory effects

  11. In Vivo Characterization of Intracellular Signaling Pathways Activated by the Nerve Agent Sarin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shih, Tsung-Ming A; Snyder, Gretchen L; Hendrick, Joseph P; Fienberg, Allen A; McDonough, John H

    2004-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OP) nerve agents, such as sarin, exert acute effects by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase in the central and peripheral nervous systems, which results in accumulation of acetylcholine and, in turn...

  12. [A case of prolonged paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akiko; Ide, Shuhei; Iwasaki, Yuji; Kaga, Makiko; Arima, Masataka

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH), after developing severe hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy because of cardiopulmonary arrest. She showed dramatic paroxysmal sympathetic activity with dystonia. She was treated with wide variety of medications against PSH, which were found to be effective in previous studies. Among them, morphine, bromocriptine, propranolol, and clonidine were effective in reducing the frequency of her attacks while gabapentin, baclofen, dantrolene, and benzodiazepine were ineffective. Though the paroxysms decreased markedly after the treatment, they could not be completely controlled beyond 500 days. Following the treatment, levels of plasma catecholamines and their urinary metabolites decreased to normal during inter- paroxysms. However, once a paroxysm had recurred, these levels were again very high. This case study is considered significant for two rea- sons. One is that PSH among children have been rarely reported, and the other is that this case of prolonged PSH delineated the transition of plasma catecholamines during the treatment. The excitatory: inhibitory ratio (EIR) model proposed by Baguley was considered while dis- cussing drug sensitivity in this case. Accumulation of similar case studies will help establish more effective treatment strategies and elucidate the pathophysiology of PSH.

  13. Nerve growth factor enhances the CRE-dependent transcriptional activity activated by nobiletin in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takito, Jiro; Kimura, Junko; Kajima, Koji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease are urgent problems for elderly people in developed countries. We previously reported that nobiletin, a poly-methoxylated flavone from the citrus peel, improved the symptoms in various types of animal models of memory loss and activated the cAMP responsive element (CRE)-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Nobiletin activated the cAMP/PKA/MEK/Erk/MAPK signaling pathway without using the TrkA signaling activated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, we examined the effect of combination of nobiletin and NGF on the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells. Although NGF alone had little effect on the CRE-dependent transcription, NGF markedly enhanced the CRE-dependent transcription induced by nobiletin. The NGF-induced enhancement was neutralized by a TrkA antagonist, K252a. This effect of NGF was effective on the early signaling event elicited by nobiletin. These results suggested that there was crosstalk between NGF and nobiletin signaling in activating the CRE-dependent transcription in PC12 cells.

  14. Sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of rectal motility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Timothy J; Tong, Wei-Dong; Takahashi, Toku; Kosinski, Lauren; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2009-11-01

    The colon and rectum are regulated by the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Abnormalities of the ANS are associated with diseases of the colon and rectum while its modulation is a putative mechanism for sacral nerve stimulation. The purpose of this study is to establish a rat model elucidating the role of the efferent ANS on rectal motility. Rectal motility following transection or stimulation of parasympathetic pelvic nerves (PN) or sympathetic hypogastric nerves (HGN) was measured with rectal strain gauge transducers and quantified as a motility index (MI). Colonic transit was measured 24 hours after transection by calculating the geometric center (GC) of distribution of (51)Cr Transection of PN and HGN decreased MI to 518 +/- 185 g*s (p < 0.05) and increased MI to 5,029 +/- 1,954 g*s (p < 0.05), respectively, compared to sham (975 +/- 243 g*s). Sectioning of PN and HGN decreased transit with GC = 4.9 +/- 0.2 (p < 0.05) and increased transit with GC = 8.1 +/- 0.7 (p < 0.02), respectively, compared to sham (GC = 5.8 +/- 0.3). Stimulation of PN and HGN increased MI to 831 +/- 157% (p < 0.01) and decreased MI to 251 +/- 24% (p < 0.05), respectively. Rectal motility is significantly altered by sectioning or stimulating either HGN or PN. This model may be useful in studying how sacral nerve stimulation exerts its effects and provide insight into the maladies of colonic motility.

  15. Broadband Prosthetic Interfaces: Combining Nerve Transfers and Implantable Multichannel EMG Technology to Decode Spinal Motor Neuron Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin D. Bergmeister

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern robotic hands/upper limbs may replace multiple degrees of freedom of extremity function. However, their intuitive use requires a high number of control signals, which current man-machine interfaces do not provide. Here, we discuss a broadband control interface that combines targeted muscle reinnervation, implantable multichannel electromyographic sensors, and advanced decoding to address the increasing capabilities of modern robotic limbs. With targeted muscle reinnervation, nerves that have lost their targets due to an amputation are surgically transferred to residual stump muscles to increase the number of intuitive prosthetic control signals. This surgery re-establishes a nerve-muscle connection that is used for sensing nerve activity with myoelectric interfaces. Moreover, the nerve transfer determines neurophysiological effects, such as muscular hyper-reinnervation and cortical reafferentation that can be exploited by the myoelectric interface. Modern implantable multichannel EMG sensors provide signals from which it is possible to disentangle the behavior of single motor neurons. Recent studies have shown that the neural drive to muscles can be decoded from these signals and thereby the user's intention can be reliably estimated. By combining these concepts in chronic implants and embedded electronics, we believe that it is in principle possible to establish a broadband man-machine interface, with specific applications in prosthesis control. This perspective illustrates this concept, based on combining advanced surgical techniques with recording hardware and processing algorithms. Here we describe the scientific evidence for this concept, current state of investigations, challenges, and alternative approaches to improve current prosthetic interfaces.

  16. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy involving the ankle in pregnancy: characteristics and therapeutic management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergent, F; Mouroko, D; Sellam, R; Marpeau, L

    2003-06-01

    We report the case of a multigravida presenting in the first trimester of pregnancy with reflex sympathetic dystrophy involving both ankles. Preferential location of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in pregnancy is classically the hip (9 times out of 10). Symptoms develop mostly with primipara in the third trimester of pregnancy or in post-partum. Fracture is the major risk of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Peculiarities of reflex sympathetic dystrophy's treatment in the course of pregnancy are evoked. The end of the pregnancy can be shortened with the aim of stabilizing disease even to activate its healing. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in pregnancy seem multiple and complex. Our observation, by its atypical characteristics, recalls it.

  17. Newer N-phthaloyl GABA derivatives with antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic activities in both sciatic nerve and spinal nerve ligation models of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogeeswari, Perumal; Ragavendran, Jegadeesan Vaigunda; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Kavya, Ramkumar; Vanitha, Kaliappan; Neelakantan, Harshini

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable research evidence supporting a palliative role for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurotransmission and voltage-gated sodium channel blockade in neuropathic pain conditions. Hence, the present study was undertaken to assess the peripheral analgesic, antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic activities of the synthesized structural analogues of GABA. The screening study included acute tissue injury, chronic constriction injury (CCI), and spinal nerve ligation (SNL) models of neuropathic pain. All of the tested compounds sup-pressed the acetic acid-induced writhing response significantly in comparison to the control. In particular, compound JVP-8 was observed to be the most active compound with percent inhibition greater than that of the standard drug aspirin (97.8% inhibition of writhing response as against 97.0% shown by aspirin). In neuropathic pain studies, compound JVP-5 (100 mg/kg i.p.) emerged as the most active compound affording maximum protection against dynamic allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia in the CCI model, and against spontaneous pain and mechanical hyperalgesia in SNL rats. In this study, we have demonstrated that combining phthalimide pharmacophore with GABA has evolved compounds effective for the treatment of neuropathic pain. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Sleep Deprivation Aggravates Median Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain and Enhances Microglial Activation