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Sample records for symbiotic root nodules

  1. Leguminous plants: inventors of root nodules to accommodate symbiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzaki, Takuya; Yoro, Emiko; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Legumes and a few other plant species can establish a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, which enables them to survive in a nitrogen-deficient environment. During the course of nodulation, infection with rhizobia induces the dedifferentiation of host cells to form primordia of a symbiotic organ, the nodule, which prepares plants to accommodate rhizobia in host cells. While these nodulation processes are known to be genetically controlled by both plants and rhizobia, recent advances in studies on two model legumes, Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula, have provided great insight into the underlying plant-side molecular mechanism. In this chapter, we review such knowledge, with particular emphasis on two key processes of nodulation, nodule development and rhizobial invasion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Infection and invasion of roots by symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing rhizobia during nodulation of temperate legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Daniel J

    2004-06-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genera Rhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Azorhizobium (collectively referred to as rhizobia) grow in the soil as free-living organisms but can also live as nitrogen-fixing symbionts inside root nodule cells of legume plants. The interactions between several rhizobial species and their host plants have become models for this type of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. Temperate legumes such as alfalfa, pea, and vetch form indeterminate nodules that arise from root inner and middle cortical cells and grow out from the root via a persistent meristem. During the formation of functional indeterminate nodules, symbiotic bacteria must gain access to the interior of the host root. To get from the outside to the inside, rhizobia grow and divide in tubules called infection threads, which are composite structures derived from the two symbiotic partners. This review focuses on symbiotic infection and invasion during the formation of indeterminate nodules. It summarizes root hair growth, how root hair growth is influenced by rhizobial signaling molecules, infection of root hairs, infection thread extension down root hairs, infection thread growth into root tissue, and the plant and bacterial contributions necessary for infection thread formation and growth. The review also summarizes recent advances concerning the growth dynamics of rhizobial populations in infection threads.

  3. The MicroRNA390/TAS3 Pathway Mediates Symbiotic Nodulation and Lateral Root Growth1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2017-01-01

    Legume roots form two types of postembryonic organs, lateral roots and symbiotic nodules. Nodule formation is the result of the interaction of legumes with rhizobia and requires the mitotic activation and differentiation of root cells as well as an independent, but coordinated, program that allows infection by rhizobia. MicroRNA390 (miR390) is an evolutionarily conserved microRNA that targets the Trans-Acting Short Interference RNA3 (TAS3) transcript. Cleavage of TAS3 by ARGONAUTE7 results in the production of trans-acting small interference RNAs, which target mRNAs encoding AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR2 (ARF2), ARF3, and ARF4. Here, we show that activation of the miR390/TAS3 regulatory module by overexpression of miR390 in Medicago truncatula promotes lateral root growth but prevents nodule organogenesis, rhizobial infection, and the induction of two key nodulation genes, Nodulation Signaling Pathway1 (NSP1) and NSP2. Accordingly, inactivation of the miR390/TAS3 module, either by expression of a miR390 target mimicry construct or mutations in ARGONAUTE7, enhances nodulation and rhizobial infection, alters the spatial distribution of the nodules, and increases the percentage of nodules with multiple meristems. Our results revealed a key role of the miR390/TAS3 pathway in legumes as a modulator of lateral root organs, playing opposite roles in lateral root and nodule development. PMID:28663332

  4. Bradyrhizobium ottawaense sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacterium from root nodules of soybeans in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiumei; Cloutier, Sylvie; Tambong, James T; Bromfield, Eden S P

    2014-09-01

    Sixteen strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of Glycine max grown in Ottawa, Canada, were previously characterized and placed in a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To verify their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized using a polyphasic approach. All strains possessed identical 16S rRNA gene sequences that were 99.79 % similar to the closest relative, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense LMG 18230(T). Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated atpD, glnII, recA, gyrB, rpoB and dnaK genes divided the 16 strains into three multilocus sequence types that were placed in a highly supported lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium consistent with results of DNA-DNA hybridization. Based on analysis of symbiosis gene sequences (nodC and nifH), all novel strains were placed in a phylogenetic group with five species of the genus Bradyrhizobium that nodulate soybeans. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests including carbon and nitrogen source utilization and antibiotic resistance could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Novel strain OO99(T) elicits effective nodules on Glycine max, Glycine soja and Macroptilium atropurpureum, partially effective nodules on Desmodium canadense and Vigna unguiculata, and ineffective nodules on Amphicarpaea bracteata and Phaseolus vulgaris. Based on the data presented, we conclude that our strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium ottawaense sp. nov. is proposed, with OO99(T) ( = LMG 26739(T) = HAMBI 3284(T)) as the type strain. The DNA G+C content is 62.6 mol%. © 2014 Her Majesty the Queen in right of Canada as represented by the Minister of AAFC.

  5. Bradyrhizobium ottawaense sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacterium from root nodules of soybeans in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiumei; Cloutier, Sylvie; Tambong, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of Glycine max grown in Ottawa, Canada, were previously characterized and placed in a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To verify their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized using a polyphasic approach. All strains possessed identical 16S rRNA gene sequences that were 99.79 % similar to the closest relative, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense LMG 18230T. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated atpD, glnII, recA, gyrB, rpoB and dnaK genes divided the 16 strains into three multilocus sequence types that were placed in a highly supported lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium consistent with results of DNA–DNA hybridization. Based on analysis of symbiosis gene sequences (nodC and nifH), all novel strains were placed in a phylogenetic group with five species of the genus Bradyrhizobium that nodulate soybeans. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests including carbon and nitrogen source utilization and antibiotic resistance could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Novel strain OO99T elicits effective nodules on Glycine max, Glycine soja and Macroptilium atropurpureum, partially effective nodules on Desmodium canadense and Vigna unguiculata, and ineffective nodules on Amphicarpaea bracteata and Phaseolus vulgaris. Based on the data presented, we conclude that our strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium ottawaense sp. nov. is proposed, with OO99T ( = LMG 26739T = HAMBI 3284T) as the type strain. The DNA G+C content is 62.6 mol%. PMID:24969302

  6. Bradyrhizobium subterraneum sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium from root nodules of groundnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Chimwamurombe, Percy; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Seven strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of local races of Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) and peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) grown on subsistence farmers' fields in the Kavango region, Namibia, were previously characterized and identified as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To corroborate their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized using a polyphasic approach. All strains possessed identical 16S rRNA gene sequences with Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071T being the most closely related type strain in the 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis, and Bradyrhizobium daqingense CCBAU 15774T in the ITS sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated glnII-recA-rpoB-dnaK placed the strains in a highly supported lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium, most closely related to Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071T. The species status was validated by results of DNA–DNA hybridization. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH genes placed the novel strains in a group with nifH of ‘Bradyrhizobium arachidis’ CCBAU 051107 that also nodulates peanuts. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests including carbon source utilization and antibiotic resistance could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Novel strain 58 2-1T induced effective nodules on V. subterranea, Vigna unguiculata and A. hypogaea, and some strains on Lablab purpureus. Based on the data presented, we conclude that our strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium subterraneum sp. nov. is proposed, with 58 2-1T [ = DSM 100298T = LMG 28792T = NTCCM0016T (Windhoek)] as the type strain. The DNA G+C content of strain 58 2-1T was 64.7 mol% (T m).

  7. Infection and Invasion of Roots by Symbiotic, Nitrogen-Fixing Rhizobia during Nodulation of Temperate Legumes

    OpenAIRE

    Gage, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genera Rhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Azorhizobium (collectively referred to as rhizobia) grow in the soil as free-living organisms but can also live as nitrogen-fixing symbionts inside root nodule cells of legume plants. The interactions between several rhizobial species and their host plants have become models for this type of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. Temperate legumes such as alfalfa, pea, and vetch form indeterminate nodules that a...

  8. Proteomic insights into intra- and intercellular plant-bacteria symbiotic association during root nodule formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin eSalavati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several decades, there have been a large number of studies done on the all aspects of legumes and bacteria which participate in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. The analysis of legume-bacteria interaction is not just a matter of numerical complexity in terms of variants of gene products that can arise from a single gene. Bacteria regulate their quorum-sensing genes to enhance their ability to induce conjugation of plasmids and symbiotic islands, and various protein secretion mechanisms; that can stimulate a collection of chain reactions including species-specific combinations of plant-secretion isoflavonoids, complicated calcium signaling pathways and autoregulation of nodulation mechanisms. Quorum-sensing systems are introduced by the intra- and intercellular organization of gene products lead to protein–protein interactions or targeting of proteins to specific cellular structures. In this study, an attempt has been made to review significant contributions related to nodule formation and development and their impacts on cell proteome for better understanding of plant-bacterium interaction mechanism at protein level. This review would not only provide new insights into the plant-bacteria symbiosis response mechanisms but would also highlights the importance of studying changes in protein abundance inside and outside of cells in response to symbiosis. Furthermore, the application to agriculture programe of plant-bacteria interaction will be discussed.

  9. Stress tolerance, genetic analysis and symbiotic properties of root-nodulating bacteria isolated from Mediterranean leguminous shrubs in Central Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Díez, Beatriz; Fajardo, Susana; Puertas-Mejía, Miguel Angel; de Felipe, María del Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    Nine root-nodulating bacterial isolates were obtained from the leguminous shrubs Spartium junceum, Adenocarpus hispanicus, Cytisus purgans, Cytisus laburnuum, Retama sphaerocarpa and Colutea arborescens in areas of Central Spain. A poliphasic approach analyzing phenotypic, symbiotic and genetic properties was used to study their diversity and characterize them in relation to Mediterranean conditions. Stress tolerance assays revealed marked variations in salinity, extreme pH and cadmium tolerance compared with reference strains, with the majority showing salinity, alkalinity and Cd tolerance and three of them growing at acid pH. Variation within the 16S rRNA gene was examined by amplified 16S rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and direct sequencing to show genetic diversity. Phylogeny confirmed the close relationship of four isolates with Bradyrhizobium canariense, three with Phylobacterium myrsinacearum, one with Rhizobium rhizogenes and another with Mesorhizobium huakuii. The cross inoculation tests revealed wide spectra of nodulation. This is the first report of P. myrsinacearum being able to nodulate these leguminous shrubs, and also the first time reported the association between B.canariense, R. rhizogenes and M. huakuii and C. laburnuum, C. purgans and C. arborescens, respectively. These results suggested that native rhizobia could be suitable candidates as biofertilizers and/or inoculants of leguminous shrubs with restoration or revegetation purposes in Mediterranean areas.

  10. Bradyrhizobium namibiense sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium from root nodules of Lablab purpureus, hyacinth bean, in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Bünger, Wiebke; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2017-10-16

    Four strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet) from Namibia were previously identified as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To confirm their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized by taking a polyphasic approach. The type strain possessed 16S rRNA gene sequences identical to Bradyrhizobium paxllaeri LMTR 21 T and Bradyrhizobiumicense LMTR 13 T , the full-length sequences were identical to those retrieved from SAMN05230119 and SAMN05230120, respectively. However, the intergenic spacer sequences of the novel group showed identities of less than 93.1 % to described Bradyrhizobium species and were placed in a well-supported separate lineage in the phylogenetic tree. Phylogenetic analyses of six concatenated housekeeping genes, recA, glnII, gyrB, dnaK, atpD and rpoB, corroborated that the novel strains belonged to a lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium, with highest sequence identities to Bradyrhizobiumjicamae and B. paxllaeri (below 93 %). The species status was validated by results of DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity values of genome sequences. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests, including carbon source utilization and antibiotic resistance, could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis of nodC and nifH genes placed the novel strains in a group with B. paxllaeri and B.lablabi. Novel strain 5-10 T induces effective nodules on Lablab purpureus, Vigna subterranea, Vigna unguiculata and Arachis hypogaea. Based on our results, we conclude that our strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium namibiense sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain 5-10 T [LMG 28789, DSM 100300, NTCCM0017 (Windhoek)].

  11. Bradyrhizobium kavangense sp. nov., a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium from root nodules of traditional Namibian pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasse Grönemeyer, Jann; Hurek, T; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Eight strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of local races of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) grown on subsistence farmers' fields in the Kavango region, Namibia, were previously characterized and identified as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To clarify their taxonomic status, these strains were further characterized using a polyphasic approach. In phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence the novel group was most closely related to Bradyrhizobium iriomotense EK05T and Bradyrhizobium ingae BR 10250T, and to 'Bradyrhizobium arachidis' CCBAU 051107 in the ITS sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated glnII-recA-rpoB-dnaK sequences placed the strains in a lineage distinct from named species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. The species status was validated by results of DNA-DNA hybridization. Phylogenetic analysis of nifH and nodC genes placed the novel strains in a group with 'B. arachidis' CCBAU 051107. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests including carbon source utilization and antibiotic resistance could be used to differentiate representative strains from recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Novel strain 14-3T induces effective nodules on Vigna subterranea, Vigna unguiculata, Arachis hypogaea and Lablab purpureus. Based on the data presented, it is concluded that the strains represent a novel species of the genus Bradyrhizobium, for which the name Bradyrhizobium kavangense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 14-3T [ = DSM 100299T = LMG 28790T = NTCCM 0012T (Windhoek)]. The DNA G+C content of strain 14-3T is 63.8 mol% (Tm).

  12. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) as a reverse genetic tool to study development of symbiotic root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Gabriela Didina Constantin; Grønlund, Mette; Stougaard, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) can provide a shortcut to plants with altered expression of specific genes. Here, we report that VIGS of the Nodule inception gene (Nin) can alter the nodulation phenotype and Nin gene expression in Pisum sativum. PsNin was chosen as target because of the disti......NinB, nodulation was reduced by at least 45%. Down-regulation of PsNin transcripts in plants inoculated with vectors carrying PsNin cDNA fragments was confirmed and these plants displayed a relative increase in the root/shoot ratio, as expected if nitrogen fixation had been impaired....

  13. Host range, symbiotic effectiveness and nodulation competitiveness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... This symbiotic interaction is of agronomic and ecological importance because of its significant amount of nitrogen to the total nitrogen budget in terrestrial ecosystems (Postgate,. 1998). An important characteristic of this symbiotic interaction is host specificity, where defined species of rhizobia forms nodules ...

  14. Root nodule organogenesis : molecular characterization of the zonation central tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, W.C.

    1994-01-01

    Legume plants form root nodules by interacting with the soil bacterium, Rhizobium. In these nodules bacteria are able to convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia which is used by the host plants as nitrogen source. Therefore symbiotic nitrogen fixation in root nodules

  15. Symbiotic leghemoglobins are crucial for nitrogen fixation in legume root nodules but not for general plant growth and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Thomas; van Dongen, Joost T; Günther, Catrin

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobins are ubiquitous in nature and among the best-characterized proteins. Genetics has revealed crucial roles for human hemoglobins, but similar data are lacking for plants. Plants contain symbiotic and nonsymbiotic hemoglobins; the former are thought to be important for symbiotic nitrogen...... accumulate to millimolar concentrations in the cytoplasm of infected plant cells prior to nitrogen fixation and are thought to buffer free oxygen in the nanomolar range, avoiding inactivation of oxygen-labile nitrogenase while maintaining high oxygen flux for respiration. Although widely accepted......RNAi plants grew normally when fertilized with mineral nitrogen. These data indicate roles for leghemoglobins in oxygen transport and buffering and prove for the first time that plant hemoglobins are crucial for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Mar-29...

  16. MtNF-YA1, a central transcriptional regulator of symbiotic nodule development, is also a determinant of Medicago truncatula susceptibility towards a root pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant NF-Y transcription factors control a wide array of biological functions enabling appropriate reproductive and developmental processes as well as adaptation to various abiotic and biotic environments. In Medicago truncatula, MtNF-YA1 was previously identified as a key determinant for nodule development and establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. Here we highlight a new role for this protein in compatibility to Aphanomyces euteiches, a root pathogenic oomycete. The Mtnf-ya1-1 mutant plants showed better survival rate, reduced symptoms, and increased development of their root apparatus as compared to their wild type background A17. MtNF-YA-1 was specifically up-regulated by A. euteiches in F83005.5, a highly susceptible natural accession of M. truncatula while transcript level remained stable in A17, which is partially resistant. The role of MtNF-YA1 in F83005.5 susceptibility was further documented by reducing MtNF-YA1 expression either by overexpression of the miR169q, a microRNA targeting MtNF-YA1, or by RNAi approaches leading to a strong enhancement in the resistance of this susceptible line. Comparative analysis of the transcriptome of wild type and Mtnf-ya1-1 led to the identification of 1509 differentially expressed genes. Among those, almost 36 defence-related genes were constitutively expressed in Mtnf-ya1-1, while 20 genes linked to hormonal pathways were repressed. In summary, we revealed an unexpected dual role for this symbiotic transcription factor as a key player in the compatibility mechanisms to a pathogen.

  17. Transcriptomic profiling of Burkholderia phymatum STM815, Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG19424 and Rhizobium mesoamericanum STM3625 in response to Mimosa pudica root exudates illuminates the molecular basis of their nodulation competitiveness and symbiotic evolutionary history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonowska, Agnieszka; Melkonian, Rémy; Miché, Lucie; Tisseyre, Pierre; Moulin, Lionel

    2018-01-30

    Rhizobial symbionts belong to the classes Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria (called "alpha" and "beta"-rhizobia). Most knowledge on the genetic basis of symbiosis is based on model strains belonging to alpha-rhizobia. Mimosa pudica is a legume that offers an excellent opportunity to study the adaptation toward symbiotic nitrogen fixation in beta-rhizobia compared to alpha-rhizobia. In a previous study (Melkonian et al., Environ Microbiol 16:2099-111, 2014) we described the symbiotic competitiveness of M. pudica symbionts belonging to Burkholderia, Cupriavidus and Rhizobium species. In this article we present a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes (by RNAseq) of B. phymatum STM815 (BP), C. taiwanensis LMG19424 (CT) and R. mesoamericanum STM3625 (RM) in conditions mimicking the early steps of symbiosis (i.e. perception of root exudates). BP exhibited the strongest transcriptome shift both quantitatively and qualitatively, which mirrors its high competitiveness in the early steps of symbiosis and its ancient evolutionary history as a symbiont, while CT had a minimal response which correlates with its status as a younger symbiont (probably via acquisition of symbiotic genes from a Burkholderia ancestor) and RM had a typical response of Alphaproteobacterial rhizospheric bacteria. Interestingly, the upregulation of nodulation genes was the only common response among the three strains; the exception was an up-regulated gene encoding a putative fatty acid hydroxylase, which appears to be a novel symbiotic gene specific to Mimosa symbionts. The transcriptional response to root exudates was correlated to each strain nodulation competitiveness, with Burkholderia phymatum appearing as the best specialised symbiont of Mimosa pudica.

  18. The DMI1 and DMI2 Early Symbiotic Genes of Medicago truncatula Are Required for a High-Affinity Nodulation Factor-Binding Site Associated to a Particulate Fraction of Roots1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Bridget V.; Cullimore, Julie V.; Ranjeva, Raoul; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The establishment of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis between Medicago spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti is dependent on the production of sulfated lipo-chitooligosaccharidic nodulation (Nod) factors by the bacterial partner. In this article, using a biochemical approach to characterize putative Nod factor receptors in the plant host, we describe a high-affinity binding site (Kd = 0.45 nm) for the major Nod factor produced by S. meliloti. This site is termed Nod factor-binding site 3 (NFBS3). NFBS3 is associated to a high-density fraction prepared from roots of Medicago truncatula and shows binding specificity for lipo-chitooligosaccharidic structures. As for the previously characterized binding sites (NFBS1 and NFBS2), NFBS3 does not recognize the sulfate group on the S. meliloti Nod factor. Studies of Nod factor binding in root extracts of early symbiotic mutants of M. truncatula reveals that the new site is present in Nod factor perception and does not make infections 3 (dmi3) mutants but is absent in dmi1 and dmi2 mutants. Roots and cell cultures of all these mutants still contain sites similar to NFBS1 and NFBS2, respectively. These results suggest that NFBS3 is different from NFBS2 and NFBS1 and is dependent on the common symbiotic genes DMI1 and DMI2 required for establishment of symbioses with both rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. The potential role of this site in the establishment of root endosymbioses is discussed. PMID:16377749

  19. Host range, symbiotic effectiveness and nodulation competitiveness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ERIC-PCR DNA fingerprinting patterns were used to identify the isolates occupying nodules. All the isolates nodulated cowpea, groundnut (Arachis hypogeae) and mungbean (Vigna radiata), but only AII-2-1, AII-3-4 and BIII-2-2 nodulated soybean (Glycine max). Apart from cowpea where all the isolates were effective, there ...

  20. Quantitative modelling of legume root nodule primordium induction by a diffusive signal of epidermal origin that inhibits auxin efflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deinum, Eva E.; Kohlen, Wouter; Geurts, René

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rhizobium nitrogen fixation in legumes takes place in specialized organs called root nodules. The initiation of these symbiotic organs has two important components. First, symbiotic rhizobium bacteria are recognized at the epidermis through specific bacterially secreted

  1. The Effect of Indigenous Root-Nodulating Bacteria on Nodulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was initiated to isolate and characterize indigenous rhizobia nodulating faba bean, and evaluate symbiotic characteristics between the crop and the rhizobia in major faba bean producing areas in Tigray highlands. Field crops were also surveyed for nodulation in selected sites of seven (7) faba bean growing ...

  2. Nodulation and Rhizobium Population in Root Nodules of Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nodulation and rhizobium population in root nodules of 5- year old Leucaena leucocephala; Gliricidia sepium and Acacia mangium were assessed. Nodules of these tree legumes were quantified in terms of their numbers, lateral and vertical distribution while the rhizobium population in cultured nodules was counted as ...

  3. Root nodule symbiosis in Lotus japonicus drives the establishment of distinctive rhizosphere, root, and nodule bacterial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Jensen, Dorthe Bodker; Koprivova, Anna; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Radutoiu, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Lotus japonicus has been used for decades as a model legume to study the establishment of binary symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia that trigger root nodule organogenesis for bacterial accommodation. Using community profiling of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we reveal that in Lotus, distinctive nodule- and root-inhabiting communities are established by parallel, rather than consecutive, selection of bacteria from the rhizosphere and root compartments. Comparative analyses of wild-type (WT) and symbiotic mutants in Nod factor receptor5 (nfr5), Nodule inception (nin) and Lotus histidine kinase1 (lhk1) genes identified a previously unsuspected role of the nodulation pathway in the establishment of different bacterial assemblages in the root and rhizosphere. We found that the loss of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis dramatically alters community structure in the latter two compartments, affecting at least 14 bacterial orders. The differential plant growth phenotypes seen between WT and the symbiotic mutants in nonsupplemented soil were retained under nitrogen-supplemented conditions that blocked the formation of functional nodules in WT, whereas the symbiosis-impaired mutants maintain an altered community structure in the nitrogen-supplemented soil. This finding provides strong evidence that the root-associated community shift in the symbiotic mutants is a direct consequence of the disabled symbiosis pathway rather than an indirect effect resulting from abolished symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Our findings imply a role of the legume host in selecting a broad taxonomic range of root-associated bacteria that, in addition to rhizobia, likely contribute to plant growth and ecological performance. PMID:27864511

  4. Nodulation outer proteins: double-edged swords of symbiotic rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehelin, Christian; Krishnan, Hari B

    2015-09-15

    Rhizobia are nitrogen-fixing bacteria that establish a nodule symbiosis with legumes. Nodule formation depends on signals and surface determinants produced by both symbiotic partners. Among them, rhizobial Nops (nodulation outer proteins) play a crucial symbiotic role in many strain-host combinations. Nops are defined as proteins secreted via a rhizobial T3SS (type III secretion system). Functional T3SSs have been characterized in many rhizobial strains. Nops have been identified using various genetic, biochemical, proteomic, genomic and experimental approaches. Certain Nops represent extracellular components of the T3SS, which are visible in electron micrographs as bacterial surface appendages called T3 (type III) pili. Other Nops are T3 effector proteins that can be translocated into plant cells. Rhizobial T3 effectors manipulate cellular processes in host cells to suppress plant defence responses against rhizobia and to promote symbiosis-related processes. Accordingly, mutant strains deficient in synthesis or secretion of T3 effectors show reduced symbiotic properties on certain host plants. On the other hand, direct or indirect recognition of T3 effectors by plant cells expressing specific R (resistance) proteins can result in effector triggered defence responses that negatively affect rhizobial infection. Hence Nops are double-edged swords that may promote establishment of symbiosis with one legume (symbiotic factors) and impair symbiotic processes when bacteria are inoculated on another legume species (asymbiotic factors). In the present review, we provide an overview of our current understanding of Nops. We summarize their symbiotic effects, their biochemical properties and their possible modes of action. Finally, we discuss future perspectives in the field of T3 effector research. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  5. [Analysis of Symbiotic Genes of Leguminous Plants Nodule Bacteria Grown in the Southern Urals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baymiev, An Kh; Ivanova, E S; Gumenko, R S; Chubukova, O V; Baymiev, Al Kh

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial strains isolated from the nodules, tissues, and root surface of wild legumes growing in the Southern Urals related to the tribes Galegeae, Hedysareae, Genisteae, Trifolieae, and Loteae were examined for the presence in their genomes of symbiotic (sym) genes. It was found that the sym-genes are present in microorganisms isolated only from the nodules of the analyzed plants (sym+ -strains). Phylogenetic analysis of sym+ -strains on the basis of a comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that sym+ -strains belong to five families of nodule bacteria: Mesorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Rhizobium, and Phyllobacterium. A study the phylogeny of the sym-genes showed that the nodule bacteria of leguminous plants of the Southern Urals at the genus level are mainly characterized by a parallel evolution of symbiotic genes and the 16S rRNA gene. Thus, cases of horizontal transfer of sym genes, which sometimes leads to the formation of certain types of atypical rhizobial strains ofleguminous plants, are detected in nodule bacteria populations.

  6. Soybean SAT1 (Symbiotic Ammonium Transporter 1) encodes a bHLH transcription factor involved in nodule growth and NH4+ transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiasson, D.M.; Loughlin, P.C.; Mazurkiewicz, D.; Mohammadidehcheshmeh, M.; Fedorova, E.E.; Okamoto, M.; McLean, E.; Glass, A.D.M.; Smith, S.E.; Bisseling, T.; Tyerman, S.D.; Day, D.A.; Kaiser, B.N.

    2014-01-01

    Glycine max symbiotic ammonium transporter 1 was first documented as a putative ammonium (NH4+) channel localized to the symbiosome membrane of soybean root nodules. We show that Glycine max symbiotic ammonium transporter 1 is actually a membrane-localized basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) DNA-binding

  7. NAD1 Controls Defense-Like Responses in Medicago truncatula Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixing Nodules Following Rhizobial Colonization in a BacA-Independent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domonkos, Ágota; Kovács, Szilárd; Gombár, Anikó; Kiss, Ernő; Horváth, Beatrix; Kováts, Gyöngyi Z; Farkas, Attila; Tóth, Mónika T; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Bóka, Károly; Fodor, Lili; Ratet, Pascal; Kereszt, Attila; Endre, Gabriella; Kaló, Péter

    2017-12-14

    Legumes form endosymbiotic interaction with host compatible rhizobia, resulting in the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Within symbiotic nodules, rhizobia are intracellularly accommodated in plant-derived membrane compartments, termed symbiosomes. In mature nodule, the massively colonized cells tolerate the existence of rhizobia without manifestation of visible defense responses, indicating the suppression of plant immunity in the nodule in the favur of the symbiotic partner. Medicago truncatula DNF2 (defective in nitrogen fixation 2) and NAD1 (nodules with activated defense 1) genes are essential for the control of plant defense during the colonization of the nitrogen-fixing nodule and are required for bacteroid persistence. The previously identified nodule-specific NAD1 gene encodes a protein of unknown function. Herein, we present the analysis of novel NAD1 mutant alleles to better understand the function of NAD1 in the repression of immune responses in symbiotic nodules. By exploiting the advantage of plant double and rhizobial mutants defective in establishing nitrogen-fixing symbiotic interaction, we show that NAD1 functions following the release of rhizobia from the infection threads and colonization of nodule cells. The suppression of plant defense is self-dependent of the differentiation status of the rhizobia. The corresponding phenotype of nad1 and dnf2 mutants and the similarity in the induction of defense-associated genes in both mutants suggest that NAD1 and DNF2 operate close together in the same pathway controlling defense responses in symbiotic nodules.

  8. Root nodule symbiosis in Lotus japonicus drives the establishment of distinctive rhizosphere, root, and nodule bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Jensen, Dorthe Bodker; Koprivova, Anna; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Radutoiu, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Legumes are known as pioneer plants colonizing marginal soils, and as enhancers of the nutritional status in cultivated soils. This beneficial activity has been explained by their capacity to engage in symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. We performed a community profiling analysis of Lotus japonicus wild type and mutants to investigate the role of the nodulation pathway on the structure of the root-associated bacterial microbiota. We found that several bacterial orders were ...

  9. Drought stress responses in soybean roots and nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Kunert

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Drought is considered to be a major threat to soybean production worldwide and yet our current understanding of the effects of drought on soybean productively is largely based on studies on above-ground traits. Although the roots and root nodules are important sensors of drought, the responses of these crucial organs and their drought tolerance features remain poorly characterized. The symbiotic interaction between soybean and rhizobia facilitates atmospheric nitrogen fixation, a process that provides essential nitrogen to support plant growth and development. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is important for sustainable agriculture, as it sustains plant growth on nitrogen-poor soils and limits fertilizer use for crop nitrogen nutrition. Recent developments have been made in our understanding of the drought impact on soybean root architecture and nodule traits, as well as underpinning transcriptome, proteome and also emerging metabolome information, with a view to improve the selection of more drought-tolerant soybean cultivars and rhizobia in the future. We conclude that the direct screening of root and nodule traits in the field as well as identification of genes, proteins and also metabolites involved in such traits will be essential in order to gain a better understanding of the regulation of root architecture, bacteroid development and lifespan in relation to drought tolerance in soybean.

  10. Drought Stress Responses in Soybean Roots and Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Karl J; Vorster, Barend J; Fenta, Berhanu A; Kibido, Tsholofelo; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Foyer, Christine H

    2016-01-01

    Drought is considered to be a major threat to soybean production worldwide and yet our current understanding of the effects of drought on soybean productively is largely based on studies on above-ground traits. Although the roots and root nodules are important sensors of drought, the responses of these crucial organs and their drought tolerance features remain poorly characterized. The symbiotic interaction between soybean and rhizobia facilitates atmospheric nitrogen fixation, a process that provides essential nitrogen to support plant growth and development. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is important for sustainable agriculture, as it sustains plant growth on nitrogen-poor soils and limits fertilizer use for crop nitrogen nutrition. Recent developments have been made in our understanding of the drought impact on soybean root architecture and nodule traits, as well as underpinning transcriptome, proteome and also emerging metabolome information, with a view to improve the selection of more drought-tolerant soybean cultivars and rhizobia in the future. We conclude that the direct screening of root and nodule traits in the field as well as identification of genes, proteins and also metabolites involved in such traits will be essential in order to gain a better understanding of the regulation of root architecture, bacteroid development and lifespan in relation to drought tolerance in soybean.

  11. Flavonoids and Auxin Transport Inhibitors Rescue Symbiotic Nodulation in the Medicago truncatula Cytokinin Perception Mutant cre1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Hassan, Samira; Truong, Thy T.; Hocart, Charles H.; Laffont, Carole; Frugier, Florian; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Initiation of symbiotic nodules in legumes requires cytokinin signaling, but its mechanism of action is largely unknown. Here, we tested whether the failure to initiate nodules in the Medicago truncatula cytokinin perception mutant cre1 (cytokinin response1) is due to its altered ability to regulate auxin transport, auxin accumulation, and induction of flavonoids. We found that in the cre1 mutant, symbiotic rhizobia cannot locally alter acro- and basipetal auxin transport during nodule initiation and that these mutants show reduced auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) accumulation and auxin responses compared with the wild type. Quantification of flavonoids, which can act as endogenous auxin transport inhibitors, showed a deficiency in the induction of free naringenin, isoliquiritigenin, quercetin, and hesperetin in cre1 roots compared with wild-type roots 24 h after inoculation with rhizobia. Coinoculation of roots with rhizobia and the flavonoids naringenin, isoliquiritigenin, and kaempferol, or with the synthetic auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5,-triiodobenzoic acid, rescued nodulation efficiency in cre1 mutants and allowed auxin transport control in response to rhizobia. Our results suggest that CRE1-dependent cytokinin signaling leads to nodule initiation through the regulation of flavonoid accumulation required for local alteration of polar auxin transport and subsequent auxin accumulation in cortical cells during the early stages of nodulation. PMID:26253705

  12. Dissecting the Root Nodule Transcriptome of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Kant

    Full Text Available A hallmark trait of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L., like other legumes, is the capability to convert atmospheric nitrogen (N2 into ammonia (NH3 in symbiotic association with Mesorhizobium ciceri. However, the complexity of molecular networks associated with the dynamics of nodule development in chickpea need to be analyzed in depth. Hence, in order to gain insights into the chickpea nodule development, the transcriptomes of nodules at early, middle and late stages of development were sequenced using the Roche 454 platform. This generated 490.84 Mb sequence data comprising 1,360,251 reads which were assembled into 83,405 unigenes. Transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO, Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG metabolic pathways analysis. Differential expression analysis revealed that a total of 3760 transcripts were differentially expressed in at least one of three stages, whereas 935, 117 and 2707 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in the early, middle and late stages of nodule development respectively. MapMan analysis revealed enrichment of metabolic pathways such as transport, protein synthesis, signaling and carbohydrate metabolism during root nodulation. Transcription factors were predicted and analyzed for their differential expression during nodule development. Putative nodule specific transcripts were identified and enriched for GO categories using BiNGO which revealed many categories to be enriched during nodule development, including transcription regulators and transporters. Further, the assembled transcriptome was also used to mine for genic SSR markers. In conclusion, this study will help in enriching the transcriptomic resources implicated in understanding of root nodulation events in chickpea.

  13. Dissecting the Root Nodule Transcriptome of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Chandra; Pradhan, Seema; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark trait of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), like other legumes, is the capability to convert atmospheric nitrogen (N2) into ammonia (NH3) in symbiotic association with Mesorhizobium ciceri. However, the complexity of molecular networks associated with the dynamics of nodule development in chickpea need to be analyzed in depth. Hence, in order to gain insights into the chickpea nodule development, the transcriptomes of nodules at early, middle and late stages of development were sequenced using the Roche 454 platform. This generated 490.84 Mb sequence data comprising 1,360,251 reads which were assembled into 83,405 unigenes. Transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO), Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) metabolic pathways analysis. Differential expression analysis revealed that a total of 3760 transcripts were differentially expressed in at least one of three stages, whereas 935, 117 and 2707 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in the early, middle and late stages of nodule development respectively. MapMan analysis revealed enrichment of metabolic pathways such as transport, protein synthesis, signaling and carbohydrate metabolism during root nodulation. Transcription factors were predicted and analyzed for their differential expression during nodule development. Putative nodule specific transcripts were identified and enriched for GO categories using BiNGO which revealed many categories to be enriched during nodule development, including transcription regulators and transporters. Further, the assembled transcriptome was also used to mine for genic SSR markers. In conclusion, this study will help in enriching the transcriptomic resources implicated in understanding of root nodulation events in chickpea.

  14. Photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain ORS285 Is Capable of Forming Nitrogen-Fixing Root Nodules on Soybeans (Glycine max)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Eric; Xu, Lei; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Gargani, Daniel; Gully, Djamel

    2013-01-01

    The ability of photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium strains ORS285 and ORS278 to nodulate soybeans was investigated. While the nod gene-deficient ORS278 strain induced bumps only on soybean roots, the nod gene-containing ORS285 strain formed nitrogen-fixing nodules. However, symbiotic efficiencies differed drastically depending on both the soybean genotype used and the culture conditions tested. PMID:23354704

  15. A histochemical study of root nodule development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de C.

    1991-01-01

    In cooperation with soil bacteria of the genera Rhizobium , Bradyrhizobium or Azorhizobium , many members of the legume family are able to form specialized organs on their roots, called root nodules. The bacteria, wrapped up

  16. Fixating on metals: new insights into the role of metals in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guerrero, Manuel; Matthiadis, Anna; Sáez, Ángela; Long, Terri A

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is one of the most promising and immediate alternatives to the overuse of polluting nitrogen fertilizers for improving plant nutrition. At the core of this process are a number of metalloproteins that catalyze and provide energy for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia, eliminate free radicals produced by this process, and create the microaerobic conditions required by these reactions. In legumes, metal cofactors are provided to endosymbiotic rhizobia within root nodule cortical cells. However, low metal bioavailability is prevalent in most soils types, resulting in widespread plant metal deficiency and decreased nitrogen fixation capabilities. As a result, renewed efforts have been undertaken to identify the mechanisms governing metal delivery from soil to the rhizobia, and to determine how metals are used in the nodule and how they are recycled once the nodule is no longer functional. This effort is being aided by improved legume molecular biology tools (genome projects, mutant collections, and transformation methods), in addition to state-of-the-art metal visualization systems.

  17. Soybean nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation in response to soil compaction and mulching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siczek, A.; Lipiec, J.

    2009-04-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legume crops such as soybean plays a key role in supplying nitrogen for agricultural systems. In symbiotic associations with Bradyrhizobium japonicum soybean can fix up to 200 kg N ha-1 yr-1. This reduces the need for expensive and often environmentally harmful because of leaching nitrogen fertilization. However both soybean nodulation and nitrogen fixation are sensitive to soil conditions. One of the critical soil constraints is soil compaction. Increasing use of heavy equipment and intensive cropping in modern agriculture leads to excessive soil compaction. Compaction often is found as a result of field operations that have to be performed in a very short period of time and when soils are wet and more susceptible to compaction. This results in unfavourable water content, temperature, aeration, pore size distribution, strength for plant growth and microbial activity. The surface mulching can alleviate the adverse effect of the environmental factors on soil by decreasing fluctuation of soil temperature, increasing moisture by controlling evaporation from the soil surface, decreasing bulk density, preventing soil crusting. The effect of mulch on soil conditions largely depends on soil compaction and weather conditions during growing season. The positive effect of the straw mulch on soil moisture has been seen under seasons with insufficient rainfalls. However thicker layers of mulch can act as diffusion barrier, especially when the mulch is wet. Additionally, low soil temperature prevalent during early spring under mulch can impede development of nodule, nodule size and delay onset of nodulation. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the straw mulch on nodulation and nitrogen fixation of soybean in variously compacted soil. The experimental field was 192 m2and was divided into three parts composed of 6 micro-plots with area 7 m2. Three degrees of soil compaction obtained in each field part through tractor passes were

  18. api, A novel Medicago truncatula symbiotic mutant impaired in nodule primordium invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillet, Alice; Garcia, Joseph; de Billy, Françoise; Gherardi, Michèle; Huguet, Thierry; Barker, David G; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Journet, Etienne-Pascal

    2008-05-01

    Genetic approaches have proved to be extremely useful in dissecting the complex nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium-legume endosymbiotic association. Here we describe a novel Medicago truncatula mutant called api, whose primary phenotype is the blockage of rhizobial infection just prior to nodule primordium invasion, leading to the formation of large infection pockets within the cortex of noninvaded root outgrowths. The mutant api originally was identified as a double symbiotic mutant associated with a new allele (nip-3) of the NIP/LATD gene, following the screening of an ethylmethane sulphonate-mutagenized population. Detailed characterization of the segregating single api mutant showed that rhizobial infection is also defective at the earlier stage of infection thread (IT) initiation in root hairs, as well as later during IT growth in the small percentage of nodules which overcome the primordium invasion block. Neither modulating ethylene biosynthesis (with L-alpha-(2-aminoethoxyvinylglycine or 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) nor reducing ethylene sensitivity in a skl genetic background alters the basic api phenotype, suggesting that API function is not closely linked to ethylene metabolism or signaling. Genetic mapping places the API gene on the upper arm of the M. truncatula linkage group 4, and epistasis analyses show that API functions downstream of BIT1/ERN1 and LIN and upstream of NIP/LATD and the DNF genes.

  19. Identifying abnormalities in symbiotic development between Trifolium spp. and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii leading to sub-optimal and ineffective nodule phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melino, V. J.; Drew, E. A.; Ballard, R. A.; Reeve, W. G.; Thomson, G.; White, R. G.; O'Hara, G. W.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Legumes overcome nitrogen limitations by entering into a mutualistic symbiosis with N2-fixing bacteria (rhizobia). Fully compatible associations (effective) between Trifolium spp. and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii result from successful recognition of symbiotic partners in the rhizosphere, root hair infection and the formation of nodules where N2-fixing bacteroids reside. Poorly compatible associations can result in root nodule formation with minimal (sub-optimal) or no (ineffective) N2-fixation. Despite the abundance and persistence of strains in agricultural soils which are poorly compatible with the commercially grown clover species, little is known of how and why they fail symbiotically. The aims of this research were to determine the morphological aberrations occurring in sub-optimal and ineffective clover nodules and to determine whether reduced bacteroid numbers or reduced N2-fixing activity is the main cause for the Sub-optimal phenotype. Methods Symbiotic effectiveness of four Trifolium hosts with each of four R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strains was assessed by analysis of plant yields and nitrogen content; nodule yields, abundance, morphology and internal structure; and bacteroid cytology, quantity and activity. Key Results Effective nodules (Nodule Function 83–100 %) contained four developmental zones and N2-fixing bacteroids. In contrast, Sub-optimal nodules of the same age (Nodule Function 24–57 %) carried prematurely senescing bacteroids and a small bacteroid pool resulting in reduced shoot N. Ineffective-differentiated nodules carried bacteroids aborted at stage 2 or 3 in differentiation. In contrast, bacteroids were not observed in Ineffective-vegetative nodules despite the presence of bacteria within infection threads. Conclusions Three major responses to N2-fixation incompatibility between Trifolium spp. and R. l. trifolii strains were found: failed bacterial endocytosis from infection threads into plant cortical

  20. Phylogeny of nodulation genes and symbiotic diversity of Acacia senegal (L.) Willd. and A. seyal (Del.) Mesorhizobium strains from different regions of Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Niokhor; Galiana, Antoine; Le Roux, Christine; Kane, Aboubacry; Duponnois, Robin; Ndoye, Fatou; Fall, Dioumacor; Noba, Kandioura; Sylla, Samba Ndao; Diouf, Diégane

    2015-04-01

    Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal are small, deciduous legume trees, most highly valued for nitrogen fixation and for the production of gum arabic, a commodity of international trade since ancient times. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes represents the main natural input of atmospheric N2 into ecosystems which may ultimately benefit all organisms. We analyzed the nod and nif symbiotic genes and symbiotic properties of root-nodulating bacteria isolated from A. senegal and A. seyal in Senegal. The symbiotic genes of rhizobial strains from the two Acacia species were closed to those of Mesorhizobium plurifarium and grouped separately in the phylogenetic trees. Phylogeny of rhizobial nitrogen fixation gene nifH was similar to those of nodulation genes (nodA and nodC). All A. senegal rhizobial strains showed identical nodA, nodC, and nifH gene sequences. By contrast, A. seyal rhizobial strains exhibited different symbiotic gene sequences. Efficiency tests demonstrated that inoculation of both Acacia species significantly affected nodulation, total dry weight, acetylene reduction activity (ARA), and specific acetylene reduction activity (SARA) of plants. However, these cross-inoculation tests did not show any specificity of Mesorhizobium strains toward a given Acacia host species in terms of infectivity and efficiency as stated by principal component analysis (PCA). This study demonstrates that large-scale inoculation of A. senegal and A. seyal in the framework of reafforestation programs requires a preliminary step of rhizobial strain selection for both Acacia species.

  1. A Medicago truncatula tobacco retrotransposon insertion mutant collection with defects in nodule development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pislariu, Catalina I; Murray, Jeremy D; Wen, JiangQi; Cosson, Viviane; Muni, RajaSekhara Reddy Duvvuru; Wang, Mingyi; Benedito, Vagner A; Andriankaja, Andry; Cheng, Xiaofei; Jerez, Ivone Torres; Mondy, Samuel; Zhang, Shulan; Taylor, Mark E; Tadege, Million; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Chen, Rujin; Udvardi, Michael K

    2012-08-01

    A Tnt1-insertion mutant population of Medicago truncatula ecotype R108 was screened for defects in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Primary screening of 9,300 mutant lines yielded 317 lines with putative defects in nodule development and/or nitrogen fixation. Of these, 230 lines were rescreened, and 156 lines were confirmed with defective symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Mutants were sorted into six distinct phenotypic categories: 72 nonnodulating mutants (Nod-), 51 mutants with totally ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix-), 17 mutants with partially ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix+/-), 27 mutants defective in nodule emergence, elongation, and nitrogen fixation (Nod+/- Fix-), one mutant with delayed and reduced nodulation but effective in nitrogen fixation (dNod+/- Fix+), and 11 supernodulating mutants (Nod++Fix+/-). A total of 2,801 flanking sequence tags were generated from the 156 symbiotic mutant lines. Analysis of flanking sequence tags revealed 14 insertion alleles of the following known symbiotic genes: NODULE INCEPTION (NIN), DOESN'T MAKE INFECTIONS3 (DMI3/CCaMK), ERF REQUIRED FOR NODULATION, and SUPERNUMERARY NODULES (SUNN). In parallel, a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy was used to identify Tnt1 insertions in known symbiotic genes, which revealed 25 additional insertion alleles in the following genes: DMI1, DMI2, DMI3, NIN, NODULATION SIGNALING PATHWAY1 (NSP1), NSP2, SUNN, and SICKLE. Thirty-nine Nod- lines were also screened for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis phenotypes, and 30 mutants exhibited defects in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Morphological and developmental features of several new symbiotic mutants are reported. The collection of mutants described here is a source of novel alleles of known symbiotic genes and a resource for cloning novel symbiotic genes via Tnt1 tagging.

  2. The value of biodiversity in legume symbiotic nitrogen fixation and nodulation for biofuel and food production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresshoff, Peter M; Hayashi, Satomi; Biswas, Bandana; Mirzaei, Saeid; Indrasumunar, Arief; Reid, Dugald; Samuel, Sharon; Tollenaere, Alina; van Hameren, Bethany; Hastwell, April; Scott, Paul; Ferguson, Brett J

    2015-01-01

    Much of modern agriculture is based on immense populations of genetically identical or near-identical varieties, called cultivars. However, advancement of knowledge, and thus experimental utility, is found through biodiversity, whether naturally-found or induced by the experimenter. Globally we are confronted by ever-growing food and energy challenges. Here we demonstrate how such biodiversity from the food legume crop soybean (Glycine max L. Merr) and the bioenergy legume tree Pongamia (Millettia) pinnata is a great value. Legume plants are diverse and are represented by over 18,000 species on this planet. Some, such as soybean, pea and medics are used as food and animal feed crops. Others serve as ornamental (e.g., wisteria), timber (e.g., acacia/wattle) or biofuel (e.g., Pongamia pinnata) resources. Most legumes develop root organs (nodules) after microsymbiont induction that serve as their habitat for biological nitrogen fixation. Through this, nitrogen fertiliser demand is reduced by the efficient symbiosis between soil Rhizobium-type bacteria and the appropriate legume partner. Mechanistic research into the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of legumes is thus strategically essential for future global agriculture. Here we demonstrate how molecular plant science analysis of the genetics of an established food crop (soybean) and an emerging biofuel P. pinnata feedstock contributes to their utility by sustainable production aided by symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. CO2 fixation in alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil root nodules and partitioning of 14C to the plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, C.A.; Vance, C.P.; Heichel, G.H.; Stade, S.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if nonphotosynthetic CO 2 fixation by root nodules contributes carbon for the assimilation of fixed N 2 in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.) and if assimilation products are partitioned to different plant organs. Effective alfalfa nodules excised from or attached to roots had apparent 14 CO 2 fixation rates of 50 to 80 μg CO 2 kg -1 s -1 (dry weight) at 0.0012 to 0.0038 mole fraction CO 2 . Nodule CO 2 fixation rates increased six- to seven-fold as ambient CO 2 was raised from 0.0038 to 0.0663 mole fraction. Respiration rates of nodules (3 to 4 mg CO 2 kg -1 s -1 ) were 10 to 100-fold higher than 14 CO 2 fixation rates of nodules. Pulse chase experiments with 14 CO 2 combined with nodule and xylem sap analysis demonstrated the initial products of root and nodule CO 2 fixation were organic acids. However, the export of fixed 14 C from effective nodules was primarily in the form of amino acids. In contrast, nodule and/or root fixed 14 C in ineffectively nodulated alfalfa and denodulated effective alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil was transported primarily as organic acids. Aspartate, asparagine, alanine, glutamate, and glutamine were the most heavily labeled compounds in the amino acid fraction of both effective alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil nodules exposed to 14 CO 2 . By contrast, asparate, asparagine, and glutamine were the predominantly labeled amino acids in xylem sap collected from nodulated effective roots exposed to 14 CO 2 . The occurrence of nodule CO 2 fixation in alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil and the export of fixed carbon as asparagine and aspartate to roots and shoots is consistent with a role for CO 2 fixation by nodules in providing carbon skeletons for assimilation and transport of symbiotically fixed N 2

  4. Symbiotic Properties of Sinorhizobium Fredii, J-TGS50 an Indonesian Soybean Nodule Forming Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiyo Hadi Waluyo

    2004-01-01

    Green House experiments were conducted to study symbiotic properties of Sinorhizobium Fredii, J-TGS50. Sinorhizobium Fredii USDA 192, USDA 201, USDA 205, USDA 206, USDA 217 and Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 were used as references. Yeast extract mannitol broth culture of the bacteria were made and used as inoculation for several local and imported soybean varieties used in this study. Plants were harvested at 20 days after inoculation. Number of nodules were counted, fresh weight of nodules and shoot were determined. S. Fredii J-TGS50 and S. Fredii USDA 192, USDA 201, USDA 205, USDA 206, USDA 217 were found different in their symbiotic properties. S. Fredii J-TGS50 formed nodules on same imported soybean. While there were no nodules obtained from the plant inoculated with S. Fredii USDA 192, USDA 201, USDA 205, USDA 206, USDA 217. S. Fredii J-TGS50 and recommended B. Japonicum USDA 110 formed nodule on several local soybean varieties. There was no differences between those two bacteria either in nodulation efficiency or in the effectiveness of the formed nodules. Results of this study can be concluded that S. Fredii, J-TGS50 is a native to Indonesian soil and it is a promising soybean nodule forming bacteria in Indonesia. Using indigenous bacteria is valuable. Since they are mostly more tolerant and adaptable than the introduced ones. An important aspect for the success of Biological Nitrogen Fixation (BNF) is insight in the structure of indigenous soybean rhizobia populations. Study on the biodiversity of soybean rhizobia was important conducted. (author)

  5. Effect of Rhizobium and Phosphate Solubilizing Bacterial Inoculants on Symbiotic Traits, Nodule Leghemoglobin, and Yield of Chickpea Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Tagore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was carried out during the rabi season of 2004-05 to find out the effect of Rhizobium and phosphate solubilizing bacterial (PSB inoculants on symbiotic traits, nodule leghemoglobin, and yield of five elite genotypes of chickpea. Among the chickpea genotypes, IG-593 performed better in respect of symbiotic parameters including nodule number, nodule fresh weight, nodule dry weight, shoot dry weight, yield attributes and yield. Leghemoglobin content (2.55 mg g−1 of fresh nodule was also higher under IG-593. Among microbial inoculants, the Rhizobium + PSB was found most effective in terms of nodule number (27.66 nodules plant−1, nodule fresh weight (144.90 mg plant−1, nodule dry weight (74.30 mg plant−1, shoot dry weight (11.76 g plant−1, and leghemoglobin content (2.29 mg g−1 of fresh nodule and also showed its positive effect in enhancing all the yield attributing parameters, grain and straw yields.

  6. Effect of exogenous application of rhizopine on lucerne root nodulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rhizopine, 3-0 -methyl scyllo-inosamine was applied to the roots of luceme seedling inoculated with either rhizopine synthesizing Sinorhizobium meliloti strain L530 or the non-rhizopine synthesizing strain Rm 1021 . There was an initial delay in nodule formation. A significant increase in the number of nodules formed in ...

  7. GC-MS based metabolite profiling implies three interdependent ways of ammonium assimilation in Medicago truncatula root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsch, Aiko; Carvalho, Helena G; Cullimore, Julie V; Niehaus, Karsten

    2006-12-15

    In symbiotic interaction with legume plants, bacteria termed Rhizobia can fix massive amounts of atmospheric nitrogen which is primarily provided in the form of ammonium to the host plants. Therefore, legume root nodules that house the symbiotic bacteria are ideally suited to study the process of primary ammonium assimilation. Here, we present a GC-MS based metabolite profiling analysis of Medicago truncatula root nodules (induced by the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti) before and after inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS) by the chemical herbicide phosphinotricine. The primary role of GS in ammonium assimilation was revealed by drastically reduced levels of glutamine in phosphinotricine treated root nodules. In comparison to previous results of increased asparagine synthetase transcript and protein abundances in GS inhibited nodules the metabolic data revealed that decreased amounts of aspartate might preclude taking advantage of this elevated enzymatic activity. A potential role of glutamate dehydrogenase in ammonium assimilation was metabolically indicated 24 and 48 h after GS inhibition. Therefore, nodule ammonium assimilation might in principle involve three interdependent metabolic pathways which are adjusted to control basic nitrogen metabolism.

  8. Diversity and symbiotic effectiveness of indigenous rhizobia-nodulating Adesmia bicolor in soils of Central Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Luciana; Angelini, Jorge; Fabra, Adriana; Malpassi, Rosana

    2013-02-01

    Native perennial legume Adesmia bicolor reveals characteristics that are key to securing persistence under grazing. Literature on the diversity and symbiotic effectiveness of indigenous rhizobia-nodulating A. bicolor in central Argentina is limited. The purpose of this study was therefore to determine phenotypic and genotypic variability as well as biological N-fixation effectiveness in rhizobia isolated from A. bicolor nodules. To this end, repetitive genomic regions were analyzed using ERIC primers. In the greenhouse, plants were grown under a (i) N-fertilized treatment, (ii) N-free control treatment, and (iii) rhizobia inoculation treatment. Dry weight and N-content were analyzed. All isolates belonged to Rhizobium genus and showed high symbiotic effectiveness. The N-content/subterranean N-content ratio in aerial and subterranean parts of inoculated plants was higher than that observed in N-fertilized plants during the vegetative stage. Results from this study demonstrate that symbiosis between native rhizobial strains and A. bicolor is very effective.

  9. A thaumatin-like protein, Rj4, controls nodule symbiotic specificity in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masaki; Shiro, Sokichi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Mori-Hosokawa, Satomi; Sasaki-Yamagata, Harumi; Sayama, Takashi; Nishioka, Miki; Takahashi, Masakazu; Ishimoto, Masao; Katayose, Yuichi; Kaga, Akito; Harada, Kyuya; Kouchi, Hiroshi; Saeki, Yuichi; Umehara, Yosuke

    2014-09-01

    Soybeans exhibit a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with soil bacteria of the genera Bradyrhizobium and Ensifer/Sinorhizobium in a unique organ, the root nodule. It is well known that nodulation of soybean is controlled by several host genes referred to as Rj (rj) genes. Among these genes, a dominant allele, Rj4, restricts nodulation with specific bacterial strains such as B. elkanii USDA61 and B. japonicum Is-34. These incompatible strains fail to invade the host epidermal cells as revealed by observations using DsRed-labeled bacteria. Here, we describe the molecular identification of the Rj4 gene by using map-based cloning with several mapping populations. The Rj4 gene encoded a thaumatin-like protein (TLP) that belongs to pathogenesis-related (PR) protein family 5. In rj4/rj4 genotype soybeans and wild soybeans, we found six missense mutations and two consecutive amino acid deletions in the rj4 gene as compared with the Rj4 allele. We also found, using hairy root transformation, that the rj4/rj4 genotype soybeans were fully complemented by the expression of the Rj4 gene. Whereas the expression of many TLPs and other PR proteins is induced by biotic/abiotic stress, Rj4 gene expression appears to be constitutive in roots including root nodules. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Molecular diversity of legume root-nodule bacteria in Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Lafay

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic relationships between leguminous plants (family Fabaceae and nodule-forming bacteria in Australia native ecosystems remain poorly characterized despite their importance. Most studies have focused on temperate parts of the country, where the use of molecular approaches have already revealed the presence of Bradyrhizobium, Ensifer (formerly Sinorhizobium, Mesorhizobium and Rhizobium genera of legume root-nodule bacteria. We here provide the first molecular characterization of nodulating bacteria from tropical Australia.45 nodule-forming bacterial strains, isolated from eight native legume hosts at eight locations in Kakadu National Park, Northern Territory, Australia, were examined for their genetic diversity and phylogenetic position. Using SSU rDNA PCR-RFLPs and phylogenetic analyses, our survey identified nine genospecies, two of which, Bradyrhizobium genospp. B and P, had been previously identified in south-eastern Australia and one, Mesorhizobium genospecies AA, in southern France. Three of the five newly characterized Bradyrhizobium genospecies were more closely related to B. japonicum USDA110, whereas the other two belonged to the B. elkanii group. All five were each more closely related to strains sampled in various tropical areas outside Australia than to strains known to occur in Australia. We also characterized an entirely novel nodule-forming lineage, phylogenetically distant from any previously described rhizobial and non-rhizobial legume-nodulating lineage within the Rhizobiales.Overall, the present results support the hypothesis of tropical areas being centres of biodiversity and diversification for legume root-nodule bacteria and confirm the widespread occurrence of Bradyrhizobium genosp. B in continental Australia.

  11. Double genetically modified symbiotic system for improved Cu phytostabilization in legume roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palacios, Patricia; Romero-Aguilar, Asunción; Delgadillo, Julián; Doukkali, Bouchra; Caviedes, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Llorente, Ignacio D; Pajuelo, Eloísa

    2017-06-01

    Excess copper (Cu) in soils has deleterious effects on plant growth and can pose a risk to human health. In the last decade, legume-rhizobium symbioses became attractive biotechnological tools for metal phytostabilization. For this technique being useful, metal-tolerant symbionts are required, which can be generated through genetic manipulation.In this work, a double symbiotic system was engineered for Cu phytostabilization: On the one hand, composite Medicago truncatula plants expressing the metallothionein gene mt4a from Arabidopsis thaliana in roots were obtained to improve plant Cu tolerance. On the other hand, a genetically modified Ensifer medicae strain, expressing copper resistance genes copAB from Pseudomonas fluorescens driven by a nodulation promoter, nifHp, was used for plant inoculation. Our results indicated that expression of mt4a in composite plants ameliorated plant growth and nodulation and enhanced Cu tolerance. Lower levels of ROS-scavenging enzymes and of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), such as malondialdehyde (a marker of lipid peroxidation), suggested reduced oxidative stress. Furthermore, inoculation with the genetically modified Ensifer further improved root Cu accumulation without altering metal loading to shoots, leading to diminished values of metal translocation from roots to shoots. The double modified partnership is proposed as a suitable tool for Cu rhizo-phytostabilization.

  12. Possible role of glutamine synthetase in the NO signaling response in root nodules by contributing to the antioxidant defenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Santos Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is emerging as an important regulatory player in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. The occurrence of NO during several steps of the symbiotic interaction suggests an important, but yet unknown, signaling role of this molecule for root nodule formation and functioning. The identification of the molecular targets of NO is key for the assembly of the signal transduction cascade that will ultimately help to unravel NO function. We have recently shown that the key nitrogen assimilatory enzyme Glutamine Synthetase (GS is a molecular target of NO in root nodules of Medicago truncatula, being post-translationally regulated by tyrosine nitration in relation to nitrogen fixation. In functional nodules of M. truncatula NO formation has been located in the bacteroid containing cells of the fixation zone, where the ammonium generated by bacterial nitrogenase is released to the plant cytosol and assimilated into the organic pools by plant GS. We propose that the NO-mediated GS post-translational inactivation is connected to nitrogenase inhibition induced by NO and is related to metabolite channeling to boost the nodule antioxidant defenses. Glutamate, a substrate for GS activity is also the precursor for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH, which is highly abundant in root nodules of several plant species and known to play a major role in the antioxidant defense participating in the ascorbate/GSH cycle. Existing evidence suggests that upon NO-mediated GS inhibition, glutamate could be channeled for the synthesis of GSH. According to this hypothesis, GS would be involved in the NO-signaling responses in root nodules and the NO-signaling events would meet the nodule metabolic pathways to provide an adaptive response to the inhibition of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by reactive nitrogen species (RNS.

  13. Auxin transport, metabolism, and signalling during nodule initiation: indeterminate and determinate nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohlen, W.; Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Deinum, E.E.; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2018-01-01

    Most legumes can form a unique type of lateral organ on their roots: root nodules. These structures host symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria called rhizobia. Several different types of nodules can be found in nature, but the two best-studied types are called indeterminate and determinate nodules.

  14. Asparagine Biosynthesis in Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Root Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, S S; Vance, C P

    1986-10-01

    Rapid direct conversion of exogenously supplied [(14)C]aspartate to [(14)C] asparagine and to tricarboxylic cycle acids was observed in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) nodules. Aspartate aminotransferase activity readily converted carbon from exogenously applied [(14)C]aspartate into the tricarboxylic acid cycle with subsequent conversion to the organic acids malate, succinate, and fumarate. Aminooxyacetate, an inhibitor of aminotransferase activity, reduced the flow of carbon from [(14)C]aspartate into tricarboxylic cycle acids and decreased (14)CO(2) evolution by 99%. Concurrently, maximum conversion of aspartate to asparagine was observed in aminooxyacetate treated nodules (30 nanomoles asparagine per gram fresh weight per hour. Metabolism of [(14)C]aspartate and distribution of nodulefixed (14)CO(2) suggest that two pools of aspartate occur in alfalfa nodules: (a) one involved in asparagine biosynthesis, and (b) another supplying a malate/aspartate shuttle. Conversion of [(14)C]aspartate to [(14)C]asparagine was not inhibited by methionine sulfoximine, a glutamine synthetase inhibitor, or azaserine, a glutmate synthetase, inhibitor. The data did not indicate that asparagine biosynthesis in alfalfa nodules has an absolute requirement for glutamine. Radioactivity in the xylem sap, derived from nodule (14)CO(2) fixation, was markedly decreased by treating nodulated roots with aminooxyacetate, methionine sulfoximine, and azaserine. Inhibitors decreased the [(14)C]aspartate and [(14)]asparagine content of xylem sap by greater than 80% and reduced the total amino nitrogen content of xylem sap (including nonradiolabeled amino acids) by 50 to 80%. Asparagine biosynthesis in alfalfa nodules and transport in xylem sap are dependent upon continued aminotransferase activity and an uninterrupted assimilation of ammonia via the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway. Continued assimilation of ammonia apparently appears crucial to continued root nodule CO(2) fixation in

  15. Expression of nodule-specific genes in alfalfa root nodules blocked at an early stage of development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickstein, R.; Bisseling, T.; Reinhold, V.N.; Ausubel, F.M.

    1988-01-01

    To help dissect the molecular basis of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, we used in vitro translation and Northern blot analysis of nodule RNA to examine alfalfa-specific genes (nodulins) expressed in two types of developmentally defective root nodules elicited by Rhizobium meliloti. Fix- nodules were

  16. Ensifer shofinae sp. nov., a novel rhizobial species isolated from root nodules of soybean (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen Hao; Yang, Sheng Hui; Li, Zhao Hu; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin; Chen, Wen Feng

    2017-04-01

    Two bacterial strains isolated from root nodules of soybean were characterized phylogenetically as members of a distinct group in the genus Ensifer based on 16S rRNA gene comparisons. They were also verified as a separated group by the concatenated sequence analyses of recA, atpD and glnII (with similarities ≤93.9% to the type strains for defined species), and by the average nucleotide identities (ANI) between the whole genome sequence of the representative strain CCBAU 251167 T and those of the closely related strains in Ensifer glycinis and Ensifer fredii (90.5% and 90.3%, respectively). Phylogeny of symbiotic genes (nodC and nifH) grouped these two strains together with some soybean-nodulating strains of E. fredii, E. glycinis and Ensifer sojae. Nodulation tests indicated that the representative strain CCBAU 251167 T could form root nodules with capability of nitrogen fixing on its host plant and Glycine soja, Cajanus cajan, Vigna unguiculata, Phaseolus vulgaris and Astragalus membranaceus, and it formed ineffective nodules on Leucaena leucocephala. Strain CCBAU 251167 T contained fatty acids 18:1 ω9c, 18:0 iso and 20:0, differing from other related strains. Utilization of l-threonine and d-serine as carbon source, growth at pH 6.0 and intolerance of 1% (w/v) NaCl distinguished strain CCBAU 251167 T from other type strains of the related species. The genome size of CCBAU 251167 T was 6.2Mbp, comprising 7,581 predicted genes with DNA G+C content of 59.9mol% and 970 unique genes. Therefore, a novel species, Ensifer shofinae sp. nov., is proposed, with CCBAU 251167 T (=ACCC 19939 T =LMG 29645 T ) as type strain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. A Genomic Encyclopedia of the Root Nodule Bacteria: assessing genetic diversity through a systematic biogeographic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Wayne; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Eshragi, Leila; Yoon, Je Won; Ngamwisetkun, Pinyaruk; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    Root nodule bacteria are free-living soil bacteria, belonging to diverse genera within the Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, that have the capacity to form nitrogen-fixing symbioses with legumes. The symbiosis is specific and is governed by signaling molecules produced from both host and bacteria. Sequencing of several model RNB genomes has provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of symbiosis. However, the small number of sequenced RNB genomes available does not currently reflect the phylogenetic diversity of RNB, or the variety of mechanisms that lead to symbiosis in different legume hosts. This prevents a broad understanding of symbiotic interactions and the factors that govern the biogeography of host-microbe symbioses. Here, we outline a proposal to expand the number of sequenced RNB strains, which aims to capture this phylogenetic and biogeographic diversity. Through the Vavilov centers of diversity (Proposal ID: 231) and GEBA-RNB (Proposal ID: 882) projects we will sequence 107 RNB strains, isolated from diverse legume hosts in various geographic locations around the world. The nominated strains belong to nine of the 16 currently validly described RNB genera. They include 13 type strains, as well as elite inoculant strains of high commercial importance. These projects will strongly support systematic sequence-based studies of RNB and contribute to our understanding of the effects of biogeography on the evolution of different species of RNB, as well as the mechanisms that determine the specificity and effectiveness of nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation by RNB with diverse legume hosts.

  18. Effects of water stress on the rooting, nodulation potentials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rooting, nodulation and growth ability of cowpea growing under limited water supply was investigated at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Imo State University, Owerri, Nigeria. The experiment was conducted in plastic buckets arranged in a completely Randomized Design with three replications, and treatments ...

  19. Root-nodule bacteria isolated from native Amphithalea ericifolia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous root-nodule bacteria isolated from the acid sands of the Cape using Aspalathus linearis, Aspalathus hispida, Aspalathus carnosa, Aspalathus capensis and Amphithalea ericifolia as trap hosts showed considerable tolerance to low pH. Isolates from A. ericifolia and A. carnosa could even grow in YMB medium at ...

  20. In situ localization of chalcone synthase mRNA in pea root nodule development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, W.C.; Canter Cremers, H.C.J.; Hogendijk, P.; Katinakis, P.; Wijffelman, C.A.; Franssen, H.J.; Kammen, van A.; Bisseling, T.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper studies on the role of flavonoids in pea root nodule development are reported. Flavonoid synthesis was followed by localizing chalcone synthase (CHS) mRNA in infected pea roots and in root nodules. In a nodule primordium, CHS mRNA is present in all cells of the primordium. Therefore it

  1. Anatomy and ultrastructure of root nodules of Lupinus luteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Woźny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents anatomic structure of root nodules of lupine (Lupinus luteus L. cv. Express and ultrastructure of cells infected by Rhizobium, The inside of cells from the infected nodule region was filled with numerous bacteria; only centrally located cell nucleus was free of bacteria. Rhizobium was present mostly in the form of "transforming bacteria" (according to the terminology by Ching et al. 1977, characterized by visible nucleoid areas, numerous ribosomes, and polyphosphate granules, although typical bacterioids with poly-β-hydroxybutyrate were also found.

  2. Host-dependent symbiotic efficiency of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strains isolated from nodules of Trifolium rubens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek-Kozaczuk, Monika; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Kalita, Michał; Chernetskyy, Mykhaylo; Deryło, Kamil; Tchórzewski, Marek; Skorupska, Anna

    2017-12-01

    Trifolium rubens L., commonly known as the red feather clover, is capable of symbiotic interactions with rhizobia. Up to now, no specific symbionts of T. rubens and their symbiotic compatibility with Trifolium spp. have been described. We characterized the genomic diversity of T. rubens symbionts by analyses of plasmid profiles and BOX-PCR. The phylogeny of T. rubens isolates was inferred based on the nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA and two core genes (atpD, recA). The nodC phylogeny allowed classification of rhizobia nodulating T. rubens as Rhizobium leguminosarum symbiovar trifolii (Rlt). The symbiotic efficiency of the Rlt isolates was determined on four clover species: T. rubens, T. pratense, T. repens and T. resupinatum. We determined that Rlt strains formed mostly inefficient symbiosis with their native host plant T. rubens and weakly effective (sub-optimal) symbiosis with T. repens and T. pratense. The same Rlt strains were fully compatible in the symbiosis with T. resupinatum. T. rubens did not exhibit strict selectivity in regard to the symbionts and rhizobia closely related to Rhizobium grahamii, Rhizobium galegae and Agrobacterium radiobacter, which did not nodulate Trifolium spp., were found amongst T. rubens nodule isolates.

  3. Localization of acid phosphatase activity in the apoplast of root nodules of pea (Pisum sativum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Sujkowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the activity of acid phosphatase (AcPase in the apoplast of pea root nodule were investigated. The activity was determined using lead and cerium methods. The results indicated a following sequence of AcPase activity appearance during the development of the infection thread: 1 low AcPase activity appears in the outer part of cells of symbiotic bacteria; 2 bacteria show increased AcPase activity, and the enzyme activity appears in the thread walls; 3 activity exhibits also matrix of the infection thread; 4 bacteria just before their release from the infection threads show high AcPase activity; 5 AcPase activity ceases after bacteria transformation into bacteroids. The increase in bacterial AcPase activity may reflect a higher demand for inorganic phosphorus necessary for propagation of the bacteria within the infection threads and/or involved in bacteria release from the infection threads.

  4. Azorhizobium caulinodans Transmembrane Chemoreceptor TlpA1 Involved in Host Colonization and Nodulation on Roots and Stems

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    Wei Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 is a motile soil bacterium that interacts symbiotically with legume host Sesbania rostrata, forming nitrogen-fixing root and stem nodules. Bacterial chemotaxis plays an important role in establishing this symbiotic relationship. To determine the contribution of chemotaxis to symbiosis in A. caulinodans ORS571-S. rostrata, we characterized the function of TlpA1 (transducer-like protein in A. caulinodans, a chemoreceptor predicted by SMART (Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool, containing two N-terminal transmembrane regions. The tlpA1 gene is located immediately upstream of the unique che gene cluster and is transcriptionally co-oriented. We found that a ΔtlpA1 mutant is severely impaired for chemotaxis to various organic acids, glycerol and proline. Furthermore, biofilm forming ability of the strain carrying the mutation is reduced under certain growth conditions. Interestingly, competitive colonization ability on S. rostrata root surfaces is impaired in the ΔtlpA1 mutant, suggesting that chemotaxis of the A. caulinodans ORS571 contributes to root colonization. We also found that TlpA1 promotes competitive nodulation not only on roots but also on stems of S. rostrata. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that TlpA1 is a transmembrane chemoreceptor involved in A. caulinodans-S. rostrata symbiosis.

  5. Study of phenanthrene utilizing bacterial consortia associated with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ran; Crowley, David E; Wei, Gehong

    2015-02-01

    Many legumes have been selected as model plants to degrade organic contaminants with their special associated rhizosphere microbes in soil. However, the function of root nodules during microbe-assisted phytoremediation is not clear. A pot study was conducted to examine phenanthrene (PHE) utilizing bacteria associated with root nodules and the effects of cowpea root nodules on phytoremediation in two different types of soils (freshly contaminated soil and aged contaminated soil). Cowpea nodules in freshly-contaminated soil showed less damage in comparison to the aged-contaminated soil, both morphologically and ultra-structurally by scanning electron microscopy. The study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) attenuation conducted by high performance liquid chromatography revealed that more PAH was eliminated from liquid culture around nodulated roots than nodule-free roots. PAH sublimation and denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis were applied to analyze the capability and diversity of PAH degrading bacteria from the following four parts of rhizo-microzone: bulk soil, root surface, nodule surface and nodule inside. The results indicated that the surface and inside of cowpea root nodules were colonized with bacterial consortia that utilized PHE. Our results demonstrated that root nodules not only fixed nitrogen, but also enriched PAH-utilizing microorganisms both inside and outside of the nodules. Legume nodules may have biotechnological values for PAH degradation.

  6. Nonphotosynthetic CO2 fixation by alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) roots and nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.P.; Heichel, G.H.; Vance, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    The dependence of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) root and nodule nonphotosynthetic CO 2 fixation on the supply of currently produced photosynthate and nodule nitrogenase activity was examined a various times after phloem-girdling and exposure of nodules to Ar:O 2 . Phloem-girdling was effected 20 hours and exposure to Ar:O 2 was effected 2 to 3 hours before initiation of experiments. Nodule and root CO 2 fixation rates of phloem-girdled plants were reduced to 38 and 50%, respectively, of those of control plants. Exposure to Ar:O 2 decreased nodule CO 2 fixation rates to 45%, respiration rates to 55%, and nitrogenase activities to 51% of those of the controls. The products of nodule CO 2 fixation were exported through the xylem to the shoot mainly as amino acids within 30 to 60 minutes after exposure to 14 CO 2 . In contrast to nodules, roots exported very little radioactivity, and most of the 14 C was exported as organic acids. The nonphotosynthetic CO 2 fixation rate of roots and nodules averaged 26% of the gross respiration rate, i.e. the sum of net respiration and nonphotosynthetic CO 2 assimilation. Nodules fixed CO 2 at a rate 5.6 times that of roots, but since nodules comprised a small portion of root system mass, roots accounted for 76% of the nodulated roots system CO 2 fixation. The results indicate that nodule CO 2 fixation in alfalfa is associated with N assimilation

  7. [Factor analysis of interactions between alfalfa nodule bacteria (Sinorhizobium meliloti) genes that regulate symbiotic nitrogen fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorov, N A; Chuklina, E; Vorob'ev, N I; Onishchuk, O P; Simarov, B V

    2013-04-01

    Factor analysis has been conducted for the data on the interaction between the genes of the root nodule bacteria (rhizobia), which influence the efficiency of symbiosis with leguminous plants, including dctA (encoding succinate permease), dctBD (activating the dctA gene due to binding its enhancer in the presence of succinate), rpoN (activating the promoters of dctA and nitrogenase genes nifHDK), and nifA (activating the nitrogenase genes due to binding their enhancers). The analysis of the alfalfa rhizobia (Sinorhizobium meliloti) recombinants that contain additional copies ofthese genes suggested the antagonistic (epistatic) interaction between nifA and rpoN. It may be associated either with the competition for C compounds imported into the nodules between the energy production and nitrogen assimilation processes or with the competition for redox potentials between the oxidative phosphorylation and nitrogen fixation processes. Since the phenotypic effects of the studied genes depend on the activity of nitrogen export into the aerial parts of plants, we suppose that its accumulation in bacteroids impairs the activation of the nifHDK genes by the NifA protein due to its interaction with the GlnB protein (the nitrogen metabolism regulator) or with the FixLJ and ActSR proteins (the redox potential regulators).

  8. Effect of localized nitrogen availability to soybean half-root systems on photosynthate partitioning to roots and nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, P.W.; van Kessel, C.

    1987-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Davis) was grown in a split-root growth system designed to maintain control of the root atmosphere. Two experiments were conducted to examine how 80% Ar:20%, O 2 (Ar:O 2 ) and air (Air) atmospheres affected N assimilation (NH 4 NO 3 and N 2 fixation) and the partitioning of photosynthate to roots and nodules. Application of NH 4 NO 3 to nonnodulated half-root systems enhanced root growth and root respiration at the site of application. A second experiment applied Ar:O 2 or air to the two sides of nodulated soybean half-root systems for 11 days in the following combinations: (a) Air to both sides (Air/Air); (b) Air to one side, Ar:O 2 to the other (Air/Ar:O 2 ), and (c) Ar:O 2 to both sides (Ar:O 2 /Ar:O 2 ). Results indicated that dry matter and current photosynthate ( 14 C) were selectively partitioned to nodules and roots where N 2 was available. Both root and nodule growth on the Air side of Air/Ar:O 2 plants was significantly greater than the Ar:O 2 side. The relative partitioning of carbon and current photosynthate between roots and nodules on a half-root system was also affected by N 2 availability. The Ar:O 2 sides partitioned relatively more current photosynthate to roots (57%) than nodules (43%), while N 2 -fixing root systems partitioned 36 and 64% of the carbon to roots and nodules, respectively. The Ar:O 2 atmosphere decreased root and nodule respiration by 80% and nitrogenase activity by 85% compared to half-root systems in Air while specific nitrogenase activity in Ar:O 2 was 50% of nodules supplied Air. Results indicated that nitrogen assimilation, whether from N 2 fixation or inorganic sources, had a localized effect on root development

  9. Effectiveness of native Rhizobium on nodulation and growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted in order to evaluate the symbiotic effectiveness of native Rhizobium isolated strains on number of nodule, weight, and morphological properties of dry bean. To realize this purpose, fresh and healthy root nodules were collected from major dry bean-growing districts of Konya, Turkey. These nodules ...

  10. Rhizobium pongamiae sp. nov. from root nodules of Pongamia pinnata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesari, Vigya; Ramesh, Aadi Moolam; Rangan, Latha

    2013-01-01

    Pongamia pinnata has an added advantage of N2-fixing ability and tolerance to stress conditions as compared with other biodiesel crops. It harbours "rhizobia" as an endophytic bacterial community on its root nodules. A gram-negative, nonmotile, fast-growing, rod-shaped, bacterial strain VKLR-01(T) was isolated from root nodules of Pongamia that grew optimal at 28°C, pH 7.0 in presence of 2% NaCl. Isolate VKLR-01 exhibits higher tolerance to the prevailing adverse conditions, for example, salt stress, elevated temperatures and alkalinity. Strain VKLR-01(T) has the major cellular fatty acid as C(18:1) ω7c (65.92%). Strain VKLR-01(T) was found to be a nitrogen fixer using the acetylene reduction assay and PCR detection of a nifH gene. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic distinctiveness and molecular data (16S rRNA, recA, and atpD gene sequences, G + C content, DNA-DNA hybridization etc.), strain VKLR-01(T) = (MTCC 10513(T) = MSCL 1015(T)) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium for which the name Rhizobium pongamiae sp. nov. is proposed. Rhizobium pongamiae may possess specific traits that can be transferred to other rhizobia through biotechnological tools and can be directly used as inoculants for reclamation of wasteland; hence, they are very important from both economic and environmental prospects.

  11. Effect of Nitrate on Nodule and Root Growth of Soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Saito

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of combined nitrogen, especially nitrate, to soybean plants is known to strongly inhibit nodule formation, growth and nitrogen fixation. In the present study, we measured the effects of supplying 5 mM nitrate on the growth of nodules, primary root, and lateral roots under light at 28 °C or dark at 18 °C conditions. Photographs of the nodulated roots were periodically taken by a digital camera at 1-h intervals, and the size of the nodules was measured with newly developed computer software. Nodule growth was depressed approximately 7 h after the addition of nitrate under light conditions. The nodule growth rate under dark conditions was almost half that under light conditions, and nodule growth was further suppressed by the addition of 5 mM nitrate. Similar results were observed for the extending growth rate of the primary root as those for nodule growth supplied with 5 mM nitrate under light/dark conditions. In contrast, the growth of lateral roots was promoted by the addition of 5 mM nitrate. The 2D-PAGE profiles of nodule protein showed similar patterns between the 0 and 5 mM nitrate treatments, which suggested that metabolic integrity may be maintained with the 5 mM nitrate treatment. Further studies are required to confirm whether light or temperature condition may give the primary effect on the growth of nodules and roots.

  12. Characterization of root-nodulating bacteria associated to Prosopis farcta growing in the arid regions of Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fterich, A; Mahdhi, M; Caviedes, M A; Pajuelo, E; Rivas, R; Rodriguez-Llorente, I D; Mars, M

    2011-06-01

    Diversity of 50 bacterial isolates recovered from root nodules of Prosopis farcta grown in different arid soils in Tunisia, was investigated. Characterization of isolates was assessed using a polyphasic approach including phenotypic characteristics, 16S rRNA gene PCR--RFLP and sequencing, nodA gene sequencing and MLSA. It was found that most of isolates are tolerant to high temperature (40°C) and salinity (3%). Genetic characterization emphasizes that isolates were assigned to the genus Ensifer (80%), Mesorhizobium (4%) and non-nodulating endophytic bacteria (16%). Forty isolates belonging to the genus Ensifer were affiliated to Ensifer meliloti, Ensifer xinjiangense/Ensifer fredii and Ensifer numidicus species. Two isolates belonged to the genus Mesorhizobium. Eight isolates failing to renodulate their host plant were endophytic bacteria and belonged to Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Acinetobacter genera. Symbiotic properties of nodulating isolates showed a diversity in their capacity to infect their host plant and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Isolate PG29 identified as Ensifer meliloti was the most effective one. Ability of Prosopis farcta to establish symbiosis with rhizobial species confers an important advantage for this species to be used in reforestation programs. This study offered the first systematic information about the diversity of microsymbionts nodulating Prosopis farcta in the arid regions of Tunisia.

  13. Laser-ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with ion mobility separation reveals metabolites in the symbiotic interactions of soybean roots and rhizobia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopka, Sylwia A.; Agtuca, Beverly J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary; Vertes, Akos; Anderton, Christopher R.

    2017-05-23

    Technologies enabling in situ metabolic profiling of living plant systems are invaluable for understanding physiological processes and could be used for rapid phenotypic screening (e.g., to produce plants with superior biological nitrogen fixing ability). The symbiotic interaction between legumes and nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria results in a specialized plant organ (i.e., root nodule), where the exchange of nutrients between host and endosymbiont occurs. Laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) is a method that can be performed under ambient conditions requiring minimal sample preparation. Here, we employed LAESI-MS to explore the well-characterized symbiosis between soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) and its compatible symbiont, Bradyrhizobium japonicum. The utilization of ion mobility separation (IMS) improved the molecular coverage, selectivity, and identification of the detected biomolecules. Specifically, incorporation of IMS resulted in an increase of 153 detected metabolites in the nodule samples. The data presented demonstrates the advantages of using LAESI-IMS-MS for the rapid analysis of intact root nodules, uninfected root segments, and free-living rhizobia. Untargeted pathway analysis revealed several metabolic processes within the nodule (e.g., zeatin, riboflavin, and purine synthesis). Compounds specific to the uninfected root and bacteria were also detected. Lastly, we performed depth-profiling of intact nodules to reveal the location of metabolites to the cortex and inside the infected region, and lateral profiling of sectioned nodules confirmed these molecular distributions. Our results established the feasibility of LAESI-IMS-MS for the analysis and spatial mapping of plant tissues, with its specific demonstration to improve our understanding of the soybean-rhizobial symbiosis.

  14. Molecular aspects of the nitrogen fixing system in pea root nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisseling, T.

    1980-01-01

    The author considers symbiotic nitrogen fixation of Pisum sativum and Rhizobium leguminosarum. Some general aspects of nodule formation and the regulation of the proteins nitrogenase and leghemoglobin (Lb) have been studied. Synthesis of these proteins was studied by 35 SO 4 labelling of intact pea plants. The sequence of appearance of the proteins was determined with specific radioimmunoassays for each protein. (Auth.)

  15. Occurrence, structure, and nitrogen-fixation of root nodules of actinorhizal Arizona alder

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. O. Dawson; Gerald J. Gottfried; D. Hahn

    2005-01-01

    Actinorhizal plants are nodulated by the symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia. The genus Alnus in the family Betulaceae is one of the 24 genera in 8 families of angiospermous plants that are actinorhizal. Arizona alder (Alnus oblongifolia Torr.) occurs in isolated populations associated with the watersheds of Madrean Sky Islands in the...

  16. CYTOKININ OXIDASE/DEHYDROGENASE3 Maintains Cytokinin Homeostasis during Root and Nodule Development in Lotus japonicus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reid, D.E.; Heckmann, A.B.; Novák, Ondřej; Kelly, S.; Stougaard, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 2 (2016), s. 1060-1074 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LK21306 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : DEPENDENT PROTEIN-KINASE * NODULATION SIGNALING PATHWAY * SYMBIOTIC ORGAN DEVELOPMENT Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 6.456, year: 2016

  17. Study of root para-nodules formation in wheat (Triticum durum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    djemel

    2013-08-28

    Aug 28, 2013 ... a growth chamber with hydroponic medium. Binocular observation revealed that para-nodules were formed when wheat roots were inoculated with Frankia and the root length was enhanced. When the inoculation with Frankia was combined to 2,4-D treatment, the para-nodules formed were bigger and.

  18. Genetic constraints that determine rhizobium-root nodule formation in Parasponia andersonii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifi Kalhor, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Rhizobium play a very important role in agriculture by inducing nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of legumes. Root nodule symbiosis enables nitrogen‐fixing bacteria (Rhizobium) to convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that is directly available for plant growth.

  19. Drought stress provokes the down-regulation of methionine and ethylene biosynthesis pathways in Medicago truncatula roots and nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Molenaar, Johanna A; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Gil-Quintana, Erena; Alibert, Bénédicte; Limami, Anis M; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; González, Esther M

    2014-09-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is one of the first physiological processes inhibited in legume plants under water-deficit conditions. Despite the progress made in the last decades, the molecular mechanisms behind this regulation are not fully understood yet. Recent proteomic work carried out in the model legume Medicago truncatula provided the first indications of a possible involvement of nodule methionine (Met) biosynthesis and related pathways in response to water-deficit conditions. To better understand this involvement, the drought-induced changes in expression and content of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of Met, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) and ethylene in M. truncatula root and nodules were analyzed using targeted approaches. Nitrogen-fixing plants were subjected to a progressive water deficit and a subsequent recovery period. Besides the physiological characterization of the plants, the content of total sulphur, sulphate and main S-containing metabolites was measured. Results presented here show that S availability is not a limiting factor in the drought-induced decline of nitrogen fixation rates in M. truncatula plants and provide evidences for a down-regulation of the Met and ethylene biosynthesis pathways in roots and nodules in response to water-deficit conditions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Root and Nodulation Phenotypes of the Ethylene-Insensitive Sickle Mutant of Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOKO PRAYITNO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The sickle (skl mutant of the model legume Medicago truncatula is an ethylene-sensitive mutant that have a ten-fold increase in nodule numbers. The nodulation and root phenotypes of the skl mutant were investigated and further characterised. The skl mutant had longer roots than the wild type, but when inoculated with Sinorhizobium, its root length was reduced to the level of wild type. Furthermore, lateral root numbers in uninoculated skl were similar to those in uninoculated wild type. However, when the root tips were decapitated, fewer lateral roots formed in skl than in wild type. Nodule numbers of the skl mutant were significantly reduced by low nitrate concentration (2.5 mM. These results suggest that skl mutant has alterations in both root and nodule development.

  1. Differentially expressed genes in mycorrhized and nodulated roots of common bean are associated with defense, cell wall architecture, N metabolism, and P metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Brenda-Mariana; Blanco, Lourdes; Lara, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Legumes participate in two important endosymbiotic associations, with phosphorus-acquiring arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM, soil fungi) and with nitrogen-fixing bacterial rhizobia. These divergent symbionts share a common symbiotic signal transduction pathway that facilitates the establishment of mycorrhization and nodulation in legumes. However, the unique and shared downstream genes essential for AM and nodule development have not been identified in crop legumes. Here, we used ion torrent next-generation sequencing to perform comparative transcriptomics of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) roots colonized by AM or rhizobia. We analyzed global gene expression profiles to identify unique and shared differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that regulate these two symbiotic interactions, and quantitatively compared DEG profiles. We identified 3,219 (1,959 upregulated and 1,260 downregulated) and 2,645 (1,247 upregulated and 1,398 downregulated) unigenes that were differentially expressed in response to mycorrhizal or rhizobial colonization, respectively, compared with uninoculated roots. We obtained quantitative expression profiles of unique and shared genes involved in processes related to defense, cell wall structure, N metabolism, and P metabolism in mycorrhized and nodulated roots. KEGG pathway analysis indicated that most genes involved in jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signaling, N metabolism, and inositol phosphate metabolism are variably expressed during symbiotic interactions. These combined data provide valuable information on symbiotic gene signaling networks that respond to mycorrhizal and rhizobial colonization, and serve as a guide for future genetic strategies to enhance P uptake and N-fixing capacity to increase the net yield of this valuable grain legume. PMID:28771548

  2. Proteome reference maps of the Lotus japonicus nodule and root

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend Secher; Dyrlund, Thomas F.; Ussatjuk, Anna

    2014-01-01

    stress level at this developmental stage. In contrast, protein spots corresponding to nodulins such as leghemoglobin, asparagine synthetase, sucrose synthase, and glutamine synthetase were prevalent in red nodules. The distinct biochemical state of nodules was further highlighted by the conspicuous...

  3. Utilization of (15)NO3 (-) by nodulated soybean plants under conditions of root hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Menolli Lanza, Luciana; Ferreira Lanza, Daniel Carlos; Sodek, Ladaslav

    2014-07-01

    Waterlogging of soils is common in nature. The low availability of oxygen under these conditions leads to hypoxia of the root system impairing the development and productivity of the plant. The presence of nitrate under flooding conditions is regarded as being beneficial towards tolerance to this stress. However, it is not known how nodulated soybean plants, cultivated in the absence of nitrate and therefore not metabolically adapted to this compound, would respond to nitrate under root hypoxia in comparison with non-nodulated plants grown on nitrate. A study was conducted with (15)N labelled nitrate supplied on waterlogging for a period of 48 h using both nodulated and non-nodulated plants of different physiological ages. Enrichment of N was found in roots and leaves with incorporation of the isotope in amino acids, although to a much smaller degree under hypoxia than normoxia. This demonstrates that nitrate is taken up under hypoxic conditions and assimilated into amino acids, although to a much lesser extent than for normoxia. The similar response obtained with nodulated and non-nodulated plants indicates the rapid metabolic adaptation of nodulated plants to the presence of nitrate under hypoxia. Enrichment of N in nodules was very much weaker with a distinct enrichment pattern of amino acids (especially asparagine) suggesting that labelling arose from a tissue source external to the nodule rather than through assimilation in the nodule itself.

  4. Endophytic Bacteria Improve Plant Growth, Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. and Induce Suppression of Root Rot Caused by Fusarium solani under Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilfuza Egamberdieva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Salinity causes disturbance in symbiotic performance of plants, and increases susceptibility of plants to soil-borne pathogens. Endophytic bacteria are an essential determinant of cross-tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. The aim of this study was to isolate non–rhizobial endophytic bacteria from the root nodules of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L., and to assess their ability to improve plant growth and symbiotic performance, and to control root rot in chickpea under saline soil conditions. A total of 40 bacterial isolates from internal root tissues of chickpea grown in salinated soil were isolated. Four bacterial isolates, namely Bacillus cereus NUU1, Achromobacter xylosoxidans NUU2, Bacillus thuringiensis NUU3, and Bacillus subtilis NUU4 colonizing root tissue demonstrated plant beneficial traits and/or antagonistic activity against F. solani and thus were characterized in more detail. The strain B. subtilis NUU4 proved significant plant growth promotion capabilities, improved symbiotic performance of host plant with rhizobia, and promoted yield under saline soil as compared to untreated control plants under field conditions. A combined inoculation of chickpea with M. ciceri IC53 and B. subtilis NUU4 decreased H2O2 concentrations and increased proline contents compared to the un-inoculated plants indicating an alleviation of adverse effects of salt stress. Furthermore, the bacterial isolate was capable to reduce the infection rate of root rot in chickpea caused by F. solani. This is the first report of F. solani causing root rot of chickpea in a salinated soil of Uzbekistan. Our findings demonstrated that the endophytic B. subtilis strain NUU4 provides high potentials as a stimulator for plant growth and as biological control agent of chickpea root rot under saline soil conditions. These multiple relationships could provide promising practical approaches to increase the productivity of legumes under salt stress.

  5. Production and Metabolism of Indole Acetic Acid in Root Nodules and Symbiont (Rhizobium undicola Isolated from Root Nodule of Aquatic Medicinal Legume Neptunia oleracea Lour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallab Kumar Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Indole acetic acid is a phytohormone which plays a vital role in plant growth and development. The purpose of this study was to shed some light on the production of IAA in roots, nodules, and symbionts of an aquatic legume Neptunia oleracea and its possible role in nodular symbiosis. The symbiont (N37 was isolated from nodules of this plant and identified as Rhizobium undicola based on biochemical characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence homology, and DNA-DNA hybridization results. The root nodules were found to contain more IAA and tryptophan than root; however, no detectable amount of IAA was found in root. The IAA metabolizing enzymes IAA oxidase, IAA peroxidase (E.C.1.11.1.7, and polyphenol oxidase (E.C.1.14.18.1 were higher in root than nodule but total phenol and IAA content were reversed. The strain N37 was found to produce copious amount of IAA in YEM broth medium with tryptophan and reached its stationary phase at 20 h. An enrichment of the medium with mannitol, ammonium sulphate, B12, and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde was found to promote the IAA production. The presence of IAA metabolizing enzymes and IAA production with PGPR traits including ACC deaminase activity of the symbionts was essential for plant microbe interaction and nodule function.

  6. Antisense repression of the Medicago truncatula nodule-enhanced sucrose synthase leads to a handicapped nitrogen fixation mirrored by specific alterations in the symbiotic transcriptome and metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Markus C; Barsch, Aiko; Küster, Helge; Hohnjec, Natalija

    2007-12-01

    We analyzed the role of the sucrose (Suc) synthase MtSucS1 during nodulation of the model legume Medicago truncatula, integrating data for the developmental, transcriptional, and metabolic processes affected downstream of an impaired Suc cleavage in root nodules. To reduce carbohydrate supply to nodule tissues, transgenic plants expressing a p35S-driven MtSucS1-antisense fusion were constructed. These plants displayed an up to 90% reduction of MtSucS1 proteins in roots and nodules. Phenotypic studies of two independent MtSucS1-reduced lines demonstrated that only under conditions depending on nodulation, these plants appeared to be impaired in above-ground growth. Specifically plant height, shoot weight, leaf development, flowering, as well as seed maturation were reduced, and the efficiency of photosynthesis was affected. Concomitantly, a significantly enhanced root to shoot ratio with a marked increase in root tip numbers was observed. Root nodule formation was found retarded and the impaired nodulation was accompanied by a less efficient nitrogen (N) acquisition. The decreased total N content of MtSucS1-antisense lines and an enhanced carbon to N ratio in roots, nodules, and shoots correlated with the extent of MtSucS1 knockdown. On the level of transcription, effects of an MtSucS1 reduction were evident for genes representing important nodes of the nodule carbon and N metabolism, while metabolite profiling revealed significantly lower levels of amino acids and their derivatives particularly in strongly MtSucS1-reduced nodules. Our results support the model that nodule-enhanced Suc synthase 1 of the model legume M. truncatula is required for the establishment and maintenance of an efficient N-fixing symbiosis.

  7. Metabolomic Analysis of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. Root-Symbiotic Rhizobia Responses under Alkali Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Song

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline salts (e.g., NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 causes more severe morphological and physiological damage to plants than neutral salts (e.g., NaCl and Na2SO4 due to differences in pH. The mechanism by which plants respond to alkali stress is not fully understood, especially in plants having symbotic relationships such as alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.. Therefore, a study was designed to evaluate the metabolic response of the root-nodule symbiosis in alfalfa under alkali stress using comparative metabolomics. Rhizobium-nodulized (RI group and non-nodulized (NI group alfalfa roots were treated with 200 mmol/L NaHCO3 and, roots samples were analyzed for malondialdehydyde (MDA, proline, glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and peroxidase (POD content. Additionally, metabolite profiling was conducted using gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS. Phenotypically, the RI alfalfa exhibited a greater resistance to alkali stress than the NI plants examined. Physiological analysis and metabolic profiling revealed that RI plants accumulated more antioxidants (SOD, POD, GSH, osmolytes (sugar, glycols, proline, organic acids (succinic acid, fumaric acid, and alpha-ketoglutaric acid, and metabolites that are involved in nitrogen fixation. Our pairwise metabolomics comparisons revealed that RI alfalfa plants exhibited a distinct metabolic profile associated with alkali putative tolerance relative to NI alfalfa plants. Data provide new information about the relationship between non-nodulized, rhizobium-nodulized alfalfa and alkali resistance.

  8. Metabolomic Analysis of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Root-Symbiotic Rhizobia Responses under Alkali Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tingting; Xu, Huihui; Sun, Na; Jiang, Liu; Tian, Pu; Yong, Yueyuan; Yang, Weiwei; Cai, Hua; Cui, Guowen

    2017-01-01

    Alkaline salts (e.g., NaHCO 3 and Na 2 CO 3 ) causes more severe morphological and physiological damage to plants than neutral salts (e.g., NaCl and Na 2 SO 4 ) due to differences in pH. The mechanism by which plants respond to alkali stress is not fully understood, especially in plants having symbotic relationships such as alfalfa ( Medicago sativa L.). Therefore, a study was designed to evaluate the metabolic response of the root-nodule symbiosis in alfalfa under alkali stress using comparative metabolomics. Rhizobium-nodulized (RI group) and non-nodulized (NI group) alfalfa roots were treated with 200 mmol/L NaHCO 3 and, roots samples were analyzed for malondialdehydyde (MDA), proline, glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and peroxidase (POD) content. Additionally, metabolite profiling was conducted using gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS). Phenotypically, the RI alfalfa exhibited a greater resistance to alkali stress than the NI plants examined. Physiological analysis and metabolic profiling revealed that RI plants accumulated more antioxidants (SOD, POD, GSH), osmolytes (sugar, glycols, proline), organic acids (succinic acid, fumaric acid, and alpha-ketoglutaric acid), and metabolites that are involved in nitrogen fixation. Our pairwise metabolomics comparisons revealed that RI alfalfa plants exhibited a distinct metabolic profile associated with alkali putative tolerance relative to NI alfalfa plants. Data provide new information about the relationship between non-nodulized, rhizobium-nodulized alfalfa and alkali resistance.

  9. Identification of Ononitol and O-methyl-scyllo-inositol in Pea Root Nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøt, Leif; Egsgaard, Helge

    1984-01-01

    Ononitol (4-O-methyl-myo-inositol) and O-methyl-scyllo-inositol were identified in pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules formed by twoRhizobium leguminosarum strains. Ononitol was the major soluble carbohydrate in nodules formed by strain 1045 while O-methyl-scyllo-inositol and two unidentified com...

  10. Comparison of the nodule vs. root transcriptome of the actinorhizal plant Datisca glomerata: actinorhizal nodules contain a specific class of defensins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V Demina

    Full Text Available Actinorhizal root nodule symbioses are very diverse, and the symbiosis of Datisca glomerata has previously been shown to have many unusual aspects. In order to gain molecular information on the infection mechanism, nodule development and nodule metabolism, we compared the transcriptomes of D. glomerata roots and nodules. Root and nodule libraries representing the 3'-ends of cDNAs were subjected to high-throughput parallel 454 sequencing. To identify the corresponding genes and to improve the assembly, Illumina sequencing of the nodule transcriptome was performed as well. The evaluation revealed 406 differentially regulated genes, 295 of which (72.7% could be assigned a function based on homology. Analysis of the nodule transcriptome showed that genes encoding components of the common symbiosis signaling pathway were present in nodules of D. glomerata, which in combination with the previously established function of SymRK in D. glomerata nodulation suggests that this pathway is also active in actinorhizal Cucurbitales. Furthermore, comparison of the D. glomerata nodule transcriptome with nodule transcriptomes from actinorhizal Fagales revealed a new subgroup of nodule-specific defensins that might play a role specific to actinorhizal symbioses. The D. glomerata members of this defensin subgroup contain an acidic C-terminal domain that was never found in plant defensins before.

  11. Role of mungbean root nodule associated fluorescent Pseudomonas and rhizobia in suppressing the root rotting fungi and root knot nematodes in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noreen, R.; Shafique, A.; Haque, S.E.; Ali, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Three isolates each of fluorescent Pseudomonas (NAFP-19, NAFP-31 and NAFP-32) and rhizobia (NFB- 103, NFB-107 and NFB-109) which were originally isolated from root nodules of mungbean (Vigna radiata) showed significant biocontrol activity in the screen house and under field condition, against root rotting fungi viz., Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani evaluated on chickpea. Biocontrol potential of these isolates was also evaluated against Meloidogyne incognita, the root knot nematode. Application of Pseudomonas and rhizobial isolates as a soil drench, separately or mixed significantly reduced root rot disease under screen house and field conditions. Nematode penetration in roots was also found significantly less in rhizobia or Pseudomonas treatments used separately or mixed as compared to control. Fluorescent Pseudomonas treated plants produced greater number of nodules per plant than control plants and about equal to rhizobia treated plants, indicating that root nodule associated fluorescent Pseudomonas enhance root nodulation. (author)

  12. Root hair deformation activity of nodulation factor and their fate on Vicia sativa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidstra, R.; Geurts, R.; Franssen, H.; Spaink, H.P.; Kammen, van A.; Bisseling, T.

    1994-01-01

    We used a semiquantitative root hair deformation assay for Vicia sativa (vetch) to study the activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae nodulation (Nod) factors. Five to 10 min of Nod factor-root interaction appears to be sufficient to induce root hair deformation. The first deformation is

  13. Metabolic responses in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris and Vicia sativa exposed to the imazamox herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Garijo, A; Tejera, N A; Lluch, C; Palma, F

    2014-05-01

    Alterations on growth, amino acids metabolism and some antioxidant enzyme activities as result of imazamox treatment were examined in determinate and indeterminate nodules, formed by Phaseolus vulgaris and Vicia sativa, respectively. Young seedlings of both legumes were inoculated with their respective microsymbionts and grown under controlled conditions. At vegetative growth, plants were treated with imazamox (250μM) in the nutrient solution and harvested 7days after. Imazamox was mainly accumulated in V. sativa where concentrations were more than six fold higher than those detected in P. vulgaris. Nodule dry weight and total nitrogen content were reduced by the herbicide treatment: the highest decrease of nodule biomass (50%) and nitrogen content (40%) were registered in V. sativa and P. vulgaris, respectively. The concentration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) did not change in neither determinate nor indeterminate nodules even though the acetohydroxyacid synthase activity decreased in root and nodules of both symbioses with the herbicide application. Based on this last result and taking into account that total free amino acids increased in roots but not in nodules of common vetch, a possible BCAA translocation from root to nodule could occur. Our results suggest that the maintenance of BCAA balance in nodule become a priority for the plant in such conditions. The involvement of activities glutathione-S-transferase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in the response of the symbioses to imazamox are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Screening for symbiotically effective and ecologically competitive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was initiated to isolate and characterize chickpea rhizobia for their symbiotic effectiveness adapted to local environmental conditions. A total of seventy root nodule bacteria were isolated from different sampling sites in central and northern Ethiopia of which only 52% were rhizobia and the remaining were ...

  15. Waterlogging-induced changes in fermentative metabolism in roots and nodules of soybean genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junior Borella

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Waterlogging blocks the oxygen supply to the root system which inhibits respiration, and greatly reduces the energy status of cells that affect important metabolic processes. This study evaluated fermentative metabolism and carbohydrate contents in the root system of two soybean (Glycine max L. Merril genotypes under hypoxic and post-hypoxic conditions. Nodulated plants (genotypes Fundacep 53 RR and BRS Macota were grown in vermiculite and transferred to a hydroponic system at the reproductive stage. The root system was submitted to hypoxia by flowing N2 (nitrogen gas in a solution for 24 and 72 h. For recovery, plants returned to normoxia condition by transfer to vermiculite for 24 and 72 h. Fermentative enzyme activity, levels of anaerobic metabolites and carbohydrate content were all quantified in roots and nodules. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase and lactate dehydrogenase enzymes, as well as the content of ethanol and lactate, increased with hypoxia in roots and nodules, and subsequently returned to pre-hypoxic levels in the recovery phase in both genotypes. Pyruvate content increased in nodules and decreased in roots. Sugar and sucrose levels increased in roots and decreased in nodules under hypoxia in both genotypes. Fundacep RR 53 was more responsive to the metabolic effects caused by hypoxia and post-hypoxia than BRS Macota, and it is likely that these characteristics contribute positively to improving adaptation to oxygen deficiency.

  16. Characterization of a symbiotic, heterocystous, N2-fixing cyanobacterium fromCycas coralloid roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A; Mishra, D P; Kumar, A

    1992-09-01

    A symbiotic, heterocystous, N2-fixing blue-green alga, isolated from the coralloid roots of a xerophytic plant,Cycas revoluta, grew best in liquid medium supplemented with 4 mM NO 3 (-) . Morphologically, the isolated alga was identical to that of the natural endophyte but the cell size had decreased markedly. The alga was heterotrophic. Intact coralloid roots had nearly 4 to 5 times more nitrogenase activity compared with natural- and laboratory-grown agla but nitrate reductase was inducible in both the forms. Plasmid(s) were found in both algal forms.

  17. Transport and partitioning of CO2 fixed by root nodules of ureide and amide producing legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, C.P.; Boylan, K.L.M.; Maxwell, C.A.; Heichel, G.H.; Hardman, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nodulated and denodulated roots of adzuki bean (Vigna angularis), soybean (Glycine max), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) were exposed to 14 CO 2 to investigate the contribution of nodule CO 2 fixation to assimilation and transport of fixed nitrogen. The distribution of radioactivity in xylem sap and partitioning of carbon fixed by nodules to the whole plant were measured. Radioactivity in the xylem sap of nodulated soybean and adzuki bean was located primarily (70 to 87%) in the acid fraction while the basic (amino acid) fraction contained 10 to 22%. In contrast radioactivity in the xylem sap of nodulated alfalfa was primarily in amino acids with about 20% in organic acids. Total ureide concentration was 8.1, 4.7, and 0.0 micromoles per milliliter xylem sap for soybean, adzuki bean, and alfalfa, respectively. While the major nitrogen transport products in soybeans and adzuki beans are ureides, this class of metabolites contained less than 20% of the the total radioactivity. When nodules of plants were removed, radioactivity in xylem sap decreased by 90% or more. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that CO 2 fixed by nodules was rapidly transported to shoots and incorporated into acid stable constituents. The data are consistent with a role for nodule CO 2 fixation providing carbon for the assimilation and transport of fixed nitrogen in amide-based legumes. In contrast, CO 2 fixation by nodules of ureide transporting legumes appears to contribute little to assimilation and transport of fixed nitrogen. 19 references, 2 figures, 5 tables

  18. Endophytic and epiphytic hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria associated with root nodules of legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashti, N.; Khanafer, M.; Radwan, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    During their withdrawal from Kuwait in 1991, the Iraqi forces damaged and set fire to approximately 700 oil wells. Oil gushed from the wells for a period of 7 months, resulting in oil lakes which covered about 50 square km of the Kuwaiti desert and posing an environmental problem. Most of the crude oil has been pumped out, leaving the lake bottoms polluted with oil to depths reaching 20 to 25 cm. The oily areas have been mediated through indigenous hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms, but recovery is slow. Rhizospheres of crop plants, including legumes, are rich in oil-utilizing bacteria. Cultivation of broad beans in oily desert samples has enhanced oil biodegradation. This paper discussed the evidence that rhizobium strains inside the nodules on roots of broad beans are active in hydrocarbon utilization, and that the nodules are also colonized on their entire surfaces with oil-utilizing bacteria. Nodule-associated hydrocarbon utilizers appear to contribute together with rhizospheric hydrocarbon utilizers to the phytoremediation of oily soil. Broad beans were removed from soil and their root surfaces were sterilized to eliminate rhizospheric microorganisms. Plants with intact nodules were tested for their potential of attenuating to crude oil in water. Plants were divided into 2 groups: control plants in which all nodules were removed; and experimental plants which were used directly without further treatment. To isolate rhizobium from inside the nodules, fresh nodules were washed, sterilized and homogenized in sterile water. Bacterial strains were tested for their hydrocarbon utilization potential by streaking cell suspensions on the surface of sterile inorganic mediums containing 1 per cent of crude oil or of individual pure aliphatic and aromatic test hydrocarbons. All bacterial isolates were tested for growth on a solid Ashbery's nitrogen free medium. Results indicated that hydrocarbons were more efficiently eliminated from water supporting disinfected

  19. effect of exogenous application of rhizopine on lucerne root nodulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    Meade, H. M., Long, S. R., Ruvkun, G. B., Brown, S. E., and Ausubel, F. M. (1982). Physical and genetic characterisation of symbiotic and auxotrophic mutants of Rhizobium meliloti induced by transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. Jou ma I of Bacteriology. 149: 114-122. Murphy, P.J., Heycke, N., Banfialvi, Z., Tate, M.E., de Bruijn, ...

  20. Genetic variation in pea (Pisum sativum L.) demonstrates the importance of root but not shoot C/N ratios in the control of plant morphology and reveals a unique relationship between shoot length and nodulation intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludidi, Ndiko N; Pellny, Till K; Kiddle, Guy; Dutilleul, Christelle; Groten, Karin; VAN Heerden, Philippus D R; Dutt, Som; Powers, Stephen J; Römer, Peter; Foyer, Christine H

    2007-10-01

    Nodule numbers are regulated through systemic auto-regulatory signals produced by shoots and roots. The relative effects of shoot and root genotype on nodule numbers together with relationships to organ biomass, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) status, and related parameters were measured in pea (Pisum sativum) exploiting natural genetic variation in maturity and apparent nodulation intensity. Reciprocal grafting experiments between the early (Athos), intermediate (Phönix) and late (S00182) maturity phenotypes were performed and Pearson's correlation coefficients for the parameters were calculated. No significant correlations were found between shoot C/N ratios and plant morphology parameters, but the root C/N ratio showed a strong correlation with root fresh and dry weights as well as with shoot fresh weight with less significant interactions with leaf number. Hence, the root C/N ratio rather than shoot C/N had a predominant influence on plant morphology when pea plants are grown under conditions of symbiotic nitrogen supply. The only phenotypic characteristic that showed a statistically significant correlation with nodulation intensity was shoot length, which accounted for 68.5% of the variation. A strong linear relationship was demonstrated between shoot length and nodule numbers. Hence, pea nodule numbers are controlled by factors related to shoot extension, but not by shoot or root biomass accumulation, total C or total N. The relationship between shoot length and nodule numbers persisted under field conditions. These results suggest that stem height could be used as a breeding marker for the selection of pea cultivars with high nodule numbers and high seed N contents.

  1. Flavonoids and Strigolactones in Root Exudates as Signals in Symbiotic and Pathogenic Plant-Fungus Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst Vierheilig

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary plant compounds are important signals in several symbiotic and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions. The present review is limited to two groups of secondary plant compounds, flavonoids and strigolactones, which have been reported in root exudates. Data on flavonoids as signaling compounds are available from several symbiotic and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions, whereas only recently initial data on the role of strigolactones as plant signals in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis have been reported. Data from other plant-microbe interactions and strigolactones are not available yet. In the present article we are focusing on flavonoids in plant-fungalinteractions such as the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM association and the signaling between different Fusarium species and plants. Moreover the role of strigolactones in the AM association is discussed and new data on the effect of strigolactones on fungi, apart from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, are provided.

  2. The monomeric GTPase RabA2 is required for progression and maintenance of membrane integrity of infection threads during root nodule symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Via, Virginia; Traubenik, Soledad; Rivero, Claudio; Aguilar, O Mario; Zanetti, María Eugenia; Blanco, Flavio Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Progression of the infection canal that conducts rhizobia to the nodule primordium requires a functional Rab GTPase located in Golgi/trans-Golgi that also participate in root hair polar growth. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) symbiotically associates with its partner Rhizobium etli, resulting in the formation of root nitrogen-fixing nodules. Compatible bacteria can reach cortical cells in a tightly regulated infection process, in which the specific recognition of signal molecules is a key step to select the symbiotic partner. In this work, we show that RabA2, a monomeric GTPase from common bean, is required for the progression of the infection canal, referred to as the infection thread (IT), toward the cortical cells. Expression of miss-regulated mutant variants of RabA2 resulted in an increased number of abortive infection events, including bursting of ITs and a reduction in the number of nodules. Nodules formed in these plants were small and contained infected cells with disrupted symbiosome membranes, indicating either early senescence of these cells or defects in the formation of the symbiosome membrane during bacterial release. RabA2 localized to mobile vesicles around the IT, but mutations that affect GTP hydrolysis or GTP/GDP exchange modified this localization. Colocalization of RabA2 with ArfA1 and a Golgi marker indicates that RabA2 localizes in Golgi stacks and the trans-Golgi network. Our results suggest that RabA2 is part of the vesicle transport events required to maintain the integrity of the membrane during IT progression.

  3. Phenolphthalein false-positive reactions from legume root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Daniel; Kovacs, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Presumptive tests for blood play a critical role in the examination of physical evidence and in the determination of subsequent analysis. The catalytic power of hemoglobin allows colorimetric reactions employing phenolphthalein (Kastle-Meyer test) to indicate "whether" blood is present. Consequently, DNA profiles extracted from phenolphthalein-positive stains are presumed to be from blood on the evidentiary item and can lead to the identification of "whose" blood is present. Crushed nodules from a variety of legumes yielded phenolphthalein false-positive reactions that were indistinguishable from true bloodstains both in color quality and in developmental time frame. Clothing and other materials stained by nodules also yielded phenolphthalein false-positive reactivity for several years after nodule exposure. Nodules from leguminous plants contain a protein (leghemoglobin) which is structurally and functionally similar to hemoglobin. Testing of purified leghemoglobin confirmed this protein as a source of phenolphthalein reactivity. A scenario is presented showing how the presence of leghemoglobin from nodule staining can mislead investigators. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Morphogenesis of root nodules in white clover. II. The effect of mutation in genes nod IJ of the microsymbiont upon the nodule structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Łotocka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphogenesis of ineffective root nodules initiated on the roots of white clover 'Astra' by the Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar. trifolii strains ANU261 (Tn5 insertion in nod 1 gene and ANU262 (Tn5 insertion in nod J gene was investigated. Following changes were observed, as compared to the wild-type nodulation: the exaggerated, not delayed reaction of root hairs; the delay in nodulation with the number of nodules the same as in plants inoculated with a wild strain; the formation and organization of the nodule primordium not changed in comparison with the wild-type nodules; infection threads abnormally branched and diffusing with bacteria deprived of light zone and enriched with storage material; infected cells of bacteroidal tissue abnormally strongly osmiophilic and only slightly vacuolated; symbiosomes with very narrowed peribacteroidal space, subject to premature degradation; abnormal accumulation of starch in the nodule tissues; nodule development blocked at the stage of laterally situated meristem and single nodule bundle; inhibition of divisions in the meristem and vacuolation of its cells; the appearance of single cells with colonies of saprophytic rhizobia embedded in the fibrillar matrix in the old, degraded regions of the bacteroidal tissue.

  5. Nitrogen transfer in the interface between the symbionts in pea root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, L.; Mouritzen, P.; Rudbeck, A.

    2001-01-01

    Transport mechanisms for transfer of nitrogen from the bacteroid side across the symbiosome membrane of pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules were identified by the use of energised bacteroid side-out symbiosome membrane vesicles. Such membrane vesicles were used to study a mechanism with high...... was not observed. The ammonium transporter has been identified as a voltage-driven channel whereas the symbiosome membrane aspartate transporter appears to be a H+/aspartate symport. The results suggest that nitrogen transfer between the symbionts in pea root nodules involves transfer of amino acids as well...

  6. Antioxidant defenses in the peripheral cell layers of legume root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, D A; Joyner, S L; Becana, M; Iturbe-Ormaetxe, I; Chatfield, J M

    1998-01-01

    Ascorbate peroxidase (AP) is a key enzyme that scavenges potentially harmful H2O2 and thus prevents oxidative damage in plants, especially in N2-fixing legume root nodules. The present study demonstrates that the nodule endodermis of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) root nodules contains elevated levels of AP protein, as well as the corresponding mRNA transcript and substrate (ascorbate). Enhanced AP protein levels were also found in cells immediately peripheral to the infected region of soybean (Glycine max), pea (Pisum sativum), clover (Trifolium pratense), and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodules. Regeneration of ascorbate was achieved by (homo)glutathione and associated enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione pathway, which were present at high levels. The presence of high levels of antioxidants suggests that respiratory consumption of O2 in the endodermis or nodule parenchyma may be an essential component of the O2-diffusion barrier that regulates the entry of O2 into the central region of nodules and ensures optimal functioning of nitrogenase.

  7. Effects of lime and calcium on root development and nodulation of clovers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, D.; Ritchey, D.; Belesky, D. [USDA ARS, Booneville, AR (USA). SPA Dale Bumpers Small Farms Research Centre

    2002-07-01

    Acidic soils can reduce the nodulation of forage legumes. Studies with a Gilpin series silt loam (fine loamy, mixed mesic Typic Hapludult) from New, WV, USA were conducted to determine the effects of lime on root development, and to assess effects of soil Ca and pH on nodulation. Liming increased soil pH from 4.8 to 5.3, nodulation, and root growth of white clover (Trifolium repens L., cultivar Huia) 28 d after planting. Seedlings from unlimed soil formed fewer indeterminate and determinate roots. Next, soils were amended with either CaCO{sub 3} or a mixture of CaCO{sub 3} and CaSO{sub 4} to achieve a soil pH of 4.7 to 6.1 and soil Ca of 170 to 680 mg kg{sup -1} soil. There was a strong quadratic relationship between number of nodules per white clover seedling 28 d after planting and soil pH. Another experiment was conducted to determine if these trends were expressed under field conditions. In 1993, field plots were amended with lime or a coal combustion by-product that supplied Ca as CaSO{sub 4} and seeded in 1994 to cool-season grasses. In spring of 1998, plots were drilled with either red (Trifolium pratense, L.) or white clover. The nodules per primary root were determined in May (1998,1999) and August (1998). Number of nodules per primary root was more closely associated with soil pH than soil Ca.

  8. Expression of a complete soybean leghemoglobin gene in root nodules of transgenic Lotus corniculatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stougaard, J; Petersen, T E; Marcker, K A

    1987-01-01

    The complete soybean leghemoglobin lbc(3) gene was transferred into the legume Lotus corniculatus using an Agrobacterium rhizogenes vector system. Organ-specific expression of the soybean gene was observed in root nodules formed on regenerated transgenic plants after infection with Rhizobium loti...

  9. Nonlegumes, legumes, and root nodules harbor different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheublin, T.R.; Ridgway, K.P.; Young, J.P.W.; van der Heijden, M.G.A.

    2004-01-01

    Legumes are an important plant functional group since they can form a tripartite symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium bacteria and phosphorus-acquiring arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). However, not much is known about AMF community composition in legumes and their root nodules. In this study,

  10. [Effects of environmental stress on seedlings root growth and nodulation of leguminous shrubs in the dry valley of Minjiang River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang-Lan; Zhu, Lin-Hai; Bao, Wei-Kai

    2009-08-01

    A field investigation was made to understand the seedlings root nodulation, biomass accumulation, root length, and fine root percentage of Sophora davidii, Indigofera lenticellata and Campylotropis polyantha along an altitudinal gradient on two contrasting sloped hills (north Zongqu and south Jingzhoushan) in the dry valley of Minjiang River. In the meantime, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the adaptation responses of 2 month-old S. davidii and C. polyantha seedlings root nodulation to different soil moisture regimes (80%, 60%, 40%, and 20% WHC). For the three test shrub species, fewer nodules were observed at lower altitude (1600-1950 m) areas, the nodule number per plant of S. davidii, I. lenticellata, and C. polyantha being 0.1 +/- 0.1, 0.9 +/- 0.5, and 5.7 +/- 1.9, and the non-nodulation plant accounting for 65.1%, 12.3% and 17.6%, respectively. The nodule number of the three species increased with increasing altitude, and correlated positively with root length and fine root percentage. However, there were no significant differences in the plant growth and biomass at different altitudes. When the soil moisture content was lower than 60% WHC, the nodule number and the fresh and dry mass of both S. davidii and C. polyantha decreased markedly, and at 20% WHC, no nodule and only 9.8 +/- 3.6 nodules were observed for S. davidii and C. polyantha, respectively, indicating that in this dry valley, the root nodulation capability of endemic leguminous shrubs was very low. Comparing with S. davidii, C. polyantha had higher root nodulation capability and drought-resistance. Prior to introducing these shrub species in forestation practices, to keep the soil moisture content higher than 40% WHC was recommended for relatively efficient biological nitrogen fixation.

  11. Utilization of 15NO3− by nodulated soybean plants under conditions of root hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes Menolli Lanza, Luciana; Ferreira Lanza, Daniel Carlos; Sodek, Ladaslav

    2014-01-01

    Waterlogging of soils is common in nature. The low availability of oxygen under these conditions leads to hypoxia of the root system impairing the development and productivity of the plant. The presence of nitrate under flooding conditions is regarded as being beneficial towards tolerance to this stress. However, it is not known how nodulated soybean plants, cultivated in the absence of nitrate and therefore not metabolically adapted to this compound, would respond to nitrate under root hypox...

  12. Metabolomic Analysis of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Root-Symbiotic Rhizobia Responses under Alkali Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Tingting; Xu, Huihui; Sun, Na; Jiang, Liu; Tian, Pu; Yong, Yueyuan; Yang, Weiwei; Cai, Hua; Cui, Guowen

    2017-01-01

    Alkaline salts (e.g., NaHCO3 and Na2CO3) causes more severe morphological and physiological damage to plants than neutral salts (e.g., NaCl and Na2SO4) due to differences in pH. The mechanism by which plants respond to alkali stress is not fully understood, especially in plants having symbotic relationships such as alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Therefore, a study was designed to evaluate the metabolic response of the root-nodule symbiosis in alfalfa under alkali stress using comparative metab...

  13. Diversity of root nodule bacteria from leguminous crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a total of 353 nodule-associated bacteria were isolated from 220 legume plant samples belonging to Cicer arietinum (85, Glycine max (74, Vigna radiata (21 and Cajanus cajan (40. A total of 224 bacteria were identified as fast-growing Rhizobium spp. on the basis of differential staining (Gram staining and carbol fuchsin staining and biochemical tests. All the isolates were tested for indole acetic acid production (IAA, phosphate solubilization and siderophore production on plate assay. To examine the effect of volatile organic metabolites (VOM and water soluble soil components (WSSC on nodule bacteria, culture conditions were optimized by observing the effects of various parameters such as pH, salt content and temperatures on the growth of bacteria. Selected rhizobia were subjected to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA analysis to identify their species. On the basis of RAPD and ARDRA, 10 isolates were identified as Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, Rhizobium GO4, G16, G20, G77, S43, S81, M07, M37, A15 and A55 were observed as the best candidates among the tested bacteria and can be further used as potent bioinoculants.

  14. Nod factor receptors form heteromeric complexes and are essential for intracellular infection in Medicago nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Postma, M.; Fedorova, E.E.; Hink, M.A.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are the key signaling molecules in the legume-rhizobium nodule symbiosis. In this study, the role of the Nod factor receptors NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION (NFP) and LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) in establishing the symbiotic interface in root nodules was investigated. It

  15. Nod factor receptors form heteromeric complexes and are essential for intracellular infection in medicago nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Postma, M.; Fedorova, E.; Hink, M.A.; Limpens, E.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are the key signaling molecules in the legume-rhizobium nodule symbiosis. In this study, the role of the Nod factor receptors NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION (NFP) and LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) in establishing the symbiotic interface in root nodules was investigated. It

  16. Characterization of Rhizobium strain isolated from the roots of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trigonella foenumgraecum (fenugreek) is known for its dietary protein source, medicinal properties and symbiotic nitrogen fixation by Rhizobium present in its root nodules. The present study describes the characterization of a Rhizobium strain isolated from root nodules of fenugreek. The Rhizobium isolates were rod ...

  17. effect of exogenous application of rhizopine on lucerne root nodulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    U1111·ersi1y of Adelaide, South Australia. *Corresspondaning author. AB TRACT. Rhizopine, 3-0 -methyl scyllo-inosamine was applied to the roots of luceme seedling inoculated with either rhizopine synthesizing Sinorhizobium meliloti strain L530 or the non-rhizopine synthesizing strain Rm 1021. There was an initial ...

  18. The relationship between thiamine and two symbioses: Root nodule symbiosis and arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagae, Miwa; Parniske, Martin; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-12-01

    Lotus japonicus THIC is expressed in all organs, and the encoded protein catalyzes thiamine biosynthesis. Loss of function produces chlorosis, a typical thiamine-deficiency phenotype, and mortality. To investigate thiamine's role in symbiosis, we focused on THI1, a thiamine-biosynthesis gene expressed in roots, nodules, and seeds. The thi1 mutant had green leaves, but formed small nodules and immature seeds. These phenotypes were rescued by THI1 complementation and by exogenous thiamine. Thus, THI1 is required for nodule enlargement and seed maturation. On the other hand, colonization by arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis was not affected in the thi1 mutant or by exogenous thiamine. However, spores of R. irregularis stored more thiamine than the source (host plants), despite lacking thiamine biosynthesis genes. Therefore, disturbance of the thiamine supply would affect progeny phenotypes such as spore formation and hyphal growth. Further investigation will be required to elucidate thiamine's effect on AM.

  19. Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformed soybean roots differ in their nodulation and nitrogen fixation response to genistein and salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatabadian, Aria; Modarres Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Ghanati, Faezeh; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated response differences of normal and transformed (so-called 'hairy') roots of soybean (Glycine max L. (Merr.), cv L17) to the Nod-factor inducing isoflavone genistein and salinity by quantifying growth, nodulation, nitrogen fixation and biochemical changes. Composite soybean plants were generated using Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of non-nodulating mutant nod139 (GmNFR5α minus) with complementing A. rhizogenes K599 carrying the wild-type GmNFR5α gene under control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter. We used genetic complementation for nodulation ability as only nodulated roots were scored. After hairy root emergence, primary roots were removed and composite plants were inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum (strain CB1809) pre-induced with 10 μM genistein and watered with NaCl (0, 25, 50 and 100 mM). There were significant differences between hairy roots and natural roots in their responses to salt stress and genistein application. In addition, there were noticeable nodulation and nitrogen fixation differences. Composite plants had better growth, more root volume and chlorophyll as well as more nodules and higher nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction) compared with natural roots. Decreased lipid peroxidation, proline accumulation and catalase/peroxidase activities were found in 'hairy' roots under salinity stress. Genistein significantly increased nodulation and nitrogen fixation and improved roots and shoot growth. Although genistein alleviated lipid peroxidation under salinity stress, it had no significant effect on the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In general, composite plants were more competitive in growth, nodulation and nitrogen fixation than normal non-transgenic even under salinity stress conditions.

  20. Metabolomic Profiling of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens-Induced Root Nodules Reveals Both Host Plant-Specific and Developmental Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lardi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont, which can grow inside root-nodule cells of the agriculturally important soybean and other host plants. Our previous studies described B. diazoefficiens host-specific global expression changes occurring during legume infection at the transcript and protein level. In order to further characterize nodule metabolism, we here determine by flow injection–time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis the metabolome of (i nodules and roots from four different B. diazoefficiens host plants; (ii soybean nodules harvested at different time points during nodule development; and (iii soybean nodules infected by two strains mutated in key genes for nitrogen fixation, respectively. Ribose (soybean, tartaric acid (mungbean, hydroxybutanoyloxybutanoate (siratro and catechol (cowpea were among the metabolites found to be specifically elevated in one of the respective host plants. While the level of C4-dicarboxylic acids decreased during soybean nodule development, we observed an accumulation of trehalose-phosphate at 21 days post infection (dpi. Moreover, nodules from non-nitrogen-fixing bacteroids (nifA and nifH mutants showed specific metabolic alterations; these were also supported by independent transcriptomics data. The alterations included signs of nitrogen limitation in both mutants, and an increased level of a phytoalexin in nodules induced by the nifA mutant, suggesting that the tissue of these nodules exhibits defense and stress reactions.

  1. The plant growth promoting substance, lumichrome, mimics starch and ethylene-associated symbiotic responses in lotus and tomato roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liezel eGouws

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Symbiosis involves responses that maintain the plant host and symbiotic partner’s genetic program; yet these cues are far from elucidated. Here we describe the effects of lumichrome, a flavin identified from Rhizobium spp., applied to lotus (Lotus japonicus and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum. Combined transcriptional and metabolite analyses suggest that both species shared common pathways that were altered in response to this application under replete, sterile conditions. These included genes involved in symbiosis, as well as transcriptional and metabolic responses related to enhanced starch accumulation and altered ethylene metabolism. Lumichrome priming also resulted in altered colonization with either Mesorhizobium loti (for lotus or Glomus intraradices/Glomus mossea (for tomato. It enhanced nodule number but not nodule formation in lotus; while leading to enhanced hyphae initiation and delayed arbuscule maturation in tomato.

  2. The Plant Growth Promoting Substance, Lumichrome, Mimics Starch, and Ethylene-Associated Symbiotic Responses in Lotus and Tomato Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouws, Liezel M.; Botes, Eileen; Wiese, Anna J.; Trenkamp, Sandra; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Tang, Yuhong; Hills, Paul N.; Usadel, Björn; Lloyd, James R.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Kossmann, Jens; van der Merwe, Margaretha J.

    2012-01-01

    Symbiosis involves responses that maintain the plant host and symbiotic partner’s genetic program; yet these cues are far from elucidated. Here we describe the effects of lumichrome, a flavin identified from Rhizobium spp., applied to lotus (Lotus japonicus) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Combined transcriptional and metabolite analyses suggest that both species shared common pathways that were altered in response to this application under replete, sterile conditions. These included genes involved in symbiosis, as well as transcriptional and metabolic responses related to enhanced starch accumulation and altered ethylene metabolism. Lumichrome priming also resulted in altered colonization with either Mesorhizobium loti (for lotus) or Glomus intraradices/G. mossea (for tomato). It enhanced nodule number but not nodule formation in lotus; while leading to enhanced hyphae initiation and delayed arbuscule maturation in tomato. PMID:22701462

  3. Diversity of Frankia populations in root nodules of geographically isolated Arizona alder trees in central Arizona (United States)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allana K. Welsh; Jeffrey O. Dawson; Gerald J. Gottfried; Dittmar Hahn

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of uncultured Frankia populations in root nodules of Alnus oblongifolia trees geographically isolated on mountaintops of central Arizona was analyzed by comparative sequence analyses of nifH gene fragments. Sequences were retrieved from Frankia populations in nodules of four trees from each of...

  4. Toxic effects of arsenic on Sinorhizobium-Medicago sativa symbiotic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajuelo, Eloísa; Rodríguez-Llorente, Ignacio D; Dary, Mohammed; Palomares, Antonio J

    2008-07-01

    Recently, the Rhizobium-legume symbiotic interaction has been proposed as an interesting tool in bioremediation. However, little is known about the effect of most common contaminants on this process. The phytotoxic effects of arsenic on nodulation of Medicago sativa have been examined in vitro using the highly arsenic resistant and symbiotically effective Sinorhizobium sp. strain MA11. The bacteria were able to grow on plates containing As concentrations as high as 10 mM. Nevertheless, as little as 25-35 microM arsenite produced a 75% decrease in the total number of nodules, due to a 90% reduction in the number of rhizobial infections, as could be determined using the strain MA11 carrying a lacZ reporter gene. This effect was associated to root hair damage and a shorter infective root zone. However, once nodulation was established nodule development seemed to continue normally, although earlier senescence could be observed in nodules of arsenic-grown plants.

  5. Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Symbiotic Specificity in Legume-Rhizobium Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Legumes are able to form a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria called rhizobia. The result of this symbiosis is to form nodules on the plant root, within which the bacteria can convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia that can be used by the plant. Establishment of a successful symbiosis requires the two symbiotic partners to be compatible with each other throughout the process of symbiotic development. However, incompatibility frequently occurs, such that a bacterial strain is unable to nodulate a particular host plant or forms nodules that are incapable of fixing nitrogen. Genetic and molecular mechanisms that regulate symbiotic specificity are diverse, involving a wide range of host and bacterial genes/signals with various modes of action. In this review, we will provide an update on our current knowledge of how the recognition specificity has evolved in the context of symbiosis signaling and plant immunity.

  6. The ethylene-inhibitor aminoethoxyvinylglycine restores normal nodulation by Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar. viciae on Vicia sativa subsp. nigra by suppressing the 'Thick and short roots' phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaat, S A; Van Brussel, A A; Tak, T; Lugtenberg, B J; Kijne, J W

    1989-02-01

    Nodulation of Vicia sativa subsp. nigra L. by Rhizobium bacteria is coupled to the development of thick and short roots (Tsr). This root phenotype as well as root-hair induction (Hai) and root-hair deformation (Had) are caused by a factor(s) produced by the bacteria in response to plant flavonoids. When very low inoculum concentrations (0.5-5 bacteria·ml(-1)) were used, V. sativa plants did not develop the Tsr phenotype and became nodulated earlier than plants with Tsr roots. Furthermore, the nodules of these plants were located on the primary root in contrast to nodules on Tsr roots, which were all located at sites of lateral-root emergence. The average numbers of nodules per plant were not significantly different for these two types of nodulation. Root-growth inhibition and Hai, but not Had, could be mimicked by ethephon, and inhibited by aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG). Addition of AVG to co-cultures of Vicia sativa and the standard inoculum concentration of 5·10(5) bacteria·ml(-1) suppressed the development of the Tsr phenotype and restored nodulation to the pattern that was observed with very low concentrations of bacteria (0.5-5 bacteria·ml(-1)). The delay in nodulation on Tsr roots appeared to be caused by the fact that nodule meristems did not develop on the primary root, but only on the emerging laterals. The relationship between Tsr, Hai, Had, and nodulation is discussed.

  7. Paraquat Toxicity on Root Nodule Formation on Macroptiliuma tropurpureum Urb. and Its Corelation with Population of Rhizobium sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erni Martani

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the paraquat toxicity toward root nodulation by Rhizobium on Macroptilium atropurpureum as an indicator plant. The legume was grown in Thornton medium treated with several concentrations of paraquat and inoculated with R.japonicum 143 (Rj-143 or Rhizobium sp. C-1.1. These bacteria represent cross-inoculation of soybean and cover-crops legumes, respectively. Nodule formation and Rhizobium population were measured periodically. At the end of planting time, nitrogenase activity of the nodules was analysis based on ARA (Acethylene Reduction Analysis method. The results showed that nodules in plants inoculated with Rhizobium without addition paraquat, were formed within four weeks. There was no nodulation when paraquat was added. Paraquat was toxic to the plant, causing chlorosis, stunting, drying of the plant tissues, and death. The symptoms were detected at the second week after planting time. Paraquat also decreased Rhizobium population from 10^6 to 10^2 or 10^1 CFU/mL at 40 and 100 pp, respectively. These results depicted that paraquat disturbed the plant before nodulation, and at the same time Rhizobium populatin decreased until below minimal population required for nodulation. Therefore, the process of nodulation was disturbed, and in some treatments there was nodulation. It was concluded that paraquat was toxic to both plant and the Rhizobium, which cause nodulation failure.

  8. The role of nodules in the tolerance of common bean to iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatni, Tarek; Ben Salah, Imen; Kouas, Saber; Abdelly, Chedly

    2014-05-01

    Iron is vital for the establishment and function of symbiotic root nodules of legumes. Although abundant in the environment, Fe is often a limiting nutrient for plant growth due to its low solubility and availability in some soils. We have studied the mechanism of iron uptake in the root nodules of common bean to evaluate the role of nodules in physiological responses to iron deficiency. Based on experiments using full or partial submergence of nodulated roots in the nutrient solution, our results show that the nodules were affected only slightly under iron deficiency, especially when the nodules were submerged in nutrient solution in the tolerant cultivar. In addition, fully submerged root nodules showed enhanced acidification of the nutrient solution and showed higher ferric chelate reductase activity than that of partially submerged roots in plants cultivated under Fe deficiency. The main results obtained in this work suggest that in addition to preferential Fe allocation from the root system to the nodules, this symbiotic organ probably develops some mechanisms to respond to iron deficiency. These mechanisms were implied especially in nodule Fe absorption efficiency and in the ability of this organ to take up Fe directly from the medium.

  9. Physiological roles of glutathione s-transferases in soybean root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, David A; Boniface, Chris; Turner, Zachary; Lindahl, Amy; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Jelinek, Laura; Govindarajulu, Manjula; Finger, Richard E; Taylor, Christopher G

    2009-05-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of toxic xenobiotics and oxidatively produced compounds to reduced glutathione, which facilitates their metabolism, sequestration, or removal. We report here that soybean (Glycine max) root nodules contain at least 14 forms of GST, with GST9 being most prevalent, as measured by both real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and identification of peptides in glutathione-affinity purified extracts. GST8 was prevalent in stems and uninfected roots, whereas GST2/10 prevailed in leaves. Purified, recombinant GSTs were shown to have wide-ranging kinetic properties, suggesting that the suite of GSTs could provide physiological flexibility to deal with numerous stresses. Levels of GST9 increased with aging, suggesting a role related to senescence. RNA interference studies of nodules on composite plants showed that a down-regulation of GST9 led to a decrease in nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activity and an increase in oxidatively damaged proteins. These findings indicate that GSTs are abundant in nodules and likely function to provide antioxidant defenses that are critical to support nitrogen fixation.

  10. Diversity and numbers of root-nodule bacteria (rhizobia in Polish soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Martyniuk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a sand pouch-plant infection method, populations of several species of root-nodule bacteria (rhizobia were enumerated in eighty soils collected throughout Poland. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae (symbionts of pea, faba bean, vetch and R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii (symbionts of clover were detected in 77 and 76 soils, respectively. Most of these soils contained moderate and high numbers of these species of the rhizobia. Symbionts of beans, R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, were assessed in 76 soils; of this number 15 soils had no detectable populations of bean rhizobia and in 40 soils high or moderate numbers of these bacteria were found. Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus, root-nodule bacteria of lupine and serradella, were absent in 19 soils, out of 80 tested, and 34 soils were colonised by high or moderate populations of bradyrhizobia. Sinorhizobium meliloti, rhizobia nodulating alfalfa, were sparse in the examined soils; with 56 soil containing no detectable numbers of S. meliloti and only 6 soils harbouring high or moderate populations of this species. The estimated numbers of the rhizobia in the studied soils were also related to some physical and chemical properties of these soils.

  11. Mutagenic effect of UV-irradiation on Alfalfa nodule bacteria and studies on symbiotic properties of the auxotrophic mutants obtained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, S.N.; Butvina, O.Yu.; Simarov, B.V.

    1983-01-01

    Inactivation and mutagenous effect of UV-radiation on nodula bacteria of lucerne is studied. The effect of photoreactivation is found and optimum conditions for mutagenesis are determined. A method for fast determination of effectiveness and nitrogenous activity of Rhizobium melilati mutants is determined. Using this method symbiotic properties of obtained auxotrophic mutants are determined. The dependence between the alteration of nitrogen registering activity of mutants and their aquisition of definite types of auxotrophity, is determined

  12. [Regulatory genes of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) controlling the development of nitrogen-fixing nodules and arbuscular mycorrhiza: a review of basic and applied aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borisov, A Iu; Vasil'chikov, A G; Voroshilova, V A

    2007-01-01

    . Progress in identifying and cloning symbiotic genes is adequately reflected. The feasibility of using double inoculation as a means of increasing the plant productivity is demonstrated, in which the potential of a tripartite symbiotic system (pea plants-root nodule bacteria-arbuscular mycorrhiza...

  13. Antisense Repression of the Medicago truncatula Nodule-Enhanced Sucrose Synthase Leads to a Handicapped Nitrogen Fixation Mirrored by Specific Alterations in the Symbiotic Transcriptome and Metabolome1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Markus C.; Barsch, Aiko; Küster, Helge; Hohnjec, Natalija

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the role of the sucrose (Suc) synthase MtSucS1 during nodulation of the model legume Medicago truncatula, integrating data for the developmental, transcriptional, and metabolic processes affected downstream of an impaired Suc cleavage in root nodules. To reduce carbohydrate supply to nodule tissues, transgenic plants expressing a p35S-driven MtSucS1-antisense fusion were constructed. These plants displayed an up to 90% reduction of MtSucS1 proteins in roots and nodules. Phenotypic studies of two independent MtSucS1-reduced lines demonstrated that only under conditions depending on nodulation, these plants appeared to be impaired in above-ground growth. Specifically plant height, shoot weight, leaf development, flowering, as well as seed maturation were reduced, and the efficiency of photosynthesis was affected. Concomitantly, a significantly enhanced root to shoot ratio with a marked increase in root tip numbers was observed. Root nodule formation was found retarded and the impaired nodulation was accompanied by a less efficient nitrogen (N) acquisition. The decreased total N content of MtSucS1-antisense lines and an enhanced carbon to N ratio in roots, nodules, and shoots correlated with the extent of MtSucS1 knockdown. On the level of transcription, effects of an MtSucS1 reduction were evident for genes representing important nodes of the nodule carbon and N metabolism, while metabolite profiling revealed significantly lower levels of amino acids and their derivatives particularly in strongly MtSucS1-reduced nodules. Our results support the model that nodule-enhanced Suc synthase 1 of the model legume M. truncatula is required for the establishment and maintenance of an efficient N-fixing symbiosis. PMID:17951459

  14. NrcR, a New Transcriptional Regulator of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 Involved in the Legume Root-Nodule Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Cerro, Pablo; Rolla-Santos, Amanda A. P.; Valderrama-Fernández, Rocío; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Bellogín, Ramón A.; Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Megías, Manuel; Hungría, Mariangela; Ollero, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of nitrogen-fixing rhizobium-legume symbioses requires a highly complex cascade of events. In this molecular dialogue the bacterial NodD transcriptional regulators in conjunction with plant inducers, mostly flavonoids, are responsible for the biosynthesis and secretion of Nod factors which are key molecules for successful nodulation. Other transcriptional regulators related to the symbiotic process have been identified in rhizobial genomes, including negative regulators such as NolR. Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 is an important symbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and its genome encompasses intriguing features such as five copies of nodD genes, as well as other possible transcriptional regulators including the NolR protein. Here we describe and characterize a new regulatory gene located in the non-symbiotic plasmid pRtrCIAT899c, that shows homology (46% identity) with the nolR gene located in the chromosome of CIAT 899. The mutation of this gene, named nrcR (nolR-like plasmid c Regulator), enhanced motility and exopolysaccharide production in comparison to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the number and decoration of Nod Factors produced by this mutant were higher than those detected in the wild-type strain, especially under salinity stress. The nrcR mutant showed delayed nodulation and reduced competitiveness with P. vulgaris, and reduction in nodule number and shoot dry weight in both P. vulgaris and Leucaena leucocephala. Moreover, the mutant exhibited reduced capacity to induce the nodC gene in comparison to the wild-type CIAT 899. The finding of a new nod-gene regulator located in a non-symbiotic plasmid may reveal the existence of even more complex mechanisms of regulation of nodulation genes in R. tropici CIAT 899 that may be applicable to other rhizobial species. PMID:27096734

  15. Metabolite profiles of nodulated alfalfa plants indicate that distinct stages of nodule organogenesis are accompanied by global physiological adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsch, Aiko; Tellström, Verena; Patschkowski, Thomas; Küster, Helge; Niehaus, Karsten

    2006-09-01

    An effective symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and its host plant Medicago sativa is dependent on a balanced physiological interaction enabling the microsymbiont to fix atmospheric nitrogen. Maintenance of the symbiotic interaction is regulated by still poorly understood control mechanisms. A first step toward a better understanding of nodule metabolism was the determination of characteristic metabolites for alfalfa root nodules. Furthermore, nodules arrested at different developmental stages were analyzed in order to address metabolic changes induced during the progression of nodule formation. Metabolite profiles of bacteroid-free pseudonodule extracts indicated that early nodule developmental processes are accompanied by photosynthate translocation but no massive organic acid formation. To determine metabolic adaptations induced by the presence of nonfixing bacteroids, nodules induced by mutant S. meliloti strains lacking the nitrogenase protein were analyzed. The bacteroids are unable to provide ammonium to the host plant, which is metabolically reflected by reduced levels of characteristic amino acids involved in ammonium fixation. Elevated levels of starch and sugars in Fix(-) nodules provide strong evidence that plant sanctions preventing a transformation from a symbiotic to a potentially parasitic interaction are not strictly realized via photosynthate supply. Instead, metabolic and gene expression data indicate that alfalfa plants react to nitrogen-fixation-deficient bacteroids with a decreased organic acid synthesis and an early induction of senescence. Noneffective symbiotic interactions resulting from plants nodulated by mutant rhizobia also are reflected in characteristic metabolic changes in leaves. These are typical for nitrogen deficiency, but also highlight metabolites potentially involved in sensing the N status.

  16. An overview of the metabolic differences between Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110 bacteria and differentiated bacteroids from soybean (Glycine max) root nodules: an in vitro 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclare, Pierre; Bligny, Richard; Gout, Elisabeth; Widmer, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that induce root nodules formation in legume soybean (Glycine max.). Using 13 C- and 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have analysed the metabolite profiles of cultivated B. japonicum cells and bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. Our results revealed some quantitative and qualitative differences between the metabolite profiles of bacteroids and their vegetative state. This includes in bacteroids a huge accumulation of soluble carbohydrates such as trehalose, glutamate, myo-inositol and homo-spermidine as well as Pi, nucleotide pools and intermediates of the primary carbon metabolism. Using this novel approach, these data show that most of the compounds detected in bacteroids reflect the metabolic adaptation of rhizobia to the surrounding microenvironment with its host plant cells. (authors)

  17. Root Exudates of Various Host Plants of Rhizobium leguminosarum Contain Different Sets of Inducers of Rhizobium Nodulation Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaat, Sebastian A. J.; Wijffelman, Carel A.; Mulders, Ine H. M.; van Brussel, Anton A. N.; Lugtenberg, Ben J. J.

    1988-01-01

    Rhizobium promoters involved in the formation of root nodules on leguminous plants are activated by flavonoids in plant root exudate. A series of Rhizobium strains which all contain the inducible Rhizobium leguminosarum nodA promoter fused to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene, and which differ only in

  18. Induced systemic resistance against Botrytis cinerea by Micromonospora strains isolated from root nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar eMartínez-Hidalgo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Micromonospora is a Gram positive bacterium that can be isolated from nitrogen fixing nodules from healthy leguminous plants, where they could be beneficial to the plant. Their plant growth promoting activity in legume and non-legume plants has been previously demonstrated. The present study explores the ability of Micromonospora strains to control fungal pathogens and to stimulate plant immunity. Micromonospora strains isolated from surface sterilized nodules of alfalfa showed in vitro antifungal activity against several pathogenic fungi. Moreover, root inoculation of tomato plants with these Micromonospora strains effectively reduced leaf infection by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, despite spatial separation between both microorganisms. This induced systemic resistance, confirmed in different tomato cultivars, is long lasting. Gene expression analyses evidenced that Micromonospora stimulates the plant capacity to activate defense mechanisms upon pathogen attack. The defensive response of tomato plants inoculated with Micromonospora spp. differs from that of non-inoculated plants, showing a stronger induction of jasmonate-regulated defenses when the plant is challenged with a pathogen. The hypothesis of jasmonates playing a key role in this defense priming effect was confirmed using defense-impaired tomato mutants, since the JA-deficient line def1 was unable to display a long term induced resistance upon Micromonospora spp. inoculation.In conclusion, nodule isolated Micromonospora strains should be considered excellent candidates as biocontrol agents as they combine both direct antifungal activity against plant pathogens and the ability to prime plant immunity.

  19. Paraquat Toxicity on Root Nodule Formation on Macroptiliuma Tropurpureum Urb. and Its Corelation with Population of Rhizobium SP.

    OpenAIRE

    Martani, Erni; Margino, Sebastian; Magdalena, Medhina

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the paraquat toxicity toward root nodulation by Rhizobium on Macroptilium atropurpureum as an indicator plant. The legume was grown in Thornton medium treated with several concentrations of paraquat and inoculated with R.japonicum 143 (Rj-143) or Rhizobium sp. C-1.1. These bacteria represent cross-inoculation of soybean and cover-crops legumes, respectively. Nodule formation and Rhizobium population were measured periodically. At the end of planting time...

  20. Activation of cell divisions in legume nodulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadzieja, Marcin

    Leguminous plants engage into symbiotic relationships with soil bacteria, rhizobia, and develop root nodules. This process initiates with recognition of bacteria derived signalling molecules called nod factors. The subsequent events lead to symbiotic infection and, occurring in parallel, de novo...... was shown to require auxin signalling. Cytokinin, in contrast, exert a negative regulation of bacterial entry into the root. During organogenesis, auxin and cytokinin maxima are known to accompany nodule primordia development and together regulate progression through the cell cycle. Moreover, application...... the two hormones require further investigation. In order to improve understanding in these areas we aimed to develop and characterise hormone and cell division markers in Lotus japonicus. Using the extensive genetic resources available in L. japonicus, these markers may then be used to develop a more...

  1. Evaluation of the symbiotic nitrogen fixation in soybean by labelling of soil organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruschel, A.P.; Freitas, J.R. de; Vose, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment was carried out using the isotopic dilution method to evaluate symbiotic nitrogen fixation in soybean grown in soil labelled with 15 N enriched organic matter. Symbiotic N 2 -fixed was 71-76% of total N in the plant. Non nodulated soybean utilized 56-59% N from organic matter and 40% from soil. Roots of nodulated plants had lower NdN 2 than aereal plant parts. The advantage of using labelled organic matter as compared with 15 N-fertilizer addition in evaluating N 2 -fixation is discussed. (Author) [pt

  2. Rhizobial peptidase HrrP cleaves host-encoded signaling peptides and mediates symbiotic compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Paul A; Tanner, Houston R; Dillon, Brett A; Shabab, Mohammed; Walker, Graham C; Griffitts, Joel S

    2015-12-08

    Legume-rhizobium pairs are often observed that produce symbiotic root nodules but fail to fix nitrogen. Using the Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago truncatula symbiotic system, we previously described several naturally occurring accessory plasmids capable of disrupting the late stages of nodule development while enhancing bacterial proliferation within the nodule. We report here that host range restriction peptidase (hrrP), a gene found on one of these plasmids, is capable of conferring both these properties. hrrP encodes an M16A family metallopeptidase whose catalytic activity is required for these symbiotic effects. The ability of hrrP to suppress nitrogen fixation is conditioned upon the genotypes of both the host plant and the hrrP-expressing rhizobial strain, suggesting its involvement in symbiotic communication. Purified HrrP protein is capable of degrading a range of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides encoded by M. truncatula. NCR peptides are crucial signals used by M. truncatula for inducing and maintaining rhizobial differentiation within nodules, as demonstrated in the accompanying article [Horváth B, et al. (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 10.1073/pnas.1500777112]. The expression pattern of hrrP and its effects on rhizobial morphology are consistent with the NCR peptide cleavage model. This work points to a symbiotic dialogue involving a complex ensemble of host-derived signaling peptides and bacterial modifier enzymes capable of adjusting signal strength, sometimes with exploitative outcomes.

  3. Rhizobium taibaishanense sp. nov., isolated from a root nodule of Kummerowia striata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li Juan; Shen, Yao Yao; Zhan, Jun Peng; Xu, Wei; Cui, Guang Ling; Wei, Ge Hong

    2012-02-01

    During a study of the diversity and phylogeny of rhizobia in the root nodules of Kummerowia striata grown in north-western China, four strains were classified in the genus Rhizobium on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of three of these strains were identical and that of the other strain, which was the only one isolated in Yangling, differed from the others by just 1 bp. The16S rRNA gene sequences of the four strains showed a mean similarity of 99.3 % with the most closely related, recognized species, Rhizobium vitis. The corresponding recA and glnA gene sequences showed similarities with established species of Rhizobium of less than 86.5 % and less than 89.6 %, respectively. These low similarities indicated that the four strains represented a novel species of the genus Rhizobium. The strains were also found to be distinguishable from the closest related, established species (R. vitis) by rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting, analysis of cellular fatty acid profiles and from the results of a series of phenotypic tests. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the representative strain CCNWSX 0483(T) and Rhizobium vitis IAM 14140(T) was only 40.13 %. Therefore, a novel species, Rhizobium taibaishanense sp. nov., is proposed, with strain CCNWSX 0483(T) ( = ACCC 14971(T) = HAMBI 3214(T)) as the type strain. In nodulation and pathogenicity tests, none of the four strains of Rhizobium taibaishanense sp. nov. was able to induce any nodule or tumour formation on plants. As no amplicons were detected when DNA from the strains was run in PCR with primers for the detection of nodA, nifH and virC gene sequences, the strains probably do not carry sym or vir genes.

  4. Bacterial-induced calcium oscillations are common to nitrogen-fixing associations of nodulating legumes and non-legumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granqvist, E.; Sun, J.; Camp, Op den R.; Pujic, P.; Hill, L.; Normand, P.; Morris, R.J.; Downie, J.A.; Geurts, R.; Oldroyd, G.E.D.

    2015-01-01

    •Plants that form root-nodule symbioses are within a monophyletic ‘nitrogen-fixing’ clade and associated signalling processes are shared with the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Central to symbiotic signalling are nuclear-associated oscillations in calcium ions (Ca2+), occurring in the root hairs

  5. The salt-responsive transcriptome of chickpea roots and nodules via deepSuperSAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhauer Diana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The combination of high-throughput transcript profiling and next-generation sequencing technologies is a prerequisite for genome-wide comprehensive transcriptome analysis. Our recent innovation of deepSuperSAGE is based on an advanced SuperSAGE protocol and its combination with massively parallel pyrosequencing on Roche's 454 sequencing platform. As a demonstration of the power of this combination, we have chosen the salt stress transcriptomes of roots and nodules of the third most important legume crop chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.. While our report is more technology-oriented, it nevertheless addresses a major world-wide problem for crops generally: high salinity. Together with low temperatures and water stress, high salinity is responsible for crop losses of millions of tons of various legume (and other crops. Continuously deteriorating environmental conditions will combine with salinity stress to further compromise crop yields. As a good example for such stress-exposed crop plants, we started to characterize salt stress responses of chickpeas on the transcriptome level. Results We used deepSuperSAGE to detect early global transcriptome changes in salt-stressed chickpea. The salt stress responses of 86,919 transcripts representing 17,918 unique 26 bp deepSuperSAGE tags (UniTags from roots of the salt-tolerant variety INRAT-93 two hours after treatment with 25 mM NaCl were characterized. Additionally, the expression of 57,281 transcripts representing 13,115 UniTags was monitored in nodules of the same plants. From a total of 144,200 analyzed 26 bp tags in roots and nodules together, 21,401 unique transcripts were identified. Of these, only 363 and 106 specific transcripts, respectively, were commonly up- or down-regulated (>3.0-fold under salt stress in both organs, witnessing a differential organ-specific response to stress. Profiting from recent pioneer works on massive cDNA sequencing in chickpea, more than 9,400 Uni

  6. Rhizobium favelukesii sp. nov., isolated from the root nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Althabegoiti, María Julia; Nilsson, Juliet Fernanda; Niehaus, Karsten; Schlüter, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Del Papa, María Florencia; Lagares, Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Pistorio, Mariano

    2016-11-01

    Strains LPU83T and Or191 of the genus Rhizobium were isolated from the root nodules of alfalfa, grown in acid soils from Argentina and the USA. These two strains, which shared the same plasmid pattern, lipopolysaccharide profile, insertion-sequence fingerprint, 16S rRNA gene sequence and PCR-fingerprinting pattern, were different from reference strains representing species of the genus Rhizobium with validly published names. On the basis of previously reported data and from new DNA-DNA hybridization results, phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic analyses, strains LPU83T and Or191 can be considered to be representatives of a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium favelukesii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of this species is LPU83T (=CECT 9014T=LMG 29160T), for which an improved draft-genome sequence is available.

  7. Occurrence of polyamines in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in symbiosis with Rhizobium tropici in response to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gómez, Miguel; Cobos-Porras, Libertad; Hidalgo-Castellanos, Javier; Lluch, Carmen

    2014-11-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are low molecular weight aliphatic compounds that have been shown to be an important part of plant responses to salt stress. For that reason in this work we have investigated the involvement of PAs in the response to salt stress in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in symbiosis with Rhizobium tropici. The level and variety of PAs was higher in nodules, compared to leaves and roots, and in addition to the common PAs (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) we found homospermidine (Homspd) as the most abundant polyamine in nodules. UPLC-mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of 4-aminobutylcadaverine (4-ABcad), only described in nodules of Vigna angularis before. Indeed, the analysis of different nodular fractions revealed higher level of 4-ABcad, as well as Homspd, in bacteroids which indicate the production of these PAs by the bacteria in symbiosis. The genes involved in PAs biosynthesis in nodules displayed an induction under salt stress conditions which was not consistent with the decline of free PAs levels, probably due to the nitrogen limitations provoked by the nitrogenase activity depletion and/or the conversion of free PAs to theirs soluble conjugated forms, that seems to be one of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of PAs levels. On the contrary, cadaverine (Cad) and 4-ABcad concentrations augmented by the salinity, which might be due to their involvement in the response of bacteroids to hyper-osmotic conditions. In conclusion, the results shown in this work suggest the alteration of the bacteroidal metabolism towards the production of uncommon PAs such as 4-ABcad in the response to salt stress in legume root nodules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The ethylene-inhibitor aminoethoxyvinylglycine restores normal nodulation by Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar. viciae on Vicia sativa subsp. nigra by suppressing the 'Thick and short roots' phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaat, S. A.; van Brussel, A. A.; Tak, T.; Lugtenberg, B. J.; KIJNE, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    Nodulation of Vicia sativa subsp. nigra L. by Rhizobium bacteria is coupled to the development of thick and short roots (Tsr). This root phenotype as well as root-hair induction (Hai) and root-hair deformation (Had) are caused by a factor(s) produced by the bacteria in response to plant flavonoids.

  9. Redox regulation of peroxiredoxin and proteinases by ascorbate and thiols during pea root nodule senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Karin; Dutilleul, Christelle; van Heerden, Philippus D R; Vanacker, Hélène; Bernard, Stéphanie; Finkemeier, Iris; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Foyer, Christine H

    2006-02-20

    Redox factors contributing to nodule senescence were studied in pea. The abundance of the nodule cytosolic peroxiredoxin but not the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin protein was modulated by ascorbate. In contrast to redox-active antioxidants such as ascorbate and cytosolic peroxiredoxin that decreased during nodule development, maximal extractable nodule proteinase activity increased progressively as the nodules aged. Cathepsin-like activities were constant throughout development but serine and cysteine proteinase activities increased during senescence. Senescence-induced cysteine proteinase activity was inhibited by cysteine, dithiotreitol, or E-64. Senescence-dependent decreases in redox-active factors, particularly ascorbate and peroxiredoxin favour decreased redox-mediated inactivation of cysteine proteinases.

  10. Distinct patterns of symbiosis-related gene expression in actinorhizal nodules from different plant families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlowski, K.; Swensen, S.; Guan, C.; Hadri, A.E.; Berry, A.M.; Bisseling, T.

    2003-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses suggest that, among the members of the Eurosid I clade, nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses developed multiple times independently, four times with rhizobia and four times with the genus Frankia. In order to understand the degree of similarity between symbiotic systems of

  11. Crowdsourcing the nodulation gene network discovery environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yupeng; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-26

    The Legumes (Fabaceae) are an economically and ecologically important group of plant species with the conspicuous capacity for symbiotic nitrogen fixation in root nodules, specialized plant organs containing symbiotic microbes. With the aim of understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to nodulation, many efforts are underway to identify nodulation-related genes and determine how these genes interact with each other. In order to accurately and efficiently reconstruct nodulation gene network, a crowdsourcing platform, CrowdNodNet, was created. The platform implements the jQuery and vis.js JavaScript libraries, so that users are able to interactively visualize and edit the gene network, and easily access the information about the network, e.g. gene lists, gene interactions and gene functional annotations. In addition, all the gene information is written on MediaWiki pages, enabling users to edit and contribute to the network curation. Utilizing the continuously updated, collaboratively written, and community-reviewed Wikipedia model, the platform could, in a short time, become a comprehensive knowledge base of nodulation-related pathways. The platform could also be used for other biological processes, and thus has great potential for integrating and advancing our understanding of the functional genomics and systems biology of any process for any species. The platform is available at http://crowd.bioops.info/ , and the source code can be openly accessed at https://github.com/bioops/crowdnodnet under MIT License.

  12. Genetic Factors in Rhizobium Affecting the Symbiotic Carbon Costs of N2 Fixation and Host Plant Biomass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøt, L.; Hirsch, P. R.; Witty, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of genetic factors in Rhizobium on host plant biomass production and on the carbon costs of N2 fixation in pea root nodules was studied. Nine strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum were constructed, each containing one of three symbiotic plasmids in combination with one of three different...

  13. Effect of cropping systems and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on soil microbial activity and root nodule nitrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Zarea

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Forage legumes are used to enhancement soil fertility of the agro ecosystem. Understanding effect of them on agro ecosystem soil status during when these legumes growing and after that is essential. In one experiment the effects of inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, Glomus mosseae, and mixed cropping systems (MCS on forage biomass yield, nitrogen production, nitrogenase activity and after harvesting on soil microbial activity were studied at various mixed cropping ratios of berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L., B to Persian clover (Trifolium resupinatum L., P (B:P = 1:0, 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3. In the second experiment, the effect of treatments on soil microbial activity were studied by soil collection after clover harvesting and 8-week soil incubations in the laboratory. MCS had positive effects on root and shoot dry weight. The effects of AMF on plant yield were positive. AMF affected the fraction root and the vertical root distribution. Plants colonized by AMF showed shorter roots than control plants. At cut 1, with the AMF colonization, the greatest nitrogenase activity (79.61 μmol C2H4 g dwt−1 h−1 of root nodule was observed with B:P = 3:1. At cut 2, the Persian clover plants colonized by G. mosseae in the mixed crop (1:3 had a higher nitrogenase activity (77.38 μmol C2H4 g dwt−1 h−1. The greatest nitrogen accumulation in the aboveground biomass, 23.5 mg g−1 forage dry matter, was obtained with mixed cropping (B:P = 1:1 in the presence of the AMF colonization. Microbial activity measured as substrate-induced respiration and activities of dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, and acid phosphatase enzymes responded positively to AMF colonization; with the greatest activities for B:P = 1:3.

  14. Bacillus radicibacter sp. nov., a new bacterium isolated from root nodule of Oxytropis ochrocephala Bunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiu Li; Lin, Yan Bing; Xu, Lin; Han, Meng Sha; Dong, Dan Hong; Chen, Wei Min; Wang, Li; Wei, Ge Hong

    2015-10-01

    A Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped, and endospore-forming strain, designated 53-2(T) was isolated from the root nodule of Oxytropis ochrocephala Bunge growing on Qilian mountain, China. The strain can grow at pH 7.0-8.0, 10-50 °C and tolerate up to 11% NaCl. Optimal growth occurred at pH 7.2 and 37 °C. The result of BLASTn search based on 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain 53-2(T) , being closest related to Bacillus acidicola 105-2(T) , possessed remote similarity (less than 95.64%) to the species within genus Bacillus. The DNA G + C content was 37.8%. Chemotaxonomic data (major quinone is MK-7; major polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, unknown phospholipid, and aminoglycophospholipid; fatty acids are anteiso-C15: 0 , iso-C15:0 and anteiso-C17: 0 ) supported the affiliation of the isolate to the genus Bacillus. On the basis of physiological, phylogenetic, and biochemical properties, strain 53-2(T) represents a novel species within genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus radicibacter is proposed. The type strain is 53-2(T) (=DSM27302(T) =ACCC06115(T) =CCNWQLS5(T) ). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Computational investigation of small RNAs in the establishment of root nodules and arbuscular mycorrhiza in leguminous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Danfeng; Meng, Xianwen; Wang, Yue; Wang, Jingjing; Zhao, Yuhua; Chen, Ming

    2018-01-03

    Many small RNAs have been confirmed to play important roles in the development of root nodules and arbuscular mycorrhiza. In this study, we carried out the identification of certain small RNAs in leguminous plants (Medicago truncatula, soybean, peanut and common bean), such as miRNAs, tRFs and srRNAs, as well as the computational investigation of their regulations. Thirty miRNAs were predicted to be involved in establishing root nodules and mycorrhiza, and 12 of them were novel in common bean and peanut. The generation of tRFs in M. truncatula was not associated with tRNA gene frequencies and codon usage. Six tRFs exhibited different expressions in mycorrhiza and root nodules. Moreover, srRNA 5.8S in M. truncatula was generated from the regions with relatively low conservation at the rRNA 3' terminal. The protein-protein interactions between the proteins encoded by the target genes of miRNAs, tRFs and srRNAs were computed. The regulation of these three types of sRNAs in the symbiosis between leguminous plants and microorganisms is not a single regulation of certain signaling or metabolic pathways but a global regulation for the plants to own growth or specific events in symbiosis.

  16. The independent acquisition of plant root nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in Fabids recruited the same genetic pathway for nodule organogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Svistoonoff

    Full Text Available Only species belonging to the Fabid clade, limited to four classes and ten families of Angiosperms, are able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS with soil bacteria. This concerns plants of the legume family (Fabaceae and Parasponia (Cannabaceae associated with the Gram-negative proteobacteria collectively called rhizobia and actinorhizal plants associated with the Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK is a key component of the common signaling pathway leading to both rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses (AM and plays a central role in cross-signaling between root nodule organogenesis and infection processes. Here, we show that CCaMK is also needed for successful actinorhiza formation and interaction with AM fungi in the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca and is also able to restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Medicago truncatula ccamk mutant. Besides, we expressed auto-active CgCCaMK lacking the auto-inhibitory/CaM domain in two actinorhizal species: C. glauca (Casuarinaceae, which develops an intracellular infection pathway, and Discaria trinervis (Rhamnaceae which is characterized by an ancestral intercellular infection mechanism. In both species, we found induction of nodulation independent of Frankia similar to response to the activation of CCaMK in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and conclude that the regulation of actinorhiza organogenesis is conserved regardless of the infection mode. It has been suggested that rhizobial and actinorhizal symbioses originated from a common ancestor with several independent evolutionary origins. Our findings are consistent with the recruitment of a similar genetic pathway governing rhizobial and Frankia nodule organogenesis.

  17. The Independent Acquisition of Plant Root Nitrogen-Fixing Symbiosis in Fabids Recruited the Same Genetic Pathway for Nodule Organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svistoonoff, Sergio; Benabdoun, Faiza Meriem; Nambiar-Veetil, Mathish; Imanishi, Leandro; Vaissayre, Virginie; Cesari, Stella; Diagne, Nathalie; Hocher, Valérie; de Billy, Françoise; Bonneau, Jocelyne; Wall, Luis; Ykhlef, Nadia; Rosenberg, Charles; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine; Gherbi, Hassen

    2013-01-01

    Only species belonging to the Fabid clade, limited to four classes and ten families of Angiosperms, are able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS) with soil bacteria. This concerns plants of the legume family (Fabaceae) and Parasponia (Cannabaceae) associated with the Gram-negative proteobacteria collectively called rhizobia and actinorhizal plants associated with the Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a key component of the common signaling pathway leading to both rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses (AM) and plays a central role in cross-signaling between root nodule organogenesis and infection processes. Here, we show that CCaMK is also needed for successful actinorhiza formation and interaction with AM fungi in the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca and is also able to restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Medicago truncatula ccamk mutant. Besides, we expressed auto-active CgCCaMK lacking the auto-inhibitory/CaM domain in two actinorhizal species: C. glauca (Casuarinaceae), which develops an intracellular infection pathway, and Discaria trinervis (Rhamnaceae) which is characterized by an ancestral intercellular infection mechanism. In both species, we found induction of nodulation independent of Frankia similar to response to the activation of CCaMK in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and conclude that the regulation of actinorhiza organogenesis is conserved regardless of the infection mode. It has been suggested that rhizobial and actinorhizal symbioses originated from a common ancestor with several independent evolutionary origins. Our findings are consistent with the recruitment of a similar genetic pathway governing rhizobial and Frankia nodule organogenesis. PMID:23741336

  18. The Influence of the Host Plant Is the Major Ecological Determinant of the Presence of Nitrogen-Fixing Root Nodule Symbiont Cluster II Frankia Species in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battenberg, Kai; Wren, Jannah A; Hillman, Janell; Edwards, Joseph; Huang, Liujing; Berry, Alison M

    2017-01-01

    The actinobacterial genus Frankia establishes nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses with specific hosts within the nitrogen-fixing plant clade. Of four genetically distinct subgroups of Frankia, cluster I, II, and III strains are capable of forming effective nitrogen-fixing symbiotic associations, while cluster IV strains generally do not. Cluster II Frankia strains have rarely been detected in soil devoid of host plants, unlike cluster I or III strains, suggesting a stronger association with their host. To investigate the degree of host influence, we characterized the cluster II Frankia strain distribution in rhizosphere soil in three locations in northern California. The presence/absence of cluster II Frankia strains at a given site correlated significantly with the presence/absence of host plants on the site, as determined by glutamine synthetase (glnA) gene sequence analysis, and by microbiome analysis (16S rRNA gene) of a subset of host/nonhost rhizosphere soils. However, the distribution of cluster II Frankia strains was not significantly affected by other potential determinants such as host-plant species, geographical location, climate, soil pH, or soil type. Rhizosphere soil microbiome analysis showed that cluster II Frankia strains occupied only a minute fraction of the microbiome even in the host-plant-present site and further revealed no statistically significant difference in the α-diversity or in the microbiome composition between the host-plant-present or -absent sites. Taken together, these data suggest that host plants provide a factor that is specific for cluster II Frankia strains, not a general growth-promoting factor. Further, the factor accumulates or is transported at the site level, i.e., beyond the host rhizosphere. Biological nitrogen fixation is a bacterial process that accounts for a major fraction of net new nitrogen input in terrestrial ecosystems. Transfer of fixed nitrogen to plant biomass is especially efficient via root nodule

  19. Nodulation of leguminous plants as affected by root secretions and red light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie, T.A.

    1964-01-01

    Nodulation of bean plants, Phaseolus vulgaris L., in water culture was poor during hot sunny weather in the greenhouse. It did not improve when indoleacetic acid, kinetin, gibberellic acid, purines and pyrimidines, yeast and soil extract were added. Nodulation was enhanced by adding used

  20. Mutation of praR in Rhizobium leguminosarum enhances root biofilms, improving nodulation competitiveness by increased expression of attachment proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederix, Marijke; Edwards, Anne; Swiderska, Anna; Stanger, Andrew; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Williams, Alan; Abbruscato, Pamela; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Poole, Philip S; Downie, J Allan

    2014-08-01

    In Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, quorum-sensing is regulated by CinR, which induces the cinIS operon. CinI synthesizes an AHL, whereas CinS inactivates PraR, a repressor. Mutation of praR enhanced biofilms in vitro. We developed a light (lux)-dependent assay of rhizobial attachment to roots and demonstrated that mutation of praR increased biofilms on pea roots. The praR mutant out-competed wild-type for infection of pea nodules in mixed inoculations. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays and promoter fusions revealed that PraR represses its own transcription and mutation of praR increased expression of several genes including those encoding secreted proteins (the adhesins RapA2, RapB and RapC, two cadherins and the glycanase PlyB), the polysaccharide regulator RosR, and another protein similar to PraR. PraR bound to the promoters of several of these genes indicating direct repression. Mutations in rapA2, rapB, rapC, plyB, the cadherins or rosR did not affect the enhanced root attachment or nodule competitiveness of the praR mutant. However combinations of mutations in rapA, rapB and rapC abolished the enhanced attachment and nodule competitiveness. We conclude that relief of PraR-mediated repression determines a lifestyle switch allowing the expression of genes that are important for biofilm formation on roots and the subsequent initiation of infection of legume roots. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Mutation of praR in Rhizobium leguminosarum enhances root biofilms, improving nodulation competitiveness by increased expression of attachment proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederix, Marijke; Edwards, Anne; Swiderska, Anna; Stanger, Andrew; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Williams, Alan; Abbruscato, Pamela; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Poole, Philip S; Downie, J Allan

    2014-01-01

    In Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, quorum-sensing is regulated by CinR, which induces the cinIS operon. CinI synthesizes an AHL, whereas CinS inactivates PraR, a repressor. Mutation of praR enhanced biofilms in vitro. We developed a light (lux)-dependent assay of rhizobial attachment to roots and demonstrated that mutation of praR increased biofilms on pea roots. The praR mutant out-competed wild-type for infection of pea nodules in mixed inoculations. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays and promoter fusions revealed that PraR represses its own transcription and mutation of praR increased expression of several genes including those encoding secreted proteins (the adhesins RapA2, RapB and RapC, two cadherins and the glycanase PlyB), the polysaccharide regulator RosR, and another protein similar to PraR. PraR bound to the promoters of several of these genes indicating direct repression. Mutations in rapA2, rapB, rapC, plyB, the cadherins or rosR did not affect the enhanced root attachment or nodule competitiveness of the praR mutant. However combinations of mutations in rapA, rapB and rapC abolished the enhanced attachment and nodule competitiveness. We conclude that relief of PraR-mediated repression determines a lifestyle switch allowing the expression of genes that are important for biofilm formation on roots and the subsequent initiation of infection of legume roots. PMID:24942546

  2. Nodulation of legumes, nitrogenase activity of roots and occurrence of nitrogen-fixing Azospirillum spp. In representative soils of central Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvester-Bradley, R.; De Oliverira, L.A.; De Podesta Filho, J.A.; St. John, T.V.

    1980-12-01

    Leguminosae do not predominate in the Brazilian Amazon rain forest, although they are among the five best represented families. Plant roots from various soils were examined for the presence of nodules, acetylene-reducing activity and N/sub 2/-fixing Azospirillum spp. Abundant nodulation was found in black earth (''terra preta dos indios'') and in one case on sandy soil under campinarana vegetation along a tributary of the upper Rio Negro. In sandy latosol some nodules occurred in secondary forest and fewer in primary forest. Legumes in disturbed clayey or sandy latosol showed more frequent nodulation. Primary forest on alluvial (''varzea'') soil, and in Bahia coastal rain forest on sandy latosol and Erythrina glauca used for shading cacao plantations were abundantly nodulated. Acetylene reduction assays showed no, or very little, nitrogenase activity of roots from primary or secondary forest on clayey latosol near Manaus. Nodulated roots from secondary forest on sandy latosol showed acetylene-reducing activity. High rates of acetylene reduction were observed in nodulated roots of primary forest on alluvial ''varzea'' soil. Root samples showed ethylene absorption in controls without acetylene which might interfere with the results of acetylene reduction tests. The incidence of Azospirillum was also higher in black earth than the other soils examined, and in soils with higher pH. The hypothesis that Azospirillum is associated with Trema micantha roots was refuted. Roots and soils collected under cultivated grasses showed a higher incidence of Azospirillum when fertilized with phosphorus and lime. Results indicate that nitrogen fixation did occur in association with roots in some soils, but not with roots of primary or secondary forest on clayey latosol in the vicinity of Manaus, which is the most common soil in Central Amazonia. The possible reasons for this are discussed.

  3. Diversity of symbiotic root endophytes of the Helotiales in ericaceous plants and the grass, Deschampsia flexuosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, J.D.; Hof, van 't P.; Baar, J.; Verkley, G.J.M.; Summerbell, R.C.; Paradi, I.; Braakhekke, W.G.; Berendse, F.

    2005-01-01

    In a study of fungi growing in various root-associated habitats in and around Picea mariana, black spruce, in northern Ontario, Canada, an examination was made of the degree to which differences in growth sites within an area of a few square kilometers might influence the structure of

  4. Toxic effects of arsenic on Sinorhizobium-Medicago sativa symbiotic interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajuelo, Eloisa [Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, 41012 Seville (Spain); Rodriguez-Llorente, Ignacio D. [Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, 41012 Seville (Spain)], E-mail: irodri@us.es; Dary, Mohammed; Palomares, Antonio J. [Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Seville, 41012 Seville (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    Recently, the Rhizobium-legume symbiotic interaction has been proposed as an interesting tool in bioremediation. However, little is known about the effect of most common contaminants on this process. The phytotoxic effects of arsenic on nodulation of Medicago sativa have been examined in vitro using the highly arsenic resistant and symbiotically effective Sinorhizobium sp. strain MA11. The bacteria were able to grow on plates containing As concentrations as high as 10 mM. Nevertheless, as little as 25-35 {mu}M arsenite produced a 75% decrease in the total number of nodules, due to a 90% reduction in the number of rhizobial infections, as could be determined using the strain MA11 carrying a lacZ reporter gene. This effect was associated to root hair damage and a shorter infective root zone. However, once nodulation was established nodule development seemed to continue normally, although earlier senescence could be observed in nodules of arsenic-grown plants. - First steps of nodulation of alfalfa, in particular infection thread formation, are more sensitive to As than nitrogen fixation due to plant effects.

  5. Root colonization by symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi increases sesquiterpenic acid concentrations in Valeriana officinalis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Monika; Wawrosch, Christoph; Steinkellner, Siegrid; Vierheilig, Horst; Kopp, Brigitte; Lössl, Andreas; Franz, Chlodwig; Novak, Johannes; Zitterl-Eglseer, Karin

    2010-03-01

    In some medicinal plants a specific plant-fungus association, known as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, increases the levels of secondary plant metabolites and/or plant growth. In this study, the effects of three different AM treatments on biomass and sesquiterpenic acid concentrations in two IN VITRO propagated genotypes of valerian ( VALERIANA OFFICINALIS L., Valerianaceae) were investigated. Valerenic, acetoxyvalerenic and hydroxyvalerenic acid levels were analyzed in the rhizome and in two root fractions. Two of the AM treatments significantly increased the levels of sesquiterpenic acids in the underground parts of valerian. These treatments, however, influenced the biomass of rhizomes and roots negatively. Therefore this observed increase was not accompanied by an increase in yield of sesquiterpenic acids per plant. Furthermore, one of the two genotypes had remarkably high hydroxyvalerenic acid contents and can be regarded as a hydroxyvalerenic acid chemotype. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  6. Early Lotus japonicus root transcriptomic responses to symbiotic and pathogenic fungal exudates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eGiovannetti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate Lotus japonicus transcriptomic responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM germinated spore exudates (GSE, responsible for activating nuclear Ca2+ spiking in plant root epidermis. A microarray experiment was performed comparing gene expression in Lotus rootlets treated with GSE or water after 24 h and 48 h. The transcriptional pattern of selected genes that resulted to be regulated in the array was further evaluated upon different treatments and timings. In particular, Lotus rootlets were treated with: GSE from the pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum trifolii; short chitin oligomers (acknowledged AM fungal signals and long chitin oligomers (as activators of pathogenic responses. This experimental set up has revealed that AM GSE generates a strong transcriptomic response in Lotus roots with an extensive defense-related response after 24 hours and a subsequent downregulation after 48 hours. A similar subset of defense-related genes resulted to be upregulated also upon treatment with C. trifolii GSE, although with an opposite trend. Surprisingly, long chitin oligomers activated both defense-like and symbiosis-related genes. Among the genes regulated in the microarray, promoter-GUS assay showed that LjMATE1 activates in epidermal cells and root hairs.

  7. Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257 Translocates NopP into Vigna unguiculata Root Nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs), which are found in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, inject virulence proteins directly into host cells during infection. T3SSs are also present in some strains of rhizobia, bacteria that form symbiotic associations with legumes and fix nitrogen in speciali...

  8. PII Overexpression in Lotus japonicus Affects Nodule Activity in Permissive Low-Nitrogen Conditions and Increases Nodule Numbers in High Nitrogen Treated Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Apuzzo, Enrica; Valkov, Vladimir Totev; Parlati, Aurora; Omrane, Selim; Barbulova, Ani; Sainz, Maria Martha; Lentini, Marco; Esposito, Sergio; Rogato, Alessandra; Chiurazzi, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    We report here the first characterization of a GLNB1 gene coding for the PII protein in leguminous plants. The main purpose of this work was the investigation of the possible roles played by this multifunctional protein in nodulation pathways. The Lotus japonicus LjGLB1 gene shows a significant transcriptional regulation during the light-dark cycle and different nitrogen availability, conditions that strongly affect nodule formation, development, and functioning. We also report analysis of the spatial profile of expression of LjGLB1 in root and nodule tissues and of the protein's subcellular localization. Transgenic L. japonicus lines overexpressing the PII protein were obtained and tested for the analysis of the symbiotic responses in different conditions. The uncoupling of PII from its native regulation affects nitrogenase activity and nodule polyamine content. Furthermore, our results suggest the involvement of PII in the signaling of the nitrogen nutritional status affecting the legumes' predisposition for nodule formation.

  9. Rhizobium acidisoli sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in acid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Ponce, Brenda; Jing Zhang, Yu; Soledad Vásquez-Murrieta, María; Hua Sui, Xin; Feng Chen, Wen; Carlos Alberto Padilla, Juan; Wu Guo, Xian; Lian Gao, Jun; Yan, Jun; Hong Wei, Ge; Tao Wang, En

    2016-01-01

    Two Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterial strains, FH13T and FH23, representing a novel group of Rhizobium isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in Mexico, were studied by a polyphasic analysis. Phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed them to be members of the genus Rhizobium related most closely to 'Rhizobium anhuiense' CCBAU 23252 (99.7 % similarity), Rhizobium leguminosarum USDA 2370T (98.6 %), and Rhizobium sophorae CCBAU 03386T and others ( ≤ 98.3 %). In sequence analyses of the housekeeping genes recA, glnII and atpD, both strains formed a subclade distinct from all defined species of the genus Rhizobium at sequence similarities of 82.3-94.0 %, demonstrating that they represented a novel genomic species in the genus Rhizobium. Mean levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between the reference strain FH13T and the type strains of related species varied between 13.0 ± 2.0 and 52.1 ± 1.2 %. The DNA G+C content of strain FH13T was 63.5 mol% (Tm). The major cellular fatty acids were 16 : 0, 17 : 0 anteiso, 18 : 0, summed feature 2 (12 : 0 aldehyde/unknown 10.928) and summed feature 8 (18 : 1ω7c). The fatty acid 17 : 1ω5c was unique for this strain. Some phenotypic features, such as failure to utilize adonitol, l-arabinose, d-fructose and d-fucose, and ability to utilize d-galacturonic acid and itaconic acid as carbon source, could also be used to distinguish strain FH13T from the type strains of related species. Based upon these results, a novel species, Rhizobium acidisoli sp. nov., is proposed, with FH13T ( = CCBAU 101094T = HAMBI 3626T = LMG 28672T) as the type strain.

  10. Visualization of symbiotic tissue in intact root nodules of Vicia tetrasperma using GFP-marked Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chovanec, Pavel; Hovorka, Ondřej; Novák, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2008), s. 139-146 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/06/0590 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN * GENE-EXPRESSION * ALFALFA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  11. Asparagine: an amide of particular distinction in the regulation of symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulieman, Saad; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2013-09-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is tightly regulated by a range of fine processes at the nodule level, over which the host plant has overall control through the whole life of the plant. The operation of this control at the nodule level is not yet fully understood, but greater knowledge will ultimately lead to a better improvement of N2 fixation through the use of crop legumes and genetic engineering of crop plants for higher performance. It has been suggested that, nodule responses to the nutritional complexity of the rhizosphere environment involve a great deal of coordination of sensing and signal transduction. This regulation can be achieved through several mechanisms, including changes in carbon metabolism, oxygen supply and/or overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recently, the cycling of amino acids observed between the plant and bacteroid fractions suggests a new and important regulatory mechanism involved in nodule responses. Most of the recent transcriptional findings are consistent with the earlier biochemical and physiological reports. Current research revealed unique advances for nodule metabolism, especially on the regulation of asparagine synthetase gene expression and the control of asparagine (ASN) to N2 fixing activity. A large amount of ASN is found accumulating in the root nodules of the symbiotic plants under restricted environments, such as drought, salinity and nutrient deficiency. Exceptionally, ASN phloem feeding has resulted in an increased concentration of the ASN amide in nodules followed by a remarkable decrease in nodule activity. In this review, recent progress concerning the possible role of ASN in whole-plant-based down-regulation of symbiotic N2 fixation will be reviewed.

  12. NPR1 Protein Regulates Pathogenic and Symbiotic Interactions between Rhizobium and Legumes and Non-Legumes

    OpenAIRE

    Peleg-Grossman, Smadar; Golani, Yael; Kaye, Yuval; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Levine, Alex

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Legumes are unique in their ability to establish symbiotic interaction with rhizobacteria from Rhizobium genus, which provide them with available nitrogen. Nodulation factors (NFs) produced by Rhizobium initiate legume root hair deformation and curling that entrap the bacteria, and allow it to grow inside the plant. In contrast, legumes and non-legumes activate defense responses when inoculated with pathogenic bacteria. One major defense pathway is mediated by salicylic acid (SA)....

  13. Rhizobial exopolysaccharides: genetic control and symbiotic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazur Andrzej

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Specific complex interactions between soil bacteria belonging to Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Phylorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium and Azorhizobium commonly known as rhizobia, and their host leguminous plants result in development of root nodules. Nodules are new organs that consist mainly of plant cells infected with bacteroids that provide the host plant with fixed nitrogen. Proper nodule development requires the synthesis and perception of signal molecules such as lipochitooligosaccharides, called Nod factors that are important for induction of nodule development. Bacterial surface polysaccharides are also crucial for establishment of successful symbiosis with legumes. Sugar polymers of rhizobia are composed of a number of different polysaccharides, such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS, capsular polysaccharides (CPS or K-antigens, neutral β-1, 2-glucans and acidic extracellular polysaccharides (EPS. Despite extensive research, the molecular function of the surface polysaccharides in symbiosis remains unclear. This review focuses on exopolysaccharides that are especially important for the invasion that leads to formation of indetermined (with persistent meristem type of nodules on legumes such as clover, vetch, peas or alfalfa. The significance of EPS synthesis in symbiotic interactions of Rhizobium leguminosarum with clover is especially noticed. Accumulating data suggest that exopolysaccharides may be involved in invasion and nodule development, bacterial release from infection threads, bacteroid development, suppression of plant defense response and protection against plant antimicrobial compounds. Rhizobial exopolysaccharides are species-specific heteropolysaccharide polymers composed of common sugars that are substituted with non-carbohydrate residues. Synthesis of repeating units of exopolysaccharide, their modification, polymerization and export to the cell surface is controlled by clusters of genes, named exo/exs, exp or

  14. A Legume TOR Protein Kinase Regulates Rhizobium Symbiosis and Is Essential for Infection and Nodule Development1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Lourdes; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase regulates metabolism, growth, and life span in yeast, animals, and plants in coordination with nutrient status and environmental conditions. The nutrient-dependent nature of TOR functionality makes this kinase a putative regulator of symbiotic associations involving nutrient acquisition. However, TOR’s role in these processes remains to be understood. Here, we uncovered the role of TOR during the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium tropici (Rhizobium) symbiotic interaction. TOR was expressed in all tested bean tissues, with higher transcript levels in the root meristems and senesced nodules. We showed TOR promoter expression along the progressing infection thread and in the infected cells of mature nodules. Posttranscriptional gene silencing of TOR using RNA interference (RNAi) showed that this gene is involved in lateral root elongation and root cell organization and also alters the density, size, and number of root hairs. The suppression of TOR transcripts also affected infection thread progression and associated cortical cell divisions, resulting in a drastic reduction of nodule numbers. TOR-RNAi resulted in reduced reactive oxygen species accumulation and altered CyclinD1 and CyclinD3 expression, which are crucial factors for infection thread progression and nodule organogenesis. Enhanced expression of TOR-regulated ATG genes in TOR-RNAi roots suggested that TOR plays a role in the recognition of Rhizobium as a symbiont. Together, these data suggest that TOR plays a vital role in the establishment of root nodule symbiosis in the common bean. PMID:27698253

  15. A Proteomic Approach of Bradyrhizobium/Aeschynomene Root and Stem Symbioses Reveals the Importance of the fixA Locus for Symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanael Delmotte

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhizobia are soil bacteria that are able to form symbiosis with plant hosts of the legume family. These associations result in the formation of organs, called nodules in which bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen to the benefit of the plant. Most of our knowledge on the metabolism and the physiology of the bacteria during symbiosis derives from studying roots nodules of terrestrial plants. Here we used a proteomics approach to investigate the bacterial physiology of photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS278 during the symbiotic process with the semi aquatical plant Aeschynomene indica that forms root and stem nodules. We analyzed the proteomes of bacteria extracted from each type of nodule. First, we analyzed the bacteroid proteome at two different time points and found only minor variation between the bacterial proteomes of 2-week- and 3-week-old nodules. High conservation of the bacteroid proteome was also found when comparing stem nodules and root nodules. Among the stem nodule specific proteins were those related to the phototrophic ability of Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS278. Furthermore, we compared our data with those obtained during an extensive genetic screen previously published. The symbiotic role of four candidate genes which corresponding proteins were found massively produced in the nodules but not identified during this screening was examined. Mutant analysis suggested that in addition to the EtfAB system, the fixA locus is required for symbiotic efficiency.

  16. Eco-physiological responses and symbiotic nitrogen fixation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2010-11-01

    Nov 1, 2010 ... Nitrogen nutrition of Hedysarum carnosum, a pastoral legume common in Tunisian central and southern rangelands ... Despite the fact that Na+ accumulation decreased plant growth, both nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation capacity of H. ... of the symbiotic interaction as well as nodule development.

  17. Final Report Grant No. DE-FG02-98ER20307 Lipopolysaccharide Structures and Genes Required for Root Nodule Development August 1, 2004 to July 31, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, K. Dale [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee,WI (United States)

    2008-12-07

    This project dealt with the plant-bacterial symbiosis that gives rise to root nodules on leguminous plants in which the bacteria carry out nitrogen fixation. Nitrogen fixation, like carbon dioxide fixation, is essential for life on planet earth, and this symbiosis is estimated to account for half of all nitrogen fixed on land. Aside from being important for the sustenance of global life, this ability allows legumes to grow without nitrogen fertilizers. Basic studies such as this project are aimed at understanding the symbiosis well enough that eventually it can be engineered into important crop species so that they no longer depend on nitrogen fertilizer for growth. The production and distribution of excessive fertilizer needed for optimal crop yields is responsible for a significant portion of the energy costs in agriculture. The specific aims of this work were to further the understanding of a bacterial factor that is essential for the symbiotic infection process. This factor is a bacterial surface molecule, lipopolysaccharide O antigen. In this project we showed that, not only the presence, but the specific structure of this molecule is crucial for infection. Although the success of bacterial infections in many pathogenic and mutualistic interactions have been shown to depend on intact O antigen, it has been very rare to establish that specific features of the structure are important. One of the features in this case is the presence of one additional methyl group on one sugar in the O antigen. It is very surprising that such a minor change should have an observable effect. This work sets the stage for biochemical studies of possible plant receptors that may be involved. During the course of this grant period, we developed a method of testing the importance of this bacterial component at stages of nodule development beyond the step that is blocked by null mutation. The method works adequately for this purpose and is being improved. It has implications for testing

  18. Acropetal Auxin Transport Inhibition Is Involved in Indeterminate But Not Determinate Nodule Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L. P. Ng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Legumes enter into a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, leading to nodule development. Two main types of nodules have been widely studied, indeterminate and determinate, which differ in the location of the first cell division in the root cortex, and persistency of the nodule meristem. Here, we compared the control of auxin transport, content, and response during the early stages of indeterminate and determinate nodule development in the model legumes Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, respectively, to investigate whether differences in auxin transport control could explain the differences in the location of cortical cell divisions. While auxin responses were activated in dividing cortical cells during nodulation of both nodule types, auxin (indole-3-acetic acid content at the nodule initiation site was transiently increased in M. truncatula, but transiently reduced in L. japonicus. Root acropetal auxin transport was reduced in M. truncatula at the very start of nodule initiation, in contrast to a prolonged increase in acropetal auxin transport in L. japonicus. The auxin transport inhibitors 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid and 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA only induced pseudonodules in legume species forming indeterminate nodules, but failed to elicit such structures in a range of species forming determinate nodules. The development of these pseudonodules in M. truncatula exhibited increased auxin responses in a small primordium formed from the pericycle, endodermis, and inner cortex, similar to rhizobia-induced nodule primordia. In contrast, a diffuse cortical auxin response and no associated cortical cell divisions were found in L. japonicus. Collectively, we hypothesize that a step of acropetal auxin transport inhibition is unique to the process of indeterminate nodule development, leading to auxin responses in pericycle, endodermis, and inner cortex cells, while increased auxin responses in outer cortex cells likely

  19. Novel Rhizobium lineages isolated from root nodules of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Andean and Mesoamerican areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Dall'Agnol, Rebeca Fuzinatto; Graham, Peter H; Martinez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2013-09-01

    The taxonomic affiliations of nineteen root-nodule bacteria isolated from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Mexico, Ecuador and Brazil were investigated by analyses of 16S rRNA and of four protein-coding housekeeping genes. One strain from Mexico could be assigned to Rhizobium etli and two from Brazil to Rhizobium leucaenae, whereas another from Mexico corresponded to a recently described bean-nodulating species-level lineage related to R. etli and Rhizobium phaseoli. Ten strains isolated in Ecuador and Mexico corresponded to three novel Rhizobium lineages that fall into the R. phaseoli/R. etli/Rhizobium leguminosarum clade. One of those lineages, with representatives isolated mostly from Ecuador, seems to be dominant in beans from that Andean region. Only one of the Mexican strains clustered within the Rhizobium tropici clade, but as an independent lineage. Interestingly, four strains were affiliated with species within the Rhizobium radiobacter clade. The existence of yet non-described native Rhizobium lineages in both the Andean and Mesoamerican areas is discussed in relation to common-bean diversity and environmental conditions. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Sucrose synthase and enolase expression in actinorhizal nodules of Alnus glutinosa: comparison with legume nodules.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghelue, van M.; Ribeiro, A.; Solheim, B.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Bisseling, T.; Pawlowski, K.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract Two different types of nitrogen-fixing root nodules are known - actinorhizal nodules induced by Frankia and legume nodules induced by rhizobia. While legume nodules show a stem-like structure with peripheral vascular bundles, actinorhizal nodule lobes resemble modified lateral roots with a

  1. Knock Down of Cell Division Cycle 16 Reveals an Inverse Relationship Between Lateral Root and Nodule Numbers and a Link to Auxin in Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    The post-embryonic development of lateral roots and nodules is a highly regulated process. Recent studies suggest the existence of cross talk and interdependency in the growth of these two organs. Although plant hormones including auxin and cytokinin appear to be key players in coordinating this cro...

  2. Identification of a transport mechanism for NH4+ in the symbiosome membrane of pea root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritzen, P.; Rosendahl, L.

    1997-01-01

    Symbiosome membrane vesicles, facing bacteroid-side-out, were purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules and used to study NH4+ transport across the membrane by recording vesicle uptake of the NH4+ analog [C-14]methylamine (MA). Membrane potentials (Delta psi) were imposed on the vesicles ...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Micromonospora Strain L5, a Potential Plant-Growth-Regulating Actinomycete, Originally Isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia Root Nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, A. M.; Alvarado, J.; Bruce, D.; Chertkov, O.; De Hoff, P. L.; Detter, J. C.; Fujishige, N. A.; Goodwin, L. A.; Han, J.; Han, S.; Ivanova, N.; Land, M. L.; Lum, M. R.; Milani-Nejad, N.; Nolan, M.; Pati, A.; Pitluck, S.; Tran, S. S.; Woyke, T.; Valdes, M.

    2013-08-29

    Micromonospora species live in diverse environments and exhibit a broad range of functions including antibiotic production, biocontrol, and ability to degrade complex polysaccharides. To learn more about these versatile actinomycetes, we sequenced the genome of strain L5, originally isolated from root nodules of an actinorhizal plant growing in Mexico.

  4. Expression of genes involved in symbiotic carbon and nitrogen transport in Pinus taeda mycorrhizal roots exposed to CO2 enrichment and nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrent, Jeri Lynn; Vilgalys, Rytas

    2009-09-01

    As atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) concentrations rise, one important mechanism by which plants can gain greater access to necessary soil nutrients is through greater investment in their mycorrhizal symbionts. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that (1) plants increase C allocation to ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) under elevated CO(2) conditions, (2) N fertilization decreases C allocation to EMF, and (3) EMF activity at the site of symbiotic C and nutrient exchange is enhanced with CO(2) enrichment. To test these hypotheses, we examined expression levels of Pinus taeda genes encoding monosaccharide transport (MST) and ammonium transport (AMT) proteins thought to be involved in symbiotic C and N movement, respectively, from mycorrhizal root tips exposed to CO(2) and N fertilization. We also examined EMF ribosomal RNA expression (18S rRNA) to determine EMF activity. There was a trend toward lower relative MST expression with increased CO(2). AMT expression levels showed no significant differences between control and treatment plots. EMF 18S rRNA expression was increased in CO(2)-enriched plots and there was a marginally significant positive interactive effect of CO(2) and N fertilization on expression (p = 0.09 and 0.10, respectively). These results are consistent with greater C allocation to EMF and greater EMF metabolic activity under elevated CO(2) conditions, although selective allocation of C to particular EMF species and greater fungal biomass on roots are plausible alternative hypotheses.

  5. The Class II trehalose 6-phosphate synthase gene PvTPS9 modulates trehalose metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarón Barraza

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Legumes form symbioses with rhizobia, producing nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of the plant host. The network of plant signaling pathways affecting carbon metabolism may determine the final number of nodules. The trehalose biosynthetic pathway regulates carbon metabolism and plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development, as well as in plant-microbe interactions. The expression of genes for trehalose synthesis during nodule development suggests that this metabolite may play a role in legume-rhizobia symbiosis. In this work, PvTPS9, which encodes a Class II trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, was silenced by RNA interference in transgenic nodules. The silencing of PvTPS9 in root nodules resulted in a reduction of 85% (± 1% of its transcript, which correlated with a 30% decrease in trehalose contents of transgenic nodules and in untransformed leaves. Composite transgenic plants with PvTPS9 silenced in the roots showed no changes in nodule number and nitrogen fixation, but a severe reduction in plant biomass and altered transcript profiles of all Class II TPS genes. Our data suggest that PvTPS9 plays a key role in modulating trehalose metabolism in the symbiotic nodule and, therefore, in the whole plant.

  6. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Han, Xiangdong; Zhan, Ge; Zhao, Zhenfang; Feng, Yongjun; Wu, Cunxiang

    2015-08-31

    The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD) and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD). Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. These results indicate that GmNMHC5 can sense the sucrose signal and plays significant roles in lateral root development and nodule building.

  7. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr., GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD. Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. These results indicate that GmNMHC5 can sense the sucrose signal and plays significant roles in lateral root development and nodule building.

  8. Characterization of the plant growth promoting bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae MSR1, isolated from roots of non-nodulating Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Ashraf Y Z; Alsyeeh, Abdel-Moneium; Almalki, Mohammed A; Saleh, Farag A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the endophytic bacterial strain designated MSR1 that was isolated from inside the non-nodulating roots of Medicago sativa after surface-sterilization. MSR1 was identified as Enterobacter cloacae using both 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis and API20E biochemical identification system (Biomerieux, France). Furthermore, this bacterium was characterized using API50CH kit (Biomerieux, France) and tested for antibacterial activities against some food borne pathogens. The results showed that E. cloacae consumed certain carbohydrates such as glycerol, d-xylose, d-maltose and esculin melibiose as a sole carbon source and certain amino acids such as arginine, tryptophan ornithine as nitrogen source. Furthermore, MSR1 possessed multiple plant-growth promoting characteristics; phosphate solubility, production of phytohormones acetoin and bioactive compounds. Inoculation of Pisum sativum with MSR1 significantly improved the growth parameters (the length and dry weight) of this economically important grain legume compared to the non-treated plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report addressing E. cloacae which exist in roots of alfalfa growing in Al-Ahsaa region. The results confirmed that E. cloacae exhibited traits for plant growth promoting and could be developed as an eco-friendly biofertilizer for P. sativum and probably for other important plant species in future.

  9. The nodule conductance to O₂ diffusion increases with phytase activity in N₂-fixing Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazali, Mohamed; Drevon, Jean Jacques

    2014-07-01

    To understand the relationship between phosphorus use efficiency (PUE) and respiration for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) in legume nodules, six recombinant inbred lines of common bean (RIL Phaseolus vulgaris L.), contrasting in PUE for SNF, were inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT899, and grown under hydroaeroponic culture with sufficient versus deficient P supply (250 versus 75 μmol P plant(-1) week(-1)). At the flowering stage, the biomass of plants and phytase activity in nodules were analyzed after measuring O2 uptake by nodulated roots. Our results show that the P-deficiency significantly increased the phytase activity in nodules of all RILs though with highest extent for RILs 147, 29 and 83 (ca 45%). This increase in phytase activity was associated with an increase in nodule respiration (ca 22%) and in use of the rhizobial symbiosis (ca 21%). A significant correlation was found under P-deficiency between nodule O2 permeability and phytase activity in nodules for RILs 104, 34 and 115. This observation is to our knowledge the first description of a correlation between O2 permeability and phytase activity of a legume nodule. It is concluded that the variation of phytase activity in nodules can increase the internal utilization of P and might be involved in the regulation of nodule permeability for the respiration linked with SNF and the adaptation to P-deficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Epidermal and cortical roles of NFP and DMI3 in coordinating early steps of nodulation in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rival, Pauline; de Billy, Françoise; Bono, Jean-Jacques; Gough, Clare; Rosenberg, Charles; Bensmihen, Sandra

    2012-09-01

    Legumes have evolved the capacity to form a root nodule symbiosis with soil bacteria called rhizobia. The establishment of this symbiosis involves specific developmental events occurring both in the root epidermis (notably bacterial entry) and at a distance in the underlying root cortical cells (notably cell divisions leading to nodule organogenesis). The processes of bacterial entry and nodule organogenesis are tightly linked and both depend on rhizobial production of lipo-chitooligosaccharide molecules called Nod factors. However, how these events are coordinated remains poorly understood. Here, we have addressed the roles of two key symbiotic genes of Medicago truncatula, the lysin motif (LysM) domain-receptor like kinase gene NFP and the calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase gene DMI3, in the control of both nodule organogenesis and bacterial entry. By complementing mutant plants with corresponding genes expressed either in the epidermis or in the cortex, we have shown that epidermal DMI3, but not NFP, is sufficient for infection thread formation in root hairs. Epidermal NFP is sufficient to induce cortical cell divisions leading to nodule primordia formation, whereas DMI3 is required in both cell layers for these processes. Our results therefore suggest that a signal, produced in the epidermis under the control of NFP and DMI3, is responsible for activating DMI3 in the cortex to trigger nodule organogenesis. We integrate these data to propose a new model for epidermal/cortical crosstalk during early steps of nodulation.

  11. Towards a better understanding of the role of reactive oxygen species in legume root nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos Escribano, J.

    2004-01-01

    Biological N2 fixation is carried out exclusively by prokaryotes, either in the free-living form or in mutualistic symbioses with green algae, legumes and actinorhizal plants. The most agronomica1ly relevant symbiosis is, by fàr, that formed between soil rhizobia and legume roots. In addition, the

  12. Rhizobium azibense sp. nov., a nitrogen fixing bacterium isolated from root-nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnasri, Bacem; Liu, Tian Yan; Saidi, Sabrine; Chen, Wen Feng; Chen, Wen Xin; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Mhamdi, Ridha

    2014-05-01

    Three microbial strains isolated from common beans, 23C2T (Tunisia), Gr42 (Spain) and IE4868 (Mexico), which have been identified previously as representing a genomic group closely related to Rhizobium gallicum, are further studied here. Their 16S rRNA genes showed 98.5-99% similarity with Rhizobium loessense CCBAU 7190BT, R. gallicum R602spT, Rhizobium mongolense USDA 1844T and Rhizobium yanglingense CCBAU 71623T. Phylogenetic analysis based on recA, atpD, dnaK and thrC sequences showed that the novel strains were closely related and could be distinguished from the four type strains of the closely related species. Strains 23C2T, Gr42 and IE4868 could be also differentiated from their closest phylogenetic neighbours by their phenotypic and physiological properties and their fatty acid contents. All three strains harboured symbiotic genes specific to biovar gallicum. Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain 23C2T and the type strains of R. loessense, R. mongolense, R. gallicum and R. yanglingense ranged from 58.1 to 61.5%. The DNA G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain 23C2T was 59.52%. On the basis of these data, strains 23C2T, Gr42 and IE4868 were considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium for which the name Rhizobium azibense is proposed. Strain 23C2T (=CCBAU 101087T=HAMBI3541T) was designated as the type strain.

  13. A nonsymbiotic root hair tip growth phenotype in NORK-mutated legumes: implications for nodulation factor-induced signaling and formation of a multifaceted root hair pocket for bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esseling, J.J.; Lhuissier, F.G.P.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Medicago truncatula Does not Make Infections (DMI2) mutant is mutated in the nodulation receptor-like kinase, NORK. Here, we report that NORK-mutated legumes of three species show an enhanced touch response to experimental handling, which results in a nonsymbiotic root hair phenotype. When care

  14. Molecular cloning of the cDNA encoding aspartate aminotransferase from bean root nodules and determination of its role in nodule nitrogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvente, Sonia; Camas, Alberto; Lara, Miguel

    2003-06-01

    A cDNA clone encoding aspartate aminotransferase (PVAAT-2) (EC 2.6.1.1) was isolated from the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris nodule cDNA library. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the full-length cDNA allowed its identification by comparison with sequence databases. The amino acid sequence of the bean PvAAT-2 showed high similarity with the AAT-2 isoforms described in other leguminous plants. The amino-terminal region of the PvAAT-2 contains a sequence, which shares common features of plastid transit peptides. Southern blot analysis showed that the PvAAT-2 clone is encoded by a single gene in the P. vulgaris genome. Analysis of the PvAAT-2 mRNA levels suggests that the expression of this gene is nodule enhanced. The PvAAT-2 transcript is more abundant in nodules with increased synthesis of amides and is down-regulated in conditions where ureides accumulate. When plants were supplemented with ureides or with amides, PvAAT-2 expression was reduced, while it was not affected when plants were treated with allopurinol, an inhibitor of ureide synthesis. On the other hand, the expression of asparagine synthetase (another enzyme involved in the synthesis of amides) is not affected either by ureides or amides. These data suggest a role for AAT-2 in the mechanism involved in the synthesis of nitrogen compounds in bean nodules.

  15. Microvirga ossetica sp. nov., a species of rhizobia isolated from root nodules of the legume species Vicia alpestris Steven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, Vera I; Kuznetsova, Irina G; Sazanova, Anna L; Belimov, Andrey A; Andronov, Evgeny E; Chirak, Elizaveta R; Osledkin, Yuri S; Onishchuk, Olga P; Kurchak, Oksana N; Shaposhnikov, Alexander I; Willems, Anne; Tikhonovich, Igor A

    2017-01-01

    Gram-stain-negative strains V5/3MT, V5/5K, V5/5M and V5/13 were isolated from root nodules of Vicia alpestris plants growing in the North Ossetia region (Caucasus). Sequencing of the partial 16S rRNA gene (rrs) and four housekeeping genes (dnaK, gyrB, recA and rpoB) showed that the isolates from V. alpestris were most closely related to the species Microvirga zambiensis (order Rhizobiales, family Methylobacteriaceae) which was described for the single isolate from root nodule of Listia angolensis growing in Zambia. Sequence similarities between the Microvirga-related isolates and M. zambiensis WSM3693T ranged from 98.5 to 98.7 % for rrs and from 79.7 to 95.8 % for housekeeping genes. Cellular fatty acids of the isolates V5/3MT, V5/5K, V5/5M and V5/13 included important amounts of C18 : 1ω7c (54.0-67.2 %), C16 : 0 (6.0-7.8 %), C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c (3.1-10.2 %), summed feature 2 (comprising one or more of iso-C16 : 1 I, C14 : 0 3-OH and unknown ECL 10.938, 5.8-22.5 %) and summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 02-OH, 2.9-4.0 %). DNA-DNA hybridization between the isolate V5/3MT and M. zambiensis WSM3693T revealed DNA-DNA relatedness of 35.3 %. Analysis of morphological and physiological features of the novel isolates demonstrated their unique phenotypic profile in comparison with reference strains from closely related species of the genus Microvirga. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic analysis, a novel species named Microvirga ossetica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is V5/3MT (=LMG 29787T=RCAM 02728T). Three additional strains of the species are V5/5K, V5/5M and V5/13.

  16. Agrobacterium salinitolerans sp. nov., a saline-alkaline-tolerant bacterium isolated from root nodule of Sesbania cannabina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Li, Yan; Yan, Hui; Chen, Wen Feng; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Wang, En Tao; Han, Xiao Zeng; Xie, Zhi Hong

    2017-06-01

    Two Gram-staining-negative, aerobic bacteria (YIC 5082T and YIC4104) isolated from root nodules of Sesbania cannabina grown in a high-salt and alkaline environment were identified as a group in the genus Agrobacterium because they shared 100 and 99.7 % sequence similarities of 16S rRNA and recA+atpD genes, respectively. These two strains showed 99.2/100 % and 93.9/95.4 % 16S rRNA and recA+atpD gene sequence similarities to Agrobacterium radiobacter LMG140T and Agrobacterium. pusense NRCPB10T, respectively. The average nucleotide identities (ANI) of genome sequences were 89.95 % or lower between YIC 5082T and the species of the genus Agrobacterium examined. Moreover, these two test strains formed a unique nifH lineage deeply separated from other rhizobia. Although the nodC gene was not detected in YIC 5082T and YIC4104, they could form effective root nodules on S. cannabina plants. The main cellular fatty acids in YIC 5082T were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c), C19 : 0cyclo ω8c, summed feature 2 (C12 : 0 aldehyde/unknown equivalent chain length 10.9525) and C16 : 0. The DNA G+C content of YIC 5082T was 59.3 mol%. The failure to utilize d-sorbitol as a carbon source distinguished YIC 5082T from the type strains of related species. YIC 5082T could grow in presence of 5.0 % (w/v) NaCl and at a pH of up to 10.0. Based on results regarding the genetic and phenotypic properties of YIC 5082T and YIC4104 the name Agrobacterium salinitolerans sp. nov. is proposed and YIC 5082T (=HAMBI 3646T=LMG 29287T) is designed as the type strain.

  17. Metabolic changes of iron uptake in N(2)-fixing common bean nodules during iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatni, Tarek; Vigani, Gianpiero; Salah, Imen Ben; Kouas, Saber; Dell'Orto, Marta; Gouia, Houda; Zocchi, Graziano; Abdelly, Chedly

    2011-08-01

    Iron is an important nutrient in N(2)-fixing legume nodules. The demand for this micronutrient increases during the symbiosis establishment, where the metal is utilized for the synthesis of various iron-containing proteins in both the plant and the bacteroid. Unfortunately, in spite of its importance, iron is poorly available to plant uptake since its solubility is very low when in its oxidized form Fe(III). In the present study, the effect of iron deficiency on the activity of some proteins involved in Strategy I response, such as Fe-chelate reductase (FC-R), H(+)-ATPase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the protein level of iron regulated transporter (IRT1) and H(+)-ATPase proteins has been investigated in both roots and nodules of a tolerant (Flamingo) and a susceptible (Coco blanc) cultivar of common bean plants. The main results of this study show that the symbiotic tolerance of Flamingo can be ascribed to a greater increase in the FC-R and H(+)-ATPase activities in both roots and nodules, leading to a more efficient Fe supply to nodulating tissues. The strong increase in PEPC activity and organic acid content, in the Flamingo root nodules, suggests that under iron deficiency nodules can modify their metabolism in order to sustain those activities necessary to acquire Fe directly from the soil solution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Legume TOR Protein Kinase Regulates Rhizobium Symbiosis and Is Essential for Infection and Nodule Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjareddy, Kalpana; Blanco, Lourdes; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Alvarado-Affantranger, Xóchitl; Quinto, Carmen; Sánchez, Federico; Lara, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase regulates metabolism, growth, and life span in yeast, animals, and plants in coordination with nutrient status and environmental conditions. The nutrient-dependent nature of TOR functionality makes this kinase a putative regulator of symbiotic associations involving nutrient acquisition. However, TOR's role in these processes remains to be understood. Here, we uncovered the role of TOR during the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium tropici (Rhizobium) symbiotic interaction. TOR was expressed in all tested bean tissues, with higher transcript levels in the root meristems and senesced nodules. We showed TOR promoter expression along the progressing infection thread and in the infected cells of mature nodules. Posttranscriptional gene silencing of TOR using RNA interference (RNAi) showed that this gene is involved in lateral root elongation and root cell organization and also alters the density, size, and number of root hairs. The suppression of TOR transcripts also affected infection thread progression and associated cortical cell divisions, resulting in a drastic reduction of nodule numbers. TOR-RNAi resulted in reduced reactive oxygen species accumulation and altered CyclinD1 and CyclinD3 expression, which are crucial factors for infection thread progression and nodule organogenesis. Enhanced expression of TOR-regulated ATG genes in TOR-RNAi roots suggested that TOR plays a role in the recognition of Rhizobium as a symbiont. Together, these data suggest that TOR plays a vital role in the establishment of root nodule symbiosis in the common bean. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Preparation of Artificial Blood from the Extract of Legume Root Nodules, and the Creation of Artificial Latent Fingermarks in Blood Using Artificial Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungwook; Kim, Chaewon; Jeon, Soyoung; Lee, Eunhye

    2018-01-01

    Distribution of homogeneous fingermarks in blood is essential for conducting proficiency tests in forensic science. Hence, the artificial blood was prepared using the root nodule extract of Glycine max plants. The reactivity of the artificial blood with widely used human blood detection reagents was tested. Artificial latent fingermarks in blood were printed using an inkjet cartridge case filled with artificial blood solution. The artificial latent fingermarks in blood were developed with amino acid-sensitive reagents and could obtain development as prominent as the image of the master fingermark saved on the computer. Therefore, it has been confirmed that the extract of legume root nodules can be used as artificial blood, and the artificial blood can be used for the preparation of artificial latent fingermarks or footmarks in blood. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Rhizobium hedysari sp. nov., a novel species isolated from a root nodule of Hedysarum multijugum in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Shi, Jianfeng; Li, Caixia; Zhu, Shengan; Li, Bo

    2017-04-01

    A strain 5-1-2 T was isolated from a root nodule of Hedysarum multijugum collected from Zhangye city, Gansu province, north-west China. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and other housekeeping genes (recA and atpD) indicated that the strain represents a novel species in the genus Rhizobium close to the strain Rhizobium subbaraonis JC85 T with similarities of 98.27, 88.92 and 89.62%, respectively. Strain 5-1-2 T contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone. Our results showed that the major fatty acids were feature 8 (C 18:1 ω7c and/or C 18:1 ω6c; 38.90%). In addition, the DNA-DNA hybridizations with the type strains R. subbaraonis JC85 T and Rhizobium halophytocola YC6881 T were 39.2 ± 2.1 and 44.3 ± 1.9, respectively. Therefore, a novel species Rhizobium hedysari sp. nov. is proposed, and 5-1-2 T (=CGMCC1.15677 T  = NBRC112532 T) is designated as the type strain.

  1. Rhizobium qilianshanense sp. nov., a novel species isolated from root nodule of Oxytropis ochrocephala Bunge in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Zhang, Yong; Deng, Zheng Shan; Zhao, Liang; Wei, Xiu Li; Wei, Ge Hong

    2013-03-01

    During a study of the diversity and phylogeny of rhizobia isolated from root nodules of Oxytropis ochrocephala grown in the northwest of China, four strains were classified in the genus Rhizobium on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. These strains have identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, which showed a mean similarity of 94.4 % with the most closely related species, Rhizobium oryzae. Analysis of recA and glnA sequences showed that these strains have less than 88.1 and 88.7 % similarity with the defined species of Rhizobium, respectively. The genetic diversity revealed by ERIC-PCR fingerprinting indicated that the isolates correspond to different strains. Strain CCNWQLS01(T) contains Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone. The major fatty acids were identified as feature 8 (C18: 1ω7c and/or C18: 1ω6c; 67.2 %). Therefore, a novel species Rhizobium qilianshanense sp. nov. is proposed, and CCNWQLS01(T) (= ACCC 05747(T) = JCM 18337(T)) is designated as the type strain.

  2. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis by bacterial isolates from pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp] root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Paulo Ivan; de Oliveira, Paulo Jansen; Rumjanek, Norma Gouvêa; Xavier, Gustavo Ribeiro

    2011-02-01

    The bacterial strains that are able to produce biopolymers that are applied in industrial sectors present a source of renewable resources. Some microorganisms are already applied at several industrial sectors, but the prospecting of new microbes must bring microorganisms that are feasible to produce interesting biopolymers more efficiently and in cheaper conditions. Among the biopolymers applied industrially, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and exopolysaccharides (EPS) stand out because of its applications, mainly in biodegradable plastic production and in food industry, respectively. In this context, the capacity of bacteria isolated from pigeonpea root nodules to produce EPS and PHB was evaluated, as well as the cultural characterization of these isolates. Among the 38 isolates evaluated, the majority presented fast growth and ability to acidify the culture media. Regarding the biopolymer production, five isolates produced more than 10 mg PHB per liter of culture medium. Six EPS producing bacteria achieved more than 200 mg EPS per liter of culture medium. Evaluating different carbon sources, the PHB productivity of the isolate 24.6b reached 69% of cell dry weight when cultured with starch as sole carbon source, and the isolate 8.1c synthesized 53% PHB in dry cell biomass and more than 1.3 g L⁻¹ of EPS when grown using xylose as sole carbon source.

  3. Paenibacillus medicaginis sp. nov. a chitinolytic endophyte isolated from the root nodule of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-An; Hameed, Asif; Lin, Shih-Yao; Hung, Mei-Hua; Hsu, Yi-Han; Liu, You-Cheng; Shahina, Mariyan; Shen, Fo-Ting; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2015-08-04

    A Gram-stain-variable, short-rod-shaped, endospore-forming, strictly aerobic, non-motile, chitinolytic and endophytic bacterium, designated strain CC-Alfalfa-19T, exhibiting unusual bipolar appendages was isolated from the root nodule of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Taiwan and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomy. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain CC-Alfalfa-19T was found to be most closely related to Paenibacillus puldeungensis CAU 9324T (95.2 %), whereas other Paenibacillus species shared ≤95.0 % sequence similarity. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a distinct phyletic lineage established by strain CC-Alfalfa-19T with respect to other Paenibacillus species. Fatty acids comprised predominantly anteiso-C15:0, C16:0, anteiso-C17:0 and iso-C16. Menaquinone 7 (MK-7) was identified as the sole respiratory quinone and the genomic DNA G+C content was 42.7 mol%. Polar lipids included diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified glycolipid and an unidentified lipid. The diagnostic diamino acid found in the cell-wall peptidoglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid. Based on the polyphasic taxonomic evidences that were in line with the genus Paenibacillus and additional distinguishing characteristics, strain CC-Alfalfa-19T is considered to represent a novel species, for which the name Paenibacillus medicaginis sp. nov. (type strain CC-Alfalfa-19T = BCRC 80441T = JCM 18446T) is proposed.

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase function at very early symbiont perception: a local nodulation control under stress conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Germán; Muñoz, Nacira; Alvarado-Affantranger, Xochitl; Saavedra, Laura; Davidenco, Vanina; Rodríguez-Kessler, Margarita; Estrada-Navarrete, Georgina; Sánchez, Federico; Lascano, Ramiro

    2018-04-09

    Root hair curling is an early and essential morphological change required for the success of the symbiotic interaction between legumes and rhizobia. At this stage rhizobia grow as an infection thread within root hairs and are internalized into the plant cells by endocytosis, where the PI3K enzyme plays important roles. Previous observations show that stress conditions affect early stages of the symbiotic interaction, from 2 to 30 min post-inoculation, which we term as very early host responses, and affect symbiosis establishment. Herein, we demonstrated the relevance of the very early host responses for the symbiotic interaction. PI3K and the NADPH oxidase complex are found to have key roles in the microsymbiont recognition response, modulating the apoplastic and intracellular/endosomal ROS induction in root hairs. Interestingly, compared with soybean mutant plants that do not perceive the symbiont, we demonstrated that the very early symbiont perception under sublethal saline stress conditions induced root hair death. Together, these results highlight not only the importance of the very early host-responses on later stages of the symbiont interaction, but also suggest that they act as a mechanism for local control of nodulation capacity, prior to the abortion of the infection thread, preventing the allocation of resources/energy for nodule formation under unfavorable environmental conditions.

  5. NPR1 protein regulates pathogenic and symbiotic interactions between Rhizobium and legumes and non-legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg-Grossman, Smadar; Golani, Yael; Kaye, Yuval; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Levine, Alex

    2009-12-21

    Legumes are unique in their ability to establish symbiotic interaction with rhizobacteria from Rhizobium genus, which provide them with available nitrogen. Nodulation factors (NFs) produced by Rhizobium initiate legume root hair deformation and curling that entrap the bacteria, and allow it to grow inside the plant. In contrast, legumes and non-legumes activate defense responses when inoculated with pathogenic bacteria. One major defense pathway is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). SA is sensed and transduced to downstream defense components by a redox-regulated protein called NPR1. We used Arabidopsis mutants in SA defense pathway to test the role of NPR1 in symbiotic interactions. Inoculation of Sinorhizobium meliloti or purified NF on Medicago truncatula or nim1/npr1 A. thaliana mutants induced root hair deformation and transcription of early and late nodulins. Application of S. meliloti or NF on M. truncatula or A. thaliana roots also induced a strong oxidative burst that lasted much longer than in plants inoculated with pathogenic or mutualistic bacteria. Transient overexpression of NPR1 in M. truncatula suppressed root hair curling, while inhibition of NPR1 expression by RNAi accelerated curling. We show that, while NPR1 has a positive effect on pathogen resistance, it has a negative effect on symbiotic interactions, by inhibiting root hair deformation and nodulin expression. Our results also show that basic plant responses to Rhizobium inoculation are conserved in legumes and non-legumes.

  6. NPR1 protein regulates pathogenic and symbiotic interactions between Rhizobium and legumes and non-legumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smadar Peleg-Grossman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Legumes are unique in their ability to establish symbiotic interaction with rhizobacteria from Rhizobium genus, which provide them with available nitrogen. Nodulation factors (NFs produced by Rhizobium initiate legume root hair deformation and curling that entrap the bacteria, and allow it to grow inside the plant. In contrast, legumes and non-legumes activate defense responses when inoculated with pathogenic bacteria. One major defense pathway is mediated by salicylic acid (SA. SA is sensed and transduced to downstream defense components by a redox-regulated protein called NPR1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used Arabidopsis mutants in SA defense pathway to test the role of NPR1 in symbiotic interactions. Inoculation of Sinorhizobium meliloti or purified NF on Medicago truncatula or nim1/npr1 A. thaliana mutants induced root hair deformation and transcription of early and late nodulins. Application of S. meliloti or NF on M. truncatula or A. thaliana roots also induced a strong oxidative burst that lasted much longer than in plants inoculated with pathogenic or mutualistic bacteria. Transient overexpression of NPR1 in M. truncatula suppressed root hair curling, while inhibition of NPR1 expression by RNAi accelerated curling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that, while NPR1 has a positive effect on pathogen resistance, it has a negative effect on symbiotic interactions, by inhibiting root hair deformation and nodulin expression. Our results also show that basic plant responses to Rhizobium inoculation are conserved in legumes and non-legumes.

  7. Dark CO/sub 2/ fixation and amino acid metabolism in symbiotic N/sub 2/-fixing systems. Labeling studies with /sup 14/C and /sup 13/N-labeled tracers. [Roots of soybean plants and alders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, G.T. III

    1982-01-01

    Amino acid metabolism was examined by monitoring the amino acids labeled with (/sup 14/C) incorporated during dark CO/sub 2/ fixation and with (/sup 13/N) incorporated from /sup 13/NH/sub 4/+, /sup 13/NO/sub 3/- or (/sup 13/N)N/sub 2/. Label from /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was directly incorporated in soybean roots and the N/sub 2/-fixing root nodules of soybeans and alders. The products of dark CO/sub 2/ fixation were primarily amino and organic acids. The distribution of label incorporated from /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ into amino acids depended on the plant species and the nitrigen source. The major labeled amino acids in roots and nodules of soybean plants dependent on N/sub 2/ were aspartate and glutamate; in alder nodules, citrulline; in roots of soybean plants treated with NO/sub 3/-, asparagine; and in roots of soybean plants treated with NH/sub 4/+, asparagine and glutamine. Asparagine was the major amino acid transported out of the soybean root system. Experiments indicated that asparagine was synthesized directly from aspartate. After exposure to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, the specific activity of glutamine was consistently higher than that of glutamate in soybean nodules and roots of plants treated with NO/sub 3/-. This was taken as evidence that there were two pools of glutamate, only one of which was associated with glutamine synthesis. Alder and soybean nodules and roots were incubated with /sup 13/N-labeled tracers. Those tissues incubated with /sup 13/NH/sub 4/+ had a higher ratio of (/sup 13/N)glutamine to (/sup 13/N)glutamate that similar tissues exposed to /sup 13/NO/sub 3/- or (/sup 13/N)N/sub 2/. An explanation for these results based on the relative rates of glutamine and glutamate synthesis is discussed.

  8. From signal to form: Nod factor as a morhogenetic signal molecule to induce symbiotic responses in legume root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esseling, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, research is presented which contributes to a better understanding of nod factor (NF) induced signalling in Iegume root hairs, leading to a successful symbiosis. We mainly use root hairs of the model Iegume Medicago truncatula ('barrel medic') as an experimental system. In the

  9. Rhizobium cauense sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of the herbaceous legume Kummerowia stipulacea grown in campus lawn soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian Yan; Li, Ying; Liu, Xiao Xiao; Sui, Xin Hua; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin; Chen, Wen Feng; Puławska, Joanna

    2012-10-01

    Three bacterial isolates (CCBAU 101002(T), CCBAU 101000 and CCBAU 101001) originating from root nodules of the herbaceous legume Kummerowia stipulacea grown in the campus lawn of China Agricultural University were characterized with a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the isolates shared 99.85-99.92% sequence similarities and had the highest similarities to the type strains of Rhizobium mesoamericanum (99.31%), R. endophyticum (98.54%), R. tibeticum (98.38%) and R. grahamii (98.23%). Sequence similarity of four concatenated housekeeping genes (atpD, glnII, recA and rpoB) between CCBAU 101002(T) and its closest neighbor (R. grahamii) was 92.05%. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain CCBAU 101002(T) and the four type strains of the most closely related Rhizobium species were less than 28.4±0.8%. The G+C mol% of the genomic DNA for strain CCBAU 101002(T) was 58.5% (Tm). The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone (Q-10). Summed feature 8 (18:1ω7cis/18:1ω6cis) and 16:0 were the predominant fatty acids. Strain CCBAU 101002(T) contained phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine as major polar lipids, and phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin as minor ones. No glycolipid was detected. Unlike other strains, this novel species could utilize dulcite or sodium pyruvate as sole carbon sources and it was resistant to 2% (w/v) NaCl. On the basis of the polyphasic study, a new species Rhizobium cauense sp. nov. is proposed, with CCBAU 101002(T) (=LMG 26832(T)=HAMBI 3288(T)) as the type strain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Paenibacillus medicaginis sp. nov. a chitinolytic endophyte isolated from a root nodule of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-An; Hameed, Asif; Lin, Shih-Yao; Hung, Mei-Hua; Hsu, Yi-Han; Liu, You-Cheng; Shahina, Mariyan; Shen, Fo-Ting; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2015-11-01

    A Gram-stain-variable, short-rod-shaped, endospore-forming, strictly aerobic, non-motile, chitinolytic and endophytic bacterium, designated strain CC-Alfalfa-19T, exhibiting unusual bipolar appendages was isolated from a root nodule of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Taiwan and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain CC-Alfalfa-19T was found to be most closely related to Paenibacillus puldeungensis CAU 9324T (95.2 %), whereas other species of the genus Paenibacillus shared ≤ 95.0 % sequence similarity. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a distinct phyletic lineage established by strain CC-Alfalfa-19T with respect to other species of the genus Paenibacillus. Fatty acids comprised predominantly anteiso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. Menaquinone 7 (MK-7) was identified as the sole respiratory quinone and the genomic DNA G+C content was 42.7 mol%. Polar lipids included diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified glycolipid and an unidentified lipid. The diagnostic diamino acid found in the cell-wall peptidoglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid. Based on the polyphasic taxonomic evidence that was in line with the genus Paenibacillus and additional distinguishing characteristics, strain CC-Alfalfa-19T is considered to represent a novel species, for which the name Paenibacillus medicaginis sp. nov. (type strain CC-Alfalfa-19T = BCRC 80441T = JCM 18446T) is proposed.

  11. The trehalose utilization gene thuA ortholog in Mesorhizobium loti does not influence competitiveness for nodulation on Lotus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampomah, Osei Yaw; Jensen, John Beck

    2014-03-01

    Competitiveness for nodulation is a desirable trait in rhizobia strains used as inoculant. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 mutation in either of the trehalose utilization genes thuA or thuB influences its competitiveness for root colonization and nodule occupancy depending on the interacting host. We have therefore investigated whether mutation in the thuA ortholog in Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 also leads to a similar competitive phenotype on its hosts. The results show that M. loti thuA mutant Ml7023 was symbiotically effective and was as competitive as the wild type in colonization and nodule occupancy on Lotus corniculatus and Lotus japonicus. The thuA gene in M. loti was not induced during root colonization or in the infection threads unlike in S. meliloti, despite its induction by trehalose and high osmolarity in in vitro assays.

  12. Symbiotic functioning and bradyrhizobial biodiversity of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp. in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakora Felix D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cowpea is the most important food grain legume in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, no study has so far assessed rhizobial biodiversity and/or nodule functioning in relation to strain IGS types at the continent level. In this study, 9 cowpea genotypes were planted in field experiments in Botswana, South Africa and Ghana with the aim of i trapping indigenous cowpea root-nodule bacteria (cowpea "rhizobia" in the 3 countries for isolation, molecular characterisation using PCR-RFLP analysis, and sequencing of the 16S - 23S rDNA IGS gene, ii quantifying N-fixed in the cowpea genotypes using the 15N natural abundance technique, and iii relating the levels of nodule functioning (i.e. N-fixed to the IGS types found inside nodules. Results Field measurements of N2 fixation revealed significant differences in plant growth, δ15N values, %Ndfa and amounts of N-fixed between and among the 9 cowpea genotypes in Ghana and South Africa. Following DNA analysis of 270 nodules from the 9 genotypes, 18 strain IGS types were found. Relating nodule function to the 18 IGS types revealed significant differences in IGS type N2-fixing efficiencies. Sequencing the 16S - 23S rDNA gene also revealed 4 clusters, with cluster 2 forming a distinct group that may be a new Bradyrhizobium species. Taken together, our data indicated greater biodiversity of cowpea bradyrhizobia in South Africa relative to Botswana and Ghana. Conclusions We have shown that cowpea is strongly dependant on N2 fixation for its N nutrition in both South Africa and Ghana. Strain IGS type symbiotic efficiency was assessed for the first time in this study, and a positive correlation was discernible where there was sole nodule occupancy. The differences in IGS type diversity and symbiotic efficiency probably accounts for the genotype × environment interaction that makes it difficult to select superior genotypes for use across Africa. The root-nodule bacteria nodulating cowpea in this study

  13. Drought stress provokes the down-regulation of methionine and ethylene biosynthesis pathways in Medicago truncatula roots and nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larrainzar, E.; Molenaar, J.A.; Wienkoop, S.; Gil-Quintana, E.; Alibert, B.; Limami, A.M.; Arrese-Igor, C.; Gonzalez, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is one of the first physiological processes inhibited in legume plants under water-deficit conditions. Despite the progress made in the last decades, the molecular mechanisms behind this regulation are not fully understood yet. Recent proteomic work carried out in the

  14. Enhanced rhizobial symbiotic capacity in an allopolyploid species of Glycine (Leguminosae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Adrian F; Doyle, Jeff J

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that polyploidy can alter biotic interactions, and it has been suggested that these effects may contribute to the increased ability for colonization of new habitats shown by many allopolyploids. Little is known, however, about the effects of allopolyploidy, which combines hybridity and genome doubling, on symbiotic interactions with rhizobial bacteria. We examined interactions of the allopolyploid Glycine dolichocarpa (designated T2) with novel rhizobial partners, such as might occur in a context of colonization, and compared these with the responses of its diploid progenitors, G. tomentella (D3) and G. syndetika (D4). We assessed root hair response, nodule formation, nodule mass, nodule number, and plant biomass. The allopolyploid (T2) showed a greater root hair deformation response when exposed to rhizobia, compared with either diploid. T2 had a greater probability of forming nodules with NGR234 compared with diploid D4, and greater total nodule mass per nodulated plant compared with diploid D3. T2 also had greater plant biomass responses to nitrogen and when exposed to NGR234. The allopolyploid is characterized by transgressive responses to rhizobia for some variables, while also combining certain parental diploid responses such that its capacity for interactions with rhizobia appears to be greater than for either diploid progenitor. This overall enhanced nodulation capacity and the ability to make greater gains from exposure to both rhizobia and additional nitrogen indicate a greater potential of the allopolyploid to benefit from these factors both generally and in a context of colonization. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  15. Symbiotic ß-proteobacteria beyond legumes: Burkholderia in Rubiaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brecht Verstraete

    Full Text Available Symbiotic ß-proteobacteria not only occur in root nodules of legumes but are also found in leaves of certain Rubiaceae. The discovery of bacteria in plants formerly not implicated in endosymbiosis suggests a wider occurrence of plant-microbe interactions. Several ß-proteobacteria of the genus Burkholderia are detected in close association with tropical plants. This interaction has occurred three times independently, which suggest a recent and open plant-bacteria association. The presence or absence of Burkholderia endophytes is consistent on genus level and therefore implies a predictive value for the discovery of bacteria. Only a single Burkholderia species is found in association with a given plant species. However, the endophyte species are promiscuous and can be found in association with several plant species. Most of the endophytes are part of the plant-associated beneficial and environmental group, but others are closely related to B. glathei. This soil bacteria, together with related nodulating and non-nodulating endophytes, is therefore transferred to a newly defined and larger PBE group within the genus Burkholderia.

  16. [Hydrogen peroxide content and catalase activity at inoculation with root tubercle bacteria of pea seedlings with the various nodulation ability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, G G; Glian'ko, A K; Mironova, N V

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content and catalase activity were studied in pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings with normal (cultivar Marat) and disrupted (pea mutants) process of nodulation, which were inoculated with the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum strain CIAM 1026. Differences in hydrogen peroxide content and catalase activity in pea seedlings with different ability for nodulation, which were inoculated with rhizobia, were found. It was assumed that H2O2 and catalase are involved in defensive and regulatory mechanisms in the host plant.

  17. A novel symbiovar (aegeanense) of the genus Ensifer nodulates Vigna unguiculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Fotiadis, Christos T; Ntatsi, Georgia; Savvas, Dimitrios

    2017-10-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) forms nitrogen-fixing root nodules with diverse symbiotic bacteria, mainly slow-growing rhizobial species belonging to the genus Bradyrhizobium, although a few studies have reported the isolation of fast-growing rhizobia under laboratory and field conditions. Although much research has been done on cowpea-nodulating bacteria in various countries around the world, very limited information is available on cowpea rhizobia in European soils. The aim of this study was to study the genetic and phenotypic diversity of indigenous cowpea-nodulating rhizobia in Greece. The genetic diversity of indigenous rhizobia associated with cowpea was investigated through a polyphasic approach. ERIC-PCR based fingerprinting analysis grouped the isolates into three groups. Based on the analysis of the 16S rRNA genes, IGS and on the concatenation of six housekeeping genes (recA, glnII, gyrB, truA, thrA and SMc00019), rhizobial isolates were classified within the species Ensifer fredii. However, symbiotic gene phylogenies, based on nodC, nifH and rhcRST genes, showed that the Ensifer isolates are markedly diverged from type and reference strains of E. fredii and formed one clearly separate cluster. The E. fredii strains were able to nodulate and fix nitrogen in cowpea but not in soybean and common bean. The present study showed that cowpea is nodulated under field conditions by fast-growing rhizobia belonging to the species E. fredii. Based on the phylogenies, similarity levels of symbiotic genes and the host range, the Ensifer isolates may constitute a new symbiovar for which the name 'aegeanense' is proposed. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell J. Rodriguez; D. Carl Freeman; E. Durant McArthur; Yong Ok Kim; Regina S. Redman

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at...

  19. The Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea Rhizobia Can Be Improved by Additional Copies of the clpB Chaperone Gene.

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    Ana Paço

    Full Text Available The ClpB chaperone is known to be involved in bacterial stress response. Moreover, recent studies suggest that this protein has also a role in the chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. In order to improve both stress tolerance and symbiotic performance of a chickpea microsymbiont, the Mesorhizobium mediterraneum UPM-Ca36T strain was genetically transformed with pPHU231 containing an extra-copy of the clpB gene. To investigate if the clpB-transformed strain displays an improved stress tolerance, bacterial growth was evaluated under heat and acid stress conditions. In addition, the effect of the extra-copies of the clpB gene in the symbiotic performance was evaluated using plant growth assays (hydroponic and pot trials. The clpB-transformed strain is more tolerant to heat shock than the strain transformed with pPHU231, supporting the involvement of ClpB in rhizobia heat shock tolerance. Both plant growth assays showed that ClpB has an important role in chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. The nodulation kinetics analysis showed a higher rate of nodule appearance with the clpB-transformed strain. This strain also induced a greater number of nodules and, more notably, its symbiotic effectiveness increased ~60% at pH5 and 83% at pH7, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, a higher frequency of root hair curling was also observed in plants inoculated with the clpB-transformed strain, compared to the wild-type strain. The superior root hair curling induction, nodulation ability and symbiotic effectiveness of the clpB-transformed strain may be explained by an increased expression of symbiosis genes. Indeed, higher transcript levels of the nodulation genes nodA and nodC (~3 folds were detected in the clpB-transformed strain. The improvement of rhizobia by addition of extra-copies of the clpB gene may be a promising strategy to obtain strains with enhanced stress tolerance and symbiotic effectiveness, thus contributing to their success as crop inoculants

  20. Formation of organelle-like N2-fixing symbiosomes in legume root nodules is controlled by DMI2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpens, E.H.M.; Mirabella, R.; Fedorova, E.; Franken, C.; Franssen, H.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2005-01-01

    In most legume nodules, the N2-fixing rhizobia are present as organelle-like structures inside their host cells. These structures, named symbiosomes, contain one or a few rhizobia surrounded by a plant membrane. Symbiosome formation requires the release of bacteria from cell-wall-bound infection

  1. Population genomics of the symbiotic plasmids of sympatric nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium species associated with Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Carrascal, Olga M; VanInsberghe, David; Juárez, Soledad; Polz, Martin F; Vinuesa, Pablo; González, Víctor

    2016-09-01

    Cultivated common beans are the primary protein source for millions of people around the world who subsist on low-input agriculture, enabled by the symbiotic N2 -fixation these legumes perform in association with rhizobia. Within a single agricultural plot, multiple Rhizobium species can nodulate bean roots, but it is unclear how genetically isolated these species remain in sympatry. To better understand this issue, we sequenced and compared the genomes of 33 strains isolated from the rhizosphere and root nodules of a particular bean variety grown in the same agricultural plot. We found that the Rhizobium species we observed coexist with low genetic recombination across their core genomes. Accessory plasmids thought to be necessary for the saprophytic lifestyle in soil show similar levels of genetic isolation, but with higher rates of recombination than the chromosomes. However, the symbiotic plasmids are extremely similar, with high rates of recombination and do not appear to have co-evolved with the chromosome or accessory plasmids. Therefore, while Rhizobium species are genetically isolated units within the microbial community, a common symbiotic plasmid allows all Rhizobium species to engage in symbiosis with the same host in a single agricultural plot. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Silicon and Nitrate Differentially Modulate the Symbiotic Performances of Healthy and Virus-Infected Bradyrhizobium-nodulated Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), Yardlong Bean (V. unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis) and Mung Bean (V. radiata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izaguirre-Mayoral, Maria Luisa; Brito, Miriam; Baral, Bikash; Garrido, Mario José

    2017-09-15

    The effects of 2 mM silicon (Si) and 10 mM KNO₃ (N)-prime signals for plant resistance to pathogens-were analyzed in healthy and Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) or Cowpea mild mottle virus (CMMV)-infected Bradyrhizobium -nodulated cowpea, yardlong bean and mung bean plants. In healthy plants of the three Vigna taxa, nodulation and growth were promoted in the order of Si + N > N > Si > controls. In the case of healthy cowpea and yardlong bean, the addition of Si and N decreased ureide and α-amino acids (AA) contents in the nodules and leaves in the order of Si + N> N > Si > controls. On the other hand, the addition of N arrested the deleterious effects of CCMV or CMMV infections on growth and nodulation in the three Vigna taxa. However, the addition of Si or Si + N hindered growth and nodulation in the CCMV- or CMMV-infected cowpea and yardlong bean, causing a massive accumulation of ureides in the leaves and nodules. Nevertheless, the AA content in leaves and nodules of CCMV- or CMMV-infected cowpea and yardlong bean was promoted by Si but reduced to minimum by Si + N. These results contrasted to the counteracting effects of Si or Si + N in the CCMV- and CMMV-infected mung bean via enhanced growth, nodulation and levels of ureide and AA in the leaves and nodules. Together, these observations suggest the fertilization with Si + N exclusively in virus-free cowpea and yardlong bean crops. However, Si + N fertilization must be encouraged in virus-endangered mung bean crops to enhance growth, nodulation and N-metabolism. It is noteworthy to see the enhanced nodulation of the three Vigna taxa in the presence of 10 mM KNO₃.

  3. Symbiont shift towards Rhizobium nodulation in a group of phylogenetically related Phaseolus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E; Zayas-Del Moral, Alejandra; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Rogel, Marco A; Delgado-Salinas, Alfonso; Sánchez, Federico; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2014-10-01

    Bean plants from the Phaseolus genus are widely consumed and represent a nitrogen source for human nutrition. They provide biological fertilization by establishing root nodule symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. To establish a successful interaction, bean plants and their symbiotic bacteria need to synchronize a proper molecular crosstalk. Within the Phaseolus genus, P. vulgaris has been the prominent species to study nodulation with Rhizobium symbionts. However the Phaseolus genus comprises diverse species whose symbionts have not been analyzed. Here we identified and studied nodule bacteria from representative Phaseolus species not previously analyzed and from all the described wild species related to P. vulgaris. We found Bradyrhizobium in nodules from most species representing all Phaseolus clades except in five phylogenetically related species from the P. vulgaris clade. Therefore we propose that Bradyrhizobium nodulation is common in Phaseolus and that there was a symbiont preference shift to Rhizobium nodulation in few related species. This work sets the basis to further study the genetic basis of this symbiont substitution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Overexpression of flavodoxin in bacteroids induces changes in antioxidant metabolism leading to delayed senescence and starch accumulation in alfalfa root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Francisco J; de la Peña, Teodoro Coba; Morcillo, César N; Lucas, M Mercedes; Pueyo, José J

    2009-02-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti cells were engineered to overexpress Anabaena variabilis flavodoxin, a protein that is involved in the response to oxidative stress. Nodule natural senescence was characterized in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) plants nodulated by the flavodoxin-overexpressing rhizobia or the corresponding control bacteria. The decline of nitrogenase activity and the nodule structural and ultrastructural alterations that are associated with nodule senescence were significantly delayed in flavodoxin-expressing nodules. Substantial changes in nodule antioxidant metabolism, involving antioxidant enzymes and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes and metabolites, were detected in flavodoxin-containing nodules. Lipid peroxidation was also significantly lower in flavodoxin-expressing nodules than in control nodules. The observed amelioration of the oxidative balance suggests that the delay in nodule senescence was most likely due to a role of the protein in reactive oxygen species detoxification. Flavodoxin overexpression also led to high starch accumulation in nodules, without reduction of the nitrogen-fixing activity.

  5. The Rhizobium meliloti putA gene: its role in the establishment of the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Zurdo, J I; García-Rodríguez, F M; Toro, N

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the energy sources used by rhizobia during colonization, invasion and root nodule formation on leguminous plants. We have recently reported that an impaired proline metabolism in rhizobium meliloti leads to a reduced nodulation efficiency and competitiveness on alfalfa roots. In the present study we have characterized the R. meliloti proline dehydrogenase gene (putA) and addressed the question of its role in symbiosis. This rhizobial gene encodes a 1224-amino-acid-long polypeptide which is homologous to enteric bacteria, Rhodobacter capsulatus and Bradyrhizobium japonicum PutA proteins. Like the situation in these bacteria, sequence analysis identified the proline dehydrogenase (PDH) and pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) domains in the R. meliloti putA-encoded protein. Beta-galactosidase assays performed with free-living cells carrying a putA-lacZ transcriptional fusion revealed that R. meliloti putA gene expression is induced by proline, autoregulated by its encoded product, and independent of the general nitrogen regulatory system (Ntr). In addition, analysis of putA expression during the different steps of the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa showed that expression of this gene is turned on by the root exudates (RE), during root invasion and nodule formation, but not in differentiated nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Furthermore, we show that the PutA- phenotype leads to a significant reduction of alfalfa root colonization by R. meliloti.

  6. Symbiotic properties of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus assayed on serradella plants

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    Mieczysława Deryło

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiological and symbiotic properties of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus nodule isolates were compared to the standard slow-growing Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus strain USDA 3045. Lupine nodules isolates showed typical characteristics for bradyrhizobial strains and nodulated small seed legume, serradella (Ornithopus sativus, in tube test. We observed a permanent physiological segregation of the effective (Fix' and ineffective (Fix- symbiotic phenotype for all tested bradyrhizobial strains during the growth of serradella in plant tube test. The ultrastructural differences between Fix* and Fix serradella nodules were observed. Rapid and visible nodulation as well as easy assay of the reduction of acetylene make serradella a convenient system for studies of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus strains in laboratory conditions.

  7. Thyroid Nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid nodules Overview Thyroid nodules are solid or fluid-filled lumps that form within your thyroid, a small gland located at the base of ... just above your breastbone. The great majority of thyroid nodules aren't serious and don't cause ...

  8. Profiling of differentially expressed genes in roots of Robinia pseudoacacia during nodule development using suppressive subtractive hybridization.

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    Hongyan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Legume-rhizobium symbiosis is a complex process that is regulated in the host plant cell through gene expression network. Many nodulin genes that are upregulated during different stages of nodulation have been identified in leguminous herbs. However, no nodulin genes in woody legume trees, such as black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia, have yet been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify the nodulin genes involved in R. pseudoacacia-Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 symbiosis, a suppressive subtractive hybridization approach was applied to reveal profiling of differentially expressed genes and two subtracted cDNA libraries each containing 600 clones were constructed. Then, 114 unigenes were identified from forward SSH library by differential screening and the putative functions of these translational products were classified into 13 categories. With a particular interest in regulatory genes, twenty-one upregulated genes encoding potential regulatory proteins were selected based on the result of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis. They included nine putative transcription genes, eight putative post-translational regulator genes and four membrane protein genes. The expression patterns of these genes were further analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR at different stages of nodule development. CONCLUSIONS: The data presented here offer the first insights into the molecular foundation underlying R. pseudoacacia-M. amorphae symbiosis. A number of regulatory genes screened in the present study revealed a high level of regulatory complexity (transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational that is likely essential to develop symbiosis. In addition, the possible roles of these genes in black locust nodulation are discussed.

  9. Profiling of Differentially Expressed Genes in Roots of Robinia pseudoacacia during Nodule Development Using Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinye; Liu, Sisi; Zhang, Feilong; Wei, Gehong

    2013-01-01

    Background Legume-rhizobium symbiosis is a complex process that is regulated in the host plant cell through gene expression network. Many nodulin genes that are upregulated during different stages of nodulation have been identified in leguminous herbs. However, no nodulin genes in woody legume trees, such as black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia), have yet been reported. Methodology/Principal findings To identify the nodulin genes involved in R. pseudoacacia-Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 symbiosis, a suppressive subtractive hybridization approach was applied to reveal profiling of differentially expressed genes and two subtracted cDNA libraries each containing 600 clones were constructed. Then, 114 unigenes were identified from forward SSH library by differential screening and the putative functions of these translational products were classified into 13 categories. With a particular interest in regulatory genes, twenty-one upregulated genes encoding potential regulatory proteins were selected based on the result of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. They included nine putative transcription genes, eight putative post-translational regulator genes and four membrane protein genes. The expression patterns of these genes were further analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR at different stages of nodule development. Conclusions The data presented here offer the first insights into the molecular foundation underlying R. pseudoacacia–M. amorphae symbiosis. A number of regulatory genes screened in the present study revealed a high level of regulatory complexity (transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational) that is likely essential to develop symbiosis. In addition, the possible roles of these genes in black locust nodulation are discussed. PMID:23776436

  10. Influence of pCO2 on carbon allocation in nodulated Medicago sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Gabriela; Hartmann, Henrik; Ziegler, Waldemar; Michalzik, Beate; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel; Trumbore, Susan

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations (pCO_2) have been related to changes in plant carbon (C) availability and photosynthetic capacity, yet there is no clear consensus as to the effect of pCO2 on the plant C balance and on nitrogen fixation in symbiotic systems. We investigated how different pCO2 (Pleistocene: 170 ppm, ambient: 400 ppm and projected future: 700 ppm) influence C allocation in nodulated Medicago sativa L. We labeled 17 week old plants with depleted 13C (-34.7±1.2‰) and traced the label over a 9-day period, to assess the redistribution of newly assimilated C across different sinks, including nodules. We analyzed N concentrations in plant tissues and found no significant differences in leaves and roots across treatments. However, growth and C fixation rates increased with pCO_2, and differences were greatest between 170 ppm and 700 ppm. Across pCO2 treatments we observed a 13C-enrichment in roots compared to leaves. We further observed the highest 13C depletion of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) and respired CO2 in tissues of plants grown at 700 ppm, especially in leaves and nodules. Our preliminary results suggest that sink organs like roots and nodules are fed with newly-assimilated NSCs from leaves to support respiration, and especially in 170 ppm plants represented a major respiratory loss of newly assimilated C (≈ 35{%} of the total plant respiration). Our results suggest that although plant metabolic processes like photosynthesis and respiration are affected by changes in pCO_2, nitrogen acquisition in such a symbiotic system is not.

  11. Isolation and characterization of the heavy metal resistant bacteria CCNWRS33-2 isolated from root nodule of Lespedeza cuneata in gold mine tailings in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Gehong; Fan Lianmei; Zhu Wenfei; Fu Yunyun; Yu Jianfu; Tang Ming

    2009-01-01

    A total of 108 strains of bacteria were isolated from root nodules of wild legumes growing in gold mine tailings in northwest of China and were tested for heavy metal resistance. The results showed that the bacterial strain CCNWRS33-2 isolated from Lespedeza cuneata was highly resistant to copper, cadmium, lead and zinc. The strain had a relatively high mean specific growth rate under each heavy metal stress test and exhibited a high degree of bioaccumulation ability. The partial sequence of the copper resistance gene copA was amplified from the strain and a sequence comparison with our Cu-resistant PCR fragment showed a high homology with Cu-resistant genes from other bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that CCNWRS33-2 belongs to the Rhizobium-Agrobacterium branch and it had 98.9% similarity to Agrobactrium tumefaciens LMG196

  12. Isolation and characterization of the heavy metal resistant bacteria CCNWRS33-2 isolated from root nodule of Lespedeza cuneata in gold mine tailings in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Gehong [College of Life Science, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling Shaanxi 712100 (China)], E-mail: weigehong@yahoo.com.cn; Fan Lianmei; Zhu Wenfei; Fu Yunyun; Yu Jianfu; Tang Ming [College of Life Science, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Agriculture, Northwest A and F University, Yangling Shaanxi 712100 (China)

    2009-02-15

    A total of 108 strains of bacteria were isolated from root nodules of wild legumes growing in gold mine tailings in northwest of China and were tested for heavy metal resistance. The results showed that the bacterial strain CCNWRS33-2 isolated from Lespedeza cuneata was highly resistant to copper, cadmium, lead and zinc. The strain had a relatively high mean specific growth rate under each heavy metal stress test and exhibited a high degree of bioaccumulation ability. The partial sequence of the copper resistance gene copA was amplified from the strain and a sequence comparison with our Cu-resistant PCR fragment showed a high homology with Cu-resistant genes from other bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that CCNWRS33-2 belongs to the Rhizobium-Agrobacterium branch and it had 98.9% similarity to Agrobactrium tumefaciens LMG196.

  13. Growth behaviour and bioproduction of indole acetic acid by a Rhizobium sp. isolated from root nodules of a leguminous tree Dalbergia lanceolaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A C; Basu, P S

    2002-07-01

    The Rhizobium sp. isolated from healthy and mature root nodules of a leguminous tree, Dalbergia lanceolaria Linn. f., preferred mannitol and KNO3 for growth as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The bacterium produced a high amount (22.3 microg/ml) of indole acetic acid (IAA) from L-tryptophan supplemented basal medium. Growth and IAA production started simultaneously. IAA production was maximum at 20 hr when the bacteria reached the stationary phase of growth. Cultural requirements were optimized for maximum growth and IAA production. The IAA production by the Rhizobium sp. was increased by 270.8% over control when the medium was supplemented with mannitol (1%,w/v), SDS (1 microg/ml), L-asparagine (0.02%,w/v) and biotin (1 microg/ml) in addition to L-tryptophan (2.5 mg/ml). The possible role of IAA production in the symbiosis is discussed.

  14. Malic Enzyme Cofactor and Domain Requirements for Symbiotic N2 Fixation by Sinorhizobium meliloti▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsch, Michael J.; Cowie, Alison; Finan, Turlough M.

    2007-01-01

    The NAD+-dependent malic enzyme (DME) and the NADP+-dependent malic enzyme (TME) of Sinorhizobium meliloti are representatives of a distinct class of malic enzymes that contain a 440-amino-acid N-terminal region homologous to other malic enzymes and a 330-amino-acid C-terminal region with similarity to phosphotransacetylase enzymes (PTA). We have shown previously that dme mutants of S. meliloti fail to fix N2 (Fix−) in alfalfa root nodules, whereas tme mutants are unimpaired in their N2-fixing ability (Fix+). Here we report that the amount of DME protein in bacteroids is 10 times greater than that of TME. We therefore investigated whether increased TME activity in nodules would allow TME to function in place of DME. The tme gene was placed under the control of the dme promoter, and despite elevated levels of TME within bacteroids, no symbiotic nitrogen fixation occurred in dme mutant strains. Conversely, expression of dme from the tme promoter resulted in a large reduction in DME activity and symbiotic N2 fixation. Hence, TME cannot replace the symbiotic requirement for DME. In further experiments we investigated the DME PTA-like domain and showed that it is not required for N2 fixation. Thus, expression of a DME C-terminal deletion derivative or the Escherichia coli NAD+-dependent malic enzyme (sfcA), both of which lack the PTA-like region, restored wild-type N2 fixation to a dme mutant. Our results have defined the symbiotic requirements for malic enzyme and raise the possibility that a constant high ratio of NADPH + H+ to NADP in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids prevents TME from functioning in N2-fixing bacteroids. PMID:17071765

  15. Malic enzyme cofactor and domain requirements for symbiotic N2 fixation by Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsch, Michael J; Cowie, Alison; Finan, Turlough M

    2007-01-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme (DME) and the NADP(+)-dependent malic enzyme (TME) of Sinorhizobium meliloti are representatives of a distinct class of malic enzymes that contain a 440-amino-acid N-terminal region homologous to other malic enzymes and a 330-amino-acid C-terminal region with similarity to phosphotransacetylase enzymes (PTA). We have shown previously that dme mutants of S. meliloti fail to fix N(2) (Fix(-)) in alfalfa root nodules, whereas tme mutants are unimpaired in their N(2)-fixing ability (Fix(+)). Here we report that the amount of DME protein in bacteroids is 10 times greater than that of TME. We therefore investigated whether increased TME activity in nodules would allow TME to function in place of DME. The tme gene was placed under the control of the dme promoter, and despite elevated levels of TME within bacteroids, no symbiotic nitrogen fixation occurred in dme mutant strains. Conversely, expression of dme from the tme promoter resulted in a large reduction in DME activity and symbiotic N(2) fixation. Hence, TME cannot replace the symbiotic requirement for DME. In further experiments we investigated the DME PTA-like domain and showed that it is not required for N(2) fixation. Thus, expression of a DME C-terminal deletion derivative or the Escherichia coli NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme (sfcA), both of which lack the PTA-like region, restored wild-type N(2) fixation to a dme mutant. Our results have defined the symbiotic requirements for malic enzyme and raise the possibility that a constant high ratio of NADPH + H(+) to NADP in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids prevents TME from functioning in N(2)-fixing bacteroids.

  16. Non-symbiotic Bradyrhizobium ecotypes dominate North American forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanInsberghe, David; Maas, Kendra R; Cardenas, Erick; Strachan, Cameron R; Hallam, Steven J; Mohn, William W

    2015-11-01

    The genus Bradyrhizobium has served as a model system for studying host-microbe symbiotic interactions and nitrogen fixation due to its importance in agricultural productivity and global nitrogen cycling. In this study, we identify a bacterial group affiliated with this genus that dominates the microbial communities of coniferous forest soils from six distinct ecozones across North America. Representative isolates from this group were obtained and characterized. Using quantitative population genomics, we show that forest soil populations of Bradyrhizobium represent ecotypes incapable of nodulating legume root hairs or fixing atmospheric nitrogen. Instead, these populations appear to be free living and have a greater potential for metabolizing aromatic carbon sources than their close symbiotic relatives. In addition, we identify fine-scaled differentiation between populations inhabiting neighboring soil layers that illustrate how diversity within Bradyrhizobium is structured by habitat similarity. These findings reconcile incongruent observations about this widely studied and important group of bacteria and highlight the value of ecological context to interpretations of microbial diversity and taxonomy. These results further suggest that the influence of this genus likely extends well beyond facilitating agriculture, especially as forest ecosystems are large and integral components of the biosphere. In addition, this study demonstrates how focusing research on economically important microorganisms can bias our understanding of the natural world.

  17. Early responses to Nod factors and mycorrhizal colonization in a non-nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Luis; Alemán, Emilia; Nava, Noreide; Santana, Olivia; Sánchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen

    2006-03-01

    Legumes can acquire nitrogen through a symbiotic interaction with rhizobial bacteria. The initiation of this process is determined by a molecular dialogue between the two partners. Legume roots exude flavonoids that induce the expression of the bacterial nodulation genes, which encode proteins involved in the synthesis and secretion of signals called Nod factors (NFs). NFs signal back to the plant root and trigger several responses, leading to bacterial invasion and nodule formation. Here, we describe the molecular and cellular characterization of a Phaseolus vulgaris non-nodulating mutant (NN-mutant). Root hair cells of the NN-mutant plant respond with swelling and branching when inoculated with Rhizobium etli, albeit without curling induction. Furthermore, neither initiation of cell division in the outer cortex, nor entrapment of bacteria nor infection thread formation was observed. Both the bean wild-type and the NN-mutant responded with elevated intracellular calcium changes in the root hairs. Although the NN-mutant is deficient in early nodulin gene expression when inoculated with R. etli, it can be effectively colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices). Our data indicate that the P. vulgaris NN-mutant is not blocked at the NFs early perception stage, but at later downstream stages between Ca(2+) signaling and early nodulin induction. This supports the idea that both microsymbionts are perceived and trigger different downstream pathways in the host plant.

  18. Co-inoculation of a Pea Core-Collection with Diverse Rhizobial Strains Shows Competitiveness for Nodulation and Efficiency of Nitrogen Fixation Are Distinct traits in the Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourion, Virginie; Heulin-Gotty, Karine; Aubert, Véronique; Tisseyre, Pierre; Chabert-Martinello, Marianne; Pervent, Marjorie; Delaitre, Catherine; Vile, Denis; Siol, Mathieu; Duc, Gérard; Brunel, Brigitte; Burstin, Judith; Lepetit, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Pea forms symbiotic nodules with Rhizobium leguminosarum sv. viciae (Rlv). In the field, pea roots can be exposed to multiple compatible Rlv strains. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the competitiveness for nodulation of Rlv strains and the ability of pea to choose between diverse compatible Rlv strains. The variability of pea-Rlv partner choice was investigated by co-inoculation with a mixture of five diverse Rlv strains of a 104-pea collection representative of the variability encountered in the genus Pisum . The nitrogen fixation efficiency conferred by each strain was determined in additional mono-inoculation experiments on a subset of 18 pea lines displaying contrasted Rlv choice. Differences in Rlv choice were observed within the pea collection according to their genetic or geographical diversities. The competitiveness for nodulation of a given pea-Rlv association evaluated in the multi-inoculated experiment was poorly correlated with its nitrogen fixation efficiency determined in mono-inoculation. Both plant and bacterial genetic determinants contribute to pea-Rlv partner choice. No evidence was found for co-selection of competitiveness for nodulation and nitrogen fixation efficiency. Plant and inoculant for an improved symbiotic association in the field must be selected not only on nitrogen fixation efficiency but also for competitiveness for nodulation.

  19. The Carbon-Nitrogen Balance of the Nodule and Its Regulation under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Libault

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2. In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency.

  20. Nodule-enhanced expression of a sucrose phosphate synthase gene member (MsSPSA) has a role in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in the nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Lorenzo; Ortega, Jose Luis; Martinez-Grimes, Martha; Seger, Mark; Holguin, Francisco Omar; Uribe, Diana J; Garcia-Ibilcieta, David; Sengupta-Gopalan, Champa

    2010-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of sucrose in photosynthetic tissues. We characterized the expression of three different isoforms of SPS belonging to two different SPS gene families in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a previously identified SPS (MsSPSA) and two novel isoforms belonging to class B (MsSPSB and MsSPSB3). While MsSPSA showed nodule-enhanced expression, both MsSPSB genes exhibited leaf-enhanced expression. Alfalfa leaf and nodule SPS enzymes showed differences in chromatographic and electrophoretic migration and differences in V (max) and allosteric regulation. The root nodules in legume plants are a strong sink for photosynthates with its need for ATP, reducing power and carbon skeletons for dinitrogen fixation and ammonia assimilation. The expression of genes encoding SPS and other key enzymes in sucrose metabolism, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and sucrose synthase, was analyzed in the leaves and nodules of plants inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Based on the expression pattern of these genes, the properties of the SPS isoforms and the concentration of starch and soluble sugars in nodules induced by a wild type and a nitrogen fixation deficient strain, we propose that SPS has an important role in the control of carbon flux into different metabolic pathways in the symbiotic nodules.

  1. W342F Mutation in CCaMK Enhances Its Affinity to Calmodulin But Compromises Its Role in Supporting Root Nodule Symbiosis in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard Jauregui

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK is regulated by free Ca2+ and Ca2+-loaded calmodulin. This dual binding is believed to be involved in its regulation and associated physiological functions, although direct experimental evidence for this is lacking. Here we document that site-directed mutations in the calmodulin-binding domain of CCaMK alters its binding capacity to calmodulin, providing an effective approach to study how calmodulin regulates CCaMK in terms of kinase activity and regulation of rhizobial symbiosis in Medicago truncatula. We observed that mutating the tryptophan at position 342 to phenylalanine (W342F markedly increased the calmodulin-binding capability of the mutant. The mutant CCaMK underwent autophosphorylation and catalyzed substrate phosphorylation in the absence of calcium and calmodulin. When the mutant W342F was expressed in ccamk-1 roots, the transgenic roots exhibited an altered nodulation phenotype. These results indicate that altering the calmodulin-binding domain of CCaMK could generate a constitutively activated kinase with a negative role in the physiological function of CCaMK.

  2. Blue light does not inhibit nodulation in Sesbania rostrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Aya; Arima, Susumu; Hayashi, Makoto; Maymon, Maskit; Hirsch, Ann M; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2017-01-02

    Earlier, we reported that root nodulation was inhibited by blue light irradiation of Lotus japonicus. Because some legumes do not establish nodules exclusively on underground roots, we investigated whether nodule formation in Sesbania rostrata, which forms both root and "stem" nodules following inoculation with Azorhizobium caulinodans, is inhibited by blue light as are L. japonicus nodules. We found that neither S. rostrata nodulation nor nitrogen fixation was inhibited by blue light exposure. Moreover, although A. caulinodans proliferation was not affected by blue light irradiation, bacterial survival was decreased. Therefore, blue light appears to impose different responses depending on the legume-rhizobial symbiosis.

  3. Effects of Cropping System and Cowpea Variety on Symbiotic Potential and Yields of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp and Pearl Millet (Pennisetum glaucum L. in the Sudano-Sahelian Zone of Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoumana Kouyaté

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many cowpea varieties (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp have been proposed by research in Mali. None of these varieties were investigated for their symbiotic potential in terms of root nodulation and mycorrhizal infection. An experiment was conducted at Cinzana Research Station, from 2007 to 2009 with an objective to identify a cowpea variety with high symbiotic potential which may improve millet/cowpea cropping global production. Randomized complete block (RCBD design with a factorial combination of 3 cowpea varieties (IT89KD-374, CZ1-94-23-1, and CZ11-94-5C and 2 cropping systems (millet/cowpea intercropping and cowpea-millet rotation was used. On farm test was conducted to evaluate CZ11-94-5C and IT89KD-374 nodulation performance. Cowpea variety CZ11-94-5-C had the highest nodule number and nodule weight. Millet/cowpea alternate rows intercropping (1/1, only, had a significant influence on cowpea root infection rates by mycorrhizae, on the 45th day after emergence. IT89KD-374 gave the best cowpea grain yield (1540 kg ha−1 in sole crop. The highest millet grain yield (1650 kg ha−1 was obtained under CZ11-94-5C-millet rotation. Farmers' fields assessments results confirmed CZ11-94-5C performance on research station. The CZ11-94-5C cowpea variety needs to be more characterized.

  4. Nodulation in Dimorphandra wilsonii Rizz. (Caesalpinioideae), a Threatened Species Native to the Brazilian Cerrado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Márcia Bacelar; Peix, Alvaro; de Faria, Sergio Miana; Mateos, Pedro F.; Rivera, Lina P.; Simões-Araujo, Jean L.; França, Marcel Giovanni Costa; dos Santos Isaias, Rosy Mary; Cruz, Cristina; Velázquez, Encarna; Scotti, Maria Rita; Sprent, Janet I.; James, Euan K.

    2012-01-01

    The threatened caesalpinioid legume Dimorphandra wilsonii, which is native to the Cerrado biome in Brazil, was examined for its nodulation and N2-fixing ability, and was compared with another, less-threatened species, D. jorgei. Nodulation and potential N2 fixation was shown on seedlings that had been inoculated singly with five bradyrhizobial isolates from mature D. wilsonii nodules. The infection of D. wilsonii by two of these strains (Dw10.1, Dw12.5) was followed in detail using light and transmission electron microscopy, and was compared with that of D. jorgei by Bradyrhizobium strain SEMIA6099. The roots of D. wilsonii were infected via small transient root hairs at 42 d after inoculation (dai), and nodules were sufficiently mature at 63 dai to express nitrogenase protein. Similar infection and nodule developmental processes were observed in D. jorgei. The bacteroids in mature Dimorphandra nodules were enclosed in plant cell wall material containing a homogalacturonan (pectic) epitope that was recognized by the monoclonal antibody JIM5. Analysis of sequences of their rrs (16S rRNA) genes and their ITS regions showed that the five D. wilsonii strains, although related to SEMIA6099, may constitute five undescribed species of genus Bradyrhizobium, whilst their nodD and nifH gene sequences showed that they formed clearly separated branches from other rhizobial strains. This is the first study to describe in full the N2-fixing symbiotic interaction between defined rhizobial strains and legumes in the sub-family Caesalpinioideae. This information will hopefully assist in the conservation of the threatened species D. wilsonii. PMID:23185349

  5. Symbiotic effectiveness of pea-rhizobia associations and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Selected strains were isolated from the root nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.) and lentil (Lens culinaris L.) plants in the Loess Plateau of China. Analyses focused on the nodule number, nodule dry weight, plant dry weight, nitrogenase activity, total N accumulation of per plant and seed yield.

  6. Effect of Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 inoculation on nodulation, nitrogen fixation and yield of soybean (Glycine max) genotypes in gray terrace soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Faridul; Bhuiyan, M A H; Alam, Sadia Sabrina; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Kim, Pil Joo; Lee, Yong Bok

    2015-01-01

    Soybean plants require high amounts of nitrogen, which are mainly obtained from biological nitrogen fixation. A field experiment was conducted by soybean (Glycine max) genotypes, growing two varieties (Shohag and BARI Soybean6) and two advanced lines (MTD10 and BGM02026) of soybean with or without Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 inoculation. Soybean plants of all genotypes inoculated with Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 produced greater nodule numbers, nodule weight, shoot and root biomass, and plant height than non-inoculated plants. Similarly, inoculated plants showed enhanced activity of nitrogenase (NA) enzyme, contributing to higher nitrogen fixation and assimilation, compared to non-inoculated soybean plants in both years. Plants inoculated with Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 also showed higher pod, stover, and seed yield than non-inoculated plants. Therefore, Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 established an effective symbiotic relationship with a range of soybean genotypes and thus increased the nodulation, growth, and yield of soybean grown in gray terrace soils in Bangladesh.

  7. Manganese nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2016-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Figure 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published in the journal Economic Geology (Mero, 1962) and later as a book (Mero, 1965). By the mid-1970s, large consortia had formed to search for and mine Mn nodules that occur between the Clarion and Clipperton fracture zones (CCZ) in the NE Pacific (Figure 2). This is still the area considered of greatest economic potential in the global ocean because of high nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), and Mn contents and the dense distribution of nodules in the area. While the mining of nodules was fully expected to begin in the late 1970s or early 1980s, this never occurred due to a downturn in the price of metals on the global market. Since then, many research cruises have been undertaken to study the CCZ nodules, and now 15 contracts for exploration sites have been given or are pending by the International Seabed Authority (ISA). Many books and science journal articles have been published summarizing the early work (e.g., Baturin, 1988; Halbach et al., 1988), and research has continued to the present day (e.g., ISA, 1999; ISA, 2010). Although the initial attraction for nodules was their high Ni, Cu, and Mn contents, subsequent work has shown that nodules host large quantities of other critical metals needed for high-tech, green-tech, and energy applications (Hein et al., 2013; Hein and Koschinsky, 2014).

  8. Legume-rhizobium symbiotic promiscuity and effectiveness do not affect plant invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keet, Jan-Hendrik; Ellis, Allan G; Hui, Cang; Le Roux, Johannes J

    2017-06-01

    The ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen is thought to play an important role in the invasion success of legumes. Interactions between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia) span a continuum of specialization, and promiscuous legumes are thought to have higher chances of forming effective symbioses in novel ranges. Using Australian Acacia species in South Africa, it was hypothesized that widespread and highly invasive species will be more generalist in their rhizobial symbiotic requirements and more effective in fixing atmospheric nitrogen compared with localized and less invasive species. To test these hypotheses, eight localized and 11 widespread acacias were examined using next-generation sequencing data for the nodulation gene, nodC , to compare the identity, species richness, diversity and compositional similarity of rhizobia associated with these acacias. Stable isotope analysis was also used to determine levels of nitrogen obtained from the atmosphere via symbiotic nitrogen fixation. No differences were found in richness, diversity and community composition between localized and widespread acacias. Similarly, widespread and localized acacias did not differ in their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen. However, for some species by site comparisons, significant differences in δ15N isotopic signatures were found, indicating differential symbiotic effectiveness between these species at specific localities. Overall, the results support recent findings that root nodule rhizobial diversity and community composition do not differ between acacias that vary in their invasiveness. Differential invasiveness of acacias in South Africa is probably linked to attributes such as differences in propagule pressure, reasons for (e.g. forestry vs. ornamental) and extent of, plantings in the country.

  9. Thyroid nodule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms, including: Fatigue Palpitations Chest pain Memory loss Thyroid nodules are sometimes found in people who have Hashimoto's disease. This may cause symptoms of an underactive thyroid gland, such as: Dry ...

  10. OxyR-regulated catalase activity is critical for oxidative stress resistance, nodulation and nitrogen fixation in Azorhizobium caulinodans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Nickels, Logan M; Wang, Hui; Ling, Jun; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    The legume-rhizobial interaction results in the formation of symbiotic nodules in which rhizobia fix nitrogen. During the process of symbiosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated. Thus, the response of rhizobia to ROS is important for successful nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In this study, we investigated how Azorhizobium caulinodans, a rhizobium that forms both root and stem nodules on its host plant, regulates ROS resistance. We found that in-frame deletions of a gene encoding the putative catalase-peroxidase katG or a gene encoding a LysR-family regulatory protein, oxyR, exhibited increased sensitivity to H2O2 We then showed that OxyR positively regulated katG expression in an H2O2-independent fashion. Furthermore, we found that deletion of katG or oxyR led to significant reduction in the number of stem nodules and decrease of nitrogen fixation capacities in symbiosis. Our results revealed that KatG and OxyR are not only critical for antioxidant defense in vitro, but also important for nodule formation and nitrogen fixation during interaction with plant hosts. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Symbiotic effectiveness of pea-rhizobia associations and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    微软用户

    2011-05-02

    May 2, 2011 ... Interactions between pea (Pisum sativa L.) cultivars and Rhizobium strain affect the symbiotic relationship and ultimately both the nitrogen fixing capacity and the yield. Since Pisum sativum L. is poorly nodulated in the Loess Plateau of China where this crop is grown, the response of pea cultivars. Yannong ...

  12. Symbiotic relationship of Thiothrix spp. with an echinoderm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); De Ridder, C. [Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium). Lab. de Biologie Marine

    1998-09-01

    Thiothrix-like bacteria have been reported as symbionts in invertebrates from sulfide-rich habitats. Isolation of these symbiotic Thiothrix-like bacteria has failed, and the organisms have not been previously identified with certainty. The genus Thiothrix was created for ensheathed filamentous bacteria that oxidize sulfide and deposit sulfur granules internally, attach to substrates, produce gliding gonidia, and form rosettes. Immunoassay procedures were used to investigate the symbiotic relationship of Thiothrix spp. in the intestinal cecum of the spatangoid species Echinocardium cordatum. Thiothrix spp. were identified in nodule samples from E. cordatum digestive tubes based on microscopic examination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and indirect immunofluorescence. Thiothrix spp. protein made up as much as 84% of the total protein content of the nodules. This is the first identification of Thiothrix spp. internally symbiotic with marine invertebrates.

  13. Solitary pulmonary nodule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer - solitary nodule; Infectious granuloma - pulmonary nodule; SPN ... More than half of all solitary pulmonary nodules are noncancerous ... infections. Infectious granulomas (which are formed by cells as ...

  14. Pesticides reduce symbiotic efficiency of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jennifer E; Gulledge, Jay; Engelhaupt, Erika; Burow, Matthew E; McLachlan, John A

    2007-06-12

    Unprecedented agricultural intensification and increased crop yield will be necessary to feed the burgeoning world population, whose global food demand is projected to double in the next 50 years. Although grain production has doubled in the past four decades, largely because of the widespread use of synthetic nitrogenous fertilizers, pesticides, and irrigation promoted by the "Green Revolution," this rate of increased agricultural output is unsustainable because of declining crop yields and environmental impacts of modern agricultural practices. The last 20 years have seen diminishing returns in crop yield in response to increased application of fertilizers, which cannot be completely explained by current ecological models. A common strategy to reduce dependence on nitrogenous fertilizers is the production of leguminous crops, which fix atmospheric nitrogen via symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria, in rotation with nonleguminous crops. Here we show previously undescribed in vivo evidence that a subset of organochlorine pesticides, agrichemicals, and environmental contaminants induces a symbiotic phenotype of inhibited or delayed recruitment of rhizobia bacteria to host plant roots, fewer root nodules produced, lower rates of nitrogenase activity, and a reduction in overall plant yield at time of harvest. The environmental consequences of synthetic chemicals compromising symbiotic nitrogen fixation are increased dependence on synthetic nitrogenous fertilizer, reduced soil fertility, and unsustainable long-term crop yields.

  15. A single evolutionary innovation drives the deep evolution of symbiotic N2-fixation in angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Gijsbert D. A.; Cornwell, William K.; Sprent, Janet I.; Kattge, Jens; Kiers, E. Toby

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic associations occur in every habitat on earth, but we know very little about their evolutionary histories. Current models of trait evolution cannot adequately reconstruct the deep history of symbiotic innovation, because they assume homogenous evolutionary processes across millions of years. Here we use a recently developed, heterogeneous and quantitative phylogenetic framework to study the origin of the symbiosis between angiosperms and nitrogen-fixing (N2) bacterial symbionts housed in nodules. We compile the largest database of global nodulating plant species and reconstruct the symbiosis’ evolution. We identify a single, cryptic evolutionary innovation driving symbiotic N2-fixation evolution, followed by multiple gains and losses of the symbiosis, and the subsequent emergence of ‘stable fixers’ (clades extremely unlikely to lose the symbiosis). Originating over 100 MYA, this innovation suggests deep homology in symbiotic N2-fixation. Identifying cryptic innovations on the tree of life is key to understanding the evolution of complex traits, including symbiotic partnerships. PMID:24912610

  16. Nodulation and N2 fixation effectiveness of Bradyrhizobium strains in symbiosis with Adzuki Bean, Vigna angularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušica Delić

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In pot experiment, one isolate Knj from a Serbian soil, four strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum and three strains of Bradyrhizobium spp. were examined for the effect on adzuki bean nodulation and effectiveness in symbiotic N2 fixation. All the tested strains produced root nodules in adzuki bean. Strains of B. japonicum showed high potential of N2 fixation, particularly 525 and 542. B. japonicum strains resulted 65-71% shoot dry weight and 99-138% total N content of uninoculated control with full N content (100%. No significant difference was found between the plants inoculated with Bradyrhizobium spp. strains and uninoculated control plants without N (40-42 and 42% shoot dry weight, respectively, which indicated symbiotic N2 fixation inactivity of the Bradyrhizobium spp. strains. Knj strain had the middle position (56% shoot dry weight. These data showed that B. japonicum 525 and 542 strains could be used in further investigations in order to apply them as inoculants in microbiological N fertilizers.

  17. Effect of phosphoglycerate mutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency on symbiotic Burkholderia phymatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Prell, Jurgen; James, Euan K; Sheu, Der-Shyan; Sheu, Shih-Yi

    2012-04-01

    Burkholderia phymatum STM815 is a β-rhizobial strain that can effectively nodulate several species of the large legume genus Mimosa. Two Tn5-induced mutants of this strain, KM16-22 and KM51, failed to form root nodules on Mimosa pudica, but still caused root hair deformation, which is one of the early steps of rhizobial infection. Both mutants grew well in a complex medium. However, KM16-22 could not grow on minimal medium unless a sugar and a metabolic intermediate such as pyruvate were provided, and KM51 also could not grow on minimal medium unless a sugar was added. The Tn5-interrupted genes of the mutants showed strong homologies to pgm, which encodes 2,3-biphosphoglycerate-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (dPGM), and fbp, which encodes fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase). Both enzymes are known to be involved in obligate steps in carbohydrate metabolism. Enzyme assays confirmed that KM16-22 and KM51 had indeed lost dPGM and FBPase activity, respectively, whilst the activities of these enzymes were expressed normally in both free-living bacteria and symbiotic bacteroids of the parental strain STM815. Both mutants recovered their enzyme activity after the introduction of wild-type pgm or fbp genes, were subsequently able to use carbohydrate as a carbon source, and were able to form root nodules on M. pudica and to fix nitrogen as efficiently as the parental strain. We conclude that the enzymes dPGM and FBPase are essential for the formation of a symbiosis with the host plant.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of acidity tolerance of root nodule bacteria Avaliação quantitativa da tolerância de rizóbios à acidez

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    Luiz Antonio de Oliveira

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of acidity tolerance in the laboratory may be the first step in rhizobial strain selection for the Amazon region. The present method evaluated rhizobia in Petri dishes with YMA medium at pH 6.5 (control and 4.5, using scores of 1.0 (sensitive, "no visible" growth to 4.0 (tolerant, maximum growth. Growth evaluations were done at 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 day periods. This method permits preliminary selection of root nodule bacteria from Amazonian soils with statistical precision. Among the 31 rhizobia strains initially tested, the INPA strains 048, 078, and 671 presented scores of 4.0 at both pHs after 9 days of growth. Strain analyses using a less rigorous criterion (growth scores higher than 3.0 included in this highly tolerant group the INPA strains 511, 565, 576, 632, 649, and 658, which grew on the most diluted zone (zone 4 after 9 days. Tolerant strains still must be tested for nitrogen fixation effectiveness, competitiveness for nodule sites, and soil persistence before their recommendation as inoculants.A quantificação da tolerância à acidez em testes de laboratório pode ser o primeiro passo na seleção de estirpes de rizóbios para a Amazônia. O presente método avaliou isolamentos de rizóbios em placas de Petri contendo meio YMA com pHs 6,5 (controle e 4,5, usando notas de 1,0 (sensíveis, sem crescimento visual, até 4,0 (tolerantes, máximo crescimento. As avaliações foram realizadas aos 6, 9, 12, 15 e 18 dias de crescimento. O método permite selecionar preliminarmente, rizóbios isolados de solos da Amazônia, com precisão estatística. Entre as 31 estirpes inicialmente testadas, as estirpes INPA 048, 078 e 671 apresentaram notas iguais a 4,0 em ambos os pHs testados após os 9 dias de crescimento. Ao se analisar as estirpes usando um sistema menos rigoroso (nota de crescimento acima de 3,0, foi possível incluir também neste grupo, as estirpes INPA 511, 565, 576, 632, 649 e 658, que cresceram na zona mais dilu

  19. Arabidopsis ROP1 and ROP6 influence germination time, root morphology, the formation of F-actin bundles, and symbiotic fungal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venus, Yvonne; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2013-05-01

    The RHO-related GTPases ROP1 and ROP6 and the ROP1-interacting protein RIC4 in Arabidopsis are involved in various processes of F-actin dynamics, cell growth, and plant/microbe interactions. The knockout rop1 and rop1 rop6 seeds germinate earlier and are impaired in root hair development. Also root hair branching is strongly affected by manipulation of the RHO-related GTPase (ROP) levels. Furthermore, in the double knockout line rop1 rop6, no actin bundle formation can be detected. We demonstrate that these proteins are required for establishing a mutualistic interaction between the root-colonizing endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica and Arabidopsis. The fungus promotes growth of wild-type plants. rop1, rop6, rop1 rop6, ric4, 35S::ROP1, and 35S::ROP6 seedlings are impaired in the response to the fungus. Since the different root architectures have no effect on root colonization, the impaired response to P. indica should be caused by ROP-mediated events in the root cells. In wild-type roots, P. indica stimulates the formation of F-actin bundles and this does not occur in the rop1 rop6 knockout line. Furthermore, the fungus stimulates the expression of the calmodulin-binding protein gene Cbp60g, and this response is severely reduced in the rop mutants. We propose that ROP1 and ROP6 are required for F-actin bundle formation in the roots, which is required for P. indica-mediated growth promotion in Arabidopsis.

  20. A phylogenetic strategy based on a legume-specific whole genome duplication yields symbiotic cytokinin type-A Response Regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, Op den R.; Mita, De S.; Lillo, A.; Cao, Q.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2011-01-01

    Legumes host their rhizobium symbiont in novel root organs, called nodules. Nodules originate from differentiated root cortical cells that de-differentiate and subsequently form nodule primordia, a process controlled by cytokinin. A whole genome duplication (WGD) has occurred at the root of the

  1. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T)-degrading gene cluster in the soybean root-nodulating bacterium Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA94.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shohei; Sano, Tomoki; Suyama, Kousuke; Itoh, Kazuhito

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)- and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T)-degrading Bradyrhizobium strains possess tfdAα and/or cadABC as degrading genes. It has been reported that root-nodulating bacteria belonging to Bradyrhizobium elkanii also have tfdAα and cadA like genes but lack the ability to degrade these herbicides and that the cadA genes in 2,4-D-degrading and non-degrading Bradyrhizobium are phylogenetically different. In this study, we identified cadRABCK in the genome of a type strain of soybean root-nodulating B. elkanii USDA94 and demonstrated that the strain could degrade the herbicides when cadABCK was forcibly expressed. cadABCK-cloned Escherichia coli also showed the degrading ability. Because co-spiked phenoxyacetic acid (PAA) could induce the degradation of 2,4-D in B. elkanii USDA94, the lack of degrading ability in this strain was supposed to be due to the low inducing potential of the herbicides for the degrading gene cluster. On the other hand, tfdAα from B. elkanii USDA94 showed little potential to degrade the herbicides, but it did for 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and PAA. The 2,4-D-degrading ability of the cad cluster and the inducing ability of PAA were confirmed by preparing cadA deletion mutant. This is the first study to demonstrate that the cad cluster in the typical root-nodulating bacterium indeed have the potential to degrade the herbicides, suggesting that degrading genes for anthropogenic compounds could be found in ordinary non-degrading bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Construction of 12 EST libraries and characterization of a 12,226 EST dataset for chicory (Cichorium intybus root, leaves and nodules in the context of carbohydrate metabolism investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutry Marc

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The industrial chicory, Cichorium intybus, is a member of the Asteraceae family that accumulates fructan of the inulin type in its root. Inulin is a low calories sweetener, a texture agent and a health promoting ingredient due to its prebiotic properties. Average inulin chain length is a critical parameter that is genotype and temperature dependent. In the context of the study of carbohydrate metabolism and to get insight into the transcriptome of chicory root and to visualize temporal changes of gene expression during the growing season, we obtained and characterized 10 cDNA libraries from chicory roots regularly sampled in field during a growing season. A leaf and a nodule libraries were also obtained for comparison. Results Approximately 1,000 Expressed Sequence Tags (EST were obtained from each of twelve cDNA libraries resulting in a 12,226 EST dataset. Clustering of these ESTs returned 1,922 contigs and 4,869 singlets for a total of 6,791 putative unigenes. All ESTs were compared to public sequence databases and functionally classified. Data were specifically searched for sequences related to carbohydrate metabolism. Season wide evolution of functional classes was evaluated by comparing libraries at the level of functional categories and unigenes distribution. Conclusion This chicory EST dataset provides a season wide outlook of the genes expressed in the root and to a minor extent in leaves and nodules. The dataset contains more than 200 sequences related to carbohydrate metabolism and 3,500 new ESTs when compared to other recently released chicory EST datasets, probably because of the season wide coverage of the root samples. We believe that these sequences will contribute to accelerate research and breeding of the industrial chicory as well as of closely related species.

  3. Strigolactone Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula and Rice Requires the Symbiotic GRAS-Type Transcription Factors NSP1 and NSP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, W.; Kohlen, W.; Lillo, A.; Camp, op den R.; Ivanov, S.; Hartog, M.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Jamil, M.; Smaczniak, C.; Kaufmann, K.; Yang, W.C.; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J.; Charnikhova, T.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2011-01-01

    Legume GRAS (GAI, RGA, SCR)-type transcription factors NODULATION SIGNALING PATHWAY1 (NSP1) and NSP2 are essential for rhizobium Nod factor-induced nodulation. Both proteins are considered to be Nod factor response factors regulating gene expression after symbiotic signaling. However, legume NSP1

  4. Use of low enriched 15N2 for symbiotic fixation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous atmospheres containing 15 N 2 with low enrichment were used to test symbiotic nitrogen fixation in beans (Phaseolus vulgari, L.). The tests of fixation in nodulated roots and the tests of fixation in the whole plant, in which the plants were placed inside a specially constructed growth chamber, gave positive results and suggest that the methodology used can be very helpfull in more detailed studies on symbiotic fixation. Samples of atmospheric air were purified by absorption of O 2 and CO 2 by two methods. The purified N 2 obtained was analysed and the results were compared. Samples of bean plant material were collected in natural conditions and analysed for 15 N natural variation. Several samples were prepared for 15 N isotopic analysis by two methods. The results obtained were compared. All samples were analysed in an Atlas-Varian Ch-4 model mass spectrometer, and the results were given in delta 15 N 0 / 00 variation in relation to a standard gas

  5. Distribution and Phylogeny of Microsymbionts Associated with Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) Nodulation in Three Agroecological Regions of Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidebe, Ifeoma N; Jaiswal, Sanjay K; Dakora, Felix D

    2018-01-15

    Cowpea derives most of its N nutrition from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) via symbiotic bacteroids in root nodules. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the diversity and biogeographic distribution of bacterial microsymbionts nodulating cowpea and other indigenous legumes are not well understood, though needed for increased legume production. The aim of this study was to describe the distribution and phylogenies of rhizobia at different agroecological regions of Mozambique using PCR of the BOX element (BOX-PCR), restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS-RFLP), and sequence analysis of ribosomal, symbiotic, and housekeeping genes. A total of 122 microsymbionts isolated from two cowpea varieties (IT-1263 and IT-18) grouped into 17 clades within the BOX-PCR dendrogram. The PCR-ITS analysis yielded 17 ITS types for the bacterial isolates, while ITS-RFLP analysis placed all test isolates in six distinct clusters (I to VI). BLAST n sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and four housekeeping genes ( glnII , gyrB , recA , and rpoB ) showed their alignment with Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium species. The results revealed a group of highly diverse and adapted cowpea-nodulating microsymbionts which included Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi , Bradyrhizobium arachidis , Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense , and a novel Bradyrhizobium sp., as well as Rhizobium tropici , Rhizobium pusense , and Neorhizobium galegae in Mozambican soils. Discordances observed in single-gene phylogenies could be attributed to horizontal gene transfer and/or subsequent recombinations of the genes. Natural deletion of 60 bp of the gyrB region was observed in isolate TUTVU7; however, this deletion effect on DNA gyrase function still needs to be confirmed. The inconsistency of nifH with core gene phylogenies suggested differences in the evolutionary history of both chromosomal and symbiotic genes. IMPORTANCE A diverse group of both Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium species responsible for cowpea

  6. Diversity and nitrogen fixation efficiency of rhizobia isolated from nodules of Centrolobium paraense

    OpenAIRE

    Baraúna, Alexandre Cardoso; Silva, Krisle da; Pereira, Gilmara Maria Duarte; Kaminski, Paulo Emílio; Perin, Liamara; Zilli, Jerri Edson

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to isolate and characterize rhizobia from nodules of Centrolobium paraense and to evaluate their symbiotic efficiency. Soil samples collected from four sites of the Roraima Cerrado, Brazil, were used to cultivate C. paraense in order to obtain nodules. Isolates (178) were obtained from 334 nodules after cultivation on medium 79. Twenty-five isolates belonging to six morphological groups were authenticated using Vigna unguiculata and they were characterized by 16...

  7. VsENOD5, VsENOD12 and VsENOD40 expression during Rhizobium-induced nodule formation on Vicia sativa roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijn, I; Yang, W C; Pallisgård, N

    1995-01-01

    We isolated ENOD5, ENOD12 and ENOD40 homologues from Vicia sativa and studied their expression pattern during Rhizobium-induced nodule formation. Comparison of the VsENOD40 nucleotide sequence with the pea, soybean and alfalfa ENOD40 sequences showed that the sequences contain two conserved regions...

  8. Analysis of nodule meristem persistence and ENOD40 functioning in Medicago truncatula nodule formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan Xi,

    2007-01-01

    Medicago root nodules are formed as a result of the interaction of the plant with the soil-borne bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Several plant genes are induced during nodule formation and MtENOD40 is one of the earliest genes activated. The precise function as well as the molecule

  9. Analysis of nodule meristem persistence and ENOD40 functioning in Medicago truncatula nodule formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan Xi,

    2007-01-01

    Medicago root nodules are formed as a result of the interaction of the plant with the soil-borne bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Several plant genes are induced during nodule formation and MtENOD40 is one of the earliest genes activated. The precise function as well as the molecule harboring the

  10. Nutritional, eco-physiological and symbiotic characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of root nodule bacteria is used for selecting and using them as inoculants to improve legume production. To this end, faba bean (Vicia faba L.) rhizobia were isolated from nodules collected from acidic soils of Central and Southern-Western parts of Ethiopia. A total of hundred rhizobial isolates were ...

  11. The roots of nodulins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, J.P.H.; Bisseling, T.

    1990-01-01

    Nodulin gene expression is an integral and highly specific part of the formation of nitrogenfixing nodules on the roots of leguminous plants. Dependent on the time of expression during root nodule development, nodulin genes can be divided into early and late nodulin genes. A brief overview of the

  12. Non-symbiotic hemoglobin and its relation with hypoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Riquelme

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Today we know that several types of hemoglobins exist in plants. The symbiotic hemoglobins were discovered in 1939 and are only found in nodules of plants capable of symbiotically fixing atmospheric N. Another class, called non-symbiotic hemoglobin, was discovered 32 yr ago and is now thought to exist throughout the plant kingdom, being expressed in different organs and tissues. Recently the existence of another type of hemoglobin, called truncated hemoglobin, was demonstrated in plants. Although the presence of hemoglobins is widespread in the plant kingdom, their role has not yet been fully elucidated. This review discusses recent findings regarding the role of plant hemoglobins, with special emphasis on their relationship to plants adaptation to hypoxia. It also discusses the role of nitric oxide in plant cells under hypoxic conditions, since one of the functions of hemoglobin appears to be modulating nitric oxide levels in the cells.

  13. Effects of high temperature on survival, symbiotic performance and genomic modifications of bean nodulating Rhizobium strains Sobrevivência, fixação de nitrogênio e modificações genéticas em estirpes de Rhizobium sp. efetivas na nodulação do feijoeiro, expostas à altas temperaturas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia P. Pinto

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available High temperatures can affect the survival, establishment and symbiotic properties of Rhizobium strains. Bean nodulating Rhizobium strains are considered particularly sensitive because on this strains genetic recombinations and/or deletions occur frequently, thus compromising the use of these bacteria as inoculants. In this study R. tropici and R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli strains isolated from Cerrado soils were exposed to thermal stress and the strains’ growth, survival and symbiotic relationships as well as alterations in their genotypic and phenotypic characteristics were analyzed. After successive thermal shocks at 45ºC for four hours, survival capacity appeared to be strain-specific, independent of thermo-tolerance and was more apparent in R. tropici strains. Certain R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli strains had significant alterations in plant dry weight and DNA patterns obtained by AP-PCR method. R. tropici strains (with the exception of FJ2.21 were more stable than R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli strains because no significant phenotypic alterations were observed following thermal treatments and they maintained their original genotypic pattern after inoculation in plants.Altas temperaturas podem afetar a sobrevivência, estabelecimento e as propriedades simbióticas em estirpes de Rhizobium. As estirpes capazes de nodular o feijoeiro têm sido consideradas particularmente sensíveis, porque nessas estirpes é comum a ocorrência de recombinações e/ou deleções genômicas comprometendo, muitas vezes, a sua utilização como inoculantes. Neste trabalho, procurou-se avaliar a capacidade de crescimento e sobrevivência em temperaturas elevadas de estirpes de Rhizobium efetivas na fixação de nitrogênio no feijoeiro isoladas dos cerrados, bem como avaliar suas características fenotípicas e genotípicas após choque térmico. A capacidade de sobrevivência à temperaturas elevadas, avaliada após choques térmicos sucessivos (45ºC por 4

  14. Vigna mungo, V. radiata and V. unguiculata plants sampled in different agronomical-ecological-climatic regions of India are nodulated by Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appunu, Chinnaswamy; N'Zoue, Angèle; Moulin, Lionel; Depret, Géraldine; Laguerre, Gisèle

    2009-10-01

    Vigna mungo, Vigna radiata and Vigna unguiculata are important legume crops cultivated in India, but little is known about the genetic resources in native rhizobia that nodulate these species. To identify these bacteria, a core collection of 76 slow-growing isolates was built from root nodules of V. mungo, V. radiata and V. unguiculata plants grown at different sites within three agro-ecological-climatic regions of India. The genetic diversity of the bacterial collection was assessed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of PCR-amplified DNA fragments of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) region, and the symbiotic genes nifH and nodC. One rDNA IGS type grouped 91% of isolates, but more diversity was found at the symbiotic loci (17 symbiotic genotypes). Overall, no host plant specificity was shown, the three host plant species sharing common bradyrhizobial genotypes that represented 62% of the collection. Similarly, the predominant genotypes were found at most sampling sites and in all agro-ecological-climatic regions. Phylogenies inferred from IGS sequencing and multi-locus sequence analysis of the dnaK, glnII and recA genes indicated that all isolates but one were clustered with the Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense species. The nifH phylogeny also grouped the different nif haplotypes within a cluster including B. yuanmingense, except for one infrequent nif haplotype which formed a new lineage within the Bradyrhizobium genus. These results may reflect a long history of co-evolution between B. yuanmingense and Vigna spp. in India, while intra-species polymorphism detected in the symbiotic loci may be linked with the long history of diversification of B. yuanmingense coinciding with that of its host legumes.

  15. Diazotroph-Bacterial Community Structure of Root Nodules Account for Two-Fold Differences in Plant Growth: Consequences for Global Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    The bacterial communities that inhabit and function as mutualists in the nodules of soybean, a major worldwide crop, are a fundamental determinant of plant growth and global nitrogen and carbon cycles. Unfertilized soybean can derive up to 90% of its nitrogen through bacterial-driven diazotrophy. It was the goal of the research in this study to assess whether different bacterial taxa (e.g. Bradyrhizobia spp.) differ in their soybean growth supportive role, which could then feedback to alter global biogeochemical cycling. Using 16S rRNA and NifH genes, nodule bacterial communities were shown to vary across 9 different cultivars of soybean, and that the variation between cultivars were highly correlated to plant yield (97 to 188 bu/Ha) and nitrogen. The relative abundances of gene sequences associated with the closest taxonomic match (NCBI), indicated that several taxa were (r= 0.76) negatively (e.g. Bradyrhizobium sp Ec3.3) or (r= 0.84) positively (e.g. Bradyrhizobium elkanii WSM 2783) correlated with plant yield. Other non-Rhizobiaceae taxa, such as Rhodopseudomonas spp. were also prevalent and correlated with plant yield. Soybeans and other leguminous crops will become increasingly important part of world food production, soil fertility and global biogeochemical cycles with rising population and food demand. The study demonstrates the importance of plant-microbial feedbacks driving plant growth but also ramifications for global cycling of nitrogen and carbon.

  16. Leguminous plants nodulated by selected strains of Cupriavidus necator grow in heavy metal contaminated soils amended with calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelar Ferreira, Paulo Ademar; Lopes, Guilherme; Bomfeti, Cleide Aparecida; de Oliveira Longatti, Silvia Maria; de Sousa Soares, Cláudio Roberto Fonseca; Guimarães Guilherme, Luiz Roberto; de Souza Moreira, Fatima Maria

    2013-11-01

    Increasing concern regarding mining area environmental contamination with heavy metals has resulted in an emphasis of current research on phytoremediation. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficiency of symbiotic Cupriavidus necator strains on different leguminous plants in soil contaminated with heavy metals following the application of inorganic materials. The application of limestone and calcium silicate induced a significant increase in soil pH, with reductions in zinc and cadmium availability of 99 and 94 %, respectively. In addition, improved nodulation of Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia, Leucaena leucocephala and Mimosa pudica in soil with different levels of contamination was observed. Significant increases in the nitrogen content of the aerial parts of the plant were observed upon nodulation of the root system of Leucaena leucocephala and Mimosa pudica by strain UFLA01-659 (36 and 40 g kg(-1)) and by strain UFLA02-71 in Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia (39 g kg(-1)). The alleviating effect of calcium silicate resulted in higher production of dry matter from the aerial part of the plant, an increase in nodule number and an increase in the nitrogen fixation rate. The results of the present study demonstrate that the combination of rhizobia, leguminous plants and calcium silicate may represent a key factor in the remediation of areas contaminated by heavy metals.

  17. The Medicago truncatula lysin [corrected] motif-receptor-like kinase gene family includes NFP and new nodule-expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Barre, Annick; Ben Amor, Besma; Bersoult, Anne; Soriano, Lidia Campos; Mirabella, Rossana; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Journet, Etienne-Pascal; Ghérardi, Michèle; Huguet, Thierry; Geurts, René; Dénarié, Jean; Rougé, Pierre; Gough, Clare

    2006-09-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide further evidence for this by showing that NFP is a lysin [corrected] motif (LysM)-receptor-like kinase (RLK). NFP was shown both to be expressed in association with infection thread development and to be involved in the infection process. Consistent with deviations from conserved kinase domain sequences, NFP did not show autophosphorylation activity, suggesting that NFP needs to associate with an active kinase or has unusual functional characteristics different from classical kinases. Identification of nine new M. truncatula LysM-RLK genes revealed a larger family than in the nonlegumes Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) or rice (Oryza sativa) of at least 17 members that can be divided into three subfamilies. Three LysM domains could be structurally predicted for all M. truncatula LysM-RLK proteins, whereas one subfamily, which includes NFP, was characterized by deviations from conserved kinase sequences. Most of the newly identified genes were found to be expressed in roots and nodules, suggesting this class of receptors may be more extensively involved in nodulation than was previously known.

  18. Outbursts in Symbiotic Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Kenyon, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Two models have been proposed for the outbursts of symbiotic stars. In the thermonuclear model, outbursts begin when the hydrogen burning shell of a hot white dwarf reaches a critical mass. After a rapid increase in the luminosity and effective temperature, the white dwarf evolves at constant luminosity to lower effective temperatures, remains at optical maximum for several years, and then returns to quiescence along a white dwarf cooling curve. In disk instability models, the brightness rises when the accretion rate from the disk onto the central white dwarf abruptly increases by factors of 5-20. After a few month to several year period at maximum, both the luminosity and the effective temperature of the disk decline as the system returns to quiescence. If most symbiotic stars undergo thermonuclear eruptions, then symbiotics are probably poor candidates for type I supernovae. However, they can then provide approx. 10% of the material which stars recycle back into the interstellar medium. If disk instabilities are the dominant eruption mechanism, symbiotics are promising type Ia candidates but recycle less material into the interstellar medium.

  19. The Sinorhizobium meliloti RNA chaperone Hfq influences central carbon metabolism and the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez-Zurdo José I

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial Hfq protein is able to interact with diverse RNA molecules, including regulatory small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs, and thus it is recognized as a global post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Loss of Hfq has an extensive impact in bacterial physiology which in several animal pathogens influences virulence. Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model soil bacterium known for its ability to establish a beneficial nitrogen-fixing intracellular symbiosis with alfalfa. Despite the predicted general involvement of Hfq in the establishment of successful bacteria-eukaryote interactions, its function in S. meliloti has remained unexplored. Results Two independent S. meliloti mutants, 2011-3.4 and 1021Δhfq, were obtained by disruption and deletion of the hfq gene in the wild-type strains 2011 and 1021, respectively, both exhibiting similar growth defects as free-living bacteria. Transcriptomic profiling of 1021Δhfq revealed a general down-regulation of genes of sugar transporters and some enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, whereas transcripts specifying the uptake and metabolism of nitrogen sources (mainly amino acids were more abundant than in the wild-type strain. Proteomic analysis of the 2011-3.4 mutant independently confirmed these observations. Symbiotic tests showed that lack of Hfq led to a delayed nodulation, severely compromised bacterial competitiveness on alfalfa roots and impaired normal plant growth. Furthermore, a large proportion of nodules (55%-64% elicited by the 1021Δhfq mutant were non-fixing, with scarce content in bacteroids and signs of premature senescence of endosymbiotic bacteria. RT-PCR experiments on RNA from bacteria grown under aerobic and microoxic conditions revealed that Hfq contributes to regulation of nifA and fixK1/K2, the genes controlling nitrogen fixation, although the Hfq-mediated regulation of fixK is only aerobiosis dependent. Finally, we found that some of the recently

  20. WATER STRESS RESPONSE ON THE ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY IN COWPEA NODULES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiredo Márcia do Vale B.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A greenhouse experiment was carried out aiming to study the effect of water stress on metabolic activity of cowpea nodules at different plant development stages. Cowpea plants were grown in pots with yellow latosol soil under three different matric potentials treatments: -7.0 (control-S1, -70.0 (S2 and <-85.0 KPa (S3. The experimental design was randomized blocks with sub-divided plots, each plot containing a different degree of water stress, divided in sub-plots for the four different developmental stages: E1 (0-15, E2 (15-30, E3 (20-35 and E4 (30-45 days after emmergence. Water stress treatments were applied by monitoring soil water potential using a set of porous cups. The effect of water stress was most harmful to cowpea when it was applied at E2 than at other symbiotic process stages. Shoot/root ratio decreased from 2.61 to 2.14 when matric potential treatment was <-85.0 and -70.0 KPa respectively. There was a reduction in the glutamine synthetase activity and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxilase activity with increased stress, while glutamine synthase activity was the enzyme most sensitive to water stress. Glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased in more negative matric potential, indicating that this enzyme is sufficiently activitye under water stress.

  1. Distinct changes in soybean xylem sap proteome in response to pathogenic and symbiotic microbe interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Un-Haing

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant systemic signaling characterized by the long distance transport of molecules across plant organs involves the xylem and phloem conduits. Root-microbe interactions generate systemic signals that are transported to aerial organs via the xylem sap. We analyzed the xylem sap proteome of soybean seedlings in response to pathogenic and symbiotic interactions to identify systemic signaling proteins and other differentially expressed proteins. Results We observed the increase of a serine protease and peroxidase in the xylem sap in response to Phytophthora sojae elicitor treatment. The high molecular weight fraction of soybean xylem sap was found to promote the growth of Neurospora crassa in vitro at lower concentrations and inhibit growth at higher concentrations. Sap from soybean plants treated with a P. sojae elicitor had a significantly higher inhibitory effect than sap from control soybean plants. When soybean seedlings were inoculated with the symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the abundance of a xyloglucan transendoglycosyl transferase protein increased in the xylem sap. However, RNAi-mediated silencing of the corresponding gene did not significantly affect nodulation in soybean hairy root composite plants. Conclusion Our study identified a number of sap proteins from soybean that are differentially induced in response to B. japonicum and P. sojae elicitor treatments and a majority of them were secreted proteins.

  2. Pea mutant risnod27 as reference line for field assessment of impact of symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biedermannová, E.; Novák, Karel; Vondrys, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 9 (2002), s. 2051-2066 ISSN 0190-4167 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/00/0937 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : pea mutant * symbiotic nodules Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.593, year: 2002

  3. Detection, Characterization, and Biological Effect of Quorum-Sensing Signaling Molecules in Peanut-Nodulating Bradyrhizobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Giordano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Bradyrhizobium are able to establish a symbiotic relationship with peanut (Arachis hypogaea root cells and to fix atmospheric nitrogen by converting it to nitrogenous compounds. Quorum sensing (QS is a cell-cell communication mechanism employed by a variety of bacterial species to coordinate behavior at a community level through regulation of gene expression. The QS process depends on bacterial production of various signaling molecules, among which the N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs are most commonly used by Gram-negative bacteria. Some previous reports have shown the production of QS signaling molecules by various rhizobia, but little is known regarding mechanisms of communication among peanut-nodulating strains. The aims of this study were to identify and characterize QS signals produced by peanut-nodulating bradyrhizobial strains and to evaluate their effects on processes related to cell interaction. Detection of AHLs in 53 rhizobial strains was performed using the biosensor strains Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZLR4 and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 for AHLs with long and short acyl chains, respectively. None of the strains screened were found to produce AHLs with short acyl chains, but 14 strains produced AHLs with long acyl chains. These 14 AHL-producing strains were further studied by quantification of β-galactosidase activity levels (AHL-like inducer activity in NTL4 (pZLR4. Strains displaying moderate to high levels of AHL-like inducer activity were subjected to chemical identification of signaling molecules by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. For each AHL-producing strain, we found at least four different AHLs, corresponding to N-hexanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone (C6, N-(3-oxodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC10, N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC12, and N-(3-oxotetradecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC14. Biological roles of 3OC10, 3OC12, and 3OC14 AHLs

  4. Phylogeny of nodulation and nitrogen-fixation genes in Bradyrhizobium: supporting evidence for the theory of monophyletic origin, and spread and maintenance by both horizontal and vertical transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, Pâmela; Hungria, Mariangela

    2011-12-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Bradyrhizobium are capable of establishing symbiotic relationships with a broad range of plants belonging to the three subfamilies of the family Leguminosae (=Fabaceae), with the formation of specialized structures on the roots called nodules, where fixation of atmospheric nitrogen takes place. Symbiosis is under the control of finely tuned expression of common and host-specific nodulation genes and also of genes related to the assembly and activity of the nitrogenase, which, in Bradyrhizobium strains investigated so far, are clustered in a symbiotic island. Information about the diversity of these genes is essential to improve our current poor understanding of their origin, spread and maintenance and, in this study, we provide information on 40 Bradyrhizobium strains, mostly of tropical origin. For the nodulation trait, common (nodA), Bradyrhizobium-specific (nodY/K) and host-specific (nodZ) nodulation genes were studied, whereas for fixation ability, the diversity of nifH was investigated. In general, clustering of strains in all nod and nifH trees was similar and the Bradyrhizobium group could be clearly separated from other rhizobial genera. However, the congruence of nod and nif genes with ribosomal and housekeeping genes was low. nodA and nodY/K were not detected in three strains by amplification or hybridization with probes using Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii type strains, indicating the high diversity of these genes or that strains other than photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium must have alternative mechanisms to initiate the process of nodulation. For a large group of strains, the high diversity of nod genes (with an emphasis on nodZ), the low relationship between nod genes and the host legume, and some evidence of horizontal gene transfer might indicate strategies to increase host range. On the other hand, in a group of five symbionts of Acacia mearnsii, the high congruence between nod and ribosomal

  5. Nitrogen fixation and carbon metabolism in legume nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neera; Singla, Ranju; Geetanjali

    2004-02-01

    A large amount of energy is utilized by legume nodules for the fixation of nitrogen and assimilation of fixed nitrogen (ammonia) into organic compounds. The source of energy is provided in the form of photosynthates by the host plant. Phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) enzyme, which is responsible for carbon dioxide fixation in C4 and crassulacean acid metabolism plants, has also been found to play an important role in carbon metabolism in legume root nodule. PEPC-mediated CO2 fixation in nodules results in the synthesis of C4 dicarboxylic acids, viz. aspartate, malate, fumarate etc. which can be transported into bacteroids with the intervention of dicarboxylate transporter (DCT) protein. PEPC has been purified from the root nodules of few legume species. Information on the relationship between nitrogen fixation and carbon metabolism through PEPC in leguminous plants is scanty and incoherent. This review summarizes the various aspects of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in legume root nodules.

  6. Isoliquiritigenin, a strong nod gene- and glyceollin resistance-inducing flavonoid from soybean root exudate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kape, R; Parniske, M; Brandt, S; Werner, D

    1992-01-01

    Isoflavonoid signal molecules from soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seed and root exudate induce the transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Bradyrhizobium japonicum. In this study, a new compound with symbiotic activity was isolated from soybean root exudate. The isolated 2',4',4-trihydroxychalcone (isoliquiritigenin) is characterized by its strong inducing activity for the nod genes of B. japonicum. These genes are already induced at concentrations 1 order of magnitude below those required of the previously described isoflavonoid inducers genistein and daidzein. Isoliquiritigenin is also a potent inducer of glyceollin resistance in B. japonicum, which renders this bacterium insensitive to potentially bactericidal concentrations of glyceollin, the phytoalexin of G. max. No chemotactic effect of isoliquiritigenin was observed. The highly efficient induction of nod genes and glyceollin resistance by isoliquiritigenin suggests the ecological significance of this compound, although it is not a major flavonoid constituent of the soybean root exudate in quantitative terms. PMID:1622242

  7. miR396 affects mycorrhization and root meristem activity in the legume Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Jérémie; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Combier, Jean-Philippe; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Debernardi, Juan Manuel; Rodriguez, Ramiro; Sorin, Céline; Palatnik, Javier; Hartmann, Caroline; Crespi, Martin; Lelandais-Brière, Christine

    2013-06-01

    The root system is crucial for acquisition of resources from the soil. In legumes, the efficiency of mineral and water uptake by the roots may be reinforced due to establishment of symbiotic relationships with mycorrhizal fungi and interactions with soil rhizobia. Here, we investigated the role of miR396 in regulating the architecture of the root system and in symbiotic interactions in the model legume Medicago truncatula. Analyses with promoter-GUS fusions suggested that the mtr-miR396a and miR396b genes are highly expressed in root tips, preferentially in the transition zone, and display distinct expression profiles during lateral root and nodule development. Transgenic roots of composite plants that over-express the miR396b precursor showed lower expression of six growth-regulating factor genes (MtGRF) and two bHLH79-like target genes, as well as reduced growth and mycorrhizal associations. miR396 inactivation by mimicry caused contrasting tendencies, with increased target expression, higher root biomass and more efficient colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In contrast to MtbHLH79, repression of three GRF targets by RNA interference severely impaired root growth. Early activation of mtr-miR396b, concomitant with post-transcriptional repression of MtGRF5 expression, was also observed in response to exogenous brassinosteroids. Growth limitation in miR396 over-expressing roots correlated with a reduction in cell-cycle gene expression and the number of dividing cells in the root apical meristem. These results link the miR396 network to the regulation of root growth and mycorrhizal associations in plants. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Outbursts of symbiotic novae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, S.J.; Truran, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    We discuss possible conditions under which thermonuclear burning episodes in the hydrogen-rich envelopes of accreting white dwarfs give rise to outbursts similar in nature to those observed in the symbiotic stars AG Peg, RT Ser, RR Tel, AS 239, V1016 Cyg, V1329 Cyg, and HM Sge. In principle, thermonuclear runaways involving low-luminosity white dwarfs accreting matter at low rates produce configurations that evolve into A--F supergiants at maximum visual light and which resemble the outbursts of RR Tel, RT Ser, and AG peg. Very weak, nondegenerage hydrogen shell flashes on white dwarfs accreting matter at high rates (M> or approx. =10 -8 M/sub sun/ yr -1 ) do not produce cool supergiants at maximum, and may explain the outbursts in V1016 Cyg, V1329 Cyg, and HM Sge. The low accretion rates demanded for systems developing strong hydrogen shell flashes on low-luminsoity white dwarfs are not compatible with observations of ''normal'' quiescent symbiotic stars. The extremely slow outbursts of symbiotic novae appear to be typical of accreting white dwarfs in wide binaries, which suggests that the outbursts of classical novae may be accelerated by the interaction of the expanding white dwarf envelope with its close binary companion

  9. Germination, growth and nodulation of Trigonella foenum graecum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... In this work, we analyzed the effects of salinity on seed germination, growth and nodulation of fenugreek plants. The germination of fenugreek seeds was not affected by salt concentrations lower than 140 mM. Two saline tolerant indigenous rhizobia strains were isolated from the root nodules of fenugreek ...

  10. Germination, growth and nodulation of Trigonella foenum graecum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, we analyzed the effects of salinity on seed germination, growth and nodulation of fenugreek plants. The germination of fenugreek seeds was not affected by salt concentrations lower than 140 mM. Two saline tolerant indigenous rhizobia strains were isolated from the root nodules of fenugreek grown in two ...

  11. Nodulation potential of four Trifolium repens cultivars under field ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four Trifolium repens (white clover) cultivars were evaluated under field conditions to determine the potential of these cultivars to sucessfully develop Rhizobium-associated root nodules. Nodulation of T. repens is often poor, because of suboptimal environmental conditions or absence of host-specific rhizobia. The cultivars ...

  12. ROOT TRAITS AND NODULATION OF RECOMBINANT INBRED BEAN LINES FROM A ‘JAMAPA × CALIMA’ POPULATION INOCULATED WITH TWO STRAINS OF RHIZOBIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean cultivars of Andean and Middle American origin often have contrasting above-ground traits. Less is known, however, of possible differences in root traits of beans from different gene pools. Recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from a cross between the Andean cultivar ‘Calima’ and the Middle A...

  13. Co-inoculation with Mesorhizobium ciceri and Azotobacter chroococcum for improving growth, nodulation and yield of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Qureshi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhizobia have the exceptional ability to form nodules on roots or stems of leguminous plants. Free living diazotrophs promote the rhizobial efficiency by altering root architecture providing more niches for nodulation and thus enhance the N2-fixing ability of legumes. Field experiment was conducted to assess the co-inoculation potential of symbiotic i.e. Mesorhizobium ciceri and non-symbiotic diazotrophs i.e. Azotobacter chroococcum on the yield of chickpea. Chickpea seeds (cv. Bittle-98 were inoculated with peat-based inocula and sown following randomized complete block design with three replications. Two levels of nitrogen i.e. 30 (recommended and 15 kg ha-1 were applied as urea while P was applied at 60 kg ha-1 to all the treatments as single super phosphate. Results revealed that introduction of A. chroococcum had positive impact on chickpea with and without rhizobial inoculation and the effect was more prominent when applied in combination as compared to non-inoculated control at low nitrogen level. It was observed that inoculation with M. ciceri or A. chroococcum produced significant increase in biomass and grain yield but the response was more pronounced with co-inoculation i.e. 3456 and 1772 kg ha-1, respectively, as compared to control (2903 and 1489 kg ha-1, respectively at 15 kg N ha-1. Higher nodule number plant-1 and nodular mass was observed with co-inoculation (42 and 0.252 g plant-1. Percent N and P content in chickpea plant were higher in the co-inoculated treatments (1.683 and 0.283% than that of their respective controls. Similar trend was observed in grains except the rhizobial inoculation alone which produced higher N content (3.62% than coinoculation (3.59%. Percent N and available P in soil were also higher in the inoculated treatments. The results imply that co-inoculation with Mesorhizobium and Azotobacter could be a useful approach for improving growth, nodulation and yield of chickpea by reducing dependence on chemical

  14. Phylogeny and Phylogeography of Rhizobial Symbionts Nodulating Legumes of the Tribe Genisteae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Stępkowski

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The legume tribe Genisteae comprises 618, predominantly temperate species, showing an amphi-Atlantic distribution that was caused by several long-distance dispersal events. Seven out of the 16 authenticated rhizobial genera can nodulate particular Genisteae species. Bradyrhizobium predominates among rhizobia nodulating Genisteae legumes. Bradyrhizobium strains that infect Genisteae species belong to both the Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii superclades. In symbiotic gene phylogenies, Genisteae bradyrhizobia are scattered among several distinct clades, comprising strains that originate from phylogenetically distant legumes. This indicates that the capacity for nodulation of Genisteae spp. has evolved independently in various symbiotic gene clades, and that it has not been a long-multi-step process. The exception is Bradyrhizobium Clade II, which unlike other clades comprises strains that are specialized in nodulation of Genisteae, but also Loteae spp. Presumably, Clade II represents an example of long-lasting co-evolution of bradyrhizobial symbionts with their legume hosts.

  15. Rhizobium nod factors reactivate the cell cycle during infection and nodule primordium formation, but the cycle is only completed in primordium formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, W.C.; Blank, de C.; Meskiene, I.; Hirt, H.; Bakker, J.; Kammen, van A.; Franssen, H.; Bisseling, T.

    1994-01-01

    Rhizobia induce the formation of root nodules on the roots of leguminous plants. In temperate legumes, nodule organogenesis starts with the induction of cell divisions in regions of the root inner cortex opposite protoxylem poles, resulting in the formation of nodule primordia. It has been

  16. Role of plant root exudate and Sym plasmid-localized nodulation genes in the synthesis by Rhizobium leguminosarum of Tsr factor, which causes thick and short roots on common vetch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, A. A.; Zaat, S. A.; Cremers, H. C.; Wijffelman, C. A.; Pees, E.; Tak, T.; Lugtenberg, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous paper it was shown that cocultivation of Rhizobium leguminosarum with the plant Vicia sativa subsp. nigra on solid medium causes a changed mode of growth of the plant roots, resulting in thick and short roots (Tsr). The Sym plasmid present in the bacterium appeared to be essential for

  17. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Soybean Root Hairs Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tran H.; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hixson, Kim K.; Libault, Marc; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Yang, Feng; Yao, Qiuming; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T.; Stacey, Gary

    2012-11-11

    Root hairs are single hair-forming cells on roots that function to increase root surface area, enhancing water and nutrient uptake. In leguminous plants, root hairs also play a critical role as the site of infection by symbiotic nitrogen fixing rhizobia, leading to the formation of a novel organ, the nodule. The initial steps in the rhizobia-root hair infection process are known to involve specific receptor kinases and subsequent kinase cascades. Here, we characterize the phosphoproteome of the root hairs and the corresponding stripped roots (i.e., roots from which root hairs were removed) during rhizobial colonization and infection to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of root hair cell biology. We chose soybean (Glycine max L.), one of the most important crop plants in the legume family, for this study because of its larger root size, which permits isolation of sufficient root hair material for phosphoproteomic analysis. Phosphopeptides derived from root hairs and stripped roots, mock inoculated or inoculated with the soybean-specific rhizobium Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were labeled with the isobaric tag 8-plex ITRAQ, enriched using Ni-NTA magnetic beads and subjected to nRPLC-MS/MS analysis using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD strategy. A total of 1,625 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1,659 non-redundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1,126 soybean phosphoproteins. Among them, 273 phosphopeptides corresponding to 240 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly regulated (>1.5 fold abundance change) in response to inoculation with B. japonicum. The data reveal unique features of the soybean root hair phosphoproteome, including root hair and stripped root-specific phosphorylation suggesting a complex network of kinase-substrate and phosphatase-substrate interactions in response to rhizobial inoculation.

  18. Exploring symbiotic nitrogen fixation and assimilation in pea root nodules by in vivo 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharff, A.M.; Egsgaard, H.; Hansen, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    indicate that ammonium is located in the bacteroids. The observed N-15-labeled amino acids, glutamine/glutamate and asparagine (Asn), apparently reside in a different compartment, presumably the plant cytoplasm, because no changes in the expected in vivo N-15 chemical shifts were observed. Extensive N-15...

  19. Rhizobium altiplani sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules on Mimosa pudica growing in untypically alkaline soil in central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraúna, Alexandre C; Rouws, Luc F M; Simoes-Araujo, Jean L; Dos Reis Junior, Fábio B; Iannetta, Pietro P M; Maluk, Marta; Goi, Silvia R; Reis, Veronica M; James, Euan K; Zilli, Jerri E

    2016-10-01

    Root nodule bacteria were isolated from nodules on Mimosa pudica L. growing in neutral-alkaline soils from the Distrito Federal in central Brazil. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of 10 strains placed them into the genus Rhizobium with the closest neighbouring species (each with 99 % similarity) being Rhizobium grahamii, Rhizobium cauense, Rhizobium mesoamericanum and Rhizobium tibeticum. This high similarity, however, was not confirmed by multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) using three housekeeping genes (recA, glnII and rpoB), which revealed R. mesoamericanum CCGE 501T to be the closest type strain (92 % sequence similarity or less). Chemotaxonomic data, including fatty acid profiles [with majority being C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c)], DNA G+C content (57.6 mol%), and carbon compound utilization patterns supported the placement of the novel strains in the genus Rhizobium. Results of average nucleotide identity (ANI) differentiated the novel strains from the closest species of the genus Rhizobium, R. mesoamericanum, R. grahamii and R. tibeticum with 89.0, 88.1 and 87.8 % similarity, respectively. The symbiotic genes essential for nodulation (nodC) and nitrogen fixation (nifH) were most similar (99-100 %) to those of R. mesoamericanum, another Mimosa-nodulating species. Based on the current data, these 10 strains represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium for which the name Rhizobium altiplani sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BR 10423T (=HAMBI 3664T).

  20. Ferric Leghemoglobin in Plant-Attached Leguminous Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kk.; Shearman, L. L.; Erickson, B. K.; Klucas, R. V.

    1995-01-01

    Leghemoglobin (Lb) is essential for nitrogen fixation by intact leguminous nodules. To determine whether ferric Lb (Lb3+) was detectable in nodules under normal or stressed conditions, we monitored the status of Lb in intact nodules attached to sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis) and soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) roots exposed to various conditions. The effects of N2 and O2 streams and elevated nicotinate levels on root-attached nodules were tested to determine whether the spectrophotometric technique was showing the predicted responses of Lb. The soybean and sweet clover nodules' Lb spectra indicated predominantly ferrous Lb and LbO2 in young (34 d) plants. As the nodule aged beyond 45 d, it was possible to induce Lb3+ with a 100% O2 stream (15 min). At 65 d without inducement, the nodule Lb status indicated the presence of some Lb3+ along with ferrous Lb and oxyferrous Lb. Nicotinate and fluoride were used as ligands to identify Lb3+. Computer-calculated difference spectra were used to demonstrate the changes in Lb spectra under different conditions. Some conditions that increased absorbance in the 626 nm region (indicating Lb3+ accumulation) were root-fed ascorbate and dehydroascorbate, plant exposure to darkness, and nodule water immersion. PMID:12228593

  1. The lipopolysaccharide lipid-a long chain fatty acid is important for rhizobium leguminosarum growth and stress adaptation in free-living and nodule environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizobium bacteria live in soil and plant environments, are capable of inducing symbiotic nodules on legumes, invade these nodules, and develop into bacteroids that fix atmospheric nitrogen into ammonium. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is anchored in the bacterial outer membrane through a specialized lipi...

  2. Direct detection of radicals in intact soybean nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, C; Moreau, S; Frendo, P

    1998-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been employed to examine the nature of the metal ions and radicals present in intact root nodules of soybean plants grown in the absence of nitrate. The spectra obtained from nodules of different ages using this non-invasive technique show dramatic...... differences, suggesting that there are both qualitative and quantitative changes in the metal ion and radical species present. A major component of the spectra obtained from young nodules is assigned to a complex (Lb-NO) of nitric oxide (NO.) with the heme protein leghemoglobin (Lb). This Lb-NO species, which...... has not been previously detected in intact root nodules of plants grown in the absence of nitrate, is thought to be formed by reaction of nitric oxide with iron(II) leghemoglobin. The nitric oxide may be generated from arginine via a nitric oxide synthase-like activity present in the nodules...

  3. Symbiotic and nonsymbiotic hemoglobin genes of Casuarina glauca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen-Lyon, K; Jensen, Erik Østergaard; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo

    1995-01-01

    Casuarina glauca has a gene encoding hemoglobin (cashb-nonsym). This gene is expressed in a number of plant tissues. Casuarina also has a second family of hemoglobin genes (cashb-sym) expressed at a high level in the nodules that Casuarina forms in a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the actinomycete...... of the Casuarina gene. The finding that the nonsymbiotic Casuarina gene is also correctly expressed in L. corniculatus suggests to us that a comparable non-symbiotic hemoglobin gene will be found in legume species. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Feb...

  4. Genetic diversity and evolution of Bradyrhizobium populations nodulating Erythrophleum fordii, an evergreen tree indigenous to the southern subtropical region of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Wang, Rui; Lu, Jun Kun; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2014-10-01

    The nodulation of Erythrophleum fordii has been recorded recently, but its microsymbionts have never been studied. To investigate the diversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with this leguminous evergreen tree, root nodules were collected from the southern subtropical region of China. A total of 166 bacterial isolates were obtained from the nodules and characterized. In a PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of ribosomal intergenic sequences, the isolates were classified into 22 types within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA, ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS), and the housekeeping genes recA and glnII classified the isolates into four groups: the Bradyrhizobium elkanii and Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi groups, comprising the dominant symbionts, Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, and an unclassified group comprising the minor symbionts. The nodC and nifH phylogenetic trees defined five or six lineages among the isolates, which was largely consistent with the definition of genomic species. The phylogenetic results and evolutionary analysis demonstrated that mutation and vertical transmission of genes were the principal processes for the divergent evolution of Bradyrhizobium species associated with E. fordii, while lateral transfer and recombination of housekeeping and symbiotic genes were rare. The distribution of the dominant rhizobial populations was affected by soil pH and effective phosphorus. This is the first report to characterize E. fordii rhizobia. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. The Medicago truncatula Lysine Motif-Receptor-Like Kinase Gene Family Includes NFP and New Nodule-Expressed Genes1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Barre, Annick; Ben Amor, Besma; Bersoult, Anne; Soriano, Lidia Campos; Mirabella, Rossana; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Journet, Etienne-Pascal; Ghérardi, Michèle; Huguet, Thierry; Geurts, René; Dénarié, Jean; Rougé, Pierre; Gough, Clare

    2006-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide further evidence for this by showing that NFP is a lysine motif (LysM)-receptor-like kinase (RLK). NFP was shown both to be expressed in association with infection thread development and to be involved in the infection process. Consistent with deviations from conserved kinase domain sequences, NFP did not show autophosphorylation activity, suggesting that NFP needs to associate with an active kinase or has unusual functional characteristics different from classical kinases. Identification of nine new M. truncatula LysM-RLK genes revealed a larger family than in the nonlegumes Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) or rice (Oryza sativa) of at least 17 members that can be divided into three subfamilies. Three LysM domains could be structurally predicted for all M. truncatula LysM-RLK proteins, whereas one subfamily, which includes NFP, was characterized by deviations from conserved kinase sequences. Most of the newly identified genes were found to be expressed in roots and nodules, suggesting this class of receptors may be more extensively involved in nodulation than was previously known. PMID:16844829

  6. Symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterial populations trapped from soils under agroforestry systems in the Western Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Marcela Duque Jaramillo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata is an important grain-producing legume that can forego nitrogen fertilization by establishing an efficient symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Although inoculating strains have already been selected for this species, little is known about the genotypic and symbiotic diversity of native rhizobia. Recently, Bradyrhizobium has been shown to be the genus most frequently trapped by cowpea in agricultural soils of the Amazon region. We investigated the genetic and symbiotic diversity of 148 bacterial strains with different phenotypic and cultural properties isolated from the nodules of the trap species cowpea, which was inoculated with samples from soils under agroforestry systems from the western Amazon. Sixty non-nodulating strains indicated a high frequency of endophytic strains in the nodules. The 88 authenticated strains had varying symbiotic efficiency. The SPAD (Soil Plant Analysis Development index (indirect measurement of chlorophyll content was more efficient at evaluating the contribution of symbiotic N2-fixation than shoot dry matter under axenic conditions. Cowpea-nodulating bacteria exhibited a high level of genetic diversity, with 68 genotypes identified by BOX-PCR. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene showed a predominance of the genus Bradyrhizobium, which accounted for 70 % of all strains sequenced. Other genera identified were Rhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Paenibacillus, Bosea, Bacillus, Enterobacter, and Stenotrophomonas. These results support the promiscuity of cowpea and demonstrate the high genetic and symbiotic diversity of rhizobia in soils under agroforestry systems, with some strains exhibiting potential for use as inoculants. The predominance of Bradyrhizobium in land uses with different plant communities and soil characteristics reflects the adaptation of this genus to the Amazon region.

  7. Management of Pulmonary Nodules

    OpenAIRE

    Arvin Aryan

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary nodule characterization is currently being redefined as new clinical, radiological and pathological data are reported, necessitating a reevaluation of the clinical management."nIn approach to an incidentally detected pulmonary nodule, we should consider that there are different risk situations, different lesion morphologies, and different sizes with various management options."nIn this session we will review the different risk situations for patients with pulmonary nodules...

  8. Micromonospora is a normal occupant of actinorhizal nodules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary table 1. Number of isolates per nodule. Nodule Colonies Average Nodule Colonies Average. AV1 Nodule 1 2 13 EEM Nodule 1 17 9.4. Nodule 2 O Nodule 2 13. Nodule 3 2 Nodule 3 9. AV2 Nodule 1 19 16.1 Nodule 4 7. Nodule 2 25 Nodule 5 18. Nodule 3 38 Nodule 6 4. AV4 Nodule 1 8 14.0 Nodule 7 12.

  9. Global changes in transcription orchestrate metabolic differentiation during symbiotic nitrogen fixation in Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colebatch, Gillian; Desbrosses, Guilhem; Ott, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    from specific sets of induced genes. In addition to the expected signs of hypoxia, numerous indications were obtained that nodule cells also experience P-limitation and osmotic stress. Several potential regulators of these stress responses were identified. Metabolite profiling by gas chromatography......Research on legume nodule metabolism has contributed greatly to our knowledge of primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism in plants in general, and in symbiotic nitrogen fixation in particular. However, most previous studies focused on one or a few genes/enzymes involved in selected metabolic...... pathways in many different legume species. We utilized the tools of transcriptomics and metabolomics to obtain an unprecedented overview of the metabolic differentiation that results from nodule development in the model legume, Lotus japonicus. Using an array of more than 5000 nodule cDNA clones...

  10. The Effect of iron fertilization on nodulation, yield and yield traits of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is the major constraint for soybean cultivation in calcareous soils. Its availability affects symbiotic association of the host plant and the endosymbiont and eventually the yield of soybean. However, the effectiveness of integrated application of Bradyrhizobium and Fe fertilizer on nodulation and yield of ...

  11. Green symbiotic cloud communications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, H D; Desai, Uday B; Baveja, Brij Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This book intends to change the perception of modern day telecommunications. Communication systems, usually perceived as “dumb pipes”, carrying information / data from one point to another, are evolved into intelligently communicating smart systems. The book introduces a new field of cloud communications. The concept, theory, and architecture of this new field of cloud communications are discussed. The book lays down nine design postulates that form the basis of the development of a first of its kind cloud communication paradigm entitled Green Symbiotic Cloud Communications or GSCC. The proposed design postulates are formulated in a generic way to form the backbone for development of systems and technologies of the future. The book can be used to develop courses that serve as an essential part of graduate curriculum in computer science and electrical engineering. Such courses can be independent or part of high-level research courses. The book will also be of interest to a wide range of readers including b...

  12. MiR171h restricts root symbioses and shows like its target NSP2 a complex transcriptional regulation in Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Legumes have the unique capability to undergo root nodule and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Both types of root endosymbiosis are regulated by NSP2, which is a target of microRNA171h (miR171h). Although, recent data implies that miR171h specifically restricts arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in the root elongation zone of Medicago truncatula roots, there is limited knowledge available about the spatio-temporal regulation of miR171h expression at different physiological and symbiotic conditions. Results We show that miR171h is functionally expressed from an unusual long primary transcript, previously predicted to encode two identical miR171h strands. Both miR171h and NSP2 transcripts display a complex regulation pattern, which involves the symbiotic status and the fertilization regime of the plant. Quantitative Real-time PCR revealed that miR171h and NSP2 transcript levels show a clear anti-correlation in all tested conditions except in mycorrhizal roots, where NSP2 transcript levels were induced despite of an increased miR171h expression. This was also supported by a clear correlation of transcript levels of NSP2 and MtPt4, a phosphate transporter specifically expressed in a functional AM symbiosis. MiR171h is strongly induced in plants growing in sufficient phosphate conditions, which we demonstrate to be independent of the CRE1 signaling pathway and which is also not required for transcriptional induction of NSP2 in mycorrhizal roots. In situ hybridization and promoter activity analysis of both genes confirmed the complex regulation involving the symbiotic status, P and N nutrition, where both genes show a mainly mutual exclusive expression pattern. Overexpression of miR171h in M. truncatula roots led to a reduction in mycorrhizal colonization and to a reduced nodulation by Sinorhizobium meliloti. Conclusion The spatio-temporal expression of miR171h and NSP2 is tightly linked to the nutritional status of the plant and, together with the results from

  13. Medicago LYK3, an entry receptor in rhizobial nodulation factor signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, P.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Geurts, R.; Fedorova, E.; Dolgikh, E.; Gough, C.; Bisseling, T.

    2007-01-01

    Rhizobia secrete nodulation (Nod) factors, which set in motion the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules on legume host plants. Nod factors induce several cellular responses in root hair cells within minutes, but also are essential for the formation of infection threads by which rhizobia enter

  14. Adaptive evolution of the symbiotic gene NORK is not correlated with shifts of rhizobial specificity in the genus Medicago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mita, De S.; Santoni, S.; Ronfort, J.; Bataillon, T.

    2007-01-01

    The NODULATION RECEPTOR KINASE (NORK) gene encodes a Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR)-containing receptor-like protein and controls the infection by symbiotic rhizobia and endomycorrhizal fungi in Legumes. The occurrence of numerous amino acid changes driven by directional selection has been reported in

  15. Analysis of nodule senescence in pea (Pisum sativum L.) using laser microdissection, real-time PCR, and ACC immunolocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serova, Tatiana A; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Tsyganov, Viktor E

    2017-05-01

    A delay in the senescence of symbiotic nodules could prolong active nitrogen fixation, resulting in improved crop yield and a reduced need for chemical fertilizers. The molecular genetic mechanisms underlying nodule senescence have not been extensively studied with a view to breeding varieties with delayed nodule senescence. In such studies, plant mutants with the phenotype of premature degradation of symbiotic structures are useful models to elucidate the genetic basis of nodule senescence. Using a dataset from transcriptome analysis of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. nodules and previous studies on pea (Pisum sativum L.) nodules, we developed a set of molecular markers based on genes that are known to be activated during nodule senescence. These genes encode cysteine proteases, a thiol protease, a bZIP transcription factor, enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of ethylene (ACS2 for ACC synthase and ACO1 for ACC oxidase) and ABA (AO3 for aldehyde oxidase), and an enzyme involved in catabolism of gibberellins (GA 2-oxidase). We analyzed the transcript levels of these genes in the nodules of two pea wild-types (cv. Sparkle and line Sprint-2) and two mutant lines, one showing premature nodule senescence (E135F (sym13)) and one showing no morphological signs of symbiotic structure degradation (Sprint-2Fix - (sym31)). Real-time PCR analyses revealed that all of the selected genes showed increased transcript levels during nodule aging in all phenotypes. Remarkably, at 4 weeks after inoculation (WAI), the transcript levels of all analyzed genes were significantly higher in the early senescent nodules of the mutant line E135F (sym13) and in nodules of the mutant Sprint-2Fix - (sym31) than in the active nitrogen-fixing nodules of wild-types. In contrast, the transcript levels of the same genes of both wild-types were significantly increased only at 6 WAI. We evaluated the expression of selected markers in the different histological nodule zones of pea cv. Sparkle and its

  16. Relationships between Nitrate and Oxygen Supply in Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation by White Clover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minchin, F. R.; Ines Minguez, M.; Sheedy, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    Exposure of mature, nodulated plants of white clover (Trifolium repens) cv. Blanca to 330 mg dm−3 NO3-N for 8 d caused nitrogenase activity per plant to decrease by 80%. Total nodulated root respiration was not significantly affected but analysis of its components showed an 81% decrease in nitrog...

  17. Identification and characterization of symbiotic genes on the Rhizobium leguminosarum pre sym-plasmid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schetgens, T.M.P.

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria of the genera Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium are unique in their quality to form nitrogen-fixing root nodules in symbiosis with leguminous plants. In fast-growing Rhizobium bacteria the genes involved in host recognition and nodule

  18. Nitrate reductase and nitrogenase activities in relation to N-uptake from soil, 15N-fertilizer and symbiotic fixation in soybean (Glycine max)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruschel, A.P.; Saito, S.M.T.; Vose, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    Nitrate reductase (NRA) and nitrogenase (ARA) activities were evaluated in relation to nitrogen in the plant from soil (NFS), fertilizer (NFF) and symbiotic fixation (NFN 2 ) to study the pattern of utilization of nitrogen in nodulated and non nodulated soybean, 35, 55 and 75 days after planting. Three levels of ( 15 NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 - added to soil were used (0 - 25 and 50 kg N/ha), being the experiment conducted in the greenhouse, with a split plot statistical design and 4 replications. Maximum levels of RNA and ARA occurred 55 days after planting. Addition of 50 kg N/ha decreased NRA at all harvesting time studied; and nodule ARA only 75 days after planting. By that time the nodulated isoline showed higher NRA than the non nodulated one, the NFS and NFF of the isolines were not different 35 and 55 days after planting, but decreased at the last harvest, especially in nodulated soybean. Symbiotic N 2 -fixation increased plant-N after 55 days growth, contribution about 65% of plant-N in the period between 55 and 75 days after planting. Nodulated plant showed higher N than non nodulated, a sinergistic effect of the three sources of N studied on N increase of nodulated plants was observed. (Author) [pt

  19. Effects of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum waaL (rfaL) Gene on Hydrophobicity, Motility, Stress Tolerance, and Symbiotic Relationship with Soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jun-Gu; Jeon, Han-Eul; So, Jae-Seong; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2015-07-23

    We cloned and sequenced the waaL (rfaL) gene from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, which infects soybean and forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybean roots. waaL has been extensively studied in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis of enteric bacteria, but little is known about its function in (brady)rhizobial LPS architecture. To characterize its role as O-antigen ligase in the LPS biosynthesis pathway, we constructed a waaL knock-out mutant and its complemented strain named JS015 and CS015, respectively. LPS analysis showed that an LPS structure of JS015 is deficient in O-antigen as compared to that of the wild type and complemented strain CS015, suggesting that WaaL ligates the O-antigen to lipid A-core oligosaccharide to form a complete LPS. JS015 also revealed increased cell surface hydrophobicity, but it showed decreased motility in soft agar plates. In addition to the alteration in cell surface properties, disruption of the waaL gene caused increased sensitivity of JS015 to hydrogen peroxide, osmotic pressure, and novobiocin. Specifically, plant tests revealed that JS015 failed to nodulate the host plant soybean, indicating that the rhizobial waaL gene is responsible for the establishment of a symbiotic relationship between soybean and B. japonicum.

  20. Ectopic phytocystatin expression increases nodule numbers and influences the responses of soybean (Glycine max) to nitrogen deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quain, Marian D; Makgopa, Matome E; Cooper, James W; Kunert, Karl J; Foyer, Christine H

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine proteases and cystatins have many functions that remain poorly characterised, particularly in crop plants. We therefore investigated the responses of these proteins to nitrogen deficiency in wild-type soybeans and in two independent transgenic soybean lines (OCI-1 and OCI-2) that express the rice cystatin, oryzacystatin-I (OCI). Plants were grown for four weeks under either a high (5 mM) nitrate (HN) regime or in the absence of added nitrate (LN) in the absence or presence of symbiotic rhizobial bacteria. Under the LN regime all lines showed similar classic symptoms of nitrogen deficiency including lower shoot biomass and leaf chlorophyll. However, the LN-induced decreases in leaf protein and increases in root protein tended to be smaller in the OCI-1 and OCI-2 lines than in the wild type. When LN-plants were grown with rhizobia, OCI-1 and OCI-2 roots had significantly more crown nodules than wild-type plants. The growth nitrogen regime had a significant effect on the abundance of transcripts encoding vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs), LN-dependent increases in VPE2 and VPE3 transcripts in all lines. However, the LN-dependent increases of VPE2 and VPE3 transcripts were significantly lower in the leaves of OCI-1 and OCI-2 plants than in the wild type. These results show that nitrogen availability regulates the leaf and root cysteine protease, VPE and cystatin transcript profiles in a manner that is in some cases influenced by ectopic OCI expression. Moreover, the OCI-dependent inhibition of papain-like cysteine proteases favours increased nodulation and enhanced tolerance to nitrogen limitation, as shown by the smaller LN-dependent decreases in leaf protein observed in the OCI-1 and OCI-2 plants relative to the wild type. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Physiological and agrochemical properties of different symbiotic genotypes of pea (Pisum sativum L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazariuk, V M; Sidorova, K K; Shumny, V K; Kallimullina, F R; Klenova M I

    2006-01-01

    Physiological characters of symbiotic mutants of pea were studied: nodulation, activities of nitrogenase and nitrate reductase, chlorophyll content in leaves and their water-holding capacity, biomass accumulation, and nitrogen forms. The parameters reflecting the genotype state of the macrosymbiont under soil conditions considerably varied. Supernodulation mutants stood out against symbiotic pea genotypes by high contents of chlorophyll and nonprotein nitrogen compounds, high nitrogenase activity, and low nitrate reductase activity. The efficiency of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis was largely mediated by the macrosymbiont genotype. The highest atmospheric nitrogen fixation (50-80%) was observed in the parental pea varieties. Despite the highest nitrogenase activity in the nodules, the supernodulation mutants were inferior to the parental varieties by the nitrogen fixation capacity (40-60%), which was due to their low productivity.

  2. Direct detection of radicals in intact soybean nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, C; Moreau, S; Frendo, P

    1998-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been employed to examine the nature of the metal ions and radicals present in intact root nodules of soybean plants grown in the absence of nitrate. The spectra obtained from nodules of different ages using this non-invasive technique show dramatic...... differences, suggesting that there are both qualitative and quantitative changes in the metal ion and radical species present. A major component of the spectra obtained from young nodules is assigned to a complex (Lb-NO) of nitric oxide (NO.) with the heme protein leghemoglobin (Lb). This Lb-NO species, which......, results in changes in the EPR spectra, with the loss of the signals from the Lb-NO complex and appearance of absorptions similar to those from untreated senescent nodules. These results suggest that there are characteristic changes in both the metal ion complexes and radicals present in intact root...

  3. Microbial community analysis of field-grown soybeans with different nodulation phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Seishi; Rallos, Lynn Esther E; Okubo, Takashi; Eda, Shima; Inaba, Shoko; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2008-09-01

    Microorganisms associated with the stems and roots of nonnodulated (Nod(-)), wild-type nodulated (Nod(+)), and hypernodulated (Nod(++)) soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merril] were analyzed by ribosomal intergenic transcribed spacer analysis (RISA) and automated RISA (ARISA). RISA of stem samples detected no bands specific to the nodulation phenotype, whereas RISA of root samples revealed differential bands for the nodulation phenotypes. Pseudomonas fluorescens was exclusively associated with Nod(+) soybean roots. Fusarium solani was stably associated with nodulated (Nod(+) and Nod(++)) roots and less abundant in Nod(-) soybeans, whereas the abundance of basidiomycetes was just the opposite. The phylogenetic analyses suggested that these basidiomycetous fungi might represent a root-associated group in the Auriculariales. Principal-component analysis of the ARISA results showed that there was no clear relationship between nodulation phenotype and bacterial community structure in the stem. In contrast, both the bacterial and fungal community structures in the roots were related to nodulation phenotype. The principal-component analysis further suggested that bacterial community structure in roots could be classified into three groups according to the nodulation phenotype (Nod(-), Nod(+), or Nod(++)). The analysis of root samples indicated that the microbial community in Nod(-) soybeans was more similar to that in Nod(++) soybeans than to that in Nod(+) soybeans.

  4. A salt stress-responsive cytokinin receptor homologue isolated from Medicago sativa nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coba de la Peña, Teodoro; Cárcamo, Claudia B; Almonacid, Luis; Zaballos, Angel; Lucas, M Mercedes; Balomenos, Dimitrios; Pueyo, José J

    2008-03-01

    A new cytokinin receptor homologue, MsHK1, was isolated from Medicago sativa root nodules. MsHK1 expression was induced in alfalfa seedlings by exogenous application of the cytokinin trans-zeatin. Transcript accumulation was detected in different plant organs. MsHK1 expression was induced by salt stress in alfalfa roots, leaves and nodules, and transcript accumulation in the vascular bundles pointed to a putative role in osmosensing for MsHK1 and/or other close cytokinin receptor homologues. Expression in the meristem and the invasion zone of the nodule suggest a role for cytokinin receptors in cytokinin sensing during nodule cell division and differentiation.

  5. Diversity and nitrogen fixation efficiency of rhizobia isolated from nodules of Centrolobium paraense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Cardoso Baraúna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to isolate and characterize rhizobia from nodules of Centrolobium paraense and to evaluate their symbiotic efficiency. Soil samples collected from four sites of the Roraima Cerrado, Brazil, were used to cultivate C. paraense in order to obtain nodules. Isolates (178 were obtained from 334 nodules after cultivation on medium 79. Twenty-five isolates belonging to six morphological groups were authenticated using Vigna unguiculata and they were characterized by 16S rRNA. Isolates identified as Bradyrhizobium were further characterized using rpoB gene sequencing. A greenhouse experiment was carried out with C. paraense to test the 18 authenticated isolates. Approximately 90% of the isolates grew slowly in medium 79. The 16S rRNA analysis showed that 14 authenticated isolates belong to the genus Bradyrhizobium, and rpoB indicated they constitute different groups compared to previously described species. Only four of the 11 fast-growing isolates nodulated V. unguiculata, two of which belong to Rhizobium, and two to Pleomorphomonas, which was not previously reported as a nodulating genus. The Bradyrhizobium isolates ERR 326, ERR 399, and ERR 435 had the highest symbiotic efficiency on C. paraense and showed a contribution similar to the nitrogen treatment. Centrolobium paraense is able to nodulate with different rhizobium species, some of which have not yet been described.

  6. Genetic Identification and Symbiotic Efficiency of an Indigenous Sinorhizobium meliloti Field Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Sikora

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti are of enormous agricultural value, because of their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen in symbiosis with an important forage crop legume – alfalfa. The main aim of this study was (i to isolate indigenous S. meliloti strains from different field sites in Croatia, (ii to assess genetic diversity and genetic relationships amongst strains of natural populations and (iii to provide information about nodulation and symbiotic efficiency of indigenous S. meliloti strains. The nine strains isolated from alfalfa nodules collected from different field sites and three reference strains were analysed. Genetic characterisation by PCR-RFLP of the 16S rDNA, rep-PCR and RAPD-PCR was applied to study the status of Sinorhizobium meliloti populations inhabiting nodules of alfalfa. The results of PCR-RFLP of the 16S rDNA revealed that all isolates belong to the S. meliloti species. Cluster analysis of rep-PCR and RAPD-PCR profiles showed significant differences among S. meliloti isolates. Both methods resulted in identical grouping of strains. Among indigenous strains two divergent groups could be determined. The biggest differences were detected among two reference strains and all field isolates. Greenhouse studies were performed for evaluation of symbiotic efficiency and compatibility of S. meliloti strains with two alfalfa cultivars. Quantitative expression of symbiotic efficiency was evaluated by measurement of nodule dry weight, content of proteins and total nitrogen in plants, dry matter and green mass yield of plants. All strains nodulated both alfalfa cultivars but with different efficiency. Significant differences in dry matter and green mass yield of alfalfa as well as protein content were determined depending on the strain used. The results indicate that three indigenous S. meliloti strains can be characterised as the most efficient of all strains used in this study.

  7. Characterization of rhizobial isolates nodulating Millettia pinnata in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Abdul; Amalraj, E Leo Daniel; Praveen Kumar, G; Grover, Minakshi; Venkateswarlu, B

    2012-11-01

    Millettia pinnata (Synonym Pongamia pinnata) is a viable source of oil for the mushrooming biofuel industry, source for agroforestry, urban landscaping, and the bio-amelioration of degraded lands. It also helps in maintaining soil fertility through symbiotic nitrogen fixation. However, not much work is reported on classification and characterization of the rhizobia associated with this plant. In the present study, an attempt was made to isolate rhizobial strains nodulating Millettia from soils collected from southern regions of India. The isolates were characterized using numerical taxonomy, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and cross nodulation ability. The results showed high phenotypic and genetic diversity among the rhizobia symbiotic with Millattia pinnata. The isolates formed five clusters at similarity level of 0.82 based on the results of numerical taxonomy. Results on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that most microsymbionts of M. pinnata belonged to Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium, which are closely related to Rhizobium sp., B. elkanii and B. yuanmingense. Among these isolates, some isolates could grow in a pH range of 4.0-10.0, some could tolerate a high salt concentration (3% NaCl) and could grow at a maximum temperature between 35 and 45 °C. M. pinnata formed nodules with diverse rhizobia in Indian soils. These results offered the first systematic information about the microsymbionts of M. pinnata grown in the soils from southern part of India. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ABUNDANCE AND DIVERSITY OF LEGUME NODULATING RHIZOBIA IN SOILS OF EMBU DISTRICT, KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George M Mwenda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A major strategy towards addressing soil fertility depletion is the conservation and sustainable use of rhizobia that are able to fix nitrogen in the soil in association with legumes. The study assessed abundance and diversity of legume nodulating rhizobia (LNB in soils collected from six different land use systems in Embu District, Kenya. The populations were estimated by the most-probable-number (MPN plant infection technique using Macroptilium atropurpureum (DC. Urban (Siratro as the trap host species. Symbiotic effectiveness was measured for the isolates in association with Siratro. Isolated rhizobia were characterized morphologically and genetically by PCR-RFLP and partial sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The LNB populations in soils collected from the different land uses in Embu ranged from 0 to 2.3 ï‚´ 102 cells g-1 soil. There was apparent land use effect on abundance of LNB with fallow system giving high abundance. A total of 250 pure isolates were obtained from the root nodules of Siratro trap plants. The isolates were characterized on yeast extract mannitol mineral salts agar (YEMA media containing bromothymol blue and grouped into fast growers (acid-producing and slow growers (alkali-producing (70% and 30 % of isolates respectively. PCR-RFLP analysis categorised the rhizobia into five species in the genera Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium and Agrobacterium. Land use system under tea had four of the five species found in the area whereas natural forests had two species. Land use significantly impacted on the diversity of rhizobia (P

  9. Nitrogen modulation of legume root architecture signalling pathways involves phytohormones and small regulatory molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiatul Akmal Mohd-Radzman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen, particularly nitrate is an important yield determinant for crops. However, current agricultural practice with excessive fertilizer usage has detrimental effects on the environment. Therefore, legumes have been suggested as a sustainable alternative for replenishing soil nitrogen. Legumes can uniquely form nitrogen-fixing nodules through symbiotic interaction with specialized soil bacteria. Legumes possess a highly plastic root system which modulates its architecture according to the nitrogen availability in the soil. Understanding how legumes regulate root development in response to nitrogen availability is an important step to improving root architecture. The nitrogen-mediated root development pathway starts with sensing soil nitrogen level followed by subsequent signal transduction pathways involving phytohormones, microRNAs and regulatory peptides that collectively modulate the growth and shape of the root system. This review focuses on the current understanding of nitrogen-mediated legume root architecture including local and systemic regulations by different N-sources and the modulations by phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

  10. The Lotus japonicus ndx gene family is involved in nodule function and maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette; Gustafsen, Camilla; Jensen, Dorthe Bødker

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the function of the ndx homeobox genes during the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, two Lotus japonicus ndr genes were expressed in the antisense orientation under the control of the nodule-expressed promoter Psenod12 in transgenic Lotus japonicus plants. Many of the transformants obtained...... segregated into plants that failed to sustain proper development and maintenance of root nodules concomitant with down-regulation of the two ndx genes. The root nodules were actively fixing nitrogen 3 weeks after inoculation, but the plants exhibited a stunted growth phenotype. The nodules on such antisense...... supplied to the plants in which the two ndx genes are down-regulated. The results presented here, indicate that the ndx genes play a role in the development of structural nodule features, required for proper gas diffusion into the nodule and/or transport of the assimilated nitrogen to the plant....

  11. The NFP locus of Medicago truncatula controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction upstream of a rapid calcium flux and root hair deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Besma Ben; Shaw, Sidney L; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Maillet, Fabienne; Penmetsa, R Varma; Cook, Douglas; Long, Sharon R; Dénarié, Jean; Gough, Clare

    2003-05-01

    Establishment of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis depends on a molecular dialogue, in which rhizobial nodulation (Nod) factors act as symbiotic signals, playing a key role in the control of specificity of infection and nodule formation. Using nodulation-defective (Nod-) mutants of Medicago truncatula to study the mechanisms controlling Nod factor perception and signalling, we have previously identified five genes that control components of a Nod factor-activated signal transduction pathway. Characterisation of a new M. truncatula Nod- mutant led to the identification of the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) locus. The nfp mutant has a novel phenotype among Nod- mutants of M. truncatula, as it does not respond to Nod factors by any of the responses tested. The nfp mutant thus shows no rapid calcium flux, the earliest detectable Nod factor response of wild-type plants, and no root hair deformation. The nfp mutant is also deficient in Nod factor-induced calcium spiking and early nodulin gene expression. While certain genes controlling Nod factor signal transduction also control the establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, the nfp mutant shows a wild-type mycorrhizal phenotype. These data indicate that the NFP locus controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction, upstream of previously identified genes and specific to nodulation.

  12. Ploidy-dependent changes in the epigenome of symbiotic cells correlate with specific patterns of gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Nagymihály, Marianna

    2017-04-13

    The formation of symbiotic nodule cells in Medicago truncatula is driven by successive endoreduplication cycles and transcriptional reprogramming in different temporal waves including the activation of more than 600 cysteine-rich NCR genes expressed only in nodules. We show here that the transcriptional waves correlate with growing ploidy levels and have investigated how the epigenome changes during endoreduplication cycles. Differential DNA methylation was found in only a small subset of symbiotic nodule-specific genes, including more than half of the NCR genes, whereas in most genes DNA methylation was unaffected by the ploidy levels and was independent of the genes\\' active or repressed state. On the other hand, expression of nodule-specific genes correlated with ploidy-dependent opening of the chromatin as well as, in a subset of tested genes, with reduced H3K27me3 levels combined with enhanced H3K9ac levels. Our results suggest that endoreduplication-dependent epigenetic changes contribute to transcriptional reprogramming in the differentiation of symbiotic cells.

  13. Genetic Diversity and Host Range of Rhizobia Nodulating Lotus tenuis in Typical Soils of the Salado River Basin (Argentina)▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrella, María Julia; Muñoz, Socorro; Soto, María José; Ruiz, Oscar; Sanjuán, Juan

    2009-01-01

    A total of 103 root nodule isolates were used to estimate the diversity of bacteria nodulating Lotus tenuis in typical soils of the Salado River Basin. A high level of genetic diversity was revealed by repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR, and 77 isolates with unique genomic fingerprints were further differentiated into two clusters, clusters A and B, after 16S rRNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Cluster A strains appeared to be related to the genus Mesorhizobium, whereas cluster B was related to the genus Rhizobium. 16S rRNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis further supported the distribution of most of the symbiotic isolates in either Rhizobium or Mesorhizobium: the only exception was isolate BA135, whose 16S rRNA gene was closely related to the 16S rRNA gene of the genus Aminobacter. Most Mesorhizobium-like isolates were closely related to Mesorhizobium amorphae, Mesorhizobium mediterraneum, Mesorhizobium tianshanense, or the broad-host-range strain NZP2037, but surprisingly few isolates grouped with Mesorhizobium loti type strain NZP2213. Rhizobium-like strains were related to Rhizobium gallicum, Rhizobium etli, or Rhizobium tropici, for which Phaseolus vulgaris is a common host. However, no nodC or nifH genes could be amplified from the L. tenuis isolates, suggesting that they have rather divergent symbiosis genes. In contrast, nodC genes from the Mesorhizobium and Aminobacter strains were closely related to nodC genes from narrow-host-range M. loti strains. Likewise, nifH gene sequences were very highly conserved among the Argentinian isolates and reference Lotus rhizobia. The high levels of conservation of the nodC and nifH genes suggest that there was a common origin of the symbiosis genes in narrow-host-range Lotus symbionts, supporting the hypothesis that both intrageneric horizontal gene transfer and intergeneric horizontal gene transfer are important mechanisms for the spread of symbiotic capacity in the Salado River Basin. PMID

  14. Genetic Diversity and Symbiotic Efficiency of Indigenous Common Bean Rhizobia in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Pohajda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nodule bacteria (rhizobia in symbiotic associations with legumes enable considerable entries of biologically fixed nitrogen into soil. Efforts are therefore made to intensify the natural process of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legume inoculation. Studies of field populationsof rhizobia open up the possibility to preserve and probably exploit some indigenous strains with hidden symbiotic or ecological potentials. The main aim of the present study is to determine genetic diversity of common bean rhizobia isolated from different field sites in central Croatia and to evaluate their symbiotic efficiency and compatibility with host plants. The isolation procedure revealed that most soil samples contained no indigenous common bean rhizobia. The results indicate that the cropping history had a significant impact on the presence of indigenous strains. Although all isolates were found to belong to species Rhizobium leguminosarum, significant genetic diversity at the strain level was determined. Application of both random amplifi cation of polymorphic DNA (RAPD and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus–polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR methods resulted in similar grouping of strains. Symbiotic efficiency of indigenous rhizobia as well as their compatibility with two commonly grown bean varieties were tested in field experiments. Application of indigenous rhizobial strains as inoculants resulted in significantly different values of nodulation, seed yield as well as plant nitrogen and seed protein contents. The most abundant nodulation and the highest plant nitrogen and protein contents were determined in plants inoculated with R. leguminosarum strains S17/2 and S21/6. Although, in general, the inoculation had a positive impact on seed yield, differences depending on the applied strain were not determined. The overall results show the high degree of symbiotic efficiency of the specific indigenous strain S21/6. These results indicate different

  15. The Medicago truncatula lysine motif-receptor-like kinase gene family includes NFP and new nodule-expressed genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arrighi, J.F.; Barre, A.; Amor, Ben B.; Bersoult, A.; Campos Soriano, L.; Mirabella, R.; Carvalho-Niebel, de F.; Journet, E.P.; Ghérardi, M.; Huguet, T.; Geurts, R.; Dénarié, J.; Rougé, P.; Gough, C.

    2006-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide

  16. Phenotypic, Molecular and Symbiotic Characterization of the Rhizobial Symbionts of Desmanthus paspalaceus (Lindm.) Burkart That Grow in the Province of Santa Fe, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasero, Laura Viviana; Del Papa, María Florencia; López, José Luis; Albicoro, Francisco Javier; Zabala, Juan Marcelo; Toniutti, María Antonieta; Pensiero, José Francisco; Lagares, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Desmanthus paspalaceus (Lindm.) Burkart belongs to the D. virgatus complex, subfamily Mimosoidae. The known potential as livestock fodder of several of these legumes prompted us to undertake a phenotypic, molecular, and symbiotic characterization of the D. paspalaceus symbionts in the Santa Fe province, Argentina. The rhizobia collected—containing isolates with different abiotic-stress tolerances—showed a remarkable genetic diversity by PCR fingerprinting, with 11 different amplification profiles present among 20 isolates. In selected isolates 16S-rDNA sequencing detected mesorhizobia (60%) and rhizobia (40%) within the collection, in contrast to the genus of the original inoculant strain CB3126—previously isolated from Leucaena leucocephala—that we typified here through its 16S rDNA as Sinorhizobium terangae. The results revealed the establishment by diverse bacterial genera -rhizobia, sinorhizobia, and mesorhizobia- of full N2-fixing symbiotic associations with D. paspalaceus. This diversity was paralleled by the presence of at least two different nodC allelic variants. The identical nodC alleles of the Mesorhizobia sp. 10.L.4.2 and 10.L.5.3 notably failed to group within any of the currently described rhizo-/brady-/azorhizobial nodC clades. Interestingly, the nodC from S. terangae CB3126 clustered close to homologs from common bean nodulating rhizobia, but not with the nodC from S. terangae WSM1721 that nodulates Acacia. No previous data were available on nod-gene phylogeny for Desmanthus symbionts. A field assay indicated that inoculation of D. paspalaceus with the local Rhizobium sp. 10L.11.4 produced higher aerial-plant dry weights compared to S. teranga CB3126–inoculated plants. Neither the mesorhizobia 10.L.4.2 or 10.L.5.3 nor the rhizobium 10L.11.4 induced root nodules in L. leucocephala or P. vulgaris. The results show that some of the local isolates have remarkable tolerances to several abiotic stresses including acidity, salt, and temperature

  17. A Biosensor-Based Leaf Punch Assay for Glutamine Correlates to Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation Measurements in Legumes to Permit Rapid Screening of Rhizobia Inoculants under Controlled Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilakarathna, Malinda S; Moroz, Nicholas; Raizada, Manish N

    2017-01-01

    Legumes are protein sources for billions of humans and livestock. These traits are enabled by symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF), whereby root nodule-inhabiting rhizobia bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen (N) into usable N. Unfortunately, SNF rates in legume crops suffer from undiagnosed incompatible/suboptimal interactions between crop varieties and rhizobia strains. There are opportunities to test much large numbers of rhizobia strains if cost/labor-effective diagnostic tests become available which may especially benefit researchers in developing countries. Inside root nodules, fixed N from rhizobia is assimilated into amino acids including glutamine (Gln) for export to shoots as the major fraction (amide-exporting legumes) or as the minor fraction (ureide-exporting legumes). Here, we have developed a new leaf punch based technique to screen rhizobia inoculants for SNF activity following inoculation of both amide exporting and ureide exporting legumes. The assay is based on measuring Gln output using the GlnLux biosensor, which consists of Escherichia coli cells auxotrophic for Gln and expressing a constitutive lux operon. Subsistence farmer varieties of an amide exporter (lentil) and two ureide exporters (cowpea and soybean) were inoculated with different strains of rhizobia under controlled conditions, then extracts of single leaf punches were incubated with GlnLux cells, and light-output was measured using a 96-well luminometer. In the absence of external N and under controlled conditions, the results from the leaf punch assay correlated with 15 N-based measurements, shoot N percentage, and shoot total fixed N in all three crops. The technology is rapid, inexpensive, high-throughput, requires minimum technical expertise and very little tissue, and hence is relatively non-destructive. We compared and contrasted the benefits and limitations of this novel diagnostic assay to methods.

  18. A Biosensor-Based Leaf Punch Assay for Glutamine Correlates to Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation Measurements in Legumes to Permit Rapid Screening of Rhizobia Inoculants under Controlled Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinda S. Thilakarathna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Legumes are protein sources for billions of humans and livestock. These traits are enabled by symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF, whereby root nodule-inhabiting rhizobia bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen (N into usable N. Unfortunately, SNF rates in legume crops suffer from undiagnosed incompatible/suboptimal interactions between crop varieties and rhizobia strains. There are opportunities to test much large numbers of rhizobia strains if cost/labor-effective diagnostic tests become available which may especially benefit researchers in developing countries. Inside root nodules, fixed N from rhizobia is assimilated into amino acids including glutamine (Gln for export to shoots as the major fraction (amide-exporting legumes or as the minor fraction (ureide-exporting legumes. Here, we have developed a new leaf punch based technique to screen rhizobia inoculants for SNF activity following inoculation of both amide exporting and ureide exporting legumes. The assay is based on measuring Gln output using the GlnLux biosensor, which consists of Escherichia coli cells auxotrophic for Gln and expressing a constitutive lux operon. Subsistence farmer varieties of an amide exporter (lentil and two ureide exporters (cowpea and soybean were inoculated with different strains of rhizobia under controlled conditions, then extracts of single leaf punches were incubated with GlnLux cells, and light-output was measured using a 96-well luminometer. In the absence of external N and under controlled conditions, the results from the leaf punch assay correlated with 15N-based measurements, shoot N percentage, and shoot total fixed N in all three crops. The technology is rapid, inexpensive, high-throughput, requires minimum technical expertise and very little tissue, and hence is relatively non-destructive. We compared and contrasted the benefits and limitations of this novel diagnostic assay to methods.

  19. Exploring the symbiotic pangenome of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galardini, Marco [University of Florence; Mengoni, Alessio [University of Florence; Brilli, Matteo [Universite de Lyon, France; Pini, Francesco [University of Florence; Fioravanti, Antonella [University of Florence; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mocali, Stefano [Agrobiol & Pedol Ctr ABP, Agr Res Council, I-50121 Florence, Italy; Bazzicalupo, Marco [University of Florence; Biondi, Emanuele [University of Florence

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model system for the studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. An extensive polymorphism at the genetic and phenotypic level is present in natural populations of this species, especially in relation with symbiotic promotion of plant growth. AK83 and BL225C are two nodule-isolated strains with diverse symbiotic phenotypes; BL225C is more efficient in promoting growth of the Medicago sativa plants than strain AK83. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of the phenotypic diversification of S. meliloti strains AK83 and BL225C, we sequenced the complete genomes for these two strains. Results: With sizes of 7.14 Mbp and 6.97 Mbp, respectively, the genomes of AK83 and BL225C are larger than the laboratory strain Rm1021. The core genome of Rm1021, AK83, BL225C strains included 5124 orthologous groups, while the accessory genome was composed by 2700 orthologous groups. While Rm1021 and BL225C have only three replicons (Chromosome, pSymA and pSymB), AK83 has also two plasmids, 260 and 70 Kbp long. We found 65 interesting orthologous groups of genes that were present only in the accessory genome, consequently responsible for phenotypic diversity and putatively involved in plant-bacterium interaction. Notably, the symbiosis inefficient AK83 lacked several genes required for microaerophilic growth inside nodules, while several genes for accessory functions related to competition, plant invasion and bacteroid tropism were identified only in AK83 and BL225C strains. Presence and extent of polymorphism in regulons of transcription factors involved in symbiotic interaction were also analyzed. Our results indicate that regulons are flexible, with a large number of accessory genes, suggesting that regulons polymorphism could also be a key determinant in the variability of symbiotic performances among the analyzed strains.

  20. Molecular and biochemical analysis of symbiotic plant receptor kinase complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Douglas R; Riely, Brendan K

    2010-09-01

    DE-FG02-01ER15200 was a 36-month project, initiated on Sept 1, 2005 and extended with a one-year no cost extension to August 31, 2009. During the project period we published seven manuscripts (2 in review). Including the prior project period (2002-2005) we published 12 manuscripts in journals that include Science, PNAS, The Plant Cell, Plant Journal, Plant Physiology, and MPMI. The primary focus of this work was to further elucidate the function of the Nod factor signaling pathway that is involved in initiation of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis and in particular to explore the relationship between receptor kinase-like proteins and downstream effectors of symbiotic development. During the project period we have map-base cloned two additional players in symbiotic development, including an ERF transcription factor and an ethylene pathway gene (EIN2) that negatively regulates symbiotic signaling; we have also further characterized the subcellular distribution and function of a nuclear-localized symbiosis-specific ion channel, DMI1. The major outcome of the work has been the development of systems for exploring and validating protein-protein interactions that connect symbiotic receptor-like proteins to downstream responses. In this regard, we have developed both homologous (i.e., in planta) and heterologous (i.e., in yeast) systems to test protein interactions. Using yeast 2-hybrid screens we isolated the only known interactor of the nuclear-localized calcium-responsive kinase DMI3. We have also used yeast 2-hybrid methodology to identify interactions between symbiotic signaling proteins and certain RopGTPase/RopGEF proteins that regulate root hair polar growth. More important to the long-term goals of our work, we have established a TAP tagging system that identifies in planta interactions based on co-immuno precipitation and mass spectrometry. The validity of this approach has been shown using known interactors that either co-iummnoprecipate (i.e., remorin) or co

  1. NODUL TIROID SOLITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Prema Yani Sidemen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Latar Belakang: Nodul tiroid adalah pembengkakan atau massa pada kelenjar tiroid.Pembedahan merupakan pilihan terapi utama, namun pembedahan yang tidak dilakukandengan baik berisiko tinggi mencederai 2 struktur penting, yakni kelenjar paratiroid dannervus rekuren laringeal. Risiko nodul tiroid akan meningkat seiring pertambahan usiadan kurangnya asupan sodium.Insiden terjadinya nodul tiroid lebih sering ditemukanpada laki-laki dan usia di atas 50 tahun, namun pada kasus ini nodul tiroid soliterditemukan pada seorang perempuan dewasa muda sehingga melatar belakangi penulisuntuk mendiskusikan kasus ini dalam laporan kasus.Kasus: Seorang pasien perempuan 32 tahun dengan keluhan tumbuh benjolan padaleher kiri sejak ± 1 tahun yang lalu. Benjolan tersebut dirasakan semakin membesar.Pasien tidak mengeluhkan rasa nyeri di daerah benjolan. Gangguan pada saat makanataupun minum, riwayat sesak, dada berdebar-debar, sering berkeringat, ataupunpenurunan berat badan disangkal. Pada pemeriksaan fisik didapatkan keadaan umumdalam batas normal.  Pada pemeriksaan status lokalis pada region colli anterior lateralsinistra ditemukan massa lunak yang mobile dengan batas tegas dan ukuran ± 3,2 cm x3,4 cm.Hasil: Hasil pemeriksaan patologi anatomi menunjukkan terdapat degenerasi kistikpada massa tiroid tersebut. Pasien kemudian menjalani tindakan pembedahan, yaknitiroidektomi dengan isthmolobectomy. Tiroidektomi dengan teknik diseksi kapsularpada pasien ini berhasil dibuktikan dengan tidak terdapatnya kerusakan pita suara ataukejang pasca operasi.Kesimpulan: Kondisi pasca tiroidektomi dengan teknik diseksi kapsular pada pasien inibaik, tidak terdapat komplikasi kerusakan pita suara dan nervus rekuren laringeal,pasien hidup, dan luka operasi terawat baik.

  2. A rhamnose-deficient lipopolysaccharide mutant of Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 is defective in root colonization and beneficial interactions with its flooding-tolerant hosts Sesbania cannabina and wetland rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Shubhajit; Mukherjee, Arijit; Wiley-Kalil, Audrey; Das, Seema; Owen, Heather; Reddy, Pallavolu M; Ané, Jean-Michel; James, Euan K; Gyaneshwar, Prasad

    2016-10-01

    Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 develops a classical nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the aquatic legume Sesbania cannabina (Retz.). It also promotes the growth of wetland rice (Oryza sativa L.), but little is known about the rhizobial determinants important for these interactions. In this study, we analyzed the colonization of S. cannabina and rice using a strain of Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 dually marked with β-glucuronidase and the green fluorescent protein. This bacterium colonized S. cannabina by crack entry and through root hair infection under flooded and non-flooded conditions, respectively. Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 colonized the surfaces of wetland rice roots, but also entered them at the base of lateral roots. It became endophytically established within intercellular spaces in the rice cortex, and intracellularly within epidermal and hypodermal cells. A mutant of Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 altered in the synthesis of the rhamnose-containing O-antigen exhibited significant defects, not only in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation with S. cannabina, but also in rice colonization and plant growth promotion. Supplementation with purified lipopolysaccharides from the wild-type strain, but not from the mutant, restored the beneficial colonization of rice roots, but not fully effective nodulation of S. cannabina Commonalities and differences in the rhizobial colonization of the roots of wetland legume and rice hosts are discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Competitive nodulation blocking of cv. Afghanistan pea is related to high levels of nodulation factors made by some strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Bridget; Davies, Andrea E; Wilson, Karen E; Bisseling, Ton; Downie, J Allan

    2002-01-01

    Cultivar Afghanistan peas are resistant to nodulation by many strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae but are nodulated by strain TOM, which carries the host specificity gene nodX. Some strains that lack nodX can inhibit nodulation of cv. Afghanistan by strain TOM. We present evidence that this "competitive nodulation-blocking" (Cnb) phenotype may result from high levels of Nod factors inhibiting nodulation of cv. Afghanistan peas. The TOM nod gene region (including nodX) is cloned on pIJ1095, and strains (including TOM itself) carrying pIJ1095 nodulate cv. Afghanistan peas very poorly but can nodulate other varieties normally. The presence of pIJ1095, which causes increased levels of Nod factor production, correlates with Cnb. Nodulation of cv. Afghanistan by TOM is also inhibited by a cloned nodD gene that increases nod gene expression and Nod factor production. Nodulation of cv. Afghanistan can be stimulated if nodD on pIJ1095 is mutated, thus severely reducing the level of Nod factor produced. Repression of nod gene expression by nolR eliminates the Cnb phenotype and can stimulate nodulation of cv. Afghanistan. Addition of Nod factors to cv. Afghanistan roots strongly inhibits nodulation. The Cnb+ strains and added Nod factors inhibit infection thread initiation by strain TOM. The sym2A allele determines resistance of cv. Afghanistan to nodulation by strains of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae lacking nodX. We tested whether sym2A is involved in Cnb by using a pea line carrying the sym2A region introgressed from cv. Afghanistan; nodulation in the introgressed line was inhibited by Cnb+ strains. Therefore, the sym2A region has an effect on Cnb, although another locus (or loci) may contribute to the stronger Cnb seen in cv. Afghanistan.

  4. Regulation of respiration and the oxygen diffusion barrier in soybean protect symbiotic nitrogen fixation from chilling-induced inhibition and shoots from premature senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerden, Philippus D R; Kiddle, Guy; Pellny, Till K; Mokwala, Phatlane W; Jordaan, Anine; Strauss, Abram J; de Beer, Misha; Schlüter, Urte; Kunert, Karl J; Foyer, Christine H

    2008-09-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is sensitive to dark chilling (7 degrees C-15 degrees C)-induced inhibition in soybean (Glycine max). To characterize the mechanisms that cause the stress-induced loss of nodule function, we examined nodule structure, carbon-nitrogen interactions, and respiration in two soybean genotypes that differ in chilling sensitivity: PAN809 (PAN), which is chilling sensitive, and Highveld Top (HT), which is more chilling resistant. Nodule numbers were unaffected by dark chilling, as was the abundance of the nitrogenase and leghemoglobin proteins. However, dark chilling decreased nodule respiration rates, nitrogenase activities, and NifH and NifK mRNAs and increased nodule starch, sucrose, and glucose in both genotypes. Ureide and fructose contents decreased only in PAN nodules. While the chilling-induced decreases in nodule respiration persisted in PAN even after return to optimal temperatures, respiration started to recover in HT by the end of the chilling period. The area of the intercellular spaces in the nodule cortex and infected zone was greatly decreased in HT after three nights of chilling, an acclimatory response that was absent from PAN. These data show that HT nodules are able to regulate both respiration and the area of the intercellular spaces during chilling and in this way control the oxygen diffusion barrier, which is a key component of the nodule stress response. We conclude that chilling-induced loss of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in PAN is caused by the inhibition of respiration coupled to the failure to regulate the oxygen diffusion barrier effectively. The resultant limitations on nitrogen availability contribute to the greater chilling-induced inhibition of photosynthesis in PAN than in HT.

  5. Magnesium-content of Rhizobium nodules in different plants: the importance of magnesium in nitrogen-fixation of nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Sandor A; Stefanovits-Bányai, Eva; Takács-Hájos, Maria

    2004-12-01

    Rhizobium bacteria induce nodules (tumors) in roots of leguminous crops that fix nitrogen (N2) from the atmosphere. Trials were carried on in sterile perlite where two species of peas were grown hydroponically, and in two different soil types (brown forest soil and meadow silt soil), in a field where different leguminous plants were chosen for test plants: lupin, soybean, broad-bean, lentil and bean inoculated by Rhizobium bacteria. The Mg-content of the nutrient solution was higher than that of the control, but in the soil tests 1% Mg leaf fertilization was applied after bacterial inoculation. Number, weight and Mg-content of nodules were evaluated using an AAS method compared with the thick and thin hair/roots of the given plant. Our results clearly show that the Mg nutrition treatment increased the number of Rhizobium nodules and their Mg-content, resulting in increased N2-fixation and yield.

  6. Nodulation pattern and biodiversity of rhizobia of some important ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A collection of 20 root nodule bacteria were isolated from the hitherto unexplored indigenous woody legumes from Ethiopia. Their diversity was evaluated using numerical analyses on different morphological and physiological characteristics. Most of the isolates were found to be slow-growing, sensitive to high concentration ...

  7. Bradyrhizobium vignae sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing symbiont isolated from effective nodules of Vigna and Arachis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Hurek, Thomas; Bünger, Wiebke; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Twenty one strains of symbiotic bacteria from root nodules of local races of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) and peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) grown on subsistence farmers' fields in the Kavango region of Namibia, were previously characterized as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To verify their taxonomic position, the strains were further analysed using a polyphasic approach. 16S rRNA gene sequences were most similar to Bradyrhizobium manausense BR 3351T, with Bradyrhizobium ganzhouense RITF806T being the most closely related type strain in the phylogenetic analysis, and Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071T in the ITS sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated glnII-recA-rpoB-dnaK placed the strains in a highly supported lineage distinct from species of the genus Bradyrhizobium with validly published names; they were most closely related to Bradyrhizobium subterraneum 58 2-1T. The status of the species was validated by results of DNA-DNA hybridization. The combination of phenotypic characteristics from several tests, including carbon source utilization and antibiotic resistance, could be used to differentiate representative strains of species of the genus Bradyrhizobium with validly published names. Novel strain 7-2T induced effective nodules on Vigna subterranea, Vigna unguiculata, Arachis hypogaea and on Lablab purpureus. The DNA G+C content of strain 7-2T was 65.4 mol% (Tm). Based on the data presented, we conclude that these strains represent a novel species for which the name Bradyrhizobium vignae sp. nov. is proposed, with strain 7-2T [LMG 28791T, DSMZ 100297T, NTCCM0018T (Windhoek)] as the type strain.

  8. Nutrient acquisition by symbiotic fungi governs Palaeozoic climate transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Benjamin J W; Batterman, Sarah A; Field, Katie J

    2018-02-05

    Fossil evidence from the Rhynie chert indicates that early land plants, which evolved in a high-CO 2 atmosphere during the Palaeozoic Era, hosted diverse fungal symbionts. It is hypothesized that the rise of early non-vascular land plants, and the later evolution of roots and vasculature, drove the long-term shift towards a high-oxygen, low CO 2 climate that eventually permitted the evolution of mammals and, ultimately, humans. However, very little is known about the productivity of the early terrestrial biosphere, which depended on the acquisition of the limiting nutrient phosphorus via fungal symbiosis. Recent laboratory experiments have shown that plant-fungal symbiotic function is specific to fungal identity, with carbon-for-phosphorus exchange being either enhanced or suppressed under superambient CO 2 By incorporating these experimental findings into a biogeochemical model, we show that the differences in these symbiotic nutrient acquisition strategies could greatly alter the plant-driven changes to climate, allowing drawdown of CO 2 to glacial levels, and altering the nature of the rise of oxygen. We conclude that an accurate depiction of plant-fungal symbiotic systems, informed by high-CO 2 experiments, is key to resolving the question of how the first terrestrial ecosystems altered our planet.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The Rhynie cherts: our earliest terrestrial ecosystem revisited'. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Nodulation and mycorrhization of transgenic soybean after glyphosate application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloisio Freitas Chagas Junior

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria like Bradyrhizobium spp with in relation to glyphosate can be influenced by the concentration of the herbicide. This study aims to evaluate the effects of two formulations of glyphosate, in two application periods, on nodulation and mycorrhization in a soybean of variety RR P98Y11, using greenhouse, in pots with capacity of 4 L with savanna soils. Six treatments were utilized using Roundup Ultra and Roundup Original with one and two applications, witness without herbicide and witness only with mineral nitrogen, in a completely randomized design. Four evaluations were done, every 15 days, to determine the plant height, shoot and root dry weight, number of nodules, nodule dry weigh and mycorrhizae. It was observed an increase on the number of nodules, with the use of Roundup Ultra until 15 days after the first application. After this period, the witness only with inoculants showed a larger number of nodules. Roundup Ultra had positive influences on the dry weight of nodules, regardless the number of applications. There was no influence of glyphosate formulation considering the mycorrhizal colonization.

  10. Thyroid carcinoma and hot nodule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukata, Shuji; Tamai, Hajime; Matsubayashi, Sunao; Nagai, Keisuke; Hirota, Yoshihiko; Matsuzuka, Fumio; Katayama, Shoichi; Kuma, Kanji; Nagataki, Shigenobu

    1987-09-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with a nodule in the thyroid gland. /sup 131/I scintigraphy of the gland showed a hot nodule. Histology of the resected thyroid revealed a papillary adenocarcinoma. Although a thyroid carcinoma with a hot nodule seen on the radioiodine isotope scan is a very rare occurrence, it is clinically very important because it may indicate a thyroid malignancy.

  11. Rhizobium esperanzae sp. nov., a N2-fixing root symbiont of Phaseolus vulgaris from Mexican soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Andrey Barbosa; Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Helene, Luisa Caroline Ferraz; Hungria, Mariangela

    2017-10-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important legume consumed worldwide; its genetic origins lie in the Mesoamerican (main centre) and Andean regions. It is promiscuous in establishing root-nodule symbioses; however, in the centres of origin/domestication, the predominant association is with Rhizobium etli. We have previously identified a new lineage (PEL-3) comprising three strains (CNPSo 661, CNPSo 666 and CNPSo 668 T ) isolated from root nodules of common bean in Mexico, and that have now been analysed in more detail. Sequences of the 16S rRNA gene positioned the three strains in a large clade including R. etli. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) with four housekeeping genes (recA, glnII, gyrB and rpoA) positioned the three strains in a clade distinct from all other described species, with 100 % bootstrap support, and nucleotide identity (NI) of the four concatenated genes with the closest species R. etli was 95.0 %. Average nucleotide identity (ANI) values of the whole genome of CNPSo 668 T and the closest species, R. etli, was 92.9 %. In the analyses of the symbiotic genes nifH and nodC, the strains comprised a cluster with other rhizobial symbionts of P. vulgaris. Other phenotypic and genotypic traits were determined for the new group and our data support the description of the three CNPSo strains as a novel species, for which the name Rhizobium esperanzae is proposed. The type strain is CNPSo 668 T (=UMR 1320 T =Z87-8 T =LMG 30030 T =U 10001 T ), isolated from a common-bean nodule in Mexico.

  12. Waterlogging tolerance, tissue nitrogen and oxygen transport in the forage legume Melilotus siculus: a comparison of nodulated and nitrate-fed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnerup, Dennis; Toro, Guillermo; Pedersen, Ole; Colmer, Timothy David

    2018-01-17

    Soil waterlogging adversely impacts most plants. Melilotus siculus is a waterlogging-tolerant annual forage legume, but data were lacking for the effects of root-zone hypoxia on nodulated plants reliant on N2 fixation. The aim was to compare the waterlogging tolerance and physiology of M. siculus reliant on N2 fixation or with access to NO3-. A factorial experiment imposed treatments of water level (drained or waterlogged), rhizobia (nil or inoculated) and mineral N supply (nil or 11 mm NO3-) for 21 d on plants in pots of vermiculite in a glasshouse. Nodulation, shoot and root growth and tissue N were determined. Porosity (gas volume per unit tissue volume) and respiration rates of root tissues and nodules, and O2 microelectrode profiling across nodules, were measured in a second experiment. Plants inoculated with the appropriate rhizobia, Ensifer (syn. Sinorhizobium) medicae, formed nodules. Nodulated plants grew as well as plants fed NO3-, both in drained and waterlogged conditions. The growth and total N content of nodulated plants (without any NO3- supplied) indicated N2 fixation. Respiration rates (mass basis) were highest in nodules and root tips and lowest in basal root tissues. Secondary aerenchyma (phellem) formed along basal root parts and a thin layer of this porous tissue also covered nodules, which together enhanced gas-phase diffusion of O2 to the nodules; O2 was below detection within the infected zone of the nodule interior. Melilotus siculus reliant on N2 fixation grew well both in drained and waterlogged conditions, and had similar tissue N concentrations. In waterlogged conditions the relatively high respiration rates of nodules must rely on O2 movement via the aerenchymatous phellem in hypocotyl, roots and the outer tissue layers of nodules. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Growth response of Casuarina equisetifolia Forst. rooted stem ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... equisetifolia produce root nodules where the bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen, which is an essential nutrient for all plant metabolic activities. ... decide the effect of Frankia on the efficiency of N uptake of C. equsetifolia rooted stem ... sterile water and 0.2 g of nodule was ground manually in sterile mortar and ...

  14. Lignin modification leads to increased nodule numbers in alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Bhattarai, Kishor; Pislariu, Catalina I; Nakashima, Jin; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Udvardi, Michael K; Monteros, Maria J; Dixon, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of lignin levels in the forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa) by down-regulation of the monolignol biosynthetic enzyme hydroxycinnamoyl coenzyme A:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) results in strongly increased digestibility and processing ability of lignocellulose. However, these modifications are often also associated with dwarfing and other changes in plant growth. Given the importance of nitrogen fixation for legume growth, we evaluated the impact of constitutively targeted lignin modification on the belowground organs (roots and nodules) of alfalfa plants. HCT down-regulated alfalfa plants exhibit a striking reduction in root growth accompanied by an unexpected increase in nodule numbers when grown in the greenhouse or in the field. This phenotype is associated with increased levels of gibberellins and certain flavonoid compounds in roots. Although HCT down-regulation reduced biomass yields in both the greenhouse and field experiments, the impact on the allocation of nitrogen to shoots or roots was minimal. It is unlikely, therefore, that the altered growth phenotype of reduced-lignin alfalfa is a direct result of changes in nodulation or nitrogen fixation efficiency. Furthermore, HCT down-regulation has no measurable effect on carbon allocation to roots in either greenhouse or 3-year field trials.

  15. Cowpea and peanut in southern Africa are nodulated by diverse Bradyrhizobium strains harboring nodulation genes that belong to the large pantropical clade common in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Emma T; Stepkowski, Tomasz; Przymusiak, Anna; Botha, Wilhelm J; Law, Ian J

    2008-09-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) in southern Africa are nodulated by a genetically diverse group of Bradyrhizobium strains. To determine the identity of these bacteria, a collection of 22 isolates originating from the root nodules of both hosts in Botswana and South Africa was investigated using the combined sequences for the core genome genes rrs, recA, and glnII. These data separated the majority of the isolates into one of three unique lineages that most likely represent novel Bradyrhizobium species. Some isolates were also conspecific with B. yuanmingense and with B. elkanii, although none grouped with B. japonicum, B. canariense or B. liaoningense. To study the evolution of nodulation genes in these bacteria, the common nodulation gene, nodA, and host-specific nodulation genes, nodZ, noeE, and noeI, were analyzed. The nodA phylogeny showed that the cowpea and peanut Bradyrhizobium isolates represent various locally adapted groups or ecotypes that form part of Clade III of the seven known BradyrhizobiumnodA clades. This large and highly diverse clade comprises all strains from sub-Saharan Africa, as well as some originating from the Americas, Australia, Indonesia, China and Japan. Some similar groupings were supported by the other nodulation genes, although the overall phylogenies for the nodulation genes were incongruent with that inferred from the core genome genes, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer significantly influences the evolution of cowpea and peanut root-nodule bacteria. Furthermore, identification of the nodZ, noeI, and noeE genes in the isolates tested indicates that African Bradyrhizobium species may produce highly decorated nodulation factors, which potentially represent an important adaptation enabling nodulation of a great variety of legumes inhabiting the African continent.

  16. Symbiotic competence in Lotus japonicus is affected by plant nitrogen status: transcriptomic identification of genes affected by a new signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrane, Selim; Ferrarini, Alberto; D'Apuzzo, Enrica; Rogato, Alessandra; Delledonne, Massimo; Chiurazzi, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    In leguminous plants, symbiotic nitrogen (N) fixation performances and N environmental conditions are linked because nodule initiation, development and functioning are greatly influenced by the amount of available N sources. We demonstrate here that N supply also controls, beforehand, the competence of leguminous plants to perform the nodulation program. Lotus japonicus plants preincubated for 10 d in high-N conditions, and then transferred to low N before the Mesorhizobium loti inoculation, had reduced nodulation. This phenotype was maintained for at least 6 d and a complete reacquisition of the symbiotic competence was observed only after 9 d. The time-course analysis of the change of the symbiotic phenotype was analysed by transcriptomics. The differentially expressed genes identified are mostly involved in metabolic pathways. However, the transcriptional response also includes genes belonging to other functional categories such as signalling, stress response and transcriptional regulation. Some of these genes show a molecular identity and a regulation profile, that suggest a role as possible molecular links between the N-dependent plant response and the nodule organogenesis program.

  17. Exploring the symbiotic pangenome of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daligault Hajnalka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model system for the studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. An extensive polymorphism at the genetic and phenotypic level is present in natural populations of this species, especially in relation with symbiotic promotion of plant growth. AK83 and BL225C are two nodule-isolated strains with diverse symbiotic phenotypes; BL225C is more efficient in promoting growth of the Medicago sativa plants than strain AK83. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of the phenotypic diversification of S. meliloti strains AK83 and BL225C, we sequenced the complete genomes for these two strains. Results With sizes of 7.14 Mbp and 6.97 Mbp, respectively, the genomes of AK83 and BL225C are larger than the laboratory strain Rm1021. The core genome of Rm1021, AK83, BL225C strains included 5124 orthologous groups, while the accessory genome was composed by 2700 orthologous groups. While Rm1021 and BL225C have only three replicons (Chromosome, pSymA and pSymB, AK83 has also two plasmids, 260 and 70 Kbp long. We found 65 interesting orthologous groups of genes that were present only in the accessory genome, consequently responsible for phenotypic diversity and putatively involved in plant-bacterium interaction. Notably, the symbiosis inefficient AK83 lacked several genes required for microaerophilic growth inside nodules, while several genes for accessory functions related to competition, plant invasion and bacteroid tropism were identified only in AK83 and BL225C strains. Presence and extent of polymorphism in regulons of transcription factors involved in symbiotic interaction were also analyzed. Our results indicate that regulons are flexible, with a large number of accessory genes, suggesting that regulons polymorphism could also be a key determinant in the variability of symbiotic performances among the analyzed strains. Conclusions In conclusions, the extended comparative genomics approach revealed a

  18. Rapid phenotyping of alfalfa root system architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root system architecture (RSA) influences the capacity of an alfalfa plant for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, nutrient uptake and water use efficiency, resistance to frost heaving, winterhardiness, and some pest and pathogen resistance. However, we currently lack a basic understanding of root system d...

  19. Genetic diversity and symbiotic compatibility among rhizobial strains and Desmodium incanum and Lotus spp. plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille E Granada

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate the symbiotic compatibility and nodulation efficiency of rhizobia isolated from Desmodium incanum, Lotus corniculatus, L. subbiflorus, L. uliginosus and L. glaber plants by cross-inoculation. Twelve reference strains and 21 native isolates of rhizobia were genetically analyzed by the BOX-PCR technique, which showed a high genetic diversity among the rhizobia studied. The isolates were also characterized based on their production of indolic compounds and siderophores, as well as on their tolerance to salinity. Fifteen of the 33 rhizobia analyzed were able to produce indolic compounds, whereas 13 produced siderophores. All the tested rhizobia were sensitive to high salinity, although some were able to grow in solutions of up to 2% NaCl. Most of the native rhizobia isolated from L. uliginosus were able to induce nodulation in all plant species studied. In a greenhouse experiment using both D. incanum and L. corniculatus plants, the rhizobia isolate UFRGS Lu2 promoted the greatest plant growth. The results demonstrate that there are native rhizobia in the soils of southern Brazil that have low host specificity and are able to induce nodulation and form active nodules in several plant species.

  20. Genetic diversity and symbiotic compatibility among rhizobial strains and Desmodium incanum and Lotus spp. plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granada, Camille E.; Strochein, Marcos; Vargas, Luciano K.; Bruxel, Manuela; de Sá, Enilson Luiz Saccol; Passaglia, Luciane M.P.

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the symbiotic compatibility and nodulation efficiency of rhizobia isolated from Desmodium incanum, Lotus corniculatus, L. subbiflorus, L. uliginosus and L. glaber plants by cross-inoculation. Twelve reference strains and 21 native isolates of rhizobia were genetically analyzed by the BOX-PCR technique, which showed a high genetic diversity among the rhizobia studied. The isolates were also characterized based on their production of indolic compounds and siderophores, as well as on their tolerance to salinity. Fifteen of the 33 rhizobia analyzed were able to produce indolic compounds, whereas 13 produced siderophores. All the tested rhizobia were sensitive to high salinity, although some were able to grow in solutions of up to 2% NaCl. Most of the native rhizobia isolated from L. uliginosus were able to induce nodulation in all plant species studied. In a greenhouse experiment using both D. incanum and L. corniculatus plants, the rhizobia isolate UFRGS Lu2 promoted the greatest plant growth. The results demonstrate that there are native rhizobia in the soils of southern Brazil that have low host specificity and are able to induce nodulation and form active nodules in several plant species. PMID:25071405

  1. Production of nodulation factors by Rhizobium meliloti: fermentation, purification and characterization of glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohring, B; Baier, R; Niehaus, K; Pühler, A; Flaschel, E

    1997-12-01

    Lipooligosaccharides, synthesized by soil bacteria of the genera Rhizobium, are known to have multifunctional effects on a wide variety of plants as signal substances in symbiosis initiation, cell response elicitation and growth regulation. These so called nodulation (Nod-) factors represent interesting biotechnological products with respect to fundamental studies of symbiotic interactions as well as for potential applications. Therefore, a batch fermentation process on a scale of 30 l has been developed by means of the Rhizobium meliloti strain R.m. 1021 (pEK327) strongly overexpressing the genes for the synthesis of Nod factors. Induction by the flavone luteolin led to growth associated production of the lipooligosaccharides. Ultrafiltration was used for separating the biomass from the filtrate containing the extracellular Nod factors. Simultaneously, ultrafiltration reduced the amount of lipophilic substances, which would otherwise interfere with processes downstream. The second separation step consisted in adsorption on XAD-2, a nonspecific hydrophobic adsorptive resin. Adsorption of Nod factors was carried out by batch operation of a stirred tank. Desorption was performed by elution with methanol in a fixed bed column. A semi-preparative reversed phase HPLC (Polygoprep 100-30 C18) was chosen as the final purification step. The Nod factors were obtained after evaporation and lyophilization. Thus, about 600 mg of Nod factors were produced from 20 l of fermentation broth. The Nod factors produced by Rhizobium meliloti R.m. 1021 (pEK327) were identified by liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry and by reversed-phase HPLC as fluorescent derivatives of 2-aminobenzamide. The biological activity of the products was demonstrated by means of the root hair deformation (HAD-) assay.

  2. Species Specific Responses to Age on Nodule Formation, Seedling Growth, and Biomass Production of Acacia auriculiformis at Nursery Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Salim Azad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nodulation responses of leguminous trees are very important for intercropping to reduce reliance on artificial nitrogen input through nitrogen fixation in agroforestry system. This study was carried out to evaluate the status of nodulation (i.e., the number of nodules and their shape and size in root and biomass production of plant growth parameters (i.e., number of leaves, shoot height, root biomass, and shoot biomass of A. auriculiformis seedlings. The assessment was conducted 60 days after seed germination. The study revealed significant differences in nodule number per seedling, leaf number per seedling, shoot height, and biomass accumulation (both green and oven dry weight with seedling age (p<0.05. The study also revealed significant correlation among the variables of nodulation responses and biomass production. The results obtained using principal component analysis (PCA justified correlation matrix of nodulation responses and biomass production of this species. The PCA showed that root biomass per seedling, leaf number per seedling, nodule number per seedling, shoot height, age of seedling, and shoot biomass per seedling were clustered with PC1 (with an eigenvalue of 5.59 and root shoot ratios were clustered with PC2 (with an eigenvalue of 1.82. Our study justified that shoot height may be an important determinant of nodule formation of A. auriculiformis.

  3. Medicago truncatula ENOD40-1 and ENOD40-2 are both involved in nodule initiation and bacteroid development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan, X.; Hontelez, J.; Lillo, A.; Guarnerio, C.; Peut, van de D.; Fedorova, E.; Bisseling, T.; Franssen, H.

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of a nitrogen-fixing root nodule on legumes requires the induction of mitotic activity of cortical cells leading to the formation of the nodule primordium and the infection process by which the bacteria enter this primordium. Several genes are up-regulated during these processes,

  4. Toxic effects of low concentrations of Cu on nodulation of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopittke, Peter M.; Dart, Peter J.; Menzies, Neal W.

    2007-01-01

    Although Cu is phytotoxic at Cu 2+ activities as low as 1-2 μM, the effect of Cu 2+ on the nodulation of legumes has received little attention. The effect of Cu 2+ on nodulation of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. cv. Caloona) was examined in a dilute solution culture system utilising a cation exchange resin to buffer solution Cu 2+ . The nodulation process was more sensitive to increasing Cu 2+ activities than both shoot and root growth; whilst a Cu 2+ activity of 1.0 μM corresponded to a 10% reduction in the relative yield of the shoots and roots, a Cu 2+ activity of 0.2 μM corresponded to a 10% reduction in nodulation. This reduction in nodulation with increasing Cu 2+ activity was associated with an inhibition of root hair formation in treatments containing ≥0.77 μM Cu 2+ , rather than to a reduction in the size of the Rhizobium population. - The nodulation process was more sensitive to increasing Cu 2+ activities than either shoot or root growth

  5. Toxic effects of low concentrations of Cu on nodulation of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopittke, Peter M. [School of Land and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia)]. E-mail: p.kopittke@uq.edu.au; Dart, Peter J. [School of Land and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia); Menzies, Neal W. [School of Land and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2007-01-15

    Although Cu is phytotoxic at Cu{sup 2+} activities as low as 1-2 {mu}M, the effect of Cu{sup 2+} on the nodulation of legumes has received little attention. The effect of Cu{sup 2+} on nodulation of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. cv. Caloona) was examined in a dilute solution culture system utilising a cation exchange resin to buffer solution Cu{sup 2+}. The nodulation process was more sensitive to increasing Cu{sup 2+} activities than both shoot and root growth; whilst a Cu{sup 2+} activity of 1.0 {mu}M corresponded to a 10% reduction in the relative yield of the shoots and roots, a Cu{sup 2+} activity of 0.2 {mu}M corresponded to a 10% reduction in nodulation. This reduction in nodulation with increasing Cu{sup 2+} activity was associated with an inhibition of root hair formation in treatments containing {>=}0.77 {mu}M Cu{sup 2+}, rather than to a reduction in the size of the Rhizobium population. - The nodulation process was more sensitive to increasing Cu{sup 2+} activities than either shoot or root growth.

  6. Hijacking of leguminous nodulation signaling by the rhizobial type III secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Shin; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sato, Shusei; Saeki, Kazuhiko

    2013-10-15

    Root-nodule symbiosis between leguminous plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia) involves molecular communication between the two partners. Key components for the establishment of symbiosis are rhizobium-derived lipochitooligosaccharides (Nod factors; NFs) and their leguminous receptors (NFRs) that initiate nodule development and bacterial entry. Here we demonstrate that the soybean microsymbiont Bradyrhizobium elkanii uses the type III secretion system (T3SS), which is known for its delivery of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria, to promote symbiosis. Intriguingly, wild-type B. elkanii, but not the T3SS-deficient mutant, was able to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybean nfr mutant En1282. Furthermore, even the NF-deficient B. elkanii mutant induced nodules unless T3SS genes were mutated. Transcriptional analysis revealed that expression of the soybean nodulation-specific genes ENOD40 and NIN was increased in the roots of En1282 inoculated with B. elkanii but not with its T3SS mutant, suggesting that T3SS activates host nodulation signaling by bypassing NF recognition. Root-hair curling and infection threads were not observed in the roots of En1282 inoculated with B. elkanii, indicating that T3SS is involved in crack entry or intercellular infection. These findings suggest that B. elkanii has adopted a pathogenic system for activating host symbiosis signaling to promote its infection.

  7. Identification of symbiotically defective mutants of Lotus japonicus affected in infection thread growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardo, Fabien; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau; Miwa, Hiroki

    2006-01-01

    infection pockets in root hairs but form very few infection threads after inoculation with Mesorhizobium loti. The few infection threads that did initiate in the mutants usually did not progress further than the root hair cell. These infection-thread deficient (itd) mutants were unaffected for early...... symbiotic responses such as calcium spiking, root hair deformation, and curling, as well as for the induction of cortical cell division and the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Complementation tests and genetic mapping indicate that itd2 is allelic to Ljsym7, whereas the itd1, itd3, and itd4 mutations...

  8. Nodules size: An important factor in nodule mining?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.

    . In order to minimize ecological and environmental problems, it is emphasized that the nodules should be screened on sea bottom during mining, which may be possible by future technological modification of mining devises...

  9. [Nodulation competitiveness of nodule bacteria: Genetic control and adaptive significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchuk, O P; Vorobyov, N I; Provorov, N A

    2017-01-01

    The most recent data on the system of cmp (competitiveness) genes that determine the nodulation competitiveness of rhizobial strains, i.e., the ability to compete for nodule formation in leguminous plants, is analyzed. Three genetic approaches for the construction of economically valuable strains of rhizobia are proposed: the amplification of positive regulators of competitiveness, the inactivation of the negative regulators of this trait, and the introduction of efficient competitiveness factors into strains capable of active nitrogen fixation.

  10. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  11. The conjugative plasmid of a bean-nodulating Sinorhizobium fredii strain is assembled from sequences of two Rhizobium plasmids and the chromosome of a Sinorhizobium strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brom Susana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bean-nodulating Rhizobium etli originated in Mesoamerica, while soybean-nodulating Sinorhizobium fredii evolved in East Asia. S. fredii strains, such as GR64, have been isolated from bean nodules in Spain, suggesting the occurrence of conjugative transfer events between introduced and native strains. In R. etli CFN42, transfer of the symbiotic plasmid (pRet42d requires cointegration with the endogenous self-transmissible plasmid pRet42a. Aiming at further understanding the generation of diversity among bean nodulating strains, we analyzed the plasmids of S. fredii GR64: pSfr64a and pSfr64b (symbiotic plasmid. Results The conjugative transfer of the plasmids of strain GR64 was analyzed. Plasmid pSfr64a was self-transmissible, and required for transfer of the symbiotic plasmid. We sequenced pSfr64a, finding 166 ORFs. pSfr64a showed three large segments of different evolutionary origins; the first one presented 38 ORFs that were highly similar to genes located on the chromosome of Sinorhizobium strain NGR234; the second one harbored 51 ORFs with highest similarity to genes from pRet42d, including the replication, but not the symbiosis genes. Accordingly, pSfr64a was incompatible with the R. etli CFN42 symbiotic plasmid, but did not contribute to symbiosis. The third segment contained 36 ORFs with highest similarity to genes localized on pRet42a, 20 of them involved in conjugative transfer. Plasmid pRet42a was unable to substitute pSfr64a for induction of pSym transfer, and its own transfer was significantly diminished in GR64 background. The symbiotic plasmid pSfr64b was found to differ from typical R. etli symbiotic plasmids. Conclusions S. fredii GR64 contains a chimeric transmissible plasmid, with segments from two R. etli plasmids and a S. fredii chromosome, and a symbiotic plasmid different from the one usually found in R. etli bv phaseoli. We infer that these plasmids originated through the transfer of a symbiotic

  12. Atividade de enzimas fermentativas em raízes e nódulos de soja sob condições de hipóxia e pós-hipóxia Fermentative enzymes activity in soybean roots and nodules under hypoxia and post-hypoxia conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junior Borella

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a atividade de enzimas fermentativas em raízes e nódulos de soja (Glycine max sob condições de hipóxia e pós-hipóxia. Os genótipos Fundacep 53 RR e BRS Macota foram cultivados em vasos de 3L contendo vermiculita como substrato em associação com Bradyrhizobium elkanii em casa de vegetação. No estádio R2, o sistema radicular das plantas foi submetido à hipóxia pelo encaixe de um segundo vaso sem perfurações e inundado com solução nutritiva diluída a 1/3 da concentração original, por 8 dias. Posteriormente, foram retirados os vasos sem perfurações para avaliação da recuperação. O material vegetal foi coletado no 2º, 4º, 6º e 8º dias após a inundação ou recuperação, juntamente com os controles para a dosagem da atividade das enzimas álcool desidrogenase (ADH, piruvato descarboxilase (PDC e lactato desidrogenase (LDH em raízes e nódulos. Os dados foram submetidos à ANOVA e comparados pelo teste de Tukey a 5% de probabilidade. As atividades da ADH, PDC e LDH foram fortemente estimuladas com a inundação, especialmente em nódulos, e diminuíram com a recuperação, em ambos os genótipos. Fundacep 53 RR respondeu de forma mais efetiva aos efeitos dos tratamentos.This study aimed to evaluate the activity of fermentative enzymes in soybean (Glycine max roots and nodules under hypoxia and post-hypoxia conditions. The soybean genotypes Fundacep 53 RR and BRS Macota associated with Bradyrhizobium elkanii were grown in 3L pots containing vermiculite as substrate under greenhouse conditions. Root system of plants at the R2 stage was subjected to hypoxia by blocking drainage of the pot, by fitting a second one without holes and flooded with nutrient solution diluted one-third of the original. The flooding of the plants was carried out for eight days and after, the pot without drilling was removed for recovery assessment. Non-waterlogged plants were kept as control. Activities of

  13. EFFECT OF PHOSPHATE ON NODULE PRIMORDIA OF SOYBEAN (Glycine max Merrill IN ACID SOILS IN RHIZOTRON EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setiyo Hadi Waluyo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To clarify whether P had a direct or indirect effect on the nodulation  process of soybean grown in acid soils from Sitiung, West Sumatra, Indonesia, a series of rhizotron experiments, with special attention given to formation of nodule primordia, was conducted at Laboratory of  Microbiology, Wageningen University in 1998-2000. It was shown that Ca and P were essential nutrients for root growth, nodule formation, and growth of soybean in the acid soils (Oxisols. Ca increased root growth, number of nodule primordia, nodules, and growth of the soybean plant. This positive effect of Ca was increased considerably by the application of P. Ca and P have a synergistic effect on biological nitrogen fixation (BNF of soybean in acid soils. Ca is important for the establishment of nodules, whilst P is essential for the development and function of the formed nodules. P increased number of nodule primordia, thus it also has an important role in the initiation of nodule formation. From this study, it can be concluded that Ca and P are the most limiting nutrients for BNF of soybean in the acid soils of Sitiung, West Sumatra, Indonesia.

  14. Correlation of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization with plant growth, nodulation, and shoot npk in legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaid, A.; Anjum, T.; Shah, M.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Correlation of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization with different root and shoot growth, nodulation and shoot NPK parameters was studied in three legumes viz. Trifolium alexandrianum, Medicago polymorpha and Melilotus parviflora. The three test legume species showed different patterns of root and shoot growth, nodulation, mycorrhizal colonization and shoot N, P and K content. Different mycorrhizal structures viz. mycelium, arbuscules and vesicles showed different patters of correlation with different studied parameters. Mycelial infection showed an insignificantly positive correlation with root and shoot dry biomass and total root length. Maximum root length was however, negatively associated with mycelial infection. Both arbuscular and vesicular infections were negatively correlated with shoot dry biomass and different parameters of root growth. The association between arbuscular infection and maximum root length was significant. All the three mycorrhizal structures showed a positive correlation with number and biomass of nodules. The association between arbuscular infection and nodule number was significant. Mycelial infection was positively correlated with percentage and total shoot N and P. Similarly percentage N was also positively correlated with arbuscular and vesicular infections. By contrast, total shoot N showed a negative association with arbuscular as well as vesicular infections. Similarly both percentage and total shoot P were negatively correlated with arbuscular and vesicular infections. All the associations between mycorrhizal parameters and shoot K were negative except between vesicular infection and shoot %K. (author)

  15. Hydrogen Reactions of Nodulated Leguminous Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Karel R.; Engelke, Jean A.; Russell, Sterling A.; Evans, Harold J.

    1977-01-01

    The ATP-dependent evolution of H2 catalyzed by nitrogenase and the hydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of H2 have been implicated as factors influencing the efficiency of energy utilization in the N2 fixation process. The effects of rhizobial strain and plant age on the H2-evolving and H2-utilizing activity of leguminous root nodules are described in this manuscript. Two classes of legume-Rhizobium combinations were observed in studies with soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr.) and cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.). One group evolved H2 in air; the other group did not exhibit net evolution of H2. The latter group metabolized H2 formed within the nodule through the action of a hydrogenase. The capacity to oxidize H2 was strongly linked to the strain of Rhizobium used to inoculate cowpeas and soybeans. Although the magnitude of H2 evolution in air changed during vegetative growth of a given symbiont, the ratio of H2 evolved in air to total nitrogenase activity was not appreciably altered during this period. No consistent difference in nitrogenase activity as measured by the C2H2 reduction assay was observed between symbionts with an active hydrogenase and those that apparently lack the enzyme and evolve H2. The effects of the two reactions of H2 on total N2 fixation and yield must now be established. PMID:16660157

  16. A Sinorhizobium meliloti-specific N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal increases nodule numbers in Medicago truncatula independent of autoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Fabiola Veliz Vallejos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs act as quorum sensing signals that regulate cell-density dependent behaviors in many gram-negative bacteria, in particular those important for plant-microbe interactions. AHLs can also be recognized by plants, and this may influence their interactions with bacteria. Here we tested whether the exposure to AHLs affects the nodule-forming symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia. We treated roots of the model legume, Medicago truncatula, with a range of AHLs either from its specific symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, or from the potential pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Agrobacterium vitis. We found increased numbers of nodules formed on root systems treated with the S. meliloti-specific AHL, 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone, at a concentration of 1 μM, while the other AHLs did not result in significant changes to nodule numbers. We did not find any evidence for altered nodule invasion by the rhizobia. Quantification of flavonoids that could act as nod gene inducers in S. meliloti did not show any correlation with increased nodule numbers. The effects of AHLs were specific for an increase in nodule numbers, but not lateral root numbers or root length. Increased nodule numbers following 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone treatment were under control of autoregulation of nodulation and were still observed in the autoregulation mutant, sunn4 (super numeric nodules4. However, increases in nodule numbers by 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone were not found in the ethylene-insensitive sickle mutant. A comparison between M. truncatula with M. sativa (alfalfa and Trifolium repens (white clover showed that the observed effects of AHLs on nodule numbers were specific to M. truncatula, despite M. sativa nodulating with the same symbiont. We conclude that plant perception of the S. meliloti-specific 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone influences nodule numbers in M. truncatula via an ethylene-dependent, but autoregulation

  17. It’s all about perception : nod factor perception inside nodules of Medicago truncatula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moling, S.G.J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Legumes are unique in that they are able to establish a mutual symbiotic interaction with nitrogen fixing soil bacteria generally referred to as rhizobia. This interaction starts off in the root epidermis where the bacterial signal molecule, the Nod factor, is perceived by the plant (Nod factor

  18. The effect of soil carbon on symbiotic nitrogen fixation and symbiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the main attribute of high-quality soil. The amount of nitrogen fixed by Rhizobium symbiotically with Trifolium repens (white clover) is ultimately determined by the quality of the soil environment. The effect of SOC on the total number of symbiotic and saprophytic rhizobia was determined.

  19. Plant densities and modulation of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Javier de Luca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Soybean nitrogen (N demands can be supplied to a large extent via biological nitrogen fixation, but the mechanisms of source/sink regulating photosynthesis/nitrogen fixation in high yielding cultivars and current crop management arrangements need to be investigated. We investigated the modulation of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in soybean [Glycine max (L. Merrill] at different plant densities. A field trial was performed in southern Brazil with six treatments, including non-inoculated controls without and with N-fertilizer, both at a density of 320,000 plants ha−1, and plants inoculated with Bradyrhizobium elkanii at four densities, ranging from 40,000 to 320,000 plants ha−1. Differences in nodulation, biomass production, N accumulation and partition were observed at stage R5, but not at stage V4, indicating that quantitative and qualitative factors (such as sunlight infrared/red ratio assume increasing importance during the later stages of plant growth. Decreases in density in the inoculated treatments stimulated photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation per plant. Similar yields were obtained at the different plant densities, with decreases only at the very low density level of 40,000 plants ha−1, which was also the only treatment to show differences in seed protein and oil contents. Results confirm a fine tuning of the mechanisms of source/sink, photosynthesis/nitrogen fixation under lower plant densities. Higher photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation rates are capable of sustaining increased plant growth.

  20. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3+) and defective mutant (BL3−) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3− than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3+. The inoculation of BL3− into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3+ had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3+ increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3− formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3−. This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence. PMID:26657304

  1. Proteomic Analysis of the Soybean Symbiosome Identifies New Symbiotic Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Victoria C.; Loughlin, Patrick C.; Gavrin, Aleksandr; Chen, Chi; Brear, Ella M.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Legumes form a symbiosis with rhizobia in which the plant provides an energy source to the rhizobia bacteria that it uses to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This nitrogen is provided to the legume plant, allowing it to grow without the addition of nitrogen fertilizer. As part of the symbiosis, the bacteria in the infected cells of a new root organ, the nodule, are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane, the symbiosome membrane, which becomes the interface between the symbionts. Fractions containing the symbiosome membrane (SM) and material from the lumen of the symbiosome (peribacteroid space or PBS) were isolated from soybean root nodules and analyzed using nongel proteomic techniques. Bicarbonate stripping and chloroform-methanol extraction of isolated SM were used to reduce complexity of the samples and enrich for hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. One hundred and ninety-seven proteins were identified as components of the SM, with an additional fifteen proteins identified from peripheral membrane and PBS protein fractions. Proteins involved in a range of cellular processes such as metabolism, protein folding and degradation, membrane trafficking, and solute transport were identified. These included a number of proteins previously localized to the SM, such as aquaglyceroporin nodulin 26, sulfate transporters, remorin, and Rab7 homologs. Among the proteome were a number of putative transporters for compounds such as sulfate, calcium, hydrogen ions, peptide/dicarboxylate, and nitrate, as well as transporters for which the substrate is not easy to predict. Analysis of the promoter activity for six genes encoding putative SM proteins showed nodule specific expression, with five showing expression only in infected cells. Localization of two proteins was confirmed using GFP-fusion experiments. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001132. This proteome will provide a rich resource for the study of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis. PMID

  2. Symbiotic propagation of seedlings of Cyrtopodium glutiniferum Raddi (Orchidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Aparecida Rodrigues Guimarães

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In nature, orchid seeds obtain the nutrients necessary for germination by degrading intracellular fungal structures formed after colonization of the embryo by mycorrhizal fungi. Protocols for asymbiotic germination of orchid seeds typically use media with high concentrations of soluble carbohydrate and minerals. However, when reintroduced into the field, seedlings obtained via asymbiotic germination have lower survival rates than do seedlings obtained via symbiotic germination. Tree fern fiber, the ideal substrate for orchid seedling acclimatization, is increasingly scarce. Here, we evaluated seed germination and protocorm development of Cyrtopodium glutiniferum Raddi cultivated in asymbiotic media (Knudson C and Murashige & Skoog and in oatmeal agar (OA medium inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Epulorhiza sp., using non-inoculated OA medium as a control. We also evaluated the performance of tree fern fiber, pine bark, eucalyptus bark, corncob and sawdust as substrates for the acclimatization of symbiotically propagated plants. We determined germination percentages, protocorm development and growth indices at 35 and 70 days of cultivation. Relative growth rates and the effects of substrates on mycorrhizal formation were calculated after 165 days of cultivation. Germination efficiency and growth indices were best when inoculated OA medium was used. Corncob and pine bark showed the highest percentages of colonized system roots. The OA medium inoculated with Epulorhiza sp. shows potential for C. glutiniferum seedling production. Corncob and pine bark are promising substitutes for tree fern fiber as substrates for the acclimatization of orchid seedlings.

  3. Regulation of Small RNAs and Corresponding Targets in Nod Factor-Induced Phaseolus vulgaris Root Hair Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formey, Damien; Martín-Rodríguez, José Ángel; Leija, Alfonso; Santana, Olivia; Quinto, Carmen; Cárdenas, Luis; Hernández, Georgina

    2016-06-04

    A genome-wide analysis identified the set of small RNAs (sRNAs) from the agronomical important legume Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), including novel P. vulgaris-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) potentially important for the regulation of the rhizobia-symbiotic process. Generally, novel miRNAs are difficult to identify and study because they are very lowly expressed in a tissue- or cell-specific manner. In this work, we aimed to analyze sRNAs from common bean root hairs (RH), a single-cell model, induced with pure Rhizobium etli nodulation factors (NF), a unique type of signal molecule. The sequence analysis of samples from NF-induced and control libraries led to the identity of 132 mature miRNAs, including 63 novel miRNAs and 1984 phasiRNAs. From these, six miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed during NF induction, including one novel miRNA: miR-RH82. A parallel degradome analysis of the same samples revealed 29 targets potentially cleaved by novel miRNAs specifically in NF-induced RH samples; however, these novel miRNAs were not differentially accumulated in this tissue. This study reveals Phaseolus vulgaris-specific novel miRNA candidates and their corresponding targets that meet all criteria to be involved in the regulation of the early nodulation events, thus setting the basis for exploring miRNA-mediated improvement of the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis.

  4. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  5. Nodule development on the tropical legume Sesbania virgata under flooded and non-flooded conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfeti, C A; Ferreira, P A A; Carvalho, T S; De Rycke, R; Moreira, F M S; Goormachtig, S; Holsters, M

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between the Brazilian pioneer legume Sesbania virgata and its microsymbiont Azorhizobium doebereinerae leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on roots that grow either in well-aerated soils or in wetlands. We studied the initiation and development of nodules under these alternative conditions. To this end, light and fluorescence microscopy were used to follow the bacterial colonisation and invasion into the host and, by means of transmission electron microscopy, we could observe the intracellular entry. Under hydroponic conditions, intercellular invasion took place at lateral root bases and mature nodules were round and determinate. However, on roots grown in vermiculite that allows aerated growth, bacteria also entered via root hair invasion and nodules were both of the determinate and indeterminate type. Such versatility in entry and developmental plasticity, as previously described in Sesbania rostrata, enables efficient nodulation in both dry and wet environments and are an important adaptive feature of this group of semi-tropical plants that grow in temporarily flooded habitats. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  6. Symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, D J; Ducket, J G; Francis, R; Ligron, R; Russell, A

    2000-06-29

    An analysis of the current state of knowledge of symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' plants is provided. Three fungal phyla, the Zygomycota, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, are involved in forming these associations, each producing a distinctive suite of structural features in well-defined groups of 'lower' plants. Among the 'lower' plants only mosses and Equisetum appear to lack one or other of these types of association. The salient features of the symbioses produced by each fungal group are described and the relationships between these associations and those formed by the same or related fungi in 'higher' plants are discussed. Particular consideration is given to the question of the extent to which root fungus associations in 'lower' plants are analogous to 'mycorrhizas' of 'higher' plants and the need for analysis of the functional attributes of these symbioses is stressed. Zygomycetous fungi colonize a wide range of extant lower land plants (hornworts, many hepatics, lycopods, Ophioglossales, Psilotales and Gleicheniaceae), where they often produce structures analogous to those seen in the vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizas of higher plants, which are formed by members of the order Glomales. A preponderance of associations of this kind is in accordance with palaeohbotanical and molecular evidence indicating that glomalean fungi produced the archetypal symbioses with the first plants to emerge on to land. It is shown, probably for the first time, that glomalean fungi forming typical VA mycorrhiza with a higher plant (Plantago lanceolata) can colonize a thalloid liverwort (Pellia epiphylla), producing arbuscules and vesicles in the hepatic. The extent to which these associations, which are structurally analogous to mycorrhizas, have similar functions remains to be evaluated. Ascomycetous associations are found in a relatively small number of families of leafy liverworts. The structural features of the fungal colonization of rhizoids and underground axes of

  7. Red nodule on the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Colucci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old woman living in the countryside referred to our department with a 2-month history of a red nodule localized on the right breast. Histological examination, immunohistochemical analyses and serologic evaluation conducted with ELISA and Western blot were performed. Clinical diagnosis of borrelial lymphocytoma was not possible solely on the clinical presentation of a classical nodular form without lymphoadenopathy. An absence of a referred prior tick bite and a previous or concomitant erythema migrans at clinical presentation rendered a more challenging diagnosis. The fact that the patient lived in the countryside, the appearance of the breast nodule in September, and serologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical analysis facilitated the diagnosis of borrelial lymphocytoma. We report this case to highlight the importance of an investigation of Lyme borreliosis when a patient living in the countryside presents with a red nodule of the nipple and areola.

  8. Symbiots: Conceptual Interventions Into Urban Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Jenny; Mazé, Ramia; Redströmand, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Symbiots set out to examine values such as ease-of-use, comfort, and rationality assumed within conventions of ‘good design’, in order to expose issues related to energy consumption and current human- (versus eco-) centered design paradigms. Exploring re-interpretations of graphical patterns......, architectural configura- tions and electrical infrastructure typical in Swedish cities, Symbiots takes the form of a photo series in the genre of contemporary hy- per-real art photography. Painting a vivid pic- ture of alternatives to current local priorities around energy consumption, the three design concepts...

  9. Symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria: nodulation and phylogenetic data across legume genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Michelle E; Luke Mahler, D; Burns, Jean H; Weber, Marjorie G; Wojciechowski, Martin F; Sprent, Janet; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2018-02-01

    How species interactions shape global biodiversity and influence diversification is a central - but also data-hungry - question in evolutionary ecology. Microbially based mutualisms are widespread and could cause diversification by ameliorating stress and thus allowing organisms to colonize and adapt to otherwise unsuitable habitats. Yet the role of these interactions in generating species diversity has received limited attention, especially across large taxonomic groups. In the massive angiosperm family Leguminosae, plants often associate with root-nodulating bacteria that ameliorate nutrient stress by fixing atmospheric nitrogen. These symbioses are ecologically-important interactions, influencing community assembly, diversity, and succession, contributing ~100-290 million tons of N annually to natural ecosystems, and enhancing growth of agronomically-important forage and crop plants worldwide. In recent work attempting to determine whether mutualism with N-fixing bacteria led to increased diversification across legumes, we were unable to definitively resolve the relationship between diversification and nodulation. We did, however, succeed in compiling a very large searchable, analysis-ready database of nodulation data for 749 legume genera (98% of Leguminosae genera; LPWG 2017), which, along with associated phylogenetic information, will provide a valuable resource for future work addressing this question and others. For each legume genus, we provide information about the species richness, frequency of nodulation, subfamily association, and topological correspondence with an additional data set of 100 phylogenetic trees curated for database compatibility. We found 386 legume genera were confirmed nodulators (i.e., all species examined for nodulation nodulated), 116 were non-nodulating, four were variable (i.e., containing both confirmed nodulators and confirmed non-nodulators), and 243 had not been examined for nodulation in published studies. Interestingly

  10. A Medicago truncatula mutant hyper-responsive to mycorrhiza and defective for nodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Dominique; le Signor, Christine; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Duc, Gérard

    2009-08-01

    One key strategy for the identification of plant genes required for mycorrhizal development is the use of plant mutants affected in mycorrhizal colonisation. In this paper, we report a new Medicago truncatula mutant defective for nodulation but hypermycorrhizal for symbiosis development and response. This mutant, called B9, presents a poor shoot and, especially, root development with short laterals. Inoculation with Glomus intraradices results in significantly higher root colonisation of the mutant than the wild-type genotype A17 (+20% for total root length, +16% for arbuscule frequency in the colonised part of the root, +39% for arbuscule frequency in the total root system). Mycorrhizal effects on shoot and root biomass of B9 plants are about twofold greater than in the wild-type genotype. The B9 mutant of M. truncatula is characterised by considerably higher root concentrations of the phytoestrogen coumestrol and by the novel synthesis of the coumestrol conjugate malonyl glycoside, absent from roots of wild-type plants. In conclusion, this is the first time that a hypermycorrhizal plant mutant affected negatively for nodulation (Myc(++), Nod (-/+) phenotype) is reported. This mutant represents a new tool for the study of plant genes differentially regulating mycorrhiza and nodulation symbioses, in particular, those related to autoregulation mechanisms.

  11. Rhizobium anhuiense sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Jing; Zheng, Wen Tao; Everall, Isobel; Young, J Peter W; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Tian, Chang Fu; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2015-09-01

    Four rhizobia-like strains, isolated from root nodules of Pisum sativum and Vicia faba grown in Anhui and Jiangxi Provinces of China, were grouped into the genus Rhizobium but were distinct from all recognized species of the genus Rhizobium by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and housekeeping genes. The combined sequences of the housekeeping genes atpD, recA and glnII for strain CCBAU 23252(T) showed 86.9 to 95% similarity to those of known species of the genus Rhizobium. All four strains had nodC and nifH genes and could form effective nodules with Pisum sativum and Vicia faba, and ineffective nodules with Phaseolus vulgaris, but did not nodulate Glycine max, Arachis hypogaea, Medicago sativa, Trifolium repens or Lablab purpureus in cross-nodulation tests. Fatty acid composition, DNA-DNA relatedness and a series of phenotypic tests also separated these strains from members of closely related species. Based on all the evidence, we propose a novel species, Rhizobium anhuiense sp. nov., and designate CCBAU 23252(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12621(T) = LMG 27729(T)) as the type strain. This strain was isolated from a root nodule of Vicia faba and has a DNA G+C content of 61.1 mol% (Tm).

  12. Micromonospora from nitrogen fixing nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). A new promising Plant Probiotic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Galindo-Villardón, Purificación; Trujillo, Martha E; Igual, José M; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio

    2014-09-17

    Biotic interactions can improve agricultural productivity without costly and environmentally challenging inputs. Micromonospora strains have recently been reported as natural endophytes of legume nodules but their significance for plant development and productivity has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to determine the diversity and function of Micromonospora isolated from Medicago sativa root nodules. Micromonospora-like strains from field alfalfa nodules were characterized by BOX-PCR fingerprinting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The ecological role of the interaction of the 15 selected representative Micromonospora strains was tested in M. sativa. Nodulation, plant growth and nutrition parameters were analyzed. Alfalfa nodules naturally contain abundant and highly diverse populations of Micromonospora, both at the intra- and at interspecific level. Selected Micromonospora isolates significantly increase the nodulation of alfalfa by Ensifer meliloti 1021 and also the efficiency of the plant for nitrogen nutrition. Moreover, they promote aerial growth, the shoot-to-root ratio, and raise the level of essential nutrients. Our results indicate that Micromonospora acts as a Rhizobia Helper Bacteria (RHB) agent and has probiotic effects, promoting plant growth and increasing nutrition efficiency. Its ecological role, biotechnological potential and advantages as a plant probiotic bacterium (PPB) are also discussed.

  13. Studies on Nodulation, Biochemical Analysis and Protein Profiles of Rhizobium Isolated From Indigofera species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari, B. S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nodulation characteristics in five species of Indigofera viz., I .trita, I. linnaei, I. astragalina, I. parviflora and I. viscosa was studied at regular intervals on the plants raised in garden soil. Among the species studied, highest average number of nodules per plant of 23 with maximum sized nodules of 8.0 mm diameter was observed in I. astragalina. Biochemical analysis of root nodules of I. astragalina revealed that the leghaemoglobin content of nodules and nitrogen content of root, shoot, leaves and nodules were gradually increased up to 60 DAS, and then decreased with increase in age. Rhizobium isolates of five species of Indigofera were isolated and screened for enzymatic activities and total cellular protein profiles. All the five isolates showed nitrate reductase, citrase, tryptophanase and catalase activity while much variation was observed for enzymes like gelatinase, urease, caseinase, lipase, amylase, lysine decarboxylase and protease activities. Among the isolates studied, only the isolate from I. viscosa has the ability to solubilize the insoluble tricalcium phosphate. All the Rhizobium isolates exhibit similarity in protein content, except the isolate from I. viscosa which showed one additional protein band.

  14. Identification and Expression Analysis of Medicago truncatula Isopentenyl Transferase Genes (IPTs Involved in Local and Systemic Control of Nodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Azarakhsh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytokinins are essential for legume plants to establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobia. Recently, the expression level of cytokinin biosynthesis IPTs (ISOPENTENYLTRANSFERASES genes was shown to be increased in response to rhizobial inoculation in Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula and Pisum sativum. In addition to its well-established positive role in nodule primordium initiation in root cortex, cytokinin negatively regulates infection processes in the epidermis. Moreover, it was reported that shoot-derived cytokinin inhibits the subsequent nodule formation through AON (autoregulation of nodulation pathway. In L. japonicus, LjIPT3 gene was shown to be activated in the shoot phloem via the components of AON system, negatively affecting nodulation. However, in M. truncatula, the detailed analysis of MtIPTs expression, both in roots and shoots, in response to nodulation has not been performed yet, and the link between IPTs and AON has not been studied so far. In this study, we performed an extensive analysis of MtIPTs expression levels in different organs, focusing on the possible role of MtIPTs in nodule development. MtIPTs expression dynamics in inoculated roots suggest that besides its early established role in the nodule primordia development, cytokinin may be also important for later stages of nodulation. According to expression analysis, MtIPT3, MtIPT4, and MtIPT5 are activated in the shoots in response to inoculation. Among these genes, MtIPT3 is the only one the induction of which was not observed in leaves of the sunn-3 mutant defective in CLV1-like kinase, the key component of AON, suggesting that MtIPT3 is activated in the shoots in an AON-dependent manner. Taken together, our findings suggest that MtIPTs are involved in the nodule development at different stages, both locally in inoculated roots and systemically in shoots, where their expression can be activated in an AON-dependent manner.

  15. Phylogenetic diversity of rhizobial species and symbiovars nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhrazi, Kiomars; Khodakaramian, Gholam; Velázquez, Encarna

    2016-03-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of 29 rhizobial strains nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris in Iran was analysed on the basis of their core and symbiotic genes. These strains displayed five 16S rRNA-RFLP patterns and belong to eight ERIC-PCR clusters. The phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, recA and atpD core genes allowed the identification of several strains as Rhizobium sophoriradicis, R. leguminosarum, R. tropici and Pararhizobium giardinii, whereas other strains represented a new phylogenetic lineage related to R. vallis. These strains and those identified as R. sophoriradicis and R. leguminosarum belong to the symbiovar phaseoli carrying the γ nodC allele distributed in P. vulgaris endosymbionts in America, Europe, Africa and Asia. The strain identified as R. tropici belongs to the symbiovar tropici carried by strains of R. tropici, R. leucaenae, R. lusitanum and R. freirei nodulating P. vulgaris in America, Africa and Asia. The strain identified as P. giardinii belongs to the symbiovar giardinii together with the type strain of this species nodulating P. vulgaris in France. It is remarkable that the recently described species R. sophoriradicis is worldwide distributed in P. vulgaris nodules carrying the γ nodC allele of symbiovar phaseoli harboured by rhizobia isolated in the American distribution centers of this legume. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Comprehensive comparative genomic and transcriptomic analyses of the legume genes controlling the nodulation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen eQiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is one of the most essential plant nutrients and one of the major factors limiting crop productivity. Having the goal to perform a more sustainable agriculture, there is a need to maximize biological nitrogen fixation, a feature of legumes. To enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction between legumes and rhizobia, the symbiotic partner fixing and assimilating the atmospheric nitrogen for the plant, researchers took advantage of genetic and genomic resources developed across different legume models (e.g. Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Glycine max and Phaseolous vulgaris to identify key regulatory genes of the nodulation process. In this study, we are presenting the results of a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis to highlight orthologous and paralogous relationships between the legume genes controlling nodulation. Mining large transcriptomic datasets, we also identified several orthologous and paralogous genes characterized by the induction of their expression during nodulation across legume plant species. This comprehensive study prompts new insights into the evolution of the nodulation process in legume plant and will benefit the scientific community interested in the transfer of functional genomic information between species.

  17. New Betaproteobacterial Rhizobium Strains Able To Efficiently Nodulate Parapiptadenia rigida (Benth.) Brenan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taulé, Cecilia; Zabaleta, María; Mareque, Cintia; Platero, Raúl; Sanjurjo, Lucía; Sicardi, Margarita; Frioni, Lillian; Battistoni, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Among the leguminous trees native to Uruguay, Parapiptadenia rigida (Angico), a Mimosoideae legume, is one of the most promising species for agroforestry. Like many other legumes, it is able to establish symbiotic associations with rhizobia and belongs to the group known as nitrogen-fixing trees, which are major components of agroforestry systems. Information about rhizobial symbionts for this genus is scarce, and thus, the aim of this work was to identify and characterize rhizobia associated with P. rigida. A collection of Angico-nodulating isolates was obtained, and 47 isolates were selected for genetic studies. According to enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR patterns and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of their nifH and 16S rRNA genes, the isolates could be grouped into seven genotypes, including the genera Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, and Rhizobium, among which the Burkholderia genotypes were the predominant group. Phylogenetic studies of nifH, nodA, and nodC sequences from the Burkholderia and the Cupriavidus isolates indicated a close relationship of these genes with those from betaproteobacterial rhizobia (beta-rhizobia) rather than from alphaproteobacterial rhizobia (alpha-rhizobia). In addition, nodulation assays with representative isolates showed that while the Cupriavidus isolates were able to effectively nodulate Mimosa pudica, the Burkholderia isolates produced white and ineffective nodules on this host. PMID:22226956

  18. Comprehensive Comparative Genomic and Transcriptomic Analyses of the Legume Genes Controlling the Nodulation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhenzhen; Pingault, Lise; Nourbakhsh-Rey, Mehrnoush; Libault, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most essential plant nutrients and one of the major factors limiting crop productivity. Having the goal to perform a more sustainable agriculture, there is a need to maximize biological nitrogen fixation, a feature of legumes. To enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction between legumes and rhizobia, the symbiotic partner fixing and assimilating the atmospheric nitrogen for the plant, researchers took advantage of genetic and genomic resources developed across different legume models (e.g., Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Glycine max, and Phaseolus vulgaris) to identify key regulatory protein coding genes of the nodulation process. In this study, we are presenting the results of a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis to highlight orthologous and paralogous relationships between the legume genes controlling nodulation. Mining large transcriptomic datasets, we also identified several orthologous and paralogous genes characterized by the induction of their expression during nodulation across legume plant species. This comprehensive study prompts new insights into the evolution of the nodulation process in legume plant and will benefit the scientific community interested in the transfer of functional genomic information between species.

  19. Interaction of a nodule specific, trans-acting factor with distinct DNA elements in the soybean leghaemoglobin Ibc(3) 5' upstream region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Østergaard; Marcker, Kjeld A; Schell, J

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear extracts from soybean nodules, leaves and roots were used to investigate protein-DNA interactions in the 5' upstream (promoter) region of the soybean leghaemoglobin lbc(3) gene. Two distinct regions were identified which strongly bind a nodule specific factor. A Bal31 deletion analysis...

  20. Learning fair play in industrial symbiotic relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazan, Devrim Murat; Yazdanpanah, Vahid; Fraccascia, Luca; Mancuso, Erika; Fantin, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we provide practical decision support to managers in firms involved in Industrial Symbiotic Relations (ISRs) in terms of strategy development and test the hypothesis that in the long-term, playing a fair strategy for sharing obtainable ISR-related benefits is dominant. We employ

  1. A report of symbiotic Siphonostomatoida (Copepoda) infecting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collected copepod specimens were fixed and preserved in 70% ethanol and studied with the stereo- and light microscopes. Most of the examined hosts (38) were infected with symbiotic siphonostomatoids. Ten different species representing five families were identified. Of these, seven represent new host records while four ...

  2. Clade identification of symbiotic zooxanthellae of dominant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tidal pools have harsh conditions due to lack of nutrients, food and pronounced changes in physical conditions such as pH, salinity and temperature, hence the study of symbiotic zooxanthellae on coral reefs of tidal pool seems to be necessary. Samples of five coral species that include Siderastrea savignyana, ...

  3. Screening soybean genotypes for promiscuous symbiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted at Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute, Kabanyolo (MUARIK) with the aim of screening of soybean germplasm for promiscuous symbiotic association with Bradyrhizobium sp. in order to identify genotypes with potential to be used as parents to initiate a breeding ...

  4. Evidence for carbon flux shortage and strong carbon/nitrogen interactions in pea nodules at early stages of water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Loli; González, Esther M; Arrese-Igor, Cesar

    2005-09-01

    Symbiotic N2 fixation in legume nodules declines under a wide range of environmental stresses. A high correlation between N2 fixation decline and sucrose synthase (SS; EC 2.4.1.13) activity down-regulation has been reported, although it has still to be elucidated whether a causal relationship between SS activity down-regulation and N2 fixation decline can be established. In order to study the likely C/N interactions within nodules and the effects on N2 fixation, pea plants (Pisum sativum L. cv. Sugar snap) were subjected to progressive water stress by withholding irrigation. Under these conditions, nodule SS activity declined concomitantly with apparent nitrogenase activity. The levels of UDP-glucose, glucose-1-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, and fructose-6-phosphate decreased in water-stressed nodules compared with unstressed nodules. Drought also had a marked effect on nodule concentrations of malate, succinate, and alpha-ketoglutarate. Moreover, a general decline in nodule adenylate content was detected. NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH; EC 1.1.1.42) was the only enzyme whose activity increased as a result of water deficit, compensating for a possible C/N imbalance and/or supplying NADPH in circumstances that the pentose phosphate pathway was impaired, as suggested by the decline in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) activity. The overall results show the occurrence of strong C/N interactions in nodules subjected to water stress and support a likely limitation of carbon flux that might be involved in the decline of N2 fixation under drought.

  5. Molecular Signals Controlling the Inhibition of Nodulation by Nitrate in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giel E. van Noorden

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of nitrogen inhibits legume nodule formation, but the mechanism of this inhibition is poorly understood. We found that 2.5 mM nitrate and above significantly inhibited nodule initiation but not root hair curling in Medicago trunatula. We analyzed protein abundance in M. truncatula roots after treatment with either 0 or 2.5 mM nitrate in the presence or absence of its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti after 1, 2 and 5 days following inoculation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to identify 106 differentially accumulated proteins responding to nitrate addition, inoculation or time point. While flavonoid-related proteins were less abundant in the presence of nitrate, addition of Nod gene-inducing flavonoids to the Sinorhizobium culture did not rescue nodulation. Accumulation of auxin in response to rhizobia, which is also controlled by flavonoids, still occurred in the presence of nitrate, but did not localize to a nodule initiation site. Several of the changes included defense- and redox-related proteins, and visualization of reactive oxygen species indicated that their induction in root hairs following Sinorhizobium inoculation was inhibited by nitrate. In summary, the presence of nitrate appears to inhibit nodulation via multiple pathways, including changes to flavonoid metabolism, defense responses and redox changes.

  6. Allene oxide synthase, allene oxide cyclase and jasmonic acid levels in Lotus japonicus nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zdyb

    Full Text Available Jasmonic acid (JA, its derivatives and its precursor cis-12-oxo phytodienoic acid (OPDA form a group of phytohormones, the jasmonates, representing signal molecules involved in plant stress responses, in the defense against pathogens as well as in development. Elevated levels of JA have been shown to play a role in arbuscular mycorrhiza and in the induction of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In this study, the gene families of two committed enzymes of the JA biosynthetic pathway, allene oxide synthase (AOS and allene oxide cyclase (AOC, were characterized in the determinate nodule-forming model legume Lotus japonicus JA levels were to be analysed in the course of nodulation. Since in all L. japonicus organs examined, JA levels increased upon mechanical disturbance and wounding, an aeroponic culture system was established to allow for a quick harvest, followed by the analysis of JA levels in whole root and shoot systems. Nodulated plants were compared with non-nodulated plants grown on nitrate or ammonium as N source, respectively, over a five week-period. JA levels turned out to be more or less stable independently of the growth conditions. However, L. japonicus nodules formed on aeroponically grown plants often showed patches of cells with reduced bacteroid density, presumably a stress symptom. Immunolocalization using a heterologous antibody showed that the vascular systems of these nodules also seemed to contain less AOC protein than those of nodules of plants grown in perlite/vermiculite. Hence, aeroponically grown L. japonicus plants are likely to be habituated to stress which could have affected JA levels.

  7. Characterization of Strains unlike Mesorhizobium loti That Nodulate Lotus spp. in Saline Soils of Granada, Spain ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite, María J.; Muñoz, Socorro; Olivares, José; Soto, María J.; Sanjuán, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Lotus species are forage legumes with potential as pastures in low-fertility and environmentally constrained soils, owing to their high persistence and yield under those conditions. The aim of this work was the characterization of phenetic and genetic diversity of salt-tolerant bacteria able to establish efficient symbiosis with Lotus spp. A total of 180 isolates able to nodulate Lotus corniculatus and Lotus tenuis from two locations in Granada, Spain, were characterized. Molecular identification of the isolates was performed by repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (REP-PCR) and 16S rRNA, atpD, and recA gene sequence analyses, showing the presence of bacteria related to different species of the genus Mesorhizobium: Mesorhizobium tarimense/Mesorhizobium tianshanense, Mesorhizobium chacoense/Mesorhizobium albiziae, and the recently described species, Mesorhizobium alhagi. No Mesorhizobium loti-like bacteria were found, although most isolates carried nodC and nifH symbiotic genes closely related to those of M. loti, considered the type species of bacteria nodulating Lotus, and other Lotus rhizobia. A significant portion of the isolates showed both high salt tolerance and good symbiotic performance with L. corniculatus, and many behaved like salt-dependent bacteria, showing faster growth and better symbiotic performance when media were supplemented with Na or Ca salts. PMID:20435777

  8. Diversity and Symbiotic Characteristics of Cowpea Bradyrhizobium Strains in Ghanaian Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fening, Joseph Opoku

    1999-08-01

    . Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of the isolates by PCR-RFLP identified 20 different composite genotypes. Diversity among the genomic species identified was very high, reaching 80% diversity. The various methods used indicated large diversity among the isolates, but the groupings of the isolates by the various methods were inconsistent, due to the different levels of resolution by the various methods. Diversity of the isolates in symbiotic effectiveness showed that some of the isolates had high nitrogen fixing capabilities that were comparable to plants fertilized with inorganic fertilizer nitrogen. Some of the isolates even showed superiority in symbiotic effectiveness relative to the standard strain TAL 169, suggesting that the native isolates may be useful strains for cowpea inoculation. The Gus A marker gene technique was used to assess the competitive abilities of the effective and ineffective isolates. Competition between the isolates was examined at different population ratios. The results obtained indicated that competitive ability was not directly related to effectiveness of strains. Inoculation of cowpea with indigenous bradyrhizobia isolates increased the number of nodules, shoot dry weight and total nitrogen of plants. The method of inoculation was observed to influence these parameters The results indicated that response of cowpea to inoculation in the presence of native rhizobia in some soils is possible. (au)

  9. Isoenzymes of superoxide dismutase in nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris L. , Pisum sativum L. , and Vigna unguiculata (L. ) Walp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becana, M.; Paris, F.J.; Sandalio, L.M.; Del Rio, L.A. (IRNA, Salamanca (Spain) Unidad de Bioquimica Vegetal, Granada (Spain))

    1989-08-01

    The activity and isozymic composition of superoxide dismutase were determined in nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris L., Pisum sativum L., and Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. A Mn-SOD was present in Rhizobium and two in Bradyrhizobium and bacteroids. Nodule mitochondria from all three legume species had a single Mn-SOD with similar relative mobility, whereas the cytosol contained several CuZn-SODs: two in Phaseolus and Pisum, and four in Vigna. In the cytoplasm of V. unguiculata nodules, a Fe-containing SOD was also present, with an electrophoretic mobility between those of CuZn- and Mn-SODs, and an estimated molecular weight of 57,000. Total SOD activity of the soluble fraction of host cells, expressed on a nodule fresh weight basis, exceeded markedly that of bacteroids. Likewise, specific SOD activities of free-living bacteria were superior or equal to those of their symbiotic forms. Soluble extracts of bacteria and bacteroids did not show peroxidase activity, but the nodule cell cytoplasm contained diverse peroxidase isozymes which were readily distinguishable from leghemoglobin components by electrophoresis. Data indicated that peroxidases and leghemoglobins did not significantly interfere with SOD localization on gels. Treatment with chloroform-ethanol scarcely affected the isozymic pattern of SODs and peroxidases, and had limited success in the removal of leghemoglobin.

  10. Automated lung nodule classification following automated nodule detection on CT: A serial approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armato, Samuel G. III; Altman, Michael B.; Wilkie, Joel; Sone, Shusuke; Li, Feng; Doi, Kunio; Roy, Arunabha S.

    2003-01-01

    We have evaluated the performance of an automated classifier applied to the task of differentiating malignant and benign lung nodules in low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans acquired as part of a lung cancer screening program. The nodules classified in this manner were initially identified by our automated lung nodule detection method, so that the output of automated lung nodule detection was used as input to automated lung nodule classification. This study begins to narrow the distinction between the 'detection task' and the 'classification task'. Automated lung nodule detection is based on two- and three-dimensional analyses of the CT image data. Gray-level-thresholding techniques are used to identify initial lung nodule candidates, for which morphological and gray-level features are computed. A rule-based approach is applied to reduce the number of nodule candidates that correspond to non-nodules, and the features of remaining candidates are merged through linear discriminant analysis to obtain final detection results. Automated lung nodule classification merges the features of the lung nodule candidates identified by the detection algorithm that correspond to actual nodules through another linear discriminant classifier to distinguish between malignant and benign nodules. The automated classification method was applied to the computerized detection results obtained from a database of 393 low-dose thoracic CT scans containing 470 confirmed lung nodules (69 malignant and 401 benign nodules). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the ability of the classifier to differentiate between nodule candidates that correspond to malignant nodules and nodule candidates that correspond to benign lesions. The area under the ROC curve for this classification task attained a value of 0.79 during a leave-one-out evaluation

  11. Anastomosis behavior differs between asymbiotic and symbiotic hyphae of Rhizophagus clarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purin, Sonia; Morton, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    The life history of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, Glomeromycota) consists of a short asymbiotic phase when spores germinate and a longer symbiotic phase where hyphae form a network within roots and subsequently in the rhizosphere. Hyphal anastomosis contributes to colony formation, yet this process has been studied mostly in the asymbiotic phase rather than in mycorrhizal plants because of methodological limitations. We sought to compare patterns of anastomosis during each phase of fungal growth by measuring hyphal fusions in genetically identical and different single spore isolates of Rhizophagus clarus from different environments and geographic locations. These isolates were genotyped with two anonymous markers of microsatellite-flanking regions. Anastomosis of hyphae from germinating spores was examined in axenic Petri dishes. A rhizohyphatron consisting of agar-coated glass slides bridging single or paired mycorrhizal sorghum plants allowed evaluation of anastomosis of symbiotic hyphae. Anastomosis of hyphae within a colony, defined here as a mycelium from an individual germinating spore or from mycorrhizal roots of one plant, occurred with similar frequencies (8-38%). However, anastomosis between paired colonies was observed in germinating spores from either genetically identical or different isolates, but it was never detected in symbiotic hyphae. The frequency of anastomosis in asymbiotic hyphae from paired interactions was low, occurring in fewer than 6% of hyphal contacts. These data suggest that anastomosis is relatively unconstrained when interactions occur within a colony but is confined to asymbiotic hyphae when interactions occur between paired colonies. This pattern of behavior suggests that asymbiotic and symbiotic phases of mycelium development by R. clarus may differ in function. Anastomosis in the asymbiotic phase may provide brief opportunities for gene flow between populations of this and possibly other AMF species.

  12. Nodulation of Sesbania Species by Rhizobium (Agrobacterium) Strain IRBG74 and Other Rhizobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concatenated sequence analysis with 16S rRNA, rpoB and fusA genes identified a strain (IRBG74) isolated from root nodules of the aquatic legume Sesbania cannabina as a close relative of the plant pathogen Rhizobium radiobacter (syn. Agrobacterium tumefaciens). However, DNA:DNA hybridisation with R. ...

  13. Nodulation studies with induced mutants of black gram (Vigna mungo L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahna, S.K.; Garg, Rekha; Parvateesam, M.

    1990-01-01

    Mutation breeding has been widely used to generate genetic variability in plants, but reports of mutations affecting the root system are less common. In the present work, black gram (Vigna mungo L. var T9), has been used for studies on the effect of induced mutations on nodulation patterns

  14. A nodule-specific protein secretory pathway required for nitrogen-fixing symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, D.; Griffitts, J.; Starker, C.; Fedorova, E.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Ivanov, S.E.; Bisseling, T.; Long, S.

    2010-01-01

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and its leguminous host plant Medicago truncatula occurs in a specialized root organ called the nodule. Bacteria that are released into plant cells are surrounded by a unique plant membrane compartment termed a symbiosome. We found that in

  15. 10Be in manganese nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Parker, P.; Mangini, A.; Cochran, K.; Turekian, K.; Krishnaswami, S.; Sharma, P.

    1981-01-01

    10 Be (t/sub 1/2) = 1.5 MY) is(formed in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation on nitrogen and oxygen. It is transported to the earth's surface via precipitation. In the oceans it is eventually associated with solid phases depositing on the ocean floor such as manganese nodules and deep-sea sediments. One of the assumptions that is normally made in analysis of such processes is that 10 Be has been produced at a relatively uniform rate over the pat several million years. If we assume, in addition, that the initial specific concentration of 10 Be as it precipitates with a solid phase is invariant with time, then we would expect that the decrease of the 10 Be concentration as a function of depth in a deep-sea core or in a manganese nodule would provide a record of sediment accumulation rate in the former and of growth rate in the latter. The possibility of using cosmic-ray produced 10 Be for the dating of marine deposits had been proposed 25 years ago by Arnold and Goel et al. The method of analysis used by these investigators, and those subsequently pursuing the problem, was low-level β counting. Though the potential of using 10 Be for dating manganese nodules was explored more than a decade ago, only a few measurements of 10 Be in nodules exist in date. This is largely because of the 10 Be measurements in environmental samples have gained considerable momentum during the past 3 to 4 years, after the development of accelerator mass spectrometry for its determination

  16. Symbiotic options for the conquest of land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Katie J; Pressel, Silvia; Duckett, Jeffrey G; Rimington, William R; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2015-08-01

    The domination of the landmasses of Earth by plants starting during the Ordovician Period drastically altered the development of the biosphere and the composition of the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences for all life ever since. It is widely thought that symbiotic soil fungi facilitated the colonization of the terrestrial environment by plants. However, recent discoveries in molecular ecology, physiology, cytology, and paleontology have brought into question the hitherto-assumed identity and biology of the fungi engaged in symbiosis with the earliest-diverging lineages of extant land plants. Here, we reconsider the existing paradigm and show that the symbiotic options available to the first plants emerging onto the land were more varied than previously thought. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Symbiotic options for the conquest of land

    OpenAIRE

    Field, KJ; Pressel, S; Duckett, JG; Rimington, WR; Bidartondo, MI

    2015-01-01

    The domination of the landmasses of Earth by plants starting during the Ordovician Period drastically altered the development of the biosphere and the composition of the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences for all life ever since. It is widely thought that symbiotic soil fungi facilitated the colonization of the terrestrial environment by plants. However, recent discoveries in molecular ecology, physiology, cytology, and paleontology have brought into question the hitherto-assumed iden...

  18. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  19. Short-term molecular acclimation processes of legume nodules to increased external oxygen concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eAvenhaus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the oxygen diffusion barrier is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30 % oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about two minutes of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about eight minutes later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency towards upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 minutes, corresponding to approximately 90 % of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050 showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased

  20. Morphological and genetic characterisation of some lima bean (phaseolus lunatus l.) cultivars and their nodulating rhizobia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kole, E.T.M.

    2014-07-01

    Three major investigations were carried out to assess the morphological traits and nodulation potential of thirteen lima bean cultivars as well as the genetic diversity of rhizobia nodulating these lima bean cultivars. Thirteen lima bean cultivars obtained from the CSIR-PGGRI and various market centres in Ghana were used. The experiment was conducted in pots filled with natural topsoil and arranged in a randomised complete block design (RCBD) with three replicates at the Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute (BNARI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC). The study aimed at obtaining some relevant information on the morphological traits of the lima bean to be improved upon, to evaluate their nodulation tendencies and determine similarities and differences of their nodulating rhizobia. Significant differences were obtained in quantitative characters (leaflet length, leaflet width, pod length, pod width, seed length, seed width, seed weight per 10 seeds and days to 50% emergence), contributing to divergence among the lima bean cultivars. Qualitative traits, however, were mostly similar, with few exceptions such as the flower wing colour, growth habit, leaf shape, main stem pigmentation, pod beak shape, seed secondary colour and seed pattern colour showing divergence among the lima bean cultivars. Two major clusters were joined at the similarity distance of 0.69. Majority of the lima bean cultivars were identified to be of the same morphotype with exception in cultivars M4 and A2. There were no significant differences in mean nodule number, mean effective and non-effective nodule counts. The lima bean cultivar GH 17I4 showed superior performance with respect to nodule number counts, effective nodules, fresh shoot weight and fresh root weight. Additionally lima bean cultivars, M5 and A2 indicated superior radiation use efficiency with total shoot dry matter of 731kg/ha and 704kg/ha respectively. A positive and high correlation existed between

  1. Genetic identification and symbiotic efficiency of Sinorhizobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic characterization by rep-PCR and RAPD-PCR was applied to study the status of S. melitloti populations inhabiting nodules of alfalfa. Cluster analysis of rep-PCR profiles showed significant differences among S. meliloti isolates. Both methods resulted in almost identical grouping of strains. Among indigenous strains ...

  2. A Medicago truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like Domain-Containing Protein Is Required for Rhizobial Infection and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharoy, Senjuti; Liu, Chengwu; Breakspear, Andrew; Guan, Dian; Shailes, Sarah; Nakashima, Jin; Zhang, Shulan; Wen, Jiangqi; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Oldroyd, Giles; Murray, Jeremy D; Udvardi, Michael K

    2016-04-01

    The symbiosis between leguminous plants and soil rhizobia culminates in the formation of nitrogen-fixing organs called nodules that support plant growth. Two Medicago truncatula Tnt1-insertion mutants were identified that produced small nodules, which were unable to fix nitrogen effectively due to ineffective rhizobial colonization. The gene underlying this phenotype was found to encode a protein containing a putative membrane-localized domain of unknown function (DUF21) and a cystathionine-β-synthase domain. The cbs1 mutants had defective infection threads that were sometimes devoid of rhizobia and formed small nodules with greatly reduced numbers of symbiosomes. We studied the expression of the gene, designated M truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like1 (MtCBS1), using a promoter-β-glucuronidase gene fusion, which revealed expression in infected root hair cells, developing nodules, and in the invasion zone of mature nodules. An MtCBS1-GFP fusion protein localized itself to the infection thread and symbiosomes. Nodulation factor-induced Ca(2+) responses were observed in the cbs1 mutant, indicating that MtCBS1 acts downstream of nodulation factor signaling. MtCBS1 expression occurred exclusively during Medicago-rhizobium symbiosis. Induction of MtCBS1 expression during symbiosis was found to be dependent on Nodule Inception (NIN), a key transcription factor that controls both rhizobial infection and nodule organogenesis. Interestingly, the closest homolog of MtCBS1, MtCBS2, was specifically induced in mycorrhizal roots, suggesting common infection mechanisms in nodulation and mycorrhization. Related proteins in Arabidopsis have been implicated in cell wall maturation, suggesting a potential role for CBS1 in the formation of the infection thread wall. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Rhizobium hidalgonense sp. nov., a nodule endophytic bacterium of Phaseolus vulgaris in acid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Yan, Hui; Liu, Li Xue; Chen, Wen Feng; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Verástegui-Valdés, Myrthala M; Wang, En Tao; Han, Xiao Zeng

    2017-01-01

    One Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated as FH14 T , was isolated from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in Hidalgo State of Mexico. Results based upon 16S rRNA gene (≥99.8 % similarities to known species), concatenated sequence (recA, atpD and glnII) analysis of three housekeeping genes (≤93.4 % similarities to known species) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) values of genome sequence (ranged from 87.6 to 90.0 % to related species) indicated the distinct position of strain FH14 T within the genus Rhizobium. In analyses of symbiotic genes, only nitrogen fixation gene nifH was amplified that had nucleotide sequence identical to those of the bean-nodulating strains in R. phaseoli and R. vallis, while nodulation gene nodC gene was not amplified. The failure of nodulation to its original host P. vulgaris and other legumes evidenced the loss of its nodulation capability. Strain FH14 T contained summed feature 8 (C 18:1 ω6c/C 18:1 ω7c, 59.96 %), C 16:0 (10.6 %) and summed feature 2 (C 12:0 aldehyde/unknown 10.928, 10.24 %) as the major components of cellular fatty acids. Failure to utilize alaninamide, and utilizing L-alanine, L-asparagine and γ-amino butyric acid as carbon source, distinguished the strain FH14 T from the type strains for the related species. The genome size and DNA G+C content of FH14 T were 6.94 Mbp and 60.8 mol %, respectively. Based on those results, a novel specie in Rhizobium, named Rhizobium hidalgonense sp. nov., was proposed, with FH14 T (=HAMBI 3636 T  = LMG 29288 T ) as the type strain.

  4. Rhizobial strains exert a major effect on the amino acid composition of alfalfa nodules under NaCl stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Annick; Bipfubusa, Marie; Dhont, Catherine; Chalifour, François-P; Drouin, Pascal; Beauchamp, Chantal J

    2016-11-01

    Specific amino acids have protective functions in plants under stress conditions. This study assessed the effects of rhizobial strains on the amino acid composition in alfalfa under salt stress. Two alfalfa cultivars (Medicago sativa L. cv Apica and salt-tolerant cv Halo) in association with two Sinorhizobium meliloti strains with contrasting growth under salt stress (strain A2 and salt-tolerant strain Rm1521) were exposed to different levels of NaCl (0, 20, 40, 80 or 160 mM NaCl) under controlled conditions. We compared root and shoot biomasses, as well as root:shoot ratio for each association under these conditions as indicators of the salt tolerance of the symbiosis. Amino acid concentrations were analyzed in nodules, leaves and roots. The total concentration of free amino acids in nodules was mostly rhizobial-strain dependent while in leaves and roots it was mostly responsive to salt stress. For both cultivars, total and individual concentrations of amino acids including asparagine, proline, glutamine, aspartate, glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), histidine and ornithine were higher in Rm1521 nodules than in A2 nodules. Conversely, lysine and methionine were more abundant in A2 nodules than in Rm1521 nodules. Proline, glutamine, arginine, GABA and histidine substantially accumulated in salt-stressed nodules, suggesting an enhanced production of amino acids associated with osmoregulation, N storage or energy metabolism to counteract salt stress. Combining the salt-tolerant strain Rm1521 and the salt-tolerant cultivar Halo enhanced the root:shoot ratios and amino acid concentrations involved in plant protection which could be in part responsible for the enhancement of salt tolerance in alfalfa. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Studies on legume root hair development : correlations with the infection process by Rhizobium bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mylona, P.

    1996-01-01


    Rhizobia-legume interaction leading to the formation of specific organs, namely root nodules, starts at the epidermis of the root. Bacteria interfere with the develomental programme of the epidermal cells by inducing a number of responses, as new root hair growth, root hair deformation

  6. Evaluation of symbiotic performance of some mutant lines of soybean inoculated with two bradyrhizobium japonicum strains using 15N technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdali, F.; Mir-Ali, N.; Al-Nabulsi, I.

    2002-11-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the symbiotic performance of two soybean varieties and some of their mutants (that were obtained as a result of a previous mutation breeding program) with two bradyrhizobium japonicum strains (RG and FA3) using 15 N isotopic dilution method. Random amplified polymorphic DNA technique (RAPD) was used to study the genetic relationships among the soybean genotypes and to make sure that the two rhizobial strains are different. The 25 random primers used discriminated the different soybean genotypes and the dendrogram resultants from shared polymorphic fragments put each variety and its mutants in two separate clusters asserting that the mutants and their mother lines are different. Both strains of B. japonicum were able to form effective nodules on all soybean plants. However, number of nodules, dry matter yield and N-uptake from the available sources by soybeans were affected by both plant genotype and rhizobial strains. N 2 -fixation was affected to a large extent by different strain and plant genotype combinations. Percentage of fixed N 2 (N dfa) ranged between 35 and 49%; whereas, the actual amounts of fixed N 2 were between 105 and 210 mg N/pot. Amounts of N 2 -fixed by FA3 strain were higher than of RG in both soybean varieties, whereas, the latter strain showed higher performance in the mutant lines. The results showed that total plant N estimation may not be a sufficient indicator for high N 2 -fixation. the results also showed that it is very important to determine both the amount of nitrogen derived from N 2 -fixation and N derived from soil for evaluating the symbiotic performance ability. Moreover, the performance of symbiotic N 2 -fixation in soybean was shown to depend on both plant genotype and rhizobial strain and the amount of N 2 -fixation can be increased by combining the best plant genotypes and the most adapted strain. (author)

  7. Physical Structure of Four Symbiotic Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Scott J. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Disk accretion powers many astronomical objects, including pre-main sequence stars, interacting binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, models developed to explain the behavior of disks and their surroundings - boundary layers, jets, and winds - lack much predictive power, because the physical mechanism driving disk evolution - the viscosity - is not understood. Observations of many types of accreting systems are needed to constrain the basic physics of disks and provide input for improved models. Symbiotic stars are an attractive laboratory for studying physical phenomena associated with disk accretion. These long period binaries (P(sub orb) approx. 2-3 yr) contain an evolved red giant star, a hot companion, and an ionized nebula. The secondary star usually is a white dwarf accreting material from the wind of its red giant companion. A good example of this type of symbiotic is BF Cygni: our analysis shows that disk accretion powers the nuclear burning shell of the hot white dwarf and also manages to eject material perpendicular to the orbital plane (Mikolajewska, Kenyon, and Mikolajewski 1989). The hot components in other symbiotic binaries appear powered by tidal overflow from a very evolved red giant companion. We recently completed a study of CI Cygni and demonstrated that the accreting secondary is a solar-type main sequence star, rather than a white dwarf (Kenyon et aL 1991). This project continued our study of symbiotic binary systems. Our general plan was to combine archival ultraviolet and optical spectrophotometry with high quality optical radial velocity observations to determine the variation of line and continuum sources as functions of orbital phase. We were very successful in generating orbital solutions and phasing UV+optical spectra for five systems: AG Dra, V443 Her, RW Hya, AG Peg, and AX Per. Summaries of our main results for these systems appear below. A second goal of our project was to consider general models for the

  8. Effects of symbiotic bacteria on chemical sensitivity of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakul, Patcharaporn; Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    The crustacean zooplankton Daphnia magna has been widely used for chemical toxicity tests. Although abiotic factors have been well documented in ecotoxicological test protocols, biotic factors that may affect the sensitivity to chemical compounds remain limited. Recently, we identified symbiotic bacteria that are critical for the growth and reproduction of D. magna. The presence of symbiotic bacteria on Daphnia raised the question as to whether these bacteria have a positive or negative effect on toxicity tests. In order to evaluate the effects of symbiotic bacteria on toxicity tests, bacteria-free Daphnia were prepared, and their chemical sensitivities were compared with that of Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria based on an acute immobilization test. The Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria showed higher chemical resistance to nonylphenol, fenoxycarb, and pentachlorophenol than bacteria-free Daphnia. These results suggested potential roles of symbiotic bacteria in the chemical resistance of its host Daphnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dual effect of Mesorhizobium loti T3SS functionality on the symbiotic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Cintia; Mercante, Virginia; Babuin, María F; Lepek, Viviana C

    2012-05-01

    Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 has a functional type III secretory system (T3SS) involved in the nodulation process on Lotus tenuis and Lotus japonicus. Four putative M. loti T3SS effectors (Mlr6358, Mlr6331, Mlr6361, and Mlr6316) have been previously described, and it has been demonstrated that the N-terminal regions of Mlr6361 and Mlr6358 mediate the secretion via a T3SS. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of Mlr6316 and Mlr6331 N-terminal regions to direct the secretion of a translational fusion to a reporter peptide through T3SS. By using single, double, and triple mutants, we demonstrated the positive and negative participation of some of these proteins in the determination of competitiveness on Lotus spp. Low competitiveness values correlated with low nodulation efficiency for a mutant deficient in three of the putative M. loti effectors. Our data suggest that the net effect of M. loti T3SS function on symbiotic process with Lotus results from a balance between positive and negative effects. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pulmonary nodules: detection, assessment, and CAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girvin, Francis; Ko, Jane P

    2008-10-01

    The imaging of pulmonary nodules is an evolving and dynamic field. In this review, we discuss the detection and multitechnique characterization of pulmonary nodules, emphasizing the impact of technological advances on both noninvasive and invasive evaluation and surveillance. The potential contribution of MRI, evolving imaging-guided techniques, and computer applications are also discussed. Advances in MDCT and PET and the potential contribution of fast-imaging MRI sequences and computer applications should continue to improve our evaluation of the solitary pulmonary nodule.

  11. Cytological diagnosis of microfilariae in subcutaneous nodule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan K Panicker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfilariaemia presenting with subcutaneous nodule is rare. We report a case of a 22-year-old female patient who presented with a subcutaneous nodule on right forearm. Fine-needle aspiration cytology from the nodule showed many sheathed motile microfilaria on wet mount preparation during day time. Wuchereria loa loa is known to be associated with soft tissue swellings as reported earlier. Nocturnal motility and cytomorphological features differentiate Wuchereria bancrofti from Wuchereria loa loa.

  12. The evolutionary events necessary for the emergence of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes may involve a loss of nitrate responsiveness of the NIN transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Wataru; Konishi, Mineko; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2013-10-01

    NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) is a key regulator of the symbiotic nitrogen fixation pathway in legumes including Lotus japonicus. NIN-like proteins (NLPs), which are presumably present in all land plants, were recently identified as key transcription factors in nitrate signaling and responses in Arabidopsis thaliana, a non-leguminous plant. Here we show that both NIN and NLP1 of L. japonicus (LjNLP1) can bind to the nitrate-responsive cis-element (NRE) and promote transcription from an NRE-containing promoter as did the NLPs of A. thaliana (AtNLPs). However, differing from LjNLP1 and the AtNLPs that are activated by nitrate signaling through their N-terminal regions, the N-terminal region of NIN did not respond to nitrate. Thus, in the course of the evolution of NIN into a transcription factor that functions in nodulation in legumes, some mutations might arise that converted it to a nitrate-insensitive transcription factor. Because nodule formation is induced under nitrogen-deficient conditions, we speculate that the loss of the nitrate-responsiveness of NIN may be one of the evolutionary events necessary for the emergence of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes.

  13. Phylogenetic multilocus sequence analysis of indigenous slow-growing rhizobia nodulating cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Fotiadis, Christos T; Ntatsi, Georgia; Savvas, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is a promiscuous grain legume, capable of establishing efficient symbiosis with diverse symbiotic bacteria, mainly slow-growing rhizobial species belonging to the genus Bradyrhizobium. Although much research has been done on cowpea-nodulating bacteria in various countries around the world, little is known about the genetic and symbiotic diversity of indigenous cowpea rhizobia in European soils. In the present study, the genetic and symbiotic diversity of indigenous rhizobia isolated from field-grown cowpea nodules in three geographically different Greek regions were studied. Forty-five authenticated strains were subjected to a polyphasic approach. ERIC-PCR based fingerprinting analysis grouped the isolates into seven groups and representative strains of each group were further analyzed. The analysis of the rrs gene showed that the strains belong to different species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. The analysis of the 16S-23S IGS region showed that the strains from each geographic region were characterized by distinct IGS types which may represent novel phylogenetic lineages, closely related to the type species of Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi, Bradyrhizobium ferriligni and Bradyrhizobium liaoningense. MLSA analysis of three housekeeping genes (recA, glnII, and gyrB) showed the close relatedness of our strains with B. pachyrhizi PAC48 T and B. liaoningense USDA 3622 T and confirmed that the B. liaoningense-related isolate VUEP21 may constitute a novel species within Bradyrhizobium. Moreover, symbiotic gene phylogenies, based on nodC and nifH genes, showed that the B. pachyrhizi-related isolates belonged to symbiovar vignae, whereas the B. liaoningense-related isolates may represent a novel symbiovar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Cytokinin signaling during root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishopp, Anthony; Help, Hanna; Helariutta, Ykä

    2009-01-01

    The cytokinin class of phytohormones regulates division and differentiation of plant cells. They are perceived and signaled by a phosphorelay mechanism similar to those observed in prokaryotes. Research into the components of phosphorelay had previously been marred by genetic redundancy. However, recent studies have addressed this with the creation of high-order mutants. In addition, several new elements regulating cytokinin signaling have been identified. This has uncovered many roles in diverse developmental and physiological processes. In this review, we look at these processes specifically in the context of root development. We focus on the formation and maintenance of the root apical meristem, primary and secondary vascular development, lateral root emergence and development, and root nodulation. We believe that the root is an ideal organ with which to investigate cytokinin signaling in a wider context.

  15. Foliar Chlorosis in Symbiotic Host and Nonhost Plants Induced by Rhizobium tropici Type B Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'connell, K P; Handelsman, J

    1993-07-01

    Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 induced chlorosis in the leaves of its symbiotic hosts, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), siratro (Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb.), and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Chlorosis induction by strains CIAT899 and CT9005, an exopolysaccharide-deficient mutant of CIAT899, required carbon substrate. When the bacteria were added at planting in a solution of mannitol (50 g/liter), as few as 10 cells of CIAT899 were sufficient to induce chlorosis in bean plants. All carbon sources tested, including organic acids and mono- and disaccharides, supported chlorosis induction. The addition of a carbon source did not affect the growth rate or the population density of CT9005 in the bean plant rhizosphere. Cell-free filtrates of cultures of CT9005 did not induce detectable chlorosis. All type B strains of R. tropici tested also induced chlorosis in common bean. Type A strains of R. tropici and all other species of bacteria tested did not induce chlorosis. Several lines of evidence indicated that nodulation was not required for chlorosis induction. Strain RSP900, a pSym-cured derivative of CIAT899, induced chlorosis in wild-type P. vulgaris. In addition, NOD125, a nodulation-defective line of common bean, developed chlorosis when inoculated with CIAT899, but did not develop nodules. CIAT899 consistently induced severe chlorosis in the leaves of the nonhost legumes alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and Berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L.), and induced chlorosis in 29 to 58% of the plants tested of sunflower, cucumber, and tomato seedlings, but it did not induce chlorosis in the leaves of corn or wheat. Chlorosis induction in nonhost plants also required carbon substrate. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that R. tropici type B strains produce a chlorosis-inducing factor that affects a wide range of plant species.

  16. Root-nodule bacteria isolated from native Amphithalea ericifolia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-26

    Jan 26, 2012 ... and Graham, 1991; Foster, 1993; Del Papa et al., 2003;. Kiss et al., 2004; Draghi et al., 2010). In the Cape flats and Cederberg mountains of South. Africa, the soils are extremely high in acidity, ranging from. pH 2.9 to 5.0 (Muofhe and Dakora, 1998); yet they support growth of many native legumes as well ...

  17. De Novo Assembly of the Pea (Pisum sativum L. Nodule Transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Zhukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The large size and complexity of the garden pea (Pisum sativum L. genome hamper its sequencing and the discovery of pea gene resources. Although transcriptome sequencing provides extensive information about expressed genes, some tissue-specific transcripts can only be identified from particular organs under appropriate conditions. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing of polyadenylated transcripts from young pea nodules and root tips on an Illumina GAIIx system, followed by de novo transcriptome assembly using the Trinity program. We obtained more than 58,000 and 37,000 contigs from “Nodules” and “Root Tips” assemblies, respectively. The quality of the assemblies was assessed by comparison with pea expressed sequence tags and transcriptome sequencing project data available from NCBI website. The “Nodules” assembly was compared with the “Root Tips” assembly and with pea transcriptome sequencing data from projects indicating tissue specificity. As a result, approximately 13,000 nodule-specific contigs were found and annotated by alignment to known plant protein-coding sequences and by Gene Ontology searching. Of these, 581 sequences were found to possess full CDSs and could thus be considered as novel nodule-specific transcripts of pea. The information about pea nodule-specific gene sequences can be applied for gene-based markers creation, polymorphism studies, and real-time PCR.

  18. NITRITE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY OF NON-SYMBIOTIC HEMOGLOBINS FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiso, Mauro; Tejero, Jesús; Kenney, Claire; Frizzell, Sheila; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Plant non-symbiotic hemoglobins possess hexa-coordinate heme geometry similar to the heme protein neuroglobin. We recently discovered that deoxygenated neuroglobin converts nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule involved in many processes in plants. We sought to determine whether Arabidopsis thaliana non-symbiotic hemoglobins class 1 and 2 (AHb1 and AHb2) might function as nitrite reductases. We found that the reaction of nitrite with deoxygenated AHb1 and AHb2 generates NO gas and iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin species. The bimolecular rate constants for nitrite reduction to NO are 19.8 ± 3.2 and 4.9 ± 0.2 M−1s−1, at pH = 7.4 and 25°C, respectively. We determined the pH dependence of these bimolecular rate constants and found a linear correlation with the concentration of protons, indicating the requirement for one proton in the reaction. Release of free NO gas during reaction in anoxic and hypoxic (2% oxygen) conditions was confirmed by chemiluminescence detection. These results demonstrate that deoxygenated AHb1 and AHb2 reduce nitrite to form NO via a mechanism analogous to that observed for hemoglobin, myoglobin and neuroglobin. Our findings suggest that during severe hypoxia and in the anaerobic plant roots, especially in water submerged species, non-symbiotic hemoglobins provide a viable pathway for NO generation via nitrite reduction. PMID:22620259

  19. Root rots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn Robbins; Philip M. Wargo

    1989-01-01

    Root rots of central hardwoods are diseases caused by fungi that infect and decay woody roots and sometimes also invade the butt portion of the tree. By killing and decaying roots, root rotting fungi reduce growth, decrease tree vigor, and cause windthrow and death. The most common root diseases of central hardwoods are Armillaria root rot, lnonotus root rot, and...

  20. Growth, nodulation and yield response of soybean to biofertilizers and organic manures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaid, A.; Mahmood, N.

    2010-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of a symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain TAL-102 and a commercial biofertlizer EM (effective microorganisms) on growth, nodulation and yield of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Wilczek] in soils amended either with farmyard manure or Trifolium alexandrinum L. green manure at the rate 20 tons ha/sup -1/ each. In green manure amendment, B. japonicum inoculation significantly enhanced number and biomass of nodules resulting in a significant increase of 27, 65 and 55% in shoot biomass and number and biomass of pods, respectively. In farmyard manure amended soil, B. japonicum inoculation significantly enhanced fresh biomass of nodules. As a result a significant increase of 45 and 47% in shoot biomass and number of pods was recorded, respectively. Generally, the effect of sole EM application on various studied parameters was insignificant in both the soil amendment systems. Combined application of EM and B. japonicum in green manure amended soil reduced shoot growth and number of pods as compared to sole B. japonicum inoculation. Conversely, in farmyard manure amendment, plants co-inoculated with B. japonicum and EM exhibited highest and significantly greater shoot biomass, and number and biomass of pods as compared to all other treatments. The present study concludes that soybean yield can be significantly enhanced by the application of B. japonicum and EM in farmyard manure amendment. (author)

  1. Identification and use of actinomycetes for enhanced nodulation of soybean co-inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, A K; Klubek, B; Varsa, E C

    2003-08-01

    The utilization of actinomycetes as potential soybean (Glycine max (L.)) co-inoculants was evaluated. Soil samples from Carbondale and Belleville, Ill., were used to inoculate pre-germinated soybean plants to determine antibiotic sensitivity in the native Bradyrhizobium japonicum population. Sensitivity was in the order kanamycin > tetracycline > oxytetracycline > rifampicin > neomycin. Antagonism by five actinomycete cultures toward seven test strains of B. japonicum was also assessed. The ranking average inhibition (across all seven B. japonicum strains) by these actino mycetes was Streptomyces kanamyceticus = Streptomyces coeruleoprunus > Streptomyces rimosus > Streptomyces sp. > Amy colatopsis mediterranei. Ten antibiotic combinations were used to isolate antibiotic-resistant mutants of B. japonicum I-110 and 3I1B-110 via successive cycles of mutation. Eighty-one antibiotic-resistant strains were isolated and tested for symbiotic competency; nine of which were selected for further characterization in a greenhouse pot study. Few differences in nodule number were caused by these treatments. Nodule occupancy varied from 0% to 18.3% when antibiotic-resistant strains of B. japonicum were used as the sole inoculants. However, when three mutant strains of B. japonicum were co-inoculated with S. kanamyceticus, significant increases in nodule occupancy (up to 55%) occurred. Increases in shoot nitrogen composition (27.1%-40.9%) were also caused by co-inoculation with S. kanamyceticus.

  2. Strategy for polymetallic nodule mining

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    'Jrlii, SinL:C tbe economic viahility of deep sCnodules and sulfides are being looked upon as an alternative tu the existing but fast dwindling land rcsourccs. Land reseNcs of... and dcscrib\\:s the approach for delineation of a mine !>itc and collection of baseline dala. 42 tn\\ertUlllQIUII ChaUenaa- VoL 10 N.... 3 • 1990 Criteria for delineation of mine site The term 'minesilc' is defined as an ocean bottom area where underspccifie...

  3. Management of solid pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poschenrieder, F.; Beyer, L.; Stroszczynski, C.; Hamer, O.W.; Rehbock, B.; Diederich, S.; Wormanns, D.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of computed tomography has meant that the number of incidentally detected solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) has greatly increased in recent years. A reasonable management of these SPN is necessary in order to firstly be able to detect malignant lesions early on and secondly to avoid upsetting the patient unnecessarily or carrying out further stressful diagnostic procedures. This review article shows how the dignity of SPNs can be estimated and based on this how the management can be accomplished taking established guidelines into consideration. (orig.) [de

  4. Lignin Modification Leads to Increased Nodule Numbers in Alfalfa1[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Bhattarai, Kishor; Pislariu, Catalina I.; Nakashima, Jin; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Udvardi, Michael K.; Monteros, Maria J.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of lignin levels in the forage legume alfalfa (Medicago sativa) by down-regulation of the monolignol biosynthetic enzyme hydroxycinnamoyl coenzyme A:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) results in strongly increased digestibility and processing ability of lignocellulose. However, these modifications are often also associated with dwarfing and other changes in plant growth. Given the importance of nitrogen fixation for legume growth, we evaluated the impact of constitutively targeted lignin modification on the belowground organs (roots and nodules) of alfalfa plants. HCT down-regulated alfalfa plants exhibit a striking reduction in root growth accompanied by an unexpected increase in nodule numbers when grown in the greenhouse or in the field. This phenotype is associated with increased levels of gibberellins and certain flavonoid compounds in roots. Although HCT down-regulation reduced biomass yields in both the greenhouse and field experiments, the impact on the allocation of nitrogen to shoots or roots was minimal. It is unlikely, therefore, that the altered growth phenotype of reduced-lignin alfalfa is a direct result of changes in nodulation or nitrogen fixation efficiency. Furthermore, HCT down-regulation has no measurable effect on carbon allocation to roots in either greenhouse or 3-year field trials. PMID:24406794

  5. Response pattern of amino compounds in phloem and xylem of trees to soil drought depends on drought intensity and root symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X-P; Gong, C-M; Fan, Y-Y; Eiblmeier, M; Zhao, Z; Han, G; Rennenberg, H

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify drought-mediated differences in amino nitrogen (N) composition and content of xylem and phloem in trees having different symbiotic N(2)-fixing bacteria. Under controlled water availability, 1-year-old seedlings of Robinia pseudoacacia (nodules with Rhizobium), Hippophae rhamnoides (symbiosis with Frankia) and Buddleja alternifolia (no such root symbiosis) were exposed to control, medium drought and severe drought, corresponding soil water content of 70-75%, 45-50% and 30-35% of field capacity, respectively. Composition and content of amino compounds in xylem sap and phloem exudates were analysed as a measure of N nutrition. Drought strongly reduced biomass accumulation in all species, but amino N content in xylem and phloem remained unaffected only in R. pseudoacacia. In H. rhamnoides and B. alternifolia, amino N in phloem remained constant, but increased in xylem of both species in response to drought. There were differences in composition of amino compounds in xylem and phloem of the three species in response to drought. Proline concentrations in long-distance transport pathways of all three species were very low, below the limit of detection in phloem of H. rhamnoides and in phloem and xylem of B. alternifolia. Apparently, drought-mediated changes in N composition were much more connected with species-specific changes in C:N ratios. Irrespective of soil water content, the two species with root symbioses did not show similar features for the different types of symbiosis, neither in N composition nor in N content. There was no immediate correlation between symbiotic N fixation and drought-mediated changes in amino N in the transport pathways. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  6. Molecular adaptation in flowering and symbiotic recognition pathways: insights from patterns of polymorphism in the legume Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronfort Joëlle

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied patterns of molecular adaptation in the wild Mediterranean legume Medicago truncatula. We focused on two phenotypic traits that are not functionally linked: flowering time and perception of symbiotic microbes. Phenology is an important fitness component, especially for annual plants, and many instances of molecular adaptation have been reported for genes involved in flowering pathways. While perception of symbiotic microbes is also integral to adaptation in many plant species, very few reports of molecular adaptation exist for symbiotic genes. Here we used data from 57 individuals and 53 gene fragments to quantify the overall strength of both positive and purifying selection in M. truncatula and asked if footprints of positive selection can be detected at key genes of rhizobia recognition pathways. Results We examined nucleotide variation among 57 accessions from natural populations in 53 gene fragments: 5 genes involved in nitrogen-fixing bacteria recognition, 11 genes involved in flowering, and 37 genes used as control loci. We detected 1757 polymorphic sites yielding an average nucleotide diversity (pi of 0.003 per site. Non-synonymous variation is under sizable purifying selection with 90% of amino-acid changing mutations being strongly selected against. Accessions were structured in two groups consistent with geographical origins. Each of these two groups harboured an excess of rare alleles, relative to expectations of a constant-sized population, suggesting recent population expansion. Using coalescent simulations and an approximate Bayesian computation framework we detected several instances of genes departing from selective neutrality within each group and showed that the polymorphism of two nodulation and four flowering genes has probably been shaped by recent positive selection. Conclusion We quantify the intensity of purifying selection in the M. truncatula genome and show that putative footprints of

  7. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in a tropical rainforest: 15N natural abundance measurements supported by experimental isotopic enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Thijs L; Perreijn, Kristel; van Kessel, Chris; Werger, Marinus J A

    2007-01-01

    * Leguminous trees are very common in the tropical rainforests of Guyana. Here, species-specific differences in N(2) fixation capability among nodulating legumes growing on different soils and a possible limitation of N(2) fixation by a relatively high nitrogen (N) and low phosphorus (P) availability in the forest were investigated. * Leaves of 17 nodulating species and 17 non-nodulating reference trees were sampled and their delta(15)N values measured. Estimates of N(2) fixation rates were calculated using the (15)N natural abundance method. Pot experiments were conducted on the effect of N and P availability on N(2) fixation using the (15)N-enriched isotope dilution method. * Nine species showed estimates of > 33% leaf N derived from N(2) fixation, while the others had low or undetectable N(2) fixation rates. High N and low P availability reduced N(2) fixation substantially. * The results suggest that a high N and low P availability in the forest limit N(2) fixation. At the forest ecosystem level, N(2) fixation was estimated at c. 6% of total N uptake by the tree community. We conclude that symbiotic N(2) fixation plays an important role in maintaining high amounts of soil available N in undisturbed forest.

  8. Field Phenotyping of Soybean Roots for Drought Stress Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhanu A. Fenta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Root architecture was determined together with shoot parameters under well watered and drought conditions in the field in three soybean cultivars (A5409RG, Jackson and Prima 2000. Morphology parameters were used to classify the cultivars into different root phenotypes that could be important in conferring drought tolerance traits. A5409RG is a drought-sensitive cultivar with a shallow root phenotype and a root angle of <40°. In contrast, Jackson is a drought-escaping cultivar. It has a deep rooting phenotype with a root angle of >60°. Prima 2000 is an intermediate drought-tolerant cultivar with a root angle of 40°–60°. It has an intermediate root phenotype. Prima 2000 was the best performing cultivar under drought stress, having the greatest shoot biomass and grain yield under limited water availability. It had abundant root nodules even under drought conditions. A positive correlation was observed between nodule size, above-ground biomass and seed yield under well-watered and drought conditions. These findings demonstrate that root system phenotyping using markers that are easy-to-apply under field conditions can be used to determine genotypic differences in drought tolerance in soybean. The strong association between root and nodule parameters and whole plant productivity demonstrates the potential application of simple root phenotypic markers in screening for drought tolerance in soybean.

  9. Investigating Tactile Stimulation in Symbiotic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orso, Valeria; Mazza, Renato; Gamberini, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    The core characteristics of tactile stimuli, i.e., recognition reliability and tolerance to ambient interference, make them an ideal candidate to be integrated into a symbiotic system. The selection of the appropriate stimulation is indeed important in order not to hinder the interaction from...... the user’s perspective. Here we present the process of selecting the most adequate tactile stimulation delivered by a tactile vest while users were engaged in an absorbing activity, namely playing a video-game. A total of 20 participants (mean age 24.78; SD= 1.57) were involved. Among the eight tactile...

  10. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  11. Position of solitary thyroid nodules by gammagraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basteris M, J.; Gomez D, R.

    2007-01-01

    In this work it is presented which it is the position more frequent of the solitary thyroid nodules. It was used the method of retrospective longitudinal observational investigation in 125 patients that went to the laboratory for realization of detection of thyroid nodules in the years 2004 and 2005 through gammagraphy. (Author)

  12. Benign solitary solid cold thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Helle; Bennedbaek, Finn Noe; Karstrup, Steen

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of ultrasonography (US)-guided interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) on the volume of benign solitary solid cold thyroid nodules and any nodule-related symptoms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ILP was performed in 16 patients with normal thyroid function and a solid...... benign thyroid nodule. None of the patients had uptake on a radionuclide scan. Patients underwent one ILP session. A needle was positioned in the thyroid nodule with US guidance, and the laser fiber was placed in the lumen of the needle. Patients were treated for 287-1,200 seconds with an output power...... of 1-3 W. ILP was performed with continuous US guidance and terminated when the echogenic changes were stationary. Thyroid nodule volume and thyroid function were evaluated before and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. During the same period, 15 untreated patients (control group) were followed up...

  13. Symbiotic effectiveness of acid-tolerant Bradyrhizobium strains with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further, symbiotic effectiveness of these strains was determined under the polyhouse conditions in sterilized soil (pH 4.5). Highest and lowest symbiotic characters, dry matter production and nitrogen improvement per plant were observed in PSR001 and NSR008 inoculated plants, respectively. All the examined isolates ...

  14. Rhizobium NodB protein involved in nodulation signal synthesis is a chitooligosaccharide deacetylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M; Röhrig, H; Schmidt, J; Wieneke, U; Schell, J

    1993-01-15

    The common nodulation genes nodABC are conserved in all rhizobia and are involved in synthesis of a lipooligosaccharide signal molecule. This bacterial signal consists of a chitooligosaccharide backbone, which carries at the nonreducing end a fatty acyl chain. The modified chitooligosaccharide molecule triggers development of nodules on the roots of the leguminous host plant. To elucidate the specific role of the NodB protein in nodulation factor synthesis, we have purified recombinant NodB and determined its biochemical role by direct assays. Our data show that the NodB protein of Rhizobium meliloti deacetylates the nonreducing N-acetylglucosamine residue of chitooligosaccharides. The monosaccharide N-acetylglucosamine is not deacetylated by NodB. In the pathway of Nod factor synthesis, deacetylation at the nonreducing end of the oligosaccharide backbone may be a necessary requirement for attachment of the fatty acyl chain.

  15. A nodule-specific protein secretory pathway required for nitrogen-fixing symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Griffitts, Joel; Starker, Colby; Fedorova, Elena; Limpens, Erik; Ivanov, Sergey; Bisseling, Ton; Long, Sharon

    2010-02-26

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and its leguminous host plant Medicago truncatula occurs in a specialized root organ called the nodule. Bacteria that are released into plant cells are surrounded by a unique plant membrane compartment termed a symbiosome. We found that in the symbiosis-defective dnf1 mutant of M. truncatula, bacteroid and symbiosome development are blocked. We identified the DNF1 gene as encoding a subunit of a signal peptidase complex that is highly expressed in nodules. By analyzing data from whole-genome expression analysis, we propose that correct symbiosome development in M. truncatula requires the orderly secretion of protein constituents through coordinated up-regulation of a nodule-specific pathway exemplified by DNF1.

  16. [Metabolic integration of organisms within symbiotic systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorov, N A; Dolgikh, E A

    2006-01-01

    Adaptation of organisms to coexisence in symbiotic systems is usually related to significant metabolic changes resulting in the integration of the biochemical pathways of the partners. In the symbioses between plants and nitrogen-fixing organisms, between heterotrophic and autotrophic organisms, as well as between animals and microorganisms providing the consumption of plant biomass, the systems of C- and N-metabolism, controlling the utilization of various sources of nitrogen (N2, organic and inorganic compounds, metabolic waste of the host) and carbon (CO2, plant polymers), of the partners are tightly integrated. Bilateral biochemical links between partners are typical to mutualistic symbioses (wherein biotrophic nutrition predominates, in some cases including necrotrophy of secondary origin). In antagonistic symbioses, unilateral links predominate, though active assimilation of the pathogen's secondary metabolites by the host is also possible. In most mutualistic symbioses, integrated metabolic ties have derived from trophic chains in biocenoses (syntrophic consortia, "predator-prey" systems), but not from the systems where the pathogens consume host metabolites. At the same time, molecular analysis of symbiotic interactions has shown that symbioses considerably differ from biocenoses, where the cycling of nutrients and energy implies no functional integration of the partner's genes.

  17. CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELL FORMATION IN SYMBIOTIC RECURRENT NOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Kevin; Bildsten, Lars [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We present models of spherically symmetric recurrent nova shells interacting with circumstellar material (CSM) in a symbiotic system composed of a red giant (RG) expelling a wind and a white dwarf accreting from this material. Recurrent nova eruptions periodically eject material at high velocities ({approx}> 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}) into the RG wind profile, creating a decelerating shock wave as CSM is swept up. High CSM densities cause the shocked wind and ejecta to have very short cooling times of days to weeks. Thus, the late-time evolution of the shell is determined by momentum conservation instead of energy conservation. We compute and show evolutionary tracks of shell deceleration, as well as post-shock structure. After sweeping up all the RG wind, the shell coasts at a velocity {approx}100 km s{sup -1}, depending on system parameters. These velocities are similar to those measured in blueshifted CSM from the symbiotic nova RS Oph, as well as a few Type Ia supernovae that show evidence of CSM, such as 2006X, 2007le, and PTF 11kx. Supernovae occurring in such systems may not show CSM interaction until the inner nova shell gets hit by the supernova ejecta, days to months after the explosion.

  18. Developing symbiotic consortia for lignocellulosic biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuroff, Trevor R.; Curtis, Wayne R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2012-02-15

    The search for petroleum alternatives has motivated intense research into biological breakdown of lignocellulose to produce liquid fuels such as ethanol. Degradation of lignocellulose for biofuel production is a difficult process which is limited by, among other factors, the recalcitrance of lignocellulose and biological toxicity of the products. Consolidated bioprocessing has been suggested as an efficient and economical method of producing low value products from lignocellulose; however, it is not clear whether this would be accomplished more efficiently with a single organism or community of organisms. This review highlights examples of mixtures of microbes in the context of conceptual models for developing symbiotic consortia for biofuel production from lignocellulose. Engineering a symbiosis within consortia is a putative means of improving both process efficiency and stability relative to monoculture. Because microbes often interact and exist attached to surfaces, quorum sensing and biofilm formation are also discussed in terms of consortia development and stability. An engineered, symbiotic culture of multiple organisms may be a means of assembling a novel combination of metabolic capabilities that can efficiently produce biofuel from lignocellulose. (orig.)

  19. Monogamy in a Hyper-Symbiotic Shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Antonio Baeza

    Full Text Available Theory predicts that monogamy is adaptive in resource-specialist symbiotic crustaceans inhabiting relatively small and morphologically simple hosts in tropical environments where predation risk away from hosts is high. We tested this prediction in Pontonia manningi, a hyper-symbiotic shrimp that dwells in the mantle cavity of the Atlantic winged oyster Pteria colymbus that, in turn, infects gorgonians from the genus Pseudopterogorgia in the Caribbean Sea. In agreement with theory, P. manningi were found dwelling as heterosexual pairs in oysters more frequently than expected by chance alone. Males and females also inhabited the same host individual independent of the female gravid condition or of the developmental stage of brooded embryos. While the observations above argue in favor of monogamy in P. manningi, there is evidence to suggest that males of the studied species are moderately promiscuous. That females found living solitary in oysters most often brooded embryos, and that males allocated more to weaponry (major claw size than females at any given size suggest that males might be roaming among host individuals in search of and, fighting for, receptive females. All available information depicts a rather complex mating system in P. manningi: primarily monogamous but with moderately promiscuous males.

  20. Functional specialization of one copy of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase in ureide production from symbiotically fixed nitrogen in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleto, Inmaculada; Trenas, Almudena T; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Pineda, Manuel; Alamillo, Josefa M

    2016-08-01

    Purines are essential molecules formed in a highly regulated pathway in all organisms. In tropical legumes, the nitrogen fixed in the nodules is used to generate ureides through the oxidation of de novo synthesized purines. Glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase (PRAT) catalyses the first committed step of de novo purine synthesis. In Phaseolus vulgaris there are three genes coding for PRAT. The three full-length sequences, which are intron-less genes, were cloned, and their expression levels were determined under conditions that affect the synthesis of purines. One of the three genes, PvPRAT3, is highly expressed in nodules and protein amount and enzymatic activity in these tissues correlate with nitrogen fixation activity. Inhibition of PvPRAT3 gene expression by RNAi-silencing and subsequent metabolomic analysis of the transformed roots shows that PvPRAT3 is essential for the synthesis of ureides in P. vulgaris nodules. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Molecular diversity of rhizobia nodulating the invasive legume Cytisus scoparius in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafay, B; Burdon, J J

    2006-06-01

    To contribute to the understanding of Cytisus scoparius success at invading and establishing itself in Australia. Root-nodule bacteria isolated from C. scoparius, growing on five different sites and originally introduced to Australia, were compared with isolates from indigenous plants growing in France and isolates from native legumes growing on the same Australian sites as C. scoparius. Small-subunit rDNA from 251 isolates were analysed by PCR-RFLP and representatives from different genospecies were selected for sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a great diversity of lineages belonging to Bradyrhizobium, with one genospecies being specific for Cytisus both in Australia and in France, Rhizobium and Mesorhizobium and one falling outside the described genera of legume-nodulating bacteria. Principal component analysis showed that the Cytisus Australian rhizobial communities are more similar to each other than to their co-occurring native partners. Early established rhizobial symbionts may have an increased probability to contribute inoculum for the development of further nodules. This is a first report comparing rhizobia nodulating C. scoparius in its native and exotic environments. Cytisus scoparius symbionts were identified outside the Bradyrhizobium genus and a new lineage of legume-nodulating bacteria was identified.

  2. Nitrogen assimilation in soybean nodules, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyama, Takuji; Kumazawa, Kikuo

    1980-01-01

    In order to elucidate the pathways to assimilate the ammonia produced by N 2 -fixation in soybean nodules, 15 N-labeled compounds were administered to intact nodules or nodule slices pretreated with various inhibitors of nitrogen assimilation. After exposure to 15 N 2 , 15 N-incorporation into various nitrogenous compounds was investigated in attached nodules injected with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) or azaserine (AS). MSX treatment increased the 15 N content of ammonia more than 6 times, however, depressed 15 N content of most of amides and amino acids. AS treatment enhanced 15 N content of amido-N of glutamine as well as ammonia, but decreased amino-N of glutamine and most of amino acids. Experiments with nodule slices pretreated with MSX or AS solution and then fed with 15 N-labeled ammonia or amido- 15 N of glutamine showed the same trends. Aminooxyacetate inhibited nitrogen flow from glutamic acid to other amino acids. These results strongly indicate that the ammonia produced by N 2 -fixation is assimilated by GS/GOGAT system to glutamic acid and then transaminated to various amino acids in situ. 15 N-incorporation patterns in nodule slices fed with 15 N-labeled ammonia, hydroxylamine, nitrite were similar, but nitrate seemed to be reduced in a definite compartment and assimilated similarly as in intact nodules fed with 15 N 2 (author)

  3. Management of a solitary thyroid nodule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Solitary nodule in the thyroid is a common clinical entity. A careful clinical assessment is the crucial first step in deciding the modality of treatment. The only worthwhile investigation is FNAC. Other investigations are done merely for the sake of a complete academic work up and can usually be dispensed with in most of the cases. Not every solitary nodule requires surgery. The optimum surgery for a solitary nodule is a total lobectomy. The specimen should be subjected to histological examination before recommending further treatment

  4. [Nodules on localized scleroderma or morphea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayle, P; Bazex, J; Marguery, M-C; Lamant, L

    2005-02-01

    Localized scleroderma or morphea usually appears as flat or depressed lesions. We report 3 cases of morphea with atypical appearance, alternating pigmented and depigmented patches with nodules or sclerous bands, occurring in adult men. The occurrence of nodular elements on generalized or localized scleroderma, although rare, was first reported in the literature by Addisson in 1884. These nodules usually appear during evolution. These scleroderma are then described as being keloidal or nodular. We report 3 cases of nodules on localized scleroderma which appeared at the beginning of the dermatosis and where the scleroderma had a similar unusual irregularly pigmented appearance.

  5. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Changes and Lipid Profile Modifications Induced by Medicago truncatula N5 Overexpression at an Early Stage of the Symbiotic Interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Santi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs are small basic secreted proteins, which are characterized by lipid-binding capacity and are putatively involved in lipid trafficking. LTPs play a role in several biological processes, including the root nodule symbiosis. In this regard, the Medicago truncatula nodulin 5 (MtN5 LTP has been proved to positively regulate the nodulation capacity, controlling rhizobial infection and nodule primordia invasion. To better define the lipid transfer protein MtN5 function during the symbiosis, we produced MtN5-downregulated and -overexpressing plants, and we analysed the transcriptomic changes occurring in the roots at an early stage of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection. We also carried out the lipid profile analysis of wild type (WT and MtN5-overexpressing roots after rhizobia infection. The downregulation of MtN5 increased the root hair curling, an early event of rhizobia infection, and concomitantly induced changes in the expression of defence-related genes. On the other hand, MtN5 overexpression favoured the invasion of the nodules by rhizobia and determined in the roots the modulation of genes that are involved in lipid transport and metabolism as well as an increased content of lipids, especially galactolipids that characterize the symbiosome membranes. Our findings suggest the potential participation of LTPs in the synthesis and rearrangement of membranes occurring during the formation of the infection threads and the symbiosome membrane.

  6. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Changes and Lipid Profile Modifications Induced by Medicago truncatula N5 Overexpression at an Early Stage of the Symbiotic Interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Chiara; Molesini, Barbara; Guzzo, Flavia; Pii, Youry; Vitulo, Nicola; Pandolfini, Tiziana

    2017-12-19

    Plant lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are small basic secreted proteins, which are characterized by lipid-binding capacity and are putatively involved in lipid trafficking. LTPs play a role in several biological processes, including the root nodule symbiosis. In this regard, the Medicago truncatula nodulin 5 (MtN5) LTP has been proved to positively regulate the nodulation capacity, controlling rhizobial infection and nodule primordia invasion. To better define the lipid transfer protein MtN5 function during the symbiosis, we produced MtN5-downregulated and -overexpressing plants, and we analysed the transcriptomic changes occurring in the roots at an early stage of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection. We also carried out the lipid profile analysis of wild type (WT) and MtN5-overexpressing roots after rhizobia infection. The downregulation of MtN5 increased the root hair curling, an early event of rhizobia infection, and concomitantly induced changes in the expression of defence-related genes. On the other hand, MtN5 overexpression favoured the invasion of the nodules by rhizobia and determined in the roots the modulation of genes that are involved in lipid transport and metabolism as well as an increased content of lipids, especially galactolipids that characterize the symbiosome membranes. Our findings suggest the potential participation of LTPs in the synthesis and rearrangement of membranes occurring during the formation of the infection threads and the symbiosome membrane.

  7. Kinematics of the symbiotic system R Aqr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, S.; Corral, L. J.; Steffen, W.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of the kinematical analysis of the symbiotic system R Aqr. We obtained high dispersion spectra with the MES spectrograph at the 2.1 m telescope of San Pedro Mártir (MEZCAL). The used filter were Ha + [NII], (λc = 6575Å, Δλ = 90Å). We analyse the [NII] λλ6583 line. When the observations are compared with previous ones by Solf (1992) we detected an important change in the projected velocities of the observed knots, supporting the idea of a precessing jet. We are working also in a 3-D kinematic model for the object using the measured velocities and the state of the model is presented.

  8. Inhibition of nitrogen fixation in symbiotic Medicago truncatula upon Cd exposure is a local process involving leghaemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Daniel; Damiani, Isabelle; Gucciardo, Sébastien; Mijangos, Iker; Pauly, Nicolas; Puppo, Alain

    2013-12-01

    Leguminous biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is very sensitive to environmental fluctuations. It is still contentious how BNF is regulated under stress conditions. The local or systemic control of BNF and the role played by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in such regulation have still not been elucidated completely. Cadmium, which belongs to the so-called heavy metals, is one of the most toxic substances released into the environment. The mechanisms involved in Cd toxicity are still not completely understood but the overproduction of ROS is one of its characteristic symptoms. In this work, we used a split-root system approach to study nodule BNF and the antioxidant machinery's response to the application of a mild Cd treatment on one side of a nodulated Medicago truncatula root system. Cd induced the majority of nodule antioxidants without generating any oxidative damage. Cd treatment also provoked BNF inhibition exclusively in nodules directly exposed to Cd, without provoking any effect on plant shoot biomass or chlorophyll content. The overall data suggest that the decline in BNF was not due to a generalized breakdown of the plant but to control exerted through leghaemoglobin/oxygen availability, affecting nitrogenase function.

  9. Distinguishing between symbiotic stars and planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iłkiewicz, K.; Mikołajewska, J.

    2017-10-01

    Context. The number of known symbiotic stars (SySt) is still significantly lower than their predicted population. One of the main problems in finding the total population of SySt is the fact that their spectrum can be confused with other objects, such as planetary nebulae (PNe) or dense H II regions. This problem is reinforced by the fact that in a significant fraction of established SySt the emission lines used to distinguish them from other objects are not present. Aims: We aim at finding new diagnostic diagrams that could help separate SySt from PNe. Additionally, we examine a known sample of extragalactic PNe for candidate SySt. Methods: We employed emission line fluxes of known SySt and PNe from the literature. Results: We found that among the forbidden lines in the optical region of spectrum, only the [O III] and [N II] lines can be used as a tool for distinguishing between SySt and PNe, which is consistent with the fact that they have the highest critical densities. The most useful diagnostic that we propose is based on He I lines, which are more common and stronger in SySt than forbidden lines. All these useful diagnostic diagrams are electron density indicators that better distinguish PNe and ionized symbiotic nebulae. Moreover, we found six new candidate SySt in the Large Magellanic Cloud and one in M 81. If confirmed, the candidate in M 81 would be the farthest known SySt thus far.

  10. Mercury-resistant rhizobial bacteria isolated from nodules of leguminous plants growing in high Hg-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Díez, Beatriz; Quiñones, Miguel A; Fajardo, Susana; López, Miguel A; Higueras, Pablo; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2012-10-01

    A survey of symbiotic bacteria from legumes grown in high mercury-contaminated soils (Almadén, Spain) was performed to produce a collection of rhizobia which could be well adapted to the environmental conditions of this region and be used for restoration practices. Nineteen Hg-tolerant rhizobia were isolated from nodules of 11 legume species (of the genera Medicago, Trifolium, Vicia, Lupinus, Phaseolus, and Retama) and characterized. Based on their growth on Hg-supplemented media, the isolates were classified into three susceptibility groups. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and the effective concentrations that produce 50% mortality identified the patterns of mercury tolerance and showed that 15 isolates were tolerant. The dynamics of cell growth during incubation with mercury showed that five isolates were unaffected by exposure to Hg concentrations under the MICs. Genetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene assigned ten strains to Rhizobium leguminosarum, six to Ensifer medicae, two to Bradyrhizobium canariense, and one to Rhizobium radiobacter. Inoculation of host plants and analysis of the nodC genes revealed that most of them were symbiotically effective. Finally, three isolates were selected for bioremediation processes with restoration purposes on the basis of their levels of Hg tolerance, their response to high concentrations of this heavy metal, and their genetic affiliation and nodulation capacity.

  11. Symbiote transmission and maintenance of extra-genomic associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Minault Fitzpatrick

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotes can be transmitted from parents to offspring or horizontally from unrelated hosts or the environment. A key question is whether symbiote transmission is similar enough to Mendelian gene transmission to generate and maintain coevolutionary associations between host and symbiote genes. Recent papers come to opposite conclusions, with some suggesting that any horizontal transmission eliminates genetic association. These studies are hard to compare owing to arbitrary differences in modeling approach, parameter values, and assumptions about selection. I show that associations between host and symbiote genes (extra-genomic associations can be described by the same dynamic model as conventional linkage disequilibria between genes in the same genome. Thus, covariance between host and symbiote genomes depends on population history, geographic structure, selection, and co-transmission rate, just as covariance between genes within a genome. The conclusion that horizontal transmission rapidly erodes extra-genomic associations is equivalent to the conclusion that recombination rapidly erodes associations between genes within a genome. The conclusion is correct in the absence of population structure or selection. However, population structure can maintain spatial associations between host and symbiote traits, and non-additive selection (interspecific epistasis can generate covariances between host and symbiote genotypes. These results can also be applied to cultural or other nongenetic traits. This work contributes to a growing consensus that genomic, symbiotic, and gene-culture evolution can be analyzed under a common theoretical framework. In terms of coevolutionary potential, symbiotes can be viewed as lying on a continuum between the intimacy of genes and the indifference of casually co-occuring species.

  12. Genetic diversity of nodulating and non-nodulating rhizobia associated with wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) in different ecoregions of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li Juan; Wang, Hai Qing; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin; Tian, Chang Fu

    2011-06-01

    A total of 99 bacterial isolates that originated from root nodules of Glycine soja were characterized with restriction analyses of amplified 16S ribosomal DNA and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacers (ITS), and sequence analyses of 16S rRNA, rpoB, atpD, recA and nodC genes. When tested for nodulation of G. soja, 72 of the isolates were effective symbionts, and these belonged to five species: Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Bradyrhizobium elkanii, Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense and Sinorhizobium fredii. All of these, except some B. yuanmingense strains, also formed effective nodules on the domesticated soybean Glycine max. The remaining 27 isolates did not nodulate either host, but were identified as Rhizobium. Phylogeny nodC in the G. soja symbionts suggested that this symbiosis gene was mainly maintained by vertical gene transfer. Different nodC sublineages and rrs-ITS clusters reflected the geographic origins of isolates in this study. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Limited Utility of Pulmonary Nodule Risk Calculators for Managing Large Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Mark M; Nachiappan, Arun C; Barbosa, Eduardo J Mortani

    The optimal management of large pulmonary nodules, at higher risk for lung cancer, has not been determined, and it remains unclear as to which patients should undergo follow-up imaging vs invasive tissue diagnosis via biopsy or surgical resection. Through search of radiology reports, 86 nodules from our institution were identified using the inclusion criterion of solid nodules measuring greater than 8mm. We evaluated these nodules with a number of risk prediction calculators, including the Brock University model, and compared these against the proven diagnosis. Of 86 nodules, 59 (69%) nodules were malignant. The most accurate predictive model, the Brock University calculator, underestimated the risk for this group at 33%. At its optimal threshold, this model had a positive predictive value of 81% and negative predictive value of 53%. Notwithstanding the low negative predictive value, the positive predictive value was no better than patients clinically selected for biopsy (86% of biopsies were malignant). Existing nodule risk prediction calculators are of limited usage in guiding the management of large pulmonary nodules. At present, the accuracy of these models in this setting is inferior to expert clinical judgment, and future work is needed to develop management algorithms for higher-risk nodules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Drought enhances symbiotic dinitrogen fixation and competitive ability of a temperate forest tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzburger, Nina; Miniat, Chelcy Ford

    2014-04-01

    General circulation models project more intense and frequent droughts over the next century, but many questions remain about how terrestrial ecosystems will respond. Of particular importance, is to understand how drought will alter the species composition of regenerating temperate forests wherein symbiotic dinitrogen (N2)-fixing plants play a critical role. In experimental mesocosms we manipulated soil moisture to study the effect of drought on the physiology, growth and competitive interactions of four co-occurring North American tree species, one of which (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a symbiotic N2-fixer. We hypothesized that drought would reduce growth by decreasing stomatal conductance, hydraulic conductance and increasing the water use efficiency of species with larger diameter xylem vessel elements (Quercus rubra, R. pseudoacacia) relative to those with smaller elements (Acer rubrum and Liriodendron tulipifera). We further hypothesized that N2 fixation by R. pseudoacacia would decline with drought, reducing its competitive ability. Under drought, growth declined across all species; but, growth and physiological responses did not correspond to species' hydraulic architecture. Drought triggered an 80% increase in nodule biomass and N accrual for R. pseudoacacia, improving its growth relative to other species. These results suggest that drought intensified soil N deficiency and that R. pseudoacacia's ability to fix N2 facilitated competition with non-fixing species when both water and N were limiting. Under scenarios of moderate drought, N2 fixation may alleviate the N constraints resulting from low soil moisture and improve competitive ability of N2-fixing species, and as a result, supply more new N to the ecosystem.

  15. Cowpea symbiotic efficiency, pH and aluminum tolerance in nitrogen-fixing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lima Soares

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata cultivation in northern and northeastern Brazil provides an excellent source of nutrients and carbohydrates for the poor and underprivileged. Production surplus leads to its consumption in other regions of Brazil and also as an export commodity. Its capacity to establish relationships with atmospheric nitrogen-fixing bacteria is crucial to the reduction of production costs and the environmental impact of nitrogen fertilizers. This study assessed the symbiotic efficiency of new strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria with cowpea and their tolerance to pH and aluminum. Twenty-seven strains of bacteria from different soils were evaluated under axenic conditions. These strains were compared to the following inoculant strains: INPA03-11B, UFLA03-84 and BR3267 and two controls that were not inoculated (with and without mineral nitrogen. Six strains and the three strains approved as inoculants were selected to increase the dry weight production of the aerial part (DWAP and were tested in pots with soil that had a high-density of nitrogen-fixing native rhizobia. In this experiment, three strains (UFLA03-164, UFLA03-153, and UFLA03-154 yielded higher DWAP values. These strains grow at pH levels of 5.0, 6.0, 6.8 and at high aluminum concentration levels, reaching 10(9 CFU mL-1. In particular UFLA03-84, UFLA03-153, and UFLA03-164 tolerate up to 20 mmol c dm-3 of Al+3. Inoculation with rhizobial strains, that had been carefully selected according to their ability to nodulate and fix N2, combined with their ability to compete in soils that are acidic and contain high levels of Al, is a cheaper and more sustainable alternative that can be made available to farmers than mineral fertilizers.

  16. Pulmonary nodules secondary to total parenteral alimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, B.A.; Melhem, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-year-old male, who had a retroperitoneal alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and was on total parenteral alimentation (TPN) developed muliple pulmonary nodules, indistinguishable from metastases. These proved to be multiple lipid emboli on open biopsy. (orig.)

  17. Nodule bottom backscattering study using multibeam echosounder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Raju, Y.S.N.; Nair, R.R.

    A study is carried out to observe the angular dependence of backscattering strength at nodule area where grab sample and photographic data is available. Theoretical study along with the experimentally observed data shows that the backscattering...

  18. Actinorhizal nitrogen fixing nodules: infection process, molecular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Actinorhizal nitrogen fixing nodules: infection process, molecular biology and genomics. Mariana Obertello, Mame Oureye SY, Laurent Laplaze, Carole Santi, Sergio Svistoonoff, Florence Auguy, Didier Bogusz, Claudine Franche ...

  19. Pulmonary nodules secondary to total parenteral alimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, B.A.; Melhem, R.E.

    1989-07-01

    A seven-year-old male, who had a retroperitoneal alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and was on total parenteral alimentation (TPN) developed muliple pulmonary nodules, indistinguishable from metastases. These proved to be multiple lipid emboli on open biopsy. (orig.).

  20. Uptake rate of nitrogen from soil and fertilizer, and N derived from symbiotic fixation in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) determined using the 15N isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Marciano de Medeiros Pereira; Muraoka, Takashi; Silva, Edson Cabral da

    2009-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) are among the main sources of plant protein for a large part of the world population, mainly that of low income, and nitrogen is the main constituent of these proteins. The objectives of this study were to evaluate, through the 15 N-dilution technique and using rice and non-nodulating soybean as control plants, the relative contributions of nitrogen sources (symbiotically fixed N, soil native N and fertilizer N) on the growth of common bean and cowpea and to compare the isotopic technique (ID) with the difference methods (DM) for the evaluation of symbiotic N 2 fixation. The study was carried out in a greenhouse of the Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture - CENA/USP, Sao Paulo State, Brazil, using 5 kg pots with a Typic Haplustox (Dystrophic Red-Yellow Latosol). The experiment was arranged in completely randomized blocks, with 16 treatments and three replications, in an 8 x 2 factorial design. The treatments were eight sampling times: 7, 24, 31, 38, 47, 58, 68 and 78 days after sowing (DAS) and two crops: common bean and cowpea. An N rate of 10 mg kg -1 soil was used, as urea, enriched with an excess of 10 % of 15 N atoms. Symbiotic N fixation supplied the bean and cowpea plants with the greatest amount of accumulated N, followed, in decreasing order, by soil and fertilizer. The highest rate of N symbiotic fixation was observed at the pre-flowering growth stage of the bean and cowpea plants. After the initial growth stage, 24 DAS, rice and non nodulating soybean were appropriate control plants to evaluate symbiotic N fixation. There was a good agreement between ID and DM, except in the initial growth stage of the crops. (author)

  1. Atypical Localized Rheumatoid Nodule: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KORHAN BARIS BAYRAM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid nodules can be seen in about 30% of patiens with rheumatoid arthritis. They are occasionally localized subcutaneous, but they can rarely seen in visceral organs. Their appearance can be confused with many clinical conditions when they have atypical localizations. To exclude the presence of a malignancy, these lesions should always be investigated. We aimed to discuss a patient with rheumatoid nodule localized in close neighborhood of hyoid bone, presumed as malignancy.

  2. Lotus japonicus nodulation requires two GRAS-domain regulators, NSP1 and NSP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau; Lombardo, Fabien; Miwa, Hiroki

    A nodulation-defective mutant of Lotus japonicus does not initiate nodule cortical cell division in response to Mesorhizobium loti, but induces root hair deformation, Nod factor-induced calcium spiking, and mycorrhization. We have shown that this mutant has a premature stop in the NSP1 (Nodulation...... Signalling Pathway 1) gene (Ljnsp1-1) resulting in loss of the C-terminal 23 amino acids (aa) and we recently identified another mutant in NSP1 (Ljnsp1-2) with a truncated protein of 341 aa. Additionally, we have sequenced and isolated a mutant in LjNSP2 (Ljnsp2-3) that has a premature stop codon showing...

  3. Bradyrhizobium neotropicale sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of Centrolobium paraense

    OpenAIRE

    Zilli, Jerri E; Baraúna, Alexandre C; da Silva, Krisle; De Meyer, Sofie; Farias, Eliane NC; Kaminski, Paulo E; da Costa, Ismaele B; Ardley, Julie K; Willems, Anne; Camacho, Natalia N; Dourado, Fernanda dos S; O'Hara, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Root nodule bacteria were isolated from Centrolobium paraense Tul. grown in soils from the Amazon region, State of Roraima (Brazil). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of seven strains (BR 10247(T), BR 10296, BR 10297, BR 10298, BR 10299, BR 10300 and BR 10301) placed them in the genus Bradyrhizobium with the closest neighbours being the type strains of Bradyrhizobium paxllaeri (98.8 % similarity), Bradyrhizobium icense (98.8 %), Bradyrhizobium lablabi (98.7 %), Bradyrhizobium jicamae (98.6 %), ...

  4. Pulmonary nodule classification with deep residual networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibali, Aiden; He, Zhen; Wollersheim, Dennis

    2017-10-01

    PURPOSE  : Lung cancer has the highest death rate among all cancers in the USA. In this work we focus on improving the ability of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems to predict the malignancy of nodules from cropped CT images of lung nodules. We evaluate the effectiveness of very deep convolutional neural networks at the task of expert-level lung nodule malignancy classification. Using the state-of-the-art ResNet architecture as our basis, we explore the effect of curriculum learning, transfer learning, and varying network depth on the accuracy of malignancy classification. Due to a lack of public datasets with standardized problem definitions and train/test splits, studies in this area tend to not compare directly against other existing work. This makes it hard to know the relative improvement in the new solution. In contrast, we directly compare our system against two state-of-the-art deep learning systems for nodule classification on the LIDC/IDRI dataset using the same experimental setup and data set. The results show that our system achieves the highest performance in terms of all metrics measured including sensitivity, specificity, precision, AUROC, and accuracy. The proposed method of combining deep residual learning, curriculum learning, and transfer learning translates to high nodule classification accuracy. This reveals a promising new direction for effective pulmonary nodule CAD systems that mirrors the success of recent deep learning advances in other image-based application domains.

  5. Symbiotic lifestyle expression by fungal endophytes and the adaptation of plants to stress: unraveling the complexities of intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Regina S.; Henson, Joan M.; Rodriguez, Russell J.

    2005-01-01

    The fossil record indicates that fungal symbionts have been associated with plants since the Ordovician period (approximately 400 million years ago), when plants first became established on land (Pirozynski and Malloch, 1975; Redecker et al., 2000; Remy et al., 1994; Simon et al., 1993). Transitioning from aquatic to terrestrial habitats likely presented plants with new stresses, including periods of desiccation. Since symbiotic fungi are known to confer drought tolerance to plants (Bacon, 1993; Read and Camp, 1986), it has been suggested that fungal symbiosis was involved with or responsible for the establishment of land plants (Pirozynski and Malloch, 1975). Symbiosis was first defined by De Bary in 1879, and since that time, all plants in natural ecosystems have been found to be colonized with fungal and bacterial symbionts. It is clear that individual plants represent symbiotic communities with microorganisms associated in or on tissues below- and aboveground.There are two major classes of fungal symbionts associated with internal plant tissues: fungal endophytes that reside entirely within plants and may be associated with roots, stems leaves, or flowers; and mycorrhizal fungi that reside only in roots but extend out into the rhizosphere. In addition, fungal endophytes may be divided into two classes: (1) a relatively small number of fastidious species that are limited to a few monocot hosts (Clay and Schardl, 2002), and (2) a large number of tractable species with broad host ranges, including both monocots and eudicots (Stone et al., 2000). While significant resources and research have been invested in mycorrhizae and class 1 endophytes, comparatively little is known about class 2 endophytes, which may represent the largest group of fungal symbionts. This is partially because the symbiotic functionalities of class 2 endophytes have only recently been elucidated and shown to be responsible for the adaptation of some plants to high-stress environments (Redman

  6. RbohB, a Phaseolus vulgaris NADPH oxidase gene, enhances symbiosome number, bacteroid size, and nitrogen fixation in nodules and impairs mycorrhizal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Nava, Noreide; Santana, Olivia; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by respiratory burst oxidative homologs (Rbohs) are involved in numerous plant cell signaling processes, and have critical roles in the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Previously, down-regulation of RbohB in Phaseolus vulgaris was shown to suppress ROS production and abolish Rhizobium infection thread (IT) progression, but also to enhance arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) colonization. Thus, Rbohs function both as positive and negative regulators. Here, we assessed the effect of enhancing ROS concentrations, by overexpressing PvRbohB, on the P. vulgaris--rhizobia and P. vulgaris--AMF symbioses. We estimated superoxide concentrations in hairy roots overexpressing PvRbohB, determined the status of early and late events of both Rhizobium and AMF interactions in symbiont-inoculated roots, and analyzed the nodule ultrastructure of transgenic plants overexpressing PvRbohB. Overexpression of PvRbohB significantly enhanced ROS production, the formation of ITs, nodule biomass, and nitrogen-fixing activity, and increased the density of symbiosomes in nodules, and the density and size of bacteroides in symbiosomes. Furthermore, PvCAT, early nodulin, PvSS1, and PvGOGAT transcript abundances were elevated in these nodules. By contrast, mycorrhizal colonization was reduced in roots that overexpressed RbohB. Overexpression of PvRbohB augmented nodule efficiency by enhancing nitrogen fixation and delaying nodule senescence, but impaired AMF colonization. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of indigenous rhizobia nodulating chickpea in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rhitu; Dash, Prasanta K; Mohapatra, Trilochan; Singh, Aqbal

    2012-05-01

    In a combined approach of phenotypic and genotypic characterization, 28 indigenous rhizobial isolates obtained from different chickpea growing regions in peninsular and northern India were analyzed for diversity. The field isolates were compared to two reference strains TAL620 and UPM-Ca142 representing M. ciceri and M. mediterraneum respectively. Phenotypic markers such as resistance to antibiotics, tolerance to salinity, temperature, pH, phosphate solubilization ability, growth rate and also symbiotic efficiency showed considerable diversity among rhizobial isolates. Their phenotypic patterns showed adaptations of rhizobial isolates to abiotic stresses such as heat and salinity. Two salt tolerant strains (1.5% NaCl by T1 and T4) with relatively high symbiotic efficiency and two P-solubilising strains (66.7 and 71 microg/ml by T2 and T5) were identified as potential bioinoculants. Molecular profiling by 16S ribosomal DNA Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) revealed three clusters at 67% similarity level. Further, the isolates were differentiated at intraspecific level by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. Results assigned all the chickpea rhizobial field isolates to belong to three different species of Mesorhizobium genus. 46% of the isolates grouped with Mesorhizobium loti and the rest were identified as M. ciceri and M. mediterraneum, the two species which have been formerly described as specific chickpea symbionts. This is the first report on characterization of chickpea nodulating rhizobia covering soils of both northern and peninsular India. The collection of isolates, diverse in terms of species and symbiotic effectiveness holds a vast pool of genetic material which can be effectively used to yield superior inoculant strains.

  8. Stress as a Normal Cue in the Symbiotic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Julia A; Ruby, Edward G

    2016-05-01

    All multicellular hosts form associations with groups of microorganisms. These microbial communities can be taxonomically diverse and dynamic, and their persistence is due to robust, and sometimes coevolved, host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions. Chemical and physical sources of stress are prominently situated in this molecular exchange, as cues for cellular responses in symbiotic microbes. Stress in the symbiotic environment may arise from three sources: host tissues, microbe-induced immune responses, or other microbes in the host environment. The responses of microbes to these stresses can be general or highly specialized, and collectively may contribute to the stability of the symbiotic system. In this review, we highlight recent work that emphasizes the role of stress as a cue in the symbiotic environment of plants and animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Symbiotic and phenotypic characterization of Rhizobium isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pisum sativum L.) Fabaceae, from central and southern Ethiopia. ... and NSRlFP18 were the elite rhizobia that can be selected and further tested for their genetic and symbiotic performance in field trials for future bio-inoculant formulation.

  10. Microevolution of symbiotic Bradyrhizobium populations associated with soybeans in east North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jie; Bromfield, E S P; Rodrigue, N; Cloutier, S; Tambong, J T

    2012-01-01

    Microevolution and origins of Bradyrhizobium populations associated with soybeans at two field sites (A and B, 280 km apart in Canada) with contrasting histories of inoculation was investigated using probabilistic analyses of six core (housekeeping) gene sequences. These analyses supported division of 220 isolates in five lineages corresponding either to B. japonicum groups 1 and 1a or to one of three novel lineages within the genus Bradyrhizobium. None of the isolates from site A and about 20% from site B (the only site with a recent inoculation history) were attributed to inoculation sources. The data suggest that most isolates were of indigenous origin based on sequence analysis of 148 isolates of soybean-nodulating bacteria from native legumes (Amphicarpaea bracteata and Desmodium canadense). Isolates from D. canadense clustered with B. japonicum group 1, whereas those from A. bracteata were placed in two novel lineages encountered at soybean field sites. One of these novel lineages predominated at soybean sites and exhibited a significant clonal expansion likely reflecting selection by the plant host. Homologous recombination events detected in the 35 sequence types from soybean sites had an effect on genetic diversification that was approximately equal to mutation. Interlineage transfer of core genes was infrequent and mostly attributable to gyrB that had a history of frequent recombination. Symbiotic gene sequences (nodC and nifH) of isolates from soybean sites and native legumes clustered in two lineages corresponding to B. japonicum and B. elkani with the inheritance of these genes appearing predominantly by vertical transmission. The data suggest that soybean-nodulating bacteria associated with native legumes represent a novel source of ecologically adapted bacteria for soybean inoculation. PMID:23301163

  11. Microbiome change by symbiotic invasion in lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Stefanie; Wedin, Mats; Fernandez-Brime, Samantha; Cronholm, Bodil; Westberg, Martin; Weber, Bettina; Grube, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) seal the soil surface from erosive forces in many habitats where plants cannot compete. Lichens symbioses of fungi and algae often form significant fraction of these microbial assemblages. In addition to the fungal symbiont, many species of other fungi can inhabit the lichenic structures and interact with their hosts in different ways, ranging from commensalism to parasitism. More than 1800 species of lichenicolous (lichen-inhabiting) fungi are known to science. One example is Diploschistes muscorum, a common species in lichen-dominated BSC that infects lichens of the genus Cladonia. D. muscorum starts as a lichenicolous fungus, invading the lichen Cladonia symphycarpa and gradually develops an independent Diploschistes lichen thallus. Furthermore, bacterial groups, such as Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria, have been consistently recovered from lichen thalli and evidence is rapidly accumulating that these microbes may generally play integral roles in the lichen symbiosis. Here we describe lichen microbiome dynamics as the parasitic lichen D. muscorum takes over C. symphycarpa. We used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene and photobiont-specific ITS rDNA sequencing to track bacterial and algal transitions during the infection process, and employed fluorescence in situ hybridization to localize bacteria in the Cladonia and Diploschistes lichen thalli. We sampled four transitional stages, at sites in Sweden and Germany: A) Cladonia with no visible infection, B) early infection stage defined by the first visible Diploschistes thallus, C) late-stage infection with parts of the Cladonia thallus still identifiable, and D) final stage with a fully developed Diploschistes thallus, A gradual microbiome shift occurred during the transition, but fractions of Cladonia-associated bacteria were retained during the process of symbiotic