WorldWideScience

Sample records for swpa

  1. 75 FR 35786 - White River Minimum Flows-Addendum to Final Determination of Federal and Non-Federal Hydropower...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... the downturned economy on wholesale electricity prices, as reflected in the SWPA's adoption of the revised Platts' price forecast.'' Response: The discount rate change proposed in the June 2009 Draft... electricity for more than half a century. Just this one change proposed by SWPA would, in effect, `cheat...

  2. Tertiary Structural studies of Myotoxin a from Crotalus viridis viridis Venom by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    electrophorus electri... 47 47 47 Sw:Ibb2SWheat P09864 wheat (triticum aestivum). proteina ... 46 46 51 Sw:Pa29$Pseau P20253 mulga snake (pseudechis...Sw:Pa2bSPsepo P20259 red-bellied black snake (pseudechis... 34 46 37 Sw:IbblSWheat P09863 wheat (triticum aestivum). proteina ... 46 46 52 Sw:Pa2a$Psepo P20258 red

  3. Counterfeit Electronic Parts Controls in the Department of Defense Supply Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Equipment Manufacturer RFID Radio Frequency Identification SASC Senate Armed Services Committee SECDEF Secretary of Defense SWPaC Space, Weight...v) mandates the use of mechanisms that enable the traceability of parts, but tracing the full pedigree of a part can be quite difficult (H.R. 1540...radio frequency identification ( RFID ). Upon the use of that printer, the RFID is checked to ensure it is a valid platform, and will not work if the

  4. Analysis and utilization of plant antioxidative mechanism by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwon, Seock-Yoon; Shin, Seung-Yung [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    In an attempt to analysis the POD isoenzymes (swpa1, swpa2, swpa3, and swpn1) expression in response to gamma-irradiation in sweet potato. In suspension cells POD isoenzymes was highly expressed at 6 h postirradiation, and the transcript levels increased at 0 and 6 h at 50 Gy in plants. POD isoenzymes expression in response to irradiation appears not to be regulated in a different manner in cultured cells and plants. The gamma radiation-induced changes of proteins in tobacco suspension cells were investigated by SDS-PAGE. In tobacco cultured cells gamma irradiation did not significantly change the protein patterns. This indicates that the gamma irradiation-induced protein was not highly expressed or might be overlap with others. In the tobacco transgenic plants simultaneously expressing SOD and/or APX in chloroplast, the specific activities of SOD and APX of gamma-irradiated plants increased according to the dose of gamma-irradiation. These results indicate that antioxidative genes depends on antioxidative isoenzymes differently respond to gamma irradiation in transgenic tobacco plant lines. 35 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  5. The role of priming effects on the conversion of blue carbon to CO2 in the coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, E.; Ward, N. D.; Arellano, A. R.; Liu, Y.; Rivas-Ubach, A.; Ogram, A.; Osborne, T.; Vaughn, D.; Bianchi, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal ecosystems are recognized as valuable but vulnerable carbon (C) sinks, and the C stored in these systems is often referred to as blue C. These systems face many threats, particularly along low-relief coastlines such as Florida, which are susceptible to erosion and C loss as sea levels rise. Peat-derived organic matter (OM) may be degraded within downstream estuarine systems, and its degradation may be enhanced in the presence of labile algal-derived OM via microbial priming effects. To investigate the role of microbial priming effects on the degradation of peat-derived blue C, incubations were established and a suite of analyses were conducted to evaluate changes in peat-derived OM, CO2 production, metabolites, and microbial community structure (via metagenomic sequencing) over the course of the experiment. Four treatments were established: seawater with peat and algal leachate (SWPA), seawater and peat leachate (SWP), seawater and algal leachate (SWA), and seawater alone (SW). Treatments containing peat leachate (SWPA and SWP) harbored greater total DOC concentrations compared to SWA and SW treatments. Over the course of the incubation, CO2 concentrations increased in all treatments, with the highest CO2 levels in treatments with algal-derived DOM (SWA and SWPA). Both treatments with algal-derived DOM (SWA and SWPA) showed an increase in 13C-labeled CO2 over the course of the incubation, and stable isotope mass balance indicated that the conversion of peat-derived OC to CO2 occurred approximately 30% faster with the presence of algal-derived DOC. Aromaticity indices from absorption spectra were significantly lower in the SWP treatment when compared to the SWPA treatment. Dissolved organic matter molecular formulae detected by Fourier-transformed ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry indicated an increase in the degradation of peat-derived compounds when algal material was present. Overall, these findings suggest that there is an increase in microbial

  6. Overexpression of the IbMYB1 gene in an orange-fleshed sweet potato cultivar produces a dual-pigmented transgenic sweet potato with improved antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Chul; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sun Ha; Jeong, Yu Jeong; Kim, Cha Young; Lee, Joon Seol; Bae, Ji-Yeong; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-04-01

    The R2R3-type protein IbMYB1 is a key regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis in the storage roots of sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam]. Previously, we demonstrated that IbMYB1 expression stimulated anthocyanin pigmentation in tobacco leaves and Arabidopsis. Here, we generated dual-pigmented transgenic sweet potato plants that accumulated high levels of both anthocyanins and carotenoids in a single sweet potato storage root. An orange-fleshed cultivar with high carotenoid levels was transformed with the IbMYB1 gene under the control of either the storage root-specific sporamin 1 (SPO1) promoter or the oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase anionic 2 (SWPA2) promoter. The SPO1-MYB transgenic lines exhibited higher anthocyanin levels in storage roots than empty vector control (EV) or SWPA2-MYB plants, but carotenoid content was unchanged. SWPA2-MYB transgenic lines exhibited higher levels of both anthocyanin and carotenoids than EV plants. Analysis of hydrolyzed anthocyanin extracts indicated that cyanidin and peonidin predominated in both overexpression lines. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that IbMYB1 expression in both IbMYB1 transgenic lines strongly induced the upregulation of several genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, whereas the expression of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes varied between transgenic lines. Increased anthocyanin levels in transgenic plants also promoted the elevation of proanthocyanidin and total phenolic levels in fresh storage roots. Consequently, all IbMYB1 transgenic plants displayed much higher antioxidant activities than EV plants. In field cultivations, storage root yields varied between the transgenic lines. Taken together, our results indicate that overexpression of IbMYB1 is a highly promising strategy for the generation of transgenic plants with enhanced antioxidant capacity. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  7. Effects of natural and human factors on groundwater quality of basin-fill aquifers in the southwestern United States-conceptual models for selected contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Thiros, Susan A.; Anning, David W.; Huntington, Jena M.; McKinney, Tim S.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, the Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study is building a better understanding of the factors that affect water quality in basin-fill aquifers in the Southwestern United States. The SWPA study area includes four principal aquifers of the United States: the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers in California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona; the Rio Grande aquifer system in New Mexico and Colorado; and the California Coastal Basin and Central Valley aquifer systems in California. Similarities in the hydrogeology, land- and water-use practices, and water-quality issues for alluvial basins within the study area allow for regional analysis through synthesis of the baseline knowledge of groundwater-quality conditions in basins previously studied by the NAWQA Program. Resulting improvements in the understanding of the sources, movement, and fate of contaminants are assisting in the development of tools used to assess aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability.This report synthesizes previously published information about the groundwater systems and water quality of 15 information-rich basin-fill aquifers (SWPA case-study basins) into conceptual models of the primary natural and human factors commonly affecting groundwater quality with respect to selected contaminants, thereby helping to build a regional understanding of the susceptibility and vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers to those contaminants. Four relatively common contaminants (dissolved solids, nitrate, arsenic, and uranium) and two contaminant classes (volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticide compounds) were investigated for sources and controls affecting their occurrence and distribution above specified levels of concern in groundwater of the case-study basins. Conceptual models of factors that are important to aquifer vulnerability with respect to those contaminants and contaminant classes were subsequently formed. The

  8. Transgenic poplar expressing Arabidopsis NDPK2 enhances growth as well as oxidative stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Myoung Duck; Choi, Young Im; Park, Sung-Chul; Yun, Dae-Jin; Noh, Eun Woon; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2011-04-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase 2 (NDPK2) is known to regulate the expression of antioxidant genes in plants. Previously, we reported that overexpression of Arabidopsis NDPK2 (AtNDPK2) under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter in transgenic potato and sweetpotato plants enhanced tolerance to various abiotic stresses. In this study, transgenic poplar (Populus alba × Poplus glandulosa) expressing the AtNDPK2 gene under the control of a SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SN) was generated to develop plants with enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress. The level of AtNDPK2 expression and NDPK activity in SN plants following methyl viologen (MV) treatment was positively correlated with the plant's tolerance to MV-mediated oxidative stress. We also observed that antioxidant enzyme activities such as ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and peroxidase were increased in MV-treated leaf discs of SN plants. The growth of SN plants was substantially increased under field conditions including increased branch number and stem diameter. SN plants exhibited higher transcript levels of the auxin-response genes IAA2 and IAA5. These results suggest that enhanced AtNDPK2 expression affects oxidative stress tolerance leading to improved plant growth in transgenic poplar. © 2010 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2010 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Conceptual understanding and groundwater quality of selected basin-fill aquifers in the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiros, Susan A.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anning, David W.; Huntington, Jena M.

    2010-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has been conducting a regional analysis of water quality in the principal aquifer systems in the southwestern United States (hereinafter, “Southwest”) since 2005. Part of the NAWQA Program, the objective of the Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study is to develop a better understanding of water quality in basin-fill aquifers in the region by synthesizing information from case studies of 15 basins into a common set of important natural and human-related factors found to affect groundwater quality.The synthesis consists of three major components:1. Summary of current knowledge about the groundwater systems, and the status of, changes in, and influential factors affecting quality of groundwater in basin-fill aquifers in 15 basins previously studied by NAWQA (this report).2. Development of a conceptual model of the primary natural and human-related factors commonly affecting groundwater quality, thereby building a regional understanding of the susceptibility and vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers to contaminants.3. Development of statistical models that relate the concentration or occurrence of specific chemical constituents in groundwater to natural and human-related factors linked to the susceptibility and vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers to contamination.Basin-fill aquifers occur in about 200,000 mi2 of the 410,000 mi2 SWPA study area and are the primary source of groundwater supply for cities and agricultural communities. Four of the principal aquifers or aquifer systems of the United States are included in the basin-fill aquifers of the study area: (1) the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers in California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona; (2) the Rio Grande aquifer system in New Mexico and Colorado; (3) the California Coastal Basin aquifers; and (4) the Central Valley aquifer system in California. Because of the generally limited availability of surface-water supplies in

  10. Transgenic alfalfa plants expressing the sweetpotato Orange gene exhibit enhanced abiotic stress tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Wang

    Full Text Available Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., a perennial forage crop with high nutritional content, is widely distributed in various environments worldwide. We recently demonstrated that the sweetpotato Orange gene (IbOr is involved in increasing carotenoid accumulation and enhancing resistance to multiple abiotic stresses. In this study, in an effort to improve the nutritional quality and environmental stress tolerance of alfalfa, we transferred the IbOr gene into alfalfa (cv. Xinjiang Daye under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2 promoter through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Among the 11 transgenic alfalfa lines (referred to as SOR plants, three lines (SOR2, SOR3, and SOR8 selected based on their IbOr transcript levels were examined for their tolerance to methyl viologen (MV-induced oxidative stress in a leaf disc assay. The SOR plants exhibited less damage in response to MV-mediated oxidative stress and salt stress than non-transgenic plants. The SOR plants also exhibited enhanced tolerance to drought stress, along with higher total carotenoid levels. The results suggest that SOR alfalfa plants would be useful as forage crops with improved nutritional value and increased tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, which would enhance the development of sustainable agriculture on marginal lands.

  11. Urenco`s experience of UF{sub 6} handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saelmans, F. [Urenco Almelo (Netherlands); Scane, C. [Urenco Capenhurst (United Kingdom); Christofzik, J. [Urenco Gronau (Germany)

    1991-12-31

    Urenco operates enrichment plants at three sites, Almelo (Netherlands), Capenhurst (United Kingdom) and Gronau (Germany). Current installed separative work capacity is 2,500 tSWpa. Since 1971, when the first pilot plants were built, enrichment production has totalled 18,000 tSW. During this last 20 years over 3,500 48 containers of UF{sub 6} have been fed to the plants, over 3,700 30 containers have been filled with product and delivered successfully to Urenco`s customers worldwide and over 3,000 48 containers of depleted tails have been filled and have either been returned to customers or retained for long term storage on site. The paper gives a brief outline of Urenco`s experience in handling UF{sub 6}: the equipment and methods used in receiving, feeding, filling, blending, liquid sampling, storing, moving on site and despatching of UF{sub 6} containers. Some of the difficulties experienced with UF{sub 6} containers are appended.

  12. Transgenic Alfalfa Plants Expressing the Sweetpotato Orange Gene Exhibit Enhanced Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Ke, Qingbo; Kim, Myoung Duck; Kim, Sun Ha; Ji, Chang Yoon; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Park, Woo Sung; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Li, Hongbing; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xiping; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lim, Yong Pyo; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a perennial forage crop with high nutritional content, is widely distributed in various environments worldwide. We recently demonstrated that the sweetpotato Orange gene (IbOr) is involved in increasing carotenoid accumulation and enhancing resistance to multiple abiotic stresses. In this study, in an effort to improve the nutritional quality and environmental stress tolerance of alfalfa, we transferred the IbOr gene into alfalfa (cv. Xinjiang Daye) under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2) promoter through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Among the 11 transgenic alfalfa lines (referred to as SOR plants), three lines (SOR2, SOR3, and SOR8) selected based on their IbOr transcript levels were examined for their tolerance to methyl viologen (MV)-induced oxidative stress in a leaf disc assay. The SOR plants exhibited less damage in response to MV-mediated oxidative stress and salt stress than non-transgenic plants. The SOR plants also exhibited enhanced tolerance to drought stress, along with higher total carotenoid levels. The results suggest that SOR alfalfa plants would be useful as forage crops with improved nutritional value and increased tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, which would enhance the development of sustainable agriculture on marginal lands. PMID:25946429

  13. Development of radiation indicator plants by molecular breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jang-Ryol; Min, Sung-Ran; Jeong, Won-Joong; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwon, Seok-Yoon; Pai, Hyun-Sook; Cho, Hye-Sun; In, Dong-Su; Oh, Seung-Chol; Park, Sang- Gyu; Woo, Je-Wook; Kin, Tae-Hwan; Park, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Chang-Sook [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    To develop the transgenic plants with low level of antioxidant enzyme, transgenic tobacco plants (157 plants) using 8 different plant expression vectors which have APX genes in sense or antisense orientation under the control of CaMV 35S promoter or stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter were developed. The insertion of transgene in transgenic plants was confirmed by PCR analysis. The total APX activities of transgenic plants were enhanced or reduced by introduction of APX gene in plants. To clone the radiation-responsive genes and their promoter from plants, the NeIF2Bb, one of radiation-responsive genes from tobacco plant was characterized using molecular and cell biological tools. Promoter of GST6, a radiation-responsive gene, was cloned using RT-PCR. The GST6 promoter sequence was analyzed, and known sequence motif was searched. To develop the remediation technology of radioactively contaminated soil using transgenic plants uranium reductase and radiation resistance genes have been introduced in tobacco and indian mustard plans. The uranium reductase and radiation resistance (RecA) genes were confirmed in transgenic tobacco and indian mustard plants by PCR analysis. Also, Gene expression of uranium reductase and radiation resistance were confirmed in transgenic indian mustard plants by northern blot analysis. 42 refs., 12 figs. (Author)

  14. Expressing the sweet potato orange gene in transgenic potato improves drought tolerance and marketable tuber production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kwang-Soo; Han, Eun-Heui; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Cho, Ji-Hong; Im, Ju-Seong; Hong, Su-Young; Sohn, Hwang-Bae; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is generally considered to be sensitive to drought stress. Even short periods of water shortage can result in reduced tuber production and quality. We previously reported that transgenic potato plants expressing the sweet potato orange gene (IbOr) under the control of the stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SOR plants) showed increased tolerance to methyl viologen-mediated oxidative stress and high salinity, along with increased carotenoid contents. In this study, in an effort to improve the productivity and environmental stress tolerance of potato, we subjected transgenic potato plants expressing IbOr to water-deficient conditions in the greenhouse. The SOR plants exhibited increased tolerance to drought stress under greenhouse conditions. IbOr expression was associated with slightly negative phenotypes, including reduced tuber production. Controlling IbOr expression imparted the same degree of drought tolerance while ameliorating these negative phenotypic effects, leading to levels of tuber production similar to or better than those of wild-type plants under drought stress conditions. In particular, under drought stress, drought tolerance and the production of marketable tubers (over 80g) were improved in transgenic plants compared with non-transgenic plants. These results suggest that expressing the IbOr transgene can lead to significant gains in drought tolerance and tuber production in potato, thereby improving these agronomically important traits. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced tolerance to methyl viologen-induced oxidative stress and high temperature in transgenic potato plants overexpressing the CuZnSOD, APX and NDPK2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Duck; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Lee, Haeng-Soon

    2010-10-01

    Oxidative stress is a major threat for plants exposed to various environmental stresses. Previous studies found that transgenic potato plants expressing both copper zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) (referred to as SSA plants), or nucleoside diphosphate kinase 2 (NDPK2) (SN plants), showed enhanced tolerance to methyl viologen (MV)-induced oxidative stress and high temperature. This study aimed to develop transgenic plants that were more tolerant of oxidative stress by introducing the NDPK2 gene into SSA potato plants under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2) promoter to create SSAN plants. SSAN leaf discs and whole plants showed enhanced tolerance to MV, as compared to SSA, SN or non-transgenic (NT) plants. SSAN plants sprayed with 400 µM MV exhibited about 53 and 83% less visible damage than did SSA and SN plants, respectively. The expression levels of the CuZnSOD, APX and NDPK2 genes in SSAN plants following MV treatment correlated well with MV tolerance. SOD, APX, NDPK and catalase antioxidant enzyme activities were also increased in MV-treated SSAN plants. In addition, SSAN plants were more tolerant to high temperature stress at 42°C, exhibiting a 6.2% reduction in photosynthetic activity as compared to plants grown at 25°C. In contrast, the photosynthetic activities of SN and SSA plants decreased by 50 and 18%, respectively. These results indicate that the simultaneous overexpression of CuZnSOD, APX and NDPK2 is more effective than single or double transgene expression for developing plants with enhanced tolerance to various environmental stresses. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2010.

  16. Enhanced salt stress tolerance in transgenic potato plants expressing IbMYB1, a sweet potato transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Jie; Kim, Myoung-Duck; Deng, Xi-Ping; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Chen, Wei

    2013-12-01

    IbMYB1, a transcription factor (TF) for R2R3-type MYB TFs, is a key regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis during storage of sweet potatoes. Anthocyanins provide important antioxidants of nutritional value to humans, and also protect plants from oxidative stress. This study aimed to increase transgenic potatoes' (Solanum tuberosum cv. LongShu No.3) tolerance to environmental stress and enhance their nutritional value. Transgenic potato plants expressing IbMYB1 genes under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2) promoter (referred to as SM plants) were successfully generated through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Two representative transgenic SM5 and SM12 lines were evaluated for enhanced tolerance to salinity, UV-B rays, and drought conditions. Following treatment of 100 mM NaCl, seedlings of SM5 and SM12 lines showed less root damage and more shoot growth than control lines expressing only an empty vector. Transgenic potato plants in pots treated with 400 mM NaCl showed high amounts of secondary metabolites, including phenols, anthocyanins, and flavonoids, compared with control plants. After treatment of 400 mM NaCl, transgenic potato plants also showed high DDPH radical scavenging activity and high PS II photochemical efficiency compared with the control line. Furthermore, following treatment of NaCl, UV-B, and drought stress, the expression levels of IbMYB1 and several structural genes in the flavonoid biosynthesis such as CHS, DFR, and ANS in transgenic plants were found to be correlated with plant phenotype. The results suggest that enhanced IbMYB1 expression affects secondary metabolism, which leads to improved tolerance ability in transgenic potatoes.

  17. Expression of the sweetpotato R2R3-type IbMYB1a gene induces anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hyosub; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Kim, Wook-Jin; Chung, Dong Min; Jeon, Hyo Kon; Ahn, Young Ock; Kim, Sun Ha; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Kim, Cha Young

    2013-06-01

    R2R3-type MYB transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in transcriptional regulation of anthocyanins. The R2R3-type IbMYB1 is known to be a key regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis in the storage roots of sweetpotato. We previously showed that transient expression of IbMYB1a led to anthocyanin pigmentation in tobacco leaves. In this article, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the IbMYB1a gene under the control of CaMV 35S promoter, and the sweetpotato SPO and SWPA2 promoters. Overexpression of IbMYBa in transgenic Arabidopsis produced strong anthocyanin pigmentation in seedlings and generated a deep purple color in leaves, stems and seeds. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that IbMYB1a expression induced upregulation of several structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, including 4CL, CHI, F3'H, DFR, AGT, AAT and GST. Furthermore, overexpression of IbMYB1a led to enhanced expression of the AtTT8 (bHLH) and PAP1/AtMYB75 genes. high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that IbMYB1a expression led to the production of cyanidin as a major core molecule of anthocyanidins in Arabidopsis, as occurs in the purple leaves of sweetpotato (cv. Sinzami). This result shows that the IbMYB1a TF is sufficient to induce anthocyanin accumulation in seedlings, leaves, stems and seeds of Arabidopsis plants. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  18. Source Water Protection and Sustainability: a Practical Approach to Assessing Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. O.; Chinitz, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    The recognition of climate change and the realization of the finite nature of sources of drinking water have spurred communities to develop resource sustainable practices. Sustainability requires overall management of the resource, and protecting existing and future water supplies from contamination plays a key role. Continued population growth will place increasing demands on water supplies and climate change will likely reduce groundwater recharge as well as increase the desire to replace dwindling surface water sources with groundwater. Aware of the need to protect its resource, the City of Springfield has delineated the source water protection areas (SWPAs) surrounding its wells and wellfields and has an ordinance in place that allows the City to establish specific guidelines associated with chemical usage. The City has established a range of best management strategies that vary in degree as a function of the time-of-travel zone and the presumed risk that a specific chemical poses to groundwater. When the guidelines were initially established, the City used more of a blanket approach to imposing specific practices on facilities within the SWPAs. The various approaches used were not site-specific and were based on limited information, reflecting limited resources, that were applied throughout the SWPAs as a function of proximity to the well(s). This practice led to the City’s receiving many questions from developers, etc., regarding “Why do you consider this product a risk?” The City needed an objective, consistent risk assessment tool that would reflect not only the specific chemical but also the geologic characteristics of the site where the chemical would be used. We used existing well reports to develop GIS coverages of both weighted hydraulic conductivity and depth to the aquifer that were then overlain on to the SWPA coverages. This exercise provided an assessment of the ease of water movement to the aquifer. Using that information, a spreadsheet was

  19. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Interim Measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1999-12-08

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed interim measures for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MW) groundwater at the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE proposes to install a small metal sheet pile dam to impound water around and over the BGC groundwater seepline. In addition, a drip irrigation system would be installed. Interim measures will also address the reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) from ''hot-spot'' regions associated with the Southwest Plume Area (SWPA). This action is taken as an interim measure for the MWMF in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to reduce the amount of tritium seeping from the BGC southwest groundwater plume. The proposed action of this EA is being planned and would be implemented concurrent with a groundwater corrective action program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). On September 30, 1999, SCDHEC issued a modification to the SRS RCRA Part B permit that adds corrective action requirements for four plumes that are currently emanating from the BGC. One of those plumes is the southwest plume. The RCRA permit requires SRS to submit a corrective action plan (CAP) for the southwest plume by March 2000. The permit requires that the initial phase of the CAP prescribe a remedy that achieves a 70-percent reduction in the annual amount of tritium being released from the southwest plume area to Fourmile Branch, a nearby stream. Approval and actual implementation of the corrective measure in that CAP may take several years. As an interim measure, the actions described in this EA would manage the release of tritium from the southwest plume area until the final actions under the CAP can be implemented. This proposed action is expected to reduce the