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Sample records for swimming exercise treatment

  1. The significance of swimming and corrective exercises in water in the treatment of postural deficits and scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Łubkowska, Wioletta; Paczyńska-Jędrycka, Małgorzata; Eider, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    More and more often specialized literature mentions the contemporarily relevant notion of the application of swimming as one of the therapeutic methods in modern medicine. The thesis reviews specialized literature and analyzes documents in order to demonstrate the significance of aquatic therapy and corrective swimming exercises as a corrective and therapeutic function in the treatment of postural deficits and scoliosis. As this article has a character of a review, its purpose is to ...

  2. Is swimming during pregnancy a safe exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Mette; Kogevinas, Manolis; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise in pregnancy is recommended in many countries, and swimming is considered by many to be an ideal activity for pregnant women. Disinfection by-products in swimming pool water may, however, be associated with adverse effects on various reproductive outcomes. We examined...... the association between swimming in pregnancy and preterm and postterm birth, fetal growth measures, small-for-gestational-age, and congenital malformations. METHODS: We used self-reported exercise data (swimming, bicycling, or no exercise) that were prospectively collected twice during pregnancy for 74......,486 singleton pregnancies. Recruitment to The Danish National Birth Cohort took place 1996-2002. Using Cox, linear and logistic regression analyses, depending on the outcome, we compared swimmers with physically inactive pregnant women; to separate a possible swimming effect from an effect of exercise...

  3. Morning Exercise: Enhancement of Afternoon Sprint-Swimming Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Courtney J; Pyne, David B; Thompson, Kevin G; Raglin, John S; Rattray, Ben

    2017-05-01

    An exercise bout completed several hours prior to an event may improve competitive performance later that same day. To examine the influence of morning exercise on afternoon sprint-swimming performance. Thirteen competitive swimmers (7 male, mean age 19 ± 3 y; 6 female, mean age 17 ± 3 y) completed a morning session of 1200 m of variedintensity swimming (SwimOnly), a combination of varied-intensity swimming and a resistance-exercise routine (SwimDry), or no morning exercise (NoEx). After a 6-h break, swimmers completed a 100-m time trial. Time-trial performance was faster in SwimOnly (1.6% ± 0.6, mean ± 90% confidence limit, P confidence limit], P = .04), body (0.2°C ± 0.1°C, P = .02), and skin temperatures (0.3°C ± 0.3°C, P = .02) were higher in SwimDry than in NoEx. Completion of a morning swimming session alone or together with resistance exercise can substantially enhance sprint-swimming performance completed later the same day.

  4. Hepatoprotective Effects of Swimming Exercise against D-Galactose-Induced Senescence Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether a 12-week swimming exercise training can prevent liver damage or senescence associated biomarkers in an experimental aging model in rats. Twenty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: vehicle treatment with sedentary control (C, , aging induction with sedentary (A, , vehicle treatment with swimming exercise (SW, , and aging induction with swimming exercise (A + SW, . Rats in groups A and AS received intraperitoneal D-galactose injections (150 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks to induce aging. Rats in groups SW and A + SW were subjected to swimming exercise training for 12 weeks. Body weight, liver weight, epididymal fat mass, blood biochemistry, and liver pathology were performed at the end of the experiment. Hepatic senescence protein markers such as β-galactosidase, p53, and p21, as well as the inflammatory mediator, IL-6, were examined. The D-galactose-treated rats exhibited increases in AST and γ-GT plasma levels and β-galactosidase protein expression compared to the control group. Swimming exercise significantly reduced BW, epididymal fat mass, γ-GT activity, and p53, p21, and IL-6 protein levels compared to the aging group. These results suggest that a 12-week swimming exercise program suppresses senescence markers and downregulates inflammatory mediator in the liver tissues of D-galactose-induced aging rats.

  5. Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re just learning to swim, stay in the shallow end. Don't push or jump on others. ... and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All rights reserved. Images provided by The Nemours ...

  6. Do swimming exercises induce anthropometric changes in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielec, Grzegorz; Peczak-Graczyk, Alicja; Waade, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of regular participation in school swimming lessons on anthropometric variables and postural defect occurrence in junior high school students. An intervention group (n = 116) and a control group (n = 114) of boys and girls aged 13.4 ± 0.3 years had an equal physical education obligatory course requirement at school, with the intervention group additionally participating in swimming class once a week for 2 years. Anthropometric variables were recorded in both groups 3 times between autumn 2006 and 2008, and a clinical examination was conducted twice during this same period of time. Students from the intervention group had lower body mass than their peers in the control group at the end of the course (ANOVA, P swimming students, the correction in scoliosis was more distinct than in the control group (P swimming education at school did not have much effect on postural defects in adolescents. A special program of corrective water exercises should be applied to the school physical education syllabus.

  7. Swim Free. A 10 Day Program of Aquatic Exercises Adapted from Life in the Waterworld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Lorraine; Sanborn, Laura

    The completely waterproof book contains instructions for an alternative form of swimming exercises based on the movements of 19 water creatures. The exercises can be used by groups or individuals to enhance training programs, to serve as part of a structured synchronized swimming program, or to supplement recreational activities. The book provides…

  8. Establishing zebrafish as a novel exercise model: swimming economy, swimming-enhanced growth and muscle growth marker gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan P Palstra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zebrafish has been largely accepted as a vertebrate multidisciplinary model but its usefulness as a model for exercise physiology has been hampered by the scarce knowledge on its swimming economy, optimal swimming speeds and cost of transport. Therefore, we have performed individual and group-wise swimming experiments to quantify swimming economy and to demonstrate the exercise effects on growth in adult zebrafish. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Individual zebrafish (n = 10 were able to swim at a critical swimming speed (U(crit of 0.548±0.007 m s(-1 or 18.0 standard body lengths (BL s(-1. The optimal swimming speed (U(opt at which energetic efficiency is highest was 0.396±0.019 m s(-1 (13.0 BL s(-1 corresponding to 72.26±0.29% of U(crit. The cost of transport at optimal swimming speed (COT(opt was 25.23±4.03 µmol g(-1 m(-1. A group-wise experiment was conducted with zebrafish (n = 83 swimming at U(opt for 6 h day(-1 for 5 days week(-1 for 4 weeks vs. zebrafish (n = 84 that rested during this period. Swimming zebrafish increased their total body length by 5.6% and body weight by 41.1% as compared to resting fish. For the first time, a highly significant exercise-induced growth is demonstrated in adult zebrafish. Expression analysis of a set of muscle growth marker genes revealed clear regulatory roles in relation to swimming-enhanced growth for genes such as growth hormone receptor b (ghrb, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor a (igf1ra, troponin C (stnnc, slow myosin heavy chain 1 (smyhc1, troponin I2 (tnni2, myosin heavy polypeptide 2 (myhz2 and myostatin (mstnb. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: From the results of our study we can conclude that zebrafish can be used as an exercise model for enhanced growth, with implications in basic, biomedical and applied sciences, such as aquaculture.

  9. Effects of Swimming and Cycling Exercise Intervention on Vascular Function in Patients With Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatan, Mohammed; Machin, Daniel R; Baker, Jeffrey R; Akkari, Amanda S; Park, Wonil; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Swimming exercise is an ideal and excellent form of exercise for patients with osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is no scientific evidence that regular swimming reduces vascular dysfunction and inflammation and elicits similar benefits compared with land-based exercises such as cycling in terms of reducing vascular dysfunction and inflammation in patients with OA. Forty-eight middle-aged and older patients with OA were randomly assigned to swimming or cycling training groups. Cycling training was included as a non-weight-bearing land-based comparison group. After 12 weeks of supervised exercise training, central arterial stiffness, as determined by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and carotid artery stiffness, through simultaneous ultrasound and applanation tonometry, decreased significantly after both swimming and cycling training. Vascular endothelial function, as determined by brachial flow-mediated dilation, increased significantly after swimming but not after cycling training. Both swimming and cycling interventions reduced interleukin-6 levels, whereas no changes were observed in other inflammatory markers. In conclusion, these results indicate that regular swimming exercise can exert similar or even superior effects on vascular function and inflammatory markers compared with land-based cycling exercise in patients with OA who often has an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, A.P.; Mes, D.; Kusters, K.; Roques, J.A.C.; Flik, G.; Kloet, K.; Blonk, R.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (U-opt in m s(-1) or body lengths s(-1), BL s(-1)) were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and

  11. Effect of swimming exercise on three-dimensional trabecular bone microarchitecture in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yong-In; Sone, Teruki; Ohnaru, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Kensuke; Fukunaga, Masao

    2015-11-01

    Swimming is generally considered ineffective for increasing bone mass in humans, at least compared with weight-bearing sports. However, swimming exercise has sometimes been shown to have a strong positive effect on bone mass in small animals. This study investigated the effects of swimming on bone mass, strength, and microarchitecture in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. OVX or sham operations were performed on 18-wk-old female Fisher 344 rats. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham sedentary (Sham-CON), sham swimming exercised (Sham-SWI), OVX sedentary (OVX-CON), and OVX swimming exercised (OVX-SWI). Rats in exercise groups performed swimming in a water bath for 60 min/day, 5 days/wk, for 12 wk. Bone mineral density (BMD) in right femurs was analyzed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Three-dimensional trabecular architecture at the distal femoral metaphysis was analyzed using microcomputed tomography (μCT). Geometrical properties of diaphyseal cortical bone were evaluated in the midfemoral region using μCT. The biomechanical properties of femurs were analyzed using three-point bending. Femoral BMD was significantly decreased following ovariectomy. This change was suppressed by swimming. Trabecular bone thickness, number, and connectivity were decreased by ovariectomy, whereas structure model index (i.e., ratio of rod-like to plate-like trabeculae) increased. These changes were also suppressed by swimming exercise. Femurs displayed greater cortical width and maximum load in SWI groups than in CON groups. Together, these results demonstrate that swimming exercise drastically alleviated both OVX-induced decreases in bone mass and mechanical strength and the deterioration of trabecular microarchitecture in rat models of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Swimming Exercise Prevents Fibrogenesis in Chronic Kidney Disease by Inhibiting the Myofibroblast Transdifferentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chiung-Chi; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Hsieh, Chiu-Lan; Peng, Robert Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background The renal function of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients may be improved by a number of rehabilitative mechanisms. Swimming exercise training was supposed to be beneficial to its recovery. Methodology/Principal Findings Doxorubicin-induced CKD (DRCKD) rat model was performed. Swimming training was programmed three days per week, 30 or 60 min per day for a total period of 11 weeks. Serum biochemical and pathological parameters were examined. In DRCKD, hyperlipidemia was observed. Active mesangial cell activation was evidenced by overexpression of PDGFR, P-PDGFR, MMP-2, MMP-9, α-SMA, and CD34 with a huge amount collagen deposition. Apparent myofibroblast transdifferentiation implicating fibrogenesis in the glomerular mesangium, glomerulonephritis and glomeruloscelorosis was observed with highly elevated proteinuria and urinary BUN excretion. The 60-min swimming exercise but not the 30 min equivalent rescued most of the symptoms. To quantify the effectiveness of exercise training, a physical parameter, i.e. “the strenuosity coefficient” or “the myokine releasing coefficient”, was estimated to be 7.154×10−3 pg/mL-J. Conclusions The 60-min swimming exercise may ameliorate DRCKD by inhibiting the transdifferentiation of myofibroblasts in the glomerular mesangium. Moreover, rehabilitative exercise training to rescue CKD is a personalized remedy. Benefits depend on the duration and strength of exercise, and more importantly, on the individual physiological condition. PMID:22761655

  13. Swimming exercise reverses aging-related contractile abnormalities of female heart by improving structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Nihal; Olgar, Yusuf; Er, Hakan; Kucuk, Murathan; Ozdemir, Semir

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of swimming exercise on aging-related Ca2+ handling alterations and structural abnormalities of female rat heart. For this purpose, 4-month and 24-month old female rats were used and divided into three following groups: sedentary young (SY), sedentary old (SO), and exercised old (Ex-O). Swimming exercise was performed for 8 weeks (60 min/day, 5 days/week). Myocyte shortening, L-type Ca2+ currents and associated Ca2+ transients were measured from ventricular myocytes at 36 ± 1°C. NOX-4 levels, aconitase activity, glutathione measurements and ultrastructural examination by electron microscopy were conducted in heart tissue. Swimming exercise reversed the reduced shortening and slowed kinetics of aged cardiomyocytes. Although the current density was similar for all groups, Ca2+ transients were higher in SO and Ex-O myocytes with respect to the SY group. Caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients and the integrated NCX current were lower in cardiomyocytes of SY rats compared with other groups, suggesting an increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in an aged heart. Aging led to upregulated cardiac NOX-4 along with declined aconitase activity. Although it did not reverse these oxidative parameters, swimming exercise achieved a significant increase in glutathione levels and improved structural alterations of old rats' hearts. We conclude that swimming exercise upregulates antioxidant defense capacity and improves structural abnormalities of senescent female rat heart, although it does not change Ca2+ handling alterations further. Thereby, it improves contractile function of aged myocardium by mitigating detrimental effects of oxidative stress.

  14. The Ineffectiveness of Manual Treatment of Swimming Pools | Nnaji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The University of Nigeria, Nsukka swimming pool was monitored for a period spanning about three months. The pool was constructed in 1961 and has been in operation since then except that many facilities including the treatment system are no longer functional forcing management to resort to treatment of the pool water ...

  15. Effects of short-term swimming exercise on bone mineral density, geometry, and microstructural properties in sham and ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foong Kiew Ooi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Little information exists about the effects of swimming exercise on bone health in ovariectomized animals with estrogen deficiency, which resembles the postmenopausal state and age-related bone loss in humans. This study investigated the effects of swimming exercise on tibia and femur bone mineral density (BMD, geometry, and microstructure in sham and ovariectomized rats. Forty 3-month-old female rats were divided into four groups: sham operated-sedentary control (Sham-control, sham operated with swimming exercise group (Sham-Swim, ovariectomy-sedentary control (OVx-control, and ovariectomy and swimming exercise (OVx-Swim groups. Swimming sessions were performed by the rats 90 minutes/day for 5 days/week for a total of 8 weeks. At the end of the study, tibial and femoral proximal volumetric total BMD, midshaft cortical volumetric BMD, cross-sectional area, and cross-sectional moment of inertia (MOI, and bone microstructural properties were measured for comparison. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. The Sham-Swim group exhibited significantly (p < 0.05; one-way ANOVA greater values in bone geometry parameters, that is, tibial midshaft cortical area and MOI compared to the Sham-control group. However, no significant differences were observed in these parameters between the Ovx-Swim and Ovx-control groups. There were no significant differences in femoral BMD between the Sham-Swim and Sham-control groups. Nevertheless, the Ovx-Swim group elicited significantly (p < 0.05; one-way ANOVA higher femoral proximal total BMD and improved bone microstructure compared to the Ovx-Sham group. In conclusion, the positive effects of swimming on bone properties in the ovariectomized rats in the present study may suggest that swimming as a non- or low-weight-bearing exercise may be beneficial for enhancing bone health in the postmenopausal population.

  16. Metabolic Responses to Swimming Exercise in the Infected Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-29

    ketosis, the increase in hepatic ketogenesis coming from elevated lipolysis and FFA utilization under hormonal influence. Results indicate that swimming...2. BEISEL, W. R., AND R-. W. WANNEMACIIIER, JR. Gluconeogcnes is, ureagenesis, and ketogenesis dUring sepsis. .11)EN 4:277-285, 1980. 3. BEISEL, W...pl.Physiol. 22:50-54, 1967. 15 20. M1-eGARRY, J. 1). , P. 11. WRIGHT, AND 1). 14. FOSTER. Hormonal Control of ketogenesis . Rapid activation of

  17. CO-RELEASED ADRENALINE MARKEDLY FACILITATES NORADRENALINE OVERFLOW THROUGH PREJUNCTIONAL BETA(2)-ADRENOCEPTORS DURING SWIMMING EXERCISE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COPPES, RP; SMIT, J; BENTHEM, L; VANDERLEEST, J; ZAAGSMA, J

    1995-01-01

    The effect of intravenously applied (-)adrenaline, taken up by and released from sympathetic nerves, on swimming exercise-induced noradrenaline overflow in permanently cannulated adrenal demedullated rats was studied. Adrenaline (100 ng/min) was infused for 2 h, during which a plasma concentration

  18. Stress Reduction and Mood Enhancement in Four Exercise Modes: Swimming, Body Conditioning, Hatha Yoga, and Fencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Bonnie G.; Owen, David R.

    1988-01-01

    Differences in mood before and after class of college students taking different courses (swimming, body conditioning, hatha yoga, fencing exercise, and lecture) were analyzed using the Profile Mood States and the State Anxiety Inventory. Results suggest that courses which meet four requirements involving aerobics, noncompetitiveness,…

  19. Effects of the swimming exercise on the consolidation and persistence of auditory and contextual fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Rodolfo Souza; Gutierres, Luís Felipe Soares; Sobrinho, Fernando César Faria; Miranda, Iris do Vale; Reis, Júlia Dos; Dias, Elayne Vieira; Sartori, Cesar Renato; Moreira, Dalmo Antonio Ribeiro

    2016-08-15

    Exposure to negative environmental events triggers defensive behavior and leads to the formation of aversive associative memory. Cellular and molecular changes in the central nervous system underlie this memory formation, as well as the associated behavioral changes. In general, memory process is established in distinct phases such as acquisition, consolidation, evocation, persistence, and extinction of the acquired information. After exposure to a particular event, early changes in involved neural circuits support the memory consolidation, which corresponds to the short-term memory. Re-exposure to previously memorized events evokes the original memory, a process that is considered essential for the reactivation and consequent persistence of memory, ensuring that long-term memory is established. Different environmental stimuli may modulate the memory formation process, as well as their distinct phases. Among the different environmental stimuli able of modulating memory formation is the physical exercise which is a potent modulator of neuronal activity. There are many studies showing that physical exercise modulates learning and memory processes, mainly in the consolidation phase of the explicit memory. However, there are few reports in the literature regarding the role of physical exercise in implicit aversive associative memory, especially at the persistence phase. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the relationship between swimming exercise and the consolidation and persistence of contextual and auditory-cued fear memory. Male Wistar rats were submitted to sessions of swimming exercise five times a week, over six weeks. After that, the rats were submitted to classical aversive conditioning training by a pairing tone/foot shock paradigm. Finally, rats were evaluated for consolidation and persistence of fear memory to both auditory and contextual cues. Our results demonstrate that classical aversive conditioning with tone/foot shock pairing induced

  20. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palstra, Arjan P.; Mes, Daan; Kusters, Kasper; Roques, Jonathan A. C.; Flik, Gert; Kloet, Kees; Blonk, Robbert J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (Uopt in m s−1 or body lengths s−1, BL s−1) were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and sustained swimming at Uopt on growth performance of juvenile yellowtail kingfish. Uopt was quantified in Blazka-type swim-tunnels for 145, 206, and 311 mm juveniles resulting in values of: (1) 0.70 m s−1 or 4.83 BL s−1, (2) 0.82 m s−1 or 3.25 BL s−1, and (3) 0.85 m s−1 or 2.73 BL s−1. Combined with literature data from larger fish, a relation of Uopt (BL s−1) = 234.07(BL)−0.779 (R2 = 0.9909) was established for this species. Yellowtail kingfish, either forced to perform sustained swimming exercise at an optimal speed of 2.46 BL s−1 (“swimmers”) or allowed to perform spontaneous activity at low water flow (“resters”) in a newly designed 3600 L oval flume (with flow created by an impeller driven by an electric motor), were then compared. At the start of the experiment, ten fish were sampled representing the initial condition. After 18 days, swimmers (n = 23) showed a 92% greater increase in BL and 46% greater increase in BW as compared to resters (n = 23). As both groups were fed equal rations, feed conversion ratio (FCR) for swimmers was 1.21 vs. 1.74 for resters. Doppler ultrasound imaging showed a statistically significant higher blood flow (31%) in the ventral aorta of swimmers vs. resters (44 ± 3 vs. 34 ± 3 mL min−1, respectively, under anesthesia). Thus, growth performance can be rapidly improved by optimal swimming, without larger feed investments. PMID:25620933

  1. Effects of skeletal deformities on swimming performance and recovery from exhaustive exercise in triploid Atlantic salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mark D; Jones, Matthew A; Lijalad, Maite

    2009-05-27

    The occurrence of spinal deformity in aquaculture can be considerable, and a high rate of deformity has been suggested in triploid smolts in Tasmania. However, the physiological performance of fish with skeletal deformities has not been addressed. The swimming performance and oxygen consumption of triploid Atlantic salmon smolts with either a vertebral fusion (platyspondyly) or multifocal scoliosis were compared to normal (non-deformed) triploid smolts. Fish with vertebral fusion attained swim speeds similar to normal fish, whereas scoliotic fish were unable to attain comparable swim speeds. Routine and maximum oxygen consumption was higher for deformed fish compared with normal fish, translating into apparent increased routine metabolic scope in vertebral fusion fish, and equivocal scope in scoliotic fish compared with normal controls. Deformed fish developed a lower excess post-exercise oxygen consumption compared to non-deformed fish, suggesting they are either incapable of sustained anaerobic activity or possess an increased recovery capacity. These data suggest that skeletal deformity has differential effects on swimming performance depending upon the type of deformity but imposes a significant metabolic cost on salmon smolts.

  2. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan P. Palstra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (Uopt in m s-1 or body lengths s-1, BL s-1 were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and sustained swimming at Uopt on growth performance of juvenile yellowtail kingfish. Uopt was quantified in Blazka-type swim-tunnels for 145 mm, 206 mm and 311 mm juveniles resulting in values of: 1 0.70 m s-1 or 4.83 BL s-1, 2 0.82 m s-1 or 3.25 BL s-1 and 3 0.85 m s-1 or 2.73 BL s-1. Combined with literature data from larger fish, a relation of Uopt (BL s-1 = 234.07(BL-0.779 (R2= 0.9909 was established for this species. Yellowtail kingfish, either forced to perform sustained swimming exercise at an optimal speed of 2.46 BL s-1 (‘swimmers’ or allowed to perform spontaneous activity at low water flow (‘resters’ in a newly designed 3,600 L oval flume (with flow created by an impeller driven by an electric motor, were then compared. At the start of the experiment, ten fish were sampled representing the initial condition. After 18 days, swimmers (n= 23 showed a 92% greater increase in BL and 46% greater increase in BW as compared to resters (n= 23. As both groups were fed equal rations, feed conversion ratio (FCR for swimmers was 1.21 vs. 1.74 for resters. Doppler ultrasound imaging showed a statistically significant higher blood flow (31% in the ventral aorta of swimmers vs. resters (44 ± 3 mL min-1 vs. 34 ± 3 mL min-1, respectively, under anesthesia. Thus growth performance can be rapidly improved by optimal swimming, without larger feed investments.

  3. Duration-controlled swimming exercise training induces cardiac hypertrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, F S; Brum, P C; Krieger, J E

    2003-12-01

    Exercise training associated with robust conditioning can be useful for the study of molecular mechanisms underlying exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy. A swimming apparatus is described to control training regimens in terms of duration, load, and frequency of exercise. Mice were submitted to 60- vs 90-min session/day, once vs twice a day, with 2 or 4% of the weight of the mouse or no workload attached to the tail, for 4 vs 6 weeks of exercise training. Blood pressure was unchanged in all groups while resting heart rate decreased in the trained groups (8-18%). Skeletal muscle citrate synthase activity, measured spectrophotometrically, increased (45-58%) only as a result of duration and frequency-controlled exercise training, indicating that endurance conditioning was obtained. In groups which received duration and endurance conditioning, cardiac weight (14-25%) and myocyte dimension (13-20%) increased. The best conditioning protocol to promote physiological hypertrophy, our primary goal in the present study, was 90 min, twice a day, 5 days a week for 4 weeks with no overload attached to the body. Thus, duration- and frequency-controlled exercise training in mice induces a significant conditioning response qualitatively similar to that observed in humans.

  4. Duration-controlled swimming exercise training induces cardiac hypertrophy in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Evangelista

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Exercise training associated with robust conditioning can be useful for the study of molecular mechanisms underlying exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy. A swimming apparatus is described to control training regimens in terms of duration, load, and frequency of exercise. Mice were submitted to 60- vs 90-min session/day, once vs twice a day, with 2 or 4% of the weight of the mouse or no workload attached to the tail, for 4 vs 6 weeks of exercise training. Blood pressure was unchanged in all groups while resting heart rate decreased in the trained groups (8-18%. Skeletal muscle citrate synthase activity, measured spectrophotometrically, increased (45-58% only as a result of duration and frequency-controlled exercise training, indicating that endurance conditioning was obtained. In groups which received duration and endurance conditioning, cardiac weight (14-25% and myocyte dimension (13-20% increased. The best conditioning protocol to promote physiological hypertrophy, our primary goal in the present study, was 90 min, twice a day, 5 days a week for 4 weeks with no overload attached to the body. Thus, duration- and frequency-controlled exercise training in mice induces a significant conditioning response qualitatively similar to that observed in humans.

  5. Swimming exercise increases serum irisin level and reduces body fat mass in high-fat-diet fed Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun; Li, Hongwei; Shen, Shi-Wei; Shen, Zhen-Hai; Xu, Ming; Yang, Cheng-Jian; Li, Feng; Feng, Yin-Bo; Yun, Jing-Ting; Wang, Ling; Qi, Hua-Jin

    2016-05-13

    It has been shown that irisin levels are reduced in skeletal muscle and plasma of obese rats; however, the effect of exercise training on irisin level remains controversial. We aim to evaluate the association of swimming exercise with serum irisin level and other obesity-associated parameters. Forty healthy male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: a normal diet and sedentary group (ND group), normal diet and exercise group (NDE group), high-fat diet and sedentary group (HFD group), and high-fat diet and exercise group (HFDE group. After 8 consecutive weeks of swimming exercise, fat mass and serum irisin level was determined. Higher serum irisin levels were detected in the HFDE group (1.15 ± 0.28 μg/L) and NDE group (1.76 ± 0.17 μg/L) than in the HFD group (0.84 ± 0.23 μg/L) or the ND group (1.24 ± 0.29 μg/L), respectively (HFDE group vs. HFD group, P Swimming exercise decreases body fat mass in high-fat-fed Wistar rats, which may be attributable to elevated irisin levels induced by swimming exercise.

  6. The Physiology and Mechanics of Undulatory Swimming: A Student Laboratory Exercise Using Medicinal Leeches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The medicinal leech is a useful animal model for investigating undulatory swimming in the classroom. Unlike many swimming organisms, its swimming performance can be quantified without specialized equipment. A large blood meal alters swimming behavior in a way that can be used to generate a discussion of the hydrodynamics of swimming, muscle…

  7. Effect of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides ssp. sinensis) leaf extract on the swimming endurance and exhaustive exercise-induced oxidative stress of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xianyun; Long, Wenmin; Liu, Gening; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yang, Xiaolan

    2012-03-15

    Seabuckthorn (SBT) leaves have significant antioxidant, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. The objective of this study was to assess the anti-fatigue, antioxidant and tissue-protective properties of aqueous lyophilised extracts of SBT dried leaves in the hearts of Wistar male rats undergoing exhaustive physical exercise. Doses of 50, 200 and 800 mg kg⁻¹ body weight (BW) day⁻¹ were given orally for 1 week. A week later the rats were forced to swim in barrels until they were exhausted. The times were noted to establish the effective dose of the extracts in rats. After establishing the effective dose, the rats were then sacrificed and assessed for various biochemical parameters. SBT leaf aqueous extracts (200 and 800 mg kg⁻¹ BW) markedly prolonged the swim time of rats. Supplementation with SBT leaf aqueous extracts helped reduce the exhaustive exercise-induced increase in malondialdehyde level and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity. Alanine aminotransferase and creatine kinase levels were lowered in the exhaustive exercise with SBT treatment group (E + SBT) compared with the exhaustive exercise group (E). The findings suggest that SBT leaf aqueous extract supplements can enhance exercise capacity and protect against oxidative damage caused by exhaustive exercise in rats. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. The Impacts of Swimming Exercise on Hippocampal Expression of Neurotrophic Factors in Rats Exposed to Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is associated with stress-induced neural atrophy in limbic brain regions, whereas exercise has antidepressant effects as well as increasing hippocampal synaptic plasticity by strengthening neurogenesis, metabolism, and vascular function. A key mechanism mediating these broad benefits of exercise on the brain is induction of neurotrophic factors, which instruct downstream structural and functional changes. To systematically evaluate the potential neurotrophic factors that were involved in the antidepressive effects of exercise, in this study, we assessed the effects of swimming exercise on hippocampal mRNA expression of several classes of the growth factors (BDNF, GDNF, NGF, NT-3, FGF2, VEGF, and IGF-1 and peptides (VGF and NPY in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS. Our study demonstrated that the swimming training paradigm significantly induced the expression of BDNF and BDNF-regulated peptides (VGF and NPY and restored their stress-induced downregulation. Additionally, the exercise protocol also increased the antiapoptotic Bcl-xl expression and normalized the CUMS mediated induction of proapoptotic Bax mRNA level. Overall, our data suggest that swimming exercise has antidepressant effects, increasing the resistance to the neural damage caused by CUMS, and both BDNF and its downstream neurotrophic peptides may exert a major function in the exercise related adaptive processes to CUMS.

  9. The effects of two different swimming training periodization on physiological parameters at various exercise intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Suárez, Vicente Javier; Dalamitros, Athanasios; Ribeiro, João; Sousa, Ana; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Vilas-Boas, J Paulo

    2017-05-01

    This study analysed the effects of two different periodization strategies on physiological parameters at various exercise intensities in competitive swimmers. Seventeen athletes of both sexes were divided to two groups, the traditional periodization (TPG, n = 7) and the reverse periodization group (RPG, n = 10). Each group followed a 10-week training period based on the two different periodization strategies. Before and after training, swimming velocity (SV), energy expenditure (EE), energy cost (EC) and percentage of aerobic (%Aer) and anaerobic (%An) energy contribution to the swimming intensities corresponding to the aerobic threshold (AerT), the anaerobic threshold (AnT) and the velocity at maximal oxygen uptake (vVO 2 max) were measured. Both groups increased the %An at the AerT and AnT intensity (P ≤ .05). In contrast, at the AnT intensity, EE and EC were only increased in TPG. Complementary, %Aer, %An, EE and EC at vVO 2 max did not alter in both groups (P > .05); no changes were observed in SV in TPG and RPG at all three intensities. These results indicate that both periodization schemes confer almost analogous adaptations in specific physiological parameters in competitive swimmers. However, given the large difference in the total training volume between the two groups, it is suggested that the implementation of the reverse periodization model is an effective and time-efficient strategy to improve performance mainly for swimming events where the AnT is an important performance indicator.

  10. Effects of Water Exercise Swimming Program on Aquatic Skills and Social Behaviors in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chien-Yu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a 10 week water exercise swimming program (WESP) on the aquatic skills and social behaviors of 16 boys with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In the first 10 week phase (phase I), eight children (group A) received the WESP while eight children (group B) did not. A second 10 week phase…

  11. Emperor penguin oxygen consumption, heart rate and plasma lactate levels during graded swimming exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooyman, G L; Ponganis, P J

    1994-10-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate and blood chemistry were measured in four emperor penguins, Aptenodytes forsteri (Gray), during graded swimming exercise. The maximum VO2 obtained, 52 ml O2 kg-1 min-1, was 7.8 times the measured resting VO2 of 6.7 ml O2 kg-1 min-1 and 9.1 times the predicted resting VO2. As the swimming effort rose, a linear increase in surface and submerged heart rates (fH) occurred. The highest average maximum surface and submersion heart rates of any bird were 213 and 210 beats min-1, respectively. No increase in plasma lactate concentrations occurred until VO2 was greater than 25 ml O2 kg-1 min-1. At the highest VO2 values measured, plasma lactate concentration reached 9.4 mmol l-1. In comparison with other animals of approximately the same mass, the aerobic capacity of the emperor penguin is less than those of the emu and dog but about the same as those of the seal, sea lion and domestic goat. For aquatic animals, a low aerobic capacity seems to be consistent with the needs of parsimonious oxygen utilization while breath-holding.

  12. Cardiac molecular-acclimation mechanisms in response to swimming-induced exercise in Atlantic salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Castro

    Full Text Available Cardiac muscle is a principal target organ for exercise-induced acclimation mechanisms in fish and mammals, given that sustained aerobic exercise training improves cardiac output. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying such cardiac acclimation have been scarcely investigated in teleosts. Consequently, we studied mechanisms related to cardiac growth, contractility, vascularization, energy metabolism and myokine production in Atlantic salmon pre-smolts resulting from 10 weeks exercise-training at three different swimming intensities: 0.32 (control, 0.65 (medium intensity and 1.31 (high intensity body lengths s(-1. Cardiac responses were characterized using growth, immunofluorescence and qPCR analysis of a large number of target genes encoding proteins with significant and well-characterized function. The overall stimulatory effect of exercise on cardiac muscle was dependent on training intensity, with changes elicited by high intensity training being of greater magnitude than either medium intensity or control. Higher protein levels of PCNA were indicative of cardiac growth being driven by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia, while elevated cardiac mRNA levels of MEF2C, GATA4 and ACTA1 suggested cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In addition, up-regulation of EC coupling-related genes suggested that exercised hearts may have improved contractile function, while higher mRNA levels of EPO and VEGF were suggestive of a more efficient oxygen supply network. Furthermore, higher mRNA levels of PPARα, PGC1α and CPT1 all suggested a higher capacity for lipid oxidation, which along with a significant enlargement of mitochondrial size in cardiac myocytes of the compact layer of fish exercised at high intensity, suggested an enhanced energetic support system. Training also elevated transcription of a set of myokines and other gene products related to the inflammatory process, such as TNFα, NFκB, COX2, IL1RA and TNF decoy receptor. This study provides the first

  13. Proteomic and carbonylation profile analysis of rat skeletal muscles following acute swimming exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Magherini

    Full Text Available Previous studies by us and other groups characterized protein expression variation following long-term moderate training, whereas the effects of single bursts of exercise are less known. Making use of a proteomic approach, we investigated the effects of acute swimming exercise (ASE on protein expression and carbonylation patterns in two hind limb muscles: the Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL and the Soleus, mostly composed of fast-twitch and slow-twitch fibres, respectively. Carbonylation is one of the most common oxidative modifications of proteins and a marker of oxidative stress. In fact, several studies suggest that physical activity and the consequent increase in oxygen consumption can lead to increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS production, hence the interest in examining the impact of RONS on skeletal muscle proteins following ASE. Results indicate that protein expression is unaffected by ASE in both muscle types. Unexpectedly, the protein carbonylation level was reduced following ASE. In particular, the analysis found 31 and 5 spots, in Soleus and EDL muscles respectively, whose carbonylation is reduced after ASE. Lipid peroxidation levels in Soleus were markedly reduced as well. Most of the decarbonylated proteins are involved either in the regulation of muscle contractions or in the regulation of energy metabolism. A number of hypotheses may be advanced to account for such results, which will be addressed in future studies.

  14. The Ineffectiveness of Manual Treatment of Swimming Pools NNAJI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    period, the COD was above 80mg/l, the pH was between 6.2 and 7.1 as against 7.2 to 7.8 recommended by standards. The total plate count was within limits but ... strains of normal human flora have been found in chlorinated swimming pools ... mucus, saliva or skin in the swimming pool water or similar recreational water ...

  15. A diphenyl diselenide-supplemented diet and swimming exercise promote neuroprotection, reduced cell apoptosis and glial cell activation in the hypothalamus of old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Marlon R; Cechella, José L; Pinton, Simone; Nogueira, Cristina W; Zeni, Gilson

    2016-09-01

    Aging is a process characterized by deterioration of the homeostasis of various physiological systems; although being a process under influence of multiple factors, the mechanisms involved in aging are not well understood. Here we investigated the effect of a (PhSe)2-supplemented diet (1ppm, 4weeks) and swimming exercise (1% of body weight, 20min per day, 4weeks) on proteins related to glial cells activation, apoptosis and neuroprotection in the hypothalamus of old male Wistar rats (27month-old). Old rats had activation of astrocytes and microglia which was demonstrated by the increase in the levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1) in hypothalamus. A decrease of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and procaspase-3 levels as well as an increase of the cleaved PARP/full length PARP ratio (poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, PARP) and the pJNK/JNK ratio (c-Jun N-terminal kinase, JNK) were observed. The levels of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (mBDNF), the pAkt/Akt ratio (also known as protein kinase B) and NeuN (neuronal nuclei), a neuron marker, were decreased in the hypothalamus of old rats. Old rats that received a (PhSe)2-supplemented diet and performed swimming exercise had the hypothalamic levels of Iba-1 and GFAP decreased. The combined treatment also increased the levels of Bcl-2 and procaspase-3 and decreased the ratios of cleaved PARP/full length PARP and pJNK/JNK in old rats. The levels of mBDNF and NeuN, but not the pAkt/Akt ratio, were increased by combined treatment. In conclusion, a (PhSe)2-supplemented diet and swimming exercise promoted neuroprotection in the hypothalamus of old rats, reducing apoptosis and glial cell activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Laryngoscopy during swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsted, Emil S; Swanton, Laura L; van van Someren, Ken

    2017-01-01

    that precipitates their symptoms. This report provides the first description of the feasibility of performing continuous laryngoscopy during exercise in a swimming environment. The report describes the methodology and safety of the use of continuous laryngoscopy while swimming. Laryngoscope, 2017....

  17. Acute aerobic swimming exercise induces distinct effects in the contractile reactivity of rat ileum to KCl and carbachol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layanne Cabral Da Cunha Araujo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic exercise promotes short-term physiological changes in the intestinal smooth muscle associated to the ischemia-reperfusion process; however, few studies have demonstrated its effect on the intestinal contractile function. Thus, this work describes our observations regarding the influence of acute aerobic swimming exercise in the contractile reactivity, oxidative stress and morphology of rat ileum. Wistar rats were divided into sedentary (SED and acutely exercised (EX-AC groups. Animals were acclimated by 10, 10 and 30 min of swimming exercise in intercalated days one week before exercise. Then they were submitted to forced swimming for 1 h with a metal of 3% of their body weight attached to their body. Animals were euthanized immediately after the exercise section and the ileum was suspended in organ baths for monitoring isotonic contractions. The analysis of lipid peroxidation was performed in order to determinate the malondialdehyde (MDA levels as a marker of oxidative stress, and intestinal smooth muscle morphology by histological staining. Cumulative concentration-response curves to KCl were altered in the EX-AC with an increase in both its efficacy and potency (Emax = 153.2 ± 2.8%, EC50 = 1.3 ± 0.1 x 10-2 M compared to the SED group (Emax = 100%, EC50 = 1.8 ± 0.1 x 10-2 M. Interestingly, carbachol had its efficacy and potency reduced in the EX-AC (Emax = 67.1 ± 1.4%, EC50 = 9.8 ± 1.4 x 10-7 M compared to the SED group (Emax = 100%, EC50 = 2.0 ± 0.2 x 10-7 M. The exercise did not alter the MDA levels in the ileum (5.4 ± 0.6 µmol/mL in the EX-AC compared to the SED group (8.4 ± 1.7 µmol/mL. Moreover, neither the circular nor the longitudinal smooth muscle layers thickness were modified by the exercise (66.2 ± 6.0 and 40.2 ± 2.6 µm, respectively compared to the SED group (61.6 ± 6.4 and 34.8 ± 3.7 µm, respectively. Therefore, the ileum sensitivity to contractile agents is differentially altered by the acute aerobic

  18. Acute Aerobic Swimming Exercise Induces Distinct Effects in the Contractile Reactivity of Rat Ileum to KCl and Carbachol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Layanne C. da Cunha; de Souza, Iara L. L.; Vasconcelos, Luiz H. C.; Brito, Aline de Freitas; Queiroga, Fernando R.; Silva, Alexandre S.; da Silva, Patrícia M.; Cavalcante, Fabiana de Andrade; da Silva, Bagnólia A.

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic exercise promotes short-term physiological changes in the intestinal smooth muscle associated to the ischemia-reperfusion process; however, few studies have demonstrated its effect on the intestinal contractile function. Thus, this work describes our observations regarding the influence of acute aerobic swimming exercise in the contractile reactivity, oxidative stress, and morphology of rat ileum. Wistar rats were divided into sedentary (SED) and acutely exercised (EX-AC) groups. Animals were acclimated by 10, 10, and 30 min of swimming exercise in intercalated days 1 week before exercise. Then they were submitted to forced swimming for 1 h with a metal of 3% of their body weight attached to their body. Animals were euthanized immediately after the exercise section and the ileum was suspended in organ baths for monitoring isotonic contractions. The analysis of lipid peroxidation was performed in order to determinate the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as a marker of oxidative stress, and intestinal smooth muscle morphology by histological staining. Cumulative concentration-response curves to KCl were altered in the EX-AC with an increase in both its efficacy and potency (Emax = 153.2 ± 2.8%, EC50 = 1.3 ± 0.1 × 10−2 M) compared to the SED group (Emax = 100%, EC50 = 1.8 ± 0.1 × 10−2 M). Interestingly, carbachol had its efficacy and potency reduced in the EX-AC (Emax = 67.1 ± 1.4%, EC50 = 9.8 ± 1.4 × 10−7 M) compared to the SED group (Emax = 100%, EC50 = 2.0 ± 0.2 × 10−7 M). The exercise did not alter the MDA levels in the ileum (5.4 ± 0.6 μ mol/mL) in the EX-AC compared to the SED group (8.4 ± 1.7 μ mol/mL). Moreover, neither the circular nor the longitudinal smooth muscle layers thickness were modified by the exercise (66.2 ± 6.0 and 40.2 ± 2.6 μm, respectively), compared to the SED group (61.6 ± 6.4 and 34.8 ± 3.7 μm, respectively). Therefore, the ileum sensitivity to contractile agents is differentially altered by the acute aerobic

  19. Eccentric exercise in treatment of Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Larsen, C C; Bieler, T

    2007-01-01

    Prognosis and treatment of Achilles tendon pain (achillodynia) has been insufficiently studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine the long-term effect of eccentric exercises compared with stretching exercises on patients with achillodynia.......Prognosis and treatment of Achilles tendon pain (achillodynia) has been insufficiently studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine the long-term effect of eccentric exercises compared with stretching exercises on patients with achillodynia....

  20. High-intensity extended swimming exercise reduces pain-related behavior in mice: involvement of endogenous opioids and the serotonergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Martins, Daniel F; Marcon, Rodrigo; Dos Santos, Ubirajara D; Speckhann, Breno; Gadotti, Vinícius M; Sigwalt, André Roberto; Guglielmo, Luiz Guilherme A; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares

    2010-12-01

    The present study examined the hyponociceptive effect of swimming exercise in a chemical behavioral model of nociception and the mechanisms involved in this effect. Male mice were submitted to swimming sessions (30 min/d for 5 days). Twenty-four hours after the last session, we noticed that swimming exercise decreased the number of abdominal constriction responses caused by acetic acid compared with the nonexercised group. The hyponociception caused by exercise in the acetic acid test was significantly attenuated by intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment of mice with naloxone (a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg), ρ-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (PCPA, an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis, 100 mg/kg once a day for 4 consecutive days), and by bilateral adrenalectomy. Collectively, the present results provide experimental evidences indicating for the first time that high-intensity extended swimming exercise reduces pain-related behavior in mice. The mechanisms involve an interaction with opioid and serotonin systems. Furthermore, endogenous opioids released by adrenal glands probably are involved in this effect. Our results indicate that high-intensity extended exercise endogenously controls acute pain by activation of opioidergic and serotonergic pathways. Furthermore, these results support the use of exercise as a nonpharmacological approach for the management of acute pain. Copyright © 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Heated jackets and dryland-based activation exercises used as additional warm-ups during transition enhance sprint swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Courtney J; Thompson, Kevin G; Pyne, David B; Raglin, John S; Rattray, Ben

    2016-04-01

    The lengthy competition transition phases commonly experienced by competitive swimmers may mitigate the benefits of the pool warm-up. To combat this, we examined the impact of additional passive and active warm-up strategies on sprint swimming performance. Counterbalanced, repeated-measures cross-over study. Sixteen junior competitive swimmers completed a standardised pool warm-up followed by a 30min transition and 100m freestyle time-trial. Swimmers completed four different warm-up strategies during transition: remained seated wearing a conventional tracksuit top and pants (Control), wore an insulated top with integrated heating elements (Passive), performed a 5min dryland-based exercise circuit (Dryland), or a combination of Passive and Dryland (Combo). Swimming time-trial performance, core and skin temperature and perceptual variables were monitored. Time variables were normalised relative to Control. Both Combo (-1.05±0.26%; mean±90% confidence limits, p=0.00) and Dryland (-0.68±0.34%; p=0.02) yielded faster overall time-trial performances, with start times also faster for Combo (-0.37±0.07%; p=0.00) compared to Control. Core temperature declined less during transition with Combo (-0.13±0.25°C; p=0.01) and possibly with Dryland (-0.24±0.13°C; p=0.09) compared to Control (-0.64±0.16°C), with a smaller reduction in core temperature related to better time-trial performance (R(2)=0.91; p=0.04). Dryland-based exercise circuits completed alone and in combination with the application of heated tracksuit jackets during transition can significantly improve sprint swimming performance. Attenuation in the decline of core temperature and a reduction in start time appear as likely mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Perceived health problems in swimmers according to the chemical treatment of water in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Luna, Álvaro; Burillo, Pablo; Felipe, José Luis; del Corral, Julio; García-Unanue, Jorge; Gallardo, Leonor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine which chemical treatment used for disinfecting water in indoor swimming pools had the least impact on users' perceptions of health problems, and which generated the greatest satisfaction with the quality of the water. A survey on satisfaction and perceived health problems was given to 1001 users at 20 indoor swimming pools which used different water treatment methods [chlorine, bromine, ozone, ultraviolet lamps (UV) and salt electrolysis]. The findings suggest that there is a greater probability of perceived health problems, such as eye and skin irritation, respiratory problems and skin dryness, in swimming pools treated with chlorine than in swimming pools using other chemical treatment methods. Pools treated with bromine have similar, although slightly better, results. Other factors, such as age, gender, time of day of use (morning and afternoon) and type of user (competitive and recreational), can also affect the probability of suffering health problems. For all of the above, using combined treatment methods as ozone and UV, or salt electrolysis produces a lower probability of perceived health problems and greater satisfaction.

  3. Swimming Pool Water Treatment Chemicals and/or Processes. Standard No. 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Chemicals or processes used or intended for use, in the treatment of swimming pool water are covered. Minimum public health limits or acceptability in regard to toxicity, biocidal effectiveness, and chemical behavior and analysis are presented. The appendices give guidelines to the scientific and statistically sound evaluations to determine the…

  4. The effect of UV treatment on highly polluted and normal operated swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    “It should be light blue, transparent” (Mario Andrada, speakerman, Olympic Games, Rio, 2016) was the comment for the “green lake”. Swimming pools are sensitive recirculating systems. A malfunction in water treatment units or a poor operating decision could possibly lead to health-endangering or a...

  5. Tactile sensitivity of blind and visually impaired children and adolescents. The significance of swimming exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Rostkowska, Elżbieta; Maśnik, Elżbieta

    2001-01-01

    The im of the study is to compare the tactile sensitivity threshold (TST) of the blind children who practice swimming and those who do not practice any sports with the TST of healthy people of similar age. TST was measured on the pad of he index finger of the dominant hand using an aesthesiometer. Lower TST was found in blind girls compared to healthy girls as well as lower TST in blind girls who practice swimming compared to the blind girls who do not practice ane sports. A significant lower...

  6. THE USE OF MEMBRANE TECHNIQUES IN SWIMMING POOL WATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Łaskawiec

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper has determined the suitability of membrane processes (UF ultrafiltration, UF, and nanofiltration, NF for the purification of waste streams, so-called backwash water, obtained from washing filtration beds in a swimming pool water system. The backwash water samples were taken from the circuits located in two indoor facilities with a different purpose of the basins. Moreover, the samples were characterized by varying quality, as described by selected physicochemical parameters (such as turbidity and ultraviolet absorbance UV254. Commercial membranes were used for the tests. The transport-separation properties of the membranes were determined based on the volumetric flux of the permeate. In addition, backwash water samples before and after the membrane process were subjected to toxicological assessment using the Microtox® screening test. The performed processes contributed to a significant reduction in turbidity and the value of UV254 ultraviolet absorbance, both in the ultrafiltration and nanofiltration processes. Whereas, significant differences in transport properties were noted within individual processes. A great influence of backwash water quality, including physicochemical parameters, on the course and results of the membrane filtration processes was demonstrated. In all of the nanofiltration cycles carried out, the removal of the toxic properties of the backwash water with respect to bacteria in the Microtox® test was found. Nevertheless, samples with high values of resultant physicochemical parameters after the ultrafiltration process were still characterized by high toxicity. Pressure membrane processes show high effectiveness in the removal of contaminants from backwash water. However, it is necessary to introduce supporting processes aimed at reducing membrane pore blocking by deposits and organic compounds, and in the case of ultrafiltration, assuring the safety of the purified stream in terms of the toxicological effect.

  7. Suckling in litters with different sizes, and early and late swimming exercise differentially modulates anxiety-like behavior, memory and electrocorticogram potentiation after spreading depression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Silva-Gondim, Mariana Barros; de Souza, Thays Kallyne Marinho; Rodrigues, Marcelo Cairrão Araújo; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2017-11-28

    Analyze the hypothesis that swimming exercise, in rats suckled under distinct litter sizes, alters behavioral parameters suggestive of anxiety and recognition memory, and the electrocorticogram potentiation that occurs after the excitability-related phenomenon that is known as cortical spreading depression (CSD). Male Wistar rats were suckled in litters with six or 12 pups (L 6 and L 12 groups). Animals swam at postnatal days (P) 8-23, or P60-P75 (early-exercised or late-exercised groups, respectively), or remained no-exercised. Behavioral tests (open field - OF and object recognition - OR) were conducted between P77 and P80. Between P90 and P120, ECoG was recorded for 2 hours. After this 'baseline' recording, CSD was elicited every 30 minutes over the course of 2 hours. Early swimming enhanced the number of entries and the percentage of time in the OF-center (P < 0.05). In animals that swam later, this effect occurred in the L6 group only. Compared to the corresponding sedentary groups, OR-test showed a better memory in the L6 early exercised rats, and a worse memory in all other groups (P < 0.05). In comparison to baseline values, ECoG amplitudes after CSD increased 14-43% for all groups (P < 0.05). In the L 6 condition, early swimming and late swimming, respectively, reduced and enhanced the magnitude of the post-CSD ECoG potentiation in comparison with the corresponding L 6 no-exercised groups (P < 0.05). Our data suggest a differential effect of early- and late-exercise on the behavioral and electrophysiological parameters, suggesting an interaction between the age of exercise and the nutritional status during lactation.

  8. Perfection of hoe-type motions of sportswomen specialized in synchronous swimming in base positions of compulsory exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Gordieieva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The features of implementation of standard hoe-type motion of sportswomen of the synchronous swimming are certain. In an experiment took part 16 sportswomen aged 8-11 years. Distinctions are exposed between the index of resulting speed of centre-of-mass biotlinks of overhead extremities of sportswomen and between kinematics and dynamic descriptions at implementation of a few types of standard hoe-type motion. It is recommended at the end of every mesocycle to conduct current control with the use of videosurvey. To conduct the analysis of video data and discussion of suffered sportswomen technical errors. It is suggested to draw on the complex of tricking into and imitation exercises, exercises on development of force and flexibility in joints, exercises on perfection of rhythm structure of motive action. It is recommended to execute motive actions on a background of considerable physical fatigue, emotional overvoltage, distraction, up-diffused attention, difficulty of activity of separate analyzers (motive actions with the closed eyes.

  9. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieli-Conwright CM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Dieli-Conwright, Breanna Z Orozco Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, Women's Health and Exercise Laboratory, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength, negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass, increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, exercise, physical well-being

  10. Ultrafiltration for Purification and Treatment of Water Streams in Swimming Pool Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Łaskawiec

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents possible applications of pressure-driven membrane processes for treatment of swimming pool water and purification of waste streams – washings. Newly identified swimming pool water quality issues are presented that require a modernization of existing technologies. The studies used polymer membranes with the same particle distribution range (50000 Da, but made of different membrane-forming materials: polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF and polyether sulfone (PES for purification of washings. The ultrafiltration process allowed obtaining a high turbidity reduction rate in washings (over 95%, and also a significant reduction of total organic carbon. The effectiveness of the PES membrane was reduced after the process commencement, whereas the separation capacity of the PVDF membrane increased during the studied filtration process. While setting the operational process parameters consideration should be given also to the resistance of used membranes to chlorine present in the swimming pool water. A prolonged exposure of the polyether sulfone membrane to chloride may have caused its gradual damage and degradation of its separation properties.

  11. Effects of intermittent fasting and chronic swimming exercise on body composition and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Ruan Carlos Macedo de; Portari, Guilherme Vannucchi; Ferraz, Alex Soares Marreiros; da Silva, Tiago Eugênio Oliveira; Marocolo, Moacir

    2017-12-01

    Intermittent fasting protocol (IFP) has been suggested as a strategy to change body metabolism and improve health. The effects of IFP seem to be similar to aerobic exercise, having a hormetic adaptation according to intensity and frequency. However, the effects of combining both interventions are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IFP with and without endurance-exercise training on body composition, food behavior, and lipid metabolism. Twenty-week-old Wistar rats were kept under an inverted circadian cycle of 12 h with water ad libitum and assigned to 4 different groups: control group (ad libitum feeding and sedentary), exercise group (ad libitum feeding and endurance training), intermittent fasting group (IF; intermittent fasting and sedentary), and intermittent fasting and exercise group (IFEX; intermittent fasting and endurance training). After 6 weeks, the body weight of IF and IFEX animals decreased without changes in food consumption. Yet, the body composition between the 2 groups was different, with the IFEX animals containing higher total protein and lower total fat content than the IF animals. The IFEX group also showed increases in total high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and increased intramuscular lipid content. The amount of brown adipose tissue was higher in IF and IFEX groups; however, the IFEX group showed higher expression levels of uncoupling protein 1 in this tissue, indicating a greater thermogenesis. The IFP combined with endurance training is an efficient method for decreasing body mass and altering fat metabolism, without inflicting losses in protein content.

  12. Deleterious effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on endurance and sprint exercise performance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, N D; Williams, D A; Lynch, G S

    2000-03-01

    The beta(2)-adrenergic agonist, clenbuterol, has powerful muscle anabolic and lipolytic effects and is used by athletes to improve exercise performance; however, its use in conjunction with different forms of exercise training has received limited attention. Since previous studies have reported that chronic use of other beta(2)-adrenergic agonists has deleterious effects on cardiac muscle structure and function, the aim of the present study was to determine whether chronic clenbuterol administration would reduce the exercise capabilities of rats subjected to long-term treadmill sprint running, endurance swimming or voluntary wheel running training. The effect of clenbuterol treatment on exercise performance in rats was evaluated in three separate studies. Different groups of male rats were assigned to an endurance swimming (2 h/day, 5/7 days, 18 weeks) group, a treadmill sprint running (8x1 min bouts, 1.05 m/s, 20 weeks) group, or a voluntary wheel running (16 weeks) group. In each study, rats were allocated into either a treated group that received clenbuterol (2 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) in their drinking water or an untreated control group. In each of the three studies, treated rats exhibited a reduction in exercise performance compared with untreated rats. Treated rats ran approximately 57% less total distance than untreated rats in the voluntary running programme and were unable to complete the swimming and sprinting protocols performed by the untreated rats. In each of the studies, the treated rats exhibited cardiac hypertrophy, with absolute heart mass increased by approximately 19% and heart mass relative to body mass increased by approximately 20%. The hearts of sedentary rats treated with clenbuterol exhibited extensive collagen infiltration surrounding blood vessels and in the wall of the left ventricle. The results indicate strongly that chronic clenbuterol administration deleteriously affects exercise performance in rats, potentially due to alterations in

  13. The effect of swimming exercise and powdered-Salicornia herbacea L. ingestion on glucose metabolism in STZ-induced diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Se Sil; Seo, Hyobin; Ryu, Sungpil; Kwon, Tae-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to observe the effects of Salicornia herbacea L. powder ingestion on carbohydrate metabolism in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods To achieve this objective, 35 Sprague-Dawley male rats were raised with feed mixed with Salicornia herbacia L. powder and given specific periods to swim for 5 weeks. There was no significant difference in the insulin increase rate while ingesting Salicornia herbacea L. powder and simultaneously exercising. Results Compared to t...

  14. Swimming Exercise Alleviated Insulin Resistance by Regulating Tripartite Motif Family Protein 72 Expression and AKT Signal Pathway in Sprague-Dawley Rats Fed with High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate whether swimming exercise could improve insulin resistance (IR by regulating tripartite motif family protein 72 (TRIM72 expression and AKT signal pathway in rats fed with high-fat diet. Five-week-old rats were classified into 3 groups: standard diet as control (CON, high-fat diet (HFD, and HFD plus swimming exercise (Ex-HFD. After 8 weeks, glucose infusion rate (GIR, markers of oxidative stress, mRNA and protein expression of TRIM72, protein of IRS, p-AKTSer473, and AKT were determined in quadriceps muscles. Compared with HFD, the GIR, muscle SOD, and GSH-Px were significantly increased (p<0.05, resp., whereas muscle MDA and 8-OHdG levels were significantly decreased (p<0.05 and p<0.01 in Ex-HFD. Expression levels of TRIM72 mRNA and protein in muscles were significantly reduced (p<0.05 and p<0.01, whereas protein expression levels of IRS-1, p-AKTSer473, and AKT were significantly increased in Ex-HFD compared with HFD (p<0.01, p<0.01, and p<0.05. These results suggest that an 8-week swimming exercise improves HFD-induced insulin resistance maybe through a reduction of TRIM72 in skeletal muscle and enhancement of AKT signal transduction.

  15. Treatment of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke; Sverrild, Asger; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    impairment of performance to severe bronchospasm and a large reduction in FEV1. Treatment of EIB varies from daily to less frequent therapy, depending on the level of activity. In this article, the authors evaluate the treatment possibilities before, during, and after exercise. They also review medications...

  16. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence...... trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates......Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile...

  17. The effects of swimming exercise and dissolved oxygen on growth performance, fin condition and precocious maturation of early-rearing Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Thomas; Summerfelt, Steven T.; Mazik, Patricia M.; Good, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Swimming exercise, typically measured in body-lengths per second (BL/s), and dissolved oxygen (DO), are important environmental variables in fish culture. While there is an obvious physiological association between these two parameters, their interaction has not been adequately studied in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. Because exercise and DO are variables that can be easily manipulated in modern aquaculture systems, we sought to assess the impact of these parameters, alone and in combination, on the performance, health and welfare of juvenile Atlantic salmon. In our study, Atlantic salmon fry were stocked into 12 circular 0.5 m3 tanks in a flow-through system and exposed to either high (1.5–2 BL/s) or low (exercise and DO concentration on growth, feed conversion, survival and fin condition. By study's end, both increased swimming speed and higher DO were independently associated with a statistically significant increase in growth performance (p exercise and dissolved oxygen at saturation during Atlantic salmon early rearing can result in improved growth performance and a lower incidence of precocious parr.

  18. The effect of UV treatment on highly polluted and normal operated swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Water samples from 2 indoor public swimming pool facilities with significantly different organic matter concentrations in the recirculation were tested to evaluate UV-induced effects on water chemistry. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of poor water quality due to increased...... organic carbon (TOC) and the potential effect of increased nitrate concentration on disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in pool water. Concentration change on total trihalomethanes (TTHM) was investigated utilising medium pressure UV treatment in conjunction with chlorine. Post-UV chlorine consumption...... increased, UV dose-dependently. The post-UV chlorination clearly induced TTHM formation in both polluted and normal operated pools. However, elevated TOC concentration did not increase significantly the DBP formation. Regarding the brominated fraction of the halogens in the formed TTHMs, it appeared...

  19. Microbial quality of swimming pool water with treatment without disinfection, with ultrafiltration, with UV-based treatment and with chlorination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuten, M.G.A.; Peters, M.C.F.M.; van Dijk, J.C.; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2017-01-01

    Swimming pools are traditionally disinfected with a residual disinfectant such as sodium hypochlorite. Nowadays, swimming water without a residual disinfectant is increasingly popular, as can be seen by the growing number of (natural) swimming ponds (Weilandt 2015), but health risks for bathers do

  20. Combined UV treatment and ozonation for the removal of by-product precursors in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools. UV treatment is the most common approach, as it is particularly efficient at removing combined chlorine. However, the UV treatment of pool water increases chlorine reactivity...... and the formation of chloro-organic DBPs such as trihalomethanes. Based on the similar selective reactivity of ozone and chlorine, we hypothesised that the created reactivity to chlorine, as a result of the UV treatment of dissolved organic matter in swimming pool water, might also be expressed as increased...... reactivity to ozone. Moreover, ozonation might saturate the chlorine reactivity created by UV treatment and mitigate increased formation of a range of volatile DBPs. We found that UV treatment makes pool water highly reactive to ozone. The subsequent reactivity to chlorine decreases with increasing ozone...

  1. Destruction of disinfection byproducts and their precursors in swimming pool water by combined UV treatment and ozonation

    OpenAIRE

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection byproducts (DBP) in swimming pools. UV treatment is most common as it is particularly efficient in removing the repulsive chlorine like smelling chloramines (combined chlorine). UV treatment of a pool water increased chlorine reactivity and formation of chlor-organic DBP such as trihalomethanes. Based on the similar selective reactivity of ozone and chlorine we hypothesized that the created reactivity towards c...

  2. Swimming as physical activity and recreation for women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yfanti Maria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reviews all data that establish swimming as an everyday lifestyle and recreational activity for women, since it promotes wellness, well-being and longevity. Swimming as a natural, physical activity is one of the most effective ways of exercise, since it affects and work outs the whole body. It is the most suitable sport for all age groups, because it combines beneficial results, for both body and soul and is also a low-risk-injury physical exercise. Aim of this study is to record the effect of recreational swimming in physical condition indexes and in quality of life in women. In particular to record the benefits, since studies have shown that swimming can help in prevention and treatment of chronic diseases and improves quality of life, of well-being and longevity. Results of all studies showed that swimming, as a great natural recreational activity has multiple beneficial effects on the female body that are not limited to the physical characteristics but are extended to the mental ones. Challenges for the application and development fields of this particular method of exercise, are the quality of service provided and the staffing of departments and programs in multiple carriers, private or public. Researchers and writers agree that there are great prospects for growth for women through partnerships, with programs and systematic research in the field of recreational swimming.

  3. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  4. Increased behavioural activity of rats in forced swimming test after partial denervation of serotonergic system by parachloroamphetamine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häidkind, Riina; Eller, Marika; Kask, Ants; Harro, Maarike; Rinken, Ago; Oreland, Lars; Harro, Jaanus

    2004-10-01

    The present study aimed at characterizing the effect of partial 5-HT denervation by parachloroamphetamine (PCA), a 5-HT selective neurotoxin, on forced swimming behaviour and monoamine levels in several rat brain regions. PCA was administered intraperitoneally in two independent experiments in doses of 2, 4 and 6 mg/kg and in doses 1, 2, 4 mg/kg, respectively. PCA (2 mg/kg) reduced immobility in the forced swimming test in the Experiment 1 and according to Experiment 2 this is explained by increased swimming time. Dose-dependent reductions in 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels were found in all brain regions studied, and the maximal effects were of a similar magnitude. In septum, the effect of PCA took more time to develop. The effects of the lowest dose of PCA suggest that the neurotoxin affects not only the dorsal raphe projection areas but also the fine axons which arise from the median raphe. alpha2-Adrenoceptors and beta-adrenoceptors in cerebral cortex were not affected by the PCA treatment. Binding affinity of the 5-HT(1A) receptors was higher after all doses of PCA. On the second exposure to the forced swimming the time spent in swimming was found to be negatively and the time spent in immobile posture positively correlated with serotonin turnover in frontal cortex. The time spent in struggling on the second exposure to test was found to be negatively correlated with KD of beta-adrenoceptor binding in cerebral cortex. These data suggest that partial 5-HT denervation with low doses of PCA, which elicits a specific pattern of neurodegeneration, results in an increased behavioural activity, and that the traditional interpretation of the measures in forced swimming test, despite of the test's predictive power in revealing antidepressants acting on monoaminergic systems, is not adequate for studies on the neurochemical basis of depression.

  5. Combined strength exercises on dry land and in the water to improve swimming parameters of athletes with paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skucas, Kestutis; Pokvytyte, Vaida

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present research was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of combined dry land strength and resistance swimming training for increasing upper body strength, swimming performance and stroking parameters in swimmers with paraplegia and to determine correlation between these parameters. The preliminary, the second (after 4 weeks), the third (after 8 weeks) and the last (after 12 weeks) testing were performed. The measurements consisted of the following assessments: the assessment of isometric strength in dry land (tension force), the assessment of swimming performance and stroke parameters during 50-m backstroke, the assessment of strength during tethered swimming (tension force). Sixteen swimmers with paraplegia after complete spinal cord injury in thoracic and lumbar lesion participated in the investigation. Subjects with paraplegia represent the experimental and control groups. The participants of the experimental group had five training sessions per week, two hours per training session on dry land (two times per week) and in the water (three times per week). The subjects of the control group had five swimming training sessions per week for two hours each. The strength, performance and stroke characteristics of the experimental group reveal differences among pre-test, after month, after two months and post-test values. The strength, performance and stroke characteristics of the control group did not change after a month, after two months and after the experiment. The coefficient of determination of the experimental group revealed a positive correlation (r2=0.67) between 50-m result and the number of strokes, between the force tension in water and in dry land (r2=0.5), between the number of strokes and the force tension in water (r2=0.53). This study indicated that the swimmers with paraplegia involved in 12 weeks combined strength on dry land and resistance training in the water program improved strength, swimming performance and stroke parameters in

  6. Physical Exercise as an Adjunct Treatment for Adolescent Depression

    OpenAIRE

    SARA RADOVIC

    2017-01-01

    There is evidence that exercise is effective in the treatment of depression amongst adults, however limited research has explored the role of exercise in the treatment of adolescent depression. This thesis demonstrated that an individualised, self-directed exercise intervention is feasible and effective in reducing depressive symptoms amongst depressed adolescents. Additionally, this thesis demonstrated that mental health clinicians hold favourable attitudes towards the use of exercise in the...

  7. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla M.S.; Andersen, Henrik R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  8. Exercise addiction- diagnosis, bio-psychological mechanisms and treatment issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Aviv; Weinstein, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Exercise and sports activity are beneficial both physically and psychologically but excessive exercise may have adverse physiological and psychological effects. There are methodological issues in the definition, diagnosis and etiology of exercise addiction. Several questionnaires and diagnostic tools have been developed and validated and they show high validity and reliability. Exercise addiction has been suggested as having an obsessive-compulsive dimension as well as rewarding aspects that may include it among the behavioral addictions. Biological studies show that in rodents, exercise such as wheel running activates the dopamine reward system and thus contributing to stress reduction. Further evidence suggests that running is associated with endorphins and cannabinoids thus explaining the "runners high" or euphoric feelings that may lead to exercise addiction. Genetic studies suggest that genes which control preference for drugs also control the preference for naturally rewarding behaviors such as exercise. Psychological studies also explain exercise addiction in terms of reward, habituation, social support, stress-relief, avoidance of withdrawal and reduction of anxiety. It has been suggested that exercise addiction is a part of a continuum of sportive activity that develops in stages from the recreational exercise to at-risk exercise, problematic exercise and finally into exercise addiction. Assessment and treatment should take into account the various stages of exercise addiction development, its comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders such as eating disorders or substance use and alcohol disorders. Treatment approaches for exercise addiction are based on the cognitive-behavioral approach but little is known about their effectiveness. A single-case study shows promise of pharmacological treatment for exercise addiction and further studies are required. This review summarizes diagnostic and phenomenology of exercise addiction with emphasis on

  9. Physical exercise in treatment of patients with lumbar discopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziszewski, Krzysztof Roch

    2007-01-01

    The beneficial effect of physical exercise in the treatment of patients with intervertebral lumbar discopathy is generally known. Regular exercise has a beneficial effect on motor performance of the spine, increasing the degree of active stabilization. Exercise also improves posture control, coordination and precision of movement, preventing spinal fatigue and micro injuries. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the popularity of physical exercise in lumbar discopathy patients. 665 patients, 16 76 years of age, with L4-L5 or L5- with discopathy, were enrolled in the study.348 patients received only conservative therapy, while 317 had undergone surgery. 55.6% of the conservatively managed patients and 57.4% of the surgically managed patients reported regular physical exercise. Patients receiving conservative therapy exercised for approx. 1 hour a week. Older patients exercised for a shorter period than young and middle-aged patients. In long-term follow-up, 2.2% more patients performed spinal exercises. Surgical patients devoted the most time to spinal exercise during the first 3 years after surgery. In long-term follow-up, the percentage of regularly exercising patients decreased by 3.9%. On average, 16.8% of conservatively managed patients and 21.5% of surgically managed patients exercised for more than 2 hours per week. Only approx. 20% of patients regularly engaged in spinal exercises for ca. 30 minutes daily. There is insufficient use of physical exercise of the spine for the prevention and treatment of lumbar discopathy.

  10. Cervical Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... see your physician before starting any exercises. The Importance of Exercise for the Neck Spine experts agree that physical ... valuable things you can do for your overall health and is especially important if you have neck pain. Con- tinue exercises as long as your symptoms do not return, ...

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Linking Exercise to Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Gehl, Julie; Christensen, Jesper F.

    2018-01-01

    The benefits of exercise training for cancer patients are becoming increasingly evident. Physical exercise has been shown to reduce cancer incidence and inhibit tumor growth. Here we provide the status of the current molecular understanding of the effect of exercise on cancer. We propose...... that exercise has a role in controlling cancer progression through a direct effect on tumor-intrinsic factors, interplay with whole-body exercise effects, alleviation of cancer-related adverse events, and improvement of anti-cancer treatment efficacy. These findings have wide-ranging societal implications......, as this understanding may lead to changes in cancer treatment strategies. Hojman et al. discuss the role of exercise in controlling cancer progression through direct effects on tumor-intrinsic factors, interplay with whole-body exercise effects, alleviation of cancer-related adverse events, and improvement of cancer...

  12. The concept of treatment of scolioses employing asymmetrical aquatic exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Łubkowska, Wioletta

    2015-01-01

    According to the statistical data, there is being observed a definite increase in percentage of children affected by posture defects, particularly scolioses. The aquatic environment facilitates treatment of scolioses, since it provides relief conditions used in order to perform prophylactic, corrective and therapeutic tasks. Hydrokinetic therapy is one of the many rehabilitation methods. It seems, however, that corrective and therapeutic swimming is far too rarely used as an auxiliar...

  13. Is exercise an alternative treatment for chronic insomnia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Soares Passos

    Full Text Available The purposes of this systematic/critical review are: 1 to identify studies on the effects of exercise on chronic insomnia and sleep complaints in middle-aged and older adults and to compare the results of exercise with those obtained with hypnotic medications and 2 to discuss potential mechanisms by which exercise could promote sleep in insomniac patients. We identified studies from 1983 through 2011 using MEDLINE, SCOPUS and Web of Science. For systematic analyses, only studies assessing the chronic effects of exercise on sleep in people with sleep complaints or chronic insomnia were considered. We used the following keywords when searching for articles: insomnia, sleep, sleep complaints, exercise and physical activity. For a critical review, studies were selected on the effects of exercise and possible mechanisms that may explain the effects of exercise on insomnia. We identified five studies that met our inclusion criteria for systematic review. Exercise training is effective at decreasing sleep complaints and insomnia. Aerobic exercise has been more extensively studied, and its effects are similar to those observed after hypnotic medication use. Mechanisms are proposed to explain the effects of exercise on insomnia. There is additional documented evidence on the antidepressant and anti-anxiety effects of exercise. Exercise is effective to decrease sleep complaints and to treat chronic insomnia. Exercise presented similar results when compared with hypnotics; however, prospective studies comparing the effects of exercise with medical and non-medical treatments are warranted before including exercise as a first-line treatment for chronic insomnia are necessary.

  14. Swimming physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmér, I

    1992-05-01

    Swimming takes place in a medium, that presents different gravitational and resistive forces, respiratory conditions and thermal stress compared to air. The energy cost of propulsion in swimming is high, but a considerable reduction occurs at a given velocity as result of regular swim training. In medley swimmers the energy cost is lowest for front crawl, followed by backstroke, butterfly and breast-stroke. Cardiac output is probably not limiting for performance since swimmers easily achieve higher values during running. Maximal heart rate, however, is lowered by approx. 10 beats/min during swimming compared to running. Most likely active muscle mass is smaller and rate of power production lesser in swimming. Local factors, such as peripheral circulation, capillary density, perfusion pressure and metabolic capacity of active muscles, are important determinants of the power production capacity and emphasize the role of swim specific training movements. Improved swimming technique and efficiency are likely to explain much of the continuous progress in performance. Rational principles based on improved understanding of the biomechanics and physiology of swimming should be guidelines for swimmers and coaches in their efforts to explore the limits of human performance.

  15. Destruction of disinfection byproducts and their precursors in swimming pool water by combined UV treatment and ozonation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection byproducts (DBP) in swimming pools. UV treatment is most common as it is particularly efficient in removing the repulsive chlorine like smelling chloramines (combined chlorine). UV treatment of a pool water increased...... chlorine reactivity and formation of chlor-organic DBP such as trihalomethanes. Based on the similar selective reactivity of ozone and chlorine we hypothesized that the created reactivity towards chlorine by UV treatment of dissolved organic matter in pool water might also be expressed as an increased...... reactivity towards ozone and that ozonation might saturate the chlorine reactivity created by UV treatment and mitigate the increased DBP formation. By experimentally treating pool water samples, we found that UV treatment makes pool water highly reactive to ozone. The created reactivity towards chlorine...

  16. The effect of swimming exercise on adenine-induced kidney disease in rats, and the influence of curcumin or lisinopril thereon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badreldin H Ali

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD have been reported to benefit from different types of exercises. It has also been shown that the ACE inhibitor lisinopril, and the natural product curcumin are also beneficial in different models of CKD in rats. We assessed the influence of moderate swimming exercise (SE on rats with adenine-induced CKD, and tested the possible effects of lisinopril and/or curcumin thereon using several physiological, biochemical, histopathological and immunohistochemical parameters. Rats (either sedentary or subjected to SE were randomly divided into several groups, and given for five weeks either normal food or food mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w to induce CKD. Some of these groups were also concomitantly treated orally with curcumin (75 mg/kg, or lisinopril (10 mg/kg and were subjected to moderate SE (45 min/day three days each week. Rats fed adenine showed the typical biochemical, histopathological signs of CKD such as elevations in blood pressure, urinary albumin / creatinine ratio, and plasma urea, creatinine, indoxyl sulfate and phosphorus. SE, curcumin or lisinopril, given singly, significantly ameliorated all the adenine-induced actions. Administering curcumin or lisinopril with SE improved the histopathology of the kidneys, a salutary effect not seen with SE alone. Combining SE to the nephroprotective agents' curcumin or lisinopril might offer additional nephroprotection.

  17. High-intensity swimming exercise increases dust mite extract and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene-derived atopic dermatitis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Eun-Ju

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-intensity swimming exercise (HISE) on atopic dermatitis (AD). For the study, we established an AD model in BALB/c mice by repeated local exposure of house dust mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) to the ears. After HISE for 4 weeks, epidermal thickness, mast cell infiltration, serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), and histamine were measured. In addition, the gene expression of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-31 in the ears was assayed. HISE increased DFE/CDNB-induced AD symptoms based on ear thickness, histopathological analysis, and serum IgE level. Moreover, HISE exercise stimulated mast cell infiltration into the ear, elevation of serum histamine, and DFE/CDNB-induced expression of IL-5 and IL-31 in the ears in the AD model. Taken together, our results indicate the possibility that HISE-induced stress gives rise to AD symptoms through the stimulation of IgE level by increasing IL-5 and IL-31 production.

  18. Exercise as an augmentation strategy for treatment of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Madhukar H; Greer, Tracy L; Grannemann, Bruce D; Chambliss, Heather O; Jordan, Alexander N

    2006-07-01

    The use of augmentation strategies among patients with major depression is increasing because rates of complete remission with standard antidepressant monotherapy are quite low. Clinical and neurobiological data suggest that exercise may be a good candidate for use as an augmentation treatment for depression. This pilot study examined the use of exercise to augment antidepressant medication in patients with major depression. Seventeen patients with incomplete remission of depressive symptoms began a 12-week exercise program while continuing their antidepressant medication (unchanged in type or dose). Individual exercise prescriptions were calculated based on an exercise dose consistent with currently recommended public health guidelines. The exercise consisted of both supervised and home-based sessions. The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) and the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (IDS-SR30) were used to assess symptoms of depression on a weekly basis. Intent-to-treat analyses yielded significant decreases on both the HRSD17 (5.8 points, p SR30 (13.9 points, p SR30 scores decreased by 18.8 points. This study provides preliminary evidence for exercise as an effective augmentation treatment for antidepressant medication. This is a lower-cost augmentation strategy that has numerous health benefits and may further reduce depressive symptoms in partial responders to antidepressant treatment. Practical tips on how practitioners can use exercise to enhance antidepressant treatment are discussed. Longer-term use of exercise is also likely to confer additional health benefits for this population.

  19. Understanding Exercise-Associated Hyponatraemia: From Pathophysiology to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidonie Hubert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The practice of extreme sports is becoming more and more common. Despite physiological adaptation, people who intensively exercise are exposed to exercise-associated complications, including hyponatraemia. Exercise-associated hyponatraemia seems to be a consequence of alteration of water regulation, particularly by excessive expression of vasopressin, sodium mobilisation, and interleukin-6 production by muscular cells. Preventing overhydration, both before and during effort, and prohibiting hypotonic solutes during treatment are the leading interventions to correct hyponatraemia.

  20. Physiotherapy and rehabilitative interventions in patients with chronic respiratory diseases: exercise and non-exercise treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellessen, A; Hernandes, N A; Pitta, F

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this literature review was to describe and discuss the available evidence about different modalities of physical therapy treatment and pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) involving exercise training in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiectasis and interstitial lung disease (ILD). The search was performed by using the Cochrane Library and PubMed databases. We selected studies published between 2001 and 2012 which involved physiotherapy treatment and included patients with COPD, asthma, bronchiectasis or ILD, aged 18 years or more, in stable or unstable disease condition. PR involving exercise training was effective in improving exercise capacity, muscle force, quality of life and reducing symptoms in patients with COPD and asthma. Although there are few studies published about exercise training in patients with bronchiectasis, improvement in exercise capacity and quality of life in those patients was also observed. Patients with ILD also respond to exercise training; however, the response is less pronounced than in COPD and they lose the gains more quickly. Non-exercise-based interventions, such as bronchial hygiene techniques and inspiratory muscle training, also present positive results when applied to patients with COPD, asthma and bronchiectasis. In some cases it is recommended that these interventions are combined with exercise training. Studies about non-exercise based interventions applied to patients with ILD are still necessary.

  1. Exercise Training and Parkinson's Disease: Placebo or Essential Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Iris; Engelhardt, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Exercise training is often recommended for people with Parkinson's disease, though there is debate about the pathophysiologic cause of impaired movement in Parkinsonism which makes it difficult to develop a specific exercise treatment for symptoms that include hypokinesia, tremor, and muscular rigidity. Most published studies show a benefit of…

  2. Neuromuscular exercise as treatment of degenerative knee disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Ewa M.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is recommended as first-line treatment of degenerative knee disease. Our hypothesis is that neuromuscular exercise is feasible and at least as effective as tradionally used strength or aerobic training, but aims to more closely target the sensorimotor deficiencies and functional...... instability associated with the degenerative knee disease than traditionally used training methods.SUMMARY FOR TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGECurrent data suggests that the effect from neuromuscular exercise on pain and function is comparable to the effects seen from other forms of exercise....

  3. Exercise as an adjunctive treatment for cannabis use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brellenthin, Angelique G; Koltyn, Kelli F

    2016-09-01

    Despite cannabis being the most widely used illicit substance in the United States, individuals diagnosed with cannabis use disorder (CUD) have few well-researched, affordable treatment options available to them. Although found to be effective for improving treatment outcomes in other drug populations, exercise is an affordable and highly accessible treatment approach that has not been routinely investigated in cannabis users. The aim of this paper is to inform the topic regarding exercise's potential as an adjunctive treatment for individuals with CUD. We reviewed the evidence surrounding cannabis use and its current treatment in the United States, explored the rationale for including exercise in the treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs), and in particular, proposed a biological mechanism (i.e., endocannabinoids (eCBs)) that should be examined when utilizing exercise for the treatment of CUD. Cannabis use is widespread and increasing in the United States. Chronic, heavy cannabis use may dysregulate the endogenous cannabinoid system, which has implications for several psychobiological processes that interact with the eCB system such as reward processing and the stress response. Given that exercise is a potent activator of the eCB system, it is mechanistically plausible that exercise could be an optimal method to supplement cessation efforts by reducing psychophysical withdrawal, managing stress, and attenuating drug cravings. We suggest there is a strong behavioral and physiological rationale to design studies which specifically assess the efficacy of exercise, in combination with other therapies, in treating CUD. Moreover, it will be especially important to include the investigation of psychobiological mechanisms (e.g., eCBs, hippocampal volume), which have been associated with both exercise and SUDs, to examine the broader impact of exercise on behavioral and physiological responses to treatment.

  4. Physical exercise in treatment of AUDs – a dropout study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sari, Sengül; Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    Background: The Healthy Lifestyle Study is one out of five alcohol research studies in the RESCueH research project. It is a randomized controlled study which aims to understand the effect of physical exercise on alcohol, fitness and wellness outcomes for outpatients in treatment of alcohol use...... disorders. Relapse rates in treatment of AUD ranges between 60 and 90 % in the first year after treatment. The Healthy Lifestyle Study offers physical exercise as add on treatment to better maintenance. However intervention studies with physical exercise can suffer from high dropout rates. To gain a better...... understanding of lived lives of dropouts from The Healthy Lifestyle Study, a qualitative interview study was conducted. Objective: This interview study aims to gain better understanding of and more in depth knowledge about how alcohol patients experience, think and feel about physical exercise when...

  5. Concentrations of disinfection by-products in swimming pool following modifications of the water treatment process: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Robert; Rodriguez, Manuel; Catto, Cyril; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Simard, Sabrina

    2017-08-01

    The formation and concentration of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in pool water and the ambient air vary according to the type of water treatment process used. This exploratory study was aimed at investigating the short-term impact of modifications of the water treatment process on traditional DBP levels (e.g., trihalomethanes (THMs), chloramines) and emerging DBPs (e.g., Halonitromethanes, Haloketones, NDMA) in swimming pool water and/or air. A sampling program was carried to understand the impact of the following changes made successively to the standard water treatment process: activation of ultraviolet (UV) photoreactor, halt of air stripping with continuation of air extraction from the buffer tank, halt of air stripping and suppression of air extraction from the buffer tank, suppression of the polyaluminium silicate sulfate (PASS) coagulant. UV caused a high increase of Halonitromethanes (8.4 fold), Haloketones (2.1 fold), and THMs in the water (1.7 fold) and, of THMs in the air (1.6 fold) and contributed to reducing the level of chloramines in the air (1.6 fold) and NDMA in the water (2.1 fold). The results highlight the positive impact of air stripping in reducing volatile contaminants. The PASS did not change the presence of DBPs, except for the THMs, which decrease slightly with the use of this coagulant. This study shows that modifications affecting the water treatment process can rapidly produce important and variable impacts on DBP levels in water and air and suggests that implementation of any water treatment process to reduce DBP levels should take into account the specific context of each swimming pool. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. HIV - implications for exercise in treatment and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mars

    2004-01-01

    following muscle injury or surgery. It is usual to advise patients with a viral infection to avoid exercise because of the risk of developing myocarditis. Should HIV+ patients should be encouraged to undertake exercise as part of rehabilitation and should they further be advised to participate in regular exercise? There is sufficient evidence to support the benefits of regular exercise in the HIV+ patient. They will experience a training effect dependent on the normal parameters of frequency, intensity, duration, and mode of exercise.  The disease does place potential limitations to exercise, as the HI virus directly affects pulmonary, cardiac, skeletal muscle and endocrine function.  The effects of these changes may be  exacerbated by secondary infection and other pathological changes may be induced by treatment.  The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy has brought with it a range of metabolic changes that may also influence exercise  participation. The limitations to exercise imposed by HIV infection and its treatment are reviewed.

  7. Long-lasting effects of chronic chlorimipramine treatment of rats on exploratory activity on a hole-board, and on immobility in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Marquez, C; Giralt, M; Armario, A

    1987-10-27

    The study concerned the effects of acute and chronic clomipramine administration to male rats on exploratory activity in a novel environment (hole-board) and on immobility in the forced swimming test. Acute clomipramine administration did not alter either exploratory activity on a hole-board as measured 3 or 20 h after drug administration, or immobility in the forced swimming test as measured 20 h after drug administration. Approximately 20 h after the last injection of clomipramine, the rats chronically treated with the drug showed reduced exploratory activity on the hole-board. In contrast, chronic clomipramine treatment significantly increased the activity in the forced swimming test. The effects of the drug on exploratory and forced swimming activities persisted for 14 days after the cessation of clomipramine administration. These data indicate that chronic clomipramine administration exerted profound and long-lasting effects on central nervous system function. The long-lasting action of the drug on behaviour in the forced swimming test might explain the long-term beneficial effect of antidepressant drugs in counteracting behavioral depression.

  8. Sports Medicine Meets Synchronized Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Betty J.; And Others

    This collection of articles contains information about synchronized swimming. Topics covered include general physiology and cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility exercises, body composition, strength training, nutrition, coach-athlete relationships, coping with competition stress and performance anxiety, and eye care. Chapters are included on…

  9. Exercise as adjunctive treatment for alcohol use disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roessler, Kirsten K; Bilberg, Randi; Søgaard Nielsen, Anette

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To examine whether physical activity as an adjunct to outpatient alcohol treatment has an effect on alcohol consumption following participation in an exercise intervention of six months' duration, and at 12 months after treatment initiation. METHODS: The study is a randomized controlled study.......02 [95% CI: 0.47; 2.18], p = 0.968 in the individual exercise condition, which, when compared to the control group as reference, did not differ statistically significantly. Participants with moderate level physical activity had lower odds for excessive drinking OR = 0.12 [0.05; 0.31], p

  10. [Aquatic exercise in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, Lidija; Bjelaković, Bojko; Lazović, Milica; Stanković, Ivona; Čolović, Hristina; Kocić, Mirjana; Zlatanović, Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic exercise is one of the most popular supplementary treatments for children with neuro-motor impairment, especially for cerebral palsy (CP). As water reduces gravity force which increases postural stability, a child with CP exercises more easily in water than on land. The aim of the study was to examine aquatic exercise effects on gross motor functioning, muscle tone and cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. The study included 19 children of both sexes, aged 6 to 12 years, with spastic CP. They were included in a 12-week aquatic exercise program, twice a week. Measurements of GMFM (gross motor function measurement), spasticity (MAS-Modified Ashworth Scale), heart rate (HR) and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) were carried out before and after treatment. The measurement results were compared before and after treatment. GMFM mean value before therapy was 80.2% and statistically it was significantly lower in comparison to the same value after therapy, which was 86.2% (p Aquatic exercise program can be useful in improving gross motor functioning, reducing spasticity and increasing cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP.

  11. Astragalus membranaceus Improves Exercise Performance and Ameliorates Exercise-Induced Fatigue in Trained Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Shao Yeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Astragalus membranaceus (AM is a popular “Qi-tonifying” herb with a long history of use as a Traditional Chinese Medicine with multiple biological functions. However, evidence for the effects of AM on exercise performance and physical fatigue is limited. We evaluated the potential beneficial effects of AM on ergogenic and anti-fatigue functions following physiological challenge. Male ICR strain mice were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10 per group for treatment: (1 sedentary control and vehicle treatment (vehicle control; (2 exercise training with vehicle treatment (exercise control; and (3 exercise training with AM treatment at 0.615 g/kg/day (Ex-AM1 or (4 3.075 g/kg/day (Ex-AM5. Both the vehicle and AM were orally administered for 6 weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after 15-min swimming exercise. Exercise training combined with AM supplementation increased endurance exercise capacity and increased hepatic and muscle glycogen content. AM reduced exercise-induced accumulation of the byproducts blood lactate and ammonia with acute exercise challenge. Moreover, we found no deleterious effects from AM treatment. Therefore, AM supplementation improved exercise performance and had anti-fatigue effects in mice. It may be an effective ergogenic aid in exercise training.

  12. Supraglottoplasty as treatment of exercise induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlum, Camilla Slot; Walsted, Emil Schwarz; Godballe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Breathing difficulties during exertion may be caused by exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO). The diagnosis depends on visualization of the larynx during exercise, i.e. by continuous laryngoscopic exercise (CLE) test. In case of severe supraglottic collapse and pronounced symptoms during...... or on very few patients. This study is the second larger-scale study that documents the positive effect of supraglottoplasty as treatment of EILO in terms of reduced respiratory symptoms and decreased laryngeal obstruction assessed by post-operative CLE test. We suggest that surgery is a well...... strenuous exertion, surgical treatment (supraglottoplasty) has been suggested. The aims of this study were to evaluate outcome and patient satisfaction after supraglottoplasty for EILO and to compare our results with previously reported data. During the period December 2010 to October 2013, 17 patients...

  13. Aquatic exercise in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Lidija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aquatic exercise is one of the most popular supplementary treatments for children with neuro-motor impairment, especially for cerebral palsy (CP. As water reduces gravity force which increases postural stability, a child with CP exercises more easily in water than on land. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine aquatic exercise effects on gross motor functioning, muscle tone and cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. Methods. The study included 19 children of both sexes, aged 6 to 12 years, with spastic CP. They were included in a 12-week aquatic exercise program, twice a week. Measurements of GMFM (Gross Motor Function Measurement, spasticity (MAS – Modified Ashworth Scale, heart rate (HR and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max were carried out before and after treatment. The measurement results were compared before and after treatment. Results. GMFM mean value before therapy was 80.2% and statistically it was significantly lower in comparison to the same value after therapy, which was 86.2% (p<0.05. The level of spasticity was considerably decreased after therapy; the mean value before treatment was 3.21 according to MAS, and after treatment it was 1.95 (p<0.001. After treatment there was a statistically significant improvement of cardiorespiratory indurance, i.e., there was a significant decrease in the mean value of HR and a significant increase of VO2max (p<0.001. Conclusion. Aquatic exercise program can be useful in improving gross motor functioning, reducing spasticity and increasing cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175092

  14. Exercise: A poorly Recognisd Treatment Adjunct in Mental Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exercise was identified as a poorly recognised treatment modality in the management of mental illnesses going by the large volume of research supporting its beneficial effect on mental health. A number of studies have revealed its positive role in individuals involved in substance abuse, schizophrenia and other patients ...

  15. Eccentric or Concentric Exercises for the Treatment of Tendinopathies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, René B; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a very common disorder in both recreational and elite athletes. Many individuals have recurrent symptoms that lead to chronic conditions and termination of sports activity. Exercise has become a popular and somewhat efficacious treatment regime, and in particular isolated eccentric...

  16. Quercetin And Exercise Treatment On The Morphology Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was therefore undertaken to investigate the effects of exercise and quercetin on lipid peroxidation (MDA), scavenging enzyme activity, and morphology of pancreatic β-cells as against experimentally-induced diabetes and oxidative stress by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment in Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced in ...

  17. Swimming training alleviated insulin resistance through Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling in type 2 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Increasing evidence suggests that regular physical exercise improves type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, the potential beneficial effects of swimming on insulin resistance and lipid disorder in T2DM, and its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Materials and Methods: Rats were fed with high fat diet and given a low dosage of Streptozotocin (STZ to induce T2DM model, and subsequently treated with or without swimming exercise. An 8-week swimming program (30, 60 or 120 min per day, 5 days per week decreased body weight, fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin. Results: Swimming ameliorated lipid disorder, improved muscular atrophy and revealed a reduced glycogen deposit in skeletal muscles of diabetic rats. Furthermore, swimming also inhibited the activation of Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling pathway, decreased Wnt3a mRNA and protein level, upregulated GSK3β phosphorylation activity and reduced the expression of β-catenin phosphorylation in diabetic rats. Conclusion: The trend of the result suggests that swimming exercise proved to be a potent ameliorator of insulin resistancein T2DM through the modulation of Wnt3a/β-catenin pathway and therefore, could present a promising therapeutic measure towards the treatment of diabetes and its relatives.

  18. Exercise treatment for drug abuse -a Danish pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    2010-01-01

    downgraded their intake, four experienced no change at all and one died through an overdose. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that physical exercise can provide important support in the treatment of drug abuse and that the main problem is maintaining change in behaviour and peer group influence to ensure long......AIMS: The paper presents a recent Danish programme using exercise to alter the behaviour and body image of drug addicts. METHODS: 38 participants (23 male and 15 female) took part in groups three times per week for a minimum of two to a maximum of six months. Self-reported data combined...

  19. ORALLY LACTATE CALCIUM AND SWIMMING DECREASE OSTEOCLAST AND INCREASE OSTEOBLAST IN RADIAL PERIMENOPAUSAL MICE (MUS MUSCULUS BONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muliani **

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium and moderate intensity swimming exercise can increase bone density. The aim of this research is to see the effect of orally calcium consumption and swimming activity to decrease osteoclast and increase osteoblast in radial perimenopausal mice (Mus musculus bone. Pretest and pos#est control group design was used in this research. Research subject used 15-16 aged mice (Mus musculus which divided into 4 groups (each group consisted of 13 mice, that was control, lactate calcium, swimming and lactate calcium and swimming. Treatment was given 90 days. This study showed a significant difference of the mean of the pos#est osteoblast between control and experimental groups (P<0.05. There was no significant difference between lactate calcium and swimming groups (P>0.05. Enhancement of osteoblast mean in combination group was greater than the other experimental groups. There was a significant difference of the mean of the pos#est  osteoclast between control and experimental groups (P<0.05, without significant difference between lactate calcium,   swimming groups and combination of lactate calcium and swimming group (P>0.05.  Conclusion: either lactate calcium or swimming decreases osteoclast and increases osteoblast of the mice but the osteoblast enhancement will be bigger when they are given together at once

  20. Exercise as adjunctive treatment for alcohol use disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roessler, Kirsten K.; Bilberg, Randi; Søgaard Nielsen, Anette

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To examine whether physical activity as an adjunct to outpatient alcohol treatment has an effect on alcohol consumption following participation in an exercise intervention of six months' duration, and at 12 months after treatment initiation. METHODS: The study is a randomized controlled stu...... was protective against excessive drinking following treatment. A dose-response effect of exercise on drinking outcome supports the need for implementing physically active lifestyles for patients in treatment for alcohol use disorder.......AIMS: To examine whether physical activity as an adjunct to outpatient alcohol treatment has an effect on alcohol consumption following participation in an exercise intervention of six months' duration, and at 12 months after treatment initiation. METHODS: The study is a randomized controlled study...... regression model was used to evaluate the odds of excessive drinking among the three groups, based on intention-to-treat. Changes in level of physical activity in all three groups were tested by using a generalized linear mixed model. A multiple linear model was used to test if there was an association...

  1. Swimming intervention mitigates HFD-induced obesity of rats through PGC-1α-irisin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X-Q; Yuan, H; Li, J; Fan, J-J; Jia, S-H; Kou, X-J; Chen, N

    2016-05-01

    Irisin, a newly discovered myokine, can drive the browning of white adipocytes to control body weight or mitigate obesity progression through regulating energy metabolism. However, the underlying mechanisms or specific signal pathways of exercise-induced irisin on the management of obesity are still unclear. Totally 30 rats were subjected to high fat diet (HFD) feeding for 8 weeks to establish the rat model with obesity successfully. HFD-induced obese model rats were provided with 8 weeks swimming intervention at moderate intensity for exploring the treatment of obesity through exercise intervention. In addition, another 15 rats were subjected to HFD feeding coupled with total 16 weeks swimming intervention at a moderate intensity from the beginning of the experiment, which was used for exploring the prevention of obesity through exercise intervention. Blood and gastrocnemius samples were harvested from obese rats after swimming intervention to explore its specific signal pathways through ELISA analysis and Western blotting. HFD feeding of rats for 8 weeks could lead to the obesity due to the disorders of lipid metabolism. Totally 8 weeks swimming intervention at moderate intensity for rats with obesity could obviously alleviate the progression of obesity and 16 weeks swimming intervention from the beginning of the experiment could significantly inhibit the development of obesity. Meanwhile, swimming intervention could result in an increased phosphorylation of AMPK and up-regulation of irisin and PGC-1α as the biomarkers of energy metabolism. Exercise intervention can activate PGC-1α-dependent irisin to induce the browning of white adipocytes, thus inhibiting or alleviating the occurrence and development of obesity.

  2. Rehabilitation exercise for treatment of vestibular disorder: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avraham Feazadeh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo and dizziness are common symptoms in the general population. While the clinical picture is well known and widely described, there are different interpretations of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. The purpose of this case report was to describe the treatment of a 56 year old woman with complains of positional vertigo for 35 consecutive years. She suffered from a sudden onset of rotatory, unilateral horizontal canal type benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. The symtoms started a day after falling from a bus, where she injured her head. Otherwise her medical history was unremarkable. She was treated with an individualized home exercise program of eye movement exercises, Brandt/Daroff exercises, and general conditioning exercises (i.e., laying on the left side from sitting on the bed, while the head rotated 45 degrees to the right, waiting for about one minue; twice a day on gradual basis, not laying on the side all the way, but to use enough pillows to lay about at 60 degrees. Four weeks from the start of physical therapy, the patient was free of symptoms, even when her neck was in the extended position.

  3. Polysaccharides from Portulaca oleracea L Improve Exercise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    POP) on exercise endurance and oxidative stress in forced-swimming mice. Methods: Forty-eight mice were divided into four groups of twelve animals each. All treatments were administered orally and daily for 28 days. Group A received isotonic ...

  4. PROPERTIES OF SWIMMING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun KIR

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Swimming waters may be hazardous on human health. So, The physicians who work in the facilities, which include swimming areas, are responsible to prevent risks. To ensure hygiene of swimming water, European Swimming Water Directive offers microbiological, physical, and chemical criteria. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2004; 3(5.000: 103-104

  5. THE EFFECT OF INSULIN AND CARBOHYDRATE SUPPLEMENTATION ON GLYCOGEN REPLENISHMENT AMONG DIFFERENT HINDLIMB MUSCLES IN RATS FOLLOWING PROLONGED SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chich Hsu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the interactive effects of insulin and carbohydrate on glycogen replenishment in different rat hindlimb muscles. Forty male Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to 5 groups, including 1 sedentary control with carbohydrate supplement (2 g glucose · kg body wt-1, 2 sedentary rats with 16 hours recovery, carbohydrate and insulin (0.5 U · kg body wt-1, 3 swimming without recovery, 4 swimming with 16 hours recovery and carbohydrate supplement, and 5 swimming with 16 hours recovery, carbohydrate and insulin. The swimming protocol consisted of two 3 h swimming sections, which were separated by a 45 min rest. The insulin and carbohydrate were administered to the rats immediately after exercise. At the end of the experiment, the soleus (S, plantaris (P, quadriceps (Q and gastrocnemius (G were surgically excised to evaluate glycogen utilization and replenishment. We observed that glycogen utilization was significantly lower in G and Q than S and P during swimming (p <0.05, and S showed the greatest capacity of glycogen resynthesis after post-exercise recovery (p <0.05. In the sedentary state, the glycogen synthesis did not differ among hindlimb muscles during insulin and carbohydrate treatments. Interestingly, with insulin and carbohydrate, the glycogen resynthesis in S and P were significantly greater than in Q and G following post-exercise recovery (p <0.05. We therefore concluded that the soleus and plantaris are the primary working muscles during swimming, and the greatest glycogen replenishment capacity of the soleus during post-exercise recovery is likely due to its highest insulin sensitivity.

  6. Exercise Physiology of Zebrafish: Swimming Effects on Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Growth, on the Immune Systeme, and the Involvement of the Stress Axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, A.P.; Schaaf, M.; Planas, J.V.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have established zebrafish as a novel exercise model and demonstrated the stimulation of growth by exercise. Exercise may also induce cardiac hypertrophy and cardiomyocyte proliferation in zebrafish making it an important model to study vertebrate heart regeneration and improved

  7. Comparing Physical Therapy Accompanying Exercise with Only Exercise Treatments in Patients with Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Yılmaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigating and comparing the effects of exercise and physical therapy accompanying exercise treatments in patients with chronic low back pain. Materials and Methods: Twenty three patients with mechanical type low back existing more than 3 months were included one of the exercise or the physical therapy+exercise groups according to their application sequence. Both of the groups performed lumbar flexion and extension exercises, strengthening of the lumbar and abdominal muscle exercises and iliopsoas, hamstring and quadriceps stretching exercises two times a day for 14 days. The physical therapy group was given hot pack+therapeutic ultrasound+ interferential current for 10 days additionally. Degree of the low back pain was evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS, range of joint motion was evaluated with hand finger floor distance (HFFD and Modified Schober test, functional status was evaluated with Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale and quality of life was evaluated with Short form-36 (SF-36 before and a month after the treatments. Results: In both groups (exercise group: average age 59 years, 21 females, 2 males; physical therapy group: average age 60 years, 20 females, 3 males pain intensity and HFFD decreased and Modified Schober increased, functionality recovered, pain and physical functions of SF-36 improved after the treatments. SF-36-physical role difficulty also improved in the exercise group. Decrease in pain, increase in HFFD andimproving of the functional status were all significantly more in the physical therapy group. There were no difference between the groups in terms of Modified Schober measurement and changes of the quality of life. Conclusions: Exercises and exercise+physical therapy are both effective in chronic low back pain. Successful results can be taken by addition of the physical therapy in patients who do not benefit sufficiently from exercise therapy. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2015;21: 73-8

  8. The effects of swimming exercise and dissolved oxygen on growth performance, fin condition and precocious maturation of early-rearing Atlantic salmon Salmo salar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic salmon fry were stocked into twelve circular 0.5 m3 tanks in a flow-through system and exposed to either high (1.5-2 body-lengths per second, or BL/s) or low (less than 0.5 BL/s) swimming speeding and high (100% saturation) or low (70% saturation) dissolved oxygen (DO) while being raised fr...

  9. SWIM EVERYDAY TO KEEP DEMENTIA AWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Singh

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A sound mind resides in a sound body. Many individuals with an active lifestyle show sharp mental skills at an advanced age. Regular exercise has been shown to exert numerous beneficial effects on brawn as well as brain. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of swimming on memory of rodents. A specially designed hexagonal water maze was used for the swimming exposures of animals. The learning and memory parameters were measured using exteroceptive behavioral models such as Elevated plus-maze, Hebb-Williams maze and Passive avoidance apparatus. The rodents (rats and mice were divided into twelve groups. The swimming exposure to the rodents was for 10- minute period during each session and there were two swimming exposures on each day. Rats and mice were subjected to swimming for -15 and -30 consecutive days. Control group animals were not subjected to swimming during above period. The learning index and memory score of all the animals was recorded on 1st, 2nd, 15th, 16th, 30th and 31st day employing above exteroceptive models. It was observed that rodents that underwent swimming regularly for 30- days showed sharp memories, when tested on above behavioral models whereas, control group animals showed decline in memory scores. Those animals, which underwent swimming for 15- days only showed good memory on 16th day, which however, declined after 30-days. These results emphasize the role of regular physical exercise particularly swimming in the maintenance and promotion of brain functions. The underlying physiological mechanism for improvement of memory appears to be the result of enhanced neurogenesis.

  10. Sodium bicarbonate improves swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, A M; Peyrebrune, M C; Ingham, S A; Bailey, D M; Folland, J P

    2008-06-01

    Sodium bicarbonate ingestion has been shown to improve performance in single-bout, high intensity events, probably due to an increase in buffering capacity, but its influence on single-bout swimming performance has not been investigated. The effects of sodium bicarbonate supplementation on 200 m freestyle swimming performance were investigated in elite male competitors. Following a randomised, double blind counterbalanced design, 9 swimmers completed maximal effort swims on 3 separate occasions: a control trial (C); after ingestion of sodium bicarbonate (SB: NaHCO3 300 mg . kg (-1) body mass); and after ingestion of a placebo (P: CaCO3 200 mg . kg (-1) body mass). The SB and P agents were packed in gelatine capsules and ingested 90 - 60 min prior to each 200 m swim. Mean 200 m performance times were significantly faster for SB than C or P (1 : 52.2 +/- 4.7; 1 : 53.7 +/- 3.8; 1 : 54.0 +/- 3.6 min : ss; p bicarbonate were all elevated pre-exercise in the SB compared to C and P trials (p < 0.05). Post-200 m blood lactate concentrations were significantly higher following the SB trial compared with P and C (p < 0.05). It was concluded that SB supplementation can improve 200 m freestyle performance time in elite male competitors, most likely by increasing buffering capacity.

  11. Aquatic exercise for the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Else Marie; Juhl, Carsten B; Christensen, Robin; Hagen, Kåre Birger; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Dagfinrud, Hanne; Lund, Hans

    2016-03-23

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic disease characterized by joint pain, tenderness, and limitation of movement. At present, no cure is available. Thus only treatment of the person's symptoms and treatment to prevent further development of the disease are possible. Clinical trials indicate that aquatic exercise may have advantages for people with osteoarthritis. This is an update of a published Cochrane review. To evaluate the effects of aquatic exercise for people with knee or hip osteoarthritis, or both, compared to no intervention. We searched the following databases up to 28 April 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2014), MEDLINE (from 1949), EMBASE (from 1980), CINAHL (from 1982), PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database), and Web of Science (from 1945). There was no language restriction. Randomized controlled clinical trials of aquatic exercise compared to a control group (e.g. usual care, education, social attention, telephone call, waiting list for surgery) of participants with knee or hip osteoarthritis. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of the included trials. We analysed the pooled results using standardized mean difference (SMD) values. Nine new trials met the inclusion criteria and we excluded two earlier included trials. Thus the number of participants increased from 800 to 1190 and the number of included trials increased from six to 13. Most participants were female (75%), with an average age of 68 years and a body mass index (BMI) of 29.4. Osteoarthritis duration was 6.7 years, with a great variation of the included participants. The mean aquatic exercise duration was 12 weeks. We found 12 trials at low to unclear risk of bias for all domains except blinding of participants and personnel. They showed that aquatic exercise caused a small short term improvement compared to control in pain (SMD -0.31, 95% CI -0.47 to -0.15; 12

  12. Exercise treatment for drug abuse--a Danish pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents a recent Danish programme using exercise to alter the behaviour and body image of drug addicts. 38 participants (23 male and 15 female) took part in groups three times per week for a minimum of two to a maximum of six months. Self-reported data combined with the European Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI) collected at initial admission and in follow-up interviews included information on drug use, body image, self-confidence and motivation to change behaviour. The completion rate of the participants during the training period was on average 52%, which is considered as a success in treatments with drug abusers, usually characterized by a low compliance and commitment. The results of the participants who completed the programme (n = 20) showed an increased oxygen uptake of an average of 10%, improved self-reported quality of life and a higher energy level for the majority of the participants. The addicts obtained a better body image, became more sensitive to physical pain and disorders and reduced their drug intake during the training period. The long-term effect showed that five of the 20 abusers interviewed reported that they still had not taken drugs, 10 had downgraded their intake, four experienced no change at all and one died through an overdose. The results show that physical exercise can provide important support in the treatment of drug abuse and that the main problem is maintaining change in behaviour and peer group influence to ensure long-term change.

  13. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001357.htm Swimming pool granuloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin ...

  14. ARC Code TI: Swim

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Swim is a software information service for the grid built on top of Pour, which is an information service framework developed at NASA. Swim provides true software...

  15. Diarrhea and Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pool What to Do if You Have Diarrhea Diarrhea and Swimming Diarrhea and swimming don’t mix! ... small amount of pool water to become infected. Diarrhea and Spreading Illness at the Pool Infectious diarrhea ...

  16. Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Departments Clinical Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management COPD: Exercises COPD: Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a Question Reviewed by Barry J. Make, ...

  17. Comparative study of muscle strengthening exercises for treatment of chronic low backache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain is a major cause of musculoskeletal disability worldwide. Objectives: To study the outcomes of different muscle strengthening exercises in treatment of low back pain Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients in the age group of 20-40 years with mechanical low back pain were randomly divided intotwo groups and instructed to perform two different types of exercises for three months (Mckenzie exercise andSwiss ball exercise. Patients were assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Modified Schober Test (MST for extension and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, based on pain intensity levels, range of motion, functional disability before starting the exercise programmes and after 3 months of intervention. Results were analysed using Students T Test. Results: There was no significant difference in the pre-treatment session between the two groups. VAS and ODI Values were significantly lower in post-treatment sessions as compared to pre-treatment values in both Groups but MST Values in post-treatment sessions in Group practicing Mckenzie exercise showed significant decreases. Significant decrease in VAS, MST and ODI Valueswere found in subjects practising McKenzie exercise when comparison was done between the two groups after 3 months of treatment. Conclusion: McKenzie exercise and Swissball exercise in patients with mechanical Low back pain reduce pain intensity, increaserange of movementand decrease functional disability. McKenzie exercise seems to have higher efficacy as compared to Swissball exercise.

  18. The Effect of Rehearsal Learning and Warm-up on the Speed of Different Swimming Strokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, Carlo; Mascardo, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of rehearsal learning and warm-up exercise on the time of performing different swimming strokes. The study was conducted among 202 college freshmen students taking up a course on physical education concentrated in swimming. The design employed is a mixed factorial (2 X 2) where time of swimming is measured before…

  19. Comparative study of muscle strengthening exercises for treatment of chronic low backache

    OpenAIRE

    Soumya Ghosh; Soma Datta; Suravi Nayak; Arunima Chaudhuri; Pitchai Dhanasekaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Low back pain is a major cause of musculoskeletal disability worldwide. Objectives: To study the outcomes of different muscle strengthening exercises in treatment of low back pain Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients in the age group of 20-40 years with mechanical low back pain were randomly divided intotwo groups and instructed to perform two different types of exercises for three months (Mckenzie exercise andSwiss ball exercise). Patients were assessed by Visua...

  20. Speech-Language Pathology as a Primary Treatment for Exercise-Induced Laryngeal Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Monica; Litts, Juliana K; Nauman, Emily; Haines, Jemma

    2018-05-01

    Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction is a condition that restricts respiration during exercise via inappropriate glottic or supraglottic obstruction. The literature supports behavioral treatment provided by a speech-language pathologist as an effective means of treating exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction. Treatment includes educating the patient, training on relaxation, instruction on paced exercise, and use of various breathing techniques to optimize laryngeal aperture. Intervention for patients with exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction may be delivered by a speech-language pathologist, given their clinical skill of facilitating long-term behavioral change and expertise in the laryngeal mechanism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. EMG evaluation of hip adduction exercises for soccer players: implications for exercise selection in prevention and treatment of groin injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serner, Andreas; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Andersen, Lars Louis; Hölmich, Per; Sundstrup, Emil; Thorborg, Kristian

    2014-07-01

    Exercise programmes are used in the prevention and treatment of adductor-related groin injuries in soccer; however, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the intensity of frequently used exercises. Primarily to investigate muscle activity of adductor longus during six traditional and two new hip adduction exercises. Additionally, to analyse muscle activation of gluteals and abdominals. 40 healthy male elite soccer players, training >5 h a week, participated in the study. Muscle activity using surface electromyography (sEMG) was measured bilaterally for the adductor longus during eight hip adduction strengthening exercises and peak EMG was normalised (nEMG) using an isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) as reference. Furthermore, muscle activation of the gluteus medius, rectus abdominis and the external abdominal obliques was analysed during the exercises. There were large differences in peak nEMG of the adductor longus between the exercises, with values ranging from 14% to 108% nEMG (pinjuries. The Copenhagen Adduction and the hip adduction with an elastic band are dynamic high-intensity exercises, which can easily be performed at any training facility and could therefore be relevant to include in future prevention and treatment programmes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. The shoulder in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A B; Jobe, F W; Collins, H R

    1980-01-01

    Shoulder pain is the most common orthopaedic problem in competitive swimming. In a group of 137 of this country's best swimmers, 58 had had symptoms of "swimmer's shoulder." Population characteristics of this group indicated that symptoms increased with the caliber of the athlete, were slightly more common in men, and were related to sprint rather than distance swimming. The use of hand-paddle training exacerbated symptoms, which were more common during the early and middle season. Consideration of shoulder mechanics in swimming reveals that freestyle, butterfly, and backstroke require similar motions; a swimmer using any of these strokes is susceptible to developing shoulder pain. Swimmer's shoulder represents chronic irritation of the humeral head and rotator cuff on the coracoacromial arch during abduction of the shoulder, the so-called impingement syndrome. Treatment included stretching, rest, ice therapy, oral antiinflammatory agents, judicious use of injectable steroids, and surgery as a last resort.

  3. Exercise in Eating Disorders Treatment: Systematic Review and Proposal of Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Brian J; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Mitchell, James E; Thompson, Ron; Sherman, Roberta; McCallum, Kimberli

    2016-07-01

    Although exercise is an effective intervention for many psychological health issues, it has often been overlooked as a potential adjunct to eating disorder (ED) treatment. Thus, our objective was to summarize the literature by synthesizing themes identified in clinical studies and explicit guidelines or recommendations for the use or management of exercise in ED interventions into a proposed set of guidelines for the use of exercise in ED treatment. A literature search in exercise science, health psychology, and the ED literature was conducted. The focus was to obtain articles that reported on therapeutic effects and/or guidelines for the therapeutic use of exercise in individuals with ED. Our review identified 11 core themes describing techniques that have been successful in using exercise therapeutically in ED treatment. These 11 guidelines are as follows: employ a team of relevant experts, monitor medical status, screen for exercise-related psychopathology, create a written contract of how therapeutic exercise will be used, include a psychoeducational component, focus on positive reinforcement, create a graded exercise program, begin with mild-intensity exercise, tailor the mode of exercise to the needs of the individual, include a nutritional component, and debrief after exercise sessions. Our review identifies specific guidelines that may enhance ED treatment outcomes. It is the first to summarize divergent literature and synthesizes previous successes that may guide the use of therapeutic exercise in some, but not all ED patients. This review provides a practical set of guidelines for the clinical management and therapeutic use of exercise in ED treatment by focusing on empowering individuals with exercise as a tool for healthy living.

  4. Growth Hormone Receptor Antagonist Treatment Reduces Exercise Performance in Young Males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goto, K.; Doessing, S.; Nielsen, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    between the groups in terms of changes in serum free fatty acids, glycerol, (V) over dotO(2), or relative fat oxidation. Conclusion: GH might be an important determinant of exercise capacity during prolonged exercise, but GHR antagonist did not alter fat metabolism during exercise. (J Clin Endocrinol......Context: The effects of GH on exercise performance remain unclear. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of GH receptor (GHR) antagonist treatment on exercise performance. Design: Subjects were treated with the GHR antagonist pegvisomant or placebo for 16 d. After the treatment...... period, they exercised to determine exercise performance and hormonal and metabolic responses. Participants: Twenty healthy males participated in the study. Intervention: Subjects were treated with the GHR antagonist (n = 10; 10 mg/d) or placebo (n = 10). After the treatment period, they performed...

  5. Peculiarities of a backstroke swimming technique acceleration in elementary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliya Sheyko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to research the possibility of intensification and improvement of the efficiency of swimming training for adults by use of accelerated learning backstroke swimming techniques. Material & Methods: the study involved a total of 43 people aged 30–40 years. Applied: analysis and generalization of scientific and methodological literature; analysis of the learning process of swimming training for adults; development and approbation of an accelerated backstroke swimming technique on the base of the recreational sports complex LLC «Technocom» (Kharkiv, Author's swimming school of U. Blyzniuk, teacher observation, experiment. Results: a study shows that developing of swimming skills of people tested occurs faster and more effectively if the accelerated procedure is used. Backstroke swimming skill formation time for examinees: check group had 26 to 36 lessons, there were 25 to 32 exercises with and without use of supporting means; the experimental group had 12 to 24 lessons with use of 15 exercises without supporting means. Conclusions: as a result of the experiment, it was found that the use of the proposed accelerated training method allows to intensify backstroke swimming learning process for people aged 30–40, due to training course total duration reduction (2 times and number of exercises used, and also allows to master quicker the main improving distance according to age of the engaged.

  6. Exercise-associated muscle cramps: causes, treatment, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin C; Stone, Marcus S; Huxel, Kellie C; Edwards, Jeffrey E

    2010-07-01

    Exercise-associated muscle cramps (EAMC) are a common condition experienced by recreational and competitive athletes. Despite their commonality and prevalence, their cause remains unknown. Theories for the cause of EAMC are primarily based on anecdotal and observational studies rather than sound experimental evidence. Without a clear cause, treatments and prevention strategies for EAMC are often unsuccessful. A search of Medline (EBSCO), SPORTDiscus, and Silverplatter (CINHAL) was undertaken for journal articles written in English between the years 1955 and 2008. Additional references were collected by a careful analysis of the citations of others' research and textbooks. Dehydration/electrolyte and neuromuscular causes are the most widely discussed theories for the cause of EAMC; however, strong experimental evidence for either theory is lacking. EAMC are likely due to several factors coalescing to cause EAMC. The variety of treatments and prevention strategies for EAMC are evidence of the uncertainty in their cause. Acute EAMC treatment should focus on moderate static stretching of the affected muscle followed by a proper medical history to determine any predisposing conditions that may have triggered the onset of EAMC. Based on physical findings, prevention programs should be implemented to include fluid and electrolyte balance strategies and/or neuromuscular training.

  7. Exercise in the Treatment of Youth Substance Use Disorders: Review and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa More

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Substance use disorders among youth represent a significant public health concern. It is well established that regular exercise provides important physical and mental health benefits; however, evidence for the role of exercise as an adjunct component within substance use disorder treatment is scarce. In this review, we identify factors associated with the development and persistence of substance use disorders among youth, identify current treatment modalities, and present evidence to support the efficacy of incorporating exercise participation during rehabilitation. We also provide a series of recommendations for future research that explores the feasibility and effectiveness of exercise participation as a complement to substance use disorder treatment among youth.

  8. Exercise in the Treatment of Youth Substance Use Disorders: Review and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Alissa; Jackson, Ben; Dimmock, James A.; Thornton, Ashleigh L.; Colthart, Allan; Furzer, Bonnie J.

    2017-01-01

    Substance use disorders among youth represent a significant public health concern. It is well established that regular exercise provides important physical and mental health benefits; however, evidence for the role of exercise as an adjunct component within substance use disorder treatment is scarce. In this review, we identify factors associated with the development and persistence of substance use disorders among youth, identify current treatment modalities, and present evidence to support the efficacy of incorporating exercise participation during rehabilitation. We also provide a series of recommendations for future research that explores the feasibility and effectiveness of exercise participation as a complement to substance use disorder treatment among youth. PMID:29089915

  9. SWIMMING CLASSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ OPINION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bielec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of modern physical education is not only to develop motor abilities of the students, but most of all prevent them from epidemic youth diseases such as obesity or postural defects. Positive attitudes to swimming as a long-life physical activity, instilled in adolescence should be beneficial in adult life. The group of 130 boys and 116 girls of 7th grade junior high school (mean age 14.6 was asked in the survey to present their opinion of obligatory swimming lessons at school. Students of both sexes claimed that they liked swimming classes because they could improve their swimming skills (59% of answers and because of health-related character of water exercises (38%. 33% of students regarded swimming lessons as boring and monotonous, and 25% of them complained about poor pool conditions like chlorine smell, crowded lanes, too low temperature. Majority of the surveyed students saw practical role of swimming in saving others life.

  10. Laryngoscopy during swimming: A novel diagnostic technique to characterize swimming-induced laryngeal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsted, Emil S; Swanton, Laura L; van van Someren, Ken; Morris, Tessa E; Furber, Matthew; Backer, Vibeke; Hull, James H

    2017-10-01

    Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) is a key differential diagnosis for respiratory symptoms in athletes and is particularly prevalent in aquatic athletes. A definitive diagnosis of EILO is dependent on laryngoscopy, performed continuously, while an athlete engages in the sport that precipitates their symptoms. This report provides the first description of the feasibility of performing continuous laryngoscopy during exercise in a swimming environment. The report describes the methodology and safety of the use of continuous laryngoscopy while swimming. Laryngoscope, 127:2298-2301, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Nurses`knowledge of and attitude towards exercise as a treatment method for hypertensive patients

    OpenAIRE

    L. Grobler; L. Roets

    2005-01-01

    Aerobic exercise is used in treating hypertension. Eventhough physiotherapists are the first choice in presenting exercise treatment, few are available to do so in primary health clinics. Nurses arepatients’ first contact and may be able to fulfil this role. Nurses’knowledge and attitude towards exercise as a treatment method for hypertensive patients was determined. This descriptive study included all nurses (n=67) working in 23 Bloemfontein clinics. Forty-three nursescompleted structured qu...

  12. Effectiveness of aquatic exercise for treatment of knee osteoarthritis: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meili; Su, Youxin; Zhang, Yingjie; Zhang, Ziyi; Wang, Wenting; He, Zhen; Liu, Feiwen; Li, Yanan; Liu, Changyan; Wang, Yiru; Sheng, Lu; Zhan, Zhengxuan; Wang, Xu; Zheng, Naixi

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of aquatic exercise for treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA). PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Embase, CAMbase, and the Web of Science were screened through to June 2014. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing aquatic exercise with control conditions were included. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed the included trials, and extracted data. Outcome measures included pain, physical function, joint stiffness, quality of life (QOL), and safety. Pooled outcomes were analyzed using standardized mean difference (SMD). There is a lack of high quality studies in this area. Six RCTs (398 participants) were included. There was moderate evidence for a moderate effect on physical function in favor of aquatic exercise immediately after the intervention, but no evidence for pain or QOL when comparing aquatic exercise with nonexercise. Only one trial reported 3 months of follow-up measurements, which demonstrated limited evidence for pain improvement with aquatic exercise and no evidence for QOL or physical function when comparing aquatic exercise with nonexercise. There was limited evidence for pain improvement with land-based exercise and no evidence for QOL or physical function, when comparing aquatic exercise with land-based exercise according to follow-up measurements. No evidence was found for pain, physical function, stiffness, QOL, or mental health with aquatic exercise immediately after the intervention when comparing aquatic exercise with land-based exercise. Two studies reported aquatic exercise was not associated with serious adverse events. Aquatic exercise appears to have considerable short-term benefits compared with land-based exercise and nonexercise in patients with knee OA. Based on these results, aquatic exercise is effective and safe and can be considered as an adjuvant treatment for patients with knee OA. Studies in this area are still

  13. Meta-analysis: aerobic exercise for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Christine A; Hay, Madeleine; Bloch, Michael H

    2013-08-01

    This meta-analysis investigates the efficacy of exercise as a treatment for DSM-IV diagnosed anxiety disorders. We searched PubMED and PsycINFO for randomized, controlled trials comparing the anxiolytic effects of aerobic exercise to other treatment conditions for DSM-IV defined anxiety disorders. Seven trials were included in the final analysis, totaling 407 subjects. The control conditions included non-aerobic exercise, waitlist/placebo, cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychoeducation and meditation. A fixed-effects model was used to calculate the standardized mean difference of change in anxiety rating scale scores of aerobic exercise compared to control conditions. Subgroup analyses were performed to examine the effects of (1) comparison condition; (2) whether comparison condition controlled for time spent exercising and (3) diagnostic indication. Aerobic exercise demonstrated no significant effect for the treatment of anxiety disorders (SMD=0.02 (95%CI: -0.20-0.24), z = 0.2, p = 0.85). There was significant heterogeneity between trials (χ(2) test for heterogeneity = 22.7, df = 6, p = 0.001). The reported effect size of aerobic exercise was highly influenced by the type of control condition. Trials utilizing waitlist/placebo controls and trials that did not control for exercise time reported large effects of aerobic exercise while other trials report no effect of aerobic exercise. Current evidence does not support the use of aerobic exercise as an effective treatment for anxiety disorders as compared to the control conditions. This remains true when controlling for length of exercise sessions and type of anxiety disorder. Future studies evaluating the efficacy of aerobic exercise should employ larger sample sizes and utilize comparison interventions that control for exercise time. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Nurses`knowledge of and attitude towards exercise as a treatment method for hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Grobler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic exercise is used in treating hypertension. Eventhough physiotherapists are the first choice in presenting exercise treatment, few are available to do so in primary health clinics. Nurses arepatients’ first contact and may be able to fulfil this role. Nurses’knowledge and attitude towards exercise as a treatment method for hypertensive patients was determined. This descriptive study included all nurses (n=67 working in 23 Bloemfontein clinics. Forty-three nursescompleted structured questionnaires that determined their knowledge of exercise as a treatment method. All nurses prescribed medication forhypertensive patients. Most nurses prescribed weight control (72.1%, diet control (76.7%, patient education (74.4%, and life-style modification (72.1%. Most (83.7% nurses were aware of exercise as a treatment method for hypertension. Only seven nurses, prescribing a brisk walk, recommended the correct type of exercise. The nurses’attitude towards exercise as a treatment method was determined using focus group interviews (n=16. Nurses reflected a positive attitude towards exercise with 198 positive responses. Nurses could express more than one opinion, all of which were recorded. Twenty responses reflected little or no knowledge, and four responses reflected an unsure/neutral attitude towards exercise. Ten responses reflected disinterest in prescribing exercise. Nurses do not have adequate knowledge to enable them to confidently prescribe exercise to patients. The need for more information was mentioned and some nurses were willing to present exercise classes. A training program, containing pertinent information, so that nurses can prescribe exercise for hypertension, needs to be developed.

  15. Swimming in air-breathing fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, S; Domenici, P; McKenzie, D J

    2014-03-01

    Fishes with bimodal respiration differ in the extent of their reliance on air breathing to support aerobic metabolism, which is reflected in their lifestyles and ecologies. Many freshwater species undertake seasonal and reproductive migrations that presumably involve sustained aerobic exercise. In the six species studied to date, aerobic exercise in swim flumes stimulated air-breathing behaviour, and there is evidence that surfacing frequency and oxygen uptake from air show an exponential increase with increasing swimming speed. In some species, this was associated with an increase in the proportion of aerobic metabolism met by aerial respiration, while in others the proportion remained relatively constant. The ecological significance of anaerobic swimming activities, such as sprinting and fast-start manoeuvres during predator-prey interactions, has been little studied in air-breathing fishes. Some species practise air breathing during recovery itself, while others prefer to increase aquatic respiration, possibly to promote branchial ion exchange to restore acid-base balance, and to remain quiescent and avoid being visible to predators. Overall, the diversity of air-breathing fishes is reflected in their swimming physiology as well, and further research is needed to increase the understanding of the differences and the mechanisms through which air breathing is controlled and used during exercise. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  16. Influence of the physical environment on treatment effect in exercise therapy for knee or hip pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, Louise Fleng

    treatment outcomes in other health-care settings, such as rehabilitation and exercise therapy settings. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the role of the physical environment as a contributor to context effects in the treatment response from exercise therapy as treatment for muskuloskeletal pain......) exploring experiences and perceptions of the physical environments. The waiting-list group reported no significant improvement (-0.05 GPE, CI 95% -0.5 to 0.4). Contrary to the study hypothesis, participants exercising in the standard environment reported greater improvement in GPE (0.98, CI 95% 0.5 to 1.......05, pexercise session. The results of this study indicate that the physical environment does influence treatment effects from exercise therapy, suggesting that the physical environment contributes to context effects. Matching the physical environment in exercise therapy to the preferences...

  17. Exercise is an effective treatment for positive valence symptoms in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toups, Marisa; Carmody, Thomas; Greer, Tracy; Rethorst, Chad; Grannemann, Bruce; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2017-02-01

    Measurement of symptoms domains and their response to treatment in relative isolation from diagnosed mental disorders has gained new urgency, as reflected by the National Institute of Mental Health's introduction of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC). The Snaith Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) and the Motivation and Energy Inventory (MEI) are two scales measuring positive valence symptoms. We evaluated the effect of exercise on positive valence symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Subjects in the Treatment with Exercise Augmentation for Depression (TREAD) study completed self-reported SHAPS and MEI during 12 weeks of exercise augmentation for depression. We evaluated the effect of exercise on SHAPS and MEI scores, and whether the changes were related to overall MDD severity measured with the Quick Inventory of Depression Symptomatology (QIDS). SHAPS and MEI scores significantly improved with exercise. MEI score change had larger effect size and greater correlation with change in QIDS score. MEI also showed significant moderator and mediator effects of exercise in MDD. Generalizability to other treatments is limited. This study lacked other bio-behavioral markers that would enhance understanding of the relationship of RDoC and the measures used. Positive valence symptoms improve with exercise treatment for depression, and this change correlates well with overall outcome. Motivation and energy may be more clinically relevant to outcome of exercise treatment than anhedonia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Prevention of atherosclerosis by Yindan Xinnaotong capsule combined with swimming in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianlu; Wang, Lan; Yang, Hongjun; You, Yun; Xu, Haiyu; Gong, Leilei; Yin, Xiaojie; Wang, Wandan; Gao, Shuangrong; Cheng, Long; Liang, Rixin; Liao, Fulong

    2015-04-08

    Yindan Xinnaotong capsule has been used for treating cardio-cerebrovascular diseases for several decades in China. Exercise training can protect against the development of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the joint effect of YXC and exercise on atherosclerosis in rats. A combined method involving low shear stress and a high-fat diet was used to establish the atherosclerosis model in rats. Partial ligation of the left common carotid artery was performed, and then the rats were divided into 9 treatment groups according to a 3 × 3 factorial design with two factors and three levels for each factor, swimming of 0, 0.5, 1 h daily and YXC administration of 0, 1, 2 g/kg p.o. daily. Next the interventions of swimming and YXC were executed for 8 weeks. After that, blood samples were collected to determine blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, haematocrit (HCT), fibrinogen (FIB), blood lipid profile (including total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C)), nitric oxide (NO), 6-keto- prostaglandin (PG) F1α, endothelin (ET) and thromboxane (TX) B2. The common carotid arteries of the rats were harvested to examine pathological changes, wall thickness and circumference, and the expression of SM22αwas assayed via immune-histochemistry. The early pathological changes were observed. The joint effects of YXC and swimming showed significant changes in the examined parameters: (1) decreases in plasma viscosity, blood viscosity and FIB; (2) increases in NO and 6-keto-PGF1α; (3) decreases in ET and TXB2; and (4) decreases in LDL-C and TG. The combination of 2 g/kg YXC and 1 h of swimming led to synergistic decreases in LDL-C and TG. The interactive effect between YXC and swimming was obvious in decreasing wall thickness. Swimming alone was able to up-regulate the expression of SM22α. In conclusion, this study indicates that the combination of YXC and swimming may

  19. Topographic Locomotive Analysis of {sup 99m}Tc-HDP Uptake of Acute Rhabdomyolysis and Musculotendinous Unit Injury due to Excessive Swimming Exercise in Novice: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee; Jeon, Ho Seung [SungAe General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Rhabdomyolysis (RM), also referred to as myonecrosis, is not an uncommon disorder of skeletal muscle, the incidence of which is on the increase as endurance tests, sports and body build have become popular. RM is divided into diffuse muscle fiber damage and musculotendinous unit (MTU) injury. A recent study by Crenshaw et al. revealed that muscular fiber damage caused by racing was associated with elevated intra-muscular pressure, capillary damage, and ischchemia. It is to be remembered that myocytes are mainly destroyed in RM whereas perimysial connective is predominantly damaged in myositis ossificans. When muscle fibers disrupt myoglobin escapes into extracellular fluid and plasma resulting in myoglobinemia and often acute renal failure. Plasma creatine phosphokinase level becomes elevated. We report a case of strenuous swimming-related RM that occurred in the muscles of the shoulder girdles and chest wall analyzed using magnified {sup 9}:9{sup m}Tc-HDP bone scan. Of interest magnified bone scan of RM in the present case showed not only ordinary muscular injury but also MTU injury. MRI is useful in the study of soft tissue injury and in recent years sonography has also become increasingly used. As mentioned {sup 99m}Tc-HDP bone scan, especially magnification scan, sensitively depicts metabolic change that occurred in injured muscles and tendons. Unless injury is trivial the bone scan nearly always reveals pathological uptake in a damaged muscle, MTU, and/or tendinous insertion permitting the topographic distinction of injury. Thus, the diagnosis of myolysis, MTU injury, and enthesitis can specifically be made when one uses magnification technique.

  20. Topographic Locomotive Analysis of 99mTc-HDP Uptake of Acute Rhabdomyolysis and Musculotendinous Unit Injury due to Excessive Swimming Exercise in Novice: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Yong Whee; Jeon, Ho Seung

    2008-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis (RM), also referred to as myonecrosis, is not an uncommon disorder of skeletal muscle, the incidence of which is on the increase as endurance tests, sports and body build have become popular. RM is divided into diffuse muscle fiber damage and musculotendinous unit (MTU) injury. A recent study by Crenshaw et al. revealed that muscular fiber damage caused by racing was associated with elevated intra-muscular pressure, capillary damage, and ischchemia. It is to be remembered that myocytes are mainly destroyed in RM whereas perimysial connective is predominantly damaged in myositis ossificans. When muscle fibers disrupt myoglobin escapes into extracellular fluid and plasma resulting in myoglobinemia and often acute renal failure. Plasma creatine phosphokinase level becomes elevated. We report a case of strenuous swimming-related RM that occurred in the muscles of the shoulder girdles and chest wall analyzed using magnified 9 :9 m Tc-HDP bone scan. Of interest magnified bone scan of RM in the present case showed not only ordinary muscular injury but also MTU injury. MRI is useful in the study of soft tissue injury and in recent years sonography has also become increasingly used. As mentioned 99m Tc-HDP bone scan, especially magnification scan, sensitively depicts metabolic change that occurred in injured muscles and tendons. Unless injury is trivial the bone scan nearly always reveals pathological uptake in a damaged muscle, MTU, and/or tendinous insertion permitting the topographic distinction of injury. Thus, the diagnosis of myolysis, MTU injury, and enthesitis can specifically be made when one uses magnification technique

  1. The Effects of One Period of Swimming Training on IL-6 Concentration in Lung Tissues of Wistar Rats Following the Injection of Carcinogen NNK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadbagher Nikzad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: It is believed that sports exercises have minimal impacts on the pathological changes in the lung tissue exposed to chemical carcinogens in cigarette smoke. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 12 weeks of swimming exercises on IL-6 concentration in the lung tissue of rats following the injection of carcinogen NNK. Materials and Methods: This study is experimental in terms of the design. Forty-six Wistar rats were divided into five groups: A Exercise (E, B Exercise-NNK (EN, C NNK (N, D Control (C and E Vehicle (V. Exercise groups completed the swimming exercises for twelve weeks, five days per week (25-60min. Rats of vehicle and NNK treatment groups were respectively administered subcutaneous injections of distilled water and NNK (12.5mg/kg, once a week, 12weeks. Then, samples of the lung tissue were collected and IL-6 concentration was measured by ELISA technique. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test were used for data analysis at the level of p ≤ 0.05. Results: The results indicated a significant decrease of IL-6 concentration in exercise (p=0.009, exercise-NKK (p=0.006 groups and vehicle (p=0.006 with NKK groups; while there was no significant difference between exercise groups and the control groups. The swimming exercises can reduce IL-6 concentration significantly in lung tissue of rats following the injection of carcinogen NNK. Conclusion: It seems that endurance exercises, along with other therapeutic methods, can play a role in reducing the effects of carcinogen NNK and negative effects of smoking by decreasing the inflammatory factor of IL-6.

  2. [Chlorine concentrations in the air of indoor swimming pools and their effects on swimming pool workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Luna, Álvaro; Burillo, Pablo; Felipe, José Luis; Gallardo, Leonor; Tamaral, Francisco Manuel

    2013-01-01

    To describe chlorine levels in the air of indoor swimming pools in Castilla-La Mancha (Spain) and relate them to other chemical parameters in the installation and to the health problems perceived by swimming pool workers. We analyzed 21 pools with chlorine as chemical treatment in Castilla-La Mancha. The iodometry method was applied to measure chlorine concentrations in the air. The concentrations of free and combined chlorine in water, pH and temperature were also evaluated. Health problems were surveyed in 230 swimming pool workers in these facilities. The mean chlorine level in the air of swimming pools was 4.3 ± 2.3mg/m(3). The pH values were within the legal limits. The temperature parameters did not comply with regulations in 17 of the 21 pools analyzed. In the pools where chlorine values in the air were above the legal regulations, a significantly higher percentage of swimming pool workers perceived eye irritation, dryness and irritation of skin, and ear problems. Chlorine values in the air of indoor swimming pools were higher than those reported in similar studies. Most of the facilities (85%) exceeded the concentration of 1.5mg/m(3) established as the limit for the risk of irritating effects. The concentration of chlorine in indoor swimming pool air has a direct effect on the self-perceived health problems of swimming pool workers. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Improved Function and Reduced Pain after Swimming and Cycling Training in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatan, Mohammed; Baker, Jeffrey R; Machin, Daniel R; Park, Wonil; Akkari, Amanda S; Pasha, Evan P; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Arthritis and its associated joint pain act as significant barriers for adults attempting to perform land-based physical activity. Swimming can be an ideal form of exercise for patients with arthritis. Yet there is no information on the efficacy of regular swimming exercise involving patients with arthritis. The effect of a swimming exercise intervention on joint pain, stiffness, and physical function was evaluated in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Using a randomized study design, 48 sedentary middle-aged and older adults with OA underwent 3 months of either swimming or cycling exercise training. Supervised exercise training was performed for 45 min/day, 3 days/week at 60-70% heart rate reserve for 12 weeks. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index was used to measure joint pain, stiffness, and physical limitation. After the exercise interventions, there were significant reductions in joint pain, stiffness, and physical limitation accompanied by increases in quality of life in both groups (all p swimming and cycling training. Regular swimming exercise reduced joint pain and stiffness associated with OA and improved muscle strength and functional capacity in middle-aged and older adults with OA. Additionally, the benefits of swimming exercise were similar to the more frequently prescribed land-based cycling training. clinicaltrials.gov NCT01836380.

  4. Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; thor Straten, Eivind Per

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors and a greater than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Improved immunological control of tumor progression may have important clinical implications in the prevention...

  5. Aquatic Exercise for the Aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michael; And Others

    The development and implementation of aquatic exercise programs for the aged are discussed in this paper. Program development includes a discussion of training principles, exercise leadership and the setting up of safe water exercise programs for the participants. The advantages of developing water exercise programs and not swimming programs are…

  6. Swimming-induced pulmonary oedema an uncommon condition diagnosed with POCUS ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Chowdhury, Motiur; Borakati, Raju; Gankande, Upali

    2017-12-01

    Swimming Induced Pulmonary Edema, or SIPE, is an emerging condition occurring in otherwise healthy individuals during surface swimming or diving that is characterized by cough, dyspnea, hemoptysis, and hypoxemia. It is typically found in those who spend time in cold water exercise with heavy swimming and surface swimming, such as civilian training for iron Man, triathalon, and military training. We report the case of a highly trained young female swimmer in excellent cardiopulmonary health, who developed acute alveolar pulmonary oedema in an open water swimming training diagnosed in the emergency department using POCUS ultrasound. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Swimming economy: determinant factors and assessment issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Novaes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Swimming economy is an important parameter in the control of the training process, since it has been demonstrated that this concept is related to the swimming performance. Swimming economy is affected by physiological and biomechanical constraints, therefore being a concept that reflects the swimmers´ adaptation to the liquid environment in those two domains. A review of the literature about swimming economy is presented, focusing some of the most relevant studies that have been conducted on this issue. Other than the biomechanical and physiological constraints, the swimming economy is influenced by other factors such as: swimming velocity, technical ability, training status, gender, age and anthropometric characteristics. Therefore a multitude of aspects are pertinent in the assessment of swimming economy and in the application of this concept in the control of the swimmers’ training process. A proper assessment of the swimming economy requires the direct measurement of the oxygen uptake. The choice of the protocol to assess the swimming economy must be carefully done. Particular attention must be paid to the oxygen uptake kinetics across the different levels of exercise intensity. Therefore, both exercise intensity and duration are to be considered. The attainment of swimming velocities as close as possible to the competition velocity is also an important issue. Although few studies have measured directly the oxygen uptake of top-level performers during swimming, the literature shows that a discontinuous protocol, with increasing exercise bouts of duration between three and six minutes seem appropriate to assess the swimming economy. RESUMO Economia de nado é um parâmetro importante no controle do processo de treinamento, desde que foi demonstrado que este conceito é relacionado ao desempenho de nado. Economia de nado é afetada por aspectosfisiológicos e biomecânicos, sendo então um conceito que reflete a adaptação de nadadores ao

  8. Aquatic exercise for the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else Marie; Juhl, Carsten B; Christensen, Robin

    2016-01-01

    that aquatic exercise may have advantages for people with osteoarthritis. This is an update of a published Cochrane review. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of aquatic exercise for people with knee or hip osteoarthritis, or both, compared to no intervention. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following...... CRITERIA: Randomized controlled clinical trials of aquatic exercise compared to a control group (e.g. usual care, education, social attention, telephone call, waiting list for surgery) of participants with knee or hip osteoarthritis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently selected...... trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of the included trials. We analysed the pooled results using standardized mean difference (SMD) values. MAIN RESULTS: Nine new trials met the inclusion criteria and we excluded two earlier included trials. Thus the number of participants...

  9. The role of exercise in the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Edward R

    2012-11-01

    The United States is in the midst of a significant public health problem that relates to obesity and inactivity. This epidemic has far-ranging consequences for our workforce and our children and shows no signs of slowing in the near future. Significant research has been performed on the effects of exercise for the reduction of body weight; results of most studies indicate that exercise alone has a small effect on body-weight reduction independent of caloric restriction. However, when combined with dietary restriction, exercise has a synergistic effect and enhances weight loss beyond the effect of diet alone. In addition, exercise has been shown to have significant beneficial effects on cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors independent of actual weight loss, and losing just a small amount of weight can have a significant beneficial effect on these parameters. Genetic factors related to obesity have been found to be positively modified when persons incorporate physical activity into their lifestyle. Sitting time appears to be an independent risk factor for the development of metabolic risk factors; persons who spend more time sitting and watching television have worse metabolic profiles, even if they achieve the recommended amount of physical activity per week, than do those who move about throughout the day. Exercise also is essential for the prevention of weight gain over a life span, although the amount required to prevent weight gain may be closer to twice the amount of exercise recommended by the current Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (www.health.gov/paguidelines). In many ways, the physiatrist is the most well prepared of all the specialists to address the complex, multidimensional problems of obesity and inactivity. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. TEACHING OF BACKSTROKE SWIMMING YOUNGER SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Vopálenská, Zuzana

    2011-01-01

    TEACHING OF BACKSTROKE SWIMMING YOUNGER SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN Objectives: The main objective of this thesis is to create a digital video recording of a contemporary teaching method of backstroke swimming technique with younger school age children. A group who are from 6 to 9 years old participate in the research work. Methods: In this thesis we have in the first and second phase focused on collection datas from the literature and its other processing into a methodical series of exercises. In th...

  11. Building a Healthy Body After Cancer: Young Adult Lymphoma Survivors' Perspectives on Exercise After Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Brittany C; Asiedu, Gladys B; Thompson, Carrie A

    2018-04-01

    Our goals were to evaluate young adult lymphoma survivors' perceptions regarding benefits of exercise after cancer treatment, to identify barriers to exercise, and to understand the types of exercise interventions that may be useful in this patient population. Young adult lymphoma survivors were invited to participate in a survey and focus group. Questions focused on elucidating barriers to exercise as well as potential opportunities for supporting patients in adequate exercise. Focus groups were audiorecorded and transcribed, and data were coded inductively for themes and applied findings. Eight survivors participated. Findings were categorized into five main themes: barriers to exercise, facilitators of exercise, personal responsibility for being active, interconnectedness of exercise with a healthy lifestyle, and recommendations. Fatigue and frustration with postcancer physical limitations are major barriers to exercise for young adult survivors, whereas support from others, data tracking, and survivor-specific resources are facilitators. Interventions that incorporate fitness tracking technology, are individually tailored, and/or create a community with other young adult survivors may be successful in this population.

  12. A critical review of exercise as a treatment for clinically depressed adults: time to get pragmatic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Felipe Barreto; Morres, Ioannis Dimitrios; Ekkekakis, Panteleimon; Rosenbaum, Simon; Stubbs, Brendon

    2017-04-01

    Although considerable evidence supports the efficacy of exercise as an antidepressant treatment, critical reviews informing routine practice and future research directions are scarce. We critically reviewed exercise studies for clinically depressed adults, focussing on the PICOS criteria referred to participants, interventions, comparisons, outcomes, and study designs. Most studies have not screened their samples for symptom heterogeneity. Also, they have employed heterogeneous exercise interventions and control groups that may lead to an underestimation of the benefits of exercise. In addition, pragmatic trials allowing scalable replication and implementation in routine practice are scarce. Future studies, can consider the research domain criteria as a diagnostic framework, and conduct moderator analyses to identify depressed subgroups with symptomatology and biopsychosocial characteristics associated with differential responses to exercise interventions. The search for biomarkers of the antidepressant responses to exercise should be prioritised. Further, non-physically active comparison groups should be used to minimise treatment cross-overs and thus the underestimation of the effects of exercise interventions. Finally, the use of outcome measures that maintain their validity at low and moderate levels of symptom severity and the development of trials with a pragmatic design are essential. The current evidence base is fraught with methodological considerations that need to be taken into account in order to increase further our understanding on the impact of exercise as medicine in depression. Future research should include moderator analyses, incorporate biomarker assays, use appropriate control and comparison groups, assess outcomes with psychometrically sensitive measures, and prioritise pragmatic trials towards transition to routine practice.

  13. Sake Protein Supplementation Affects Exercise Performance and Biochemical Profiles in Power-Exercise-Trained Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Che-Li; Wei, Li; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Chen, Kuan-Neng; Huang, Chi-Chang; Kao, Chin-Hsung

    2016-02-20

    Exercise and fitness training programs have attracted the public's attention in recent years. Sports nutrition supplementation is an important issue in the global sports market. In this study, we designed a power exercise training (PET) program with a mouse model based on a strength and conditional training protocol for humans. We tested the effect of supplementation with functional branched-chain amino acid (BCAA)-rich sake protein (SP) to determine whether the supplement had a synergistic effect during PET and enhanced athletic performance and resistance to fatigue. Male ICR mice were divided into three groups (n = 8 per group) for four-week treatment: sedentary controls with vehicle (SC), and PET and PET groups with SP supplementation (3.8 g/kg, PET + SP). Exercise performance was evaluated by forelimb grip strength and exhaustive swimming time as well as changes in body composition and anti-fatigue activity levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase (CK) after a 15-min swimming exercise. The biochemical parameters were measured at the end of the experiment. four-week PET significantly increased grip strength and exhaustive swimming time and decreased epididymal fat pad (EFP) weight and area. Levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine, and uric acid (UA) were significantly increased. PET + SP supplementation significantly decreased serum lactate, ammonia and CK levels after the 15-min swimming exercise. The resting serum levels of AST, ALT, CREA and UA were all significantly decreased with PET + SP. The PET program could increase the exercise performance and modulate the body composition of mice. PET with SP conferred better anti-fatigue activity, improved biochemical profiles, and may be an effective ergogenic aid in strength training.

  14. Sake Protein Supplementation Affects Exercise Performance and Biochemical Profiles in Power-Exercise-Trained Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ming Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Exercise and fitness training programs have attracted the public’s attention in recent years. Sports nutrition supplementation is an important issue in the global sports market. Purpose: In this study, we designed a power exercise training (PET program with a mouse model based on a strength and conditional training protocol for humans. We tested the effect of supplementation with functional branched-chain amino acid (BCAA-rich sake protein (SP to determine whether the supplement had a synergistic effect during PET and enhanced athletic performance and resistance to fatigue. Methods: Male ICR mice were divided into three groups (n = 8 per group for four-week treatment: sedentary controls with vehicle (SC, and PET and PET groups with SP supplementation (3.8 g/kg, PET + SP. Exercise performance was evaluated by forelimb grip strength and exhaustive swimming time as well as changes in body composition and anti-fatigue activity levels of serum lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase (CK after a 15-min swimming exercise. The biochemical parameters were measured at the end of the experiment. Results: four-week PET significantly increased grip strength and exhaustive swimming time and decreased epididymal fat pad (EFP weight and area. Levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, creatinine, and uric acid (UA were significantly increased. PET + SP supplementation significantly decreased serum lactate, ammonia and CK levels after the 15-min swimming exercise. The resting serum levels of AST, ALT, CREA and UA were all significantly decreased with PET + SP. Conclusion: The PET program could increase the exercise performance and modulate the body composition of mice. PET with SP conferred better anti-fatigue activity, improved biochemical profiles, and may be an effective ergogenic aid in strength training.

  15. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of the effects of Urtica dioica and swimming activity on diabetic factors and pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbari, Abbas; Azarbayjani, Mohammad Ali; Yusof, Ashril; Halim Mokhtar, Abdul; Akbarzadeh, Samad; Ibrahim, Mohamed Yousif; Tarverdizadeh, Bahman; Farzadinia, Parviz; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Dehghan, Firouzeh

    2016-03-15

    Urtica dioica (UD) has been identified as a traditional herbal medicine. This study aimed to investigate the effect of UD extract and swimming activity on diabetic parameters through in vivo and in vitro experiments. Adult WKY male rats were randomly distributed in nine groups: intact control, diabetic control, diabetic + 625 mg/kg, 1.25 g/kg UD, diabetic + 100 mg/kg Metformin, diabetic + swimming, diabetic + swimming 625 mg/kg, 1.25 g/kg UD, and diabetic +100 mg/kg Metformin + swimming. The hearts of the animals were punctured, and blood samples were collected for biochemical analysis. The entire pancreas was exposed for histologic examination. The effect of UD on insulin secretion by RIN-5F cells in 6.25 or 12.5 mM glucose dose was examined. Glucose uptake by cultured L6 myotubes was determined. The serum glucose concentration decreased, the insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity significantly increased in treated groups. These changes were more pronounced in the group that received UD extract and swimming training. Regeneration and less beta cell damage of Langerhans islets were observed in the treated groups. UD treatment increased insulin secretion in the RIN-5F cells and glucose uptake in the L6 myotubes cells. Swimming exercises accompanied by consuming UD aqueous extracts effectively improved diabetic parameters, repaired pancreatic tissues in streptozotocin-induced diabetics in vivo, and increased glucose uptake or insulin in UD-treated cells in vitro.

  16. The Effect of Swimming on the Lung Functions in Healthy Young Male Population of Amritsar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan Shashi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this research is to study the effects of swimming on the lung functions in adult male population of Amritsar. Many exercise physiologists study the effect of exercise on pathology, and the mechanisms by which exercise can reduce or reverse disease progression. The present study was undertaken to study the effects swimming on the lung functions. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs of swimming trainees were compared with those of controls. We evaluated PFTs in 50 healthy subjects who participated in a 3 months of swimming plan. Pulmonary function tests were recorded before the commencement of swimming and at the end of swimming and compared the values so obtained with 50 healthy non- swimmers who were chosen as controls. The controls were the physiotherapy students from Khalsa College Amritsar. Both were in the age group of 18- 20 years. The PFTs were carried out with a computerized spirometer “Med-Spiror”. The various data was collected, compiled, statistically analysed and valid conclusions were drawn. Higher lung volumes and flow rates were achieved in swimming trainees after their training period, as compared to their own values obtained before their training period and to those of controls. Regular exercise enhances physical capabilities and physiological responses of the human body and also in the lungs. The cause of improved of various respiratory functions and flow rates after  swimming duration was better mechanical factors and lower airway resistance influenced during the training period. Key words: Pulmonary; Expiration; Swimming; Pulmonary Function Test

  17. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to ...

  18. Environmental calcium and variation in yolk sac size influence swimming performance in larval lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deslauriers, David; Svendsen, Jon Christian; Genz, Janet

    2018-01-01

    , because the yolk sac is likely to affect drag forces during swimming. Testing swimming performance of larval A. fulvescens reared in four different calcium treatments spanning the range of 4-132 mg l-1 [Ca2+], this study found no treatment effects on the sprint swimming speed. A novel test of volitional...... environmental calcium concentrations are declining, partly due to anthropogenic activity. As calcium is important for muscle contraction and fatigue resistance, declining calcium levels could constrain swimming performance. Similarly, swimming performance could be influenced by variation in yolk sac volume...... swimming performance, however, revealed reduced swimming performance in the low calcium environment. Specifically, volitionally swimming larvae covered a shorter distance before swimming cessation in the low calcium environment compared to the other treatments. Moreover, sprint swimming speed in larvae...

  19. Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among fighter pilots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Andersen, Christoffer Højnicke

    Introduction Neck and shoulder pain is a common complaint among fighter pilots and a growing aero-medical concern. Unfortunately, previous intervention studies have been unsuccessful in relieving such pain within this occupational group. The aim of this study was to investigate if an exercise...... intervention could reduce the high prevalence of neck pain among fighter pilots. Methods F-16 pilots were randomized in a controlled intervention trial, to either an exercise-training-group (ET, n=27) or reference-group (REF, n=28). ET underwent 24 weeks of strength, endurance, and coordination training, 3...... times a week, targeting deep and superficial neck muscles (see: www.sdu.dk/f16pilots). REF received no training but was scheduled for corresponding training 6 months later. Main outcome: Three months prevalence of neck pain assessed on a ten point visual analog scale, VAS (0 corresponded to “no pain...

  20. The critical velocity in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Prampero, Pietro E; Dekerle, Jeanne; Capelli, Carlo; Zamparo, Paola

    2008-01-01

    In supra-maximal exercise to exhaustion, the critical velocity (cv) is conventionally calculated from the slope of the distance (d) versus time (t) relationship: d = I + St. I is assumed to be the distance covered at the expense of the anaerobic capacity, S the speed maintained on the basis of the subject's maximal O(2) uptake (VO2max) This approach is based on two assumptions: (1) the energy cost of locomotion per unit distance (C) is constant and (2) VO2max is attained at the onset of exercise. Here we show that cv and the anaerobic distance (d (anaer)) can be calculated also in swimming, where C increases with the velocity, provided that VO2max its on-response, and the C versus v relationship are known. d (anaer) and cv were calculated from published data on maximal swims for the four strokes over 45.7, 91.4 and 182.9 m, on 20 elite male swimmers (18.9 +/- 0.9 years, 75.9 +/- 6.4 kg), whose VO2max and C versus speed relationship were determined, and compared to I and S obtained from the conventional approach. cv was lower than S (4, 16, 7 and 11% in butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl) and I (=11.6 m on average in the four strokes) was lower than d (anaer). The latter increased with the distance: average, for all strokes: 38.1, 60.6 and 81.3 m over 45.7, 91.4 and 182.9 m. It is concluded that the d versus t relationship should be utilised with some caution when evaluating performance in swimmers.

  1. The Use of Breathing Exercises in the Treatment of Chronic, Nonspecific Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Barton E; Bliven, Kellie C Huxel

    2017-09-01

    Clinical Scenario: Research has shown a link between poor core stability and chronic, nonspecific low back pain, with data to suggest that alterations in core muscle activation patterns, breathing patterns, lung function, and diaphragm mechanics may occur. Traditional treatment approaches for chronic, nonspecific low back pain focus on exercise and manual therapy interventions, however it is not clear whether breathing exercises are effective in treating back pain. Focused Clinical Question: In adults with chronic, nonspecific low back pain, are breathing exercises effective in reducing pain, improving respiratory function, and/or health related quality of life? Summary of Key Findings: Following a literature search, 3 studies were identified for inclusion in the review. All reviewed studies were critically appraised at level 2 evidence and reported improvements in either low back pain or quality of life following breathing program intervention. Clinical Bottom Line: Exercise programs were shown to be effective in improving lung function, reducing back pain, and improving quality of life. Breathing program frequencies ranged from daily to 2-3 times per week, with durations ranging from 4 to 8 weeks. Based on these results, athletic trainers and physical therapists caring for patients with chronic, nonspecific low back pain should consider the inclusion of breathing exercises for the treatment of back pain when such treatments align with the clinician's own judgment and clinical expertise and the patient's preferences and values. Strength of Recommendation: Grade B evidence exists to support the use of breathing exercises in the treatment of chronic, nonspecific low back pain.

  2. The Impact of Exercise on Cancer Mortality, Recurrence, and Treatment-Related Adverse Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; Zopf, Eva M; Zhang, Xiaochen; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2017-01-01

    The combination of an increasing number of new cancer cases and improving survival rates has led to a large and rapidly growing population with unique health-care requirements. Exercise has been proposed as a strategy to help address the issues faced by cancer patients. Supported by a growing body of research, major health organizations commonly identify the importance of incorporating exercise in cancer care and advise patients to be physically active. This systematic review comprehensively summarizes the available epidemiologic and randomized controlled trial evidence investigating the role of exercise in the management of cancer. Literature searches focused on determining the potential impact of exercise on 1) cancer mortality and recurrence and 2) adverse effects of cancer and its treatment. A total of 100 studies were reviewed involving thousands of individual patients whose exercise behavior was assessed following the diagnosis of any type of cancer. Compared with patients who performed no/less exercise, patients who exercised following a diagnosis of cancer were observed to have a lower relative risk of cancer mortality and recurrence and experienced fewer/less severe adverse effects. The findings of this review support the view that exercise is an important adjunct therapy in the management of cancer. Implications on cancer care policy and practice are discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Swimming Training Reduces Neuroma Pain by Regulating Neurotrophins

    Science.gov (United States)

    TIAN, JINGE; YU, TINGTING; XU, YONGMING; PU, SHAOFENG; LV, YINGYING; ZHANG, XIN; DU, DONGPING

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Neuroma formation after peripheral nerve transection leads to severe neuropathic pain in amputees. Previous studies suggested that physical exercise could bring beneficial effect on alleviating neuropathic pain. However, the effect of exercise on neuroma pain still remained unclear. In addition, long-term exercise can affect the expression of neurotrophins (NT), such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which play key roles in nociceptor sensitization and nerve sprouting after nerve injury. Here, we investigated whether long-term swimming exercise could relieve neuroma pain by modulating NT expression. Methods We used a tibial neuroma transposition (TNT) rat model to mimic neuroma pain. After TNT surgery, rats performed swimming exercise for 5 wk. Neuroma pain and tactile sensitivities were detected using von Frey filaments. Immunofluorescence was applied to analyze neuroma formation. NGF and BDNF expressions in peripheral neuroma, dorsal root ganglion, and the spinal cord were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting. Results TNT led to neuroma formation, induced neuroma pain, and mechanical allodynia in hind paw. Five-week swimming exercise inhibited neuroma formation and relieved mechanical allodynia in the hind paw and neuroma pain in the lateral ankle. The analgesic effect lasted for at least 1 wk, even when the exercise ceased. TNT elevated the expressions of BDNF and NGF in peripheral neuroma, dorsal root ganglion, and the spinal cord to different extents. Swimming also decreased the elevation of NT expression. Conclusions Swimming exercise not only inhibits neuroma formation induced by nerve transection but also relieves pain behavior. These effects might be associated with the modulation of NT. PMID:28846565

  4. Eccentric Exercise in Treatment of Patellar Tendinopathy in High Level Basketball Players. A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Sosa, Carlos; Lorenzo Calvo, Alberto; Jiménez, Sergio L.; Bonfanti, Noelia

    2014-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinopathy is a common pathology in sporting population. To date, there is no agreed upon protocol as election treatment. Eccentric exercises have been used with satisfactory outcomes. The purpose of this trial is compare the effects of two eccentric exercise protocols. 0.146 SJR (2014) Q4, 199/231 Health (social science), 131/169 Physical therapy, sports therapy and rehabilitation, 119/128 Sports sciences UEM

  5. Effect of medium-pressure UV-lamp treatment on disinfection by-products in chlorinated seawater swimming pool waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Waqas A; Manasfi, Tarek; Kaarsholm, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-12-01

    Several brominated disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed in chlorinated seawater pools, due to the high concentration of bromide in seawater. UV irradiation is increasingly employed in freshwater pools, because UV treatment photodegrades harmful chloramines. However, in freshwater pools it has been reported that post-UV chlorination promotes the formation of other DBPs. To date, UV-based processes have not been investigated for DBPs in seawater pools. In this study, the effects of UV, followed by chlorination, on the concentration of three groups of DBPs were investigated in laboratory batch experiments using a medium-pressure UV lamp. Chlorine consumption increased following post-UV chlorination, most likely because UV irradiation degraded organic matter in the pool samples to more chlorine-reactive organic matter. Haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations decreased significantly, due to photo-degradation, but the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) increased with post-UV chlorination. Bromine incorporation in HAAs was significantly higher in the control samples chlorinated without UV irradiation but decreased significantly with UV treatment. Bromine incorporation was promoted in THM and HAN after UV and chlorine treatment. Overall, the accumulated bromine incorporation level in DBPs remained essentially unchanged in comparison with the control samples. Toxicity estimates increased with single-dose UV and chlorination, mainly due to increased HAN concentrations. However, brominated HANs are known in the literature to degrade following further UV treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A six-month randomized controlled trial of exercise and pyridostigmine in the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K D; Burckhardt, C S; Deodhar, A A; Perrin, N A; Hanson, G C; Bennett, R M

    2008-02-01

    A subset of fibromyalgia (FM) patients have a dysfunctional hypothalamic-pituitary-insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) axis, as evidenced by low serum levels of IGF-1 and a reduced growth hormone (GH) response to physiologic stimuli. There is evidence that pyridostigmine (PYD) improves the acute response of GH to exercise in FM patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of 6 months of PYD and group exercise on FM symptoms. FM patients were randomized to 1 of the following 4 groups: PYD plus exercise, PYD plus diet recall but no exercise, placebo plus exercise, and placebo plus diet recall but no exercise. The primary outcome measures were the visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain, tender point count, and total myalgic score. Secondary outcome measures were the total score on the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and FIQ VAS scores for individual symptoms (fatigue, poor sleep, stiffness, and anxiety), as well as quality of life (QOL) and physical fitness (lower body strength/endurance, upper and lower body flexibility, balance, and time on the treadmill). A total of 165 FM patients completed baseline measurements; 154 (93.3%) completed the study. The combination of PYD and exercise did not improve pain scores. PYD groups showed a significant improvement in sleep and anxiety in those who completed the study and in QOL in those who complied with the therapeutic regimen as compared with the placebo groups. Compared with the nonexercise groups, the 2 exercise groups demonstrated improvement in fatigue and fitness. PYD was generally well tolerated. Neither the combination of PYD plus supervised exercise nor either treatment alone yielded improvement in most FM symptoms. However, PYD did improve anxiety and sleep, and exercise improved fatigue and fitness. We speculate that PYD may have improved vagal tone, thus benefiting sleep and anxiety; this notion warrants further study.

  7. A Correlational Analysis of Tethered Swimming, Swim Sprint Performance and Dry-land Power Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loturco, I; Barbosa, A C; Nocentini, R K; Pereira, L A; Kobal, R; Kitamura, K; Abad, C C C; Figueiredo, P; Nakamura, F Y

    2016-03-01

    Swimmers are often tested on both dry-land and in swimming exercises. The aim of this study was to test the relationships between dry-land, tethered force-time curve parameters and swimming performances in distances up to 200 m. 10 young male high-level swimmers were assessed using the maximal isometric bench-press and quarter-squat, mean propulsive power in jump-squat, squat and countermovement jumps (dry-land assessments), peak force, average force, rate of force development (RFD) and impulse (tethered swimming) and swimming times. Pearson product-moment correlations were calculated among the variables. Peak force and average force were very largely correlated with the 50- and 100-m swimming performances (r=- 0.82 and -0.74, respectively). Average force was very-largely/largely correlated with the 50- and 100-m performances (r=- 0.85 and -0.67, respectively). RFD and impulse were very-largely correlated with the 50-m time (r=- 0.72 and -0.76, respectively). Tethered swimming parameters were largely correlated (r=0.65 to 0.72) with mean propulsive power in jump-squat, squat-jump and countermovement jumps. Finally, mean propulsive power in jump-squat was largely correlated (r=- 0.70) with 50-m performance. Due to the significant correlations between dry-land assessments and tethered/actual swimming, coaches are encouraged to implement strategies able to increase leg power in sprint swimmers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Aerobic and anaerobic performances in tethered swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoti, M; da Silva, A S R; Araujo, G G; Santiago, V; Martins, L E B; Cunha, S A; Gobatto, C A

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the critical force (CritF) and anaerobic impulse capacity (AIC) - estimated by tethered swimming - reflect the aerobic and anaerobic performance of swimmers. 12 swimmers performed incremental test in tethered swimming to determine lactate anaerobic threshold (AnTLAC), maximal oxygen uptake ( ˙VO2MAX) and force associated with the ˙VO2MAX (i ˙VO2MAX). The swimmers performed 4 exhaustive (tlim) exercise bouts (100, 110, 120 and 130% i ˙VO2MAX) to compute the CritF and AIC (F vs. 1/tlim model); a 30-s all-out tethered swimming bout to determine their anaerobic fitness (ANF); 100, 200, and 400-m time-trials to determine the swimming performance. CritF (57.09±11.77 N) did not differ from AnTLAC (53.96±11.52 N, (P>0.05) but was significantly lower than i ˙VO2MAX (71.02±8.36 N). In addition, CritF presented significant correlation with AnTLAC (r=0.76; Pswimming. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Effect of exercise combined with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist treatment on cardiac function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter G; Jensen, Magnus T; Mensberg, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes, both supervised exercise and treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) liraglutide may improve cardiac function. We evaluated cardiac function before and after 16 weeks of treatment with the GLP-1RA liraglutide or placebo...

  10. Controlled-frequency breath swimming improves swimming performance and running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, K M; Guenette, J A; Smoliga, J M; Zavorsky, G S

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue can negatively impact athletic performance, but swimming has beneficial effects on the respiratory system and may reduce susceptibility to fatigue. Limiting breath frequency during swimming further stresses the respiratory system through hypercapnia and mechanical loading and may lead to appreciable improvements in respiratory muscle strength. This study assessed the effects of controlled-frequency breath (CFB) swimming on pulmonary function. Eighteen subjects (10 men), average (standard deviation) age 25 (6) years, body mass index 24.4 (3.7) kg/m(2), underwent baseline testing to assess pulmonary function, running economy, aerobic capacity, and swimming performance. Subjects were then randomized to either CFB or stroke-matched (SM) condition. Subjects completed 12 training sessions, in which CFB subjects took two breaths per length and SM subjects took seven. Post-training, maximum expiratory pressure improved by 11% (15) for all 18 subjects (P swimming may improve muscular oxygen utilization during terrestrial exercise in novice swimmers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of different delayed exercise regimens on cognitive performance in fimbria‑fornix transected rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, Elise; Marschner, Linda; Gram, Marie Gajhede

    2017-01-01

    to a mechanical transection of the FF or control sham surgery and divided into following groups: i) no exercise (NE), ii) voluntary exercise in a running wheel (RW), iii) forced swimming exercise administered as interval training of short (3x5 min) duration (FS‑SI), iv) forced swimming exercise administered...... as interval training of long (3x15 min) duration (FS‑LI), v) forced swimming exercise administered as one session of short (5 min) duration (FS‑SS), and vi) forced swimming exercise administered as one session of long (15 min) duration (FS‑LS). The exercise was initiated 21 days post‑surgery. Subsequently......‑promoting method....

  12. Effect of in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol on lumbar and femoral bone, articular cartilage, and the intervertebral disc in male and female adult mice progeny with and without swimming exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowas, Sora Al; Haddad, Rami; Gawri, Rahul; Al Ma'awi, Abdul Aziz; Chalifour, Lorraine E; Antoniou, John; Mwale, Fackson

    2012-01-23

    Developmental exposure to estrogens has been shown to affect the musculoskeletal system. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that environmental exposure to estrogen-like compounds is much higher than originally anticipated. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a well-known estrogen agonist, on articular cartilage, intervertebral disc (IVD), and bone phenotype. C57Bl/6 pregnant mice were dosed orally with vehicle (peanut oil) or 0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg/day of DES on gestational days 11 to 14. Male and female pups were allowed to mature without further treatment until 3 months of age, when swim and sedentary groups were formed. After euthanasia, bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone area (BA), and trabecular bone area (TBA) of the lumbar vertebrae and femur were measured by using a PIXImus Bone Densitometer System. Intervertebral disc proteoglycan was measured with the DMMB assay. Histologic analysis of proteoglycan for IVD and articular cartilage was performed with safranin O staining, and degeneration parameters were scored. The lumbar BMC was significantly increased in female swimmers at both the highest and lowest dose of DES, whereas the femoral BMC was increased only at the highest. The males, conversely, showed a decreased BMC at the highest dose of DES for both lumbar and femoral bone. The female swim group had an increased BA at the highest dose of DES, whereas the male counterpart showed a decreased BA for femoral bone. The TBA showed a similar pattern. Proteoglycan analysis of lumbar IVDs showed a decrease at the lowest doses but a significant increase at the highest doses for both males and females. Histologic examination showed morphologic changes of the IVD and articular cartilage for all doses of DES. DES significantly affected the musculoskeletal system of adult mice. Results suggest that environmental estrogen contaminants can have a detrimental effect on the developmental lumbar

  13. Aquatic Exercise for the Treatment of Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Marcia R; Morelhão, Priscilla K; de Carvalho, Augusto; Pinto, Rafael Z

    2017-07-01

    highlights the findings and application of Cochrane reviews and other evidence pertinent to the practice of physical therapy. The Cochrane library is a respected source of reliable evidence related to health care. Cochrane systematic reviews explore the evidence for and against the effectiveness and appropriateness of interventions-medications, surgery, education, nutrition, exercise-and the evidence for and against the use of diagnostic tests for specific conditions. Cochrane reviews are designed to facilitate the decisions of clinicians, patients, and others in health care by providing a careful review and interpretation of research studies published in the scientific literature. Each article in this PTJ series summarizes a Cochrane review or other scientific evidence on a single topic and presents clinical scenarios based on real patients or programs to illustrate how the results of the review can be used to directly inform clinical decisions. This article focuses on an older adult with severe knee joint pain. Can aquatic exercise help this patient with knee osteoarthritis? © 2017 American Physical Therapy Association.

  14. Knee pain in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeo, S A

    1999-04-01

    The high volume of training in competitive swimming results in cumulative overload injuries. Knee pain ranks second to shoulder pain as a common complaint in competitive swimmers. Most knee pain occurs on the medial side of the knee and, most commonly, in breaststroke swimmers; however, knee pain may accompany all strokes. This article reviews the incidence of knee pain, the biomechanic and anatomic factors predisposing to injury, specific injury patterns, injury diagnosis, and the treatment and prevention of injury to the knee in swimmers.

  15. Qigong exercise for the treatment of fibromyalgia: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cecilia L W; Wang, Chong-Wen; Ho, Rainbow T H; Ng, Siu-Man; Ziea, Eric T C; Wong, Vivian Taam

    2012-07-01

    The study objective was to summarize and critically assess the evidence available from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of qigong exercise for patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Thirteen (13) databases were searched up to February 2011. RCTs testing the effects of qigong exercise among patients with FM were included. For each included study, data were extracted and study quality was evaluated using the Jadad Scale. Four (4) RCTs met the inclusion criteria. One (1) RCT demonstrated beneficial effects of qigong exercise for FM. Two (2) RCTs testing the effectiveness of qigong as a part of a treatment package compared with group education or daily activities failed to show favorable effects of qigong exercise for adult patients with FM. Another RCT comparing qigong with aerobic exercise among children with FM showed effects in favor of aerobic exercise. Given methodological flaws in the included studies, it is still too early to draw a conclusion about the effectiveness of qigong exercise for FM. Further rigorously designed RCTs are warranted.

  16. The effectiveness of exercise as a treatment for postnatal depression: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daley Amanda J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal depression can have a substantial impact on the woman, the child and family as a whole. Thus, there is a need to examine different ways of helping women experiencing postnatal depression; encouraging them to exercise may be one way. A meta analysis found some support for exercise as an adjunctive treatment for postnatal depression but the methodological inadequacy of the few small studies included means that it is uncertain whether exercise reduces symptoms of postnatal depression. We aim to determine whether a pragmatic exercise intervention that involves one-to-one personalised exercise consultations and telephone support plus usual care in women with postnatal depression, is superior to usual care only, in reducing symptoms of postnatal depression. Methods We aim to recruit 208 women with postnatal depression in the West Midlands. Recently delivered women who meet the ICD-10 diagnosis for depression will be randomised to usual care plus exercise or usual care only. The exercise intervention will be delivered over 6 months. The primary outcome measure is difference in mean Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score between the groups at six month follow-up. Outcome measures will be assessed at baseline and at six and 12 month post randomisation. Discussion Findings from the research will inform future clinical guidance on antenatal and postnatal mental health, as well as inform practitioners working with postnatal depression. Trial registration number ISRCTN84245563

  17. Hormonal changes after supine posture, immersion, and swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viti, A; Lupo, C; Lodi, L; Bonifazi, M; Martelli, G

    1989-12-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the supine posture, immersion, and swimming on hormones involved in the regulation of hydrosaline equilibrium. Plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), arginine vasopressin (AVP), plasma renin activity (PRA), and aldosterone (ALDO) were measured by radioimmunoassay in eight untrained young subjects (five males and three females). Blood samples were collected on different days: control morning samples in a relaxed standing posture before each test; after 20 min in a supine position; after 20 min of horizontal immersion in water at 28 degrees C; after 20 min of backstroke swimming (speed about 1 m/s). No changes occurred in AVP levels after each test. ALDO and PRA increased significantly only after swimming and were directly correlated. ANP increased significantly after immersion, but no further increase was observed after swimming. The hematocrit, which increased after swimming, was inversely correlated with ANP levels in the post-exercise samples. These data show that while ALDO and PRA increase only in response to swimming, even at moderate intensity, ANP probably requires more prolonged and intense exercise to reach a significantly higher level than in immersion.

  18. Geneva 24 hours swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  19. Geneva 24 Hours Swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  20. Illness and treatment perceptions are associated with adherence to medications, diet, and exercise in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Donkin, Liesje; Stroh, Julia C

    2011-02-01

    To investigate diabetic patients' perceptions of illness and treatments, and explore relationships to adherence and blood glucose control. Forty-nine type 1 and one hundred and eight type 2 diabetic patients completed questionnaires assessing illness perceptions, treatment beliefs, and adherence to medications, diet, and exercise. Blood glucose control was assessed from blood tests. Patients rated medication more important than diet and exercise, and reported higher adherence to medications. Insulin was perceived as more helpful for diabetes, while antihypertensives and cholesterol medication were perceived more helpful for preventing heart problems. Perceptions were associated with adherence to insulin, cholesterol and antihypertensive medications, exercise, and diet. Blood glucose control in type 1 diabetic patients was associated with insulin adherence and perceived personal control, and in type 2 diabetic patients to being prescribed insulin or antihypertensives, and perceived personal control. Patients hold specific mental models about diabetes treatments, which are associated with adherence.

  1. Prescribing exercise for prevention and treatment of gestational diabetes: review of suggested recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Cristina; Battini, Lorella; Aragona, Michele; Lencioni, Cristina; Ottanelli, Serena; Romano, Matilde; Calabrese, Maria; Cuccuru, Ilaria; De Bellis, Alessandra; Mori, Mary Liana; Leopardi, Anna; Sabbatini, Gigliola; Bottone, Pietro; Miccoli, Roberto; Trojano, Giuseppe; Salerno, Maria Giovanna; Del Prato, Stefano; Bertolotto, Alessandra

    2017-04-01

    Exercise has been proved to be safe during pregnancy and to offer benefits for both mother and fetus; moreover, physical activity may represent a useful tool for gestational diabetes prevention and treatment. Therefore, all women in uncomplicated pregnancy should be encouraged to engage in physical activity as part of a healthy lifestyle. However, exercise in pregnancy needs a careful medical evaluation to exclude medical or obstetric contraindications to exercise, and an appropriate prescription considering frequency, intensity, type and duration of exercise, to carefully balance between potential benefits and potential harmful effects. Moreover, some precautions related to anatomical and functional adaptations observed during pregnancy should be taken into consideration. This review summarized the suggested recommendations for physical activity among pregnant women with focus on gestational diabetes.

  2. 2007 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  3. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  4. 2006 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  5. 2009 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  6. 2008 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  7. 2010 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  8. 2012 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  9. [Physical exercise and yoga in prevention and treatment of addictive diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespor, K

    2005-01-01

    Prevention of addictive diseases should be complex and systematic and it should include training of social skills, decision-making skills, family intervention, etc. Similarly, effective treatment is usually long-term, systematic and complex. Physical exercise and yoga can be useful components of comprehensive prevention and treatment programmes. On the other hand, competitive professional sport rather increases the number of risk factors for substance-related problems. Practical experience with the use of yoga in substance dependent patients and pathological gambles are mentioned. One of the advantages of yoga is the integration of physical exercise and relaxation.

  10. Swimming and cycling do not cause positive effects on bone mineral density: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odilon Abrahin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Osteoporosis is considered a common metabolic bone disease and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In this context, physical activity has been used as a non-pharmacological tool for prevention and auxiliary treatment of this disease. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of cycling and swimming practice on bone mineral density (BMD. This research was conducted in accordance with the recommendations outlined by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The studies were consulted in the period from 2004 to 2014, through major electronic databases: PubMed®, SciELO® and LILACS®. Ten studies evaluated the effects of cycling on BMD, and the results showed that nine studies have linked the practice of professional cycling with low levels of BMD. Another 18 studies have reported that swimming has no positive effects on bone mass. We conclude that cycling and swimming do not cause positive effects on BMD; thus, these are not the most suitable exercises for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

  11. Swimming and cycling do not cause positive effects on bone mineral density: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahin, Odilon; Rodrigues, Rejane Pequeno; Marçal, Anderson Carlos; Alves, Erik Artur Cortinhas; Figueiredo, Rosa Costa; de Sousa, Evitom Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is considered a common metabolic bone disease and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In this context, physical activity has been used as a non-pharmacological tool for prevention and auxiliary treatment of this disease. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of cycling and swimming practice on bone mineral density (BMD). This research was conducted in accordance with the recommendations outlined by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The studies were consulted in the period from 2004 to 2014, through major electronic databases: PubMed(®), SciELO(®) and LILACS(®). Ten studies evaluated the effects of cycling on BMD, and the results showed that nine studies have linked the practice of professional cycling with low levels of BMD. Another 18 studies have reported that swimming has no positive effects on bone mass. We conclude that cycling and swimming do not cause positive effects on BMD; thus, these are not the most suitable exercises for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Physical ExeRcise Following Esophageal Cancer Treatment (PERFECT) study: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vulpen, Jonna K; Siersema, Peter D; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; Kouwenhoven, Ewout A; Groenendijk, Richard P R; van der Peet, Donald L; Hazebroek, Eric J; Rosman, Camiel; Schippers, Carlo C G; Steenhagen, Elles; Peeters, Petra H M; May, Anne M

    2017-08-18

    Following esophagectomy, esophageal cancer patients experience a clinically relevant deterioration of health-related quality of life, both on the short- and long-term. With the currently growing number of esophageal cancer survivors, the burden of disease- and treatment-related complaints and symptoms becomes more relevant. This emphasizes the need for interventions aimed at improving quality of life. Beneficial effects of post-operative physical exercise have been reported in several cancer types, but so far comparable evidence in esophageal cancer patients is lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate effects of physical exercise on health-related quality of life in esophageal cancer patients following surgery. The Physical ExeRcise Following Esophageal Cancer Treatment (PERFECT) study is a multicenter randomized controlled trial including 150 esophageal cancer patients after surgery with curative intent. Patients are randomly allocated to an exercise group or usual care group. The exercise group participates in a 12-week combined aerobic and resistance exercise program, supervised by a physiotherapist near the patient's home-address. In addition, participants in the exercise group are requested to be physically active for at least 30 min per day, every day of the week. Participants allocated to the usual care group are asked to maintain their habitual physical activity pattern. The primary outcome is health-related quality of life (EORTC-QLQ-C30). Secondary outcomes include esophageal cancer specific quality of life, fatigue, anxiety and depression, sleep quality, work-related factors, cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2peak ), muscle strength, physical activity, malnutrition risk, anthropometry, blood markers, recurrence of disease and survival. All questionnaire outcomes, diaries and accelerometers are assessed at baseline, post-intervention (12 weeks post-baseline) and 24 weeks post-baseline. Physical fitness, anthropometry and blood markers are assessed

  13. Exercise in prevention and treatment of anxiety and depression among children and young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larun, L; Nordheim, L V; Ekeland, E; Hagen, K B; Heian, F

    2006-07-19

    Depression and anxiety are common psychological disorders for children and adolescents. Psychological (e.g. psychotherapy), psychosocial (e.g. cognitive behavioral therapy) and biological (e.g. SSRIs or tricyclic drugs) treatments are the most common treatments being offered. The large variety of therapeutic interventions give rise to questions of clinical effectiveness and side effects. Physical exercise is inexpensive with few, if any, side effects. To assess the effects of exercise interventions in reducing or preventing anxiety or depression in children and young people up to 20 years of age. We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (latest issue available), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC and Sportdiscus up to August 2005. Randomised trials of vigorous exercise interventions for children and young people up to the age of 20, with outcome measures for depression and anxiety. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. The trials were combined using meta-analysis methods. A narrative synthesis was performed when the reported data did not allow statistical pooling. Sixteen studies with a total of 1191 participants between 11 and 19 years of age were included.Eleven trials compared vigourous exercise versus no intervention in a general population of children. Six studies reporting anxiety scores showed a non-significant trend in favour of the exercise group (standard mean difference (SMD) (random effects model) -0.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.97 to 0.01). Five studies reporting depression scores showed a statistically significant difference in favour of the exercise group (SMD (random effects model) -0.66, 95% CI -1.25 to -0.08). However, all trials were generally of low methodological quality and they were highly heterogeneous with regard to the population, intervention and measurement instruments used. One small trial investigated children in treatment showed no

  14. Swimming pool use and birth defect risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopian, A J; Lupo, Philip J; Canfield, Mark A; Mitchell, Laura E

    2013-09-01

    Swimming during pregnancy is recommended. However, the use of swimming pools is also associated with infection by water-borne pathogens and exposure to water disinfection byproducts, which are 2 mechanisms that are suspected to increase risk for birth defects. Thus, we evaluated the relationship between maternal swimming pool use during early pregnancy and risk for select birth defects in offspring. Data were evaluated for nonsyndromic cases with 1 of 16 types of birth defects (n = 191-1829) and controls (n = 6826) from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study delivered during 2000-2006. Logistic regression analyses were conducted separately for each birth defect type. Separate analyses were conducted to assess any pool use (yes vs no) and frequent use (5 or more occasions in 1 month) during the month before pregnancy through the third month of pregnancy. There was no significant positive association between any or frequent pool use and any of the types of birth defects, even after adjustment for several potential confounders (maternal race/ethnicity, age at delivery, education, body mass index, folic acid use, nulliparity, smoking, annual household income, surveillance center, and season of conception). Frequent pool use was significantly negatively associated with spina bifida (adjusted odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.99). Among offspring of women 20 years old or older, pool use was associated with gastroschisis (adjusted odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.8), although not significantly so. We observed little evidence suggesting teratogenic effects of swimming pool use. Because swimming is a common and suggested form of exercise during pregnancy, these results are reassuring. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biomarcadores de estresse em ratos exercitados por natação em intensidades igual e superior à máxima fase estável de lactato Biomarkers of stress in rats exercised in swimming at intensities equal and superior to the maximal estable lactate phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Vinicius Ledesma Contarteze

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O estresse alcançado durante exercício agudo/crônico é relevante, pois altos índices de estresse podem prejudicar o bem-estar dos animais. As concentrações dos hormônios adrenocorticotrófico (ACTH e corticosterona, bem como as concentrações de ácido ascórbico e colesterol das glândulas adrenais são importantes biomarcadores de estresse. OBJETIVO: Analisar a sensibilidade de diferentes biomarcadores de estresse em ratos durante exercício agudo de natação em diferentes intensidades. MÉTODO: Ratos (18 adaptados à natação foram submetidos a três testes de 25 minutos suportando cargas 5,0; 5,5 e 6,0% do peso corporal (PC, para obtenção da máxima fase estável de lactato (MFEL. Em seguida, os animais foram divididos em dois grupos: M (n = 9, sacrificado após 25 minutos de exercício na intensidade de MFEL e S (n = 9, sacrificado após exercício exaustivo, em intensidade 25% superior a MFEL. Para comparações, um grupo controle C (n = 10 foi sacrificado em repouso. RESULTADOS: As concentrações séricas de ACTH e corticosterona foram superiores após exercício em ambas as intensidades comparadas com o grupo controle (P INTRODUCTION: The level of stress during acute/chronic exercise is important, since higher levels of stress may impair animal welfare. The adrenocorticotrophic (ACTH and corticosterone hormone concentrations, as well as cholesterol and ascorbic acid concentrations in adrenal gland, are considered an important stress biomarker. PURPOSE: To analyze the sensitivity of the different biomarkers during acute swimming exercise in different intensities performed by rats. METHODS: Male Wistar adult rats (n = 18 previously adapted to swimming were submitted to three 25 min. swimming tests with loads of 5.0; 5.5 and 6.0% of their body weight (BW, for maximum lactate steady state (MLSS determination. After MLSS attainment, the animals were divided into two groups: M (n = 9 sacrificed shortly after a 25

  16. A pilot randomized controlled trial of aerobic exercise as an adjunct to OCD treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, Ana M; Brown, Richard A; Strong, David R; McLaughlin, Nicole; Garnaat, Sarah L; Mancebo, Maria; Riebe, Deborah; Desaulniers, Julie; Yip, Agustin G; Rasmussen, Steven; Greenberg, Benjamin D

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the current study was to conduct a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of aerobic exercise for decreasing OCD symptom severity, other mental health outcomes, and increasing exercise behaviors and cardiorespiratory fitness among individuals with OCD. Fifty-six patients (64% female; mean age=38.8years) with OCD and a Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) score of 16 or greater despite engaging in OCD treatment were randomized to 12-weeks of supervised plus home-based moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (AE; n=28) or to 12-weeks of health education sessions (HE; n=28). Random intercepts mixed models examined differences between conditions at post-treatment. Though no difference between conditions on outcomes was observed, both AE and HE showed significant reduction in OCD symptom severity, depression and anxiety at post-treatment. Relative to HE, significant increases were noted in amount of exercise and cardiorespiratory fitness for those in the AE condition. At post-treatment, 30.4% of the AE condition (7 of 23) were treatment-responders (using the commonly accepted measure of 35% symptom reduction from baseline). In the HE condition, 7.7% of the sample (2 of 26) met this criterion at post-treatment. The results of this preliminary study suggest that exercise and health-focused interventions may be beneficial adjuncts to existing OCD treatment. Future studies with larger samples are needed to more definitively answer questions the efficacy of AE for reducing OCD symptoms and improving related clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. PGM1 deficiency: Substrate use during exercise and effect of treatment with galactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voermans, N C; Preisler, N; Madsen, K L; Janssen, M C H; Kusters, B; Abu Bakar, N; Conte, F; Lamberti, V M L; Nusman, F; van Engelen, B G; van Scherpenzeel, M; Vissing, J; Lefeber, D J

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in PGM1 (phosphoglucomutase 1) cause Glycogen Storage Disease type XIV, which is also a congenital disorder of protein N-glycosylation. It presents throughout life as myopathy with additional systemic symptoms. We report the effect of oral galactose treatment during five months in a patient with biochemically and genetically confirmed PGM1 deficiency. The 12-minute-walking distance increased by 225 m (65%) and transferrin glycosylation was restored to near-normal levels. The exercise assessments showed a severe exercise intolerance due to a block in skeletal muscle glycogenolytic capacity and that galactose treatment tended to normalize skeletal muscle substrate use from fat to carbohydrates during exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interferência dos ácidos graxos ômega-3 nos lipídeos sangüíneos de ratos submetidos ao exercício de natação Omega-3 fatty acids interference on the blood lipids of rats subjected to swimming exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Moritz

    2008-12-01

    as concentrações de lipídeos sangüíneos.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation at doses of 0.5 and 1.0g/kg/day on the blood lipids of rats submitted or not to swimming exercise. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: control, control+swimming, omega-3 fatty acids and omega-3 fatty acids+swimming. The omega-3 fatty acids and omega-3 fatty acids+swimming groups received supplements by gavage, while the remaining animals received water by the same method. The control+swimming and omega-3 fatty acids +swimming groups were submitted to exercise. Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides and HDL were determined before and after the experimental procedures. RESULTS: The concentrations of total cholesterol in the 0.5g/kg/day groups reduced proportionally more in the omega-3 fatty acids+swimming group, even though total cholesterol of the control+swimming and omega-3 fatty acids groups also decreased. Total cholesterol decreased in both groups receiving 1.0g/kg/day supplementation, but the decrease was higher in the omega-3 fatty acids+swimming group than in the omega-3 fatty acids group. Triglycerides also decreased in all experimental groups. The greatest decrease was seen in the omega-3 fatty acids+swimming group receiving 0.5g/kg/day supplementation. In the 1.0g/kg/day protocol, the decrease was significant in both groups: the omega-3 fatty acids and omega-3 fatty acids+swimming groups. HDL increased among the non-supplemented animals and decreased among the animals receiving a supplementation of 1.0g/kg/day. CONCLUSION: Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation at doses of 0.5 or 1.0g/kg/day associated with swimming exercise reduced plasma concentrations of total cholesterol and triglycerides, yet additional studies, including varying doses, are necessary to better understand the relationship between ingestion of fish oil and blood lipid concentrations.

  19. Clinical effectiveness of aquatic exercise to treat chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Umit; Solak, Ozlem; Yigit, Ilknur; Evcik, Deniz; Kavuncu, Vural

    2009-06-15

    This study was a prospective, randomized, controlled study. To compare the effectiveness of aquatic exercise interventions with land-based exercises in the treatment of chronic low back pain (CLBP). Land-based exercise and physiotherapy are the main treatment tools used for CLBP. Clinical experience indicates that aquatic exercise may have advantages for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. A total of 65 patients with CLBP were included in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive aquatic exercise or land-based exercise treatment protocol. Aquatic exercise program consisted of 20 sessions, 5 x per week for 4 weeks in a swimming pool at 33 degrees C. Land-based exercise (home-based exercise) program were demonstrated by a physiotherapist on one occasion and then they were given written advice The patients were assessed for spinal mobility, pain, disability, and quality of life. Evaluations were performed before treatment (week 0) and after treatment (week 4 and week 12). In both groups, statistically significant improvements were detected in all outcome measures (except modified Schober test) compared with baseline. However, improvement in modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability questionnaire and physical function and role limitations due to physical functioning subpart of Short-Form 36 Health Survey were better in aquatic exercise group (P exercises produced better improvement in disability and quality of life of the patients with CLBP than land-based exercise.

  20. Exercise therapy is evidence-based treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome. Current practice or recommendation only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, J; Vuorenmaa, M; Paloneva, J; Kiviranta, I; Kautiainen, H; Oikari, M; Häkkinen, A

    2013-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common indication for shoulder operation. However, exercise therapy for the conservative treatment is recommended in the first instance. To evaluate the implementation of exercise therapy in impingement syndrome. Retrospective study using structured postal questionnaire and data collected from hospital archive. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone shoulder surgery due to impingement syndrome. Patients were asked about therapy modalities that they had received before and after the operation as well as pain (VAS) and functional impairment (ASES) at one-year follow-up. Before surgery 49% of patients had not received advice for shoulder muscle exercises. After operation all patients had received mobility exercises, but one quarter of patients still reported that they had not received instructions about shoulder strength exercises. At the follow-up the means of the ASES index was 85 and use of NSAID had decreased by 75%. However, 15% of patients had moderate functional impairment (ASES under 60). About half of patients reported that they had not received advice for rotator cuff exercise therapy before surgery even though with it surgery would probably have been avoided in many cases. Although symptoms in most patients had decreased after operation, several patients still suffered from pain and decreased function. Still several patients had not received advice for shoulder strengthening exercises that are important to recovery. The adherence to the current recommendations about exercise therapy is insufficient in clinical practice. Thus we recommend that it should be monitored in all institutions in which shoulder pain is treated.

  1. Efficacy of aerobic exercise for treatment of chronic low back pain: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xian-Guo; Yue, Shou-Wei

    2015-05-01

    A meta-analysis of relevant cohort studies was performed to investigate the efficacy of aerobic exercise for the treatment of patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). A range of electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE (1966-2013), the Cochrane Library Database (issue 12, 2013), EMBASE (1980-2013), CINAHL (1982-2013), Web of Science (1945~2013), and the Chinese Biomedical Database (1982-2013), without language restrictions. The Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, the McGill Pain Questionnaire, visual analog scale, and heart rate, sit-and-reach test, and maximum oxygen consumption were used to evaluate the efficacy of aerobic exercise. Meta-analysis was performed with the use of the STATA statistical software. The standardized mean difference (SMD) with its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Eight clinical cohort studies with a total of 310 CLBP patients were included in the meta-analysis. The results of this meta-analysis indicated that CLBP patients exhibited positive decreases in scores on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (SMD, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.20-0.68; P aerobic exercise. It was also observed that aerobic exercise could markedly reduce the visual analog scale score for pain of CLBP patients (SMD, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.48-1.02; P aerobic exercise had no effects on heart rate, sit-and-reach test, and maximum oxygen consumption of CLBP patients (all P > 0.05). The current meta-analysis provides reliable evidence that aerobic exercise could effectively diminish pain intensity and improve the physical and psychologic functioning of CLBP patients. Thus, aerobic exercise may be a good choice in the treatment for CLBP.

  2. Treatment of NAFLD with diet, physical activity and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Zelber-Sagi, Shira; Trenell, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Lifestyle intervention can be effective when treating non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) patients. Weight loss decreases cardiovascular and diabetes risk and can also regress liver disease. Weight reductions of ⩾10% can induce a near universal non-alcoholic steatohepatitis resolution and fibrosis improvement by at least one stage. However, modest weight loss (>5%) can also produce important benefits on the components of the NAFLD activity score (NAS). Additionally, we need to explore the role of total calories and type of weight loss diet, micro- and macronutrients, evidence-based benefits of physical activity and exercise and finally support these modifications through established behavioural change models and techniques for long-term maintenance of lifestyle modifications. Following a Mediterranean diet can reduce liver fat even without weight loss and is the most recommended dietary pattern for NAFLD. The Mediterranean diet is characterised by reduced carbohydrate intake, especially sugars and refined carbohydrates (40% of the calories vs. 50-60% in a typical low fat diet), and increased monounsaturated and omega-3 fatty acid intake (40% of the calories as fat vs. up-to 30% in a typical low fat diet). Both TV sitting (a reliable marker of overall sedentary behaviour) and physical activity are associated with cardio-metabolic health, NAFLD and overall mortality. A 'triple hit behavioural phenotype' of: i) sedentary behaviour, ii) low physical activity, and iii) poor diet have been defined. Clinical evidence strongly supports the role of lifestyle modification as a primary therapy for the management of NAFLD and NASH. This should be accompanied by the implementation of strategies to avoid relapse and weight regain. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Case-control study of stretching exercise on treatment of plantar fasciitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-wei; Zheng, Ping; Wu, Jian; Lu, Jie; Yan, An

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of different methods of physical therapy on plantar fasciitis. From June 2009 to March 2012,30 patients with plantar fasciitis were randomly divided into 3 groups including phonophoresis (PH) combined with stretching exercise, ultrasound (US) combined with stretching exercise,stretching exercise, 10 patiens in each group. In stretching exercise group, there were 2 males and 8 females with an average age of (46.7+/-6.5) years old,the mean constitutional index duration was (26.7+/-2.8) kg/m2. In US combined with stretching exercise group, there were 4 males and 6 females with an average age of (45.8+/-6.1) years old,the mean constitutional index duration was (26.4+/-3.4) kg/m2. In PH combined with stretching exercise group,there were 3 males and 7 females with an average age of (48.4+/-8.0) years old,the mean constitutional index duration was (25.4+/-3.0) kg/m2. Patients in PH and US were treated for 10 min everyday by ultrasound, 5 times per week, lasted for 4 weeks; and patients by ultrasound therapy in PH were treated with diclofenac diethylamine at the same time. All the 30 patients received instruction for stretching exercises at home. Pain and ability to function were evaluated before treatment, immediately afterwards,and three months later. Morning pain was evaluated by VAS, and the sub-scale of FFI evaluated the affected foot function. Patients's general status and original pain state of plantar fasciitis before treatment had no significant difference among three groups. There were statistical differences of morning pain and FFI-disability score between PH group and stretching exercise group at 1 month (P0.05). Compared with before therapy,the pain and disability score of three groups significantly improved in the three points of time (PStretching exercises and combining with PH or US are effective for pain and disability in patients with plantar fasciitis and that addition of PH to exercise therapy betters the effectiveness.

  4. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfim, Mariana Rotta, E-mail: mrb-unesp@yahoo.com.br [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Motricidade, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista “Júlio de Mesquita Filho” (UNESP), Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle [Setor de Doenças Neuromusculares, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amaral, Sandra Lia do; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz [Departamento de Educação Física, Faculdade de Ciências, UNESP, Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords “statin” AND “exercise” AND “muscle”, restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible.

  5. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfim, Mariana Rotta; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Amaral, Sandra Lia do; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords “statin” AND “exercise” AND “muscle”, restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible

  6. Physical exercise training interventions for children and young adults during and after treatment for childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, Katja I.; van der Torre, Patrick; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A.; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Kaspers, Gertjan J L

    BACKGROUND: A decreased physical fitness has been reported in patients and survivors of childhood cancer. This is influenced by the negative effects of the disease and the treatment of childhood cancer. Exercise training for adult cancer patients has frequently been reported to improve physical

  7. Effect of therapeutic exercises augmented by kinesio tape in treatment of scoliosis in adolescent females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman.A.Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Scoliosis is a lateral curvature of the spine. It is the most common deformity of the immature spine. The essential goal of treatment is to allow patients with scoliosis to avoid cardiopulmonary and neurological problems, and to improve the patient's appearance and future quality of life. Kinesio Taping is a method used for treatment of various musculo-skeletal conditions. The effects of Kinesio Taping is to relieve pain or abnormal feeling on the skin and fascia, supports the muscle in movement, removes congestion of lymphatic fluid or hemorrhages under the skin, and corrects misalignment of the muscle, fascia, and joint. Forty adolescent females complain from scoliosis their ages ranged from 11 to 17 years old, and their BMI was from 15 to 25 kg/m². They were divided randomly into two groups. Group A received therapeutic exercises for scoliosis, while group B received therapeutic exercise in addition to kinesio taping. X ray plain used for measuring of Cobb’s angle and present pain intensity (Ppi for pain assessment before and after treatment. There was a significant reduction of Cobb's angle and pain intensity at post treatment at both groups (p<0.05. There were significant reduction p<0.0001 in Ppi and this significant reduction in favor of group B. There was no significant differences between both groups in Cobb’s angle. Exercises for scoliosis and exercises augmented by kinesio taping had a significant effects on reduction of both Cobb’s angle and pain intensity.

  8. Holistic Treatment Approaches to ADHD: Nutrition, Sleep,and Exercise, Part 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This article is part of a series exploring Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In this seventh installment, the author discusses three holistic treatments for children and adults with ADHD: diet and nutrition, sleep, and exercise. These approaches focus and improve the overall health of ADHD patients. (For Part 6 of this series, see…

  9. Treatment of Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Platelet-Rich Plasma or Exercise Therapy? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Parisa; Ghahremaninia, Armita; Naderi, Farrokh; Gharibzadeh, Safoora; Mazaherinezhad, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) is the most common disorder of the shoulder. The evidence for the effectiveness of treatment options is inconclusive and limited. Therefore, there is a need for more evidence in this regard, particularly for long-term outcomes. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) would be an effective method in treating subacromial impingement. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. This was a single-blinded randomized clinical trial with 1-, 3-, and 6-month follow-up. Sixty-two patients were randomly placed into 2 groups, receiving either PRP or exercise therapy. The outcome parameters were pain, shoulder range of motion (ROM), muscle force, functionality, and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Both treatment options significantly reduced pain and increased shoulder ROM compared with baseline measurements. Both treatments also significantly improved functionality. However, the treatment choices were not significantly effective in improving muscle force. Trend analysis revealed that in the first and third months, exercise therapy was superior to PRP in pain, shoulder flexion and abduction, and functionality. However, in the sixth month, only shoulder abduction and total Western Ontario Rotator Cuff score were significantly different between the 2 groups. Both PRP injection and exercise therapy were effective in reducing pain and disability in patients with SAIS, with exercise therapy proving more effective.

  10. Role of Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philteos George S

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is a very common disorder that still causes significant morbidity and mortality. A high percentage of individuals with asthma also experience exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB. This article reviews the current literature and updates the reader on the safety, efficacy, and clinical applications of leukotriene modifiers in the treatment of EIB.

  11. Swimming performance assessment in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Keith B

    2011-05-20

    Swimming performance tests of fish have been integral to studies of muscle energetics, swimming mechanics, gas exchange, cardiac physiology, disease, pollution, hypoxia and temperature. This paper describes a flexible protocol to assess fish swimming performance using equipment in which water velocity can be controlled. The protocol involves one to several stepped increases in flow speed that are intended to cause fish to fatigue. Step speeds and their duration can be set to capture swimming abilities of different physiological and ecological relevance. Most frequently step size is set to determine critical swimming velocity (U(crit;)), which is intended to capture maximum sustained swimming ability. Traditionally this test has consisted of approximately ten steps each of 20 min duration. However, steps of shorter duration (e.g. 1 min) are increasingly being utilized to capture acceleration ability or burst swimming performance. Regardless of step size, swimming tests can be repeated over time to gauge individual variation and recovery ability. Endpoints related to swimming such as measures of metabolic rate, fin use, ventilation rate, and of behavior, such as the distance between schooling fish, are often included before, during and after swimming tests. Given the diversity of fish species, the number of unexplored research questions, and the importance of many species to global ecology and economic health, studies of fish swimming performance will remain popular and invaluable for the foreseeable future.

  12. Differential effects of exercise on cancer-related fatigue during and following treatment: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetz, Timothy W; Herring, Matthew P

    2012-08-01

    Exercise-induced improvements in cancer-related fatigue may be moderated differentially in patients during and following treatment. These effects have not been reviewed systematically. In accordance with PRISMA guidelines, the population effect size for exercise training on cancer-related fatigue during and following treatment was estimated and the extent to which the effect is differentiated across the time course of treatment and recovery was determined. Articles published before August 2011 were retrieved using Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Web of Science databases. Seventy studies involving 4881 cancer patients during or following treatment were selected. Articles included a cancer-related fatigue outcome measured at baseline and post-intervention and randomized allocation to exercise or non-exercise comparison. From August to October 2011, Hedges' d effect sizes were computed, study quality was evaluated, and random effects models were used to estimate sampling error and population variance. Exercise significantly reduced cancer-related fatigue by a mean effect Δ (95% CI) of 0.32 (0.21, 0.43) and 0.38 (0.21, 0.54) during and following cancer treatment, respectively. During treatment, patients with lower baseline fatigue scores and higher exercise adherence realized the largest improvements. Following treatment, improvements were largest for trials with longer durations between treatment completion and exercise initiation, trials with shorter exercise program lengths, and trials using wait-list comparisons. Exercise reduces cancer-related fatigue among patients during and following cancer treatment. These effects are moderated differentially over the time course of treatment and recovery. Exercise has a palliative effect in patients during treatment and a recuperative effect post-treatment. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of an exercise intervention on methamphetamine use outcomes post-residential treatment care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Richard A; Chudzynski, Joy; Mooney, Larissa; Gonzales, Rachel; Ang, Alfonso; Dickerson, Daniel; Penate, Jose; Salem, Bilal A; Dolezal, Brett; Cooper, Christopher B

    2015-11-01

    We examined the efficacy of an 8-week exercise intervention on posttreatment methamphetamine (MA) use among MA-dependent individuals following residential treatment. 135 individuals newly enrolled in treatment were randomly assigned to a structured 8-week exercise intervention or health education control group. Approximately 1 week after completion of the intervention, participants were discharged to the community. Interview data and urine samples were collected at 1-, 3-, and 6-months post-residential care. Of the sample, 54.8% were classified as higher severity users (using MA more than 18 days in the month before admission) and 45.2% as lower severity users (using MA for up to 18 days in the month before admission). Group differences in MA use outcomes were examined over the 3 timepoints using mixed-multivariate modeling. While fewer exercise participants returned to MA use compared to education participants at 1-, 3- and 6-months post-discharge, differences were not statistically significant. A significant interaction for self-reported MA use and MA urine drug test results by condition and MA severity was found: lower severity users in the exercise group reported using MA significantly fewer days at the three post-discharge timepoints than lower severity users in the education group. Lower severity users in the exercise group also had a lower percentage of positive urine results at the three timepoints than lower severity users in the education group. These relationships were not present in the comparison of the higher severity conditions. Results support the value of exercise as a treatment component for individuals using MA 18 or fewer days/month. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Physical exercise training interventions for children and young adults during and after treatment for childhood cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Braam, Katja I.; van der Torre, Patrick; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A.; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Kaspers, Gertjan J L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A decreased physical fitness has been reported in patients and survivors of childhood cancer. This is influenced by the negative effects of the disease and the treatment of childhood cancer. Exercise training for adult cancer patients has frequently been reported to improve physical fitness. In recent years, literature on this subject has also become available for children and young adults with cancer, both during and after treatment. This is an update of the original review that ...

  15. Specific vestibular exercises in the treatment of vestibular neuritis

    OpenAIRE

    Komazec Zoran; Lemajić Slobodanka N.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Vestibular neuritis rapidly damages unilateral vestibular periphery, inducing severe balance disorders. In most cases, such vestibular imbalance is gradually restored to within the normal level after clinical therapies. This successive clinical recovery occurs due to regeneration of vestibular periphery and/or accomplishment of central vestibular compensation. Rehabilitation The program of vestibular rehabilitation presents a major achievement in the field of treatment of balance...

  16. Enhanced information regarding exercise training as treatment is needed. An interview study in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordvall Strömberg, Petronella; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine; Wadell, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe thoughts and attitudes of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when talking about exercise training as treatment. Semi-structured interviews were performed and analyzed with the grounded theory method. Four men and six women were interviewed (ages 66-84 years), with moderate to severe COPD, and no experience of organized exercise training as treatment for COPD. The analysis resulted in one core category, unknown territory, and three categories, good for those who can, but not for me; fear of future; and mastering. Exercise training as treatment was perceived by the participants as something unknown. It was also described as important for others but not for them. Their perceptions were that they could not perform exercise training, and did not have the knowledge of what or how to perform exercise that was good for them. Patients with COPD, with no previous experience of exercise training as treatment for their disease, describe exercise training as something unknown and unimportant for them. The results provide important knowledge for healthcare professionals regarding how to educate patients with COPD about the content and benefits of exercise training as treatment. Implications for Rehabilitation Exercise training is effective for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with regard to dyspnea, physical capacity, health-related quality of life, and health care use. Patients with COPD perceive a lack of information regarding exercise training as treatment. The information and the presentation of exercise training as treatment might be of importance to get better adherence to this treatment.

  17. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema in a Triathlon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotomo Yamanashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Family physicians have more opportunities to attend athletic competitions as medical staff at first-aid centers because of the increasing popularity of endurance sports. Case. A 38-year-old man who participated in a triathlon race experienced difficulty in breathing after swimming and was moved to a first-aid center. His initial oxygen saturation was 82% and a thoracic computed tomography scan showed bilateral ground glass opacity in the peripheral lungs. His diagnosis was noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with exercise or swimming: exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE or swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE. Treatment with furosemide and corticosteroid relieved his symptoms of pulmonary edema. Discussion. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with endurance sports is not common, but knowledge about EIPE/SIPE or neurogenic pulmonary edema associated with hyponatremia, which is called Ayus-Arieff syndrome, is crucial. Knowledge and caution for possible risk factors, such as exposure to cold water or overhydration, are essential for both medical staff and endurance athletes. Conclusion. To determine the presence of pulmonary edema associated with strenuous exercise, oxygen saturation should be used as a screening tool at a first-aid center. To avoid risks for EIPE/SIPE, knowledge about these diseases is essential for medical staff and for athletes who perform extreme exercise.

  18. The treatment effect of exercise programmes for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline; Grimmer-Somers, Karen

    2010-06-01

    This paper summarizes evidence of long-term effectiveness of physiotherapy exercise therapy for chronic low back pain (LBP). A literature search was undertaken for experimental studies (2001-2007), which reported any post-intervention (follow-up) outcomes. Studies were critically appraised using the PEDro instrument. Comparative statistics were calculated, relative to the type of follow-up outcome data. Fifteen moderate quality trials were included [mean PEDro score 7.7, SD 1.3 (range 5-10)]. Nine trials reported pain scales, and six reported LBP reoccurrence. Trials which reported on pain scales at 6-month follow-up found significant differences in favour of exercise [standardized mean differences -0.57, 95%CI -0.75 to -0.39 (555 participants)]. At 12-month follow-up, a small pain scale benefit from exercise persisted [standardized mean differences -0.25, 95%CI -0.44 to 0.06 (434 participants)]. There was unconvincing evidence of exercise effectiveness on pain scales after this time. Three of the four trials which reported dichotomous outcomes at 6-month follow-up demonstrated large clinical benefits of exercise (relative risk reduction of reoccurrence 45-246%, absolute risk reduction of reoccurrence 36-42 for every 100 patients; and number needed to treat approximating 3, to prevent one patient suffering a LBP recurrence). The effect of exercise on LBP reoccurrence was variably reported beyond 6 months. Exercise programmes are effective for chronic LBP up to 6 months after treatment cessation, evidenced by pain score reduction and reoccurrence rates. The way in which follow-up data are reported assists clinical interpretation of research findings.

  19. Treatment-related cardiovascular late effects and exercise training countermeasures in testicular germ cell cancer survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper F; Bandak, Mikkel; Campbell, Anna

    2015-01-01

    , are subjected to toxicities, which individually, and synergistically, can cause physiological impairments leading to sub-clinical or clinical cardiovascular disorders (i.e. the 'multiple-hit hypothesis'). Furthermore, we discuss the efficacy and utility of structured exercise training to ameliorate treatment......-induced cardiovascular dysfunction to prevent premature onset of clinical cardiovascular disease in germ cell cancer survivors, with a view towards highlighting future directions of exercise-based survivorship research in the germ cell cancer setting. CONCLUSION: As exercise training may have the potential to ameliorate....... However, the excellent cancer-specific survival comes at considerable costs, as individuals with a history of germ cell cancer experience serious long-term complications, including markedly increased risk of cardiovascular morbidities and premature cardiovascular death. The factors responsible, as well...

  20. The Benefits of Exercise and Metabolic Interventions for the Prevention and Early Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliszewska-Cyna, Ewelina; Lynch, Madelaine; Oore, Jonathan Jordan; Nagy, Paul Michael; Aubert, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neuronal degeneration, vascular pathology and cognitive decline. Furthermore, deficits in cerebral glucose metabolism and insulin resistance are being increasingly recognized in AD. Many lifestyle-modifying approaches, including diet and exercise, have yielded promising results in modulating brain morphology and function for the prevention and early treatment of AD. This review focuses on the effects of physical exercise on rescuing cognition and limiting the progression of AD pathology. Specifically, the impact of exercise, in human and animal models of AD, on the stimulation and preservation of cognition, neurotransmission, neurogenesis, vasculature, glucose metabolism and insulin signaling is discussed. Studies have highlighted the potential of physical activity to improve overall brain health, which could delay or lessen AD-related cognitive deficits and pathology. Physical activity influences cognitive function, vascular health and brain metabolism, which taken together offers benefits for the aging population, including AD patients.

  1. Stirring by swimming bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiffeault, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jeanluc@math.wisc.ed [Department of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 480 Lincoln Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Institute for Mathematics and Applications, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, 207 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Childress, Stephen [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2010-07-26

    We consider the stirring of an inviscid fluid caused by the locomotion of bodies through it. The swimmers are approximated by non-interacting cylinders or spheres moving steadily along straight lines. We find the displacement of fluid particles caused by the nearby passage of a swimmer as a function of an impact parameter. We use this to compute the effective diffusion coefficient from the random walk of a fluid particle under the influence of a distribution of swimming bodies. We compare with the results of simulations. For typical sizes, densities and swimming velocities of schools of krill, the effective diffusivity in this model is five times the thermal diffusivity. However, we estimate that viscosity increases this value by two orders of magnitude.

  2. Cortisol emphasizes the metabolic strategies employed by common carp, Cyprinus carpio at different feeding and swimming regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Hon Jung; Chiarella, Daniela; Pelle, Antonella; Faggio, Caterina; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the interaction between feeding, exercise and cortisol on metabolic strategies of common carp over a 168h post-implant period. Feeding provided readily available energy and clearly increased muscle and liver protein and glycogen stores. Swimming, feeding and cortisol all induced aerobic metabolism by increasing oxygen consumption, and stimulated protein metabolism as demonstrated by the increased ammonia and urea excretion and ammonia quotient. Hypercortisol stimulated ammonia self-detoxifying mechanisms by enhancing ammonia and urea excretion, especially during severe exercise. At high swimming level, higher branchial clearance rates in cortisol treated fish succeeded in eliminating the elevation of endogenous ammonia, resulting in reduced plasma Tamm levels compared to control and sham implanted fish. Carp easily induced anaerobic metabolism, both during routine and active swimming, with elevated lactate levels as a consequence. Both feeding and cortisol treatment increased this dependence on anaerobic metabolism. Hypercortisol induced both glycogenesis and gluconeogenesis resulting in hyperglycemia and muscle and liver glycogen deposition, most likely as a protective mechanism for prolonged stress situations and primarily fuelled by protein mobilization. © 2013.

  3. Effective diet and exercise treatments for overweight and recommendations for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W C

    2001-01-01

    Traditional diet and exercise treatments for obesity have been ineffective in reducing the prevalence of overweight in the population. Treatment outcomes for overweight can be measured in terms of physical parameters (e.g. bodyweight, percentage body fat, body mass index), medical terms (e.g. blood pressure, blood glucose control, blood lipid levels), psychological terms (e.g. eating pathology, self-esteem, mood state) and behavioural terms (e.g. frequency of exercise, eating patterns, self healthcare). Regardless of the specific outcome measures used to define successful treatment, the desired outcome must be maintained for several years to be considered effective. Energy restrictive diets cause significant initial bodyweight loss, but are plagued with high dropout- and relapse-rate. Low-fat diets have met with minimal success for bodyweight control, but nonetheless can significantly lower blood lipid levels. High-protein/low-carbohydrate diets are claimed to be the most effective in reducing bodyweight, but there are no scientific data to support these claims. Persons on these types of diets are also at the greatest risk for metabolic adverse effects. Nondieting approaches and programmes that stress 'health at any size' have not been researched rigorously, but preliminary data show minimal bodyweight loss with significant improvements in psychological state, eating pathology and well-being. Exercise is the only variable that consistently shows effectiveness in physiological, medical, psychological and behavioural outcomes. A treatment programme that has the greatest potential for success, regardless of outcome measure, is a programme that consists of 4 key components. These components are: (i) pre-evaluation, where historical information is gathered and used to set programme goals, objectives and outcome measures; (ii) exercise, wherein enjoyable exercise is encouraged for health, bodyweight control and well being; (iii) a behavioural plan, which is based on

  4. Effect of exercise augmentation of cognitive behavioural therapy for the treatment of suicidal ideation and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Abbas; LeBouthillier, Daniel M; Najafi, Mahmoud; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Hosseinian, Simin; Shahidi, Shahriar; Carlbring, Per; Kalhori, Atefeh; Sadeghi, Hassan; Jalili, Marzieh

    2017-09-01

    Suicidal ideation and depression are prevalent and costly conditions that reduce quality of life. This study was designed to determine the efficacy of exercise as an adjunct to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for suicidal ideation and depression among depressed individuals. In a randomized clinical trial, 54 mildly to moderately depressed patients (54% female, mean age=48.25) were assigned to a combined CBT and exercise group or to a CBT only group. Both groups received one weekly session of therapy for 12 weeks, while the combined group also completed exercise three times weekly over the same period. Self-reported suicidal ideation, depression, and activities of daily living were measured at the beginning and the end of treatment. Multilevel modelling revealed greater improvements in suicidal ideation, depression, and activities of daily living in the combined CBT and exercise group, compared to the CBT only group. No follow-up data were collected, so the long-term effects (i.e., maintenance of gains) is unclear. The findings revealed that exercise adjunct to CBT effectively decreases both depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in mildly to moderately depressed individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Augmented exercise in the treatment of deconditioning from major burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lateur, Barbara J; Magyar-Russell, Gina; Bresnick, Melissa G; Bernier, Faedra A; Ober, Michelle S; Krabak, Brian J; Ware, Linda; Hayes, Michael P; Fauerbach, James A

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the efficacy of a 12-week exercise program in producing greater improvement in aerobic capacity in adult burn survivors, relative to usual care. Randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial. Burn center. A population-based sample of 35 adult patients admitted to a burn center for treatment of a serious burn injury. A 12-week, 36-session, aerobic treadmill exercise program where work to quota (WTQ) participants intensified their exercise according to preset quotas and work to tolerance (WTT) participants continued to their tolerance. Participants completed a maximal stress test at baseline and 12 weeks to measure physical fitness. Maximal aerobic capacity. The WTT and the WTQ exercise groups both made significant improvements in aerobic capacity from baseline to 12 weeks (t=-3.60, P< or =.01; t=-3.17, P< or =.01, respectively). The control group did not (t=-1.39, P=.19). WTT and WTQ participants demonstrated significantly greater improvements in aerobic capacity in comparison to the control group members (F=4.6, P< or =.05). The WTT and WTQ groups did not differ significantly from each other with regard to their respective improvements in aerobic capacity (F=.014, P=.907). The aerobic capacity of adult burn survivors can be improved with participation in a structured, 12-week exercise program after injury.

  6. Exercise Training in Treatment and Rehabilitation of Hip Osteoarthritis: A 12-Week Pilot Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsti Uusi-Rasi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Osteoarthritis (OA of the hip is one of the major causes of pain and disability in the older population. Although exercise is an effective treatment for knee OA, there is lack of evidence regarding hip OA. The aim of this trial was to test the safety and feasibility of a specifically designed exercise program in relieving hip pain and improving function in hip OA participants and to evaluate various methods to measure changes in their physical functioning. Materials and Methods. 13 women aged ≥ 65 years with hip OA were recruited in this 12-week pilot study. Results. Pain declined significantly over 30% from baseline, and joint function and health-related quality of life improved slightly. Objective assessment of physical functioning showed statistically significant improvement in the maximal isometric leg extensor strength by 20% and in the hip extension range of motion by 30%. Conclusions. The exercise program was found to be safe and feasible. The present evidence indicates that the exercise program is effective in the short term. However, adequate powered RCTs are needed to determine effects of long-term exercise therapy on pain and progression of hip OA.

  7. Effects of swimming activity on the copulatory behavior of sexually active male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allouh, M Z

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity has long been associated with better sexual function. This study investigated the effects of moderate swimming exercise on the copulatory behavior of sexually potent male rats. Two sets of sexually potent male rats -highly active and moderately active- were identified depending on baseline sexual activity. Each of the two sets of rats was further randomly divided into two groups (swimming and sedentary). There were 16 rats in each of the four study groups (highly active swimming, highly active sedentary, moderately active swimming and moderately active sedentary). The copulatory behavior parameters and serum testosterone levels were measured and compared between the rats of the swimming and sedentary groups following a month long training period in which rats were made to swim for 1 h every alternate day. Swimming significantly improved the sexual performance of highly active rats, as indicated by increased intromission frequency and intromission ratio, compared with the sedentary controls. Swimming improved both sexual desire and performance, as indicated by reduced mount latency and increased intromission ratio, respectively, in swimming moderately active rats compared with the sedentary moderately active controls. Therefore, swimming activity improves the copulatory behavior of both highly active and moderately active male rats.

  8. Manual therapy and therapeutic exercise in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hip: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Romeo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review aimed at investigating the role of therapeutic exercise and/or manual therapy in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis (OA. Two independent reviewers (AR, CV searched PubMed, Cinahl, Cochrane Library, PEDro and Scopus databases and a third one (SP was consulted in case of disagreement. The research criteria were publication period (from May 2007 to April 2012 and publication language (English or Italian. Ten randomized controlled trials matched inclusion criteria, eight of which concerning therapeutic exercise and two manual therapy. Few good quality studies were found. At mid- and long-term follow-up land-based exercises showed insufficient evidence of effectiveness with respect to pain and quality of life, but positive results were found for physical function. Water exercises significantly reduced fall risk when combined with functional exercises. Programs containing progressive and gradual exposure of difficult activities, education and exercises promoted better outcomes, higher adherence to home program and increased amount of physical activity, especially walking. Manual therapy seemed to reduce pain and decrease disability at short-term. Less use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was statistically significant at long-term follow-up in patients treated with manual therapy. The relationship between clinical results and radiological grade of OA was not investigated. Encouraging results were found in recent literature for manual therapy and functional training. Further research is needed to elucidate this issue through high-quality trials, especially addressing the aspects that have not been thoroughly explored yet, for instance type, amount and scheduling of conservative treatment.

  9. Effects of Clinical Pilates Exercises on Patients Developing Lymphedema after Breast Cancer Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şener, Hülya Özlem; Malkoç, Mehtap; Ergin, Gülbin; Karadibak, Didem; Yavuzşen, Tuğba

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of clinical Pilates exercises with those of the standard lymphedema exercises on lymphedema developing after breast cancer treatment. The study comprised 60 female patients with a mean age of 53.2±7.7 years who developed lymphedema after having breast cancer treatment. The patients were randomized into two groups: the clinical Pilates exercise group (n=30), and the control group (n=30). Before, and at the 8th week of treatment, the following parameters were measured: the severity of lymphedema, limb circumferences, body image using the Social Appearance Anxiety Scale, quality of life with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life questionnaire (QLQ-BR23), and upper extremity function using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) outcome measure. Both groups performed one-hour exercises three days a week for 8 weeks. After treatment, the symptoms recovered significantly in both groups. Reductions in the severity of lymphedema, improvements in the social appearance anxiety scale scores, quality of life scores, and upper extremity functions scores in the clinical Pilates exercise group were greater than those in the control group. Clinical Pilates exercises were determined to be more effective on the symptoms of patients with lymphedema than were standard lymphedema exercises. Clinical Pilates exercises could be considered a safe model and would contribute to treatment programs.

  10. Exercise as a Time-conditioning Effector in Chronic Disease: a Complementary Treatment Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. B. P. Costa Rosa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise has been widely believed to be a preventive and therapeutic aid in the treatment of various pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. A common problem associated with such pathologies is cachexia, characterized by progressive weight loss and depletion of lean and fat body mass, and is linked to poor prognosis. As this syndrome comprises changes in many physiological systems, it is tempting to assume that the modulation of the psychoneuroimmunoendocrine axis could attenuate or even prevent cachexia progression in cancer patients. Cancer cachexia is characterized by a disruption in the rhythmic secretion of melatonin, an important time-conditioning effector. This hormone, secreted by the pineal gland, transmits circadian and seasonal information to all organs and cells of the body, synchronizing the organism with the photoperiod. Considering that exercise modulates the immune response through at least two different mechanisms—metabolic and neuroendocrine—we propose that the adoption of a regular exercise program as a complementary strategy in the treatment of cancer patients, with the exercise bouts regularly performed at the same time of the day, will ameliorate cachexia symptoms and increase survival and quality of life.

  11. A review of the benefits of whole body exercise during and after treatment for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshbaum, Marilyn N

    2007-01-01

    A current critical review of the literature was deemed necessary to evaluate the strength of evidence to inform clinical practice. Recently, there has been a noticeable increase in empirical literature surrounding the benefits of exercise for breast cancer patients. A systematic search strategy was used to identify relevant literature. Twenty-nine articles were retained for critical review, appraised for quality and synthesized. Many early studies had limited internal and external validity. Recent studies were considerably more rigorous and robust. Consistent support for all types of aerobic exercise was most evident in studies of patients during adjuvant cancer treatments (chemotherapy and radiotherapy), compared with post-treatment studies. The evidence which suggested that aerobic exercise limits cancer-related fatigue was particularly strong. For other patient concerns, the empirical support was less robust, however, the potential for beneficial and measurable patient outcomes was indicated for cardiopulmonary function, overall quality of life, global health, strength, sleep, self-esteem and reduced weight gain, depression, anxiety and tiredness. Additional studies with higher methodological quality are required in this clinically relevant area to substantiate current indications particularly for patient subgroups (e.g. older people, those with advanced cancer and the disadvantaged). It is important for all healthcare professionals involved in the care of individuals affected by breast cancer to be aware of the evidence surrounding the benefits of exercise and to encourage patients to increase physical activity and improve their overall health and well-being.

  12. Does Scoliosis-Specific Exercise Treatment in Adolescence Alter Adult Quality of Life?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Płaszewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Health-related quality of life in adults, who in adolescence participated in a scoliosis-specific exercise program, was not previously studied. Design. Cross-sectional study, with retrospective data collection. Material and Methods. Homogenous groups of 68 persons (43 women aged 30.10 (25–39 years, with mild or moderate scoliosis, and 76 (38 women able-bodied persons, aged 30.11 (24–38 years, who 16.5 (12–26 years earlier had completed scoliosis-specific exercise or observation regimes, participated. Their respiratory characteristics did not differ from predicted values. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, and pain scale (VAS were applied. Results. The transformed WHOQOL-BREF scores ranged from 54.6 ± 11.19 in the physical domain in the mild scoliotic subgroup to 77.1 ± 16.05 in the social domain in the able-bodied subgroup. The ODQ values did not generally exceed 5.3 ± 7.53. Inter- and intragroup differences were nonsignificant. Age, marital status, education, and gender were significantly associated with the ODQ scores. Significant association between the ODQ and WHOQOL-BREF social relationships domain scores with the participation in exercise treatment was found. Conclusions. Participants with the history of exercise treatment generally did not differ significantly from their peers who were only under observation. This study cannot conclude that scoliosis-specific exercise treatment in adolescence alters quality of life in adulthood.

  13. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  14. A Preliminary Randomized Clinical Trial on the Effect of Cervicothoracic Manipulation Plus Supervised Exercises vs a Home Exercise Program for the Treatment of Shoulder Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa-Montoya, Sergio; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel; Fernández-Espinar, Elena María; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in pain, disability, and range of movement after cervicothoracic manipulation plus exercise therapy in individuals with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Forty-one patients (30 men, 11 women; aged 47 ± 9) diagnosed with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome attended 10 sessions for 5 weeks (2 sessions/wk). Eligible patients were randomly allocated to 2 study groups: cervicothoracic manipulation plus exercise therapy (n = 21) or home exercise program (n = 20). The outcomes measures included the visual analog scale (VAS); the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score; Shoulder Disability Questionnaire; subacromial impingement syndrome (Hawkins-Kennedy Test and Neer Test); and shoulder active range of motion (movements of flexion, extension, rotation, adduction, and abduction). Assessments were applied at baseline and 24 hours after completing 5 weeks of related interventions. After 5 weeks of treatment significant between-group differences were observed in the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score ( P = .012); however, no statistically significant differences were achieved for Shoulder Disability Questionnaire ( P = .061) and pain intensity ( P = .859). Both groups improved with regard to disability and clinical tests for detecting subacromial impingement syndrome. This clinical trial suggests that cervicothoracic manipulative treatment with mobilization plus exercise therapy may improve intensity of pain and range of motion compared with the home exercise group alone; the home exercise group had significant changes for flexion, extension, adduction, and abduction, but not for external and internal rotation movement in patients with shoulder impingement.

  15. A study to determine the effectiveness of core stabilisation exercises in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    M.Tech. This study compared the effectiveness of two different Chiropractic treatment protocols in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome. This was done in order to establish whether or not core stabilisation exercises play a role in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome. Thirty participants were used for this study. They were randomly placed into two groups namely; group 1 and group 2. Group 1 received strengthening exercises of the quadriceps muscle group and stretching ex...

  16. Decreased blood levels of lactic acid and urinary excretion of 3-methylhistidine after exercise by chronic taurine treatment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Sachinobu; Kurroda, Ikuyo; Okada, Kazuko; Morishima, Masaki; Okamoto, Miki; Harada, Nagakatsu; Takahashi, Akira; Sakai, Kentaro; Nakaya, Yutaka

    2003-12-01

    Taurine is reported to increase contractility of skeletal muscle and cardiac myocyte, which can increase exercise performance. The present study aimed to clarify taurine's effect on chronic endurance exercise, especially accumulation of lactic acid (LA), a marker of fatigue and ability of aerobic exercise, and urinary secretion of 3-methylhistidine (3-MH), a marker of muscle breakdown in rats. After exercise blood levels of LA and urinary excretion of 3-MH were significantly increased and this increase was significantly less in those with chronic treatment of taurine. Taurine treatment also significantly decreased fat accumulation and blood levels of cholesterol and triglyceride, which might improve insulin resistance and utilization of fat and glucose. These results indicate taurine treatment is useful for reducing physical fatigue and muscle damage during exercise training in rats, presumably due to antioxidant property and improvement of muscle and cardiac functions by taurine.

  17. Exercise for the treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Riebling Nørnberg, Bo

    Exercise for the treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members Murray M, 1, Lange B, 1,2, Nørnberg R. B, 3, Søgaard K, 1, Sjøgaard G, 1 1Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark 2Department of Anesthesia and Intensive......, and design an exercise training program aiming at prevention and treatment of neck pain. Methods: 9 pilots and 9 crew members participated in 9 standardized flight sorties encompassing: Patient-transport (PT), Patient-transport with Night Vision Goggles (NVG) (PT+NVG), and Search And Rescue with NVG (SAR......+NVG). Electromyography (EMG) was conducted for: trapezius m. (TRA), upper neck extensors (UNE) and sternocleido-mastoid m. (SCM). EMG was normalized to Maximal Voluntary Contractions (MVC). Results: EMG in UNE (%MVC) was in general significantly higher than TRA and SCM, and significantly higher during SAR+NVG (pilots: 2...

  18. Aerobic physical exercise as a possible treatment for neurocognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucyi, Aaron; Alsuwaidan, Mohammad T; Liauw, Samantha S; McIntyre, Roger S

    2010-11-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction associated with bipolar disorder (BD) is pervasive, persistent across illness phases, and is demonstrated to predispose and portend psychosocial impairment. Moreover, no approved therapies for various phases of BD have been shown to reliably improve any dimension of neurocognitive performance. In this article, we emphasize that aerobic physical exercise is a viable neurocognitive-enhancing adjunctive treatment for patients with BD. The overarching aim of this review is to emphasize that aerobic physical exercise is a viable neurocognitive-enhancing adjunctive treatment for patients with BD. We conducted PubMed and Google Scholar searches of all English-language articles published between January 1966 and February 2010 using the search terms bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, depression, exercise, and physical activity cross-referenced with each other and the following terms: cognition, executive function, learning, memory, attention, emotion, and behavior. Articles selected for review were based on adequacy of sample size, use of standardized experimental procedures, validated assessment measures, and overall quality. Available studies have documented an array of persisting neurocognitive deficits across disparate bipolar populations. Abnormalities in verbal working memory are highly replicated; deficits in executive function, learning, attention, and processing speed are also a consistent abnormality. The effect sizes of neurocognitive deficits in BD are intermediate between those reported in schizophrenia and major depressive disorder. Several original reports and reviews have documented the neurocognitive-enhancing effects of aerobic exercise in the general population as well as across diverse medical populations and ages. Proposed mechanisms involve nonexclusive effects on neurogenesis, neurotrophism, immunoinflammatory systems, insulin sensitivity, and neurotransmitter systems. Each of these effector systems are implicated

  19. Breast cancer treatment-associated cardiovascular toxicity and effects of exercise countermeasures

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Anthony F.; Jones, Lee W.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in breast cancer treatment have improved disease-free survival and overall survival in women with early-stage breast cancer. However, these improvements may be attenuated by the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with breast cancer adjuvant therapy. Exercise may be a potential strategy to counteract these toxicities. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the adverse cardiovascular effects of breast cancer therapy as well as the evidence supporting the potentia...

  20. Physical ExeRcise Following Esophageal Cancer Treatment (PERFECT) study: design of a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Vulpen, J.K. van; Siersema, P.D.; Hillegersberg, R. van; Nieuwenhuijzen, G.A.; Kouwenhoven, E.A.; Groenendijk, R.P.R.; Peet, D.L. van der; Hazebroek, E.J.; Rosman, C.; Schippers, C.C.G.; Steenhagen, E.; Peeters, P.H.M.; May, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following esophagectomy, esophageal cancer patients experience a clinically relevant deterioration of health-related quality of life, both on the short- and long-term. With the currently growing number of esophageal cancer survivors, the burden of disease- and treatment-related complaints and symptoms becomes more relevant. This emphasizes the need for interventions aimed at improving quality of life. Beneficial effects of post-operative physical exercise have been reported in sev...

  1. An evaluation of two types of exercise classes, containing shoulder exercises or a combination of shoulder and thoracic exercises, for the treatment of nonspecific shoulder pain: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Eva; Conroy, Carmela; Corcoran, Marie; Sullivan, Kieran O'; Purtill, Helen; Lewis, Jeremy; McCreesh, Karen

    2017-12-04

    A case series was carried out. There is a lack of evidence exploring the effectiveness of group exercise classes for people with nonspecific shoulder pain (NSSP). Also, there is a lack of research that measures potential reductions in thoracic kyphosis after exercise interventions in people with NSSP. To observe changes in shoulder pain, disability, and thoracic kyphosis in 2 groups of people with NSSP, after 2 different types of group exercise classes. People with NSSP received a 6-week block of exercises classes containing either shoulder exercises alone (shoulder group, n = 20) or a mixture of shoulder and thoracic extension exercises (thoracic group, n = 19). The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire for disability and the Numeric Rating Scale for pain were measured at baseline, 6 weeks, and 6 months. Thoracic kyphosis was measured at baseline and 6 weeks using the manual inclinometer. Significant and clinically meaningful improvements in Numeric Rating Scale and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand were demonstrated in both groups at 6-week and 6-month follow-up (P shoulder group and 0.85-1.88 in the thoracic group. Thoracic kyphosis did not change beyond measurement error in either group. Group exercise classes can improve shoulder pain and disability in people with NSSP. Resting thoracic kyphosis did not change after either exercise intervention, which suggests that the treatment effect was not due to a change in static thoracic spine posture. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. All rights reserved.

  2. Vocal function exercises for presbylaryngis: a multidimensional assessment of treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Cara; Roy, Nelson; Tanner, Kristine; Houtz, Daniel R; Smith, Marshall E

    2010-07-01

    Presbylaryngis, or aging of the larynx, can adversely affect vocal function and quality of life in the elderly. This preliminary investigation examined the effects of vocal function exercises, a physiologic voice therapy approach, as a primary treatment for presbylaryngis. Nine consecutive elderly patients with presbylaryngis (2 female, 7 male) underwent a 6-week course of voice therapy employing vocal function exercises. Pretherapy-versus-posttherapy comparisons were made of self-ratings of voice handicap and phonatory effort level, as well as auditory-perceptual voice assessments, acoustic analyses, and visual-perceptual evaluations of laryngeal images. After treatment, patients reported significant reductions on Voice Handicap Index scores, phonatory effort levels, and voice disorder severity. Blinded listeners rated the posttreatment voices as significantly less breathy and strained. However, comparison of pretreatment and posttreatment maximum phonation times, acoustic measures, and laryngeal images did not reveal significant changes. These preliminary data suggest that vocal function exercises produce significant functional and perceptual improvements in voice, and deserve further attention as a treatment for elderly patients with presbylaryngis.

  3. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    OpenAIRE

    Maladen, Ryan D.; Ding, Yang; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numeric...

  4. Exercise intervention for the treatment of trismus in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Nina; Fagerberg-Mohlin, Bodil; Andréll, Paulin; Finizia, Caterina

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of structured exercise with jaw mobilizing devices on trismus and its effect on trismus symptomatology and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in head and neck (H&N) cancer patients. Fifty patients with H&N cancer and trismus, i.e. maximum interincisal opening (MIO) ≤ 35 mm participated in a structured intervention program with jaw exercise. The patients in the intervention group underwent a 10-week exercise program with regular follow-up. A control group comprising of 50 patients with trismus and H&N cancer were matched to the intervention group according to gender, tumor location, tumor stage, comorbidity and age. HRQL and trismus-related symptoms were assessed. The mean MIO improvement was 6.4 mm (4.8-8.0) and 0.7 (-0.3-1.7) mm in the intervention group and control group respectively, three months post-intervention commencement (p Trismus Questionnaire (GTQ) domains, i.e. jaw-related problems (p trismus (MIO) was also reflected in the patient-reported outcome questionnaires where the patients who underwent the structured exercise program after cancer treatment reported improvements in HRQL and less trismus-related symptoms compared to the control group.

  5. The effectiveness of the treatment of severe exercise-induced asthma in schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Garas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bronchial asthma is one of the most common chronic multifactorial diseases of the lungs. At least 10–12 % of patients with bronchial asthma are suffering from a severe form of the disease. One aspect of inadequate severe asthma control is its phenotypic heterogeneity, interest of experts increases to the problem of exercise-induced asthma. The purpose of the study was to increase efficiency of treatment for severe exercise-induced asthma in schoolchildren based on the analysis of the attack dynamics and to achieve disease control according to main inflammatometric and spirometric indices. Materials and methods. We examined 46 children with severe persistent bronchial asthma, in particular, 15 schoolchildren suffering from severe exercise-induced asthma, the second clinical group (comparison one consisted of 31 children suffering from severe type of the disease, with no signs of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Basic therapy effectiveness was determined prospectively by assessing the disease control using AST-test with an interval of 3 months. The severity of bronchial obstruction syndrome in patients on admission to hospital during exacerbation was assessed by score scale. Airway hyperresponsiveness was evaluated according to the results of bronchoprovocation with histamine. Results. Children of I clinical group had more significant manifestations of bronchial obstruction during the week of inpatient treatment than the comparison group of patients, including significantly more severe manifestations of bronchial obstruction were verified on 1st and 7th day of hospitalization. Due to the analysis of basic therapy effectiveness, only a quarter of I clinical group patients and a larger part of schoolchildren in comparison group achieved the partial control after a 3-month course of anti-inflammatory treatment. Eosinophilic inflammation was observed in most children with severe exercise-induced asthma (60.1 % and in 47.2 % of

  6. ADAPTED SWIMMING TRAINING FOCUSED ON IMPROVEMENT OF PSYCHOPHYSICAL STATUS OD ELDERLY PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Krivokapić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries chronological age from 65 is often mentioned as age limit when elderly age begins, and which is featured by significant changes in organic functions as well as social relations. Thanks to qualitative medical care and contemporary ways of treatment, an average lifetime has been prolonged. Therefore, according to some data in developed countries of Western Europe, each fourth inhabitant is older than 65. However, there psychophysical abilities are very weak, and health is bad, which directly influences reduction in life quality. Adapted physical activities in water adjusted to abilities and health state of elderly people give a series of advantages in comparison to exercises that can be done outside water. For that reason, in those conditions effect of gravity is reduced, so PTO-skeletal system suffers a lot less burden than at practicing on dry. Taking into account that postural system with elderly people is often damaged, great advantage at exercising in water enables horizontal position that a person takes. That beneficially influences first of all the spinal cord, which is in horizontal position disburdened from gravity influence which beneficially affects spinal disease. Results of numerous researches indicate that swimming harmonically burdens organism so that almost all musculature of upper and lower extremities, belly and pelvis area. Swimming accelerates blood circulation, heart gets more blood which directly affects increase in minute volume. Eventually it all brings to fortification of heart muscle and more permanent increase of its functional abilities. Possibility of precise dosing of burden in swimming enables excellent way of therapy with elderly people and those with damaged heart. Besides, activated musculature enables fast relaxation of organism and restore of all vital cardio respiratory functions to the level of standard work ability of a man.

  7. Exercise training for people following curative intent treatment for non-small cell lung cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheri, Vinicius; Jenkins, Sue; Cecins, Nola; Gain, Kevin; Phillips, Martin J; Sanders, Lucas H; Hill, Kylie

    In people following curative intent treatment for non-small cell lung cancer, to investigate the effects of supervised exercise training on exercise capacity, physical activity and sedentary behavior, peripheral muscle force, health-related quality of life, fatigue, feelings of anxiety and depression, and lung function. This pilot randomized controlled trial included participants 6-10 weeks after lobectomy for non-small cell lung cancer or, for those who required adjuvant chemotherapy, 4-8 weeks after their last cycle. Participants were randomized to either 8 weeks of supervised exercise training (exercise group) or 8 weeks of usual care (control group). Prior to and following the intervention period, both groups completed measurements of exercise capacity, physical activity and sedentary behavior, quadriceps and handgrip force, HRQoL, fatigue, feelings of anxiety and depression, and lung function. Intention-to-treat analysis was undertaken. Seventeen participants (mean age 67, SD=9 years; 12 females) were included. Nine and eight participants were randomized to the exercise and control groups, respectively. Four participants (44%) adhered to exercise training. Compared with any change seen in the control group, those in the exercise group demonstrated greater gains in the peak rate of oxygen consumption (mean difference, 95% confidence interval for between-group difference: 0.19 [0.04-0.33]Lmin -1 ) and 6-minute walk distance (52 [12-93]m). No other between-group differences were demonstrated. In people following curative intent treatment for non-small cell lung cancer, 8 weeks of supervised exercise training improved exercise capacity, measured by both laboratory- and field-based exercise tests. These results suggest that this clinical population may benefit from attending exercise training programs. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Biochemical and Hematological Changes Following the 120-Km Open-Water Marathon Swim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Drygas, Ewa Rębowska, Ewa Stępień, Jacek Golański, Magdalena Kwaśniewska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Data on physiological effects and potential risks of a ultraendurance swimming are scarce. This report presents the unique case of a 61-year old athlete who completed a non-stop open-water 120-km ultramarathon swim on the Warta River, Poland. Pre-swimming examinations revealed favorable conditions (blood pressure, 110/70 mmHg; rest heart rate, 54 beats/minute, ejection fraction, 60%, 20.2 metabolic equivalents in a maximal exercise test. The swimming time and distance covered were 27 h 33 min and 120 km, respectively. Blood samples for hematological and biochemical parameters were collected 30 min, 4 hrs, 10 hrs and 8 days after the swim. The body temperature of the swimmer was 36.7°C before and 35.1°C after the swim. The hematological parameters remained within the reference range in the postexercise period except for leucocytes (17.5 and 10.6 x G/l noted 30 minutes and 4 hours after the swim, respectively. Serum urea, aspartate aminotransferase and C-reactive protein increased above the reference range reaching 11.3 mmol/l, 1054 nmol/l/s and 25.9 mg/l, respectively. Symptomatic hyponatremia was not observed. Although the results demonstrate that an experienced athlete is able to complete an ultra-marathon swim without negative health consequences, further studies addressing the potential risks of marathon swimming are required.

  9. New insights into treatment of children with exercise-induced asthma symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Iwona; Sztafiska, Anna; Jerzyska, Joanna; Podlecka, Daniela; Majak, Pawe; Stelmach, Wodzimierz

    2016-11-01

    Exercise is one of the most common triggers of bronchoconstriction and affects up to 80% of children with asthma. The purpose of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to assess the effectiveness of treatment with ciclesonide 160 microgram, either alone, with a higher dose, with a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA), or with a long-acting beta-agonist (LABA) in children with asthma with postexercise-induced symptoms. Eighty adolescents, ages 1218 years, with asthma and postexercise symptoms were enrolled. Children were treated in one of four treatment groups: ciclesonide 160 microgram daily dose (cic 160), ciclesonide 320 microgram daily dose (cic 320), ciclesonide 160 microgram daily dose combined with montelukast (cic + LTRA), or ciclesonide 160 microgram daily combined with formoterol (cic + LABA). The impact of treatment on clinical symptoms, maximum percentage decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second after intense exercise effort, fractional exhaled nitric oxide in exhaled breath, and the contribution of inflammatory mediators in exhaled breath condensate were assessed. In children with asthma and with postexercise symptoms, 8-week daily administration of ciclesonide 320 microgram, ciclesonide 160 microgram plus LABA, and ciclesonide 160 microgram alone decreased daytime symptoms; decrease in maximal fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second reached the level of significance in the cic 320, cic + LABA, and cic + LTRA groups. A higher prevalence of positive responses to treatment after addition of an LTRA or LABA to ciclesonide 160 microgram for patients with exercise treadmill challengeinduced clinical symptoms only was revealed. Monotherapy with ciclesonide 320 microgram can be as effective as combined therapy in reducing exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. We revealed a higher prevalence of positive responses to treatment after the addition of LTRA or LABA to ciclesonide 160 microgram for patients with exercise treadmill

  10. Fueling the engine: induction of AMP-activated protein kinase in trout skeletal muscle by swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnoni, L.J.; Palstra, A.P.; Planas, J.V.

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is well known to be induced by exercise and to mediate important metabolic changes in the skeletal muscle of mammals. Despite the physiological importance of exercise as a modulator of energy use by locomotory muscle, the regulation of this enzyme by swimming has

  11. Development of an exercise intervention as part of rehabilitation in a glioblastoma multiforme survivor during irradiation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders; Søgaard, Karen; Minet, Lisbeth Rosenbek

    2018-01-01

    attended all possible sessions without experiencing adverse effects, and improved in aerobe power (24%), muscle strength (0-38%), standing balance (71%), walking ability (9%), and QOL domains of "Global Health Status/QoL" and "Physical functioning." CONCLUSIONS: Based on this single case, exercise...... completed a supervised six-week exercise intervention during irradiation treatment beginning 42 d after resection. Exercise modalities of cardiorespiratory, resistance, and balance training were designed on generic recommendations of various cancer populations and literature review. RESULTS: Our case...... of exercise as part of rehabilitation still needs attention in strong methodology studies of patients with gliomas. Exercise rehabilitation may maintain or even improve functional performance and QOL domains during medical treatment regimens. Functional independent patients with GBM are capable to comply...

  12. Rest versus exercise as treatment for patients with low back pain and Modic changes. A randomised controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Krüger; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Clinical experience suggests that many patients with Modic changes have relatively severe and persistent low back pain (LBP), which typically appears to be resistant to treatment. Exercise therapy is the recommended treatment for chronic LBP, however due to their underlying...... on any outcome. CONCLUSIONS: No differences were found between the two treatment approaches, 'rest and reduced load' and 'exercise and staying active', in patients with persistent LBP and Modic changes. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00454792....... pathology, Modic changes might be a diagnostic subgroup that does not benefit from exercise. The objective of this study was to compare the current state-of-the art treatment approach (exercise and staying active) with a new approach (load reduction and daily rest) for people with Modic changes using...

  13. Mindfulness Is Associated With Treatment Response From Nonpharmacologic Exercise Interventions in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Augustine C; Harvey, William F; Price, Lori Lyn; Han, Xingyi; Driban, Jeffrey B; Wong, John B; Chung, Mei; McAlindon, Timothy E; Wang, Chenchen

    2017-11-01

    To examine the association between baseline mindfulness and response from exercise interventions in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Cohort study; responder analysis of a clinical trial subset. Urban tertiary care academic hospital. Participants with symptomatic, radiographic knee OA (N=86; mean age, 60y; 74% female; 48% white). Twelve weeks (twice per week) of Tai Chi or physical therapy exercise. Treatment response was defined using Osteoarthritis Research Society International criteria indicating meaningful improvements in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, WOMAC function, or Patient Global Assessment scores. At baseline, participants completed the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (mean total score, 142±17) and were grouped into 3 categories of total mindfulness: higher, medium, or lower. Relative risk (RR) ratios were used to compare treatment response across groups. Participants with higher total mindfulness were 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.83) more likely to meet responder criteria than those with lower mindfulness. We found no significant difference between medium and lower mindfulness groups (RR=1.0; 95% CI, 0.69-1.44). Among the 5 mindfulness facets, medium acting-with-awareness was 46% (95% CI, 1.09-1.96) more likely to respond than lower acting-with-awareness, and higher acting-with-awareness was 34% more likely to respond, but this did not reach significance (95% CI, 0.97-1.86). In this study, higher mindfulness, primarily driven by its acting-with-awareness facet, was significantly associated with a greater likelihood of response to nonpharmacologic exercise interventions in knee OA. This suggests that mindfulness-cultivating interventions may increase the likelihood of response from exercise. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. SWIMMING ENHANCES BONE MASS ACQUISITION IN GROWING FEMALE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne McVeigh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Growing bones are most responsive to mechanical loading. We investigated bone mass acquisition patterns following a swimming or running exercise intervention of equal duration, in growing rats. We compared changes in bone mineral properties in female Sprague Dawley rats that were divided into three groups: sedentary controls (n = 10, runners (n = 8 and swimmers (n = 11. Runners and swimmers underwent a six week intervention, exercising five days per week, 30min per day. Running rats ran on an inclined treadmill at 0.33 m.s-1, while swimming rats swam in 25oC water. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scans measuring bone mineral content (BMC, bone mineral density (BMD and bone area at the femur, lumbar spine and whole body were recorded for all rats before and after the six week intervention. Bone and serum calcium and plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH concentrations were measured at the end of the 6 weeks. Swimming rats had greater BMC and bone area changes at the femur and lumbar spine (p < 0.05 than the running rats and a greater whole body BMC and bone area to that of control rats (p < 0.05. There were no differences in bone gain between running and sedentary control rats. There was no significant difference in serum or bone calcium or PTH concentrations between the groups of rats. A swimming intervention is able to produce greater beneficial effects on the rat skeleton than no exercise at all, suggesting that the strains associated with swimming may engender a unique mechanical load on the bone

  15. Effects of bone-conducted music on swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Angela R; Gennings, Chris; Hoffman, Regina A; Strittmatter, Andrew P; Retchin, Sheldon M

    2012-04-01

    Music has been shown to be a useful adjunct for many forms of exercise and has been observed to improve athletic performance in some settings. Nonetheless, because of the limited availability of practical applications of sound conduction in water, there are few studies of the effects of music on swimming athletes. The SwiMP3 is a novel device that uses bone conduction as a method to circumvent the obstacles to transmitting high fidelity sound in an aquatic environment. Thus, we studied the influence of music on swimming performance and enjoyment using the SwiMP3. Twenty-four competitive swimmers participated in a randomized crossover design study in which they completed timed swimming trials with and without the use of music delivered via bone conduction with the SwiMP3. Each participant swam four 50-m trials and one 800-m trial and then completed a physical enjoyment survey. Statistically significant improvements in swimming performance times were found in both the 50-m (0.32 seconds; p = 0.013) and 800-m (6.5 seconds; p = 0.031) trials with music using the SwiMP3. There was no significant improvement in physical enjoyment with the device as measured by a validated assessment tool. Bone-conducted music appears to have a salutary influence on swimming performance in a practice environment among competitive adult swimmers.

  16. The Impact of Baby Swimming on Introductory and Elementary Swimming Training

    OpenAIRE

    Břízová, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    THESIS ANNOTATION Title: The Impact of Baby Swimming on Introductory and Elementary Swimming Training Aim: To assess the impact of 'baby swimming' on the successfulness in introductory and partly in elementary swimming training, and to find out whether also other circumstances (for example the length of attendance at 'baby swimming') have some influence on introductory swimming training. Methods: We used a questionnaire method for the parents of children who had attended 'baby swimming' and f...

  17. Swimming level of pupils from elementary schools with own swimming pool

    OpenAIRE

    Zálupská, Klára

    2012-01-01

    Title: Swimming level of pupils from primary school with private swimming pool. Work objectives: The aim is to identify assess level of swimming of pupils from first to ninth grade of primary school with a private pool in Chomutov district using continuous swimming test with regular swimming lessons, which is started in the first grade and persists until the ninth grade. The condition was organizing a school swimming lessons once a week for 45 minutes in all grades. Methodology: Swimming leve...

  18. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercises Electrothermal Modalities Ergonomic Changes Hydrotherapy Manual Therapy Physical Therapy Postural Training Traction Watchful Waiting and Education Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections ...

  19. The management of bilateral high hamstring tendinopathy with ASTYM® treatment and eccentric exercise: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Joshua R

    2012-08-01

    High hamstring tendinopathy (HHT) is an overuse injury that occurs most commonly in runners. The management of HHT is often challenging and the research supporting many interventions is limited. Eccentric exercise has been proven effective in the treatment of various tendinopathies but has not been thoroughly studied with HHT. Soft tissue mobilization, including ASTYM, is often utilized in the treatment of tendinopathies, though there is limited evidence supporting this approach. The purpose of this paper is to present the case of a patient referred to physical therapy with bilateral HHT. The patient was a 41-year-old recreational runner that had an insidious onset of right buttock pain 12 months prior to initiating therapy and left buttock pain 9 months prior. Her primary complaints included an inability to run, pain with prolonged or brisk walking, and pain with sitting on hard surfaces. The patient was treated in physical therapy two times per week for 16 visits with treatment focused on eccentric hamstring strengthening and ASTYM. By her eighth visit, the patient was able to walk 2·5 miles without pain and by her 12 visit, she was able to jog 1 mile before the onset of pain. After 16 visits, the patient reported that she was approximately 95% improved, was able to run 2·5 miles without pain, and had no pain with sitting on hard surfaces. This case suggests that eccentric exercise combined with ASTYM may be an effective treatment for HHT.

  20. The assessment and treatment of unhealthy exercise in adolescents with anorexia nervosa: A Delphi study to synthesize clinical knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noetel, Melissa; Dawson, Lisa; Hay, Phillipa; Touyz, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to explore and synthesize expert clinical knowledge on defining and managing unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. The Delphi methodology was used. Clinicians (n = 25) considered experts in the treatment of AN in adolescents were recruited internationally to form the panel. The first round of the questionnaires was comprised of five open-ended questions regarding defining, assessing, and treating unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. Statements were derived from this data using content analysis, and included as Likert-based items in two subsequent rounds, in which panellists were required to rate their level of agreement for each item. All 25 respondents completed the three rounds of questionnaires. Consensus was achieved for 59.0% of the items included in the second and third round of questionnaires. Although consensus was not achieved, compulsive exercise was the preferred term for the panel when referring to unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. The panel clearly delineated features of unhealthy and healthy exercise, and endorsed a number of items considered important to assess for when evaluating exercise in this clinical population. A variety of treatment approaches and strategies reached consensus. Notably, for those who are medically stable and progressing toward recovery, the panel recommended initial exercise restriction practices and reintroducing healthy exercise behaviors, rather than exercise cessation practices. The current findings can serve as preliminary treatment guidelines. A unified approach to labeling and defining unhealthy exercise in the eating disorder literature and clinical settings is required to achieve further progress. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Association of physical performance and biochemical profile of mice with intrinsic endurance swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Ching; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Wei, Li; Chen, Ying-Ju; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the potential mediators and relationship affecting congenital exercise performance in an animal model with physical activity challenge from physiological and biochemical perspectives. A total of 75 male ICR mice (5 weeks old) were adapted for 1 week, then mice performed a non-loading and exhaustive swimming test and were assigned to 3 groups by exhaustive swimming time: low exercise capacity (LEC) (5 hr). After a 1-week rest, the 3 groups of mice performed an exhaustive swimming test with a 5% and 7.5% weight load and a forelimb grip-strength test, with a 1-week rest between tests. Blood samples were collected immediately after an acute exercise challenge and at the end of the experiment (resting status) to evaluate biochemical blood variables and their relation with physical performance. Physical activity, including exhaustive swimming and grip strength, was greater for HEC than other mice. The swimming performance and grip strength between groups were moderately correlated (r=0.443, p <0.05). Resting serum ammonium level was moderately correlated with endurance with a 7.5% weight load (r=-0.447, p <0.05) and with lactate level (r=0.598, p <0.05). The pulmonary morphology of the HEC group seemed to indicate benefits for aerobic exercise. Mice showed congenital exercise performance, which was significantly correlated with different physical challenges and biochemical variable values. This study may have implications for interference in intrinsic characteristics.

  2. Exercise during and after neoadjuvant rectal cancer treatment (the EXERT trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morielli, Andria R; Usmani, Nawaid; Boulé, Normand G; Severin, Diane; Tankel, Keith; Nijjar, Tirath; Joseph, Kurian; Fairchild, Alysa; Courneya, Kerry S

    2018-01-12

    Standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer includes 5-6 weeks of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) followed by total mesorectal excision 6-8 weeks later. NACRT improves local disease control and surgical outcomes but also causes side effects including fatigue, diarrhea, hand-foot syndrome, and physical deconditioning that may impede quality of life (QoL), treatment completion, treatment response, and long-term prognosis. Interventions to improve treatment outcomes and manage side effects that are safe, tolerable and low-cost are highly desirable. Exercise has been shown to improve some of these outcomes in other cancer patient groups but no study to date has examined the potential benefits (and harms) of exercise training during and after NACRT for rectal cancer. The Exercise During and After Neoadjuvant Rectal Cancer Treatment (EXERT) trial is a single-center, prospective, two-armed, phase II randomized controlled trial designed to test the preliminary efficacy of exercise training in this clinical setting and to further evaluate its feasibility and safety. Participants will be 60 rectal cancer patients scheduled to receive long-course NACRT followed by total mesorectal excision. Participants will be randomly assigned to exercise training or usual care. Participants in the exercise training group will be asked to complete three supervised, high-intensity interval training sessions/week during NACRT and ≥ 150 min/week of unsupervised, moderate-to-vigorous-intensity, continuous exercise training after NACRT prior to surgery. Participants in the usual care group will be asked not to increase their exercise from baseline. Assessments will be completed pre NACRT, post NACRT, and pre surgery. The primary endpoint will be cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2 peak) at the post-NACRT time point assessed by a graded exercise test. Secondary endpoints will include functional fitness assessed by the Senior's Fitness Test, QoL assessed by the European

  3. Effect of Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Combined with Testosterone Treatment on Cardiovascular Function in Rats: Influence of Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engi, Sheila A; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Crestani, Carlos C

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of voluntary ethanol consumption combined with testosterone treatment on cardiovascular function in rats. Moreover, we investigated the influence of exercise training on these effects. To this end, male rats were submitted to low-intensity training on a treadmill or kept sedentary while concurrently being treated with ethanol for 6 weeks. For voluntary ethanol intake, rats were given access to two bottles, one containing ethanol and other containing water, three 24-hour sessions per week. In the last two weeks (weeks 5 and 6), animals underwent testosterone treatment concurrently with exercise training and exposure to ethanol. Ethanol consumption was not affected by either testosterone treatment or exercise training. Also, drug treatments did not influence the treadmill performance improvement evoked by training. However, testosterone alone, but not in combination with ethanol, reduced resting heart rate. Moreover, combined treatment with testosterone and ethanol reduced the pressor response to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Treatment with either testosterone or ethanol alone also affected baroreflex activity and enhanced depressor response to acetylcholine, but these effects were inhibited when drugs were coadministrated. Exercise training restored most cardiovascular effects evoked by drug treatments. Furthermore, both drugs administrated alone increased pressor response to phenylephrine in trained animals. Also, drug treatments inhibited the beneficial effects of training on baroreflex function. In conclusion, the present results suggest a potential interaction between toxic effects of testosterone and ethanol on cardiovascular function. Data also indicate that exercise training is an important factor influencing the effects of these substances.

  4. Baby swimming and respiratory health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystad, Wenche; Håberg, Siri E; London, Stephanie J; Nafstad, Per; Magnus, Per

    2008-05-01

    To estimate the effect of baby swimming in the first 6 months of life on respiratory diseases from 6 to 18 months. We used data from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in children born between 1999 and 2005 followed from birth to the age of 18 months (n = 30,870). Health outcomes: lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), wheeze and otitis media between 6 and 18 months of age. baby swimming at the age of 6 months. The effect of baby swimming was estimated by logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. About 25% of the children participated in baby swimming. The prevalence of LRTI was 13.3%, wheeze 40.0% and otitis media 30.4%. Children who were baby swimming were not more likely to have LRTI, to wheeze or to have otitis media. However, children with atopic mothers who attended baby swimming had an increased risk of wheeze, adjusted odds ratios (aOR) 1.24 (95% CI 1.11, 1.39), but not LRTI or otitis media. This was also the case for children without respiratory diseases before 6 months aOR 1.08 (95%CI 1.02-1.15). Baby swimming may be related to later wheeze. However, these findings warrant further investigation.

  5. Swimming attenuates inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in a rat model of dextran sulfate sodium-induced chronic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ling; Yao, Zhi-Qiang; Chang, Qi; Zhao, Ya-Li; Liu, Ning-Ning; Zhu, Xiao-Shan; Liu, Qin-Qin; Wang, Li-Feng; Yang, An-Gang; Gao, Chun-Fang; Li, Jun-Tang

    2017-01-31

    Increasing evidence suggests that regular physical exercise suppresses chronic inflammation. However, the potential inhibitory effects of swimming on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced chronic colitis, and its underlying mechanisms, remain unclear. In this study, rats were orally administered DSS to induce chronic colitis, and subsequently treated with or without swimming exercise. A 7-week swimming program (1 or 1.5 hours per day, 5 days per week) ameliorated DSS-caused colon shortening, colon barrier disruption, spleen enlargement, serum LDH release, and reduction of body weight gain. Swimming for 1.5 hours per day afforded greater protection than 1 hour per day. Swimming ameliorated DSS-induced decrease in crypt depth, and increases in myeloperoxidase activity, infiltration of Ly6G+ neutrophils and TNF-α- and IFN-γ-expressing CD3+ T cells, as well as fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin. Swimming inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production and decreased the protein expression of phosphorylated nuclear factor-κB p65 and cyclooxygenase 2, whereas it elevated interleukin-10 levels. Swimming impeded the generation of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide; however, it boosted glutathione levels, total antioxidant capacity, and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. Additionally, swimming decreased caspase-3 activity and expression of apoptosis-inducing factor, cytochrome c, Bax, and cleaved-caspase-3, but increased Bcl-2 levels. Overall, these results suggest that swimming exerts beneficial effects on DSS-induced chronic colitis by modulating inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis.

  6. EFFICIENCY OF DIFFERENT METHODOLOGICAL MODELS OF SWIMMING PRACTICE WITH PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Krivokapić

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available On the sample of 68 preschool boys and girls aged five to six years two models of swimming teaching realised with purpose to research their efficacity. lt was finded before that they were nonswimers. Testers deviated in two similar groups by basic motor and cognitive abilities. First model of swim teaching, signed as time deviated learning, was realised at the cloused swimming pool with 36 testers which exercised twice of week during three months. Second model of swim teaching, signed as time concentrated learning, was realised as a two-week course with 32 testers which exercised at the sea side. Two control assessment of swimming level knowledge were made during experimental process, and a final assesment was made at the and of the experiment Scaling tehnicque was used for assesing. An analysis of the obtained data resulted in the following conclusions: the both models of swim teaching were efficacity and majority of children accepted swim knovvledge. Results of time concentrated model learning were statistical significance beter then time deviated learning only in the control assesments, but the svviming level knowledge was not different in the final assment. That conclusion shows that model of time concentrated learning has more efficacity in the begining, and model of time deviated learning in the later period of teaching

  7. The Effectiveness of Aquatic Exercises in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncay Çakır

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic destructive inflammatory disorder. This study is aimed to investigate the effects of balneotherapy and aquatherapy in the treatment of RA patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 59 patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria for RA were included this study. Patients were randomly assigned into three groups. Group 1 (n=20 received balneotherapy, group 2 (n=20 received an aquatic exercise program and group 3 (n=19 was accepted as control group. These programs were applied five times a week, over three weeks (15 sessions. Patients were evaluated for clinical and laboratory parameters. Clinical parameters included pain,duration of morning stiffness, number of swollen and tender joints, disease activity score (DAS28, Modified health assessment questionnaire (mHAQ, physician’s and patient’s global assessment and hand grip strength. Laboratory evaluation included erythrocyte sedimentation rate(ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP. The assessment parameters were measured before, at the end of and after 3 months of the therapy. Results: The mean age of the patients was 54±10.7 (25-75 years and the mean disease duration was 122.3±98.1 (1-424 months. In aquatic exercise group we observed an improvement in DAS28 scores (p0.05. Conclusion: This study shows that aquatic exercise program is beneficial in the management of DAS28, pain, HAQ parameters and should be taken in to consideration in planning exercise therapy for RA patients. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2014;20: 10-5

  8. Swimming Performance and Metabolism of Golden Shiners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The swimming ability and metabolism of golden shiners, Notemigonus crysoleucas, was examined using swim tunnel respirometery. The oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies at various swimming speeds, an estimation of the standard metabolic rate, and the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) was determ...

  9. Immediate Effects of Osteopathic Treatment Versus Therapeutic Exercise on Patients With Chronic Cervical Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindez-Ibarbengoetxea, Xabier; Setuain, Igor; Ramírez-Velez, Robinson; Andersen, Lars L; González-Izal, Miriam; Jauregi, Andoni; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-11-14

    Context • Alternatives to medication for immediate pain relief are needed because long-term use of pain medication has been associated with adverse effects. High-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) manipulation techniques (MTs) and craniocervical flexion (CCF) exercises have been frequently used in the management of chronic cervical pain. Objective • The study intended to compare the immediate effects on pain of a treatment using HVLA manipulation versus one using a CCF exercise protocol. Design • The research team designed a single-blinded, randomized clinical trial. Setting • The study was conducted at osteopathic clinics. Participants • Participants were 25 volunteer patients with chronic neck pain. Intervention • Participants were randomly enrolled in one of 2 groups: the HVLA manipulation group (MT group), n = 12, or the CCF exercise protocol group (CCF group), n = 13. Participants in the CCF group performed the exercise for 10 repetitions of a 10-s duration, with a 10-s rest interval between each contraction, for a total contraction time of 100 s and a total time of the session of 190 s. Outcome Measures • The outcomes were measured at baseline and at 60 s postintervention. The measures included (1) a visual analogue scale (VAS) completed during range of motion (ROM) measurement, (2) an evaluation of the ROM of the cervical spine, (3) a test of pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), and (4) electromyographic (EMG) activation of sternocleidomastoid muscle during a craniocervical flexion test. Results • Following both interventions, significant changes were found between baseline and immediately postintervention in the VAS score during ROM measurement for both groups, with P = .004 and P = .015, respectively. In the MT group, the measures for flexion (P = .001), right-side bending (P = .002), and left rotation (P = .005) changed significantly between baseline and postintervention; however, only flexion (P = .026) and extension (P = .040) ROM changed

  10. Swimming ability and physiological response to swimming fatigue in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-06

    Apr 6, 2009 ... The swimming endurance of kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus (11.04 ± 2.43 g) at five swimming speeds (23.0, 26.7, 31.0, 34.6 and 38.6 cm s-1) was determined in a circulating flume at 25.7 ± 0.7°C. The plasma glucose and total protein, hepatopancreas and pleopods muscle glycogen ...

  11. Swimming ability and physiological response to swimming fatigue in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The swimming endurance of kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus (11.04 ± 2.43 g) at five swimming speeds (23.0, 26.7, 31.0, 34.6 and 38.6 cm s-1) was determined in a circulating flume at 25.7 ± 0.7°C. The plasma glucose and total protein, hepatopancreas and pleopods muscle glycogen concentrations were ...

  12. Effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injections combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Fusaro, Isabella; Galletti, Stefano; Volini, Silvia; Benedetti, Maria Grazia

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the association of exercises for the shoulder with ultrasound-guided injection into the bursa significantly improves the treatment outcome in adhesive bursitis. Two groups of 35 patients, one treated with ultrasound-guided injection (UGI) and the other one with ultrasound-guided injection and home exercise program (UGI-exercise) for 1 month, were assessed for pain and shoulder function before treatment, 1 and 3 months post-treatment. Fourteen patients in UGI group and 23 patients in the UGI-exercises group were completely free of pain after 1 month (p = 0.031). At 3 months' follow-up, patients in the UGI-exercise group showed a significant improvement with respect to the other group (p = 0.005). No differences were found in function assessment. The UGI combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis is effective to ensure a more frequent complete pain relief in the medium term.

  13. Astym treatment vs. eccentric exercise for lateral elbow tendinopathy: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Sevier

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with chronic lateral elbow (LE tendinopathy, commonly known as tennis elbow, often experience prolonged symptoms and frequent relapses. Astym treatment, evidenced in animal studies to promote the healing and regeneration of soft tissues, is hypothesized to improve outcomes in LE tendinopathy patients. This study had two objectives: (1 to compare the efficacy of Astym treatment to an evidence-based eccentric exercise program (EE for patients with chronic LE tendinopathy, and (2 to quantify outcomes of subjects non-responsive to EE who were subsequently treated with Astym treatment.Study Design. Prospective, two group, parallel, randomized controlled trial completed at a large orthopedic center in Indiana. Inclusion criteria: age range of 18–65 years old, with clinical indications of LE tendinopathy greater than 12 weeks, with no recent corticosteriod injection or disease altering comorbidities.Methods. Subjects with chronic LE tendinopathy (107 subjects with 113 affected elbows were randomly assigned using computer-generated random number tables to 4 weeks of Astym treatment (57 elbows or EE treatment (56 elbows. Data collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12 weeks, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measure: DASH; secondary outcome measures: pain with activity, maximum grip strength and function. The treating physicians and the rater were blinded; subjects and treating clinicians could not be blinded due to the nature of the treatments.Results. Resolution response rates were 78.3% for the Astym group and 40.9% for the EE group. Astym subjects showed greater gains in DASH scores (p = 0.047 and in maximum grip strength (p = 0.008 than EE subjects. Astym therapy also resolved 20/21 (95.7% of the EE non-responders, who showed improvements in DASH scores (p < 0.005, pain with activity (p = 0.002, and function (p = 0.004 following Astym treatment. Gains continued at 6 and 12 months. No adverse effects were reported.Conclusion. This study

  14. Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC) Featured Partners Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global WASH Other Uses of Water WASH-related Emergencies & Outbreaks Water, Sanitation, & Environmentally-related ...

  15. Free Swimming in Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran-Carney, Jackson; Wagenhoffer, Nathan; Zeyghami, Samane; Moored, Keith

    2017-11-01

    A free-swimming potential flow analysis of unsteady ground effect is conducted for two-dimensional airfoils via a method of images. The foils undergo a pure pitching motion about their leading edge, and the positions of the body in the streamwise and cross-stream directions are determined by the equations of motion of the body. It is shown that the unconstrained swimmer is attracted to a time-averaged position that is mediated by the flow interaction with the ground. The robustness of this fluid-mediated equilibrium position is probed by varying the non-dimensional mass, initial conditions and kinematic parameters of motion. Comparisons to the foil's fixed-motion counterpart are also made to pinpoint the effect that free swimming near the ground has on wake structures and the fluid-mediated forces over time. Optimal swimming regimes for near-boundary swimming are determined by examining asymmetric motions.

  16. System Wide Information Management (SWIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritz, Mike; McGowan, Shirley; Ramos, Cal

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation lists questions regarding the implementation of System Wide Information Management (SWIM). Some of the questions concern policy issues and strategies, technology issues and strategies, or transition issues and strategies.

  17. Swimming literacy field hockey woman player ground.

    OpenAIRE

    Baštová, Miroslava

    2012-01-01

    Title: Swimming literacy field hockey woman player ground. Objectives: To obtain and analyze data on the level ground swimming literacy field hockey woman player. Their perception swimming literacy for life, the use of non-specific regeneration and as a training resource. Methods: Analysis of scientific literature, survey, case study, data analysis and graphical presentation of results. Results of the work: field hockey player as swimming literate, benefits swimming but not used as a means of...

  18. Human inflammatory and resolving lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and ibuprofen treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markworth, James F.; Vella, Luke; Lingard, Benjamin S.; Tull, Dedreia L.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W.; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Maddipati, Krishna Rao

    2013-01-01

    Classical proinflammatory eicosanoids, and more recently discovered lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving bioactivity, exert a complex role in the initiation, control, and resolution of inflammation. Using a targeted lipidomics approach, we investigated circulating lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and treatment with the NSAID ibuprofen. Human subjects undertook a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise (80% of one repetition maximum) following oral ingestion of ibuprofen (400 mg) or placebo control. Venous blood was collected during early recovery (0–3 h and 24 h postexercise), and serum lipid mediator composition was analyzed by LC-MS-based targeted lipidomics. Postexercise recovery was characterized by elevated levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and 2-derived prostanoids (TXB2, PGE2, PGD2, PGF2α, and PGI2), lipooxygenase (5-LOX, 12-LOX, and 15-LOX)-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and leukotrienes (e.g., LTB4), and epoxygenase (CYP)-derived epoxy/dihydroxy eicosatrienoic acids (EpETrEs/DiHETrEs). Additionally, we detected elevated levels of bioactive lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins (LXA4 and LXB4), and the EPA (E-series) and DHA (D-series)-derived resolvins (RvD1 and RvE1), and protectins (PD1 isomer 10S, 17S-diHDoHE). Ibuprofen treatment blocked exercise-induced increases in COX-1 and COX-2-derived prostanoids but also resulted in off-target reductions in leukotriene biosynthesis, and a diminished proresolving lipid mediator response. CYP pathway product metabolism was also altered by ibuprofen treatment, as indicated by elevated postexercise serum 5,6-DiHETrE and 8,9-DiHETrE only in those receiving ibuprofen. These findings characterize the blood inflammatory lipid mediator response to unaccustomed resistance exercise in humans and show that acute proinflammatory signals are mechanistically linked to the induction of a

  19. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfim, Mariana Rotta; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Amaral, Sandra Lia do; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz

    2015-02-13

    Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords "statin" AND "exercise" AND "muscle", restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible.A associação do tratamento medicamentoso por estatinas com a prática de exercícios físicos pode reduzir substancialmente o risco de mortalidade cardiovascular de indivíduos dislipidêmicos, porém sua realização vem sendo associada à exacerbação de quadros miopáticos. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo apresentar os resultados mais recentes da literatura específica sobre os efeitos da associação de estatinas ao exercício físico na musculatura esquelética. Para tanto, realizou

  20. Water Evaporation in Swimming Baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgård, Carl-Erik

    This paper is publishing measuring results from models and full-scale baths of the evaporation in swimming baths, both public baths and retraining baths. Moreover, the heat balance of the basin water is measured. In addition the full-scale measurements have given many experiences which are repres...... are represented in instructions for carrying out and running swimming baths. If you follow the instructions you can achieve less investments, less heat consumption and a better comfort to the bathers....

  1. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  2. Successful treatment of groin pain syndrome in a pole-vault athlete with core stability exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dello Iacono, Antonio; Maffulli, Nicola; Laver, Lior; Padulo, Johnny

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this case report was to present a case of groin pain in a pole vault athlete describing the biomechanical features of the injury`s mechanism, acute medical management, and its successful rehabilitation. A 22-year-old professional pole-vaulter sustained an injury during a regular training session. The athlete reported significant left lower abdominal and left proximal adductor discomfort in all activities, including basic trunk motion when moving in bed, sit to stand, and walking, and was unable to return to the regular training. Clinical evaluation and imaging studies addressed the injury to a case of adductor-related groin pain associated with pubic symphysis degeneration. Treatment consisted of an exercise-based therapeutic protocol based on trunk and core muscle strengthening and stability program, with progressive motor and functional demands. Significant improvements in the overall clinical findings and functional outcomes were reported after 52 days of intervention when the athletes returned to his full athletic activity. These results suggest that an appropriate rehabilitation program, focused on trunk and core musculature stability exercise addressing to sport-related specific demands, should be considered as an optimal conservative method in the multidisciplinary approach for treatment of groin pain and prior to any surgical intervention.

  3. Swimming with the Shoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ann

    2017-10-01

    This article responds to Yuli Rahmawati and Peter Charles Taylor's piece and explores my role as a science teacher, science teacher educator and researcher in two contexts, Sierra Leone and Bhutan. In the first part of the article I reflect on my 3 years as a science teacher in Sierra Leone and demonstrate resonances with Yuli's accounts of culture shock and with her positioning of herself in a third space. I also reflect on the importance of colleagues in helping me reshape my identity as a science teacher in this new context. The second part of the article reflects on much shorter periods of time in Bhutan and my work as a teacher educator and researcher where, unlike Sierra Leone, it was not possible because of the short periods I worked there, to occupy a third space. I close by discussing how in Bhutan, but also Sierra Leone, collaboration with colleagues allowed me to contribute my own expertise, despite my lack of a deep understanding of the cultural context, in a way that was as valuable as possible. I liken this way of collaborative working in my professional life as `swimming with the shoal'.

  4. Is paramecium swimming autonomic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Toplosky, Norman; Hansen, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We seek to explore if the swimming of paramecium has an underlying autonomic mechanism. Such robotic elements may be useful in capturing the disturbance field in an environment in real time. Experimental evidence is emerging that motion control neurons of other animals may be present in paramecium as well. The limit cycle determined using analog simulation of the coupled nonlinear oscillators of olivo-cerebellar dynamics (ieee joe 33, 563-578, 2008) agrees with the tracks of the cilium of a biological paramecium. A 4-motor apparatus has been built that reproduces the kinematics of the cilium motion. The motion of the biological cilium has been analyzed and compared with the results of the finite element modeling of forces on a cilium. The modeling equates applied torque at the base of the cilium with drag, the cilium stiffness being phase dependent. A low friction pendulum apparatus with a multiplicity of electromagnetic actuators is being built for verifying the maps of the attractor basin computed using the olivo-cerebellar dynamics for different initial conditions. Sponsored by ONR 33.

  5. Effects of nutritional status on metabolic rate, exercise and recovery in a freshwater fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingerich, Andrew J.; Philipp, D. P.; Suski, C. D.

    2010-11-20

    The influence of feeding on swimming performance and exercise recovery in fish is poorly understood. Examining swimming behavior and physiological status following periods of feeding and fasting is important because wild fish often face periods of starvation. In the current study, researchers force fed and fasted groups of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) of similar sizes for a period of 16 days. Following this feeding and fasting period, fish were exercised for 60 s and monitored for swimming performance and physiological recovery. Resting metabolic rates were also determined. Fasted fish lost an average of 16 g (nearly 12%) of body mass, while force fed fish maintained body mass. Force fed fish swam 28% further and required nearly 14 s longer to tire during exercise. However, only some physiological conditions differed between feeding groups. Resting muscle glycogen concentrations was twofold greater in force fed fish, at rest and throughout recovery, although it decreased in both feeding treatments following exercise. Liver mass was nearly three times greater in force fed fish, and fasted fish had an average of 65% more cortisol throughout recovery. Similar recovery rates of most physiological responses were observed despite force fed fish having a metabolic rate 75% greater than fasted fish. Results are discussed as they relate to largemouth bass starvation in wild systems and how these physiological differences might be important in an evolutionary context.

  6. Pre-treatment Social Anxiety Severity Moderates the Impact of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction and Aerobic Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Jazaieri, Hooria; Lee, Ihno A.; Goldin, Philippe R.; Gross, James J.

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether social anxiety severity at pre-treatment would moderate the impact of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) or Aerobic Exercise (AE) for generalized social anxiety disorder. MBSR and AE produced equivalent reductions in weekly social anxiety symptoms. Improvements were moderated by pre-treatment social anxiety severity.

  7. Exercise physiological responses to drug treatments in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampopoulos, Athanasios; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Davies, Rachel J.; Gin-Sing, Wendy; Murphy, Kevin; Sheares, Karen K.; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Jenkins, David P.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) that was deemed to be inoperable were more likely to respond to drugs for treating pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by using cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing than those with CTEPH that was deemed to be operable. We analyzed CPX testing data of all patients with CTEPH who were treated with PAH drugs and had undergone CPX testing before and after treatment at a single pulmonary hypertension center between February 2009 and March 2013. Suitability for pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) was decided by experts in PEA who were associated with a treatment center. The group with inoperable CTEPH included 16 patients, the operable group included 26 patients. There were no differences in demographics and baseline hemodynamic data between the groups. Unlike patients in the operable group, after drug treatment patients with inoperable CTEPH had a significantly higher peak V̇o2 (P < 0.001), work load (P = 0.002), and oxygen pulse (P < 0.001). In terms of gas exchange, there was an overall net trend toward improved V̇e/V̇co2 in the group with inoperable CTEPH, with an increased PaCO2 (P = 0.01), suggesting reduced hyperventilation. No changes were observed in patients with operable CTEPH. In conclusion, treatment with PAH drug therapy reveals important pathophysiological differences between inoperable and operable CTEPH, with significant pulmonary vascular and cardiac responses in inoperable disease. Drug effects on exercise function observed in inoperable CTEPH cannot be translated to all forms of CTEPH. PMID:27418685

  8. Influence of pre-school swimming on level of swimming abilities of early schol age children

    OpenAIRE

    Velová, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    My thesis paper is focused on children swimming from their birth to early school age. The pivotal part of the paper is the comparison of swimming abilities between primary school children who have passed pre-school swimming training and those who have had no training at all. Theoretical framework of the paper is then focused on general swimming theory, characteristics of children's evolutionary stages within the context of swimming and definition of basic swimming skills.

  9. Exercise and quality of life during and after treatment for breast cancer: results of two randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmus, Lisa A; Salovey, Peter; Yu, Herbert; Chung, Gina; Kasl, Stanislav; Irwin, Melinda L

    2009-04-01

    To determine the effect of exercise on quality of life in (a) a randomized controlled trial of exercise among recently diagnosed breast cancer survivors undergoing adjuvant therapy and (b) a similar trial among post-treatment survivors. Fifty newly diagnosed breast cancer survivors were recruited through a hospital-based tumor registry and randomized to a 6-month, home-based exercise program (n=25) or a usual care group (n=25). In a separate trial, 75 post-treatment survivors were randomized to a 6-month, supervised exercise intervention (n=37) or to usual care (n=38). Participants in both studies completed measures of happiness, depressive symptoms, anxiety, stress, self-esteem, and quality of life at baseline and 6 months. Forty-five participants completed the trial for newly diagnosed survivors and 67 completed the trial for post-treatment survivors. Good adherence was observed in both studies. Baseline quality of life was similar for both studies on most measures. Exercise was not associated with quality of life benefits in the full sample of either study; however exercise was associated with improved social functioning among post-treatment survivors who reported low social functioning at baseline (p<0.05). Exercise did not affect quality of life in either recently diagnosed or post-treatment breast cancer survivors; however this may be due in part to relatively high baseline functioning among participants in both studies. Strategies for future research include limiting enrollment to survivors who report reduced quality of life on screening questionnaires and targeting survivor subgroups known to be at particular risk for quality of life impairment. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Education Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle ... Z Spine Specialists Videos 9 for Spine Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis ...

  11. MUSCLE FIBER SPECIFIC ANTIOXIDATIVE SYSTEM ADAPTATION TO SWIM TRAINING IN RATS: INFLUENCE OF INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gonchar

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of intermittent hypoxia at rest and in combination with long-term high-intensity swimming exercise on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense system adaptation in skeletal muscles differing in fiber type composition. High-intensity chronic exercise was performed as swimming training with load that corresponded to ~ 75 % VO2max (30 min·day-1, 5 days·wk-1, for 4 wk. Intermittent hypoxic training (IHT consisted of repeated episodes of hypoxia (12%O2, 15 min, interrupted by equal periods of recovery (5 sessions/day, for 2 wk. Sessions of IHT were used during the first two weeks and during the last two weeks of chronic exercise. Oxidative (red gastrocnemius and soleus, mix and glycolytic (white gastrocnemius muscles were sampled. Our results indicated that high-intensity swim training in combination with sessions of IHT induced more profound antioxidative adaptations in skeletal muscles than the exercise training only. This adaptation has muscle fiber type specificity and is reflected in significantly elevated superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in highly oxidative muscle only. Training adaptation of GSH system (reduced glutathione content, activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, NADPH-supplying enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase occurred both in slow- and fast-twitch muscles. However, this process was more effective in oxidative muscles. IHT attenuated the increase in TBARS content induced by high-intensity swimming training. The test on exercise tolerance demonstrated a significant elevation of the swimming time to exhaustion after IHT at rest and after IHT in conjunction with high-intensity exercise in comparison with untrained and chronically exercised rats. These results confirmed that sessions of IHT might improve exercise tolerance and increase maximal work capacity

  12. Impaired swim bladder inflation in early-life stage fathead ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigated whether inhibition of deiodinase, the enzyme which converts thyroxine (T4) to the more biologically-active form, 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), would impact inflation of the posterior and/or anterior chamber of the swim bladder, processes previously demonstrated to be thyroid-hormone regulated. Two experiments were conducted using a model deiodinase inhibitor, iopanoic acid (IOP). In the first study, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) embryos were exposed to 0.6, 1.9, or 6.0 mg IOP/L or control water in a flow-through system until reaching 6 days post-fertilization (dpf) at which time posterior swim bladder inflation was assessed. To examine effects on anterior swim bladder inflation, a second study was conducted with 6 dpf larvae exposed to the same IOP concentrations until reaching 21 dpf. Fish from both studies were sampled for T4/T3 measurements, gene transcription analyses, and thyroid histopathology. In the embryo study, incidence and length of inflated posterior swim bladders were significantly reduced in the 6.0 mg/L treatment at 6 dpf. Incidence of inflation and length of anterior swim bladder in larval fish were significantly reduced in all IOP treatments at 14 dpf, but inflation recovered by 18 dpf. Throughout the larval study, whole body T4 concentrations were significantly increased and T3 concentrations were significantly decreased in all IOP treatments. Consistent with hypothesized compensatory responses, sig

  13. Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis: A Case Report and Review of the Diagnosis and Treatment of a Rare but Potentially Life-Threatening Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T. Jaqua

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old male Marine with an uncomplicated medical history and a long history of strenuous, daily exercise presented to the emergency department after experiencing anaphylactic shock while running. Symptoms resolved following administration of intramuscular diphenhydramine, ranitidine, intravenous methylprednisolone, and intravenous fluids. On followup in the allergy clinic, a meticulous clinical history was obtained which elucidated a picture consistent with exercise-induced anaphylaxis. He had experienced diffuse pruritus and urticaria while exercising on multiple occasions over the last three years. His symptoms would usually increase as exercise continued. Prior to the first episode, he regularly exercised without symptoms. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis is a rare but potentially life-threatening syndrome that requires a careful clinical history and is a diagnosis of exclusion. Treatment is primarily exercise avoidance. Prophylactic mediations are inconsistently effective but are empirically used. Successful treatment with omalizumab was recently reported in a case of refractory exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

  14. Treating shoulder impingement using the supraspinatus synchronization exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrode, L W

    1994-01-01

    More and more athletes are seeking care in the chiropractic office for athletic injuries. This article presents a case report of a young athletic patient suffering from bilateral shoulder pain-shoulder impingement and presents a review of the literature and a review of shoulder anatomy. This report introduces the supraspinatus synchronization exercise with discussion and illustrations. This patient was treated using the supraspinatus synchronization exercise. A 16-yr-old female was seen suffering from a 4-month history of shoulder pain. She was a competitive swimmer in high school athletics and the pain was made worse by swimming the backstroke. A clinical diagnosis of bilateral stage I impingement of the shoulder (Neer's classification) was made. The patient was given instructions on how to perform the supraspinatus synchronization exercise, conservative therapies including chiropractic manipulative therapy, ice, high-voltage electrical muscle stimulation and rehabilitation exercise band exercises were also used. The patient was treated for seven treatments over a 4-wk period with resolution of the condition. The shoulder is a very complex joint, and many authors discuss the necessity of smooth synchronous movement to keep it pain free without going into how one measures this synchronous movement. The case presented in this report responded quickly to conservative treatment using the supraspinatus synchronization exercise. A good well-designed clinical trial needs to be set up to check the efficacy of this exercise.

  15. The effect of exercise and metformin treatment on circulating free DNA in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, S C; Vanky, E; Klungland, H; Stafne, S N; Mørkved, S; Salvesen, K Å; Sæther, M; Carlsen, S M

    2014-12-01

    Some pregnancy complications are characterized by increased levels of cell-free fetal (cffDNA) and maternal DNA (cfmDNA), the latter may also be elevated during physical strain. This study aims at assessing the impact of exercise and metformin intervention in pregnancy, and to compare the levels of cell free DNA in pregnant women with or without PCOS diagnosis. Consecutive women from two previous randomized controlled trials in pregnancy were included. Women came from a trial with organized exercise vs. standard antenatal care in pregnancy and a trial of metformin vs. placebo in PCOS women. Levels of cffDNA, cfmDNA and cell-free total DNA (cftDNA) were measured by qPCR. Training in pregnancy did not affect the levels of cffDNA, cfmDNA or cftDNA. PCOS-women treated with metformin had lower levels of cfmDNA and cftDNA at week 32 (mean ± SD: 301 ± 162 versus 570 ± 337, p = 0.012, 345 ± 173 versus 635 ± 370, p = 0.019); otherwise the levels were comparable to PCOS-controls. Metformin-treated PCOS-women had higher cffDNA at inclusion, in the 1st trimester; later on in pregnancy the levels in the metformin and placebo groups were equal. A comparison of pregnant women in the exercise study (TRIP) to placebo-treated pregnant PCOS-women, showed the levels of cffDNA, cfmDNA or cftDNA during mid-pregnancy (weeks 18-36) to be equal. Training during pregnancy was not associated with altered levels of cffDNA cfmDNA or cftDNA, but metformin treatment may reduce cfmDNA and cftDNA in pregnant PCOS women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The swimming program effects on the gross motor function, mental adjustment to the aquatic environment, and swimming skills in children with cerebral palsy: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgić Bojan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the swimming program effects on the gross motor function, mental adjustment to the aquatic environment and the ability to move in the water and swim in children with cerebral palsy. The sample consisted of seven children (4 boys and 3 girls with spastic cerebral palsy and an average age of 9y 5mo ± 1y 3 mo. The swimming program lasted 6 weeks, with two swimming sessions per week. Each session lasted 45 minutes. The swimming program included the application of the Halliwick Method and swimming exercises which are used in a healthy population. The GMFM test was used for the assessment of gross motor functions. The WOTA2 test was applied to assess mental adjustment and swimming skills. The Wilcoxon matched pairs test was used to determine the statistically significant differences between the initial and final measuring. The results have indicated that there was statistically significant differences in the E dimension (p=0.04 and the total score T (p=0.03 of the GMFM test, then for mental adjustment to the aquatic environment WMA (p=0.02, ability to move in water andswimming skills WSW (p=0.03 and the overall result WTO (p=0.02 of the WOTA2 test. The applied swimming program had a statistically significant effect on the improvement in walking, running and jumping as well as the overall gross motor functions of children with cerebral palsy. The applied program also contributed to a statistically significant influence on the increase in mental adjustment to the aquatic environment and the ability to move in water and swim.

  17. Effect of physical exercise on muscle mass and strength in cancer patients during treatment--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stene, G B; Helbostad, J L; Balstad, T R; Riphagen, I I; Kaasa, S; Oldervoll, L M

    2013-12-01

    Cancer treatment and its side effects may cause muscle wasting. Physical exercise has the potential to increase muscle mass and strength and to improve physical function in cancer patients undergoing treatment. A systematic review was conducted to study the effect of physical exercise (aerobic, resistance or a combination of both) on muscle mass and strength in cancer patients with different type and stage of cancer disease. Electronic searches were performed up to January 11th 2012, identifying 16 randomised controlled trials for final data synthesis. The studies demonstrated that aerobic and resistance exercise improves upper and lower body muscle strength more than usual care. Few studies have assessed the effect of exercise on muscle mass. Most studies were performed in patients with early stage breast or prostate cancer. Evidence on the effect of physical exercise on muscle strength and mass in cancer patients with advanced disease is lacking. More exercise studies in patients with advanced cancer and at risk of cancer cachexia are warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Exercise as a Treatment to Improve the Quality of Life in Patients with Cancer: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasra Mirhosseini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Improvement in cancer care increases life expectancy of patients with cancer, most of whom have experienced prolonged episodes of fatigue during and after their treatment. This has been found to reduce the quality of life and increase morbidity and mortality of such patients. Therefore, additional interventions are beneficial to improve overall quality of life as well as longevity. There is growing evidence that exercise is beneficial for oncology patients though improvements in their physical, physiological abilities and functions. The purpose of the present article is to evaluate the current evidence to determine if exercise could be used as a safe and effective medicine to reduce fatigue and improve quality of life in these patients. Methods: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL search engines were electronically searched and 21 empirical studies, published between 1995 and 2009, were located. Results: There is accumulative data in the literature supporting the effectiveness of exercise interventions on the physical and psychological wellbeing of patients with cancer. Exercise can improve muscle mass and strength and whole body oxygen uptake which are reduced during bed rest, infection and cancer treatments. Discussion: Growing evidence is now supporting the effectiveness of exercise on specific populations such as women suffering from breast cancer. However, the effect of exercise on other populations such as children and patients suffering from other types of cancers is vague. Therefore, more research is needed to define scientific evidence based rehabilitation protocols for oncology patients with different types of cancer.

  19. Sports psychiatry: mental health and mental disorders in athletes and exercise treatment of mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, Andreas

    2018-03-21

    Sports psychiatry has developed for the past 3 decades as an emerging field within psychiatry and sports medicine. An International society has been established in 1994 and also national interest groups were implemented, mostly within the national organizations for psychiatry, some also containing the topic of exercise treatment of mental disorders. Where are we now 30 years later? We systematically but also selectively review the medical literature on exercise, sport, psychiatry, mental health and mental disorders and related topics. The number of publications in the field has increased exponentially. Most topics keep remaining on the agenda, e.g., head trauma and concussion, drug abuse and doping, performance enhancement, overtraining, ADHD or eating disorders. Supported by the growing literature, evidence-based recommendations have become available now in many clinical areas. A relatively new phenomenon is muscle dysmorphia, observed in weightlifters, bodybuilders but also in college students and gym users. Further, sports therapy of mental disorders has been studied by more and more high-quality randomized controlled clinical trials. Mostly as a complementary treatment, however, for some disorders already with a 1a evidence level, e.g., depression, dementia or MCI but also post-traumatic stress disorder. Being grown up and accepted nowadays, sports psychiatry still represents a fast-developing field. The reverse side of the coin, sport therapy of mental disorders has received a scientific basis now. Who else than sports psychiatry could advance sport therapy of mental disorders? We need this enthusiasm for sports and psychiatry for our patients with mental disorders and it is time now for a broadening of the scope. Optimized psychiatric prevention and treatment of athletes and ideal sport-related support for individuals with mental disorders should be our main purpose and goal.

  20. A review of guidelines and pharmacologic options for asthma treatment, with a focus on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Mikayla; Hawley, Heather; Barnes, Nicole; Saxena, Shailendra

    2013-09-01

    Asthma affects millions of individuals worldwide. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction is common in patients diagnosed with asthma, but may also occur in patients without chronic asthma. Patients with isolated exercise-induced bronchoconstriction may require pretreatment with inhaled short-acting β-agonists prior to exercise. Patients diagnosed with asthma can achieve good control of the symptoms of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction with appropriate treatment of underlying chronic asthma. Current guidelines suggest staging patients with asthma based on severity of symptoms and initiating therapy according to their stage. Pharmacotherapy for asthma management consists of both quick-relief medications (short-acting β-agonists) as well as maintenance, or long-term control, medications (inhaled corticosteroids, long-acting β-agonists, leukotriene receptor antagonists, cromolyn, and theophylline).

  1. Pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) fruit extract improves physical fatigue and exercise performance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Yi; Huang, Wen-Ching; Liu, Chieh-Chung; Wang, Ming-Fu; Ho, Chin-Shan; Huang, Wen-Pei; Hou, Chia-Chung; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2012-10-09

    Pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) is a popular and nutritious vegetable consumed worldwide. The overall purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of C. moschata fruit extract (CME) on anti-fatigue and ergogenic functions following physiological challenges. Male ICR mice from four groups designated vehicle, CME-50, CME-100 and CME-250, respectively (n = 8 per group in each test) were orally administered CME for 14 days at 0, 50, 100 and 250 mg/kg/day. The anti-fatigue activity and exercise performance were evaluated using exhaustive swimming time, forelimb grip strength, as well as levels of plasma lactate, ammonia, glucose, and creatine kinase after an acute swimming exercise. The resting muscular and hepatic glycogen was also analyzed after 14-day supplementation with CME. Trend analysis revealed that CME treatments increased grip strength. CME dose-dependently increased 5% body weight loaded swimming time, blood glucose, and muscular and hepatic glycogen levels. CME dose-dependently decreased plasma lactate and ammonia levels and creatine kinase activity after a 15-min swimming test. The mechanism was relevant to the increase in energy storage (as glycogen) and release (as blood glucose), and the decrease of plasma levels of lactate, ammonia, and creatine kinase. Therefore, CME may be potential for the pharmacological effect of anti-fatigue.

  2. Aerobic exercise training in the treatment of non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease related fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Melissa A.; Sheldon, Ryan D.; Meers, Grace M.; Ortinau, Laura C.; Morris, E. Matthew; Booth, Frank W.; Kanaley, Jill A.; Vieira‐Potter, Victoria J.; Sowers, James R.; Ibdah, Jamal A.; Thyfault, John P.; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2016-01-01

    Key points Physiologically relevant rodent models of non‐alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) that resemble the human condition are limited.Exercise training and energy restriction are first‐line recommendations for the treatment of NASH.Hyperphagic Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima fatty rats fed a western diet high in fat, sucrose and cholesterol for 24 weeks developed a severe NASH with fibrosis phenotype.Moderate intensity exercise training and modest energy restriction provided some improvement in the histological features of NASH that coincided with alterations in markers of hepatic stellate cell activation and extracellular matrix remodelling.The present study highlights the importance of lifestyle modification, including exercise training and energy restriction, in the regulation of advanced liver disease. Abstract The incidence of non‐alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is rising but the efficacy of lifestyle modifications to improve NASH‐related outcomes remain unclear. We hypothesized that a western diet (WD) would induce NASH in the Otsuka Long–Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat and that lifestyle modification would improve this condition. Eight‐week‐old Long–Evans Tokushima Otsuka (L) and OLETF (O) rats consumed a control diet (10% kcal fat, 3.5% sucrose) or a WD (45% kcal fat, 17% sucrose, 1% cholesterol) for 24 weeks. At 20 weeks of age, additional WD‐fed OLETFs were randomized to sedentary (O‐SED), food restriction (O‐FR; ∼25% kcal reduction vs. O‐SED) or exercise training (O‐EX; treadmill running 20 m min–1 with a 15% incline, 60 min day–1, 5 days week–1) conditions for 12 weeks. WD induced a NASH phenotype in OLETFs characterized by hepatic fibrosis (collagen 1α1 mRNA and hydroxyproline content), as well as elevated inflammation and non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease activity scores, and hepatic stellate cell activation (α‐smooth muscle actin) compared to Long–Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats. FR and EX modestly

  3. Effect of Poly Phenols on Swimming Performance in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Tamatam

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Increased physical activities elevate reactive oxygen species (ROS leading to dysfunction and integrity of cells thus inducing oxidative stress which intern may affect overall physical performance. Polyphenols are well known for their excellent antioxidant potency. In this study, the effect of selected polyphenols with established health benefits viz., catachin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid and quercetin was investigated with respect to swimming performance in rats. Methods: The animals were force fed with aqueous mixture of polyphenols at 25 mg/rat/day and subjected to swimming exercise until exhaustion. Results: Rats fed with poly phenols showed a significant increase in swimming time, and the activities of Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH and creatine pyruvic kinase (CPK were lowered. Polyphenols increased the concentration of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP, glycogen in muscle lowered the activities of and. Polyphenols increased the concentration of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP and glycogen in muscle and reduced MDA levels in the liver, muscle and blood but increased DNA and RNA concentration in muscle. Conclusion: The results clearly demonstrated combination of polyphenols used enhanced the swimming performance of the rats.

  4. The Effects of Tai Chi and Neck Exercises in the Treatment of Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Stumpe, Christoph; Fehr, Johannes; Cramer, Holger; Cheng, Ying Wu; Wayne, Peter M; Rampp, Thomas; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to test the efficacy of Tai Chi for treating chronic neck pain. Subjects with chronic nonspecific neck pain were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of group Tai Chi or conventional neck exercises with weekly sessions of 75 to 90 minutes, or a wait-list control. The primary outcome measure was pain intensity (visual analogue scale). Secondary outcomes included pain on movement, functional disability, quality of life, well-being and perceived stress, postural and interoceptive awareness, satisfaction, and safety. Altogether, 114 participants were included (91 women, 49.4 ± 11.7 years of age). After 12 weeks Tai Chi participants reported significantly less pain compared with the wait list group (average difference in mm on the visual analogue scale: -10.5; 95% confidence interval, -20.3 to -.9; P = .033). Group differences were also found for pain on movement, functional disability, and quality of life compared with the wait list group. No differences were found for Tai Chi compared with neck exercises. Patients' satisfaction with both exercise interventions was high, and only minor side effects were observed. Tai Chi was more effective than no treatment in improving pain in subjects with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Because Tai Chi is probably as effective as neck exercises it may be considered a suitable alternative to conventional exercises for those with a preference toward Tai Chi. This article presents results of a randomized controlled trial comparing Tai Chi, conventional neck exercises, and no treatment for chronic nonspecific neck pain. Results indicate that Tai Chi exercises and conventional neck exercises are equally effective in improving pain and quality of life therefore representing beneficial interventions for neck pain. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of wearing clothes on oxygen uptake and ratings of perceived exertion while swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S W; Kurokawa, T; Ebisu, Y; Kikkawa, K; Shiokawa, M; Yamasaki, M

    2000-07-01

    For a comparative study between swimming in swimwear (control-sw) and swimming in clothes (clothes-sw), oxygen uptake (VO2) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured. The subjects were six male members of a university swimming team. Three swimming strokes--the breaststroke, the front crawl stroke and the elementary backstroke--were applied. With regards to clothes-sw, swimmers wore T-shirts, sportswear (shirt and pants) over swimwear and running shoes. In both cases of control-sw and clothes-sw, the VO2 was increased exponentially with increased swimming speed. The VO2 of the subjects during the clothed tests did not exceed 1.4 times of that in the case of control-sw at swimming speeds below 0.3 m/s. As swimming speeds increased, VO2 difference in both cases increased. Consequently, VO2 in the clothed tests was equal to 1.5-1.6 times and 1.5-1.8 times of that in the swimwear tests at speeds of 0.5 and 0.7 m/s, respectively. At speeds below 0.6 m/s in clothes-sw, the breaststroke showed lower VO2 than the front crawl stroke, and the elementary backstroke showed higher VO2 than the other two swimming strokes. RPE increased linearly with %peak VO2. In addition, any RPE differences among the three swimming strokes were not shown in the control-sw tests. At an exercise intensity above 60 %peak VO2, clothed swimmers showed slightly higher RPE in the front crawl stroke compared to that in the two other swimming strokes.

  6. Pre-treatment social anxiety severity moderates the impact of mindfulness-based stress reduction and aerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazaieri, Hooria; Lee, Ihno A; Goldin, Philippe R; Gross, James J

    2016-06-01

    We examined whether social anxiety severity at pre-treatment would moderate the impact of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) or aerobic exercise (AE) for generalized social anxiety disorder. MBSR and AE produced equivalent reductions in weekly social anxiety symptoms. Improvements were moderated by pre-treatment social anxiety severity. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) and aerobic exercise (AE) are effective in reducing symptoms of social anxiety. Pre-treatment social anxiety severity can be used to inform treatment recommendations. Both MBSR and AE produced equivalent reductions in weekly levels of social anxiety symptoms. MBSR appears to be most effective for patients with lower pre-treatment social anxiety symptom severity. AE appears to be most effective for patients with higher pre-treatment social anxiety symptom severity. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  7. The effect of driven exercise on treatment outcomes for adolescents with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles-Shields, Colleen; DclinPsy, Bryony Bamford; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of driven exercise (DE) and its role in treatment outcome for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN) and anorexia nervosa (AN). Participants were 201 adolescents with an eating disorder (ED) (80 with BN and 121 with AN) presenting for outpatient treatment at two specialist clinics. All adolescents participated in one of two randomized controlled trials. Descriptive statistics were conducted to evaluate the presence and frequency of baseline DE. Exploratory hierarchical regressions were used to evaluate the effect of baseline DE on treatment outcomes. About 66.3% of adolescents with BN and 23.1% of adolescents with AN presented with baseline DE. The presence of baseline DE predicted significantly worse outcomes for adolescents with AN in terms of ED symptom severity (ps adolescents with BN (ps adolescents with BN and AN. However, DE may be related to different constructs for adolescents with AN than those with BN, suggesting differences in treatment needs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The influence of a steroid hormone and of physical exercise on protein metabolism in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menschikowski, M.; Jung, K.; Junghans, P.; Petzke, K.J.; Albrecht, V.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Potsdam

    1989-01-01

    The influence of an anabolic steroid hormone preparation and of a physical exercise training program was studied on the nitrogen and protein metabolism in rats with the help of the 15 N tracer technique and the emission spectrometric 15 N isotope analysis. For the determination of the dynamic parameters of the protein metabolism graphic (stochastic) and computer-aided compartmental methods wer compared. Using the area method as a stochastic approach the animals showed significant differences in the protein turnover parameters under the influence of hormone treatment and (or) physical stress by swimming exercise in comparison to the controls. (author)

  9. Swimming and other activities: applied aspects of fish swimming performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Farrell, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities such as hydropower development, water withdrawals, and commercial fisheries often put fish species at risk. Engineered solutions designed to protect species or their life stages are frequently based on assumptions about swimming performance and behaviors. In many cases, however, the appropriate data to support these designs are either unavailable or misapplied. This article provides an overview of the state of knowledge of fish swimming performance – where the data come from and how they are applied – identifying both gaps in knowledge and common errors in application, with guidance on how to avoid repeating mistakes, as well as suggestions for further study.

  10. Effects of combined exercise training and electromyostimulation treatments in chronic heart failure: A prospective multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliou, Marie C; Vergès-Patois, Bénédicte; Pavy, Bruno; Charles-Nelson, Anais; Monpère, Catherine; Richard, Rudy; Verdier, Jean C

    2017-08-01

    Background Exercise training as part of a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is recommended for patients with cardiac heart failure. It is a valuable method for the improvement of exercise tolerance. Some studies reported a similar improvement with quadricipital electrical myostimulation, but the effect of combined exercise training and electrical myostimulation in cardiac heart failure has not been yet evaluated in a large prospective multicentre study. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine whether the addition of low frequency electrical myostimulation to exercise training may improve exercise capacity and/or muscular strength in cardiac heart failure patients. Methods Ninety-one patients were included (mean age: 58 ± 9 years; New York Heart Association II/III: 52/48%, left ventricular ejection fraction: 30 ± 7%) in a prospective French study. The patients were randomised into two groups: 41 patients in exercise training and 50 in exercise training + electrical myostimulation. All patients underwent 20 exercise training sessions. In addition, in the exercise training + electrical myostimulation group, patients underwent 20 low frequency (10 Hz) quadricipital electrical myostimulation sessions. Each patient underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test, a six-minute walk test, a muscular function evaluation and a quality of life questionnaire, before and at the end of the study. Results A significant improvement of exercise capacity (Δ peak oxygen uptake+15% in exercise training group and +14% in exercise training + electrical myostimulation group) and of quality of life was observed in both groups without statistically significant differences between the two groups. Mean creatine kinase level increased in the exercise training group whereas it remained stable in the combined group. Conclusions This prospective multicentre study shows that electrical myostimulation on top of exercise training does not demonstrate any significant

  11. Effects of aquatic exercise and CES treatment on the changes of cognitive function, BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF of persons with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In Ho; Seo, Eun Jung; Lim, In Soo

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aquatic exercise and CES treatment on the cognitive function by using K-WAB and BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF of persons with intellectual disabilities. All subjects were 15 male with intellectual disabilities who were participating in the aquatic training program and CES treatment during 12 weeks at rehabilitation center. The subjects were divided into control group, exercise group, and exercise+CES group. Blood samples for BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF were taken from brachial vein at rest between before and after treatment. The results are summarized as follows: Cognitive function level increased significantly in the exercise+CES group compared to those in the exercise and control group. The changes of blood IGF-1 concentration were no significant difference among groups. The changes of blood BDNF and VEGF concentration were significantly increased in exercise group and exercise+CES group than control group. However, blood BDNF and VEGF concentration were significantly difference between exercise group and exercise+CES group. In conclusion, it can be concluded that CES treatment with exercise can amend cognitive function of persons with intellectual disabilities more effectively and increase of BDNF and VEGF by exercise can explain the cognitive function improvement of persons with intellectual disabilities.

  12. FES-biofeedback versus intensive pelvic floor muscle exercise for the prevention and treatment of genuine stress incontinence.

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, M. S.; Hong, J. Y.; Choi, Y. H.; Baik, S. H.; Yoon, H.

    2000-01-01

    We undertook this work to compare the treatment efficacies and the changes of quality of life after pelvic floor muscle (PFM) exercise and the functional electrical stimulation (FES)-biofeedback treatment, both of which are being widely used as conservative treatment methods for female urinary incontinence. We randomly selected 60 female incontinence patients who visited our department and divided them evenly into two groups. They were treated for a period of 6 weeks. The subjective changes i...

  13. L-Arginine supplementation improves antioxidant defenses through L-arginine/nitric oxide pathways in exercised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lingling; Wang, Bin; Gao, Guizhen; Cao, Wengen; Zhang, Yunkun

    2013-10-15

    l-Arginine (l-Arg) supplementation has been shown to enhance physical exercise capacity and delay onset of fatigue. This work investigated the potential beneficial mechanism(s) of l-Arg supplementation by examining its effect on the cellular oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways in the exercised rats. Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into six groups: sedentary control; sedentary control with l-Arg treatment; endurance training (daily swimming training for 8 wk) control; endurance training with l-Arg treatment; an exhaustive exercise (one time swimming to fatigue) control; and an exhaustive exercise with l-Arg treatment. l-Arg (500 mg/kg body wt) or saline was given to rats by intragastric administration 1 h before the endurance training and the exhaustive swimming test. Expression levels and activities of the l-Arg/nitric oxide (NO) pathway components and parameters of the oxidative stress and antioxidant defense capacity were investigated in l-Arg-treated and control rats. The result show that the l-Arg supplementation completely reversed the exercise-induced activation of NO synthase and superoxide dismutase, increased l-Arg transport capacity, and increased NO and anti-superoxide anion levels. These data demonstrate that l-Arg supplementation effectively reduces the exercise-induced imbalance between oxidative stress and antioxidant defense capacity, and this modulation is likely mediated through the l-Arg/NO pathways. The findings of this study improved our understanding of how l-Arg supplementation prevents elevations of reactive oxygen species and favorably enhances the antioxidant defense capacity during physical exercise.

  14. Predictors of treatment response to strengthening and stretching exercises for patellofemoral pain: An examination of patellar alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hsien-Te; Song, Chen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    Closed kinetic chain and quadriceps strengthening, combined with flexibility exercises of the lower limb musculature, is a common treatment for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). The effectiveness has been well documented; however, very little is known about which factors predict treatment success. A total of 43 female subjects with PFPS participated in an eight-week progressive leg press (LP) strengthening and stretching exercise program. A decrease of 1.5 cm on a 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) score was used as an indicator for treatment success. The baseline patellar tilt angle difference (PTA-d) due to quadriceps contraction prior to treatment was evaluated as a predictor of treatment success. The logistic regression and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis were performed to investigate the predictive value of PTA-d. PTA-d could significantly predict the treatment success of LP strengthening and stretching exercises. The odds ratio (OR) for having an unsuccessful outcome was 1.19 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.39, Pstretching exercise was -1.5° of PTA-d (sensitivity=0.74, specificity=0.71). The area under the ROC curve was 0.73 (standard error=0.08). Female patients with PFPS whose quadriceps contraction reduced the lateral patellar tilt prior to LP strengthening and stretching exercise treatment are more likely to experience pain relief. It seems clinically important to check dynamic patellar tilt characteristics before treatment to aid in clinical decision making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Combined with Testosterone Treatment on Cardiovascular Function in Rats: Influence of Exercise Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila A Engi

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of voluntary ethanol consumption combined with testosterone treatment on cardiovascular function in rats. Moreover, we investigated the influence of exercise training on these effects. To this end, male rats were submitted to low-intensity training on a treadmill or kept sedentary while concurrently being treated with ethanol for 6 weeks. For voluntary ethanol intake, rats were given access to two bottles, one containing ethanol and other containing water, three 24-hour sessions per week. In the last two weeks (weeks 5 and 6, animals underwent testosterone treatment concurrently with exercise training and exposure to ethanol. Ethanol consumption was not affected by either testosterone treatment or exercise training. Also, drug treatments did not influence the treadmill performance improvement evoked by training. However, testosterone alone, but not in combination with ethanol, reduced resting heart rate. Moreover, combined treatment with testosterone and ethanol reduced the pressor response to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Treatment with either testosterone or ethanol alone also affected baroreflex activity and enhanced depressor response to acetylcholine, but these effects were inhibited when drugs were coadministrated. Exercise training restored most cardiovascular effects evoked by drug treatments. Furthermore, both drugs administrated alone increased pressor response to phenylephrine in trained animals. Also, drug treatments inhibited the beneficial effects of training on baroreflex function. In conclusion, the present results suggest a potential interaction between toxic effects of testosterone and ethanol on cardiovascular function. Data also indicate that exercise training is an important factor influencing the effects of these substances.

  16. Impact of beta-blocker treatment and nutritional status on glycemic response during exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, Annie; Brassard, Patrice; Croteau, Sara; Lemieux, Simone; Bergeron, Jean; Lacroix, Stéphanie; Fournier, Lison; Poirier, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Most individuals with type 2 diabetes are affected by hypertension and thus have higher risk of cardiac complications. In addition to behavioural modifications, such as healthy food choices and regular physical activity, beta-blocker treatment may be considered to reduce morbidity and mortality, especially after a cardiovascular event. However, this medication is generally associated with a deleterious impact on glucose metabolism. The objective of the study was to assess the impact of beta-blocker treatment on glucose response during exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes, free of cardiovascular complications. Ten sedentary men, treated with diet and/or hypoglycemic agents have performed four exercise sessions at 60% of their V O2peak, in the fasted state or 2 hours following a standardized breakfast, with and without beta-blockers (atenolol 100 mg id for five consecutive days). Blood samples were drawn during the resting period, at 15-min intervals during the exercise session and during the recovery period. A reduction of blood glucose levels was observed following the exercise session in the postprandial state (48% and 44% reduction with and without beta-blockers respectively; P exercise performed in the fasted state had a minimal impact on glucose and insulin levels, whether with or without beta-blockers. beta-blocker treatment was not associated with increased baseline blood glucose or insulin levels in the fasted or the postprandial situation. Dietary status has a more important impact on plasma glucose and insulin modulation than short-term use of beta-blockers.

  17. Managing nocturnal leg cramps — calf-stretching exercises and cessation of quinine treatment: a factorial randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppin, Richard J; Wicke, Dorothy M; Little, Paul S

    2005-01-01

    Background Quinine is a common treatment for nocturnal leg cramps but has potential side effects. An uncontrolled study suggested that calf-stretching exercises could prevent nocturnal leg cramps (night cramps) but these findings have never been confirmed. Aim To assess the effect of calf-stretching exercises and cessation of quinine treatment for patients with night cramps taking quinine. Design of study Randomised controlled trial. Setting Twenty-eight general practices in southern England. Method One hundred and ninety-one patients prescribed quinine for night cramps were randomised to one of four groups defined by two ‘advice’ factors: undertake exercises and stop quinine. After 6 weeks they were advised that they could take quinine and undertake the exercises freely. Documentation of cramp at 12 weeks was achieved in 181 (95%) patients. Main outcome measures were: symptom burden score, and frequency of night cramps and quinine usage. Results At 12 weeks there was no significant difference in number of cramps in the previous 4 weeks (exercise = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = −3.01 to 6.90; quinine cessation = 3.45, 95% CI = −1.52 to 8.41) nor symptom burden or severity of cramps. However, after 12 weeks 26.5% (95% CI = 13.3% to 39.7%) more patients who had been advised to stop quinine treatment reported taking no quinine tablets in the previous week (odds ratio [OR] = 3.32, 95% CI = 1.37 to 8.06), whereas advice to do stretching exercises had no effect (OR = 0.73, 95% CI =0.27 to 1.98]). Conclusions Calf-stretching exercises are not effective in reducing the frequency or severity of night cramps. Advising those on long-term repeat prescriptions to try stopping quinine temporarily will result in no major problems for patients, and allow a significant number to stop medication. PMID:15808033

  18. Effect of pool length on blood lactate, heart rate, and velocity in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinen, O P; Keskinen, K L; Mero, A A

    2007-05-01

    Exercise testing in water has been used to follow the progression of conditioning during regular training in swimmers. The present study examined the effects of pool length in eleven male swimmers on a set of 5 x 200-m freestyle swims with increasing speed from submaximal to maximal. Mean velocity of swimming, blood lactate and heart rate were examined in both 25-m and 50-m pools. Turning benefit as a marker for turning skill was measured separately by a underwater video system (speed difference between pre- and post-turning) during short all-out swims. Maximum force during swimming was measured in tethered swimming and explosive strength of leg extensor muscles was evaluated by a counter movement jump. The significantly higher (p=0.033 - 0.000) blood lactate values for the 50-m pool as compared to the 25-m pool were found at each point of swimming velocity versus blood lactate curve. The highest post-test lactate level was 7.36 +/- 1.47 mmol x l (-1) in the short course and 8.24 +/- 1.55 mmol x l (-1) (p=0.033) in the long course. The maximum swimming velocity was significantly greater (4.5 %) in the 25-m pool swimming (1.38 +/- 0.11 m x s (-1) vs. 1.32 +/- 0.12 m x s (-1); p=0.000). The heart rate values were significantly (p=0.020 - 0.000) lower in the short course than in the long course at all points of submaximal velocity with a mean difference of 7.3 +/- 0.7 bpm. Heart rate was equal (172 +/- 14 vs. 172 +/- 14 bpm) after the maximum swims in both short and long course. The turning benefit in the short maximum swim was 0.12 +/- 0.05 m x s (-1) (8.1 +/- 3.2 %), correlating positively with the difference in maximal swimming velocity between the short and long-pool swims (r = 0.59; p = 0.029), with the maximum force during tethered swimming (r=0.75; p=0.004) and with the vertical jumping height in the counter movement jump (r=0.55; p=0.039). We conclude that the pool length has a strong effect on blood lactate concentration and heart rate with greater swimming

  19. Effects of muscle stretching exercises in the treatment of fibromyalgia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorena, Suélem Barros de; Lima, Maria do Carmo Correia de; Ranzolin, Aline; Duarte, Ângela Luiza Branco Pinto

    2015-01-01

    This study has the objective to systematize scientific evidences about the use of muscle stretching exercises in the treatment of FM. It was performed from retrospective research without chronological and linguistic limits, at databases of MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO and PEDro, as well as at PubMed search tool. Data collection was performed by two independent reviewers in October 2012, with the search strategy formulated by crossing descriptors and relevant terms to the topic in English, Portuguese and Spanish languages. Randomized clinical trials, only with patients with a clinical diagnosis of fibromyalgia and muscle stretching exercises as a therapeutic measure at least in one of the intervention groups were included. Included studies were assessed for methodological quality using PEDro scale and their references analyzed to highlight additional sources. The search amounted to an average of 6,794 items. Only five articles were selected, one being excluded because of its low methodological quality. Pain was assessed unanimously. The method and timing of interventions varied widely, there was poor mention of the parameters used in the stretches and absence of specific physical examinations. There was significant improvement in all studies regarding pain, besides as related to quality of life and physical condition. It is clear the importance of muscle stretching in the treatment of FM, however, there is a need for further studies to establish the real benefits of the technique, because the majority of published studies shows low methodological quality and there is a lack of standardization regarding the use of this resource. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Saikat; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-04-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat need to navigate through a wide range of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with boundaries in such situations is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism when compared to ideal laboratory conditions. We study the different patterns of ciliary locomotion in glass capillaries of varying diameter and characterize the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight lines as the diameter of the capillary tubes decreases. We predict the swimming velocity in capillaries by modeling the system as a confined cylinder propagating longitudinal metachronal waves that create a finite pressure gradient. Comparing with experiments, we find that such pressure gradient considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized ciliary organisms in restrictive geometries.

  1. Swimming in an Unsteady World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, M. A. R.

    2016-02-01

    When animals swim in marine habitats, the water through which they move is usually flowing. Therefore, an important part of understanding the physics of how animals swim in nature is determining how they interact with the fluctuating turbulent water currents in their environment. The research systems we have been using to address this question are microscopic marine animals swimming in turbulent, wavy water flow over spatially-complex communities of organisms growing on surfaces. Field measurements of water motion were used to design realistic turbulent flow in a laboratory wave-flume over different substrata, particle-image velocimetry was used to measure fine-scale, rapidly-varying water velocity vector fields, and planar laser-induced fluorescence was used to measure concentrations of chemical cues from the substratum. We used individual-based models of small animals swimming in this unsteady flow to determine how their trajectories and contacts with substrata were affected by their locomotion through the water, rotation by local shear, response to odors, and transport by ambient flow. We found that the shears, accelerations, and odor concentrations encountered by small swimmers fluctuate rapidly, with peaks much higher than mean values lasting fractions of a second. We identified ways in which the behavior of small, weak swimmers can bias how they are transported by ambient flow (e.g. sinking during brief encounters with shear or odor enhances settlement onto substrata below, whereas constant swimming enhances contact with surfaces above or beside larvae). Although microscopic organisms swim slowly relative to ambient water flow, their locomotory behavior in response to the rapidly-fluctuating shears and odors they encounter can affect where they are transported by ambient water movement.

  2. Effect of Eight Weeks Forced Swimming Training with Methadone Supplementation on Aspartate Aminotransferase, Alanine Aminotransferase, and Alkaline Phosphatase of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Hoseini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Narcotics abuse can induce liver disorders; nevertheless, exercises improve liver disorders. The present research aimed to review the effect of eight weeks forced swimming training with methadone supplementation on liver enzymes of rats. Material & Method: In this experimental research, 48 rats were selected, and after one week adaptation to lab environment, they were randomly divided into four groups of 12 rats including (1 forced swimming training, (2 methadone supplementation, (3 forced swimming training with methadone supplementation, and (4 control. Groups 2 and 3 used 2 mg/kg methadone daily for 8 weeks. Also, groups 1 and 3 swam for 8 weeks, three sessions per week and each session for 30 minutes. For statistical analysis of data, one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests were used (α≤0.05. Results: Findings showed that forced swimming training, methadone supplementation, and forced swimming training with methadone supplementation had no significant effect on AST (P=0.90 and ALT (P=0.99 enzymes; forced swimming training had significant effect on increase of ALP (P=0.001; also, forced swimming training, compared with methadone supplementation and combination of forced swimming training with methadone supplementation, had significant effect on increase of ALP (P=0.001. Conclusion: Accordingly, 8 weeks of forced swimming training with methadone has possibly no significant effect on liver enzymes.

  3. Effect of aquatic exercise on ankylosing spondylitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, U; Solak, O; Toktas, H; Demirdal, U S; Subasi, V; Kavuncu, V; Evcik, D

    2014-11-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease that affects mainly the axial skeleton and causes significant pain and disability. Aquatic (water-based) exercise may have a beneficial effect in various musculoskeletal conditions. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of aquatic exercise interventions with land-based exercises (home-based exercise) in the treatment of AS. Patients with AS were randomly assigned to receive either home-based exercise or aquatic exercise treatment protocol. Home-based exercise program was demonstrated by a physiotherapist on one occasion and then, exercise manual booklet was given to all patients in this group. Aquatic exercise program consisted of 20 sessions, 5× per week for 4 weeks in a swimming pool at 32-33 °C. All the patients in both groups were assessed for pain, spinal mobility, disease activity, disability, and quality of life. Evaluations were performed before treatment (week 0) and after treatment (week 4 and week 12). The baseline and mean values of the percentage changes calculated for both groups were compared using independent sample t test. Paired t test was used for comparison of pre- and posttreatment values within groups. A total of 69 patients with AS were included in this study. We observed significant improvements for all parameters [pain score (VAS) visual analog scale, lumbar flexion/extension, modified Schober test, chest expansion, bath AS functional index, bath AS metrology index, bath AS disease activity index, and short form-36 (SF-36)] in both groups after treatment at week 4 and week 12 (p aquatic exercise group. It is concluded that a water-based exercises produced better improvement in pain score and quality of life of the patients with AS compared with home-based exercise.

  4. Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS) has been designed to meet multi-agency hydrologic database needs for Kansas. The SWIMS project was supported...

  5. Partition of aerobic and anaerobic swimming costs related to gait transitions in a labriform swimmer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jon Christian; Tudorache, Christian; Jordan, Anders D.

    2010-01-01

    was to partition aerobic and anaerobic swimming costs at speeds below and above the Up–c in the striped surfperch Embiotoca lateralis using swimming respirometry and video analysis to test the hypothesis that the gait transition marks the switch from aerobic to anaerobic power output. Exercise oxygen consumption......Members of the family Embiotocidae exhibit a distinct gait transition from exclusively pectoral fin oscillation to combined pectoral and caudal fin propulsion with increasing swimming speed. The pectoral–caudal gait transition occurs at a threshold speed termed Up–c. The objective of this study...... included caudal fin propulsion in a mostly steady and unsteady (burst-assisted) mode, respectively. There was no evidence of EPOC after swimming at 1.4 and 1.9 L s–1, indicating that the pectoral–caudal gait transition was not a threshold for anaerobic metabolism. At 2.3 L s–1, E. lateralis switched...

  6. Physical exercise training interventions for children and young adults during and after treatment for childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braam, Katja I; van der Torre, Patrick; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Kaspers, Gertjan J L

    2013-04-30

    A decreased physical fitness and impaired social functioning has been reported in patients and survivors of childhood cancer. This is influenced by the negative effects of disease and treatment of childhood cancer and by behavioural and social elements. Exercise training for adults during or after cancer therapy has frequently been reported to improve physical fitness and social functioning. More recently, literature on this subject became available for children and young adults with cancer, both during and after treatment. This review aimed to evaluate the effect of a physical exercise training intervention (at home, at a physical therapy centre, or hospital based) on the physical fitness of children with cancer, in comparison with the physical fitness in a care as usual control group. The intervention needed to be offered within the first five years from diagnosis.The second aim was to assess the effects of a physical exercise training intervention in this population on fatigue, anxiety, depression, self efficacy, and health-related quality of life and to assess the adverse effects of the intervention. For this review the electronic databases of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro, and ongoing trial registries were searched on 6 September 2011. In addition, a handsearch of reference lists and conference proceedings was performed in that same month. The review included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and clinical controlled trials (CCTs) that compared the effects of physical exercise training with no training, in people who were within the first five years of their diagnosis of childhood cancer. By the use of standardised forms two review authors independently identified studies meeting the inclusion criteria, performed the data extraction, and assessed the risk of bias. Quality of the studies was rated by using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Five articles were included in this review: four RCTs (14

  7. A call to action: exercise as treatment for patients with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Simon; Rosenbaum, Simon; Kalucy, Megan; Reaburn, Peter; Happell, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Mental illness affects the lives of a significant number of Australians. In addition to pharmacological and psychological interventions, exercise has demonstrated benefits for people with mental illness including symptom reduction, improved cardiovascular risk profile and improved physical capacity. Unfortunately, evidence shows that clinician-delivered exercise advice is not routinely offered. This is despite patient acceptability for exercise. This article summarises the recent evidence supporting the prescription of exercise for people with mental illness and offers a model incorporating basic exercise prescription, and referral pathways for specialised advice. Current exercise prescription patterns for people with mental illness may not meet patient expectations; therefore, clinicians should consider exercise referral schemes to increase the accessibility of interventions for people with a mental illness.

  8. Partition of aerobic and anaerobic swimming costs related to gait transitions in a labriform fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jon Christian; Tudorache, Christian; Jordan, Anders Drud

    ) is below the Up-c, whereas both 1.9 and 2.3 bl s-1 are above the Up-c. Exercise oxygen consumption (MO2) while the fish were swimming at these speeds was determined. The presence and magnitude of excessive post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) was evaluated after the three swimming speeds....... There was no evidence of EPOC after swimming 1.4 and 1.9 bl s-1 indicating that the gait transition from pectoral oscillation to axial undulation is not a threshold for anaerobic metabolism. In contrast, swimming at 2.3 bl s-1 resulted in EPOC being 51.7 mg O2 kg-1 suggesting that anaerobic metabolism added about 34......% to the exercise MO2. E. lateralis switched to an unsteady burst and flap gait at 2.3 bl s-1. Burst activity correlated linearly and positively with the magnitude of the resulting EPOC. Collectively, these data suggest that steady axial propulsion does not lead to EPOC whereas transition to burst assisted swimming...

  9. Critical force during tethered swimming for the evaluation of aerobic capacity and prediction of performances in freestyle swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Papoti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the relationship of critical force (Fcrit with lactate threshold (LLNA and the intensity corresponding to VO2max (iVO2max in tethered swimming (TS, and their correlation with maximal performance in 400-m (V400 and 30-min (VT30 freestyle swimming (FS. Seven swimmers were submitted to a TS incremental test for the determination of LLNA and iVO2max. For the determination of Fcrit, the swimmers performed four exercises to exhaustion at intensities (F corresponding to 87%, 104%, 118% and 134% of iVO2max for the calculation of time limits (Tlim. Fcrit corresponded to the linear coefficient of the ratio between F and 1/tlim. The maximal performance in FS corresponded to the mean velocity obtained during maximal exercise of 400-m and 30-min crawl swimming. Fcrit (51.97 ± 4.02 N was significantly lower than iVO2max (60.21 ± 8.73 N but not than LLNA (45.89 ± 8.73. Fcrit was significantly correlated with iVO2max (0.97, LLNA (0.88, V400 (0.85, and VT30 (0.86. These data suggest that Fcrit can be used for the determination of aerobic capacity, prescription of a TS training program, and prediction of performance in FS.

  10. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics Book RESOURCES ... The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND ...

  11. Modelling swimming hydrodynamics to enhance performance

    OpenAIRE

    Marinho, D.A.; Rouboa, A.; Barbosa, Tiago M.; Silva, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Swimming assessment is one of the most complex but outstanding and fascinating topics in biomechanics. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology is one of the different methods that have been applied in swimming research to observe and understand water movements around the human body and its application to improve swimming performance. CFD has been applied attempting to understand deeply the biomechanical basis of swimming. Several studies have been conducted willing to analy...

  12. Dioxin inhibition of swim bladder development in zebrafish: is it secondary to heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Monica S; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2015-05-01

    The swim bladder is a gas-filled organ that is used for regulating buoyancy and is essential for survival in most teleost species. In zebrafish, swim bladder development begins during embryogenesis and inflation occurs within 5 days post fertilization (dpf). Embryos exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) before 96 h post fertilization (hpf) developed swim bladders normally until the growth/elongation phase, at which point growth was arrested. It is known that TCDD exposure causes heart malformations that lead to heart failure in zebrafish larvae, and that blood circulation is a key factor in normal development of the swim bladder. The adverse effects of TCDD exposure on the heart occur during the same period of time that swim bladder development and growth occurs. Based on this coincident timing, and the dependence of swim bladder development on proper circulatory development, we hypothesized that the adverse effects of TCDD on swim bladder development were secondary to heart failure. We compared swim bladder development in TCDD-exposed embryos to: (1) silent heart morphants, which lack cardiac contractility, and (2) transiently transgenic cmlc2:caAHR-2AtRFP embryos, which mimic TCDD-induced heart failure via heart-specific, constitutive activation of AHR signaling. Both of these treatment groups, which were not exposed to TCDD, developed hypoplastic swim bladders of comparable size and morphology to those found in TCDD-exposed embryos. Furthermore, in all treatment groups swim bladder development was arrested during the growth/elongation phase. Together, these findings support a potential role for heart failure in the inhibition of swim bladder development caused by TCDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Can exercise regulate the circadian system of adolescents? Novel implications for the treatment of delayed sleep-wake phase disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Cele E; Gradisar, Michael; Short, Michelle A; Lang, Christin

    2017-08-01

    Adolescents are vulnerable to inadequate sleep due to a unique constellation of risk factors. In particular, the puberty-related phase delay in the timing of the circadian system postpones the onset of sleep. Resultantly, disordered sleep is common among teenagers and young adults, with the most common sleep problem being delayed sleep wake-phase disorder (DSWPD). Although current treatments for DSWPD show promise, novel ways to improve our youth's sleep are needed. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the evidence for the role of exercise as a method to shift and/or regulate circadian timing, and thus improve sleep, in adolescents and young adults. A growing body of evidence suggests that nocturnal exercise can delay circadian timing. However, exercise administered at different times of the 24-h day may result in phase advances, particularly when the timing of exercise is gradually advanced in small daily increments. The implications of these results for young people's sleep health are discussed and suggestions are provided for ways that exercise could be used clinically, to improve the treatment of DSWPD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Impact of Exercise On Depression and Anxiety Symptoms Among Abstinent Methamphetamine-Dependent Individuals in A Residential Treatment Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Richard A; Chudzynski, Joy; Gonzales, Rachel; Mooney, Larissa; Dickerson, Daniel; Ang, Alfonso; Dolezal, Brett; Cooper, Christopher B

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports data from a study designed to determine the impact of an 8-week exercise program on depression and anxiety symptoms among newly abstinent methamphetamine (MA)-dependent individuals in residential treatment. One hundred thirty-five MA-dependent individuals, newly enrolled in residential treatment, were randomly assigned to receive either a 3-times-per-week, 60-minute structured exercise program for 8 weeks (24 sessions) or an equivalent number of health education sessions. Using mixed-modeling repeated-measures regression, we examined changes in weekly total depression and anxiety scores as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory over the 8-week study period. Mean age of participants was 31.7 (SD = 6.9); 70.4% were male and 48% Latino. Analyses indicate a significant effect of exercise on reducing depression (β = -0.63, P = 0.001) and anxiety (β = -0.95, P=0.001) symptoms (total scores) over the 8-week period compared to a health education control group. A significant dose interaction effect between session attendance and exercise was found as well on reducing depression (β = -0.61, P < 0.001) and anxiety symptoms (β = -0.22, P=0.009) over time compared to the control group. Results support the role of a structured exercise program as an effective intervention for improving symptoms of depression and anxiety associated with MA abstinence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Electromyography in the four competitive swimming strokes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Jonas; Figueiredo, Pedro; Daly, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview on 50 years of research in electromyography in the four competitive swimming strokes (crawl, breaststroke, butterfly, and backstroke). A systematic search of the existing literature was conducted using the combined keywords "swimming" and "EMG" on studies published before August 2013, in the electronic databases PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, SPORT discus, Academic Search Elite, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane Library. The quality of each publication was assessed by two independent reviewers using a custom made checklist. Frequency of topics, muscles studied, swimming activities, populations, types of equipment and data treatment were determined from all selected papers and, when possible, results were compared and contrasted. In the first 20 years of EMG studies in swimming, most papers were published as congress proceedings. The methodological quality was low. Crawl stroke was most often studied. There was no standardized manner of defining swimming phases, normalizing the data or of presenting the results. Furthermore, the variability around the mean muscle activation patterns is large which makes it difficult to define a single pattern applicable to all swimmers in any activity examined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Análise histológica e histoquímica das fibras dos músculos reto do abdome e intercostal paraesternal de ratos submetidos ao exercício da natação Histologic and histochemical analysis of fibers of rectus of abdomen and paraesternal intercostal muscles of Wistar rats after swimming exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Bálade Saad

    2002-08-01

    ção aeróbica, com conseqüente aumento do percentual de fibras oxidativas, induzindo maior resistência à fadiga.The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of swimming exercise on metabolic and contractile abilities of rectus of abdomen and the paraesternal intercostal muscle fibers. Adult Wistar rats were initially submitted to an adaptation period and then divided into control and exercise groups. Exercised animals were submitted to swimming for 15, 30, 45, and 60 days, 1 hr/day, 5days/week. At the end of each period, the animals were killed. Small segments of the above muscles were frozen in N-hexane at -70ºC, pre-cooled with liquid nitrogen for two minutes. Histological transverse sections (7 µm were obtained in a cryostat microtome at -20ºC. Some serial sections were stained with HE. Subsequent sections were reacted for NADH-TR to evaluate the oxidizing capacity, and for m-ATPase, after acid and alkaline pre-incubations mediums. Under microscopic examination, the frequencies of fiber types were sampled. Muscle fibers revealed to be grouped in different fascicles, presenting polygonal outlines, with different diameters. Three kind of fibers were detected: SO (slow oxidative, FOG (fast oxidative glycolytic and FG (fast glycolytic, presenting a mosaic pattern distribution. The analysis of the results demonstrated that after 60 days of exercise, the abdominal muscles showed a significant increase in the frequency of SO fibers. After 15 days, a significant decrease in frequency of intermediate FOG fibers and an increase of FG fibers. The paraesternal intercostal muscles revealed a significant increase in the percentage of SO fibers in the 60 day-exercised animals, a percentage increase of FOG fibers in the animals of 45 and 60 days, and a percentage decrease of FG fibers in those of 30, 45 and 60 days. So, due to hydrostatic pressure in swimming exercise, the degree of work was greater in the inspiration muscles. This increase was parallel with

  17. Home exercises for pelvic floor in continent women one year after physical therapy treatment for urinary incontinence: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Ana P; Luz, Soraia C T; Virtuoso, Janeisa F

    2011-01-01

    To describe the results of home exercise targeting the pelvic floor in continent women one year after the end of a physical therapy treatment for the following outcomes: functional assessment of the pelvic floor and urinary incontinence. This is an observational study that evaluated fifteen women one year after physical therapy treatment for Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI). The outcomes for this study were: situations of urinary loss, use of daily protection, practice of home exercises for the pelvic floor, functional assessment of the pelvic floor (FAPF) and patient satisfaction. We also investigated some confounding variables such as hormonal status, number of vaginal deliveries and previous history of episiotomy. One year after completion of physical therapy treatment, we observed that the FAPF median remained stable over time (Median=5, p=0.08). The presence of urinary incontinence was reported by 40% of women in the sample, however, was characterized as mild (i.e. not requiring the use of daily protection). There was also a significant association (p=0.001) between the completion of home exercises (twice or more per week) and the normal clinical status. Confounding variables, which could compromise the clinical status, showed no significant association with the outcomes (p≥0.05). Home exercises contributed to the maintenance of continence following a physical therapy treatment.

  18. Acute and long-term effect of antihypertensive treatment on exercise-induced albuminuria in incipient diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Cramer; Mogensen, C E

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the study was to clarify whether antihypertensive treatment could affect the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and urinary albumin excretion (UAE) in diabetics during exercise (450 kpm/min, followed by 600 kpm/min, 20 min each). Young male insulin-dependent diabetics with normal UAE (n = 9...

  19. 43 CFR 423.36 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Swimming. 423.36 Section 423.36 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Swimming. (a) You may swim, wade, snorkel, scuba dive, raft, or tube at your own risk in Reclamation waters...

  20. 36 CFR 331.10 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swimming. 331.10 Section 331.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY REGULATIONS..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.10 Swimming. Swimming is prohibited unless authorized in writing by the District...

  1. 36 CFR 327.5 - Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swimming. 327.5 Section 327.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY RULES AND REGULATIONS... Swimming. (a) Swimming, wading, snorkeling or scuba diving at one's own risk is permitted, except at...

  2. Energetics of swimming of schooling fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    schools. Oxygen consumption of swimming fish increases exponentially or as a power function with respect to swimming speed, and hence the decrease in oxygen saturation through the school is related to the swimming speed of the school. A model describing the oxygen saturation in a fish school from front...

  3. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries Associated With Military Survival Swim Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Michael S; Mason, John S; Posner, Matthew A; Haley, Chad A

    2017-07-01

    patient's rehabilitation programs consisted of a progression of exercises to improve range of motion, muscle strength/endurance, motor control, and muscular power. Military and sports medicine professionals should be aware of the potential for PCL injury with this unusual, and previously unreported, mechanism of injury during survival swim training. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment is essential to prevent long-term disability. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Physical exercise training interventions for children and young adults during and after treatment for childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braam, Katja I; van der Torre, Patrick; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Kaspers, Gertjan J L

    2016-03-31

    A decreased physical fitness has been reported in patients and survivors of childhood cancer. This is influenced by the negative effects of the disease and the treatment of childhood cancer. Exercise training for adult cancer patients has frequently been reported to improve physical fitness. In recent years, literature on this subject has also become available for children and young adults with cancer, both during and after treatment. This is an update of the original review that was performed in 2011. To evaluate the effect of a physical exercise training intervention on the physical fitness (i.e. aerobic capacity, muscle strength, or functional performance) of children with cancer within the first five years from their diagnosis (performed either during or after cancer treatment), compared to a control group of children with cancer who did not receive an exercise intervention.To determine whether physical exercise within the first five years of diagnosis has an effect on fatigue, anxiety, depression, self efficacy, and HRQoL and to determine whether there are any adverse effects of the intervention. We searched the electronic databases of Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PEDro; ongoing trial registries and conference proceedings on 6 September 2011 and 11 November 2014. In addition, we performed a handsearch of reference lists. The review included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and clinical controlled trials (CCTs) that compared the effects of physical exercise training with no training, in people who were within the first five years of their diagnosis of childhood cancer. Two review authors independently identified studies meeting the inclusion criteria, performed the data extraction, and assessed the risk of bias using standardized forms. Study quality was rated by the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Apart from the five studies in the original review, this

  5. Polysaccharides from Portulaca oleracea L Improve Exercise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Exercise Endurance and Decrease Oxidative Stress in ... Keywords: Polysaccharides, Portulaca oleracea L., Oxidative stress, Swimming, Exercise endurance. ..... activity in mice. Phytother Res 2010; 24: 1508-1513. 15. Bonen A. Lactate transporters (MCT proteins) in heart and skeletal muscles. Med. Med Sci Sports Exe.

  6. Aqua Dynamics. Physical Conditioning through Water Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, Washington, DC.

    Swimming is recognized as America's most popular active sport. It is one of the best physical activities for people of all ages and for people who are physically handicapped. Vigorous water exercises can increase a person's flexibility, strength, and cardio-vascular endurance. Exercises requiring flexibility are performed more easily in water…

  7. Is the Comparison between Exercise and Pharmacologic Treatment of Depression in the Clinical Practice Guideline of the American College of Physicians Evidence-Based?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Netz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Major depression disorder is most commonly treated with antidepressants. However, due to their side effects clinicians seek non-pharmacologic options, and one of these is exercise. The literature on the benefits of exercise for depression is extensive. Nevertheless, two recent reviews focusing on antidepressants vs. other therapies as a basis for clinical practice guidelines recommended mainly antidepressants, excluding exercise as a viable choice for treatment of depression. The aim of this perspective is to analyze the literature exploring the reasons for this discrepancy. Two categories of publications were examined: randomized controlled trials (RCTs and meta-analyses or systematic reviews. Based on this reassessment, RCTs comparing exercise to antidepressants reported that exercise and antidepressants were equally effective. RCTs comparing exercise combined with antidepressants to antidepressants only reported a significant improvement in depression following exercise as an adjunctive treatment. Almost all the reviews examining exercise vs. other treatments of depression, including antidepressants, support the use of exercise in the treatment of depression, at least as an adjunctive therapy. The two reviews examining pharmacologic vs. non-pharmacologic therapies as a basis for clinical practice guidelines examined limited evidence on exercise vs. antidepressants. In addition, it is possible that academics and health care practitioners are skeptical of viewing exercise as medicine. Maybe, there is a reluctance to accept that changes in lifestyle as opposed to pharmacological treatment can alter biological mechanisms. Longitudinal studies are needed for assessing the effectiveness of exercise in real clinical settings, as well as studies exploring dose-response relationship between exercise and depression.

  8. The influence of elements of synchronized swimming on technique of the selected swimming strokes

    OpenAIRE

    Široký, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Title: The influence of elements of synchronized swimming on technique of the selected swimming strokes Objectives: The objective of the thesis is to assess the effect of the elements of synchronized swimming at improving the techniques of swimming. Methods: The results were detected by overt observation with active participation and subsequent scaling on the ordinal scale 1 to 5. Results: The results show that the influence of the elements of synchronized swimming on improving the technique ...

  9. The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauga, Eric [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States); Powers, Thomas R [Division of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912-9104 (United States)], E-mail: elauga@ucsd.edu, E-mail: Thomas_Powers@brown.edu

    2009-09-15

    Cell motility in viscous fluids is ubiquitous and affects many biological processes, including reproduction, infection and the marine life ecosystem. Here we review the biophysical and mechanical principles of locomotion at the small scales relevant to cell swimming, tens of micrometers and below. At this scale, inertia is unimportant and the Reynolds number is small. Our emphasis is on the simple physical picture and fundamental flow physics phenomena in this regime. We first give a brief overview of the mechanisms for swimming motility, and of the basic properties of flows at low Reynolds number, paying special attention to aspects most relevant for swimming such as resistance matrices for solid bodies, flow singularities and kinematic requirements for net translation. Then we review classical theoretical work on cell motility, in particular early calculations of swimming kinematics with prescribed stroke and the application of resistive force theory and slender-body theory to flagellar locomotion. After examining the physical means by which flagella are actuated, we outline areas of active research, including hydrodynamic interactions, biological locomotion in complex fluids, the design of small-scale artificial swimmers and the optimization of locomotion strategies.

  10. The hydrodynamics of swimming microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauga, Eric; Powers, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    Cell motility in viscous fluids is ubiquitous and affects many biological processes, including reproduction, infection and the marine life ecosystem. Here we review the biophysical and mechanical principles of locomotion at the small scales relevant to cell swimming, tens of micrometers and below. At this scale, inertia is unimportant and the Reynolds number is small. Our emphasis is on the simple physical picture and fundamental flow physics phenomena in this regime. We first give a brief overview of the mechanisms for swimming motility, and of the basic properties of flows at low Reynolds number, paying special attention to aspects most relevant for swimming such as resistance matrices for solid bodies, flow singularities and kinematic requirements for net translation. Then we review classical theoretical work on cell motility, in particular early calculations of swimming kinematics with prescribed stroke and the application of resistive force theory and slender-body theory to flagellar locomotion. After examining the physical means by which flagella are actuated, we outline areas of active research, including hydrodynamic interactions, biological locomotion in complex fluids, the design of small-scale artificial swimmers and the optimization of locomotion strategies.

  11. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    shark). Redrawn from Review of Fish. Swimming Modes for Aquatic. Locomotion, IEEE Journal of. Oceanic Engineering, Vol.24,. No.2, pp. 237–252, 1999, D M. Lane, M Sfakiotakis and J B C. Davies, Heriot-Watt University. undulatory → oscillatory caudaltail¯n (B C F ) m otions are know n collectively as. B C F sw im m ers.

  12. Shape Optimization of Swimming Sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkening, J.; Hosoi, A.E.

    2005-03-01

    The swimming behavior of a flexible sheet which moves by propagating deformation waves along its body was first studied by G. I. Taylor in 1951. In addition to being of theoretical interest, this problem serves as a useful model of the locomotion of gastropods and various micro-organisms. Although the mechanics of swimming via wave propagation has been studied extensively, relatively little work has been done to define or describe optimal swimming by this mechanism.We carry out this objective for a sheet that is separated from a rigid substrate by a thin film of viscous Newtonian fluid. Using a lubrication approximation to model the dynamics, we derive the relevant Euler-Lagrange equations to optimize swimming speed and efficiency. The optimization equations are solved numerically using two different schemes: a limited memory BFGS method that uses cubic splines to represent the wave profile, and a multi-shooting Runge-Kutta approach that uses the Levenberg-Marquardt method to vary the parameters of the equations until the constraints are satisfied. The former approach is less efficient but generalizes nicely to the non-lubrication setting. For each optimization problem we obtain a one parameter family of solutions that becomes singular in a self-similar fashion as the parameter approaches a critical value. We explore the validity of the lubrication approximation near this singular limit by monitoring higher order corrections to the zeroth order theory and by comparing the results with finite element solutions of the full Stokes equations.

  13. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 1. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming - Lift-based Propulsion. Jaywant H Arakeri. General Article Volume 14 Issue 1 January 2009 pp 32-46. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    forces generated by their °apping tails. A nguilliform sw im m .... In natural systems, like a human walking or a ¯sh swimming, there is always unsteadiness. ... (L) mainly from the wings balances the weight (W). b) For the fish shown here the thrust is mainly from the flapping tail. Lift from fins and buoyancy (FB ) bal- ance the ...

  15. The Effect of Swimming Experience on Acquisition and Retention of Swimming-Based Taste Aversion Learning in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2010-01-01

    Swimming endows rats with an aversion to a taste solution consumed before swimming. The present study explored whether the experience of swimming before or after the taste-swimming trials interferes with swimming-based taste aversion learning. Experiment 1 demonstrated that a single preexposure to 20 min of swimming was as effective as four or…

  16. Study of safflower on blood lactate concentration and exercise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The exercise function of mice was evaluated by a calculation of the rolling-stick time, swimming endurance time and hypoxia tolerance time. The results showed that both rolling-stick and swimming endurance time of mice in the experimental groups were significantly prolonged (p < 0.05) with regards to the control groups.

  17. Efeitos de dois tipos de treinamento de natação sobre a adiposidade e o perfil lipídico de ratos obesos exógenos Effects of two different types of swimming exercise on adiposity and lipid profile in rats with exogenous obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimara Zambon

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar os efeitos do exercício de natação intermitente em relação ao exercício contínuo e ao sedentarismo, em ratos Wistar, após o desenvolvimento de obesidade exógena pela administração de uma dieta hiperlipídica palatável sobre: evolução do peso corporal, ingestão alimentar, adiposidade, percentual de gordura dos tecidos e perfil lipídico. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados ratos adultos, mantidos em gaiolas individuais, com livre acesso a água e comida. O protocolo experimental incluiu: 1 desenvolvimento da obesidade exógena (3 semanas, os animais foram divididos em: P: sedentários alimentados com dieta padrão Primor® (n=8 e H: sedentários alimentados com dieta hiperlipídica (n=32; 2 tratamentos (8 semanas subseqüentes, os animais (n=24 passaram a receber dieta padrão e foram divididos em: sedentário; treinado contínuo e treinado intermitente. Treinamentos (5x semana: Contínuo (90 minutos/dia e Intermitente (3x30min/dia. Os animais foram submetidos à eutanásia (3 e 8 semanas, sendo coletados os tecidos adiposos, o fígado e o sangue. Foram determinados a adiposidade e o percentual de gordura dos tecidos adiposos e do fígado, o ganho de peso corporal, o consumo alimentar e o perfil lipídico. RESULTADOS: A dieta hiperlipídica aumentou a adiposidade, o percentual de gordura acumulada no fígado e desenvolveu dislipidemias. A troca de dieta e os dois tipos de treinamento foram capazes de reverter o quadro de obesidade exógena. Contudo, o exercício intermitente foi mais eficiente na redução da adiposidade e de ganho de peso. CONCLUSÃO: Associados à dieta balanceada, os treinamentos aplicados neste estudo poderiam ser utilizados como estratégia no controle de peso e de dislipidemias, tanto em modelos experimentais quanto em seres humanos.OBJECTIVE: The objective was to look into the effects of intermittent swimming against continuous exercise and inactivity in Wistar rats after they developed exogenous

  18. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jordan Gliedt, DC Directional Exercises Electrothermal Modalities Ergonomic Changes Hydrotherapy Manual Therapy Physical Therapy Postural Training Traction Watchful Waiting and Education Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections ...

  19. A phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, Robert U; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Gardiner, Robert A; Levin, Gregory; Wall, Bradley; Joseph, David; Chambers, Suzanne K; Galvão, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is accompanied by a number of adverse side effects including reduced bone mass and increased risk for fracture, reduced lean mass and muscle strength, mood disturbance and increased fat mass compromising physical functioning, independence, and quality of life. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the effects of long term exercise on reversing musculoskeletal-related side effects, and cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors in men receiving androgen deprivation for their prostate cancer. Specifically, we aim to investigate the effects of a 12-month exercise program designed to load the musculoskeletal system and reduce cardiovascular and diabetes disease progression on the following primary endpoints: 1) bone mineral density; 2) cardiorespiratory function and maximal oxygen capacity; 3) body composition (lean mass and fat mass); 4) blood pressure and cardiovascular function; 5) lipids and glycemic control; and 6) quality of life and psychological distress. Multi-site randomized controlled trial of 195 men (65 subjects per arm) undergoing treatment for prostate cancer involving ADT in the cities of Perth and Brisbane in Australia. Participants will be randomized to (1) resistance/impact loading exercise, (2) resistance/cardiovascular exercise groups and (3) usual care/delayed exercise. Participants will then undergo progressive training for 12 months. Measurements for primary and secondary endpoints will take place at baseline, 6 and 12 months (end of the intervention). The principal outcome of this project will be the determination of the strength of effect of exercise on the well established musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and insulin metabolism side effects of androgen deprivation in prostate cancer patients. As this project is much longer term than previous investigations in the area of exercise and cancer, we will gain knowledge as to the continuing effects of exercise in this patient population specifically

  20. Tailoring exercise interventions to comorbidities and treatment-induced adverse effects in patients with early stage breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy: a framework to support clinical decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Leeden, Marike; Huijsmans, Rosalie J; Geleijn, Edwin; de Rooij, Mariëtte; Konings, Inge R; Buffart, Laurien M; Dekker, Joost; Stuiver, Martijn M

    2018-02-01

    Delivery of exercise interventions to patients with early-stage breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy requires complex clinical decisions. The purpose of this study was to develop a framework to support clinical decisions for tailoring exercise interventions to common comorbidities and cancer treatment-induced adverse effects. Tailored exercise prescriptions were developed in four steps, following the i3-S strategy. All steps were based on current best available evidence, complemented with expert opinions. First, common comorbidities and treatment-induced adverse effects were identified. In the subsequent steps, contra-indications and restrictions for exercise were described, along with possible exercise adaptations. In the final step, the obtained information was synthesized into a framework. Prevalent comorbidities were hypertension, heart disease, diabetes mellitus, (osteo)arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and obesity. Adverse effects included conditions induced by pretreatment (e.g., lymphedema as a result of surgery) or by chemotherapy (e.g., reduced blood cell counts). Adaptations to the recommended exercise program were related to exercise tolerance, safety, and hygiene. A framework was proposed to guide clinical decisions during the exercise intervention. Comorbidities and adverse effects of breast cancer treatment require exercise adaptations. The proposed framework provides guidance on tailored exercise prescriptions in patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Implications for Rehabilitation Exercise is recommended for patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy, but requires complex clinical decisions of the health professional. We identified the most important comorbidities and adverse effects of breast cancer treatment, and the resultant contra-indications and restrictions to exercise. We incorporated these findings into a clinical decision framework that provides suggestions for exercise adaptations in patients with

  1. An open-source analytical platform for analysis of C. elegans swimming-induced paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardaway, J Andrew; Wang, Jing; Fleming, Paul A; Fleming, Katherine A; Whitaker, Sarah M; Nackenoff, Alex; Snarrenberg, Chelsea L; Hardie, Shannon L; Zhang, Bing; Blakely, Randy D

    2014-07-30

    The nematode Caenhorhabditis elegans offers great power for the identification and characterization of genes that regulate behavior. In support of this effort, analytical methods are required that provide dimensional analyses of subcomponents of behavior. Previously, we demonstrated that loss of the presynaptic dopamine (DA) transporter, dat-1, evokes DA-dependent Swimming-Induced Paralysis (Swip) (Mcdonald et al., 2007), a behavior compatible with forward genetic screens (Hardaway et al., 2012). Here, we detail the development and implementation of SwimR, a set of tools that provide for an automated, kinetic analysis of C. elegans Swip. SwimR relies on open source programs that can be freely implemented and modified. We show that SwimR can display time-dependent alterations of swimming behavior induced by drug-treatment, illustrating this capacity with the dat-1 blocker and tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (IMI). We demonstrate the capacity of SwimR to extract multiple kinetic parameters that are impractical to obtain in manual assays. Standard measurements of C. elegans swimming utilizes manual assessments of the number of animals exhibiting swimming versus paralysis. Our approach deconstructs the time course and rates of movement in an automated fashion, offering a significant increase in the information that can be obtained from swimming behavior. The SwimR platform is a powerful tool for the deconstruction of worm thrashing behavior in the context of both genetic and pharmacological manipulations that can be used to segregate pathways that underlie nematode swimming mechanics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Scapular-focused exercise treatment protocol for shoulder impingement symptoms: Three-dimensional scapular kinematics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Gisele Harumi; Santos, Adriane Lopes; McQuade, Kevin James; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe the effects of a periscapular strengthening and neuromuscular training protocol in three-dimensional scapular kinematics and resting positioning in participants with shoulder impingement symptoms. Self-reported function was also evaluated. The study group comprised 50 subjects with shoulder impingement syndrome (control group, n=25; treatment group, n=25). The treatment group underwent 8weeks of neuromuscular training and periscapular strengthening. Scapular kinematics was measured using an electromagnetic tracking device, and the Brazilian version of the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI-Br) questionnaire was carried out before and after the treatment. In the resting position, treated subjects had lower (p<0.01) internal rotation of the scapula compared to the control group, with a large effect size (2.4). On the coronal plane, the treated group had less scapular upward rotation (p<0.01) and less internal rotation (p<0.05), with a medium effect size. On the sagittal plane, the treated group had less internal rotation (p<0.01), less upward rotation (p<0.05), and less scapular anterior tilt (p<0.01), with a medium effect size. On the scapular plane, a reduction in upward rotation (p<0.01) after the intervention was observed, with a large effect size. Moreover, a reduction in the total SPADI-Br score was found, with a mean difference of 32.4 [24.4; 40.4] points (p<0.01) after the implementation of the protocol and a large effect size (2.0). The results provide biomechanical support for the clinical rationale for indicating therapeutic exercises focused on the periscapular muscles to improve scapular dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-managed loaded exercise versus usual physiotherapy treatment for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Chris; Malliaras, Peter; Mawson, Sue; May, Stephen; Walters, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff tendinopathy is a common source of shoulder pain characterised by persistent and/or recurrent problems for a proportion of sufferers. The aim of this study was to pilot the methods proposed to conduct a substantive study to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-managed loaded exercise programme versus usual physiotherapy treatment for rotator cuff tendinopathy. A single-centre pragmatic unblinded parallel group pilot randomised controlled trial. One private physiotherapy clinic, northern England. Twenty-four participants with rotator cuff tendinopathy. The intervention was a programme of self-managed loaded exercise. The control group received usual physiotherapy treatment. Baseline assessment comprised the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and the Short-Form 36, repeated three months post randomisation. The recruitment target was met and the majority of participants (98%) were willing to be randomised. 100% retention was attained with all participants completing the SPADI at three months. Exercise adherence rates were excellent (90%). The mean change in SPADI score was -23.7 (95% CI -14.4 to -33.3) points for the self-managed exercise group and -19.0 (95% CI -6.0 to -31.9) points for the usual physiotherapy treatment group. The difference in three month SPADI scores was 0.1 (95% CI -16.6 to 16.9) points in favour of the usual physiotherapy treatment group. In keeping with previous research which indicates the need for further evaluation of self-managed loaded exercise for rotator cuff tendinopathy, these methods and the preliminary evaluation of outcome offer a foundation and stimulus to conduct a substantive study. Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dyslipidemia, Diet and Physical Exercise in Children on Treatment With Antiretroviral Medication in El Salvador: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonego, Michela; Sagrado, Maria José; Escobar, Gustavo; Lazzerini, Marzia; Rivas, Estefanie; Martín-Cañavate, Rocio; Pérez de López, Elsy; Ayala, Sandra; Castaneda, Luis; Aparicio, Pilar; Custodio, Estefanía

    2016-10-01

    Dyslipidemias are common in HIV-infected children, especially if treated with protease inhibitors, but there are few data on how to treat dyslipidemias in this population. We estimated the dyslipidemia prevalence and its association with treatment, diet and physical exercise in children on antiretroviral treatment at the El Salvador reference center for pediatric HIV care (CENID). Information was gathered regarding socio-demographic characteristics, treatment, diet and physical activity of 173 children aged 5-18 years and receiving antiretroviral therapy. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C), viral load and CD4 T-lymphocytes were measured. Abnormal concentrations were defined as triglycerides ≥130 mg/dL in 10- to 18-year olds and ≥100 mg/dL in dyslipidemia with protease inhibitors, diet and physical exercise. Of the 173 children, 83 (48%) had hypertriglyceridemia and 25 (14.5%) hypercholesterolemia. High LDL-C concentrations were observed in 17 children (9.8%) and low HDL-C in 38 (22%). Treatment with protease inhibitors was significantly associated with hypertriglyceridemia [prevalence ratio (PR) 2.8; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.0-3.8] and hypercholesterolemia (PR 9.0; 95% CI: 3.6-22.2). Higher adherence to a "high fat/sugar diet" was associated with hypercholesterolemia (PR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1-2.3) and high LDL-C (PR 1.7; 95% CI: 1.0-2.9). Compared with those exercising <3 times/week, children exercising ≥7 times were less likely to have low HDL-C (PR = 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2-0.7). These results suggest that a healthy diet and exercise habits can contribute to controlling some aspects of the lipid profile in this population.

  5. Rest versus exercise as treatment for patients with low back pain and Modic changes. A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rikke K; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Wedderkopp, Niels; Sorensen, Joan S; Manniche, Claus

    2012-02-29

    Clinical experience suggests that many patients with Modic changes have relatively severe and persistent low back pain (LBP), which typically appears to be resistant to treatment. Exercise therapy is the recommended treatment for chronic LBP, however, due to their underlying pathology, Modic changes might be a diagnostic subgroup that does not benefit from exercise. The objective of this study was to compare the current state-of-the art treatment approach (exercise and staying active) with a new approach (load reduction and daily rest) for people with Modic changes using a randomized controlled trial design. Participants were patients from an outpatient clinic with persistent LBP and Modic changes. They were allocated using minimization to either rest therapy for 10 weeks with a recommendation to rest for two hours daily and the option of using a flexible lumbar belt or exercise therapy once a week for 10 weeks. Follow-up was at 10 weeks after recruitment and 52 weeks after intervention and the clinical outcome measures were pain, disability, general health and global assessment, supplemented by weekly information on low back problems and sick leave measured by short text message (SMS) tracking. In total, 100 patients were included in the study. Data on 87 patients at 10 weeks and 96 patients at one-year follow-up were available and were used in the intention-to-treat analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two intervention groups on any outcome. No differences were found between the two treatment approaches, 'rest and reduced load' and 'exercise and staying active', in patients with persistent LBP and Modic changes. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00454792.

  6. Rest versus exercise as treatment for patients with low back pain and Modic changes. a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Rikke K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical experience suggests that many patients with Modic changes have relatively severe and persistent low back pain (LBP, which typically appears to be resistant to treatment. Exercise therapy is the recommended treatment for chronic LBP, however, due to their underlying pathology, Modic changes might be a diagnostic subgroup that does not benefit from exercise. The objective of this study was to compare the current state-of-the art treatment approach (exercise and staying active with a new approach (load reduction and daily rest for people with Modic changes using a randomized controlled trial design. Methods Participants were patients from an outpatient clinic with persistent LBP and Modic changes. They were allocated using minimization to either rest therapy for 10 weeks with a recommendation to rest for two hours daily and the option of using a flexible lumbar belt or exercise therapy once a week for 10 weeks. Follow-up was at 10 weeks after recruitment and 52 weeks after intervention and the clinical outcome measures were pain, disability, general health and global assessment, supplemented by weekly information on low back problems and sick leave measured by short text message (SMS tracking. Results In total, 100 patients were included in the study. Data on 87 patients at 10 weeks and 96 patients at one-year follow-up were available and were used in the intention-to-treat analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two intervention groups on any outcome. Conclusions No differences were found between the two treatment approaches, 'rest and reduced load' and 'exercise and staying active', in patients with persistent LBP and Modic changes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00454792

  7. Pre-task music improves swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirmaul, B P; Dos Santos, R V; Da Silva Neto, L V

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pre-task music on swimming performance and other psychological variables. A randomized counterbalanced within-subjects (experimental and control condition) design was employed. Eighteen regional level male swimmers performed two 200-m freestyle swimming time trials. Participants were exposed to either 5 minutes of self-selected music (pre-task music condition) or 5 minutes of silence (control condition) and, after 1 minute, performed the swimming task. Swimming time was significantly shorter (-1.44%) in the pre-task music condition. Listening to pre-task music increased motivation to perform the swimming task, while arousal remained unchanged. While fatigue increased after the swimming task in both conditions, vigor, ratings of perceived exertion and affective valence were unaltered. It is concluded, for the first time, that pre-task music improves swimming performance.

  8. Anti-aging by means of physical education (on example of swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Fedyniak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to work out complex anti-aging program to find its influence on biological age and tem of elderly persons’ ageing. Material: in experiment 78 persons (44 men and 34 women with accelerated organism’s ageing participated. Two groups were formed. In both groups trainings were conducted three times a week. Each training took 55-80 minutes. Realization of the program was in three stages: preparatory-adaptive, training and supporting. Testing of the author’s program took ten months. For determination of biological (functional age and temp of organism’s ageing we used methodic by V.P. Voytenko. Results: we expanded ideas about slowing of involution changes in human organism without medication means. The main means of the program were special blocks of swimming. We determined the demand in formation of person’s desire for further physical development, for accumulation knowledge and skills in correct selection and fulfillment of physical exercises; for independent controlling own physical fitness. Conclusions: In preparatory part we recommend to use the following blocks: warming up, breathing, theoretical block. In main part the following blocks were used: exercises with objects, imitation exercises, facilitating mastering swimming; jumps and exercises on ground; distant swimming; hypoxic exercises. In final part game and breathing exercises were used. It is recommended to use principle of variability, which envisages planning of training process in compliance with age-gender specificities.

  9. Effect of Exercise Training on Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors in Methamphetamine Users during Behavioral Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Chelsea L; Ishibashi, Kenji; Chudzynski, Joy; Mooney, Larissa J; Rawson, Richard A; Dolezal, Brett A; Cooper, Christopher B; Brown, Amira K; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D

    2016-05-01

    Methamphetamine use disorder is associated with striatal dopaminergic deficits that have been linked to poor treatment outcomes, identifying these deficits as an important therapeutic target. Exercise attenuates methamphetamine-induced neurochemical damage in the rat brain, and a preliminary observation suggests that exercise increases striatal D2/D3 receptor availability (measured as nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND)) in patients with Parkinson's disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether adding an exercise training program to an inpatient behavioral intervention for methamphetamine use disorder reverses deficits in striatal D2/D3 receptors. Participants were adult men and women who met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine dependence and were enrolled in a residential facility, where they maintained abstinence from illicit drugs of abuse and received behavioral therapy for their addiction. They were randomized to a group that received 1 h supervised exercise training (n=10) or one that received equal-time health education training (n=9), 3 days/week for 8 weeks. They came to an academic research center for positron emission tomography (PET) using [(18)F]fallypride to determine the effects of the 8-week interventions on striatal D2/D3 receptor BPND. At baseline, striatal D2/D3 BPND did not differ between groups. However, after 8 weeks, participants in the exercise group displayed a significant increase in striatal D2/D3 BPND, whereas those in the education group did not. There were no changes in D2/D3 BPND in extrastriatal regions in either group. These findings suggest that structured exercise training can ameliorate striatal D2/D3 receptor deficits in methamphetamine users, and warrants further evaluation as an adjunctive treatment for stimulant dependence.

  10. NOX2 inhibition impairs early muscle gene expression induced by a single exercise bout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henríquez-Olguín

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS participate as signaling molecules in response to exercise in skeletal muscle. However, the source of ROS and the molecular mechanisms involved in these phenomena are still not completely understood. The aim of this work was to study the role of skeletal muscle NADPH oxidase isoform 2 (NOX2 in the molecular response to physical exercise in skeletal muscle. BALB/c mice, pre-treated with a NOX2 inhibitor, apocynin, (3 mg/kg or vehicle for 3 days, were swim-exercised for 60 min. Phospho-p47phox levels were significantly upregulated by exercise in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB. Moreover, exercise significantly increased NOX2 complex assembly (p47phox-gp91phox interaction demonstrated by both proximity ligation assay and co-immunoprecipitation. Exercise-induced NOX2 activation was completely inhibited by apocynin treatment. As expected, exercise increased the mRNA levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, citrate synthase (CS, mitochondrial transcription factor A (tfam and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in FDB muscles. Moreover, the apocynin treatment was associated to a reduced activation of p38 MAP kinase, ERK 1/2, and NF-κB signaling pathways after a single bout of exercise. Additionally, the increase in plasma IL-6 elicited by exercise was decreased in apocynin-treated mice compared with the exercised vehicle-group (p<0.001. These results were corroborated using gp91-dstat in an in-vitro exercise model. In conclusion, NOX2 inhibition by both apocynin and gp91dstat, alters the intracellular signaling to exercise and electrical stimuli in skeletal muscle, suggesting that NOX2 plays a critical role in molecular response to an acute exercise.

  11. Three-dimensional analysis of the swimming behavior of Daphnia magna exposed to nanosized titanium dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Noss

    Full Text Available Due to their surface characteristics, nanosized titanium dioxide particles (nTiO2 tend to adhere to biological surfaces and we thus hypothesize that they may alter the swimming performance and behavior of motile aquatic organisms. However, no suitable approaches to address these impairments in swimming behavior as a result of nanoparticle exposure are available. Water fleas Daphnia magna exposed to 5 and 20 mg/L nTiO2 (61 nm; polydispersity index: 0.157 in 17.46 mg/L stock suspension for 96 h showed a significantly (p<0.05 reduced growth rate compared to a 1-mg/L treatment and the control. Using three-dimensional video observations of swimming trajectories, we observed a treatment-dependent swarming of D. magna in the center of the test vessels during the initial phase of the exposure period. Ensemble mean swimming velocities increased with increasing body length of D. magna, but were significantly reduced in comparison to the control in all treatments after 96 h of exposure. Spectral analysis of swimming velocities revealed that high-frequency variance, which we consider as a measure of swimming activity, was significantly reduced in the 5- and 20-mg/L treatments. The results highlight the potential of detailed swimming analysis of D. magna for the evaluation of sub-lethal mechanical stress mechanisms resulting from biological surface coating and thus for evaluating the effects of nanoparticles in the aquatic environment.

  12. Theoretical methodological analysis of indexes of preparedness of children of сhernobyl to health employments swimming

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    Babalich V.A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Verification of readiness of children is carried out to health employments on swimming. An evaluation reeved for 10 ball scale. The health role of swimming is rotined as compared to other types of physical exercises. Morphofunctional and bodily condition of children is found out. The level of formed of knowledges is considered about facilities of improvement of own health. An accent is done on the necessity of expansion of range of possible ways of making healthy of children. Needs sound study questions of the individual making healthy of children by facilities of swimming.

  13. Metabolic Consequences of Dieting and Exercise in the Treatment of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoe, Clyde P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the effects of dieting and exercise on resting metabolic rate (RMR) in overweight women (N=10). Results showed that dieting lowered RMR by nearly double that expected on the basis of resulting weight loss; and that exercise caused RMR to rise to a level appropriate to prevailing body weight. (LLL)

  14. Muscle Fiber Specific Antioxidative System Adaptation to Swim Training in Rats: Influence of Intermittent Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchar, Olga

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of intermittent hypoxia at rest and in combination with long-term high-intensity swimming exercise on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense system adaptation in skeletal muscles differing in fiber type composition. High-intensity chronic exercise was performed as swimming training with load that corresponded to ~ 75 % VO2max (30 min·day-1, 5 days·wk-1, for 4 wk). Intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) consisted of repeated episodes of hypoxia (12%O2, 15 min), interrupted by equal periods of recovery (5 sessions/day, for 2 wk). Sessions of IHT were used during the first two weeks and during the last two weeks of chronic exercise. Oxidative (red gastrocnemius and soleus, mix) and glycolytic (white gastrocnemius) muscles were sampled. Our results indicated that high-intensity swim training in combination with sessions of IHT induced more profound antioxidative adaptations in skeletal muscles than the exercise training only. This adaptation has muscle fiber type specificity and is reflected in significantly elevated superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in highly oxidative muscle only. Training adaptation of GSH system (reduced glutathione content, activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, NADPH-supplying enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) occurred both in slow- and fast-twitch muscles. However, this process was more effective in oxidative muscles. IHT attenuated the increase in TBARS content induced by high-intensity swimming training. The test on exercise tolerance demonstrated a significant elevation of the swimming time to exhaustion after IHT at rest and after IHT in conjunction with high-intensity exercise in comparison with untrained and chronically exercised rats. These results confirmed that sessions of IHT might improve exercise tolerance and increase maximal work capacity. Key PointsSingle high-intensity exercise induces a significant increase in TBARS content

  15. [Exercise therapy in the treatment of idiopathic adolescent scoliosis: Is it useful?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porte, M; Patte, K; Dupeyron, A; Cottalorda, J

    2016-06-01

    Many practitioners, pediatricians, and general practitioners prescribe physical therapy when tracking scoliosis. However, has physical therapy alone proved its efficacy in the care of the scoliosis to slow down progression? Our purpose is to report the results of a literature review on the effectiveness of rehabilitation in idiopathic scoliosis. No current study presents sufficient scientific proof to validate the efficacy of isolated exercise therapy in scoliosis. Learned societies recognize, however, the efficacy of combining conservative therapy (brace+physiotherapy) in idiopathic scoliosis. Should we then still prescribe rehabilitation without brace treatment? Although physical therapy alone does not seem effective in treating scoliosis, it can limit potential painful phenomena and be beneficial for respiratory function. The physical therapist can also teach the teenager the classic principles of hygiene of the back. It may therefore be appropriate to prescribe physical therapy, but the principles and objectives must be explained to the patient and family in light of current evidence-based medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Diabetic Foot and Exercise Therapy: Step by Step The Role of Rigid Posture and Biomechanics Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Piergiorgio; Gulisano, Massimo; Anichini, Roberto; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Lower extremity ulcers represent a serious and costly complication of diabetes mellitus. Many factors contribute to the development of diabetic foot. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main causes of foot ulceration and contribute in turn to the growth of additional risk factors such as limited joint mobility, muscular alterations and foot deformities. Moreover, a deficit of balance, posture and biomechanics can be present, in particular in patients at high risk for ulceration. The result of this process may be the development of a vicious cycle which leads to abnormal distribution of the foot's plantar pressures in static and dynamic postural conditions. This review shows that some of these risk factors significantly improve after a few weeks of exercise therapy (ET) intervention. Accordingly it has been suggested that ET can be an important weapon in the prevention of foot ulcer. The aim of ET can relate to one or more alterations typically found in diabetic patients, although greater attention should be paid to the evaluation and possible correction of body balance, rigid posture and biomechanics. Some of the most important limitations of ET are difficult access to therapy, patient compliance and the transitoriness of the results if the training stops. Many proposals have been made to overcome such limitations. In particular, it is important that specialized centers offer the opportunity to participate in ET and during the treatment the team should work to change the patient’s lifestyle by improving the execution of appropriate daily physical activity. PMID:24807636

  17. The fascial system and exercise intolerance in patients with chronic heart failure: hypothesis of osteopathic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordoni B

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Bordoni,1–3 F Marelli2,3 1Don Carlo Gnocchi Foundation, Department of Cardiology, IRCCS Santa Maria Nascente, Milan, Italy; 2School CRESO, Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Falconara Marittima, AN, Italy; 3School CRESO, Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Castellanza, VA, Italy Abstract: Chronic heart failure is a progressive, debilitating disease, resulting in a decline in the quality of life of the patient and incurring very high social economic costs. Chronic heart failure is defined as the inability of the heart to meet the demands of oxygen from the peripheral area. It is a multi-aspect complex disease which impacts negatively on all of the body systems. Presently, there are no texts in the modern literature that associate the symptoms of exercise intolerance of the patient with a dysfunction of the fascial system. In the first part of this article, we will discuss the significance of the disease, its causes, and epidemiology. The second part will explain the pathological adaptations of the myofascial system. The last section will outline a possible osteopathic treatment for patients with heart failure in order to encourage research and improve the general curative approach for the patient. Keywords: manual therapy, fatigue, chronic heart failure, osteopathic

  18. Impact of exercise training associated to pyridostigmine treatment on autonomic function and inflammatory profile after myocardial infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriani, Daniele J; Souza, Gabriel I H; Carrozzi, Nicolle M; Mostarda, Cristiano; Dourado, Paulo M M; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda M; De Angelis, Kátia; Moreno, Heitor; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2017-01-15

    The effects of exercise training (ET) associated with pyridostigmine bromide (PYR) treatment on cardiac and autonomic function, as well as on inflammatory profile after myocardial infarction (MI), are unclear. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to: control (C); sedentary+infarcted (I); sedentary+infarcted treated with PYR (IP); infarcted submitted to aerobic exercise training (IT); and infarcted submitted to treatment with PYR and aerobic exercise training (ITP). After 12weeks of ET (50-70% maximal running speed; 1h a day, 5days a week) and/or PYR treatment (0.14mg/mL on drink water), hemodynamic, autonomic and cytokines expression were performed. We observed that both aerobic ET, associated or not with PYR treatment in MI animals, were able to: reduced MI area, improved systolic and diastolic function, baroreflex sensitivity, cardiovascular autonomic modulation, and tonic activity of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. Also, they led to a reduction of inflammatory profile measured at plasma, left ventricle and soleus skeletal muscle. However, additional effects were observed when ET and PYR were associated, such as an increase in vagal tonus and modulation, reduction of MI area, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as an increase of interleukin-10/TNF-α ratio on left ventricle. These data suggest that associating ET and PYR promotes some additional benefits on cardiovascular autonomic modulation and inflammatory profile in infarcted rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Travel at low energetic cost by swimming and wave-riding bottlenose dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T M; Friedl, W A; Fong, M L; Yamada, R M; Sedivy, P; Haun, J E

    1992-02-27

    Over the past 50 years there has been much speculation about the energetic cost of swimming and wave-riding by dolphins. When aligned properly in front of the bow of moving ships in the stern wake of small boats, on wind waves, and even in the wake of larger cetaceans, the animals appear to move effortlessly through the water without the benefit of propulsive strokes by the flukes. Theoretically, body streamlining as well as other anatomical and behavioural adaptations contribute to low transport costs in these animals. The economy of movement permitted by wave-riding has been perceived as an energetic advantage for the swimming dolphin, but has been hard to prove in the absence of physiological data for exercising cetaceans. Here we determine the aerobic and anaerobic costs of swimming and wave-riding in bottlenose dolphins and find that the minimum cost of transport for swimming dolphins is 1.29 +/- 0.05 J kg-1 m-1 at a cruising speed of 2.1 m s-1. Aerobic costs are nearly twice as high for swimming seals and sea lions, and 8-12 times higher for human swimmers. Wave-riding by dolphins provides additional benefits in terms of speed. The results indicate that behavioural, physiological and morphological factors make swimming an economical form of high-speed travel for dolphins.

  20. Nutritional recommendations for synchronized swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sherry; Benardot, Dan; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    The sport of synchronized swimming is unique, because it combines speed, power, and endurance with precise synchronized movements and high-risk acrobatic maneuvers. Athletes must train and compete while spending a great amount of time underwater, upside down, and without the luxury of easily available oxygen. This review assesses the scientific evidence with respect to the physiological demands, energy expenditure, and body composition in these athletes. The role of appropriate energy requirements and guidelines for carbohydrate, protein, fat, and micronutrients for elite synchronized swimmers are reviewed. Because of the aesthetic nature of the sport, which prioritizes leanness, the risks of energy and macronutrient deficiencies are of significant concern. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport and disordered eating/eating disorders are also of concern for these female athletes. An approach to the healthy management of body composition in synchronized swimming is outlined. Synchronized swimmers should be encouraged to consume a well-balanced diet with sufficient energy to meet demands and to time the intake of carbohydrate, protein, and fat to optimize performance and body composition. Micronutrients of concern for this female athlete population include iron, calcium, and vitamin D. This article reviews the physiological demands of synchronized swimming and makes nutritional recommendations for recovery, training, and competition to help optimize athletic performance and to reduce risks for weight-related medical issues that are of particular concern for elite synchronized swimmers.

  1. Cetacean Swimming with Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank

    2016-11-01

    During entanglement in fishing gear, dolphins can suffer abrasions and amputations of flukes and fins. As a result, if the dolphin survives the ordeal, swimming performance is altered. Current rehabilitation technques is the use of prosthesis to regain swimming ability. In this work, analyses are focused on two dolphins with locomotive impairment; Winter (currently living in Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Florida) and Fuji (lived in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan). Fuji lost about 75% of its fluke surface to necrosis (death of cells) and Winter lost its tail due to amputation. Both dolphins are aided by prosthetic tails that mimic the shape of a real dolphin tail. Using 3D surface reconstruction techniques and a high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solver, we were able to elucidate the kinematics and hydrodynamics and fluke deformation of these swimmers to clarify the effectiveness of prostheses in helping the dolphins regain their swimming ability. Associated with the performance, we identified distinct features in the wake structures that can explain this gap in the performance compared to a healthy dolphin. This work was supported by ONR MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  2. Diagnosis of Swimming Induced Pulmonary Edema—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Grünig

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE is a complication that can occur during exercise with the possibility of misdiagnosis and can quickly become life threatening; however, medical literature infrequently describes SIPE. Therefore, the aim of this review was to analyse all individual cases diagnosed with SIPE as reported in scientific sources, with an emphasis on the diagnostic pathways and the key facts resulting in its diagnosis. Due to a multifactorial and complicated pathophysiology, the diagnosis could be difficult. Based on the actual literature, we try to point out important findings regarding history, conditions, clinical findings, and diagnostic testing helping to confirm the diagnosis of SIPE. Thirty-eight cases from seventeen articles reporting the diagnosis of SIPE were selected. We found remarkable differences in the individual described diagnostic pathways. A total of 100% of the cases suffered from an acute onset of breathing problems, occasionally accompanied by hemoptysis. A total of 73% showed initial hypoxemia. In most of the cases (89%, an initial chest X-Ray or chest CT was available, of which one-third (71% showed radiological signs of pulmonary edema. The majority of the cases (82% experienced a rapid resolution of symptoms within 48 h, the diagnostic hallmark of SIPE. Due to a foreseeable increase in participation in swimming competitions and endurance competitions with a swimming component, diagnosis of SIPE will be important, especially for medical teams caring for these athletes.

  3. Near-normalization of glycaemic control with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist treatment combined with exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mensberg, Pernille; Nyby, Signe; Jørgensen, Peter Godsk

    2017-01-01

    seen in body fat (exercise plus liraglutide: -2.5 ± 1.4%, (p exercise plus placebo: -2.2 ± 1.9%, (p exercise plus liraglutide: 0.5 ± 0.5 l O2 per min (p exercise plus placebo: 0.4 ± 0.4 l O2 per min (p = 0...... the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: In obese patients with type 2 diabetes, exercise combined with GLP-1RA treatment near-normalised HbA1c levels and caused a robust weight loss when compared to placebo. These results suggest that a combination of exercise and GLP-1RA treatment is effective in type 2 diabetes.......AIMS: Exercise as well as glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) treatment improves glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated the effects of exercise in combination with a GLP-1RA (liraglutide) or placebo for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Thirty...

  4. Comparison of angiography, prone renography, and exercise renography for treatment planning in hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clorius, J.H.; Strauss, L.G.; Allenberg, J.; Hupp, T.; Schmidlin, P.; Irngartinger, G.

    1987-01-01

    Fifteen hypertensives with unilateral vascular stenosis had selective renal angiograms, prone-position gamma camera hippurate renograms, and upright exercise renograms. The exercise renograms were used to identify renal vasomotor dysfunction. Each procedure was assessed for its value to predict cure of hypertension. Therapy included one nephrectomy, and angioplasty, and 13 surgical revascularizations. Neither the extent of vascular lumen reduction as assessed with angiography nor the unilateral function impairment documented with a prone-position renogram contained useful prognostic data. Exercise renography correctly predicted the posttherapy blood pressure status in 14 of 15 hypertensives. Exercise renography can identify a newly recognized function response of the vasculature of the kidney, a pathologic response that shows promise in the investigation of hypertension

  5. Comparing the effects of exercise program and low-level laser therapy with exercise program and polarized polychromatic non-coherent light (bioptron light) on the treatment of lateral elbow tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasinopoulos, Dimitrios; Stasinopoulos, Ioannis; Pantelis, Manias; Stasinopoulou, Kalliopi

    2009-06-01

    The use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and polarized polychromatic non-coherent light as supplements to an exercise program has been recommended for the management of lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET). To investigate whether an exercise program supplemented with LLLT is more successful than an exercise program supplemented with polarized polychromatic non-coherent light in treating LET. Patients with unilateral LET for at least 4 wk were sequentially allocated to receive either an exercise program with LLLT or an exercise program with polarized polychromatic non-coherent light. The exercise program consisted of eccentric and static stretching exercises of wrist extensors. In the LLLT group a 904-nm Ga-As laser was used in continuous mode, and the power density was 130 mW/cm(2), and the dose was 0.585 J/point. In the group receiving polarized polychromatic non-coherent light the Bioptron 2 was used to administer the dose perpendicularly to the lateral epicondyle at three points at an operating distance of 5-10 cm for 6 min at each position. The outcome measures were pain and function and were evaluated at baseline, at the end of the treatment (week 4), and 3 mo after the end of treatment (week 16). Fifty patients met the inclusion criteria. At the end of treatment there was a decline in pain and a rise in function in both groups compared with baseline (p 0.0005 on the independent t-test). The results suggest that the combination of an exercise program with LLLT or polarized polychromatic non-coherent light is an adequate treatment for patients with LET. Further research to establish the relative and absolute effectiveness of such a treatment approach is needed.

  6. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT MODELS OF SWIMMING TRAINING (DEFINED IN RELATION TO ANAEROBIC THRESHOLD ON THE INCREASE OF SWIM SPEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Krivokapić

    2007-05-01

    treatments had signifi cant impact on the increase of swim speed at 400m and 50 m measured in the moment of reaching the anaerobic threshold.

  7. Exercise as a potential treatment for drug abuse: Evidence from preclinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Andrew Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies reveal that individuals who engage in regular aerobic exercise are less likely to use and abuse illicit drugs. Until recently, very few studies had examined the causal influences that mediate this relationship, and it was not clear whether exercise was effective at reducing substance use and abuse. In the past few years, several preclinical studies have revealed that exercise reduces drug self-administration in laboratory animals. These studies have revealed that exercise produces protective effects in procedures designed to model different transitional phases that occur during the development of, and recover from, a substance use disorder (e.g., acquisition, maintenance, escalation, and relapse/reinstatement of drug use. Moreover, recent studies have revealed several behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exercise that may be responsible for its protective effects in these assays. Collectively, these studies have provided convincing evidence to support the development of exercise-based interventions to reduce compulsive patterns of drug intake in clinical and at-risk populations.

  8. Kinematics of swimming garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Yonatan

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the kinematics of swimming garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis) using a novel nonlinear regression-based digitization method to establish quantitative statistical support for non-constant wavelengths in the undulatory pattern exhibited by swimming snakes. We find that in swimming snakes, the growth of the amplitude of the propulsive wave head-to-tail is strongly correlated (p < 0.005) with the head-to-tail growth in the wavelength. We investigate correlations between kinematic parameters and steady swimming speed, and find a very strong positive correlation between swimming speed and undulation frequency. We furthermore find a statistically well-supported positive correlation between swimming speed and both the initial amplitude of the propulsive wave at the head and the degree of amplitude growth from head to tail.

  9. Compulsive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Hinze, Cecilie Juul; Emborg Jannsen, Bolette

    2017-01-01

    Compulsive exercise is a condition described since 1970s. It is characterized by a craving for physical training, resulting in uncontrollable excessive exercise behavior with harmful consequences, such as injuries and impaired social relations. It has not been accepted as a mental disorder...... found that compulsive exercise is associated with eating disorder pathology, perfectionism, neuroticism, narcissism, and obsessive compulsive traits. The most prominent negative consequences were injuries, social impairment, and depression, but more research is needed to uncover the potential...... dysfunction resulting from compulsive exercise. As the condition is not recognized as a psychiatric disorder, studies on treatment interventions are sparse. Problems with compliance have been reported; therefore, motivational interviewing has been proposed as a treatment approach, in combination...

  10. Effect of Maitland mobilization and exercises for the treatment of shoulder adhesive capsulitis: a single-case design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricar, N; Shacklady, C; McLoughlin, L

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this single-case design (ABCBC) was to investigate the response of shoulder motions, pain, and function to two commonly used physiotherapy management approaches. An individual with stage three shoulder adhesive capsulitis was treated with exercise (phase B) and exercise plus mobilization (phase C). Initially, a "baseline" phase (phase A) when treatment had not started was established for comparison. Two types of Maitland "accessory" glenohumeral mobilization techniques, anteroposterior mobilization in shoulder flexion and longitudinal caudad in shoulder abduction, were evaluated during phase C. The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) was used to monitor pain and functional disability, and four shoulder movements (flexion, abduction, internal, and external rotations) were measured. The results were evaluated by using single-case design analysis method of Split Middle Technique and visual observation. The SPADI scores deteriorated in phase A but improved in phase B1, C1, and B2. All four shoulder movements improved under both management approaches, although more gain in motion was observed when mobilizations were added to an exercise program. The exercise plus mobilization intervention shows promise as a cost-effective management. The deterioration in shoulder motion, pain, and function observed in phase A may suggest benefit of an earlier physiotherapy intervention.

  11. Effects of Exercise in the Treatment of Overweight and Obese Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review of Meta-Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Kelley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Conduct a systematic review of previous meta-analyses addressing the effects of exercise in the treatment of overweight and obese children and adolescents. Methods. Previous meta-analyses of randomized controlled exercise trials that assessed adiposity in overweight and obese children and adolescents were included by searching nine electronic databases and cross-referencing from retrieved studies. Methodological quality was assessed using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR Instrument. The alpha level for statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results. Of the 308 studies reviewed, two aggregate data meta-analyses representing 14 and 17 studies and 481 and 701 boys and girls met all eligibility criteria. Methodological quality was 64% and 73%. For both studies, statistically significant reductions in percent body fat were observed (P=0.006 and P<0.00001. The number-needed-to treat (NNT was 4 and 3 with an estimated 24.5 and 31.5 million overweight and obese children in the world potentially benefitting, 2.8 and 3.6 million in the US. No other measures of adiposity (BMI-related measures, body weight, and central obesity were statistically significant. Conclusions. Exercise is efficacious for reducing percent body fat in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Insufficient evidence exists to suggest that exercise reduces other measures of adiposity.

  12. Chronic treatment with caffeine and its withdrawal modify the antidepressant-like activity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the forced swim and tail suspension tests in mice. Effects on Comt, Slc6a15 and Adora1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, Aleksandra; Doboszewska, Urszula; Herbet, Mariola; Wośko, Sylwia; Wyska, Elżbieta; Świąder, Katarzyna; Serefko, Anna; Korga, Agnieszka; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Wróbel, Andrzej; Ostrowska, Marta; Terlecka, Joanna; Kanadys, Adam; Poleszak, Ewa; Dudka, Jarosław; Wlaź, Piotr

    2017-12-15

    Recent preclinical and clinical data suggest that low dose of caffeine enhances the effects of common antidepressants. Here we investigated the effects of chronic administration of caffeine (5mg/kg, twice daily for 14days) and its withdrawal on day 15th on the activity of per se ineffective doses of fluoxetine (5mg/kg) and escitalopram (2mg/kg) given on day 15th. We found decreased immobility time in the forced swim and tail suspension tests in mice in which caffeine was administered simultaneously with antidepressants on day 15th following a 14-day caffeine treatment and no alterations in the spontaneous locomotor activity. A decrease in the level of escitalopram and an increase in the level of caffeine in serum were observed after concomitant administration of these compounds, while the joint administration of caffeine and fluoxetine was not associated with changes in their levels in serum or brain. Caffeine withdrawal caused a decrease in Adora1 mRNA level in the cerebral cortex (Cx). Administration of escitalopram or fluoxetine followed by caffeine withdrawal caused an increase in this gene expression, whereas administration of escitalopram, but not fluoxetine, on day 15th together with caffeine caused a decrease in Adora1 mRNA level in the Cx. Furthermore, antidepressant-like activity observed after joint administration of the tested drugs with caffeine was associated with decreased Slc6a15 mRNA level in the Cx. The results show that withdrawal of caffeine after its chronic intake may change activity of antidepressants with concomitant alterations within monoamine, adenosine and glutamate systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of a swimming program on infants' heart rate response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Mario J; Barbosa, Tiago M; Ramos, Alberto; Marinho, Daniel A

    2016-04-01

    The physiological response has been used to characterize or estimate physical demands while exercising. The aim of this study was to analyze the infant's physiological adaptations over an intervention water program. Fourteen infants (36±5.08 months old) were tested before (M1) and 4 months after (M2) a well-designed swimming program aiming to develop aquatic readiness, cognitive behavior and social interaction. The physiological response was assessed based on heart rate measurements (HR, bpm) at a sampling rate of 1 Hz during several basic aquatic motor skills: 1) individual displacement in ventral position (HR@InD); 2) Individual displacement in vertical position (HR@VD); 3) immersion (HR@Im); 4) voluntary underwater displacement (HR@UnD); 5) jump from the deck (HR@JD); 6) jump from the swimming mat (HR@JM); 7) from a swimming slider (HR@Sli). The HR@Im showed the lowest values (~119 bpm) at the end of the program. Main trend was for a HR decreased over time (HR@Im: -14.17±17.76%; HR@InD: -8.16±9.16%; HR@JD: -10.36±12.70%; HR@Sli: -3.48±6.40%. In all other skills, HR remained unchanged. Our findings suggest that infants experience significant hear rate adaptations while participating on a swimming program. The HR decreases suggests a higher capability to perform the basic aquatic motor skills and a less stressful behavior through the lessons.

  14. Enhanced active swimming in viscoelastic fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, Emily E; Lauga, Eric Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Swimming microorganisms often self propel in fluids with complex rheology. While past theoretical work indicates that fluid viscoelasticity should hinder their locomotion, recent experiments on waving swimmers suggest a possible non-Newtonian enhancement of locomotion. We suggest a physical mechanism, based on fluid-structure interaction, leading to swimming in a viscoelastic fluid at a higher speed than in a Newtonian one. Using Taylor's two-dimensional swimming sheet model, we solve for the...

  15. HYDRODINAMICS AND SWIMMING TEHNIQUE AS PARAMETERS FOR SUCCESSFULL SWIMMING AT THE AGE 10–12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Dimitrić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to confirm that swimming technique and hydrodynamic parameters of a swimmer are relevant for successful swimming. Total of 63 boys, at the age of 10-12, participated in this research. There were 15 criterion morphology and specific motoric skills variables as well as one predictive variable derived from FINA points. We have concluded that hydrodynamic and swimming technique significantly contributes for successful swimming. These facts should use trainers as guidance for workout plan.

  16. Swimming and spinal deformities: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaina, Fabio; Donzelli, Sabrina; Lusini, Monia; Minnella, Salvatore; Negrini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of spinal deformities and low back pain (LBP) in adolescent competitive swimmers and normal controls. This was a cross-sectional study with convenience sample of 112 adolescent competitive swimmers (62 females) compared with 217 students (106 females) of the same age (12.5 years). We designed a questionnaire to collect data on LBP and measured the angle of trunk rotation with a Bunnell scoliometer to screen for scoliosis, along with the plumbline distances for kyphosis and lordosis. Clinical cutoffs defined in the literature for detection of spinal deformities were applied. Analyses were performed using the t test and χ(2) test, and ORs and 95% CIs were calculated. Swimming was found to increase the risk of trunk asymmetries (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.08-3.20). Swimming also increased the risk of hyperkyphosis (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.35-3.77) and hyperlordosis (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.06-4.73), and increased LBP in females by 2.1-fold (95% CI, 1.08-4.06). Swimming is associated with an increased risk of trunk asymmetries and hyperkyphosis. Although swimming has been considered a complete sport and a treatment option for scoliosis, our data contradict that approach, and also show a higher prevalence of LBP in females. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Swimming Ability of Children with Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benčuriková Ľubomíra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on findings of a pilot research to determine the level of swimming ability of children with weak respiratory system aged between 10 - 11 years, who attended special classes for asthmatics. Swimming ability was assessed by 25 m free style swimming test. The results of asthmatics were compared with healthy peers (Benčuriková 2006; Kováčová 2010; Labudová 2011. The results confirmed that the level of swimming capability of asthmatic children, despite their handicap, is significantly higher than their healthy peers.

  18. A 10-year follow-up of tailored behavioural treatment and exercise-based physiotherapy for persistent musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilson, Christina; Demmelmaier, Ingrid; Bergman, Stefan; Lindberg, Per; Denison, Eva; Åsenlöf, Pernilla

    2017-02-01

    To study the long-term outcomes of two interventions targeting patients with sub-acute and persistent pain in a primary care physiotherapy setting. A 10-year follow-up of a two-armed randomised controlled trial, initially including 97 participants. Tailored behavioural medicine treatment, applied in a physiotherapy context (experimental condition), and exercise-based physiotherapy (control condition). Pain-related disability was the primary outcome. The maximum pain intensity, pain control, fear of movement, sickness-related absence (register data) and perceived benefit and confidence in coping with future pain problems were the secondary outcomes. Forty-three (44%) participants responded to the follow-up survey, 20 in the tailored behavioural medicine treatment group and 23 in the exercise-based physiotherapy group. The groups did not differ in terms of the change in the scores for the primary outcome ( p=0.17) of pain-related disability between the experimental group (median: 2.5, Q1-Q3: -2.5-14.25), and the control group (median: 0, Q1-Q3: -5-6). Further, there were also no significant differences found for the secondary outcomes except for sickness-related absence, where the exercise-based physiotherapy group had more days of sickness-related absence three months before treatment ( p= 0.02), and at the 10-year follow-up ( p=0.03). The beneficial effects favouring tailored behavioural medicine treatment that observed post-treatment and at the two-year follow-up were not maintained 10 years after treatment.

  19. A model of poorly controlled type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and its treatment with aerobic exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melling, C W J; Grisé, K N; Hasilo, C P; Fier, B; Milne, K J; Karmazyn, M; Noble, E G

    2013-05-01

    Modern exogenous insulin therapy can improve the quality of life of Type 1 Diabetic Mellitus (T1DM) patients, although maintenance of normal glycaemic levels is often a challenge given the variety of factors that alter it. A number of studies have examined the effect of exercise in T1DM; however, the majority of experimental studies have utilized diabetic rodents with severe hyperglycaemia. Given that T1DM patients are likely to refrain from hyperglycaemia, studies examining the effects of regular exercise in which blood glucose is poorly controlled would better represent the T1DM population. The current study examined the ability of a ten-week aerobic exercise training program to modify markers of cardiovascular function and bone health in STZ-induced diabetic rodents maintained in the 9-15 mM glycaemic range through insulin therapy. Moderate hyperglycaemia, when prolonged, leads to significant changes in cardiac structure, bone health, and glucose handling capacity. Ten weeks of exercise was able to alleviate many of these deleterious events as no significant cardiovascular functional alterations were evident except a reduction in resting heart rate and an increase in stroke volume index. Further, despite changes in cardiac dimensions, exercise was able to elevate cardiac output index and increase the E/A ratio of exercising diabetic animals which would be indicative of improvements of cardiac function. Together, this study demonstrates that despite moderate hyperglycaemia, the combined role of a ten-week exercise training program coupled with insulin therapy is able to alleviate many of the well-known complications associated with diabetes progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Tethered swimming can be used to evaluate force contribution for short-distance swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morouço, Pedro G; Marinho, Daniel A; Keskinen, Kari L; Badillo, Juan J; Marques, Mário C

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to compare stroke and the physiological responses between maximal tethered and free front crawl swimming and (b) to evaluate the contribution of force exertion for swimming performance over short distances. A total of 34 male swimmers, representing various levels of competitive performance, participated in this study. Each participant was tested in both a 30-second maximal tethered swimming test and a 50-m free swimming test. The tethered force parameters, the swimming speed, stroke (stroke rate [SR]), and the physiological responses (increase in blood lactate concentration [ΔBLa], heart rate, and rate of perceived exertion) were recorded and calculated. The results showed no differences in stroke and the physiological responses between tethered and free swimming, with a high level of agreement for the SR and ΔBLa. A strong correlation was obtained between the maximum impulse of force per stroke and the speed (r = 0.91; p swimming performance. The relationship between the swimming speed and maximum force tended to be nonlinear, whereas linear relationships were observed with the maximum impulse. This study demonstrates that tethered swimming does not significantly alter stroke and the physiological responses compared with free swimming, and that the maximum impulse per stroke should be used to evaluate the balance between force and the ability to effectively apply force during sprint swimming. Consequently, coaches can rely on tethered forces to identify strength deficits and improve swimming performance over short distances.

  1. Can exercise mimetics substitute for exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Kiens, Bente; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Exercise leads to changes in muscle phenotype with important implications for exercise performance and health. A recent paper in Cell by Narkar et al. (2008) shows that many of the adaptations in muscle phenotype elicited by exercise can be mimicked by genetic manipulation and drug treatment...

  2. Effects of an 8-weeks erythropoietin treatment on mitochondrial and whole body fat oxidation capacity during exercise in healthy males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Plenge, Ulla; Helbo, Signe

    2015-01-01

    and angiogenesis. Recombinant erythropoietin was administered by subcutaneous injections (5000 IU) in six healthy male volunteers (aged 21 ± 2 years; fat mass 18.5 ± 2.3%) over 8 weeks. The participants performed two graded cycle ergometer exercise tests before and after the intervention where VO2max and maximal...... fat oxidation were measured. Biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle were obtained before and after the intervention. Recombinant erythropoietin treatment increased mitochondrial O2 flux during ADP stimulated state 3 respiration in the presence of complex I and II substrates (malate, glutamate...... myoglobin increased by 16.5% (P fat oxidation was not increased after treatment. Eight weeks...

  3. Effect of swimming on the production of aldosterone in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Kong Lieu

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that exercise is one of the stresses known to increase the aldosterone secretion. Both potassium and angiotensin II (Ang II levels are shown to be correlated with aldosterone production during exercise, but the mechanism is still unclear. In an in vivo study, male rats were catheterized via right jugular vein (RJV, and divided into four groups namely water immersion, swimming, lactate infusion (13 mg/kg/min and pyruvate infusion (13 mg/kg/min groups. Each group was treated for 10 min. Blood samples were collected at 0, 10, 15, 30, 60 and 120 min from RJV after administration. In an in vitro study, rat zona glomerulosa (ZG cells were challenged by lactate (1-10 mM in the presence or absence of Ang II (10(-8 M for 60 min. The levels of aldosterone in plasma and medium were measured by radioimmunoassay. Cell lysates were analyzed by immunoblotting assay. After exercise and lactate infusion, plasma levels of aldosterone and lactate were significantly higher than those in the control group. Swimming for 10 min significantly increased the plasma Ang II levels in male rats. Administration of lactate plus Ang II significantly increased aldosterone production and enhanced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR in ZG cells. These results demonstrated that acute exercise led to the increase of both aldosterone and Ang II secretion, which is associated with lactate action on ZG cells and might be dependent on the activity of renin-angiotensin system.

  4. Amitriptyline and aerobic exercise or amitriptyline alone in the treatment of chronic migraine: a randomized comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Dias Santos Santiago

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To compare the preventive treatment benefits of amitriptyline and aerobic exercise or amitriptyline alone in patients with chronic migraine. Method Sixty patients, both genders, aged between 18 and 50 years, with a diagnosis of chronic migraine, were randomized in groups called amitriptyline and aerobic exercise or amitriptyline alone. The following parameters were evaluated: headache frequency, intensity and duration of headache, days of the analgesic medication use, body mass index (BMI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI scores. Results In the evaluated parameters, was observed decrease in headache frequency (p=0.001, moderate intensity (p=0.048, in headache duration (p=0.001, the body mass index (p=0.001, Beck Depression Inventory (p=0.001 and Beck Anxiety Inventory scores (p=0.001, when groups were compared in the end of third month. Conclusion In this study, the amitriptyline was an effective treatment for chronic migraine, but its efficacy was increased when combined with aerobic exercise.

  5. Advantages of exercise in rehabilitation, treatment and prevention of altered morphological features in knee osteoarthritis. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Loreto, Carla; Imbesi, Rosa; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Di Giunta, Angelo; Lombardo, Claudia; Castorina, Sergio; Castrogiovanni, Paola

    2014-06-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) represents one of the most common causes of disability in the world. It leads to social, psychological and economic costs with financial consequences, also because a further increase is expected. Different knee OA treatments are usually considered in relation to the stage of the disease, such as surgical management and pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments. Treatment should begin with the safest and least invasive one, before proceeding to more invasive, expensive ones. Non-pharmacologic, behavioral treatments of knee OA are recommended not only in rehabilitation but also in prevention because many risk factors, such as excess weight, obesity and joint tissue inflammation, can be monitored and thus prevented. In the present review, we analyze data from the most recent literature in relation to the effects of physical exercise on prevention, therapy and rehabilitation in knee OA. All data suggest that physical exercise is an effective, economical and accessible tool to everyone, in the treatment and prevention of knee OA. The literature search was conducted on PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar using appropriate keywords in relation to knee osteoarthritis.

  6. Resistance Versus Aerobic Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Jane E.; Kenny, Glen P.; Perkins, Bruce A.; Riddell, Michael C.; Balaa, Nadia; Malcolm, Janine; Boulay, Pierre; Khandwala, Farah; Sigal, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In type 1 diabetes, small studies have found that resistance exercise (weight lifting) reduces HbA1c. In the current study, we examined the acute impacts of resistance exercise on glycemia during exercise and in the subsequent 24 h compared with aerobic exercise and no exercise. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twelve physically active individuals with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c 7.1 ± 1.0%) performed 45 min of resistance exercise (three sets of seven exercises at eight repetitions maximum), 45 min of aerobic exercise (running at 60% of Vo2max), or no exercise on separate days. Plasma glucose was measured during and for 60 min after exercise. Interstitial glucose was measured by continuous glucose monitoring 24 h before, during, and 24 h after exercise. RESULTS Treatment-by-time interactions (P exercise. Plasma glucose decreased from 8.4 ± 2.7 to 6.8 ± 2.3 mmol/L (P = 0.008) during resistance exercise and from 9.2 ± 3.4 to 5.8 ± 2.0 mmol/L (P = 0.001) during aerobic exercise. No significant changes were seen during the no-exercise control session. During recovery, glucose levels did not change significantly after resistance exercise but increased by 2.2 ± 0.6 mmol/L (P = 0.023) after aerobic exercise. Mean interstitial glucose from 4.5 to 6.0 h postexercise was significantly lower after resistance exercise versus aerobic exercise. CONCLUSIONS Resistance exercise causes less initial decline in blood glucose during the activity but is associated with more prolonged reductions in postexercise glycemia than aerobic exercise. This might account for HbA1c reductions found in studies of resistance exercise but not aerobic exercise in type 1 diabetes. PMID:23172972

  7. Swimming and Persons with Mild Persistant Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Arandelovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of recreational swimming on lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR in patients with mild persistent asthma. This study included 65 patients with mild persistent asthma, who were divided into two groups: experimental group A (n = 45 and control group B (n = 20. Patients from both groups were treated with low doses of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS and short-acting β2 agonists salbutamol as needed. Our program for patients in group A was combined asthma education with swimming (twice a week on a 1-h basis for the following 6 months. At the end of the study, in Group A, we found a statistically significant increase of lung function parameters FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (3.55 vs. 3.65 (p < 0.01, FVC (forced vital capacity (4.27 vs. 4.37 (p < 0.05, PEF (peak expiratory flow (7.08 vs. 7.46 (p < 0.01, and statistically significant decrease of BHR (PD20 0.58 vs. 2.01 (p < 0.001. In Group B, there was a statistically significant improvement of FEV1 3.29 vs. 3.33 (p < 0.05 and although FVC, FEV1/FVC, and PEF were improved, it was not significant. When Groups A and B were compared at the end of the study, there was a statistically significant difference of FVC (4.01 vs. 4.37, FEV1 (3.33 vs. 3.55, PEF (6.79 vs.7.46, and variability (p <0.001, and statistically significantly decreased BHR in Group A (2.01 vs. 1.75 (p < 0.001. Engagement of patients with mild persistent asthma in recreational swimming in nonchlorinated pools, combined with regular medical treatment and education, leads to better improvement of their parameters of lung function and also to more significant decrease of their airway hyperresponsiveness compared to patients treated with traditional medicine

  8. Feasibility, Acceptability, and Impact of a Web-based Gratitude Exercise among Individuals in Outpatient Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krentzman, Amy R.; Mannella, Kristin A.; Hassett, Afton L.; Barnett, Nancy P.; Cranford, James A.; Brower, Kirk J.; Higgins, Margaret M.; Meyer, Piper S.

    2015-01-01

    This mixed-methods pilot study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of a web-based gratitude exercise (the ‘Three Good Things’ exercise (TGT)) among 23 adults in outpatient treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD). Participants were randomized to TGT or a placebo condition. The intervention was feasible with high rates of completion. Participants found TGT acceptable and welcomed the structure of daily emails; however, they found it difficult at times and discontinued TGT when the study ended. Participants associated TGT with gratitude, although there were no observed changes in grateful disposition over time. TGT had a significant effect on decreasing negative affect and increasing unactivated (e.g., feeling calm, at ease) positive affect, although there were no differences between groups at the 8 week follow up. Qualitative results converged on quantitative findings that TGT was convenient, feasible, and acceptable, and additionally suggested that TGT was beneficial for engendering positive cognitions and reinforcing recovery. PMID:27076837

  9. Walking impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis: exercise training as a treatment option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Motl

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert W Motl1, Myla D Goldman2, Ralph HB Benedict31Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA; 2Department of Neurology, University of Virginia, VA, USA; 3Department of Neurology, SUNY Buffalo School of Medicine, Buffalo, NY, USAAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic disease of the central nervous system that culminates in the progression of physical and cognitive disability over time. Walking impairment is a ubiquitous feature of MS and a sentinel characteristic of the later or advanced stages of the disease. This paper presents a conceptual rationale along with empirical evidence for exercise training as a rehabilitation approach for managing walking impairment and improving walking function in persons with MS. Conceptually, MS is associated with a decrease in physical activity, which, in turn, can result in deconditioning across multiple domains of physiological functioning. The resulting deconditioning feeds back and further drives physical inactivity until a threshold is reached that likely initiates the progression of walking impairment in MS. Empirically, physical activity and exercise training have been associated with beneficial effects on walking function in persons with MS. This is based on cross-sectional, longitudinal, and experimental research that included diversity in the breadth of measures of walking, persons with MS, and exercise/physical activity characteristics. Of particular importance, future researchers might consider examining the combinatory effects of exercise training plus pharmacological agents on walking mobility in MS. Collectively, exercise training and physical activity might hold significant potential for the management of progressive mobility disability in MS.Keywords: mobility, walking, exercise, physical activity, movement

  10. Halliwickov koncept učenja plavanja in ocenjevanje plavalnih veščin: The Halliwick concept of teaching of swimming and assessment of swimming skills: The Halliwick concept of teaching of swimming and assessment of swimming skills:

    OpenAIRE

    Groleger, Katja; Vidmar, Gaj; Vrečar, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The Halliwick concept of teaching of swimming is a comprehensive programme of adaptation to water, learning to breathe, moving in water and swimming, aimed mainly at persons with movement and/or learning disabilities of different age. Assessment of swimming ability is an integral part of the Halliwick concept. The system of Halliwick badges is used, which has recently been supplemented by the Swimming With Independent Measurement (SWIM). There is no data on sensitivity of the SWIM test in the...

  11. The Impact of 200 Meter Breast Stroke Swimming Activity on Blood Glucose Level of The Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahrastani, S.; Badri, H.; Argantos, A.; Yuniarti, E.

    2018-04-01

    Blood sugar in the human body is very important, as it is a source of energy for humans. Fasting blood sugar needs to be recognized, because it is an indicator of a person’s health. The research that has been done aims to determine the effect of physical activity on fasting blood sugar. This research is a quasi-experimental research. The research was conducted on 15 students of FIK UNP Padang, who have passed the swimming course. Blood was taken before and after doing physical exercise activity of 200 meter breaststroke swimming. Data collection was conducted with tests and measurements. The data analysis technique used inference statistics with t test formula, with α = 0.05. From the results it is obtained that there is a very significant impact on blood sugar levels after 200 meters breaststroke swimming activity with p <0.05

  12. A user-centred approach to developing bWell, a mobile app for arm and shoulder exercises after breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Helena; Holroyd, Patrick; Burkinshaw, Lynn; Watten, Phil; Zammit, Charles; Harris, Peter R; Good, Anna; Jenkins, Val

    2017-12-01

    The study aim was to develop a mobile application (app) supported by user preferences to optimise self-management of arm and shoulder exercises for upper-limb dysfunction (ULD) after breast cancer treatment. Focus groups with breast cancer patients were held to identify user needs and requirements. Behaviour change techniques were explored by researchers and discussed during the focus groups. Concepts for content were identified by thematic analysis. A rapid review was conducted to inform the exercise programme. Preliminary testing was carried out to obtain user feedback from breast cancer patients who used the app for 8 weeks post surgery. Breast cancer patients' experiences with ULD and exercise advice and routines varied widely. They identified and prioritised several app features: tailored information, video demonstrations of the exercises, push notifications, and tracking and progress features. An evidence-based programme was developed with a physiotherapist with progressive exercises for passive and active mobilisation, stretching and strengthening. The exercise demonstration videos were filmed with a breast cancer patient. Early user testing demonstrated ease of use, and clear and motivating app content. bWell, a novel app for arm and shoulder exercises, was developed by breast cancer patients, health care professionals and academics. Further research is warranted to confirm its clinical effectiveness. Mobile health has great potential to provide patients with information specific to their needs. bWell is a promising way to support breast cancer patients with exercise routines after treatment and may improve future self-management of clinical care.

  13. A COMPARATIVE STUDY TO FIND OUT THE EFFECTIVENESS BETWEEN CORE STABILIZATION VS MCKENZIE EXERCISES IN THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH MECHANICAL LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Dutta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mechanical Low back pain is a leading cause of disability. It occurs in similar proportions in all cultures, interferes with quality of life and work performance. Both male and female populations are affected; however, there is a tendency towards a higher incidence in male patients. Mechanical low back pain is associated with pain and clinical instability in lumbar motion segments. Exercises play an important part in the rehabilitation of low back pain. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness between Core stabilization vs McKenzie exercises in the treatment of patients with mechanical low back pain. Methods: 30 patients were selected between the age groups of 20 yrs to 50 yrs and having a past history of low back pain for one month. 15 patients were allotted to each group of experiment. Group I was given Core stabilization exercises and Group II with McKenzie exercises. Interferential therapy was a common treatment for both the groups. Evaluations of the subjects were done using the Revised Oswestry Disability Index and Dynamic Endurance tests. Results: Data analysis revealed statistically significant difference between both the groups (p<0.05 and proved that Core stabilization exercises is more effective than McKenzie exercises in mechanical low back pain. Conclusion: This study shows that core stabilization exercises possess a greater potential over McKenzie exercises in treating Mechanical Low back pain patients.

  14. Potential risks of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles released from sunscreens into outdoor swimming pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Soo-kyung; Kim, Eun-ju; Lee, Jaesang; Lee, Seunghak

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanoparticles from sunscreen products can be released into public pools. • Nanoparticles and organic ingredients can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). • A negative impact of ROS should not be significant in swimming pool. - Abstract: The potential risks of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens being released into swimming water were evaluated by a series of laboratory experiments simulating the fate and transport of NPs in outdoor swimming pools. NPs released from sunscreen-applied skin were estimated using pig skins covered with five different commercial sunscreens containing TiO 2 , ZnO, or both at various concentrations. Assuming that the swimming water treatment processes consisted of filtration, UV irradiation, heating, and chlorination, possible removal of the released NPs by each process was estimated. Generation of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) by the NPs under sunlight and after UV photochemical treatment were measured, and the H 2 O 2 concentration possibly present in the swimming pool was calculated based on some specific scenarios of operating an outdoor swimming pool. It was found that a significant amount of the NPs in sunscreens could be released into the swimming water, and accumulate during circulation through the treatment system. However, the concentration of H 2 O 2 possibly present in the swimming pool should be below the level at which an adverse effect to bathers is concerned.

  15. Potential risks of TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles released from sunscreens into outdoor swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Soo-kyung [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-ju [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaesang [Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seunghak, E-mail: seunglee@kist.re.kr [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Nanoparticles from sunscreen products can be released into public pools. • Nanoparticles and organic ingredients can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). • A negative impact of ROS should not be significant in swimming pool. - Abstract: The potential risks of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens being released into swimming water were evaluated by a series of laboratory experiments simulating the fate and transport of NPs in outdoor swimming pools. NPs released from sunscreen-applied skin were estimated using pig skins covered with five different commercial sunscreens containing TiO{sub 2}, ZnO, or both at various concentrations. Assuming that the swimming water treatment processes consisted of filtration, UV irradiation, heating, and chlorination, possible removal of the released NPs by each process was estimated. Generation of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) by the NPs under sunlight and after UV photochemical treatment were measured, and the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration possibly present in the swimming pool was calculated based on some specific scenarios of operating an outdoor swimming pool. It was found that a significant amount of the NPs in sunscreens could be released into the swimming water, and accumulate during circulation through the treatment system. However, the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} possibly present in the swimming pool should be below the level at which an adverse effect to bathers is concerned.

  16. Strouhal number for free swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Mehdi; van Buren, Tyler; Floryan, Daniel; Smits, Alexander; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we present experimental results to explore the implications of free swimming for Strouhal number (as an outcome) in the context of a simple model for a fish that consists of a 2D virtual body (source of drag) and a 2D pitching foil (source of thrust) representing cruising with thunniform locomotion. The results validate the findings of Saadat and Haj-Hariri (2012): for pitching foils thrust coefficient is a function of Strouhal number for all gaits having amplitude less than a certain critical value. Equivalently, given the balance of thrust and drag forces at cruise, Strouhal number is only a function of the shape, i.e. drag coefficient and area, and essentially a constant for high enough swimming speeds for which the mild dependence of drag coefficient on the speed vanishes. Furthermore, a dimensional analysis generalizes the findings. A scaling analysis shows that the variation of Strouhal number with cruising speed is functionally related to the variation of body drag coefficient with speed. Supported by ONR MURI Grant N00014-14-1-0533.

  17. Growing swimming algae for bioenergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croze, Ottavio

    Biofuel production from photosynthetic microalgae is not commercially viable due to high processing costs. New engineering and biological solutions are being sought to reduce these costs by increasing processing efficiency (productivity per energy input). Important physics, however, is ignored. For example, the fluid dynamics of algal suspensions in photobioreactors (ponds or tube arrays) is non-trivial, particularly if the algae swim. Cell reorientation by passive viscous and gravitational torques (gyrotaxis) or active reorientation by light (phototaxis) cause swimming algae in suspension to structure in flows, even turbulent ones. This impacts the distribution and dispersion of swimmers, with significant consequences for photobioreactor operation and design. In this talk, I will describe a theory that predicts swimmer dispersion in laminar pipe flows. I will then then present experimental tests of the theory, as well as new results on the circadian suspension dynamics of the algaChlamydomonas reinhardtii in lab-scale photobioreactors. Finally, I will briefly consider the implications of our work, and related active matter research, for improving algal bioprocessing efficiency. Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability.

  18. Basic Land Drills for Swimming Stroke Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Teaching swimming strokes can be a challenging task in physical education. The purpose of the article is to introduce 12 on land drills that can be utilized to facilitate the learning of swimming strokes, including elementary back stroke, sidestroke, front crawl, back stroke, breaststroke, and butterfly. Each drill consists of four components…

  19. Propulsive force in front crawl swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; de Groot, G.; Hollander, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the propulsive forces in front crawl arm swimming, derived from a three-dimensional kinematic analysis, these values were compared with mean drag forces. The propulsive forces during front crawl swimming using the arms only were calculated using three-dimensional kinematic analysis

  20. Swimming and muscle structure in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierts, I.L.Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this series of studies the relations between swimming behaviour of fish in general and extreme swimming responses in particular (called fast starts or escape responses) and the structure and ontogeny of the muscle system was investigated. Special attention was paid to relate functional

  1. Swimming dynamics of bidirectional artificial flagella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namdeo, S.; Khaderi, S. N.; Onck, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    We study magnetic artificial flagella whose swimming speed and direction can be controlled using light and magnetic field as external triggers. The dependence of the swimming velocity on the system parameters (e. g., length, stiffness, fluid viscosity, and magnetic field) is explored using a

  2. Follow-up of an Exercise-Based Treatment for Children with Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, David; Nicolson, Roderick I.

    2007-01-01

    This study reports the results of a long-term follow-up of an exercise-based approach to dyslexia-related disorders (Reynolds, Nicolson, & Hambly, "Dyslexia," 2003; 9(1): 48-71). In the initial study, children at risk of dyslexia were identified in 3 years of a junior school. One half then undertook a 6 month, home-based exercise…

  3. The psychological benefits of exercise and the treatment of delinquent adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMahon, J R

    1990-06-01

    The conviction that athletic participation imparts desirable educational, social and personal values has been the basis for including recreational sports in the remedial programme for juvenile delinquents. More recently, the psychological benefits of aerobic exercise and increased fitness have been investigated. Changes following intensive exercise include reductions in anxiety, tension and depression, and increased self-esteem. These effects have been variously hypothesised as due to a sense of increased control or mastery, a meditative effect or to alterations in neurotransmitter-levels. Delinquent adolescents comprise a heterogeneous population characterised by clusters of risk factors, handicapping conditions and psychopathology, with a prevalence of depression and low self-esteem far exceeding that of the population at large. Intervention which can benefit these characteristics may be especially useful in preventive or therapeutic programmes in this group. While less intensive recreational play or physically challenging 'Outward Bound' programmes can be effective in improving social attitudes and self-esteem, intensive aerobic exercise may produce greater improvements in self-esteem and depression. Future research must identify the mechanisms by which exercise confers these benefits, whether it enhances other areas, such as social skills or academic performance, and which populations are benefitted by such programmes.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF CREATINE LONG-TERM SUPPLEMENTATION ON MUSCLE MORPHOLOGY AND SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Erdal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Creatine (Cr has been shown to increase the total muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Cr supplementation on muscle morphology and swimming performance, using an animal model. Each rat was subjected to exercise 15-minute period daily for the 12 weeks. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: no Cr supplementation (CON, no Cr supplementation and incomplete food intake (lacking lysine and methionine in diet for rats (INCO, Cr supplementation 1 g·kg-1·day-1 (CREAT-I and Cr supplementation 2 g·kg-1·day-1 (CREAT-II. Three months later, all groups adult rats exercised in swimming pool chambers. Swimming time was recorded as minute for each rat. Following swimming performance period, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation and the gastrocnemius and diaphragm muscles were dissected. Serial slices of 5-7 μm were allocated paraffin wax and histochemical staining procedure of cross-sections was carried out with heamatoxylin-eosin technics. All groups gained body weight at the end of 12 weeks but there was no statistical difference among them. Swimming time values were statistical difference between CREAT-II and CON group as well as between CREAT-I and CON group (p < 0.05. In the INCO group was determined increased connective tissue cell of the muscle sample. In contrast, in the CREAT-I and CREAT-II group, the basic histological changes were large-scale muscle fibers and hypertrophic muscle cells. These results suggest that long-term creatine supplementation increased the number of muscle fibers and enhanced endurance swimming performance in rats

  5. Plasma cytokine response, lipid peroxidation and NF-κB activation in skeletal muscle following maximum progressive swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Cleto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine lipid peroxidation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation in skeletal muscle and the plasma cytokine profile following maximum progressive swimming. Adult male Swiss mice (N = 15 adapted to the aquatic environment were randomly divided into three groups: immediately after exercise (EX1, 3 h after exercise (EX2 and control. Animals from the exercising groups swam until exhaustion, with an initial workload of 2% of body mass attached to the tail. Control mice did not perform any exercise but were kept immersed in water for 20 min. Maximum swimming led to reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in skeletal muscle, as indicated by increased thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS levels (4062.67 ±1487.10 vs 19,072.48 ± 8738.16 nmol malondialdehyde (MDA/mg protein, control vs EX1. Exercise also promoted NF-κB activation in soleus muscle. Cytokine secretion following exercise was marked by increased plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6 levels 3 h post-exercise (P < 0.05. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 levels were reduced following exercise and remained reduced 3 h post-exercise (P < 0.05. Plasma levels of other cytokines investigated, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ and interleukin-12 (IL-12, were not altered by exercise. The present findings showed that maximum swimming, as well as other exercise models, led to lipid peroxidation and NF-κB activation in skeletal muscle and increased plasma IL-6 levels. The plasma cytokine response was also marked by reduced IL-10 levels. These results were attributed to exercise type and intensity.

  6. Prey capture by freely swimming flagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Anders; Dolger, Julia; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Kiorboe, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Flagellates are unicellular microswimmers that propel themselves using one or several beating flagella. Here, we explore the dependence of swimming kinematics and prey clearance rate on flagellar arrangement and determine optimal flagellar arrangements and essential trade-offs. To describe near-cell flows around freely swimming flagellates we consider a model in which the cell is represented by a no-slip sphere and each flagellum by a point force. For uniflagellates pulled by a single flagellum the model suggests that a long flagellum favors fast swimming, whereas high clearance rate is favored by a very short flagellum. For biflagellates with both a longitudinal and a transversal flagellum we explore the helical swimming kinematics and the prey capture sites. We compare our predictions with observations of swimming kinematics, prey capture, and flows around common marine flagellates. The Centre for Ocean Life is a VKR Centre of Excellence supported by the Villum Foundation.

  7. Energetics of swimming of schooling fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    Soc for experimental Biol Annual Meeting - Salzburg 2012 John F. Steffensen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark) When a fish school swims through the water, every individual consumes a certain amount of oxygen, which means that less will be available for the trailing fish in the school. In 1967 Mc......Farland and Moss reported that the oxygen saturation decreased approximately 30% from the front to the rear of an approximately 150-m long school of mullets swimming in normoxic water. They also observed that the decline in oxygen saturation at the rear resulted in the school disintegrating into smaller separate...... schools. Oxygen consumption of swimming fish increases exponentially or as a power function with respect to swimming speed, and hence the decrease in oxygen saturation through the school is related to the swimming speed of the school. A model describing the oxygen saturation in a fish school from front...

  8. Treatment of subclinical fluid retention in patients with symptomatic heart failure: effect on exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, D B; Lang, C C; Rayos, G; Wilson, J R

    1997-08-01

    Patients with heart failure frequently have elevated intracardiac diastolic pressures but no clinical evidence of excess fluid retention. We speculated that such pressure elevations may indicate subclinical fluid retention and that removal of this fluid could improve exercise intolerance. To test this hypothesis, we studied 10 patients with right atrial pressure > or = 8 mm Hg but without rales, edema, or apparent jugular venous distension. Right-sided heart catheterization was performed, after which patients underwent maximal treadmill cardiopulmonary testing. Patients were then hospitalized and underwent maximal diuresis, after which exercise was repeated. Before diuresis, right atrial pressure averaged 16 +/- 5 mm Hg (+/-standard deviation), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure 30 +/- 6 mm Hg, and peak exercise Vo2 11.2 +/- 2.3 ml/min/ kg. Patients underwent diuresis of 4.5 +/- 2.2 kg over 4 +/- 2 days to a resting right atrial pressure of 6 +/- 4 and wedge pressure of 19 +/- 7 mm Hg. After diuresis, all patients reported overall symptomatic improvement. Maximal exercise duration increased significantly from 9.2 +/- 4.2 to 12.5 +/- 4.7 minutes. At matched peak workloads, significant improvements were also seen in minute ventilation (45 +/- 12 to 35 +/- 9 L/min), lactate levels (42 +/- 16 to 29 +/- 9 mg/dl), and Borg dyspnea scores (15 +/- 3 to 12 +/- 4) (all p < 0.05). Invasive hemodynamic monitoring allows the identification of excess fluid retention in patients with heart failure when there are no clinical signs of fluid overload. Removal of this subclinical excess fluid improves exercise performance and exertional dyspnea.

  9. The functional exercise capacity and its correlates in obese treatment-seeking people with binge eating disorder: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; De Herdt, Amber; Vanderlinden, Johan; Lannoo, Matthias; Adriaens, An; De Hert, Marc; Stubbs, Brendon; Soundy, Andrew; Probst, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim was to compare the functional exercise capacity between obese treatment-seeking people with and without binge eating disorder (BED) and non-obese controls. The secondary aim was to identify clinical variables including eating and physical activity behaviour, physical complaints, psychopathology and physical self-perception variables in obese people with BED that could explain the variability in functional exercise capacity. Forty people with BED were compared with 20 age-, gender- and body mass index (BMI)-matched obese persons without BED and 40 age and gender matched non-obese volunteers. A 6-minute walk test (6MWT), the Baecke physical activity questionnaire, the Symptom Checklist-90, the Physical Self-Perception Profile and the Eating Disorder Inventory were administered. Physical complaints before and after the 6MWT were also documented. The distance achieved on the 6MWT was significantly lower in obese participants with BED (512.1 ± 75.8 m versus 682.7 ± 98.4, p eating disorder should incorporate a functional exercise capacity assessment. Clinicians involved in the rehabilitation of people with binge eating disorder should consider depression and lower self-esteem as potential barriers. Clinicians should take into account the frequently observed physical discomfort when developing rehabilitation programmes for people with binge eating disorder.

  10. Metabolismo glicídico em ratos submetidos a desnervação do músculo esquelético e ao exercício de natação Glicidic metabolism in rats submitted to denervation of skeletal muscle and swimming exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilton Marlindo Santana Nunes

    2009-02-01

    . Além disso, o exercício melhorou o aporte e a utilização da glicose no músculo desnervado.Denervation of the skeletal muscle involves well known alterations of the glucose metabolism; however, little is known about the influence of these alterations on the peripheral sensitivity to insulin of the animal as a whole. This study aimed to analyze the glucose metabolism in the soleus muscle of rats submitted to denervation as well as their response to exogenous insulin and to exercise. Wistar rats aged from 3 to 5 months were submitted to section of the sciatic nerve in the right paw. After 48 hours, half of them started a swimming program of 1 hour/day, 5 days/week. Intact animals, either submitted to exercise or not, were used as control. The rats were submitted to the insulin tolerance test after 28 days for evaluating the response to insulin. The results were analyzed by determination of the blood glucose removal rate (Kitt. In another batch of animals, slices of the denerved soleus muscle and the counterlateral intact paw were incubated in the presence of glucose (5.5mM, containing [³H]2-deoxyglucose (0.5µCi/mL and [U14C] glucose (0.25µCi/mL and insulin (100U/mL, for analysis of glucose uptake, oxidation and glycogen synthesis. Denerved rats submitted to exercise presented KiTT (%/min higher (7.22 ± 0.49 than the sedentary animals (5.31 ± 0.22, and the sedentary control animals (4.53 ± 0.27. Glucose uptake (3.55 ± 0.21 µmol/g.h by the denerved muscle was lower than those of the opposite muscle in the sedentary rats (5.12 ± 0.38 µmol/g.h. Chronic exercise raised glucose uptake and oxidation in the counterlateral muscle (uptake: 6.53 ± 0.37, oxidation: 20.39 ± 1.91 and in the denerved muscle (uptake: 5.70 ± 0.41, oxidation: 20.54 ± 1.97. The same situation occurred with the exercised control group. These results suggest that restricted alterations of the muscular glucose metabolism influenced the response to insulin of the animals as a whole

  11. Exercise self-efficacy moderates the relation between anxiety sensitivity and body mass index and exercise tolerance in treatment-seeking smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farris, S.G.; Davis, M.L.; Rosenfield, D.; Kauffman, B.Y.; Baird, S.O.; Powers, M.B.; Otto, M.W.; Marcus, B.H.; Church, T.S.; Smits, J.A.J.; Zvolensky, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    There is little known about factors that contribute to the comorbidity of cigarette smoking and obesity. The current study sought to test whether exercise self-efficacy moderated the relation between anxiety sensitivity (fear of internal sensations) and BMI and exercise tolerance among cigarette

  12. A randomized trial of aerobic exercise and sleep quality in lymphoma patients receiving chemotherapy or no treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courneya, Kerry S; Sellar, Christopher M; Trinh, Linda; Forbes, Cynthia C; Stevinson, Clare; McNeely, Margaret L; Peddle-McIntyre, Carolyn J; Friedenreich, Christine M; Reiman, Tony

    2012-06-01

    Patients with lymphoma experience sleep problems that may be managed with aerobic exercise but no previous study has examined this issue. We randomized 122 patients with lymphoma to usual care (n = 62) or 12 weeks of supervised aerobic exercise training (AET; n = 60). Our primary sleep endpoint was global sleep quality assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Secondary endpoints were the PSQI component scores. Planned subgroup analyses were also conducted. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated that AET resulted in a nonsignificant (P = 0.16) improvement in global sleep quality compared with usual care [mean group difference = -0.64; 95% confidence interval (CI), -1.56 to +0.27]. In planned subgroup analyses, statistically significant or borderline significant interactions were identified for type of lymphoma (P(interaction) = 0.006), current treatment status (P(interaction) = 0.036), time since diagnosis (P(interaction) = 0.010), body mass index (P(interaction) = 0.075), and baseline sleep quality (P(interaction) = 0.041). Specifically, AET improved global sleep quality in patients with lymphoma who had indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (P = 0.001), were receiving chemotherapy (P = 0.013), were sleep quality in this heterogeneous sample of patients with lymphoma; however, clinically identifiable subgroups appeared to benefit. Future exercise trials targeting these responsive subgroups are needed to confirm these findings. If replicated in larger and more focused trials, aerobic exercise may be an attractive option to manage sleep dysfunction in patients with cancer because of its favorable safety profile and other documented health benefits.

  13. Anti-hypotensive treatment and endothelin blockade synergistically antagonize exercise fatigue in rats under simulated high altitude.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Radiloff

    Full Text Available Rapid ascent to high altitude causes illness and fatigue, and there is a demand for effective acute treatments to alleviate such effects. We hypothesized that increased oxygen delivery to the tissue using a combination of a hypertensive agent and an endothelin receptor A antagonist drugs would limit exercise-induced fatigue at simulated high altitude. Our data showed that the combination of 0.1 mg/kg ambrisentan with either 20 mg/kg ephedrine or 10 mg/kg methylphenidate significantly improved exercise duration in rats at simulated altitude of 4,267 m, whereas the individual compounds did not. In normoxic, anesthetized rats, ephedrine alone and in combination with ambrisentan increased heart rate, peripheral blood flow, carotid and pulmonary arterial pressures, breathing rate, and vastus lateralis muscle oxygenation, but under inspired hypoxia, only the combination treatment significantly enhanced muscle oxygenation. Our results suggest that sympathomimetic agents combined with endothelin-A receptor blockers offset altitude-induced fatigue in rats by synergistically increasing the delivery rate of oxygen to hypoxic muscle by concomitantly augmenting perfusion pressure and improving capillary conductance in the skeletal muscle. Our findings might therefore serve as a basis to develop an effective treatment to prevent high-altitude illness and fatigue in humans.

  14. Physical exercise as a supplement to outpatient treatment of alcohol use disorders – design and preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sari, Sengül; Bilberg, Randi Marie; Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    Background and aim Alcohol use disorder is a widespread problem in Denmark and has severe impacts on health and quality of life of each individual. The clinical treatment of alcohol use disorder involves evidence-based knowledge on medical treatment, physical training, and psychological management....... The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of physical exercise on alcohol intake, cardio-respiratory fitness and socio-psychological outcomes. Methods and design The study is a randomized controlled trial with three arms: (A) Standard treatment alone, (B) Standard treatment and physical exercise...... the study and inform about the first preliminary results. Perspectives If this study detects a positive relationship between exercise as a supplement to alcohol treatment and patients’ alcohol intake, quality of life, fitness, well-being, anxiety, depression and interpersonal problems...

  15. Antifatigue and increasing exercise performance of Actinidia arguta crude alkaloids in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Actinidia arguta (Siebold et Zucc. Planch. ex. Miq. is one of the most recently domesticated fruit species with increasing commercial production worldwide. It is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine and is used to reduce blood glucose and treat atopic dermatitis. In addition, it possesses antioxidant, anticancer, and antiallergic properties. In this study, we investigated the physical antifatigue and exercise performance effects of A. arguta crude alkaloids (AACA extracted with 70% ethanol. Four groups of male Kunming mice (n = 16 were orally administered AACA at doses of 0 mg/kg/d (vehicle, 50 mg/kg/d (AACA-50, 100 mg/kg/d (AACA-100, or 200 mg/kg/d (AACA-200 for 28 days. The effect of AACA treatment on exercise performance was studied using the forelimb grip strength experiment and by the measurement of the weight-loaded swimming time. The antifatigue effect is evaluated based on fatigue-associated biochemical parameters, hepatic and muscular glycogen levels, and changes in the morphology of transverse and longitudinal sections of skeletal muscle. The results showed that AACA could elevate the endurance and grip strength in mice. The exhaustive swimming time of the AACA-50, AACA-100, and AACA-200 groups was significantly (p < 0.05 increased compared with the vehicle. The swimming time of the AACA-100 group was the longest among all groups studied. Mice in the AACA-treated groups had decreased levels of lactate, ammonia, and creatine kinase after a physical challenge compared with the vehicle group. The tissue glycogen, an important energy source during exercise, significantly increased with AACA. The morphology of transverse and longitudinal sections of skeletal muscle did not change in the vehicle group. Overall, these findings suggest that AACA possesses antifatigue effects and increases exercise performance in mice. Therefore, A. arguta may be developed as an antifatigue dietary supplement in the category of functional foods.

  16. A case report: Glycopyrrolate for treatment of exercise-induced hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negaard, Matthew; Anthony, Christopher; Bonthius, Daniel; Jepson, Matthew; Marcussen, Britt; Pelzer, Daniel; Peterson, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis can cause dehydration and exercise intolerance. There are several case reports of extremely high sweat rates in athletes. We present as case report of a 17-year-old male with the highest sweat rate recorded in the literature (5.8 L/h). Our goal was to determine if glycopyrrolate, an anticholinergic medication with primarily anti-muscarinic effects that is known to decrease sweat production, would reduce the sweat rate of our subject in a controlled exercise setting. Our patient and a control subject were subjected to an exercise protocol consisting of running on a treadmill (5.4-6.7 mile/h at 1° of incline) in a warm climate-controlled chamber after receiving 0, 2, or 4 mg of glycopyrrolate. Core temperature, heart rate, rater of perceived exertion, and sweat rate were monitored in both subjects. Glycopyrrolate dose was not significantly correlated with decreased sweat rate and maximal core temperature. However, the clinical effect of reducing the sweat rate was very strong. The improvement of the subject's sweat rate allowed him to successfully return to sport. Our findings suggest that low-dose glycopyrrolate may be a safe and effective method of controlling exertional hyperhidrosis.

  17. Swimming of the Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Chris; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    When the weather gets hot, nursing honey bees nudge foragers to collect water for thermoregulation of their hive. While on their mission to collect water, foragers sometimes get trapped on the water surface, forced to interact with a different fluid environment. In this study, we present the survival strategy of the honey bees at the air-water interface. A high-speed videography and shadowgraph were used to record the honey bees swimming. A unique thrust mechanism through rapid vibration of their wings at 60 to 150 Hz was observed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  18. Near-normalization of glycaemic control with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist treatment combined with exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensberg, P; Nyby, S; Jørgensen, P G; Storgaard, H; Jensen, M T; Sivertsen, J; Holst, J J; Kiens, B; Richter, E A; Knop, F K; Vilsbøll, T

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effects of exercise in combination with a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA), liraglutide, or placebo for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Thirty-three overweight, dysregulated and sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated to 16 weeks of either exercise and liraglutide or exercise and placebo. Both groups had three supervised 60-minute training sessions per week including spinning and resistance training. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels dropped by a mean ± standard deviation of 2.0% ± 1.2% (from 8.2% ± 1.4%) in the exercise plus liraglutide group vs 0.3% ± 0.9% (from 8.0% ± 1.2%) in the exercise plus placebo group ( P < .001), and body weight was reduced more with liraglutide (-3.4 ± 2.9 kg vs -1.6 ± 2.3 kg; P < .001). Compared with baseline, similar reductions were seen in body fat (exercise plus liraglutide: -2.5% ± 1.4% [ P < .001]; exercise plus placebo: -2.2% ± 1.9% [ P < .001]) and similar increases were observed in maximum oxygen uptake (exercise plus liraglutide: 0.5 ± 0.5 L O 2 /min [ P < .001]; exercise plus placebo: 0.4 ± 0.4 L O 2 /min [ P = .002]). Greater reductions in fasting plasma glucose (-3.4 ± 2.3 mM vs -0.3 ± 2.6 mM, P < .001) and systolic blood pressure (-5.4 ± 7.4 mm Hg vs -0.6 ± 11.1 mm Hg, P < .01) were seen with exercise plus liraglutide vs exercise plus placebo. The two groups experienced similar increases in quality of life during the intervention. In obese patients with type 2 diabetes, exercise combined with GLP-1RA treatment near-normalized HbA1c levels and caused a robust weight loss when compared with placebo. These results suggest that a combination of exercise and GLP-1RA treatment is effective in type 2 diabetes. © 2016 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Body roll in swimming: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psycharakis, Stelios G; Sanders, Ross H

    2010-02-01

    In this article, we present a critical review of the swimming literature on body roll, for the purposes of summarizing and highlighting existing knowledge, identifying the gaps and limitations, and stimulating further research. The main research findings can be summarized as follows: swimmers roll their shoulders significantly more than their hips; swimmers increase hip roll but maintain shoulder roll when fatigued; faster swimmers roll their shoulders less than slower swimmers during a 200-m swim; roll asymmetries, temporal differences in shoulder roll and hip roll, and shoulder roll side dominance exist in front crawl swimming, but there is no evidence to suggest that they affect swimming performance; and buoyancy contributes strongly to generating body roll in front crawl swimming. Based on and stimulated by current knowledge, future research should focus on the following areas: calculation of body roll for female swimmers and for backstroke swimming; differences in body roll between breathing and non-breathing cycles; causes of body roll asymmetries and their relation to motor laterality; body roll analysis across a wide range of velocities and swimming distances; exploration of the association between body roll and the magnitude and direction of propulsive/resistive forces developed during the stroke cycle; and the influence of kicking actions on the generation of body roll.

  20. Krill (Meganyctiphanes norvegica) swim faster at night

    KAUST Repository

    Klevjer, Thor A.

    2011-05-01

    Krill are key members in marine food webs, and measurement of swimming speed is vital to assess their bioenergetic budgets, feeding, and encounters with predators. We document a consistent and marked diel signal in swimming speed of krill in their natural habitat that is not related to diel vertical migration. The results were obtained using a bottom-mounted, upward-looking echo sounder at 150-m depth in the Oslofjord, Norway, spanning 5 months from late autumn to spring at a temporal resolution of ~1–2 records s−1. Swimming speed was assessed using acoustic target tracking of individual krill. At the start of the registration period, both daytime and nocturnal average swimming speeds of Meganyctiphanes norvegica were ~ 3.5 cm s−1 (~ 1 body lengths ([bl] s−1) in waters with oxygen concentrations of ~ 15–20% O2 saturation. Following intrusion of more oxygenated water, nocturnal average swimming speeds increased to ~ 10 cm s−1 (~ 3 bl s−1), i.e., more than double that of daytime swimming speeds in the same period. We hypothesize that krill activity during the first period was limited by oxygen, and the enhanced swimming at night subsequent to the water renewal is due to increased feeding activity under lessened danger of predation in darkness.

  1. Compulsive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Compulsive Exercise KidsHealth / For Parents / Compulsive Exercise What's in this ... for both physical and psychological problems. About Compulsive Exercise Compulsive exercise (also called obligatory exercise and anorexia ...

  2. Exercise Therapy and Glycaemic Control in Diabetic Persons at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Exercise is a major therapeutic tool in diabetes care, with proven benefits including improved metabolic indices and physical wellbeing. However, its effects ... Brisk walking was the most common exercise (44%) and the least common were Table Tennis, Swimming and Weight lifting (2% each). There were no ...

  3. The effect of acute exhaustive swimming exercise and high altitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows 7

    2012-06-05

    Jun 5, 2012 ... 3Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, Biomarker Research Program, King Saud University P.O. Box 2455 ... for Health Sciences, King Fahad Medical City, P.O.BOX 365072 Al-Dabab st., Riyadh 11393, Saudi Arabia. .... Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.4 using a Potter-Elvejhem homogenizer at 4°C.

  4. Treatment for a 14-year-old girl with Lyme disease using therapeutic exercise and gait training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Myriam M C

    2011-09-01

    Lyme disease is well documented in the literature; however, specific physical therapy interventions for the pediatric population with residual effects of Lyme disease have not been addressed. The purposes of this retrospective case report are: (1) to present an example of a therapeutic intervention for a pediatric patient in the late stages of Lyme disease with related musculoskeletal dysfunction and severely impaired quality of life, (2) to report the patient's functional outcomes from treatment, and (3) to discuss implications for treatment of patients with musculoskeletal dysfunction in the late stages of Lyme disease. The patient was a 14-year old girl who had contracted Lyme disease 1 year prior to initiation of physical therapy. She was unable to participate with her peers in school, church, and sporting events due to significant impairments in strength (force-generating capacity), endurance, and gait; fatigue; pain; and total body tremor. Therapeutic exercise and gait training were used for treatment. The patient actively participated in managing her care by providing feedback during interventions and setting goals. After 18 weeks of treatment, the patient achieved 96.7% of her predicted distance on the Six-Minute Walk Test with normal gait mechanics and returned to playing high school sports. She had a manual muscle test grade of 4/5 or greater in major extremity muscle groups. She returned to school and church participation with minimal total body tremor when fatigued and daily pain rated 0 to 3/10. Therapeutic exercise and gait training may facilitate return to function in an adolescent patient with late effects of Lyme disease. Further investigation is advised to establish treatment effects in a broader population.

  5. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Feature Articles Patient Q&A Success Stories Definitions Anatomy of the Spine Definitions A-Z Spine Specialists Videos 9 for Spine Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Prevention ...

  6. A Review of Swimming Cues and Tips for Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Kelsey; Barney, David

    2016-01-01

    Swimming is a low-impact activity that causes little stress on joints so it can be done for a lifetime. Many teachers may wish to teach swimming but do not have cues or ideas for doing so. This article reviews swimming cues, relays and equipment that can help a physical education teacher include a swimming unit in their curriculum. Certification…

  7. A Rapidly-Incremented Tethered-Swimming Test for Defining Domain-Specific Training Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessôa Filho Dalton M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a tethered-swimming incremental test comprising small increases in resistive force applied every 60 seconds could delineate the isocapnic region during rapidly-incremented exercise. Sixteen competitive swimmers (male, n = 11; female, n = 5 performed: (a a test to determine highest force during 30 seconds of all-out tethered swimming (Favg and the ΔF, which represented the difference between Favg and the force required to maintain body alignment (Fbase, and (b an incremental test beginning with 60 seconds of tethered swimming against a load that exceeded Fbase by 30% of ΔF followed by increments of 5% of ΔF every 60 seconds. This incremental test was continued until the limit of tolerance with pulmonary gas exchange (rates of oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production and ventilatory (rate of minute ventilation data collected breath by breath. These data were subsequently analyzed to determine whether two breakpoints defining the isocapnic region (i.e., gas exchange threshold and respiratory compensation point were present. We also determined the peak rate of O2 uptake and exercise economy during the incremental test. The gas exchange threshold and respiratory compensation point were observed for each test such that the associated metabolic rates, which bound the heavy-intensity domain during constant-work-rate exercise, could be determined. Significant correlations (Spearman’s were observed for exercise economy along with (a peak rate of oxygen uptake (ρ = .562; p < 0.025, and (b metabolic rate at gas exchange threshold (ρ = −.759; p < 0.005. A rapidly-incremented tethered-swimming test allows for determination of the metabolic rates that define zones for domain-specific constant-work-rate training.

  8. Swimming without a spine: Computational modeling and analysis of the swimming hydrodynamics of the Spanish Dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuoyu; Mittal, Rajat

    2017-10-16

    Incompressible flow simulations are used to study the swimming of a Spanish Dancer (Hexabranchus sanguineus), a soft-bodied invertebrate marine gastropod that swims by combining body pitching with undulations of its large mantle. A simple model based on a field video is employed as the basis for the model and coupling of the flow with the body acceleration enables us to examine the free swimming of this animal. Simulations indicate propulsive efficiencies of up to about 57% and terminal swimming speeds of 1.33 body lengths per cycle. Examination of the effect of body planform on the swimming hydrodynamics suggests that the planform of this animal is likely adapted to enhance its swimming performance. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  9. Global postural reeducation and static stretching exercises in the treatment of myogenic temporomandibular disorders: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, Sâmia A; Moreno, Bruno G D; Crivello, Osvaldo; Cabral, Cristina M N; Bortolotti, Gislaine; Marques, Amélia P

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 2 different interventions, global postural reeducation (GPR) and static stretching exercises (SS), in the treatment of women with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). A total of 28 subjects with TMDs were randomized into 2 treatment groups: GPR, where therapy involved muscle global chain stretching, or SS, with conventional static stretching; but only 24 completed the study. Eight treatment sessions lasting 40 minutes each (weekly) were performed. Assessments were conducted at baseline, immediately after treatment end, and 2 months later. Measurements included pain intensity at the temporomandibular joint, headache, cervicalgia, teeth clenching, ear symptoms, restricted sleep, and difficulties for mastication, using a visual analogue scale. In addition, electromyographic activity and pain thresholds were measured at the masseter, anterior temporalis, sternocleidomastoid, and upper trapezius muscles. Two-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc test was used for between-group comparisons. Significance level was .05. Comparing the pain assessments using the visual analogue scale, no significant differences were seen with the exception of severity of headaches at treatment end (GPR, 3.92 ± 2.98 cm; SS, 1.64 ± 1.66 cm; P .05). For the subjects in this study, both GPR and SS were similarly effective for the treatment of TMDs with muscular component. They equally reduced pain intensity, increased pain thresholds, and decreased electromyographic activity. Copyright © 2010 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment With Diet and Exercise for Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosed Using IADPSG Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kgosidialwa, Oratile; Egan, Aoife M; Carmody, Louise; Kirwan, Breda; Gunning, Patricia; Dunne, Fidelma P

    2015-12-01

    Prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and obesity continue to increase. This study aimed to ascertain whether diet and exercise is a successful intervention for women with GDM and whether a subset of these women have comparable outcomes to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). This was a retrospective cohort study of five antenatal centers along the Irish Atlantic seaboard of 567 women diagnosed with GDM and 2499 women with NGT during pregnancy. Diet and exercise therapy on diagnosis of GDM were prescribed and multiple maternal and neonatal outcomes were examined. Infants of women with GDM were more likely to be hypoglycemic (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 7.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.94-17.9) at birth. They were more likely to be admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (aOR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.60-2.91). Macrosomia and large-for-gestational-age rates were lower in the GDM group (aOR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.37-0.64 and aOR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.46-0.82, respectively). There was no increase in small for gestational age among offspring of women with GDM (aOR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.49-1.34). Women with diet-treated GDM and body mass index (BMI) diabetes status. Medical nutritional therapy and exercise for women with GDM may be successful in lowering rates of large for gestational age and macrosomia without increasing small-for-gestational-age rates. Women with GDM and a BMI less than 25 kg/m(2) had outcomes similar to those with NGT suggesting that these women could potentially be treated in a less resource intensive setting.

  11. Intracellular β2-adrenergic receptor signaling specificity in mouse skeletal muscle in response to single-dose β2-agonist clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shogo; Shirato, Ken; Mitsuhashi, Ryosuke; Inoue, Daisuke; Kizaki, Takako; Ohno, Hideki; Tachiyashiki, Kaoru; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the intracellular β2-adrenergic receptor signaling specificity in mouse slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch tibialis anterior (TA) muscles, resulting from single-dose β2-agonist clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise. At 1, 4, and 24 h after single-dose treatment with clenbuterol or after acute running exercise, the soleus and TA muscles were isolated and subjected to analysis. The phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) increased after single-dose clenbuterol treatment and acute exercise in the soleus muscle but not in the TA muscle. Although there was no change in the phosphorylation of Akt after acute exercise in either muscle, phosphorylation of Akt in the soleus muscle increased after single-dose clenbuterol treatment, whereas that in the TA muscle remained unchanged. These results suggest that p38 MAPK and Akt pathways play a functional role in the adaptation to clenbuterol treatment and exercise, particularly in slow-twitch muscles.

  12. Home-based supervised exercise versus hospital-based supervised exercise or unsupervised walk advice as treatment for intermittent claudication: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Maria; Jivegård, Lennart; Johansson, Anna; Nordanstig, Joakim; Svanberg, Therese; Adania, Ulla Wikberg; Sjögren, Petteri

    2015-10-05

    To evaluate the effects of home-based supervised exercise vs hospital-based supervised exercise, and the effects of home-based supervised exercise vs unsupervised "go home and walk advice" on daily life and corridor-walking capacity, health-related quality of life and patient-reported functional walking capacity in patients with intermittent claudication. Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, ProQuest, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), the Cochrane Library, and a number of Health Technology Assessment (HTA)-databases in October 2014. Randomized controlled trials and non-randomized controlled trials (> 100 patients) were considered for inclusion. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment was performed independently and discussed in meetings. Seven randomized controlled trials and 2 non-randomized controlled studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The included studies had some, or major, limitations. Based on a low quality of evidence, home-based supervised exercise may lead to less improvement in maximum and pain-free walking distance, and in more improvement in daily life walking capacity, compared with hospital-based supervised exercise. Home-based supervised exercise may improve maximum and pain-free walking distance compared with "go home and walk advice" and result in little or no difference in health-related quality of life and functional walking capacity compared with hospital-based supervised exercise or "go home and walk advice". Further research is needed to establish the optimal exercise modality for these patients.

  13. Swimming championship finalist positions on success in international swimming competitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yustres, I; Martín, R; Fernández, L; González-Ravé, J M

    2017-01-01

    The primary goal was to determine whether the achievement of finalist positions in the Junior Championship was associated with the achievement of success in the International Swimming Federation (FINA) World Championship (WC). Secondary goals included analyzing the effect of various factors (gender, age, country, etc) on swimmers' performances. Data were obtained from FINA information about the finalists from 2007 to 2015 WCs and finalists from 2006 to 2013 Junior-WCs (2400 entries). Final filtered database just included swimmers who participated in both junior and senior WCs (719 entries). A univariate general linear model (GLM) was used to examine the association between time; origin (swimmer who participated in Junior WC or not); maintenance years (number of years achieving finalist positions); country; and age, adjusting for year of competition. An ordinal logistic regression (OLR) model was used to identify predictors of achieving the top positions. The origin variable was not significant in either the GLM or the OLR. The only significant variables in the GLM were maintenance years (F4,706 = 7.689; p getting better positions as you get more WCs (odds = 1.85). In conclusion, no evidence was obtained to conclude finalist position in Junior WC have influence in achieve success in FINA WC. Maintenance years in WCs have a positive impact to achieve better positions.

  14. Swimming championship finalist positions on success in international swimming competitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Yustres

    Full Text Available The primary goal was to determine whether the achievement of finalist positions in the Junior Championship was associated with the achievement of success in the International Swimming Federation (FINA World Championship (WC. Secondary goals included analyzing the effect of various factors (gender, age, country, etc on swimmers' performances. Data were obtained from FINA information about the finalists from 2007 to 2015 WCs and finalists from 2006 to 2013 Junior-WCs (2400 entries. Final filtered database just included swimmers who participated in both junior and senior WCs (719 entries. A univariate general linear model (GLM was used to examine the association between time; origin (swimmer who participated in Junior WC or not; maintenance years (number of years achieving finalist positions; country; and age, adjusting for year of competition. An ordinal logistic regression (OLR model was used to identify predictors of achieving the top positions. The origin variable was not significant in either the GLM or the OLR. The only significant variables in the GLM were maintenance years (F4,706 = 7.689; p < .05 and year of competition (F4,706 = 23.239; p < .05. The OLR revealed a strong association (p < .001 between the position variable and maintenance years, getting better positions as you get more WCs (odds = 1.85. In conclusion, no evidence was obtained to conclude finalist position in Junior WC have influence in achieve success in FINA WC. Maintenance years in WCs have a positive impact to achieve better positions.

  15. High molecular mass proteomics analyses of left ventricle from rats subjected to differential swimming training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Luiz A O

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular exercises are commonly described as an important factor in health improvement, being directly related to contractile force development in cardiac cells. In order to evaluate the links between swimming exercise intensity and cardiac adaptation by using high molecular mass proteomics, isogenic Wistar rats were divided into four groups: one control (CG and three training groups (TG’s, with low, moderate and high intensity of exercises. In order to evaluate the links between swimming exercise intensity and cardiac adaptation by using high molecular mass proteomics, isogenic Wistar rats were divided into four groups: one control (CG and three training groups (TG’s, with low, moderate and high intensity of exercises. Results Findings here reported demonstrated clear morphologic alterations, significant cellular injury and increased energy supplies at high exercise intensities. α-MyHC, as well proteins associated with mitochondrial oxidative metabolism were shown to be improved. α-MyHC expression increase 1.2 fold in high intensity training group when compared with control group. α-MyHC was also evaluated by real-time PCR showing a clear expression correlation with protein synthesis data increase in 8.48 fold in high intensity training group. Other myofibrillar protein, troponin , appear only in high intensity group, corroborating the cellular injury data. High molecular masses proteins such as MRS2 and NADH dehydrogenase, involved in metabolic pathways also demonstrate increase expression, respectily 1.5 and 1.3 fold, in response to high intensity exercise. Conclusions High intensity exercise demonstrated an increase expression in some high molecular masses myofibrilar proteins, α-MyHC and troponin. Furthermore this intensity also lead a significant increase of other high molecular masses proteins such as MRS2 and NADH dehydrogenase in comparison to low and moderate intensities. However, high intensity exercise also

  16. The effects on depression of Internet-administered behavioural activation and physical exercise with treatment rationale and relapse prevention: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite their potential as low-threshold, low-cost and high-flexibility treatments of depression, behavioural activation and physical exercise have not yet been directly compared. This study will examine the effects of these interventions, administered via the Internet. The added effect of providing a treatment rationale will also be studied, as well as a relapse prevention program featuring cognitive behavioural therapy components. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial will include 500 participants meeting the diagnostic criteria for major depression, recruited in multiple cycles and randomised to either a waiting list control group with delayed treatment, or one of the four treatment groups: (1) physical exercise without a clear treatment rationale; (2) physical exercise with treatment rationale; (3) behavioural activation with treatment rationale; or (4) behavioural activation without a clear treatment rationale. Post treatment, half of the participants will be offered a relapse prevention program. Primary outcome measure will be the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item. Secondary measures include diagnostic criteria for depression, as well as self-reported anxiety, physical activity and quality of life. Measurements - done via telephone and the Internet - will be collected pre-treatment, weekly during treatment period, immediately post treatment and then monthly during a 24-month follow-up period. Discussion The results of this study will constitute an important contribution to the body of knowledge of the respective interventions. Limitations are discussed. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01619930 PMID:23374879

  17. Swimming of Paramecium in confined channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-02-01

    Many living organisms in nature have developed a few different swimming modes, presumably derived from hydrodynamic advantage. Paramecium is a ciliated protozoan covered by thousands of cilia with a few nanometers in diameter and tens of micro-meters in length and is able to exhibit both ballistic and meandering motions. First, we characterize ballistic swimming behaviors of ciliated microorganisms in glass capillaries of different diameters and explain the trajectories they trace out. We develop a theoretical model of an undulating sheet with a pressure gradient and discuss how it affects the swimming speed. Secondly, investigation into meandering swimmings within rectangular PDMS channels of dimension smaller than Paramecium length. We find that Paramecium executes a body-bend (an elastic buckling) using the cilia while it meanders. By considering an elastic beam model, we estimate and show the universal profile of forces it exerts on the walls. Finally, we discuss a few other locomotion of Paramecium in other extreme environments like gel.

  18. Ingestion of swimming pool water by recreational

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Swimming pool water ingestion data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Dufour, A., L. Wymer, M. Magnuson, T. Behymer, and R. Cantu. Ingestion...

  19. Muscle dynamics in fish during steady swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shadwick, RE; Steffensen, JF; Katz, SL

    1998-01-01

    SYNOPSIS. Recent research in fish locomotion has been dominated by an interest in the dynamic mechanical properties of the swimming musculature. Prior observations have indicated that waves of muscle activation travel along the body of an undulating fish faster than the resulting waves of muscular...... position in swimming fish. Quantification of muscle contractile properties in cyclic contractions relies on in vitro experiments using strain and activation data collected in vivo. In this paper we discuss the relation between these parameters and body kinematics. Using videoradiographic data from swimming...... constant cross-section of red muscle along much of the body suggests that positive power for swimming is generated fairly uniformly along the length of the fish....

  20. Exercise training as treatment of neck pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling

    Introduction: Neck pain is frequent among helicopter pilots and crew (1). The aim of this study was to investigate if an exercise intervention could reduce the prevalence of neck-pain among helicopter pilots and crew. Methods: Thirty-one pilots and thirty-eight crew members were randomized...... to an exercise-training-group ETG (n=35) or a reference-group REF (n=34). ETG underwent 20 weeks of strength-endurance and coordination training, targeting deep/superficial neck muscles. REF received no training. Primary outcome: Intensity of neck-pain the previous 3-months (11-point numeric box scale) (2......) and Pressure-Pain-Threshold (PPT) in the trapezius m. and upper neck extensors. Secondary outcome: Maximal-Voluntary-Contraction (MVC) for cervical flexion/extension and shoulder-elevation. Results: Neck-pain for ETG was (mean±SD) 1.9±1.7 at baseline and 1.8±2.1 at follow-up, and correspondingly for REF 2...

  1. Antidepressant behavioral effects by dual inhibition of monoamine reuptake in the rat forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rénéric, J P; Lucki, I

    1998-03-01

    Because of clinical interest in the effects of antidepressant drugs that exert their effects on multiple neurotransmitter systems, the behavioral effects produced by combined treatment with an SSRI (fluoxetine) with a selective norepinephrine (NE; desipramine) or dopamine (DA) reuptake inhibitor (buproprion) were examined in the forced swimming test (FST), a behavioral test in rodents that predicts the clinical activity of antidepressants. Three additional compounds with mixed activity as NE-5-HT reuptake inhibitors, milnacipran, duloxetine and venlafaxine, were also examined. Desipramine and fluoxetine both reduced immobility in the FST, but desipramine increased only climbing behavior, whereas fluoxetine increased only swimming behavior. The combination of fluoxetine with desipramine or bupropion increased both climbing and swimming behaviors at certain doses, but higher doses of desipramine when combined with fluoxetine replaced swimming behavior with climbing behavior. The mixed NE-5-HT reuptake inhibitors milnacipran and duloxetine reduced immobility and increased climbing behavior, but did not alter swimming. Venlafaxine reduced immobility and increased swimming behavior, except at the highest dose tested (80 mg/kg), which increased both swimming and climbing behaviors. Thus, combining certain doses of pharmacologically selective monoamine reuptake inhibitors, or the mixed reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine, produced a pattern of mixed active behaviors in the FST (climbing and swimming) that may reflect the activity of multiple neurotransmitters, especially the combination of enhanced 5-HT and DA activity. The combination of higher doses of desipramine with fluoxetine, or compounds with mixed activity at inhibiting NE and 5-HT reuptake, demonstrated effects similar to those of desipramine alone and may reflect inhibition of the expression of serotonergic antidepressant behavioral effects by selective NE reuptake inhibitors.

  2. Contribution of liver nerves, glucagon, and adrenaline to the glycaemic response to exercise in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Gertjan; Balkan, B.; Lindfeldt, J.; Bouws, G.; Scheurink, A.J.W.; Ahrén, B.; Steffens, A.B.

    1994-01-01

    The contribution of hepatic sympathetic innervation, glucagon and adrenaline to the glycaemic response to exercise was investigated in rats. Hepatically denervated (LDX) or sham operated (SHAM) rats with permanent catheters were therefore submitted to swimming with or without infusion of

  3. CONTRIBUTION OF LIVER NERVES, GLUCAGON, AND ADRENALINE TO THE GLYCEMIC RESPONSE TO EXERCISE IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VAN DIJK, G; BALKAN, B; LINDFELDT, J; BOUWS, G; SCHEURINK, AJW; AHREN, B; STEFFENS, AB

    The contribution of hepatic sympathetic innervation, glucagon and adrenaline to the glycaemic response to exercise was investigated in rats. Hepatically denervated (LDX) or sham operated (SHAM) rats with permanent catheters were therefore submitted to swimming with or without infusion of

  4. Effectiveness of ultrasound treatment applied with exercise therapy on patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şilte Karamanlioğlu, Duygu; Aktas, Ilknur; Ozkan, Feyza Unlu; Kaysin, Meryem; Girgin, Nuray

    2016-05-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate effectiveness of ultrasound treatment applied with exercise therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Fifty-two patients, who were diagnosed according to modified New York criteria, were aged 25-60, and have spine pain, were randomly assigned to two groups. Ultrasound (US) and exercise therapy were applied to treatment group (27); placebo US treatment and exercise therapy were applied to control group (25). Patients were evaluated before treatment, at the end of treatment, and 4 weeks after the treatment. Daily and night pain, morning stiffness, patient global assessment (PGA), doctor global assessment (DGA), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire, Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and ASDAS C-reactive protein (CRP) were used as clinical parameters. In US group, all parameters showed significant improvements at 2 and 6 weeks, in comparison with the baseline. In placebo US group, significant improvement was obtained for all parameters (except tragus-to-wall distance and modified Schober test at 2 weeks and lumbar side flexion and modified Schober test at 6 weeks). Comparison of the groups showed significantly superior results of US group for parameters of BASMI (p treatment increases the effect of exercise in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

  5. Divergence in physiological factors affecting swimming performance between anadromous and resident populations of brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespel, A; Dupont-Prinet, A; Bernatchez, L; Claireaux, G; Tremblay, R; Audet, C

    2017-05-01

    In this study, an anadromous strain (L) and a freshwater-resident (R) strain of brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis as well as their reciprocal hybrids, were reared in a common environment and submitted to swimming tests combined with salinity challenges. The critical swimming speeds (U crit ) of the different crosses were measured in both fresh (FW) and salt water (SW) and the variations in several physiological traits (osmotic, energetic and metabolic capacities) that are predicted to influence swimming performance were documented. Anadromous and resident fish reached the same U crit in both FW and SW, with U crit being 14% lower in SW compared with FW. The strains, however, seemed to use different underlying strategies: the anadromous strain relied on its streamlined body shape and higher osmoregulatory capacity, while the resident strain had greater citrate synthase (FW) and lactate dehydrogenase (FW, SW) capacity and either greater initial stores or more efficient use of liver (FW, SW) and muscle (FW) glycogen during exercise. Compared with R ♀ L ♂ hybrids, L ♀ R ♂ hybrids had a 20% lower swimming speed, which was associated with a 24% smaller cardio-somatic index and higher physiological costs. Thus swimming performance depends on cross direction (i.e. which parental line was used as dam or sire). The study thus suggests that divergent physiological factors between anadromous and resident S. fontinalis may result in similar swimming capacities that are adapted to their respective lifestyles. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  6. The effects of short time monohydrate creatine supplementation on systemic stress homeostasis following repeated maximum swimming in young women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Oladazimi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of short-term creatine supplementation on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes after six bouts of 50-meter sprint swimming. Methods: This quasi-experimental study recruited eight trained female swimmers with the mean age of 25±4.4 years and body mass index (BMI of 21.8±4.2 kg/m2 to perform six bouts of 50-meter sprint swimming with a 120-second active recovery in water. Then, subjects consumed Cr supplement (capsules containing 5 g monohydrate creatine, four times a day for six days. Blood samples were taken in resting position after the sixth bout of swimming before and following Cr supplementation period. Protein carbonyl (PC and superoxide dismutase (SOD concentration were measured using ELISA method. Result: Sprint swimming significantly increased PC concentration compared to resting state, but an insignificant increase was detected after Cr supplementation. In addition, sprint swimming led to a significant reduction in SOD levels after creatine supplementation compared to pre-test. Swimmers’ records after creatine supplementation in sixth bout of sprint swimming was also lower compared to the first bout. Conclusion: Cr supplementation can inhibit increased oxidative stress markers induced by high-intensity and short-duration exercise in trained female swimmers.

  7. An influence of initial swimming training technology on technical preparedness indicators of children with consequences of cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy Bosko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop an innovative technology of elementary swimming training in the backstroke way of children with the consequences of infantile cerebral palsy (ICP and to evaluate its effectiveness. Material & Methods: methods were used: analysis of scientific and methodological literature, pedagogical experiment, expert evaluation, statistical methods. The pedagogical experiment involved 29 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy, of which two groups were formed: an experimental group consisting of 14 children, 6 of them with spastic diplegia and 8 with a hemiparetic form, and a control group of 15, of which 6 – with spastic diplegia and 8 – with a hemiparetic form of cerebral palsy. After the experiment, we conducted an expert survey in order to identify the experts' opinion on the level of mastering the technique of swimming by backstroke way of children with the consequences of infantile cerebral palsy. Results: main means of implementing the technology is the web-based information system "SwimCP (Swimming with Cerebral Palsy" developed by us, which promotes the effective learning of the swimming of children with the effects of infantile cerebral palsy in the initial stage of sports training by selecting and recommending an orienting set of exercises, in accordance with the specific form of infantile cerebral palsy and the stage of learning motor action. Conclusion: with the help of expert assessment confirmed that the proposed technology is the initial training to swimming by backstroke way to children with consequences of cerebral palsy is effective.

  8. THE EFFECT OF 8-WEEK CORE TRAINING ON 100 M BACKSTROKE SWIMMING PERFORMANCE ON 13-15 AGE MALE SWIMMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Gönener

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, It was aimed to investigate the effect of 8-week core training on backstroke swimming style 100 m performance in male swimming group of 13-15 age group. 24 athletes from the Gebze Gençlerbirliği Swimming Club participated in this study. The groups are divided into experiment group and control group randomly as 12 persons per group. During the study, the experimental group participated in core training in addition to swimming for 3 days a week. Control group just participated in swimming training during the survey. The exercises were designed as strength training for core muscles for 8 weeks. 100 m swimming test was used as a test measurement tool. The obtained data from pre and post test comparison was analyzed with Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test in SPSS 21.0 statistical package program. When the pretest and posttest results were compared as intragroup, a statistically significant difference was found in the experimental group (p.05. As a result, it was seen that the core area trained by 8-week core training on 13-15 age male swimmers have a positive effect on 100 m backstroke style performance.

  9. Aerobic exercise combined with antioxidative treatment does not counteract moderate- or mid-stage Alzheimer-like pathophysiology of APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Lu-Qing; Wang, Qin; Marshall, Charles; Xiao, Na; Gao, Jun-Ying; Wu, Ting; Ding, Jiong; Hu, Gang; Xiao, Ming

    2013-10-01

    The present study evaluated the combined treatment effects of aerobic exercise and antioxidative stress on moderate-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ten-month-old APP/PS1 mice were given antioxidative treatment with acetylcysteine, along with aerobic exercise for 6 weeks. Spatial learning and memory were tested using the Morris water maze, and β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque deposits in the forebrain were quantified by Thioflavin-S staining. Levels of soluble Aβ1-42, β-secretase enzyme, ү-secretase enzyme, oxidative and antioxidant stress markers nitrotyrosine and peroxiredoxin-1, glial markers glial fibrillary acidic protein and ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1, and synaptic protein synaptophysin in the hippocampus were all measured by western blotting and/or immunohistochemistry. APP/PS1 mice showed severe declines in spatial learning and memory compared with their wild-type littermates, which were not attenuated by aerobic exercise combined with antioxidative treatment. The pathologic analysis revealed that Aβ deposition and production, oxidative stress, glial inflammation, and synaptic loss were not mitigated in the brain of exercised APP/PS1 mice, compared with the sedentary APP/PS1 animals. This study reveals that a combined treatment of aerobic exercise plus antioxidative stress does not counteract pathophysiology in the moderate- or mid-stages of AD. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Clinical Efficacy of a Mouth-Exercising Device Adjunct to Local Ointment Intra-Lesional Injections and Surgical Treatment for Oral Submucous Fibrosis: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pravinkumar; Hazarey, Vinay; Chaudhari, Rekha; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Oral physiotherapy or mouth exercise is considered to be an adjunct but mandatory treatment modality for oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF). This study planned to evaluate the clinical efficacy of a newly designed mouth exercising device (MED) in OSMF patients receiving local ointment, intra-lesional drugs and surgical treatment. A total of 231 OSMF patients were selected and treated with basic regime including topical corticosteroids, oral antioxidants and the icecream-stick exercise regime and allotted randomly to two equal groups A and B. Group-A patients were additionally given MED. Subgroups A1 and B1 patients with an inter-incisal distance (IID) 20-35mm were not given any additional therapy; subgroup A2 and B2 patients (IID 20-35mm) were treated additionally with intra-lesional injections. Subgroups A3 and B3 with IIDoral opening in OMSF patients in conjunction with local, injection and/or surgical treatment.

  11. Front Crawl Swimming Performance and Bi-Lateral Force Asymmetry during Land-Based and Tethered Swimming Tests

    OpenAIRE

    dos Santos, Karini B.; Bento, Paulo C. Barauce; Pereira, Gleber; Payton, Carl; Rodacki, André L.F.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether land-based and tethered swimming strength tests can explain swimming performance in 200-meter front crawl and, whether these tests were able to identify bilateral symmetry in force production. In the first session, eighteen swimmers completed a maximum effort 200 m front crawl swim (swimming performance) and 15 seconds maximal effort tethered front crawl swim. In the second session, participants performed the upper extremity isometric strengt...

  12. Relationship Between Vertical Jump Height and Swimming Start Performance Before and After an Altitude Training Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Padial, Paulino; de la Fuente, Blanca; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan; Feriche, Belén

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed (a) to analyze the development in the squat jump height and swimming start performance after an altitude training camp, (b) to correlate the jump height and swimming start performance before and after the altitude training period, and (c) to correlate the percent change in the squat jump height with the percent change in swimming start performance. Fifteen elite male swimmers from the Spanish Junior National Team (17.1 ± 0.8 years) were tested before and after a 17-day training camp at moderate altitude. The height reached in the squat jump exercise with additional loads of 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% of swimmers' pretest body weight and swimming start performance (time to 5, 10, and 15 m) were the dependent variables analyzed. Significant increases in the jump height (p ≤ 0.05; effect size [ES]: 0.35-0.48) and swimming start performance (p training period were observed. The start time had similar correlations with the jump height before training (r = -0.56 to -0.77) and after training (r = -0.50 to -0.71). The change in the squat jump height was inversely correlated with the change in the start time at 5 m (r = -0.47), 10 m (r = -0.73), and 15 m (r = -0.62). These results suggest that altitude training can be suitable to enhance explosive performance. The correlations obtained between the squat jump height and start time in the raw and change scores confirm the relevance of having high levels of lower-body muscular power to optimize swimming start performance.

  13. Action Mechanism of Ginkgo biloba Leaf Extract Intervened by Exercise Therapy in Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chiung-Chi; Liu, Jia-Hong; Chang, Chi-Huang; Chung, Jin-Yuan; Chen, Kuan-Chou

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), an imbalance between androgen/estrogen, overexpression of stromal, and epithelial growth factors associated with chronic inflammation, has become an atypical direct cause of mortality of aged male diseases. Ginkgo possesses anti-inflammatory, blood flow-enhancing, and free radical scavenging effects. Considering strenuous exercise can reduce BPH risks, we hypothesize Ginkgo + exercise (Ginkgo + Ex) could be beneficial to BPH. To verify this, rat BPH model was induced by s.c. 3.5 mg testosterone (T) and 0.1 mg estradiol (E2) per head per day successively for 8 weeks, using mineral oil as placebo. Cerenin® 8.33 μL/100 g was applied s.c. from the 10th to the 13th week, and simultaneously, Ex was applied (30 m/min, 3 times/week). In BPH, Ginkgo alone had no effect on T, 5α-reductase, and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), but suppressed androgen receptor (AR), aromatase, E2 and estrogen receptor (ER), and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA); Ex alone significantly reduced T, aromatase, E2, ER, AR, and PCNA, but highly raised DHT. While Ginkgo + Ex androgenically downregulated T, aromatase, E2, and ER, but upregulated DHT, AR, and PCNA, implying Ginkgo + Ex tended to worsen BPH. Conclusively, Ginkgo or Ex alone may be more beneficial than Ginkgo + Ex for treatment of BPH. PMID:23690843

  14. Action Mechanism of Ginkgo biloba Leaf Extract Intervened by Exercise Therapy in Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Chi Peng

    2013-01-01

    overexpression of stromal, and epithelial growth factors associated with chronic inflammation, has become an atypical direct cause of mortality of aged male diseases. Ginkgo possesses anti-inflammatory, blood flow-enhancing, and free radical scavenging effects. Considering strenuous exercise can reduce BPH risks, we hypothesize Ginkgo + exercise (Ginkgo + Ex could be beneficial to BPH. To verify this, rat BPH model was induced by s.c. 3.5 mg testosterone (T and 0.1 mg estradiol (E2 per head per day successively for 8 weeks, using mineral oil as placebo. Cerenin® 8.33 μL/100 g was applied s.c. from the 10th to the 13th week, and simultaneously, Ex was applied (30 m/min, 3 times/week. In BPH, Ginkgo alone had no effect on T, 5α-reductase, and dihydrotestosterone (DHT, but suppressed androgen receptor (AR, aromatase, E2 and estrogen receptor (ER, and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA; Ex alone significantly reduced T, aromatase, E2, ER, AR, and PCNA, but highly raised DHT. While Ginkgo + Ex androgenically downregulated T, aromatase, E2, and ER, but upregulated DHT, AR, and PCNA, implying Ginkgo + Ex tended to worsen BPH. Conclusively, Ginkgo or Ex alone may be more beneficial than Ginkgo + Ex for treatment of BPH.

  15. [Evaluation of grip strength in normal and obese Wistar rats submitted to swimming with overload after median nerve compression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coradinia, Josinéia Gresele; Kakihata, Camila Mayumi Martin; Kunz, Regina Inês; Errero, Tatiane Kamada; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2015-01-01

    To verify the functionality through muscle grip strength in animals with obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) and in control animals, which suffered compression of the right median nerve, and treated with swimming with overload. During the first five days of life, neonatal Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of MSG. The control group received a hypertonic saline solution. Forty-eight rats were divided into six groups: G1 (control); G2 (control + injury); G3 (control + injury + swimming); G4 (obese); G5 (obese + injury); G6 (obese + injury + swimming). The animals in groups G2, G3, G5 and G6 were submitted to compression of the median nerve and G3 and G6 groups were treated, after injury, with swimming exercise with load for three weeks. The swimming exercise had a progressive duration, according to the week, of 20, 30 and 40minutes. Muscle strength was assessed using a grip strength meter preoperatively and on the 3rd, 7th, 14th and 21st days after surgery. The results were expressed and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. When the grip strength was compared among assessments regardless of group, in the second assessment the animals exhibited lower grip strength. G1 and G4 groups had greater grip strength, compared to G2, G3, G4 and G6. The swimming exercise with overload has not been effective in promoting improvement in muscle grip strength after compression injury of the right median nerve in control and in obese-MSG rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Forced and Voluntary Exercise on the Foreleg and Hindlimb Skeletal Muscles of Rats

    OpenAIRE

    堀田, 曻; 石河, 利寛; 内藤, 久士; 藤沢, 政美

    1990-01-01

    This study was carried out to clarify the effects of forcrd (treadmill running, swimming) training and voluntary (voluntary runing) exercise training on the foreleg and hindlimb skeletal muscles of rats. Methods of forced exercise training used in this study were treadmill running and swimming with weights on the tail of rats. Voluntary running on running wheel was used as voluntary execise training. The results obtained were summarized as follows: 1. Muscle fiber area of both foreleg (M. b...

  17. Combining Teletherapy and On-line Language Exercises in the Treatment of Chronic Aphasia: An Outcome Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D. Steele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 12-week outcome study in which nine persons with long-term chronic aphasia received individual and group speech-language teletherapy services, and also used on-line language exercises to practice from home between therapy sessions.  Participants were assessed at study initiation and completion using the Western Aphasia Battery, a portion of the Communicative Effectiveness Index, ASHA National Outcome Measurement System, and RIC Communication Confidence Rating Scale for Aphasia; additionally participants were polled regarding satisfaction at discharge.  Pre-treatment and post-treatment means were calculated and compared, and matched t-tests were used to determine significance of improvements following treatment, with patterns of independent on-line activity analyzed.  Analysis of scores shows that means improved on most measures following treatment, generally significantly: the WAB AQ improved +3.5 (p = .057; the CETI Overall (of items administered — +17.8 (p = .01, and CCRSA Overall — + 10.4 (p = .0004.  Independent work increased with time, and user satisfaction following participation was high.

  18. Curative and health enhancement effects of aquatic exercise: evidence based on interventional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Takuya; Kamioka, Hiroharu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report on the health benefits and curative effects of aquatic exercise. We adopted the results of high-grade study designs (ie, randomized controlled trials and nonrandomized controlled trials), for which there were many studies on aquatic exercise. Aquatic exercise, in this study, means walking in all directions, stretching, and various exercises and conditioning performed with the feet grounded on the floor of a swimming pool. We excluded swimming. We decided to treat aquatic exercise, underwater exercise, hydrotherapy, and pool exercise as all having the same meaning. Aquatic exercise had significant effects on pain relief and related outcome measurements for locomotor diseases. Patients may become more active, and improve their quality of life, as a result of aquatic exercise.

  19. The effect of the addition of hip strengthening exercises to a lumbopelvic exercise programme for the treatment of non-specific low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Karen D; Emery, Carolyn A; Wiley, J Preston; Ferber, Reed

    2015-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of two exercise programmes in reducing pain and disability for individuals with non-specific low back pain and to examine the underlying mechanical factors related to pain and disability for individuals with NSLBP. A single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Eighty participants were recruited from eleven community-based general medical practices and randomized into two groups completing either a lumbopelvic motor control or a combined lumbopelvic motor control and progressive hip strengthening exercise therapy programme. All participants received an education session, 6 rehabilitation sessions including real time ultrasound training, and a home based exercise programme manual and log book. The primary outcomes were pain (0-100 mm visual analogue scale), and disability (Oswestry Disability Index V2). The secondary outcomes were hip strength (N/kg) and two-dimensional frontal plane biomechanics (°) measure during the static Trendelenburg test and while walking. All outcomes were measured at baseline and at 6-week follow up. There was no statistical difference in the change in pain (x¯ = -4.0 mm, t = -1.07, p = 0.29, 95%CI -11.5, 3.5) or disability (x¯ = -0.3%, t = -0.19, p = 0.85, 95%CI -3.5, 2.8) between groups. Within group comparisons revealed clinically meaningful reductions in pain for both Group One (x¯ = -20.9 mm, 95%CI -25.7, -16.1) and Group Two (x¯ = -24.9, 95%CI -30.8, -19.0). Both exercise programmes had similar efficacy in reducing pain. The addition of hip strengthening exercises to a motor control exercise programme does not appear to result in improved clinical outcome for pain for individuals with non-specific low back pain. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Zortea, R.; Piketty, A.

    2013-01-01

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported...

  1. Automation of water supply and recirculation-filtration of water at a swimming pool using Zelio PLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper proposes the use of the Zelio PLC for the automation of the water supply and recirculation-filtration system of a swimming pool. To do this, the Zelio SR3B261BD - 24V DC with 10 digital inputs (24V DC) and 10 digital outputs (relay contacts) was used. The proposed application makes the control of the water supply pumps and the water recirculation-filtration from a swimming pool. The recirculation-filtration systems for pools and swimming pools are designed to ensure water cleaning and recirculation to achieve optimum quality and lasting service life. The water filtration process is one of the important steps in water treatment in polls and swimming pools. It consists in recirculation of the entire volume of water and begins by absorbing the water in the pool by means of a pump followed by the passing of water through the filter, disinfectant and pH dosing, and reintroducing the water back into the pool or swimming pool through the discharge holes. Filters must to work 24 hours a day to remove pollutants from pools or swimming pools users. Filtration removes suspension particles with different origins. All newly built pools and swimming pools must be fitted with water recirculation systems, and existing ones will be equipped with water recirculation and water treatment systems.

  2. The Effects of Low to Moderate Intensity Exercise on Fatigue in Breast Cancer Patients Following Clinical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise . 37:5, 2005. Frank, J., Burnham T., Kemble K., (2005). Low...moderate intensity aerobic exercise improves quality of life indices and emotional distress in cancer survivors. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise . 37...life and body composition in breast cancer survivors. Medicine and Science in Sports and

  3. Swimming performance in surf: the influence of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, M; Reilly, T; Rees, A; Spray, G; Golden, F

    2008-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis (H1) that surf swimming involves a quantifiable experience component. Sixty-five beach lifeguards with (n = 35) and without surf experience (n = 30) completed: a best effort 200-m swim in a 25-m pool, a calm and a surf sea; an anthropometric survey; maximum effort 30-s swim bench test; 50-m pool swim (25 m underwater). In both groups, time to swim 200 m was slower in calm seas than in the pool and slower in surf than in either calm seas or the pool (p surf conditions (p surf experience as a predictor of surf swim time (R(2) = 0.32, p surf swimming. This limits the usefulness of pool swim times and other land-based tests as predictors of surf swimming performance. The hypothesis (H1) is accepted.

  4. Acute and long-term effect of antihypertensive treatment on exercise-induced albuminuria in incipient diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Cramer; Mogensen, C E

    1986-01-01

    . In the acute study, using placebo/metoprolol 10 mg i.v. in patients with normal UAE, the maximal SBP at 600 kpm/min was reduced by 17 mmHg +/- 10 (SD) (2p less than 1.0%) and the maximal SBP at 600 kpm/min in the patients with incipient nephropathy was reduced by 15 mmHg +/- 11 (SD) (2p less than 1.......0%). However, no difference was observed in UAE, in patients with normal UAE or those with incipient nephropathy. Five of the patients with incipient nephropathy were followed with repeated exercise tests before and during 2.6 years of antihypertensive treatment, using metoprolol 200 mg/24 h and subsequently...

  5. Deep RNA sequencing of the skeletal muscle transcriptome in swimming fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjan P Palstra

    Full Text Available Deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq was performed to provide an in-depth view of the transcriptome of red and white skeletal muscle of exercised and non-exercised rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss with the specific objective to identify expressed genes and quantify the transcriptomic effects of swimming-induced exercise. Pubertal autumn-spawning seawater-raised female rainbow trout were rested (n = 10 or swum (n = 10 for 1176 km at 0.75 body-lengths per second in a 6,000-L swim-flume under reproductive conditions for 40 days. Red and white muscle RNA of exercised and non-exercised fish (4 lanes was sequenced and resulted in 15-17 million reads per lane that, after de novo assembly, yielded 149,159 red and 118,572 white muscle contigs. Most contigs were annotated using an iterative homology search strategy against salmonid ESTs, the zebrafish Danio rerio genome and general Metazoan genes. When selecting for large contigs (>500 nucleotides, a number of novel rainbow trout gene sequences were identified in this study: 1,085 and 1,228 novel gene sequences for red and white muscle, respectively, which included a number of important molecules for skeletal muscle function. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that sustained swimming increased transcriptional activity in skeletal muscle and specifically an up-regulation of genes involved in muscle growth and developmental processes in white muscle. The unique collection of transcripts will contribute to our understanding of red and white muscle physiology, specifically during the long-term reproductive migration of salmonids.

  6. Treatment Integrity Enhancement via Performance Feedback Conceptualized as an Exercise in Social Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erchul, William P.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary is in response to the article "Effects of Verbal and Written Performance Feedback on Treatment Adherence" (Kaufman, Codding, Markus, Tryon, & Kyse, this issue). The overall recommendation to those who study treatment integrity using performance feedback methods is to incorporate theories and research on social…

  7. Body mass index and active range of motion exercise treatment after intra-articular injection in adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Huang, Tung-Fu; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Liu, Chien-Lin

    2013-04-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is commonly associated with medical diseases such as diabetes mellitus, hyperthyroidism, and obesity. Intra-articular injection has been used to speed recovery and relieve pain associated with frozen shoulder. In this study, we evaluated and compared the effects of an intra-articular injection of corticosteroid and lidocaine in the treatment of primary adhesive capsulitis in overweight and normal-weight patients. This is a prospective clinical study of patients with adhesive capsulitis, in which the main treatment strategy was an intra-articular injection of corticosteroid (3 mL) and lidocaine (3 mL). Active range of motion exercise was initiated immediately after the injection and performed four times daily. The evaluation included the recording of a detailed medical and orthopedic history, and the assessment of pain and function by determining the Constant score at baseline (before injection) and every 2 weeks thereafter. Patients were classified as normal weight (body mass index [BMI] adhesive capsulitis between 2010 and 2012. In the normal-weight group, the mean Constant score increased from 35.4 to 74.6 after 8 weeks, whereas in the overweight group, the mean Constant score increased from 32.0 to 47.2. There was a significant difference in the mean Constant score between the normal-weight and overweight groups at 8 weeks. Active range of motion exercise after an intra-articular injection of corticosteroid and lidocaine improved pain and functional outcome at 8 weeks in normal-weight (BMI adhesive capsulitis. Manipulation under anesthesia may be considered a priority in overweight patients. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Evaluation of the impact of writing exercises interventions on quality of life in patients with psoriasis undergoing systemic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabolli, S; Naldi, L; Pagliarello, C; Sampogna, F; di Pietro, C; Spagnoli, A; Abeni, D

    2012-12-01

    Emotional writing is a short-term psychological intervention that has been successfully used in several controlled studies. The overall objective of the study was to test the efficacy of Pennebaker's emotional writing intervention in patients with psoriasis treated with systemic therapy. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in seven clinical centres in Italy, over a 2-year period. The main outcome measures were the psoriasis area and severity index and the Physician Global Assessment, as well as generic and dermatology-specific quality of life questionnaires. Such outcomes were measured at 4 weeks, and 6 and 12 months from baseline. The project recruitment time was 12 months, and the total follow-up time for each individual was also 12 months. In total, 202 patients were enrolled and assessed at baseline, 67 of whom completed all three follow-up visits. The writing exercise had little or no effect on patients with psoriasis who were undergoing systemic treatment. In the Generalized Estimating Equations models no statistically significant differences were observed in the Pennebaker intervention group vs. the control group. In subgroup analysis for health status, small effects in favour of patients assigned to the Pennebaker group were documented at the end of the study in women, in overweight individuals, in patients under treatment with biological drugs, and on the Physical Component Summary of the Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study Questionnaire. The Pennebaker and control groups had similar changes over time for practically all the outcome variables, and also when considering all observations and adjusting for all the variables of interest. The longitudinal analysis confirmed that the intervention had little or no effect on the variables of interest. The implementation of writing exercises requires a careful and ad hoc organization, including dedicated spaces for the writing itself. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of

  9. Laps or lengths? The effects of different exercise programs on asthma control in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carew, Chris; Cox, Des W

    2017-09-05

    Exercise training has been shown in numerous studies to improve lung function and asthma control in children with asthma. Swimming has been shown to be of benefit in children with asthma, but which form of exercise is better for asthmatics has not been determined to date. The aim of this study was to examine if swimming improved lung function and asthma symptoms in asthmatic children when compared with different forms of exercise and a control group. Subjects with asthma were randomly assigned to either one of three different exercise training groups (swimming, football, and basketball) or a control group. Spirometry was performed before and after and the subjects were asked to keep asthma diaries and perform daily peak flow measurements. 41 children and adolescents between the ages of 9 and 16 participated in the study. After completing the training, children across all three exercise programs had significantly higher forced vital capacity (FVC) percentage values when compared to the control group. The swimming group demonstrated a significant increase in the percentage peak expiratory flow (PEF) following the exercise program when compared with the control group (78.3 ± 9.3 versus 89.0 ± 14.9, p = 0.04). All children on exercise training programs reported an improvement in their asthma symptoms via asthma diaries. This study suggests that a swimming training program is more beneficial in terms of peak flow measurements when compared with other exercise training programs.

  10. Comparing the effects of eccentric training with eccentric training and static stretching exercises in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy. A controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos; Pantelis, Manias; Kalliopi, Stasinopoulou

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of eccentric training and eccentric training with static stretching exercises in the management of patellar tendinopathy. Controlled clinical trial. Rheumatology and rehabilitation centre. Forty-three patients who had patellar tendinopathy for at least three months. They were allocated to two groups by alternative allocation. Group A (n = 22) was treated with eccentric training of patellar tendon and static stretching exercises of quadriceps and hamstrings and Group B (n = 21) received eccentric training of patellar tendon. All patients received five