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Sample records for swedish manufacturing industry

  1. Development blocks in innovation networks: The Swedish manufacturing industry, 1970-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taalbi, Josef

    2017-01-01

    The notion of development blocks (Dahmén, 1950, 1991) suggests the co-evolution of technologies and industries through complementarities and the overcoming of imbalances. This study proposes and applies a methodology to analyse development blocks empirically. To assess the extent and character of innovational interdependencies between industries the study combines analysis of innovation biographies and statistical network analysis. This is made possible by using data from a newly constructed innovation output database for Sweden. The study finds ten communities of closely related industries in which innovation activity has been prompted by the emergence of technological imbalances or by the exploitation of new technological opportunities. The communities found in the Swedish network of innovation are shown to be stable over time and often characterized by strong user-supplier interdependencies. These findings serve to stress how historical imbalances and opportunities are key to understanding the dynamics of the long-run development of industries and new technologies.

  2. Antecedents of creativity and innovativeness in the Swedish manufacturing pharmaceutical industry

    OpenAIRE

    Boman, Peter; Huang, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    The ability to create new products and services is a competitive advantage and in many cases a requirement for long term success of a company. In the manufacturing pharmaceutical industry, the freedom to think and act creatively is depressed by the demand for external and internal compliance. As such, it is important to understand the underlying factors of creativity and innovativeness in order to promote them. Several studies have been performed on the subject to increase creativity. A theme...

  3. ISO 14001 adoption and industrial waste generation: the case of Swedish manufacturing firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobel, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Adoption of environmental management systems (EMSs) based on ISO 14001 has constituted one of the most important developments in sustainable industry management in recent years. Previous research on the impact of EMSs has relied heavily on corporate representatives' subjective perception of benefits. Moreover, studies tend to focus on the systems' impact on firms' overall environmental performance, not distinguishing between the differences in different environmental aspects. This study aims to contribute knowledge about the influence of certified EMSs on industrial waste generation based on objective industrial waste data derived from mandatory annual environmental reports. The study focuses on changes in waste generation over a period of 12 years and includes both ISO 14001-certified firms (66 firms) and non-certified firms (50 firms). Consideration is given to the improvement efforts in the firms before EMS adoption. Analysis has been carried out using statistical methods for three different industrial waste parameters: hazardous waste, waste to landfill and the total amounts of waste. The results indicate that the certified EMSs have no statistically significant effect on any of the three waste parameters. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Factors driving and restraining adoption of Automation technologies in Swedish wood product industry.

    OpenAIRE

    Mapulanga, Mwanza; Saladi, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Swedish wood product industry contributes significantly to the economy of the country. This industry adds more value to the sawn timber produced in order to manufacture different wooden products. Companies in Swedish wood product industry are presently seen as underdeveloped in terms of investments and developments in automation technologies. Automation technologies are seen by companies as a solution for improving productivity, product quality, manufacturing cost reduction and ultimately imp...

  5. Industrial Symbiosis in the Swedish Forest Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Forskningen som presenteras i denna avhandling anknyter till forskningsfältet Industriell Ekologi och då särskilt den gren som kallas Industriell Symbios (IS). Inom IS förordas att ett företag kan öka produktionen och samtidigt minska resursanvändningen genom att effektivt integrera energi och materialflöden i ett större system. Utbyte av tex spillvärme och biprodukter mellan olika industrier kan minska behovet av primärvärme och råmaterial. Syftet med avhandlingen är att undersöka hur det te...

  6. Solar array manufacturing industry simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Firnett, P. J.; Kleine, B.

    1980-01-01

    Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation (SAMIS) program is a standardized model of industry to manufacture silicon solar modules for use in electricity generation. Model is used to develop financial reports that detail requirements, including amounts and prices for materials, labor, facilities, and equipment required by companies.

  7. The Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    their currencies to the dollar at an artificially weak exchange rate in order to ensure continued access to the US market on favorable terms. China is...creates US jobs in the manufacturing sector, spurring investments in people and equipment, which contributes to the strength of the economy.73 US...movements are: (1) Kaizen , (2) Synchronous Manufacturing, and (3) Just-In-Time (JIT) Manufacturing. Kaizen : Kaizen is a Japanese word that means

  8. Impacts of foreign direct investment on efficiency in Swedish manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedin, Dick; Stage, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have found that foreign direct investment (FDI) can have positive impacts on productivity. However, while FDI has clearly positive impacts on technology transfers, its effects on resource use within firms is less clear and, in principle, efficiency losses might offset some of the productivity gains associated with improved technologies. In this paper, we study the impacts of FDI on efficiency in Swedish manufacturing. We find that foreign ownership has positive impacts on efficiency, supporting the earlier findings on productivity.

  9. Subcontractors and Component Suppliers in the Swedish Wind Power Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Linn

    2003-05-01

    This paper studies the Swedish component suppliers in the wind power industry. This group has not received much attention so far, and today very little is known. This study addresses the fact that the Swedish component suppliers have not been able to penetrate the wind power market despite the Swedish industry's strength in mechanical and electrical engineering. The aims of this paper were to gather information regarding the existing production and to identify factors that affect the Swedish component suppliers' scope to penetrate the wind turbine market. To date, although Sweden has spent considerable amounts of money on projects involving wind turbines, there is no series production of large wind turbines in Sweden. The historical development of the wind turbine industry suggests this alone would have inhibited the development of component production in Sweden. Yet, the country's proximity and good access to large wind turbine producing countries should be an advantage. Various factors and issues are identified and discussed in this paper that are relevant for the Swedish component suppliers' scope to penetrate the wind turbine market. These include market and product development, buyer-supplier relationships, export and sourcing behaviors, and time of market entry. This is a first step towards increasing the knowledge of Swedish component production and it is recognized that more studies are required. Various areas where relevant knowledge is largely missing or scarce are identified and discussed as well, and should serve as relevant starting points for continued research.

  10. Deregulation and internationalisation - impact on the Swedish nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haukeland, Sverre R. [Swedish Nuclear Society, Vattenfall Research and Development, 162 89 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    The deregulation of the Swedish electricity market in 1996 was well known in advance, and the nuclear power plants in Sweden, as well as their main suppliers, made early preparations for a this new situation. In a study - performed by the author at Malardalen University in Sweden - it is concluded that the electricity industry, including the nuclear power plants, was fundamentally transformed in conjunction with market liberalisation. Two large foreign companies, E-on and Fortum, entered the Swedish market and became part-owners of the nuclear plants. After deregulation, the electricity market in Sweden is dominated by these two companies and the large national company Vattenfall. Similarly, Vattenfall has recently grown into an international energy company, acquiring generation capacity in Northern Europe outside of Sweden, including nuclear power plants in Germany. Restructuring of the nuclear industry on the supplier side started in the 1980's, when the Swedish company ASEA and BBC of Switzerland merged to become ABB. Several years later the Swedish nuclear plant supplier ABB-Atom became part of Westinghouse Electric Company, today owned by Toshiba. The Swedish experience thus confirms an international trend of mergers and consolidation in the nuclear industry. (authors)

  11. Assembly-Line Manufacturing Industry Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Firnett, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Assists in economic analysis of production line manufacturing. Originally developed to estimate product price received by hypothetical U.S. industry that manufactures silicon solar modules for use in electricity generation, SAMIS extended and generalized to extent that it simulates operation of many different production line manufacturing industries and/or companies.

  12. Manufacturing Capacity Utilization and Industrial Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the impact of manufacturing capacity utilization on industrial development in Nigeria during the period of 1976 – 2005. Manufacturing capacity utilization, value added and employment generation were regressed on index of industrial productivity (which served as the proxy for industrial development) ...

  13. Manufacturing Capacity Utilization and Industrial Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Abstract. This paper investigates the impact of manufacturing capacity utilization on industrial development in Nigeria during the period of 1976 – 2005. Manufacturing capacity utilization, value added and employment generation were regressed on index of industrial productivity (which served as the proxy for industrial ...

  14. Cancer incidence of workers in the Swedish petroleum industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvholm, B; Mellblom, B; Norrman, R; Nilsson, R; Nordlinder, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risk of cancer due to occupational exposure to petroleum products in the Swedish transport and refinery industries. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort study the cancer incidence in 4128 men and 191 women, who had worked for at least one year in the petroleum industry, was compared with the incidence in the general population. The job titles and employment times for each person were found in personal files in the industries. The men had on average worked in jobs exposed to petroleum for 11.6 years at the end of the observation period. The cases of cancer were identified by record linkage with the Swedish cancer register. RESULTS: In total there were 146 cases of cancer v 157.6 expected (standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 0.93 90% confidence interval (90% CI) 0.80 to 1.1). Operators at refineries had an increased risk of leukaemia (6 cases v 1.7 expected, 90% CI of relative risk (RR) 1.5 to 7.0). Five of the six cases had started to work at the refineries in the 1950s or later. No other significantly increased risk of cancer was found. Distribution workers had a decreased incidence of lung cancer (no cases, 90% CI of RR 0 to 0.4). CONCLUSIONS: Operators at Swedish refineries had an increased risk of leukaemia. A possible cause is exposure to benzene. There was no increased risk of leukaemia in distribution workers. Distribution workers had a decreased risk of lung cancer. PMID:9423584

  15. Approaching safety in the Swedish and Danish construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grill, Martin; Grytnes, Regine; Törner, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Persistent high accident rates in the construction industry motivate research to improve the understanding of underlying factors affecting safety behaviour and safety outcomes. The Scandinavian countries of Sweden and Denmark are culturally similar but with a considerable difference...... industry. The transcripts were analysed using semantic thematic analysis. Results: Seven safety related themes were distinguished, conveying safety culture differences between Swedish and Danish construction industry concerning: participatory or directive management; challenge or obey; compliance or non......-compliance; cooperation or conflict; caution or cockiness; planning management; and employment security. Interconnections between the thematic areas revealed patterns of interaction between managers and employees, interpreted as process models of participatory and directive safety cultures. Conclusion: This study...

  16. Manufacturing strategy issues in selected Indian manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahender Singh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some findings of Indian manufacturing sectors viz. automobile (especially two-wheeler, tractor and general manufacturing industry. Various manufacturing strategy issues such as competitive priorities, improvement activities, and performance measures, have been identified and assessed in Indian context. Sector wise comparison of competitive priorities, improvement activities i.e. advanced manufacturing technology (AMT, integrated information systems (IIS, and advanced management systems (AMS, and performance measure, is provided. Our results showed that most of the Indian companies are still emphasizing on quality. However, automobile sector has set to compete globally with high innovation rate, faster new product development, and continuous improvement. It is also observed that Indian companies are investing more in AMS as compared to IIS and AMT. Manufacturing competence index is also computed for each sector.

  17. Energy Intensity analysis of Indian manufacturing industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Soni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy has been recognized as one of the key inputs for the economic growth and social development of a country. India being one of the largest and rapidly growing developing countries, there is an impending energy crisis which requires immediate measures to be adopted. In this situation the concept of Energy Intensity comes under special focus to ensure energy security in an environmentally sustainable way. Energy Intensity of Indian manufacturing industries is among the highest in the world and stands for enormous energy consumption. Hence, reducing the Energy Intensity of Indian manufacturing industries is one of the challenges. This study attempts to analyse the factors which influence the Energy Intensity of Indian manufacturing industries and how they can be improved to reduce the Energy Intensity. The paper considers five of the largest energy consuming manufacturing industrial sectors in India viz. Aluminium, Cement, Iron & Steel Industries, Textile Industries and Fertilizer Industries and conducts a detailed Energy Intensity analysis using the data from PROWESS database of the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy (CMIE for the period 2005–2014.

  18. Photovoltaic industry manufacturing technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanecek, D.; Diver, M.; Fernandez, R. [Automation and Robotics Research Inst., Fort Worth, TX (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This report contains the results of the Photovoltaic (PV) Industry Manufacturing Technology Assessment performed by the Automation and Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) of the University of Texas at Arlington for the National Renewable Energy laboratory. ARRI surveyed eleven companies to determine their state-of-manufacturing in the areas of engineering design, operations management, manufacturing technology, equipment maintenance, quality management, and plant conditions. Interviews with company personnel and plant tours at each of the facilities were conducted and the information compiled. The report is divided into two main segments. The first part of the report presents how the industry as a whole conforms to ``World Class`` manufacturing practices. Conclusions are drawn from the results of a survey as to the areas that the PV industry can improve on to become more competitive in the industry and World Class. Appendix A contains the questions asked in the survey, a brief description of the benefits to performing this task and the aggregate response to the questions. Each company participating in the assessment process received the results of their own facility to compare against the industry as a whole. The second part of the report outlines opportunities that exist on the shop floor for improving Process Equipment and Automation Strategies. Appendix B contains the survey that was used to assess each of the manufacturing processes.

  19. Experienced Barriers to Lean in Swedish Manufacturing and Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt Halling

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to compare similarities and divergences in how the concepts of Lean and barriers to Lean are described by key informants at a production unit in a large manufacturing company and two emergency health care units in Sweden. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews and analyzed with the constant comparative method (CCM and Porras and Robertson’s (1992 change model. : In both organizations, the view of Lean changed from a toolbox to a human behavior view. Eight barriers were experienced in both organizations. Three barriers were unique to manufacturing or to health care, respectively. Nine barriers were elements of social factors; five were elements of organizing arrangements. Only people practically involved and responsible for the implementation at the two organizations participated in the study. Persons responsible for implementing Lean should consider organizational arrangements and social factors in order to limit barriers to successful implementation. Most research on Lean has been about successful Lean implementations. This study focuses on how Lean is viewed and what barriers personnel in manufacturing and health care have experienced. In comparing the barriers to Lean experienced in the two groups, common, archetypical, and unique barriers for manufacturing and health care can be identified, thus contributing to knowledge about barriers to Lean implementation.

  20. Experienced Barriers to Lean in Swedish Manufacturing and Health Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Halling, Bengt; Wijk, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    A B S T R A C T  Purpose: The purpose is to compare similarities and divergences in how the concepts of Lean and barriers to Lean are described by key informants at a production unit in a large manufacturing company and two...

  1. Experienced Barriers to Lean in Swedish Manufacturing and Health Care

    OpenAIRE

    Bengt Halling; Katarina Wijk

    2013-01-01

    The purpose is to compare similarities and divergences in how the concepts of Lean and barriers to Lean are described by key informants at a production unit in a large manufacturing company and two emergency health care units in Sweden. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews and analyzed with the constant comparative method (CCM) and Porras and Robertson’s (1992) change model. : In both organizations, the view of Lean changed from a toolbox to a human behavi...

  2. Manufacturing Capacity Utilization and Industrial Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    The econometric evidence confirms that there is a long run positive relationship between Manufacturing capacity utilization, value added and index of industrial productivity in Nigeria. It was recommended based on this relationship that as a result of the low capacity utilization experienced in Nigeria, the government should ...

  3. From domestic manufacture to Industrial Revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2006-01-01

    The classical story of industrialization always begins with agriculture: the modernization of rural institutions, involving both the enclosure of ‘open fields' and a shift from peasant farming to larger scale capitalist farming, generates a rise in agricultural productivity, which in turn fuels...... industrial development. An emerging view, however, turns the old story on its head, arguing that agricultural improvement is a response to urban development. This paper follows the line of this emerging view, demonstrating that productivity growth in commercial manufacture is crucial to the performance...

  4. Industrial manufacturing of electric insulators; Fabricacion industrial de aisladores electricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Lucia [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1987-12-31

    Porcelain is the insulating material more extensively used for electric insulators manufacturing, due to its dielectric properties; nevertheless, it presents fragility problems of manufacture and of resistance to the thermal shock, among others. For this reason studies are being conducted for the substitution of porcelain in the electric insulators manufacturing. In this area, the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas developed an improved insulating formulation - the polymeric concrete- and an industrial prototype machine for the manufacture of high voltage electric insulators for outdoors use. [Espanol] La porcelana es el material aislante electrico mas utilizado en la elaboracion de aisladores electricos, debido a sus propiedades dielectricas; sin embargo, presenta problemas de fragilidad, de fabricacion y de baja resistencia al choque termico, entre otros. Es por ello que se realizan estudios para sustituir la porcelana en la fabricacion de aisladores electricos. En este campo, el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas desarrollo una formulacion aislante mejorada -el concreto polimerico- y una maquina prototipo industrial para fabricar aisladores electricos de alto voltaje para uso en exteriores.

  5. Prefabricated Construction using Digitally Integrated Industrial Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Giles

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes research being carried out in relation to prefabricated high density affordablehousing under a grant from the Partnership for the Advancement of Technology in Housing(PATH and the National Science Foundation (NSF in the USA. The objective is to demonstratehow a new paradigm for the conceptualization and construction of buildings can be conceivedof as an entirely factory based process that creates advantages for construction through industrialsystems technology transfer. Our approach is intended to transform design methodologythrough demonstrating how alternative construction concepts, using entirely pre-manufacturedvolumetric units, can be adopted. This involves digital modeling that facilitates parametric variationsfor creating customized prefabricated products from design conceptualization through tofinal product delivery. The paper discusses key areas under investigation in relation to a manufacturingparadigm used in the automotive industry that integrates virtual prototyping and industrialmanufacturing systems. Our research explores a type of monocoque volumetric unit prefabricatedin steel, which will be pre-finished as part of a modular factory-built approach usingindustrialized methodologies that will facilitate customized manufacture of a high quality energyefficient product for affordable housing.The paper addresses the automotive industry methods of manufacture that have served increasedautomobile performance and economics through mass production for over a century. In starkcontrast, the building industry and in particular the housing industry is still a century behind. It issuggested that a move away from tradition will require an industry wide initiative, just like HenryFord led the way with mass production. By embracing the increasing sophistication and capabilitythat digital technology offers, it is shown how digital tools are implemented towards masscustomization in house design using virtual modeling in the

  6. Electricity and the Technology–Skill Complementarity: Evidence from the Swedish Industrial Census of 1931

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svante Prado

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding the popularity among economists of attributing the surging inequality of recent decades to technology–skill complementarity, researchers with a keen eye on history have been reluctant to pick up this thread. This paper joins Claudia Goldin and Lawrence Katz’s attempt to examine the role of electrification as an example of a technology that is complementary to workers’ rising skill levels. Sweden electrified manufacturing processes rapidly in the first quarter of the twentieth century, while the supply of skills through secondary education only increased significantly in the 1950s. We use industry-specific information from the Swedish Industrial Census of 1931 to establish whether electricity and the use of white-collar workers correlated positively. The results indicate that the correlation was positive, but the estimated effect was rather small. Moreover, the available evidence for skill ratios does not suggest that inequality, thus measured, increased. We conclude that labor market institutions prevented—and also overturned—the inequality push emanating from technology.

  7. EMPLOYMENT ABSORPTION IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY: YOGYAKARTA CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Indra Putri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Unemployment has been a main problem in economic development, especially in developing countries. Unemployment stems from the inability of the economy to absorb the growing labor force. This paper investigates factors influencing absorbtion of labor in Yogyakarta manufacturing industries. Variables hypothesized to affect the absorbtion are wage, labor productivity, non-wage spending, and output of production. It collects data from Indonesia Centre Bureau of Statistics, and uses panel data regression, namely common effect approach, to estimate the model. Employing Eviews software package, it finds that wage, labor productivity, and output production significantly influence labor absorption. However, non-wage spending does not significantly influence the absorption.Keywords: Labor absorption, wage, labor productivity, non-wage spendingJEL classification numbers: J01, J23, J24

  8. Computer integrated manufacturing in the chemical industry : Theory & practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashayeri, J.; Teelen, A.; Selen, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the possibilities of implementing Computer Integrated Manufacturing in the process industry, and the chemical industry in particular. After presenting some distinct differences of the process industry in relation to discrete manufacturing, a number of focal points are discussed.

  9. The Development of Low Carbon Manufacturing Industry in Hainan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the main part of industrial production, the manufacturing industry promotes the economic growth of our country, but the subsequent large amount of energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions have greatly undermined human’s living environment. Therefore this paper aims at finding some solutions through the example of Hainan’s low carbon manufacturing industry. It first analyzes the importance of low carbon economy for the development of the manufacturing industry, then describes the current status of Hainan’s low carbon manufacturing industry, and finally puts forward five ways for the development of low carbon manufacturing in Hainan Province such as perfecting relevant laws and regulations, formulating supporting policies, setting up suitable industrial layout, improving the low-carbon technology innovation system, and establishing incentive mechanism of personnel in manufacturing enterprises. The third part is also the main innovation in this field.

  10. Best Manufacturing practice adoptions by Indian Industries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R Nesamoorthy; Manvijay Singh

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new model to provide guidance and support for Indian manufacturing companies who aim to reach at global level standards both in maintenance and manufacturing...

  11. Evaluation of a laboratory health examination programme in a Swedish industry (Volvo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, G; Bengtsson, C

    1991-04-01

    The records of 117 subjects, workers who had participated in a health examination at a Swedish industry, were studied retrospectively in order to find out which measures had been taken as a consequence of the results from the different examinations. The extensive laboratory examination programme that had been carried out seemed to be of limited value. It is concluded that the extensive examination programmes carried out in many industries should be re-evaluated more critically.

  12. 75 FR 36421 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls Postapproval Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Chemistry, Manufacturing, and... reported in annual reports. Specifically, the draft guidance describes chemistry, manufacturing, and... the many advances in quality management practices in manufacturing and to enable the agency to more...

  13. Industry 4.0 implies lean manufacturing: Research activities in industry 4.0 function as enablers for lean manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Sanders

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Lean Manufacturing is widely regarded as a potential methodology to improve productivity and decrease costs in manufacturing organisations. The success of lean manufacturing demands consistent and conscious efforts from the organisation, and has to overcome several hindrances. Industry 4.0 makes a factory smart by applying advanced information and communication systems and future-oriented technologies. This paper analyses the incompletely perceived link between Industry 4.0 and lean manufacturing, and investigates whether Industry 4.0 is capable of implementing lean. Executing Industry 4.0 is a cost-intensive operation, and is met with reluctance from several manufacturers. This research also provides an important insight into manufacturers’ dilemma as to whether they can commit into Industry 4.0, considering the investment required and unperceived benefits. Design/methodology/approach: Lean manufacturing is first defined and different dimensions of lean are presented. Then Industry 4.0 is defined followed by representing its current status in Germany. The barriers for implementation of lean are analysed from the perspective of integration of resources. Literatures associated with Industry 4.0 are studied and suitable solution principles are identified to solve the abovementioned barriers of implementing lean. Findings: It is identified that researches and publications in the field of Industry 4.0 held answers to overcome the barriers of implementation of lean manufacturing. These potential solution principles prove the hypothesis that Industry 4.0 is indeed capable of implementing lean. It uncovers the fact that committing into Industry 4.0 makes a factory lean besides being smart. Originality/value: Individual researches have been done in various technologies allied with Industry 4.0, but the potential to execute lean manufacturing was not completely perceived. This paper bridges the gap between these two realms, and identifies

  14. Offshoring trends in the manufacturing process within the automotive industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simplay, S.; Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee

    2014-01-01

    consisting of original equipment manufacturers and engineering service providers. The findings indicated some offshoring trends in the automotive industry. Offshoring in this industry is moving from a manufacturing focus to incorporate large parts of the process, including high-level product development......This paper investigates offshoring trends in the automotive industry. The research approach consisted of combining empirical findings from case companies with latest research from the field. Empirical data was collected through case studies from 15 automotive organisations based in Europe...... with a focus on offshoring in the automotive industry and provides practitioners with information on a cutting-edge trend to the industry...

  15. Manufacture of industrial products from oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugh W. Reynolds

    1971-01-01

    The three largest and fastest growing markets for oak are railroad crossties, reusable pallets, and truck and container flooring. Manufacturers of oak lumber are advised to keep these products in mind when planning their production.

  16. Selection of Technology in Global Manufacturing Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Transferring a manufacturing system to another country has proven to be problematic for most multinational firms. Selection of the appropriate production process and technology is a critical decision as transplantation of an existing system from another country without adaptation usually does...... not work well. The host country's business and cultural environment must be taken into account in designing a production system which requires attention to the management elements of technology transfer. This paper presents a model for transfer of manufacturing technology to a foreign site based...... on a sociotechnical system approach. It views the decisions for selecting and implementing a production system as a five stage process. The first step is determining the strategic goals of the foreign plant followed by selection of the production process and manufacturing system types. The last stages involve...

  17. Industrial conflict and its management in selected Nigerian manufacturing companies

    OpenAIRE

    Solaja Oludele Mayowa

    2015-01-01

    This study examined industrial conflict and its management strategies in selected manufacturing companies in Lagos State, Nigeria. The study utilized co-relational survey method which involves the use of structured questionnaire and personal observation to elicit information from the respondents. Participants comprised of staffs of three manufacturing companies in Lagos, Nigeria. Multistage sampling technique was employed in selecting the respondents from the three manufacturing companies und...

  18. The Effect of Improved Productivity of the Manufacturing Industries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopia's manufacturing industry is at the onset of development though there are recent upsurges in the number of firms. This study examines the effect of productivity improvement of the manufacturing sector on the macro economy, sectoral output, factor and household income and welfare of households. In order to ...

  19. Centers for manufacturing technology: Industrial Advisory Committee Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    An advisory committee, composed of senior managers form industrial- sector companies and major manufacturing trade associations and representatives from appropriate educational institutions, meets semi-annually to review and advise the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT) on its economic security program. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

  20. Manufacturing Industry Employers’ Perception of Graduates’ English Language Skills Proficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Manjet Kaur Mehar Singh; Julie Chuah Suan Choo

    2012-01-01

    Proficiency in English language skills among graduates that create advantages for the organization is preferred by prospective employers as one of the main criteria for employability.  This article provides an overview of undergraduates in higher education and also workplace literacy from the perspective of the employers in the manufacturing industry. The result from the research demonstrates that Malaysian manufacturing industry employers perceive that the graduate employees’ English languag...

  1. Energy management in Swedish pulp and paper industry - the daily grind that matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenqvist, Christian; Nilsson, Lars J.; Ericsson, Karin; Modig, Gunnar (Environmental and Energy Systems Studies, Lund University (Sweden))

    2011-07-01

    The Swedish pulp and paper industry (PPI) accounts for almost 50 percent of industrial final energy use. It is an energy intensive industry and process optimization is seen as prerequisite to compete on the global market. This alone should motivate company boards and on-site organisations to put energy management high on the agenda. Definitely, from time to time, energy issues (e.g. fuel shifts, selling of generation capacity, and more lately increasing auto-produced electricity) have been managed with respect to the combined effects of policies and market forces. Yet, it was first after 2004 that the industry implemented energy management systems (EnMS), with particular focus on energy efficiency, and received certification according to the Swedish and later the European standard. This was required by the Programme for improving energy efficiency in energy-intensive industries (PFE), a five-year voluntary agreement in which some 100 companies reported gross annual electricity savings of 1.45 TWh, equal to 5 percent of base year consumption. This result highlights the potential role of an EnMS in raising awareness and facilitating investments. In this paper we analyse the case of the Swedish PPI; its relation to energy issues in previous periods and the formalised EnMS practices of recent years. We pose the questions: How are standardised EnMS structured and put into practice? What are there measurable effects and other discernible outcomes? The results are based on in-depth interviews with energy management coordinators at eight pulp and paper mills. The experiences with EnMS are found to be predominantly positive. EnMS has changed organisational structures and created greater focus on energy efficiency, which has resulted in quantified energy savings. Considering that EnMS implementation and certification is at a pioneering stage and that the international ISO 50001 standard is currently being developed, these are important results for the future of EnMS in

  2. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  3. Genotoxic risk in rubber manufacturing industry: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Claudia; Moretto, Angelo

    2014-10-15

    A large body of evidence from epidemiological studies among workers employed in the rubber manufacturing industry has indicated a significant excess cancer risk in a variety of sites. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has recently classified the "Occupational exposures in the rubber-manufacturing industry" as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). A genotoxic mechanism for the increased cancer risk was suggested on the basis of the evidence from the scientific literature. Exposure assessment studies have shown that workers in the rubber manufacturing industry may be exposed to different airborne carcinogenic and/or genotoxic chemicals, such as certain aromatic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitrosamines, although the available information does not allow to establish a causal association of cancer or genotoxic risk with particular substances/classes of chemicals or specific jobs. The aim of this paper is to critically evaluate, by conducting a systematic review, the available biomonitoring studies using genotoxicity biomarkers in rubber manufacturing industry. This systematic review suggests that a genotoxic hazard may still be present in certain rubber manufacturing industries. A quantitative risk assessment needs further studies addressing the different, processes and chemicals in the rubber manufacturing industries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrating developing country manufacturing industries into global supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasika Bete Georgise

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Due to globalization of manufacturing activities, the arena of competition and competitiveness advantage is moving from firms towards supply chains and networks. With the recent advancement of information and communication technologies this participation are becoming as common business practice in developed countries firms. Companies were more integrated into the world market for the global nature of the sourcing, manufacturing and distribution. These changes create both challenges and opportunities for the manufacturing industries in developing countries. The objective of this paper is to examine the level of inter-organizational and intra-organizational supply chain integration practices in developing country, Ethiopia.Design/methodology/approach: An industrial questionnaires survey was used to collect the current practices of the manufacturing industries in Ethiopia as an example of the developing countries. Descriptive statistics is primarily used for the analysis.Findings: Results show a low level of supply chain relationship both in intra and inter organizational supply chain integration level among members. Accordingly, such issues require much attention to facilitate a greater integration within the supply chains in the Ethiopian manufacturing industries.Research limitations/implications: The paper focuses on examining the practices of Ethiopian manufacturing industries empirical data. The interpretation of results should be taken with prudence.Originality/Value: The manufacturing industry in developing countries (MIDC has been a part of the global supply chains for long time as a supplier of raw material and manufacturer of primary products. Currently, the MIDC is trying to access the different markets segment of the world even with new products starting from their local market to the complex and dynamic international market. Nevertheless, their supply chains are inefficient and hence, their competitiveness level far from the

  5. Industry 4.0 implies lean manufacturing: research activities in industry 4.0 function as enablers for lean manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Adam; Elangeswaran, Chola; Wulfsberg, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Lean Manufacturing is widely regarded as a potential methodology to improve productivity and decrease costs in manufacturing organisations. The success of lean manufacturing demands consistent and conscious efforts from the organisation, and has to overcome several hindrances. Industry 4.0 makes a factory smart by applying advanced information and communication systems and future-oriented technologies. This paper analyses the incompletely perceived link between Industr...

  6. Manufacturing Technology and Industrial Modernization Incentive Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    pier year Rigid Flax Printed Circuit Manufacturing Standard Missile NAVSEA 152 6,500 * Foam Filled Fiberglass Radomew Phalanx NAVSEA 116 4,684 by 1985...a low-cost, machine-wound, graphite- epoxy material system. AUTOATE TES SYTEM BENEFITS TO BE ACCOMPLISHED FOR PHASED ARRAY T1he project was of limited...1981, the and physical size of hermetically sealed Metal Core Printed Circuit Boards project devices via tape automated, bonding was to replace epoxy

  7. [Chinese medicine industry 4.0:advancing digital pharmaceutical manufacture toward intelligent pharmaceutical manufacture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Yu; Qu, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Bo-Li

    2016-01-01

    A perspective analysis on the technological innovation in pharmaceutical engineering of Chinese medicine unveils a vision on "Future Factory" of Chinese medicine industry in mind. The strategy as well as the technical roadmap of "Chinese medicine industry 4.0" is proposed, with the projection of related core technology system. It is clarified that the technical development path of Chinese medicine industry from digital manufacture to intelligent manufacture. On the basis of precisely defining technical terms such as process control, on-line detection and process quality monitoring for Chinese medicine manufacture, the technical concepts and characteristics of intelligent pharmaceutical manufacture as well as digital pharmaceutical manufacture are elaborated. Promoting wide applications of digital manufacturing technology of Chinese medicine is strongly recommended. Through completely informationized manufacturing processes and multi-discipline cluster innovation, intelligent manufacturing technology of Chinese medicine should be developed, which would provide a new driving force for Chinese medicine industry in technology upgrade, product quality enhancement and efficiency improvement. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  8. Industrial conflict and its management in selected Nigerian manufacturing companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solaja Oludele Mayowa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined industrial conflict and its management strategies in selected manufacturing companies in Lagos State, Nigeria. The study utilized co-relational survey method which involves the use of structured questionnaire and personal observation to elicit information from the respondents. Participants comprised of staffs of three manufacturing companies in Lagos, Nigeria. Multistage sampling technique was employed in selecting the respondents from the three manufacturing companies under the study. The data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistic including tables, frequency counts, and percentages as well as mean scores. The findings revealed that the causes of conflict in manufacturing companies in Lagos State, Nigeria include poor means of communicating grievances to top managers, unfavorable economic and industrial policies, poor employee compensation and welfare among others. Therefore, this study concluded that managers should combine strategies such as bargaining, collaboration and avoidance when dealing with industrial conflict to maintain cordial and productive labour-management relationship.

  9. The Effect of Improved Productivity of the Manufacturing Industries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel

    (2007). The Growth of the Industrial Manufacturing in Ethiopia and its Contribution to GDP”. Addis Ababa University, School of. Economics. MSc Thesis Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Varian, H., R. (1992). Microeconomic Analysis (3rd ed.). W. W. Norton and. Company Inc. New York. Weiss, J. (2011). Industrial Policy in the Twenty ...

  10. Outsourcing of Logistics Activities in Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Ogorelc

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The external supply of logistics se1vices is part of a trend towardoutsourcing non-core logistics activities. The scope ofthird-party logistics may range from a relatively limited combinationof activities (e.g. transportation and warehousing to acomprehensive set of logistics se1vices.The authors first discuss the characteristics of business logisticsin manufacturing indusfly, to be taken into account inlogistics outsourcing. They particularly point out the motimtionsfor logistics outsourcing, the possibilities of outsourcing,as well as supplier selection. Finally they analyze the outsourcingin the reverse logistics.

  11. Building Bridges: Linking universities with the manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Knutsen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores ideas for linking university research entities with small- and medium-sized manufacturing industries. In an environment such as the Western Cape, South Africa, where well established teaching and research activities in science and engineering exist at several universities and research institutions, it is astonishing to realize that the local manufacturing industry struggles to obtain assistance with research and development in order to remain competitive locally and globally. Some of the reasons for this situation are outlined and solutions are proposed. In particular, the role of a gateway organization which aims to build networks between universities, research institutions and industry is described.

  12. Optimizing inventory management in the insulation manufacturing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert-Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Larsen, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Inventory issues within the insulation manufacturing industry are essential for competitiveness. However, they are largely unexplored in academic literature. Therefore the aim of this paper is to address the research question: “What approach to inventory management provides the best balance between...... service level and cost for the insulation manufacturing industry?” This is done through an in-depth case study of a world-leading company within this industry, with focus on two of its factories. This paper contributes with empirical research within operations management in a sector which has not been...

  13. Research on networked manufacturing system for reciprocating pump industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yangdong; Qi, Guoning; Xie, Qingsheng; Lu, Yujun

    2005-12-01

    Networked manufacturing is a trend of reciprocating pump industry. According to the enterprises' requirement, the architecture of networked manufacturing system for reciprocating pump industry was proposed, which composed of infrastructure layer, system management layer, application service layer and user layer. Its main functions included product data management, ASP service, business management, and customer relationship management, its physics framework was a multi-tier internet-based model; the concept of ASP service integration was put forward and its process model was also established. As a result, a networked manufacturing system aimed at the characteristics of reciprocating pump industry was built. By implementing this system, reciprocating pump industry can obtain a new way to fully utilize their own resources and enhance the capabilities to respond to the global market quickly.

  14. An explorative study to enable environmentally conscious manufacturing for an industrial gearbox manufacturing organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Parag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, environmentally conscious manufacturing (ECM has become an important aspect and proactive approach for majority of the manufacturing organizations in India. The reason is that ECM not only helps to produce environment friendly, but also helps to make money by reducing cost or achieving competitive advantage. Industrial gearbox manufacturing organizations have significant environmental impacts as industrial gearbox manufacturing involves several steps which use valuable resources and pollute the environment. Hence, this paper presents an explorative environmental study of an Indian industrial gearbox manufacturing organization. The objective of the current paper is (i to identify the environmental problems and environmentally conscious manufacturing indicators (ECMI, (ii to find out the root causes of these problems and (iii to solve the root causes based on the available state-of-the-art literature. This research work not only reviews the efficient environment friendly manufacturing techniques, but also helps the organization to become eco-efficient by producing environment friendly while making money. First ECMIs selected from literature review, are validated through process mapping. Then these indicators are prioritized using analytic hierarchy process (AHP to find out the critical environmentally conscious manufacturing indicators (CECMI. The sources of CECMIs are identified using either data envelopment analysis (DEA or direct observation of the available database. Finally, some possible solutions are also addressed in this paper.

  15. Innovation and technical efficiency in Malaysian family manufacturing industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susila Munisamy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the technical efficiency for each industry in the Malaysian manufacturing sector is estimated by using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA. In order to pursue a balance of innovation between long-term and short-term performance strategy, we integrate the Balance Scorecard (BSC approach with DEA. Furthermore, this paper looks at the determinants of efficiency using the Tobit regression model. In measuring the level of firms’ efficiency and innovation, the wood and wood based products industry is emphasized due to its importance in the economic growth of manufacturing sector. In the wood and wood based products industry, the highest level of technical efficiency was achieved by two sub-sectors i.e. veneer sheets and plywood and laminboard, particle board and other panels board, with the mean value of technical efficiency of 1.081 and 1.097 respectively. Generally, the majority of the manufacturing firms are operating technical inefficiently. The distribution of DEA and DEA-BCS technical efficiency in Malaysian Manufacturing Industries show that most of the industries have the average technical efficiency scores greater than 1.05 with only 7 industries (13.21% in DEA-BSC model operating at or near to the most optimal productions.

  16. Safety climate practice in Korean manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jong-Bae; Bae, Sejong; Ham, Byung-Ho; Singh, Karan P

    2008-11-15

    Safety climate survey was sent to 642 plants in 2003 to explore safety climate practices in the Korean manufacturing plants, especially in hazardous chemical treating plants. Out of 642 plants contacted 195 (30.4%) participated in the surveys. Data were collected by e-mail using SQL-server and mail. The main objective of this study was to explore safety climate practices (level of safety climate and the underlying problems). In addition, the variables that may influence the level of safety climate among managers and workers were explored. The questionnaires developed by health and safety executive (HSE) in the UK were modified to incorporate differences in Korean culture. Eleven important factors were summarized. Internal reliability of these factors was validated. Number of employees in the company varied from less than 30 employees (9.2%) to over 1000 employees (37.4%). Both managers and workers showed generally high level of safety climate awareness. The major underlying problems identified were inadequate health and safety procedures/rules, pressure for production, and rule breaking. The length of employment was a significant contributing factor to the level of safety climate. In this study, participants showed generally high level of safety climate, and length of employment affected the differences in the level of safety climate. Managers' commitment to comply safety rules, procedures, and effective safety education and training are recommended.

  17. Social Internet of Industrial Things for Industrial and Manufacturing Assets

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hao; Parlikad, Ajith Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The IoT (Internet of Things) concept is being widely discussed as the major approach towards the next industry revolution - Industry 4.0. As the value of data generated in social networks has been increasingly recognised, the integration of Social Media and the IoT is witnessed in areas such as product-design, traffic routing, etc.. However, its potential in improving system-level performance in production plants has rarely been explored. This paper discusses the feasibility of improving syst...

  18. Inter- and intra-industry variations of capital structure in the Czech manufacturing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlína Pinková; Sylvie Riederová

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to investigate the existence of inter-industry variations in the capital structure of enterprises of the Czech manufacturing industry and to identify the intra-industry causes of these differences. Three measures of capital structure are employed to determine the inter-industry variations. These are total debt ratio, long-term debt and short-term debt ratios. The set of explanatory variables is included to clarify the intra-industry variations. These explanatory ...

  19. Characterization of cyclical phases in the manufacturing industry in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Sala

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available 120 Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to characterize the cyclical phases of the manufacturing industry in Spain and detect which industries have more influence on the Spanish business cycle. We assume that economic growth is a priority; we are going to determine which industries have a more/less appropriate cyclical behavior according this priority. We analyze if the industries with better cyclical behavior are the ones that achieve greater co-movement with the business cycle of the Spanish economy, as this means they have a positive influence on economic activity. Design/methodology/approach: We examine the disaggregated quarterly IPI data of 16 manufacturing industries. Our methodology follows three steps. Firstly, we define cycle turning points; we follow the Harding and Pagan (2002 methodology. Secondly, we characterize the cyclical phases of the manufacturing industries in terms of duration, amplitude, deepness and steepness. We also determine the degree of inter-industrial cyclical synchronization and between industries in the cycle of the Spanish economy. This analysis is performed in two ways. On the one hand, we use the concordance index and the correlation coefficient. On the other hand, we work with indicators based on a consistency table. In the Third step, we apply a multi-objective methodology, specifically the compromise programming, to determine which industries have a more/less appropriate cyclical behavior according to the growth priority. Findings and Originality/value: The business cycle of the Spanish economy is positively influenced by high- and medium-tech industries, which have demonstrated their competitive capacity in international markets, and by medium- low-tech industries, with major strengths in R&D, and in survival and consolidation strategies. These results enable manufacturing industries to exert a positive effect on the business cycle that is weakened because many of them show a high correlation between

  20. Inter- and intra-industry variations of capital structure in the Czech manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlína Pinková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to investigate the existence of inter-industry variations in the capital structure of enterprises of the Czech manufacturing industry and to identify the intra-industry causes of these differences. Three measures of capital structure are employed to determine the inter-industry variations. These are total debt ratio, long-term debt and short-term debt ratios. The set of explanatory variables is included to clarify the intra-industry variations. These explanatory variables are size, asset structure, asset utilization, profitability, non-debt tax shield and growth. The paper reports the analysis of capital structure of five distinctive industrial branches, namely the manufacture of beverages, the manufacture of textiles, the manufacture of paper and paper products, the manufacture of chemicals and chemical products, and the manufacture of computer, electronic and optical products. The data come from the financial statements of selected companies and cover a period from 2008 to 2012. The analysis of variance, correlation and regression analyses are used to develop the statistical framework. The paper aims to study the impact of industry and firm characteristics on capital structure choice.

  1. Labor Agency in the Football Manufacturing Industry of Sialkot, Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    be highly gendered and tends to be more constrained than facilitated by both vertical forces (the governance of GPNs) and horizontal forces (local socio-economic and labor market contexts). This is done through a case study of labor agency in the football manufacturing industry of Sialkot, Pakistan....

  2. Customer-driven manufacturing in the food processing industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donk, D.P. van

    2000-01-01

    Food processing industry copes with high logistical demands from its customers. This paper studies a company changing to more customer (order) driven manufacturing. In order to help decide which products should be made to order and which made to stock, a frame is developed and applied to find and

  3. Can Lean Manufacturing Change the Aerospace Defense Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    trying to add it at the end of the process. Flexible production methods were also a goal under the lean manifacturing system . Whereas mass production was...ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................... iii BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH ............... ........... iv Chapter I. INTRODUCTQON...Acronautical Systems Centcr (ASC) in Air Force Matericl Command is exploring ways to implcmcnt lean manufacturing in thc acrospace defense industry

  4. Older Workers' Workplace Learning in Manufacturing Industries: Subjectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Maria-Cristina Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to older workers (OWs)' subjective engagement in working and learning in the manufacturing industry. Workplace learning (WPL) literature rarely considers the subjective side of learning from a cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) account. Design/methodology/approach: The paper adopts a…

  5. Near Net Shape Manufacturing of New Titanium Powders for Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop a manufacturing technology to process new titanium powders into fully consolidated near net shape components for industrial applications. This will be achieved using various technologies, including press and sinter, pneumatic isostatic forging (PIF), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and adiabatic compaction.

  6. SAMIS- STANDARD ASSEMBLY-LINE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY SIMULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The Standard Assembly-Line Manufacturing Industry Simulation (SAMIS) program was originally developed to model a hypothetical U. S. industry which manufactures silicon solar modules for use in electricity generation. The SAMIS program has now been generalized to the extent that it should be useful for simulating many different production-line manufacturing industries and companies. The most important capability of SAMIS is its ability to "simulate" an industry based on a model developed by the user with the aid of the SAMIS program. The results of the simulation are a set of financial reports which detail the requirements, including quantities and cost, of the companies and processes which comprise the industry. SAMIS provides a fair, consistent, and reliable means of comparing manufacturing processes being developed by numerous independent efforts. It can also be used to assess the industry-wide impact of changes in financial parameters, such as cost of resources and services, inflation rates, interest rates, tax policies, and required return on equity. Because of the large amount of data needed to describe an industry, a major portion of SAMIS is dedicated to data entry and maintenance. This activity in SAMIS is referred to as model management. Model management requires a significant amount of interaction through a system of "prompts" which make it possible for persons not familiar with computers, or the SAMIS program, to provide all of the data necessary to perform a simulation. SAMIS is written in TURBO PASCAL (version 2.0 required for compilation) and requires 10 meg of hard disk space, an 8087 coprocessor, and an IBM color graphics monitor. Executables and source code are provided. SAMIS was originally developed in 1978; the IBM PC version was developed in 1985. Release 6.1 was made available in 1986, and includes the PC-IPEG program.

  7. Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

    1981-10-01

    A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

  8. Manufacturing waste disposal practices of the chemical propulsion industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Adams, Daniel E.; Schutzenhofer, Scott A.

    1995-01-01

    The waste production, mitigation and disposal practices of the United States chemical propulsion industry have been investigated, delineated, and comparatively assessed to the U.S. industrial base. Special emphasis has been placed on examination of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC's). The research examines present and anticipated future practices and problems encountered in the manufacture of solid and liquid propulsion systems. Information collected includes current environmental laws and regulations that guide the industry practices, processes in which ODC's are or have been used, quantities of waste produced, funding required to maintain environmentally compliant practices, and preventive efforts.

  9. Development of a Job Exposure Matrix for Noise in the Swedish Soft Tissue Paper Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Neitzel, Richard; Andersson, Marianne; Eriksson, Helena; Torén, Kjell; Andersson, Eva

    2018-02-13

    Noise exposure is a common occupational hazard, but has not been sufficiently characterized in paper mills. We developed a job-exposure matrix (JEM) for noise exposure for use in estimating exposures among Swedish soft tissue paper mill workers. We used a combination of area and personal dosimetry noise exposure measurements made at four soft tissue paper mills by industry and research staff between 1977 and 2013 to estimate noise exposures by department, location, and job title. We then utilized these estimates, in conjunction with information on process and facility changes and use of hearing protection collected via focus groups, to create a seven-category, semi-quantitative JEM for all departments, locations, and job titles spanning the years 1940-2010. The results of the 1157 area and personal dosimetry noise measurements indicated that noise levels have generally declined in Swedish paper mills over time, though these changes have been neither uniform nor monotonic within or across the four mills. Focus group results indicated that use of hearing protection has generally increased over time. The noise JEM totals 1917 cells, with each cell representing a unique combination of operation, job title, and single year. We estimated that ~50% of workers at the four mills assessed were exposed at or above the Swedish 8-h average noise exposure limit of an 85 dBA at the conclusion of the study period in 2010. Our results highlight the continuing need for hearing loss prevention and noise control efforts at these and similar mills, and the completed JEM now represents a tool for use in epidemiological studies of noise-related health outcomes.

  10. UP-report. Energy intensive industry. Basis of the Development platform. Industry to the Swedish Energy Agency's strategy work FOKUS; UP-rapport. Energiintensiv industri. Underlag fraan Utvecklingsplattformen. Industri till Energimyndighetens strategiarbete FOKUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    The report serves as input to the Swedish Energy Agency's strategies and priorities for research and innovation under the thematic area of energy intensive industry for the period 2011 - 2016. The report has been compiled by members of the Development platform Industry. This report provides background and conditions for the energy intensive industry, and proposed priorities and activities for future efforts in this area. The development platform has contributed with valuable experience and knowledge which enabled the Swedish Energy Agency to then develop a strategy that meets needs of the society and business.

  11. Development of an ergonomics guideline for the furniture manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirka, Gary A

    2005-03-01

    Industry-specific ergonomics guidelines are an important component in the four-pronged approach to workplace ergonomics currently pursued by the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The American Furniture Manufacturers Association has taken the initiative of developing such a guideline for its members. The result of this effort is the "AFMA Voluntary Ergonomics Guideline for the Furniture Manufacturing Industry", a document that includes basic information about ergonomics program components as well as a compilation of work-proven, ergonomics best practices as submitted by members of the furniture manufacturing community. This guideline was developed through an industry-research-government partnership and made strategic use of the unique attributes that each sector brought to this effort. Outlined in this paper are some of the characteristics of this partnership including, the roles played by each, the different motivations for pursuing the guideline, the challenges faced during the development of the document, the successes experienced in this process, as well as a proposed outline for measuring the effectiveness of this effort. The hope is that this summary, and some of the lessons learned contained herein, would be helpful to others considering the prospect of developing such a guideline for their industry.

  12. Survey of US Department of Defense Manufacturing Technology Program activities applicable to civilian manufacturing industries. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azimi, S.A.; Conrad, J.L.; Reed, J.E.

    1985-03-01

    Intent of the survey was to identify and characterize activities potentially applicable to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in the civilian manufacturing industries. The civilian industries emphasized were the general manufacturing industries (including fabricated metals, glass, machinery, paper, plastic, textile, and transportation equipment manufacturing) and the primary metals industries (including primary aluminum, copper, steel, and zinc production). The principal steps in the survey were to: develop overview taxonomies of the general manufacturing and primary metals industries as well as specific industry taxonomies; identify needs and opportunities for improving process energy efficiency and productivity in the industries included; identify federal programs, capabilities, and special technical expertise that might be relevant to industry's needs and opportunities; contact federal laboratories/facilities, through visits and other forms of inquiry; prepare formatted profiles (descriptions) potentially applicable work efforts; review findings with industry; and compile and evaluate industry responses.

  13. INDICATORS FOR SUSTAINABILITY IN INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS CASE STUDY: PAPER MANUFACTURING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Emiliana Fortună

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a framework for promoting sustainability by using indicators for sustainable production. The concept of sustainable production is described as it is viewed by various organisms actions involved in the analysis of the sustainable industrial systems.The measure of sustainability is approached considering indicators of sustainable production, addressing both their dimensions and qualitative and quantitative features.The proposed framework refines the sustainability dimension for a case study which envisages sustainability in paper manufacturing. The analysis takes into account the life cycle analysis for the considered process since the environmental impact is seen as an essential sustainability indicator. Paper recycling and reuse is associated environmental and social costs, as a preferred alternative in waste minimization hierarchy in the manufacturing of non-trees eco-friendly paper.Proactive initiatives to improve the environmental performances of production process are considered as powerful tools for improving the paper manufacturing environmental footprint.

  14. Manufacturing Industry Employers’ Perception of Graduates’ English Language Skills Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjet Kaur Mehar Singh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Proficiency in English language skills among graduates that create advantages for the organization is preferred by prospective employers as one of the main criteria for employability.  This article provides an overview of undergraduates in higher education and also workplace literacy from the perspective of the employers in the manufacturing industry. The result from the research demonstrates that Malaysian manufacturing industry employers perceive that the graduate employees’ English language proficiency skills are still below their expectations. Therefore, this study recommends that there is a need for intervention into language teaching to improve the English language syllabus level of English proficiency at primary, secondary and tertiary level. At the same time, emphasis on the importance of English in everyday use should be inculcated without neglecting the national language of Malaysia.  This will ensure that the teaching of English will be in line with globalization and current workplace demands.

  15. Digitalization of automotive industry – scenarios for future manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Steven

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the current challenges to the global automotive industry are changes in global markets leading to product variety, regulation leading to pressure for new technologies in body and powertrain, and competition by new players such as huge information and communication technology companies. Automotive original equipment manufacturers (OEMs deal with these issues in different ways. This paper uses the scenario technique to illustrate possible answers to the question, how future value chains of automotive industry will look like. In almost all cases, information and communication technology (ICT plays a major role in future strategies to cope with the aforementioned challenges. On the one hand, ICT can boost the way to more efficient production of variants by utilizing smart manufacturing approaches, on the other hand ICT enables new features such as autonomous driving.

  16. Importance of wood from planted forests for manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Almeida De Araujo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The manufactured wood products are essential to modern society, since they are made from renewable and recyclable raw material, characterizing a sustainable input. The objective of this study was to elucidate the importance of wood from planted forests in forest products manufacture of higher added value, addressing forest and wood contexts of topics related to education, resources, products, industry, government incentives, public policies and markets. Different from Europe, it was verified that Brazil does not support positively this important industrial sector, nevertheless it still presents growth potential due to range of wooden-based products. Thus, wood could reach a prominent position in Brazilian economy, if strategies and incentives were defined by rules and public policies..

  17. Lean Rules Identification and Classification for Manufacturing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Mourtzis, D.; Papathanasiou, P; Fotia, S.

    2016-01-01

    Lean theory, principles and tools, are intended to highlight the value within the company and eliminate waste entirely. Despite the large amount of literature work on lean, there is a lack of in-depth analysis for collection and categorization of specific lean rules for the manufacturing industry. Therefore, the present work proposes a classification, formalization and identification of lean rules, in order to create a comprehensive and applicable library of lean rules, after the investigatio...

  18. Implementing total productive maintenance in Nigerian manufacturing industries

    OpenAIRE

    Eti, Mark C.; Ogaji, S. O. T.; Probert, S. D.

    2004-01-01

    Remarkable improvements have occurred recently in the maintenance management of physical assets and productive systems, so that less wastages of energy and resources occur. The requirement for optimal preventive maintenance using, for instance, justin-time (JIT) and total quality-management (TQM) techniques has given rise to whathas been called the total productive-maintenance (TPM) approach. This study explores the ways in which Nigerian manufacturing industries can implement TPM as a strate...

  19. Stimulating Manufacturing Excellence through University-Industry Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Jens Ove

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers what a university engineering school can do to stimulate manufacturing excellence in industry. Aalborg University, with its unique use of problem-based learning methods, is used as a case example. This approach is also embedded in a new research initiative, the Centre...... of integration and implementation. The engineering problem-solving approach helps to identify university core competencies and suggests a new research agenda....

  20. A Swiss Manufacturer Sees the Industrial Revolution in England*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buess, Heinrich

    1962-01-01

    I have recently come across the diaries of Johann Conrad Fischer. These diaries span six decades and cover the years of social, economic, and technological upheaval which marked the industrial revolution in England. The reader is given a picture of these years through the eyes of a Swiss manufacturer with a good perception of history, and his notes are of some value to historians. PMID:13874462

  1. An Econometric Model of Employment in Zimbabwe's Manufacturing Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Heshmati, Almas; Ncube, Mkhululi

    1998-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the estimation of an employment relationship and employment efficiency under production risk using a panel of Zimbabwe's manufacturing industries. A flexible labour demand functions are used and consist of two parts: the traditional labour demand function and labour demand variance function. Labour demand is a function of wages, output, quasi-fixed inputs and time variables. The variance function is a function of the determinants of labour demand and a number of p...

  2. Analysis on critical success factors for agile manufacturing evaluation in original equipment manufacturing industry-an AHP approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay Guru Dev, C.; Senthil Kumar, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    Manufacturing industries are facing challenges in the implementation of agile manufacturing in their products and processes. Agility is widely accepted as a new competitive concept in the manufacturing sector in fulfilling varying customer demand. Thus, evaluation of agile manufacturing in industries has become a necessity. The success of an organisation depends on its ability to manage finding the critical success factors and give them special and continued attention in order to bring about high performance. This paper proposes a set of critical success factors (CSFs) for evaluating agile manufacturing considered appropriate for the manufacturing sector. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) method is applied for prioritizing the success factors, by summarizing the opinions of experts. It is believed that the proposed CSFs enable and assist manufacturing industries to achieve a higher performance in agile manufacturing so as to increase competitiveness.

  3. Land transportation model for supply chain manufacturing industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Fajar

    2017-12-01

    Supply chain is a system that integrates production, inventory, distribution and information processes for increasing productivity and minimize costs. Transportation is an important part of the supply chain system, especially for supporting the material distribution process, work in process products and final products. In fact, Jakarta as the distribution center of manufacturing industries for the industrial area. Transportation system has a large influences on the implementation of supply chain process efficiency. The main problem faced in Jakarta is traffic jam that will affect on the time of distribution. Based on the system dynamic model, there are several scenarios that can provide solutions to minimize timing of distribution that will effect on the cost such as the construction of ports approaching industrial areas other than Tanjung Priok, widening road facilities, development of railways system, and the development of distribution center.

  4. The Persistence of Abnormal Returns: Analysis of Polish Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Puziak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of a company is to build the enterprise value, which is achievable thanks to abnormal profits generated in particular period. Moreover, firms are expected to take measures to maintain abnormal profit in the future. On the other hand, abnormal profits attract competitors, who increase competition and as a result abnormal profits disappear. The persistence of profit is a term that describes a situation, when the company is successful in maintaining the abnormal profit over time. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the persistence of abnormal profit in Polish manufacturing sector. In other words, the question is whether Polish manufacturing companies are able to maintain their abnormal profits over time. The persistence of abnormal profits is investigated using dynamic panel model with generalized method-of-moments estimators. The method is applied to a panel of 5303 Polish companies from manufacturing sector observed over the period 2006-2014. This paper contributes to the existing literature in two ways. First, analysis is performed for developing country. Second, analysis is performed both at the level of entire sector and at division level. Three main conclusions can be drawn from the conducted research: there are significant differences between profit rates within the same industry at division level; estimated persistence of abnormal profit coefficients are at moderate level; there are substantial differences between estimated persistence of profit coefficients for divisions in the same industry.

  5. Energy efficiency and ventilation in Swedish industries barriers, simulation and control strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohdin, Patrik

    2008-11-15

    The energy issue is presently in focus worldwide. This is not only due to increasing environmental concern regarding energy related emissions, but also due to the trend of increasing energy prices. Energy usage in the industrial sector in Sweden today represents about one third of the national energy use. A substantial part of that is related to support processes such as heating, ventilation and cooling systems. These systems are important as they are related both to energy cost and indoor climate management as well as to the health of the occupants. The purpose of this thesis is to reach a more comprehensive view on industrial energy efficiency and indoor environment issues related to industrial ventilation. This has been studied in three themes where the first part addresses barriers to energy efficiency in Swedish industries, the second theme discuss simulation as decision support, and the third studies the variable air volume system in industrial facilities. In the first theme three different studies were made: the first studies non energy intensive companies in Oskarshamn in Sweden, the second studies the energy intensive foundry industry and the third study was part of an evaluation of a large energy efficiency program called Project Highland. These studies had several findings in common, such as the importance of a strategic view on the energy issue and the presence of a person with real ambition with power over investment decisions related to energy issues at the company. The studies also show that several information related barriers are important for decision makers at the studied companies. This shows that information related barriers are one reason in why energy efficient equipment is not implemented. In the second theme the use of simulation in the form of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Building Energy Simulation (BES) are used as decision support for industrial ventilation related studies at two different industries, one foundry is

  6. ICT support for industrial production of houses:the Swedish case

    OpenAIRE

    Johnsson, Helena; Malmgren, Linus; Persson, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The Swedish construction sector is currently undergoing great changes. The large costs for labour have forced the construction companies to rationalise and minimise labour intense work operations. Therefore, the current trend in construction to adopt the principles of lean production and transform it into lean construction, suits the Swed-ish way of working and the entire Swedish construction sector has caught on. A growing market is the prefabrication of building elements that are transporte...

  7. Industrial Assessment Centers - Small Manufacturers Reduce Energy & Increase Productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-11-06

    Since 1976, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), administered by the US Department of Energy, have supported small and medium-sized American manufacturers to reduce energy use and increase their productivity and competitiveness. The 24 IACs, located at premier engineering universities around the country (see below), send faculty and engineering students to local small and medium-sized manufacturers to provide no-cost assessments of energy use, process performance and waste and water flows. Under the direction of experienced professors, IAC engineering students analyze the manufacturer’s facilities, energy bills and energy, waste and water systems, including compressed air, motors/pumps, lighting, process heat and steam. The IACs then follow up with written energy-saving and productivity improvement recommendations, with estimates of related costs and payback periods.

  8. Trends in innovation activities in manufacturing industries across development echelons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Khan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This empirical paper explores trends in innovation activities measured by a countries’ total patent application submission intensity relative to its population, and by analyzing U.S. granted patents data for cohorts of developed countries and developing countries. In addition to tabular and graphical analyses, I use a baseline regression model and a variant model thereof to assess the relative influence of a set of aggregate variables on innovation activities in eight manufacturing industries across two cohorts of countries (developed and developing where each cohort contains eight individual countries. Eight industries included in this study are: Chemical, Petroleum, electrical and electronics equipment, machinery, pharmaceutical, plastic, computer, and textile. The cohort of developed countries includes Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Italy, Poland, Switzerland, and the United States. The cohort of developing countries includes Brazil, China, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, and Turkey. Per regression results, ethnic diversity is a statistically significant positive determinant of innovation for all industry aggregate patent count for both high income and developing countries. Also, per capita electricity usage, R&D expenditure as percent of GDP, and percent of population with internet access are three positive factors of innovation irrespective of industrial subsectors and position of a country in the development echelon. Interestingly, impact of ICT-services export is statistically significant and innovation boosting in developing countries in the cohort relative to countries in the cohort of developed countries. It also appears that trade openness served as a stronger stimulant of innovation activities for developing countries’ but not as much for the cohort of developed or high-income countries. This paper attempts to extend the literature on cross-country comparison of innovation activities by using two

  9. Development and validation of resource flexibility measures for manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulshan Chauhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Global competition and ever changing customers demand have made manufacturing organizations to rapidly adjust to complexities, uncertainties, and changes. Therefore, flexibility in manufacturing resources is necessary to respond cost effectively and rapidly to changing production needs and requirements.  Ability of manufacturing resources to dynamically reallocate from one stage of a production process to another in response to shifting bottlenecks is recognized as resource flexibility. This paper aims to develop and validate resource flexibility measures for manufacturing industry that could be used by managers/ practitioners in assessing and improving the status of resource flexibility for the optimum utilization of resources. Design/methodology/approach: The study involves survey carried out in Indian manufacturing industry using a questionnaire to assess the status of various aspects of resource flexibility and their relationships. A questionnaire was specially designed covering various parameters of resource flexibility. Its reliability was checked by finding the value of Cronback alpha (0.8417. Relative weightage of various measures was found out by using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP. Pearson’s coefficient of correlation analysis was carried out to find out relationships between various parameters. Findings: From detailed review of literature on resource flexibility, 17 measures of resource flexibility and 47 variables were identified. The questionnaire included questions on all these measures and parameters. ‘Ability of machines to perform diverse set of operations’ and ability of workers to work on different machines’ emerged to be important measures with contributing weightage of 20.19% and 17.58% respectively.  All the measures were found to be significantly correlated with overall resource flexibility except ‘training of workers’, as shown by Pearson’s coefficient of correlation. This indicates that

  10. Carbon footprint as environmental performance indicator for the manufacturing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurent, Alexis; Olsen, Stig Irving; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2010-01-01

    With the current focus on our climate change impacts, the embodied CO2 emission or "Carbon footprint" is often used as an environmental performance indicator for our products or production activities. The ability of carbon footprint to represent other types of impact like human toxicity, and hence...... the overall environmental impact is investigated based on life cycle assessments of several materials of major relevance to manufacturing industries. The dependence of the carbon footprint on the assumed scenarios for generation of thermal and electrical energy in the life cycle of the materials is analyzed......, and the appropriateness of carbon footprint as an overall indicator of the environmental performance is discussed....

  11. Implementing total productive maintenance in Nigerian manufacturing industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eti, M.C. [Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Port Harcourt (Nigeria). Mechanical Engineering Department; Ogaji, S.O.T.; Probert, S.D. [Cranfield University, Bedfordshire (United Kingdom). School of Engineering

    2004-12-01

    Remarkable improvements have occurred recently in the maintenance management of physical assets and productive systems, so that less wastages of energy and resources occur. The requirement for optimal preventive maintenance, using, for instance, just-in-time (JIT) and total quality-management (TQM) techniques, has given rise to what has been called the total productive-maintenance (TPM) approach. This study explores the ways in which Nigerian manufacturing industries can implement TPM as a strategy and culture for improving its performance and suggests self-auditing and bench-marking as desirable prerequisites before TPM implementation. (author)

  12. Effective Emotions The Enactment of a Work Ethic in the Swedish Meeting Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Andersson Cederholm

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The meeting industry – an encompassing term for services related to various kinds of professional meetings, from mega-conventions to the ordinary work meetings – is increasingly consolidated and legitimated as a specific sector in the service in-dustry. New professions such as meeting designers, meeting facilitators and meet-ing consultants are emerging, promoting new knowledge in this field. By focuss-ing on processes and social interaction, and highlighting emotional dimensions of meetings, these professions pave the way for new modes of conceptualising and practising professional relationships. The intangible, emotional and playful di-mensions of social interactions are promoted as effective means to achieve eco-nomic goals, thus highlighting a professional ideal that is here called “effective emotions”. The aim of this article is to show how the work ethic promoted by the meeting industry encourages new intersections, and tensions, between the ideali-sation of the tangible/measurable/rational on the one hand and the intangi-ble/emotional/magical on the other hand, and between working life and intimate spheres. Through a discourse analysis of a Swedish corporate meeting magazine, it is shown how the distinction between work and leisure is dissolved in this spe-cific work culture, and by this, it is discussed how the meeting profession acts as a normative regulator by reinforcing ideal ways of being and interacting with oth-ers. Creativity, personal growth, reflexivity and flexibility are enacted as idealised personal assets as well as moral imperatives in the discourse of the meeting pro-fession and through the practices of various meeting techniques, thus reinforcing not merely a professional ethic but cultural ideals of being as a person as well. It is also suggested that this reinforcement may, under certain circumstances, turn into its opposite and undermine the promoted ideals, thus pointing at the impor-tance to pinpoint the

  13. DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING OF MODULAR PARQUET FLOORING IN INDUSTRIAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan CISMARU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper submits constructive options and methods to design and manufacture modular parquet flooring, as well as fastening methods in constructions. Likewise, it presents the branches of civil engineering where modular parquet flooring may be turned to profit – industrial buildings, company premises or residential premises. The turn towards the achievement of private constructions, such as individual houses, led to losing control of the modular system applied in defining the inner sizes of the constructions and implicitly to the apparition of dimensional incompatibilities between the parquet flooring and the built spaces. The paper sets out (to solve by an individualized design procedure to achieve modular parquet flooring in industrial system, in correspondence with the sizes of the inner spaces afferent to the constructions.

  14. The challenge of economic growth in Mexico. Manufacturing industries and industrial policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Leobardo Sánchez Juárez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on a structural problem of the Mexican economy: low economic growth. It is argued that the manufacturing industries are the engine of economic growth. In this sense, it is assumed that one of them main causes of low growth in Mexico is the insufficient dynamic of the manufacturers. To verify the above, the authors used quarterly time series from 1982 to 2015, of the manufacturing output, non-manufacturing output, and total, through which they then proved stationarity and co-integration. They also applied a Granger causality test. The authors found that the manufacturing output series is a statistical effect of the non-manufacturing output and total, which is consistent with the sectorial-structural theoretical framework used as reference. Based on the results, the article discusses the current economic policy and recommends improvements, particularly in terms of procuring a more active focus in relation to promoting the development of the manufacturing output, to help the economy become more dynamic and enter a virtuous circle.

  15. Management accounting techniques and corporate performance of manufacturing industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardiansyah Rasyid

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research is to investigate that some factors that affect the new adoption in management accounting techniques on the Indonesia manufacturing industries, specifically in Jakarta, Bogor, Depok, Tangerang and Bekasi regions. The research can give a clearer portrait of how some factors can significantly affect the adoption of management accounting techniques. The research used some questioners which were sent to respondents who work in manufacturing industries as a middle level management. The methods used to distribute the questioners to respondents were by door to door, by e-mail and by media telecommunication (what’s app or close relationship up to hundreds questioners. We obtained 45 respondents but we eliminated one respondent, because they are not suitable to the research requirements. The research model contains the two paths. The first path contains 7 variables that divided by six exogenous variables to affect one endogenous variable and the next path model is from the three variables, that are divided to the one mediating variable and the other one exogenous variables to affect one endogenous variable (like path modelling. The research result shows that high competition does not affect the new accounting adoption but the other five variables; cost system changing, technology changes, organization climate, consumer demand and size significantly affect the new accounting adoption. For the next path, the research finds that the new accounting adoption can significantly affect corporate performance and also corporate performance measurement perception.

  16. Leadership, organization and health at work: a case study of a Swedish industrial company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Andrea; Jansson, Bjarne; Haglund, Bo J A; Axelsson, Runo

    2008-06-01

    The application of knowledge on organization and leadership is important for the promotion of health at workplace. The purpose of this article is to analyse the leadership and organization, including the organizational culture, of a Swedish industrial company in relation to the health of the employees. The leadership in this company has been oriented towards developing and actively promoting a culture and a structure of organization where the employees have a high degree of control over their work situation. According to the employees, this means extensive possibilities for personal development and responsibility, as well as good companionship, which makes them feel well at work. This is also supported by the low sickness rate of the company. The results indicate that the leadership and organization of this company may have been conducive to the health of the employees interviewed. However, the culture of personal responsibility and the structure of self-managed teams seemed to suit only those who were able to manage the demands of the company and adapt to that kind of organization. Therefore, the findings indicate that the specific context of the technology, the environment and the professional level of the employees need to be taken into consideration when analysing the relation between leadership, organization and health at work.

  17. EUV mask manufacturing readiness in the merchant mask industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael; Choi, Yohan; Ham, Young; Kamberian, Henry; Progler, Chris; Tseng, Shih-En; Chiou, Tsann-Bim; Miyazaki, Junji; Lammers, Ad; Chen, Alek

    2017-10-01

    As nodes progress into the 7nm and below regime, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) becomes critical for all industry participants interested in remaining at the leading edge. One key cost driver for EUV in the supply chain is the reflective EUV mask. As of today, the relatively few end users of EUV consist primarily of integrated device manufactures (IDMs) and foundries that have internal (captive) mask manufacturing capability. At the same time, strong and early participation in EUV by the merchant mask industry should bring value to these chip makers, aiding the wide-scale adoption of EUV in the future. For this, merchants need access to high quality, representative test vehicles to develop and validate their own processes. This business circumstance provides the motivation for merchants to form Joint Development Partnerships (JDPs) with IDMs, foundries, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) and other members of the EUV supplier ecosystem that leverage complementary strengths. In this paper, we will show how, through a collaborative supplier JDP model between a merchant and OEM, a novel, test chip driven strategy is applied to guide and validate mask level process development. We demonstrate how an EUV test vehicle (TV) is generated for mask process characterization in advance of receiving chip maker-specific designs. We utilize the TV to carry out mask process "stress testing" to define process boundary conditions which can be used to create Mask Rule Check (MRC) rules as well as serve as baseline conditions for future process improvement. We utilize Advanced Mask Characterization (AMC) techniques to understand process capability on designs of varying complexity that include EUV OPC models with and without sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs). Through these collaborations, we demonstrate ways to develop EUV processes and reduce implementation risks for eventual mass production. By reducing these risks, we hope to expand access to EUV mask capability for

  18. Critical success factors model developing for sustainable Kaizen implementation in manufactur-ing industry in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haftu Hailu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to identify critical success factors and model developing for sustaining kaizen implementation. Peacock shoe is one of the manufacturing industries in Ethiopia facing challenges on sustaining. The methodology followed is factor analysis and empirically testing hypothesis. A database was designed using SPSS version 20. The survey was validated using statistical validation using the Cronbach alpha index; the result is 0.908. The KMO index value was obtained for the 32 items and had a value of 0.642 with Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square 4503.007, degree of freedom 496 and significance value 0.000. A factor analysis by principal components and varimax rotation was applied for finding the critical success factors. Finding designates that 32 items were merged into eight critical success factors. All the eight factors together explain for 76.941 % of the variance. Multiple regression model analysis has indicated that some of the critical success factors had relationship with success indicators. Due to constraint of time, the researcher focused only at peacock shoe manufacturing industry. Other limitation also includes the absence of any local research that shows the critical success factors at the moment.

  19. ANALYSIS OF ECONOMICS OF QUALITY IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sailaj

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In modern industries, much emphasis is given to quality as it is the most effective tool which can capture, retain and enlarge customer base. The customer satisfaction is the ultimate goal of business and no other strategy can achieve it other than attaining best quality. An improvement in quality enhances customer satisfaction, taper s manufacturing costs and of course in turn, increases productivity. But in business scenario, improving quality should be considered along with the expenses associated with it. The strategy should be to achieve high Quality in a most economic way. So identifying effective methods for the analysis of economics behind quality and reduction of costs associated with achieving quality is a serious potential management problem and should be looked in to and analyzed. Economics of Quality analysis which is also termed as cost of quality or quality cost analysis has emerged as a powerful management tool for assessing the present quality level of the organization and to identify the improvement opportunities and also supports in decision making. This paper presents a study on quality cost analysis of two manufacturing units and tries to analyze the interrelationships between quality cost categories using statistical methods. The secondary data collected from the financial records of two firms under manufacturing sector is used for this analysis. The Pearson product momentum correlation coefficient between different quality cost categories provides insight to the relationships between different quality cost elements and in turn helps management to set action priorities to be addressed to achieve good quality at lower cost. The regression analysis helps the management in estimation or prediction of the unknown value of one variable from the known value of the other variable.

  20. Widespread waterborne pollution in central Swedish lakes and the Baltic Sea from pre-industrial mining and metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindler, Richard; Renberg, Ingemar; Rydberg, Johan; Andrén, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Metal pollution is viewed as a modern problem that began in the 19th century and accelerated through the 20th century; however, in many parts of the globe this view is wrong. Here, we studied past waterborne metal pollution in lake sediments from the Bergslagen region in central Sweden, one of many historically important mining regions in Europe. With a focus on lead (including isotopes), we trace mining impacts from a local scale, through a 120-km-long river system draining into Mälaren--Sweden's third largest lake, and finally also the Baltic Sea. Comparison of sediment and peat records shows that pollution from Swedish mining was largely waterborne and that atmospheric deposition was dominated by long-range transport from other regions. Swedish ore lead is detectable from the 10th century, but the greatest impact occurred during the 16th-18th centuries with improvements occurring over recent centuries, i.e., historical pollution > modern industrial pollution.

  1. Voluntary agreements, implementation and efficiency. Swedish country study report. Covering the EKO-Energi programme. With case studies in pulp and paper and heavy vehicle manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaagstroem, Jonas; Aastrand, Kerstin; Helby, Peter

    2000-03-01

    The VAIE research project is concerned with voluntary agreements for improvement of industrial energy efficiency in five European countries. This national report deals with the Swedish EKO-Energi agreements. It includes case studies in pulp and paper and heavy vehicle manufacturing. The first chapter presents the principal aspects of the Swedish EKO-Energi programme, explains the selection of companies for case studies, and summarises the results of the national study. The chapter shows the EKO-Energi programme to be directed at a fairly exclusive part of Swedish industry, namely environmental front-runners striving for EMAS or ISO 14001 certification. It provides them with paid energy audits and with marketing support. It requires them to establish an energy management system, i.e. to include energy efficiency issues in their certification process. The agreements are 'soft' in the sense that they address mainly organisational issues, are based much on trust in the companies own dedication to improvement, and are very informal in the monitoring. On the balance, the EKO-Energi programme would seem to be a small, but reasonably effective programme, contributing particularly to such organisational developments as are important for long-term trends in industrial energy efficiency. The second chapter provides a brief introduction to the whole VAIE project and outlines the methodology of the study, explained in more detail in a separate report. The third chapter describes the progress of the EKO-Energi programme from policy formulation to implementation, and assesses a number of hypotheses concerning this process. Support is found for the hypotheses (a) that voluntary agreements tend to exclude the influence of third parties, (b) that they tend to continue the logic of previous policies, and (c) that expected short term energy savings tend to be very close to the baseline scenario. The fourth chapter describes how agreements with individual companies are made

  2. Success of manufacturing industries – Role of Six Sigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh N.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Six Sigma is a phenomenal quality management concepts which has helped many organizations to overcome quality crisis in the recent past. Six Sigma is observed as a very promising quality management tool for any organization to make its presence felt in the corporate world as it emphasizes on obtaining a fruitful solution to improve accuracy, reduce defect thereby reduce the cost and improve profits. The main objective of this investigation is to unearth the extent to which the companies have been benefitted due to Six Sigma implementation. This article presents the results based on the analysis of collective opinion of employees of various Indian manufacturing industries that have implemented Six Sigma. This research also examines interrelationship among various parameters defined in the research. The research revealed that industries are benefitted irrespective of their nature in terms of their growth, financial benefits, productivity and satisfaction of the customer. However, peoples’ equity that deals with the benefits that employees obtain after Six Sigma implementation is not certain. The research also revealed the existence of strong interrelationship among various parameters used to measure the success of Six Sigma.

  3. 2014 International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Webb, Jeff; Ding, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering 2014 (MOIME 2014), was held at the Grand Mercure Harmoni, Opal Room 3rd Floor, Jakarta, Indonesia, during 29-30 March 2014. The MOIME 2014 conference is designed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. MOIME 2014 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within Material Engineering, Industrial Engineering and all areas that relate to Optimization. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 97 papers and after rigorous review, 24 papers were accepted. The participants come from 7 countries. There are 4 (four) parallel session and 2 Invited Speakers and one workshop. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of MOIME 2014. The Editors of the MOIME 2014 Proceedings Editors Dr Ford Lumban Gaol Jeff Webb, PhD Professor Jun Ding, PhD

  4. A NEW Curriclum for Manufacturing & Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management for Bs and Ms Degrees

    OpenAIRE

    SARI, Zaki

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the design and implementation of a new curriclum for manufacturing & industrial engineering and engineering management for bachelor and master degrees at tlemcen university, algeria

  5. Equipment failures and their contribution to industrial incidents and accidents in the manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Dominic; Gauthier, François; Abdul-Nour, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Accidental events in manufacturing industries can be caused by many factors, including work methods, lack of training, equipment design, maintenance and reliability. This study is aimed at determining the contribution of failures of commonly used industrial equipment, such as machines, tools and material handling equipment, to the chain of causality of industrial accidents and incidents. Based on a case study which aimed at the analysis of an existing pulp and paper company's accident database, this paper examines the number, type and gravity of the failures involved in these events and their causes. Results from this study show that equipment failures had a major effect on the number and severity of accidents accounted for in the database: 272 out of 773 accidental events were related to equipment failure, where 13 of them had direct human consequences. Failures that contributed directly or indirectly to these events are analyzed.

  6. Study of skin and mucous membrane disorders among workers engaged in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Vijay Kumar; Deswal, Balbir Singh; Singh, Bachu Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation of dusts and fumes arising during the manufacture of sodium dichromate from chrome ore, chromic acid mist emitted during electroplating, and skin contact with chromate produce hazards to workers. (1) To elucidate the prevalence of skin and mucous membrane disorders among the workers engaged in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry. (2) To know the relationship of prevalence with the duration of exposure to chrome mist, dust, and fumes. A cross-sectional study was conducted among all the workers engaged in sodium dichromate manufacturing and chrome plating from several industries situated near the Delhi-Haryana border in the districts of Faridabad and Sonepat of Haryana, India from January 01, 2014 to December 31, 2014. All the workers available from the concerned industries for the study were interviewed and medically examined after obtaining their informed consent. A total of 130 workers comprising 66 workers from the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and 64 workers from the chrome plating industry were examined on a pretested schedule. Descriptive statistical methods (proportions, relative risk, and Chi-square test of significance with P value analyzed using Epi Info version 7). All the workers were found to be males and of the adult age group. Out of the total examined, 69.69% and 56.22% of the workers had disorders of the nasal mucous membrane in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and the chrome plating industry, respectively. 42.42% and 28.22% of the workers had perforation of the nasal septum in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry, respectively. 6.06% and 3.12% workers had skin ulcers in the sodium dichromate manufacturing industry and chrome plating industry, respectively. Nasal irritation and rhinorrhea were the most commonly found symptoms in both the processes. 48.48% and 90.52% of the workers were using hand gloves in the sodium dichromate manufacturing

  7. Recycling industrial waste in brick manufacture. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreola, F.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing accumulation of industrial waste speaks to the need to seek cost-effective disposal methods. Brick manufacture would appear to be particularly promising in this regard. The present study analyzes the possibility of recycling the sludge generated in porcelain tile polishing, as well as coal, steel and municipal incinerator ash to make a special type of facing brick whose properties readily accommodate a full analysis of all the problems deriving from the incorporation of residue in its manufacture. Physical-chemical, mechanical and structural analyses were performed on bricks made with varying percentages of the different types of waste considered. This first paper reports the results of the physical arid technological characterization of the products; the second part of the research will address their chemical, mechanical and structural properties.

    El continuo aumento de la cantidad de residuos (desechos que se generan en los procesos industriales induce a buscar nuevos métodos alternativos a la disposición final que sean altamente eficientes y a bajo costo. La industria manufac turera de ladrillos resulta muy prometedora desde este punto de vista. En este trabajo ha sido investigada la posibilidad de usar distintos residuos industriales, entre ellos barros de pulido del gres porcelánico. cenizas de carbón, cenizas de acerías y de incinerador municipal para la fabricación de ladrillos de exteriores. Fueron analizados los problemas que podrían derivar al introducir estos residuos en la pasta. En particular, en esta primera parte del trabajo se muestran los resultados derivados de la introducción de los residuos considerados, en distintos porcentajes, sobre las propiedades físicas y tecnológicas del producto final. En la segunda parte se desarrollarán los efectos causados sobre las propiedades químicas, mecánicas y microestructurales.

  8. Importance of Advanced Planning of Manufacturing for Nuclear Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shykinov Nick

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of energy demands by growing economies, climate changes, fossil fuel pricing volatility, and improved safety and performance of nuclear power plants, many countries express interest in expanding or acquiring nuclear power capacity. In the light of the increased interest in expanding nuclear power the supply chain for nuclear power projects has received more attention in recent years. The importance of the advanced planning of procurement and manufacturing of components of nuclear facilities is critical for these projects. Many of these components are often referred to as long-lead items. They may be equipment, products and systems that are identified to have a delivery time long enough to affect directly the overall timing of a project. In order to avoid negatively affecting the project schedule, these items may need to be sourced out or manufactured years before the beginning of the project. For nuclear facilities, long-lead items include physical components such as large pressure vessels, instrumentation and controls. They may also mean programs and management systems important to the safety of the facility. Authorized nuclear operator training, site evaluation programs, and procurement are some of the examples. The nuclear power industry must often meet very demanding construction and commissioning timelines, and proper advanced planning of the long-lead items helps manage risks to project completion time. For nuclear components there are regulatory and licensing considerations that need to be considered. A national nuclear regulator must be involved early to ensure the components will meet the national legal regulatory requirements. This paper will discuss timing considerations to address the regulatory compliance of nuclear long-lead items.

  9. Swedish Government Minister at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research recently visited CERN. The Swedish Minister was greeted by Swedish scientists working at CERN. Signing of the Swedish Computing Memorandum of Understanding. Pär Omling, Director-General of the Swedish Research Council (left), and Jos Engelen, CERN’s Chief Scientific Officer. Lars Leijonborg, the Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research, was welcomed to CERN by Director-General Robert Aymar on 10 March. After an introduction to the Laboratory’s activities, the Minister was given guided tours of the control room, the ATLAS surface hall and experiment cavern and the adjoining LHC tunnel. Mr Leijonborg was then greeted by Swedish scientists and given an overview of the Swedish research programme at CERN. Five Swedish university groups are taking part in LHC research. Swedish universities are notably involved in the manufacture of parts for the sub-detectors of AT...

  10. Swedish Projects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borgvall, Jonathan; Lif, Patrik

    2005-01-01

    .... The military research work presented here includes the three military administrations, FOI -- Swedish Defence Research Agency, FMV -- Swedish Defence Materiel Administration, and SNDC -- Swedish...

  11. Construction of corporate social performance indicators for Czech manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Dočekalová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to map out the level of social performance measurement of Czech companies, i.e. what social performance indicators companies monitor and what information they provide to their stakeholders and to construct alternative corporate social performance indicators. Based on an analysis of 24 corporate voluntary reports and results of an empirical research performed among 79 large companies operating in the manufacturing industry, it was found that companies partially monitor their social performance, but from the perspective of international standards (e.g. Global Reporting Initiative, International Federation of Accountants it is still insufficient. Czech companies usually provide only absolute numbers which disguise real trends and do not allow year on year comparison or comparison with other companies. Czech companies should provide a comprehensive picture of their overall performance, they should not focus only on financial indicators based on accounting data, since it is known that the performance measurement based only on financial and economic performance does not lead to long-term success and sustainability of organizations. Companies should monitor more their impact on society within which they operate. Proposed corporate social performance indicators in a measurable and thus manageable way express social issues.

  12. Characterization of new international business of traditional manufacturing industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Cantarero Sanz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to study the characteristics of the New International Business (NIS or Born-Global in a sample of 81 SMEs belonging to the Spanish textile sector. This is descriptive analysis regarding the location, the subsector of activity, size, economic performance and internationalization strategy implemented by the NEI (2005-2009.The results identified three groups of NIS: export, import and export-import. The group of companies that makeup the largest importers and are associated with smaller companies. The exporters appear to be related more to low techsub-sectors while more internationally committed are those with a higher dimension. Regarding the location not detected any evidence of territorial pattern. Finally, among firms internationalized in the time period analyzed, it is also noteworthy that the economic performance of these is higher among importers. This study provides information on why the same country and same industry some companies decide shortly be created to assume certain levels of risk, engaging in operations engaged in foreign markets while others do not. It also participates in the debate on the competitiveness of manufacturing companies.

  13. Accelerating Industrial Adoption of Metal Additive Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanian, Kenneth; McDonald, Tom

    2016-03-01

    While metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology has clear benefits, there are still factors preventing its adoption by industry. These factors include the high cost of metal AM systems, the difficulty for machinists to learn and operate metal AM machines, the long approval process for part qualification/certification, and the need for better process controls; however, the high AM system cost is the main barrier deterring adoption. In this paper, we will discuss an America Makes-funded program to reduce AM system cost by combining metal AM technology with conventional computerized numerical controlled (CNC) machine tools. Information will be provided on how an Optomec-led team retrofitted a legacy CNC vertical mill with laser engineered net shaping (LENS®—LENS is a registered trademark of Sandia National Labs) AM technology, dramatically lowering deployment cost. The upgraded system, dubbed LENS Hybrid Vertical Mill, enables metal additive and subtractive operations to be performed on the same machine tool and even on the same part. Information on the LENS Hybrid system architecture, learnings from initial system deployment and continuing development work will also be provided to help guide further development activities within the materials community.

  14. Thermal comfort study of plastics manufacturing industry in converting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiono Sugiono

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is one of ergonomics factors that can create a significant impact to workers performance. For a better thermal comfort, several environment factors (air temperature, wind speed and relative humidity should be considered in this research. The object of the study is a building for converting process of plastics manufacturing industry located in Malang, Indonesia. The maximum air temperature inside the building can reach as high as 36°C. The result of this study shows that heat stress is dominantly caused by heat source from machine and wall building. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation is used to show the air characteristic through inside the building. By using the CFD simulation, some scenarios of solution are successfully presented. Employees thermal comfort was investigated based on predicted mean vote model (PMV and predicted percentage of dissatisfied model (PPD. Existing condition gives PMV in range from 1.83 to 2.82 and PPD in range from 68.9 to 98%. Meanwhile, modification of ventilation and replacing ceiling material from clear glass into reflective clear glass gave significant impact to reduce PMV into range from 1.63 to 2.18 and PPD into range from 58.2 to 84.2%. In sort, new design converting building process has more comfortable for workers.

  15. The Swedish Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokko, Ari

    2012-01-01

    The main characteristics of ‘the Swedish model’ are arguably related to the country's knowledge-intensive industry and its advanced welfare state. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the historical development of these two features of the Swedish economy. The first part looks at industrial...

  16. Efficiency of innovation expenditure in the Brazilian manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Provezano Gomes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify whether 23 sectors of Brazilian manufacturing industry spent efficiently in innovation activities in the years 2003 and 2005, through data envelopment analysis, especially by the model of variable returns to scale. It was found that the level of efficiency has reduced considerably over the years, with the average score from 0.82 in 2003 to 0.68 in 2005, and in the past year, have been a shift from the efficient unities. The only efficient industries in the two years were linked to the production of oil, non-ferrous metals and automobiles in general. The conclusion is, after all, that maintaining the levels of profitability in terms of innovation expenditure of the sectors of processing industry depends on a more efficient use of resources in order to achieve or, if possible, overcome the technological standards international.O presente estudo buscou identificar se 23 setores da indústria de transformação que investiram em atividades de inovação foram eficientes em 2003 e 2005, por meio da análise envoltória de dados, principalmente pelo modelo de retornos variáveis à escala. Verificou-se que o nível de eficiência reduziu-se consideravelmente ao longo dos anos, com o escore médio passando de 0,82 para 0,68 entre 2003 e 2005, além de, neste último ano, ter ocorrido uma mudança em relação às unidades eficientes. Os únicos setores eficientes nos dois anos foram os ligados à produção de derivados do petróleo, de metais não ferrosos e de automóveis em geral. Conclui-se, afinal, que a manutenção dos níveis de lucratividade em função dos gastos com inovação dos setores da indústria de transformação nacional depende de uma maior eficiência no uso destes recursos, com o intuito de alcançar ou, se possível, ultrapassar os padrões tecnológicos internacionais.

  17. Manufacturing technology in the Danish pig slaughter industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Lars

    2010-02-01

    The Danish pig meat industry is very export oriented. Ninety per cent of the production of the big cooperative slaughterhouses is exported to more than 100 countries all over the world. This poses a requirement for the industry to be globally competitive in the sense of quality, product safety and--of course--price. A big challenge for the industry is therefore to maintain sufficient low unit costs in spite of the high factor costs of Denmark. In particular the high labour costs must be accompanied by correspondingly high labour productivity. And, it should be emphasized, this high labour productivity must be achieved without compromising the concern for good working conditions of the employees in the manufacturing. Technology is one of the means to achieve this combination of good working conditions and high labour productivity. One of the most important benefits from automation is the improved working environment. Pig slaughtering, cutting and boning is traditionally very labour intensive and requires hard and repetitive work. For many people a job in a slaughterhouse is therefore not their first choice. This situation can be changed by automation, which will not only reduce arduous and repetitive work but in addition will introduce more motivating jobs in terms of planning, supervision and control of the new technology. Automation will also improve the hygiene and thereby the food safety. This applies in particular to the clean slaughter line where cross contamination between carcasses is reduced because of less manual handling and because the tools in the machines can be sterilised more effectively between each carcass. Automated processes are more accurate and repeatable than manual work. For some processes, in particular in cutting and boning, this will enhance the product yield. New technology can also improve the animal welfare. The group-stunning system and mechanised lairage systems are examples of that. Improved animal welfare has an ethical value in

  18. Selected Characteristics of the U.S. Feed Manufacturing Industry, 1984. Staff Report No. AGES880121.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Mark; And Others

    This report summarizes some selected characteristics of the feed manufacturing industry based on the results of a mail survey of U.S. feed manufacturing establishments to obtain information about structural characteristics of the industry in 1984. These characteristics are compared with those reported earlier from the 1975 survey to provide…

  19. Towards an industrial manufactured morphing trailing edge flap system for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Bergami, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Industri (DK) work on flap manufacturing and Hydratech Industries (DK) is developing the powering system for the flaps and the control system. DTU is the coordinator of the project. Flap prototypes have been manufactured in a continuous thermoplastic extrusion process and a unique rotating test rig has...

  20. Regional Capital Inputs in Chinese Industry and Manufacturing, 1978-2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Lili; Szirmai, Adam

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides new estimates of capital inputs in the Chinese economy. Estimates are made for the total economy (1953-2003), for the industrial sector (1978-2003) and for the manufacturing sector (1985-2003). The estimates for industry and manufacturing are broken down by thirty regions. The

  1. The Effects of Climate on Output per Worker: Evidence from the Manufacturing Industry in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Mateo

    2012-01-01

    This paper quantifies the effect of an increase in temperature and precipitation on the average output per worker in the Colombian manufacturing industry. In order to approach this issue rigorously, a methodology is developed with a theoretical model and an empirical estimation. The estimation of the empirical model is done with economic data from the Annual Survey of the Manufacturing Industry, the Monthly Manufacturing Sample and climate data from IDEAM. The results do not allow to reject a...

  2. Impact of Overhead Costs Apportionment on Selling Price Determination in Malaysian Automobile Manufacturing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Dandago, Kabiru Isa; Zaidi, Zulaikha Rabitah; Amir, Aliana Shazma Amir Binti

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to examine the impact of overhead cost apportionment on selling price determination in the Malaysian automobile manufacturing industry. Specifically, the study looks at the treatment of overhead costs apportionment from the perspective of the profit making effort of automobile manufacturing firms. The methodology used is interview with staff of one automobile manufacturing company in Malaysia taken as a case study: that is Naza Automotive Manufacturing Sdn. Bhd. The findings o...

  3. Industrial Characteristics and Employment of Older Manufacturing Workers in the Early-Twentieth-Century United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chulhee

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how industry-specific technological, organizational, and managerial features affected the employment of old male manufacturing workers in the early twentieth-century United States. Industrial characteristics favorably related to the employment of old industrial workers include high labor productivity, less capital- and material-intensive production, short workdays, low intensity of work, high job flexibility, and formalized employment relationship. Results show that aged industrial workers were heavily concentrated in “unfavorable” industries, suggesting that the contemporary argument of “industrial scrap heap” was applicable for most of the manufacturing workers in the early twentieth century United States. PMID:26989273

  4. Industrial Characteristics and Employment of Older Manufacturing Workers in the Early-Twentieth-Century United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chulhee

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how industry-specific technological, organizational, and managerial features affected the employment of old male manufacturing workers in the early twentieth-century United States. Industrial characteristics favorably related to the employment of old industrial workers include high labor productivity, less capital- and material-intensive production, short workdays, low intensity of work, high job flexibility, and formalized employment relationship. Results show that aged industrial workers were heavily concentrated in "unfavorable" industries, suggesting that the contemporary argument of "industrial scrap heap" was applicable for most of the manufacturing workers in the early twentieth century United States.

  5. Sustainable manufacturing practices in Malaysian automotive industry: confirmatory factor analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Habidin, Nurul Fadly; Zubir, Anis Fadzlin Mohd; Fuzi, Nursyazwani Mohd; Latip, Nor Azrin Md; Azman, Mohamed Nor Azhari

    2015-01-01

    .... This reported study was conducted to examine confirmatory factor analysis for SMP such as manufacturing process, supply chain management, social responsibility, and environmental management based...

  6. Are the determinants of markup size industry-specific? The case of Slovenian manufacturing firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponikvar Nina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to identify factors that affect the pricing policy in Slovenian manufacturing firms in terms of the markup size and, most of all, to explicitly account for the possibility of differences in pricing procedures among manufacturing industries. Accordingly, the analysis of the dynamic panel is carried out on an industry-by-industry basis, allowing the coefficients on the markup determinants to vary across industries. We find that the oligopoly theory of markup determination for the most part holds for the manufacturing sector as a whole, although large variability in markup determinants exists across industries within the Slovenian manufacturing. Our main conclusion is that each industry should be investigated separately in detail in order to assess the precise role of markup factors in the markup-determination process.

  7. Designing Integrated Product- Service System Solutions in Manufacturing Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Nina; Patrício, Lia; Morelli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Manufacturing firms are increasingly evolving towards the design of integrated product-service solutions but servitization literature does not provide specific guidance on how to design these integrated solutions. Building upon ProductService System (PSS) and Service Design (SD) approaches...... how it brings new insights to manufacturing companies moving to a service, value cocreation perspective....

  8. Towards an Industrial Manufactured Morphing Trailing Edge Flap System for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Bergami, Leonardo

    Several numerical studies in the past 10 years have shown big potentials for load reduction on MW turbines using distributed control for alleviation of the fluctuating loads along the blade span. However, the requirements by the wind turbine industry of robust actuator solutions where the stronge......, is transferred into an industrial manufacturing process and tested on a novel rotating test rig. The industrial partners are Rehau, Hydratech Industries and Dansk Gummi Industri....

  9. The Effects of Import Competition on Employment and Wages in the Manufacturing Industry of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzin Emel Akkus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of import competition on employment and wages in the 18 sectors of the Turkish manufacturing industry using panel data methodology over the 2003-2011 period. The industry import unit value indexes are used in order to measure import competition for the industries. The estimation results of two stages squares method suggest that changes in import values have a significant effect on employment in the sectors of manufacturing industry. However, this study can not find a significant relationship between import competition and industry wages.

  10. Smart Manufacturing for the Oil Refining and Petrochemical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Yuan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Smart manufacturing will transform the oil refining and petrochemical sector into a connected, information-driven environment. Using real-time and high-value support systems, smart manufacturing enables a coordinated and performance-oriented manufacturing enterprise that responds quickly to customer demands and minimizes energy and material usage, while radically improving sustainability, productivity, innovation, and economic competitiveness. In this paper, several examples of the application of so-called “smart manufacturing” for the petrochemical sector are demonstrated, such as the fault detection of a catalytic cracking unit driven by big data, advanced optimization for the planning and scheduling of oil refinery sites, and more. Key scientific factors and challenges for the further smart manufacturing of chemical and petrochemical processes are identified.

  11. Lobbying during the revision of the European emissions trading system: Easier for Swedish industrial insiders than for Norwegian outsiders?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miard, Kadri

    2011-07-01

    This report examines and compares the lobbying routes taken by Swedish and Norwegian energy-intensive industry firms during the revision of the European Emissions Trading System. Two key explanatory factors are in focus here - whether the company has its origin in the EU member state Sweden or in non-member Norway; and the size of the company. Six companies are chosen as cases: Norsk Hydro, Norcem and Norske Skog from Norway; and SSAB, Cementa and Svenska Cellulosa Aktiebolaget from Sweden. A key finding is the extensive use of European associations by all these firms in lobbying EU institutions. Also prevalent is the use of national associations, which would indicate benefits in the form of better institutional response to collective lobbying and resource-sharing aspects. Although Norwegian firms seem to have struggled more than Swedish firms when it comes to lobbying EU institutions, due to lack of access to the EU, not all differences can be explained by the fact of originating in an EU member state Sweden or non-member Norway. While company size has a positive effect on the number of available lobbying routes, this appears to depend on cross-border production and possibly other influences as well.(auth)

  12. A Study to Determine the Educational Needs of Industrial Technologists in the Automotive-Type Manufacturing Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ronald Walter

    Questionnaires were used to gather data about educational needs of industrial technologists in the automotive-type manufacturing industries in the United States. Each of the 101 establishments received four questionnaires; 67 (66.3 percent) returned one or more of the questionnaires. The responses of the selected individuals were analyzed by…

  13. Smart manufacturing systems for Industry 4.0: Conceptual framework, scenarios, and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pai; wang, Honghui; Sang, Zhiqian; Zhong, Ray Y.; Liu, Yongkui; Liu, Chao; Mubarok, Khamdi; Yu, Shiqiang; Xu, Xun

    2018-01-01

    Information and communication technology is undergoing rapid development, and many disruptive technologies, such as cloud computing, Internet of Things, big data, and artificial intelligence, have emerged. These technologies are permeating the manufacturing industry and enable the fusion of physical and virtual worlds through cyber-physical systems (CPS), which mark the advent of the fourth stage of industrial production (i.e., Industry 4.0). The widespread application of CPS in manufacturing environments renders manufacturing systems increasingly smart. To advance research on the implementation of Industry 4.0, this study examines smart manufacturing systems for Industry 4.0. First, a conceptual framework of smart manufacturing systems for Industry 4.0 is presented. Second, demonstrative scenarios that pertain to smart design, smart machining, smart control, smart monitoring, and smart scheduling, are presented. Key technologies and their possible applications to Industry 4.0 smart manufacturing systems are reviewed based on these demonstrative scenarios. Finally, challenges and future perspectives are identified and discussed.

  14. ACCOUNTING AND ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE IN A MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny van Sten-van’t Hoff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses change drivers, change actions and change outcomes in a textilemanufacturing industry in converting traditional management accounting into activitybasedmanagement.

  15. Smartfactory: challenges of open and low cost ICT in the small manufacturing industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bosscha, P

    2006-02-27

    Full Text Available The neglected field of appropriate information and communications technologies for small companies in the manufacturing industry is addressed through the development of an architecture that integrates various open and low-cost technologies...

  16. Fact Sheet: Final Air Toxics Standards for Area Sources in the Chemical Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact sheet on the national air toxics standards issued October 16, 2009 by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for smaller-emitting sources, known as area sources, in the chemical manufacturing industry.

  17. The performance of environmental impact assessment in the explosives manufacturing industry in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Sandham, Luke Alan; Van der Vyver, Felicity; Retief, Francois Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Explosives manufacture in South Africa is a major component of the chemical and mining industry, and as an important producer of hazardous chemicals it is also a potential contributor to significant environmental impacts. Environmental authorisation of explosives manufacturing activities is based primarily upon the quality of information made available in the Environmental Impact Report (EIR), but the quality of EIR for explosives manufacturing projects has never been investigated. A modified...

  18. Advanced manufacturing technologies for improved competitiveness of the South African manufacturing industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlale, NS

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the manufacturing environment with regards to technology and market is discussed. Both the South African and global view are given, together with technology management strategies. Value added products are described and determined...

  19. 77 FR 64462 - Conference on International Trade Issues Facing U.S. Machinery Manufacturing Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ...-makers with well- informed policy analysis for use in expanding international markets across the broad... market access challenges they face. Dated: Tuesday, October 16, 2012. Thomas Sobotta, Acting Office... Conference on International Trade Issues Facing U.S. Machinery Manufacturing Industries AGENCY: Manufacturing...

  20. Intelligent Manufacturing in the Context of Industry 4.0: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Y. Zhong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Our next generation of industry—Industry 4.0—holds the promise of increased flexibility in manufacturing, along with mass customization, better quality, and improved productivity. It thus enables companies to cope with the challenges of producing increasingly individualized products with a short lead-time to market and higher quality. Intelligent manufacturing plays an important role in Industry 4.0. Typical resources are converted into intelligent objects so that they are able to sense, act, and behave within a smart environment. In order to fully understand intelligent manufacturing in the context of Industry 4.0, this paper provides a comprehensive review of associated topics such as intelligent manufacturing, Internet of Things (IoT-enabled manufacturing, and cloud manufacturing. Similarities and differences in these topics are highlighted based on our analysis. We also review key technologies such as the IoT, cyber-physical systems (CPSs, cloud computing, big data analytics (BDA, and information and communications technology (ICT that are used to enable intelligent manufacturing. Next, we describe worldwide movements in intelligent manufacturing, including governmental strategic plans from different countries and strategic plans from major international companies in the European Union, United States, Japan, and China. Finally, we present current challenges and future research directions. The concepts discussed in this paper will spark new ideas in the effort to realize the much-anticipated Fourth Industrial Revolution.

  1. [Noise hazard and hearing loss in workers in automotive component manufacturing industry in Guangzhou, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Liang, Jiabin; Rong, Xing; Zhou, Hao; Duan, Chuanwei; Du, Weijia; Liu, Yimin

    2015-12-01

    To investigate noise hazard and its influence on hearing loss in workers in the automotive component manufacturing industry. Noise level in the workplace of automotive component manufacturing enterprises was measured and hearing examination was performed for workers to analyze the features and exposure levels of noise in each process, as well as the influence on hearing loss in workers. In the manufacturing processes for different products in this industry, the manufacturing processes of automobile hub and suspension and steering systems had the highest degrees of noise hazard, with over-standard rates of 79.8% and 57.1%, respectively. In the different technical processes for automotive component manufacturing, punching and casting had the highest degrees of noise hazard, with over-standard rates of 65.0% and 50%, respectively. The workers engaged in the automotive air conditioning system had the highest rate of abnormal hearing ability (up to 3.1%). In the automotive component manufacturing industry, noise hazard exceeds the standard seriously. Although the rate of abnormal hearing is lower than the average value of the automobile manufacturing industry in China, this rate tends to increase gradually. Enough emphasis should be placed on the noise hazard in this industry.

  2. Waste reduction possibilities for manufacturing systems in the industry 4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, P.; Illés, B.; Dobos, P.

    2016-11-01

    The industry 4.0 creates some new possibilities for the manufacturing companies’ waste reduction for example by appearance of the cyber physical systems and the big data concept and spreading the „Internet of things (IoT)”. This paper presents in details the fourth industrial revolutions’ more important achievements and tools. In addition there will be also numerous new research directions in connection with the waste reduction possibilities of the manufacturing systems outlined.

  3. Study on the Transformation and Upgrade of E-Commerce Application in Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the Internet thinking, manufacturing management mode is changed, it is not depend on the scale, but in the user as the center, more dependent on the reaction rate of user requirements. As the big data, cloud computing, Internet of things technology such as the development of technology, manufacturing is from automatic to intelligent evolution, on the user's personalized customization is possible. Using Internet thinking positive development manufacturing enterprise electronic commerce application mode of transformation and upgrading of manufacturing industry plays an important role. Promoting the continued ascent of manufacturing industry informatization level, promote the transformation of the manufacturing production mode, provide greater profit space for the export of products. In industrial 4.0 mode, the user is the core of the enterprise, C2B model will be the mainstream of future manufacturing e-commerce application mode. This paper to present the sorted out the basic model of manufacturing enterprise electronic commerce application, point out the existing problems, and the computing technology, communication technology, the constant development of storage technology, such as background, puts forward the corresponding countermeasure, points out that the C2B model is the development direction of manufacturing enterprise electronic commerce application mode.

  4. Innovation Training within the Australian Advanced Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jerome Denis; Maritz, Alex; McLellan, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Innovation has emerged as a core driver for the future profitability and success of the manufacturing sector, and increasingly both governments and the private sector are examining ways to support the development of innovation capabilities within organisations. In this research, we have evaluated a government-funded innovation training course…

  5. Root Cause Assessment for a Manufacturing Industry: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kalantri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Root-cause identification for quality related problems are key issues for manufacturing processes. It has been a very challenging engineering problem particularly in a multistage manufacturing, where maximum number of processes and activities are performed. However, it may also be implemented with ease in each and every individual set up and activities in any manufacturing process. Kaizen is aimed towards reduction in different types of losses i.e. Failure Loss/ Breakdown Loss, Minor stoppage, idling loss, Setup and adjustment loss etc. So as to improve quality and productivity.In this report, root-cause identification methodology has been adopted to eliminate the rejection of product manufactured by the enterprise and improving the life of product. Brainstorming and other Root Cause Assesmenttools have been used to find out the reasons of tube failure and vibration in tubular strander. Solutions of these problems have also given in this report. Kaizen activities have reduced the time consumed in daily activities of cleaning, lubricating, inspection etc. A detailed study has illustrated the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  6. Six sigma critical success factors in manufacturing industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Zainol; Jamaluddin, Z.

    2017-04-01

    The success of Six Sigma implementation is known to depend on a number of contributing factors. The purpose of this paper is to explore Six Sigma critical success factors (CSFs) in the context of Malaysian manufacturing organizations. Although Six Sigma success factors have been abundantly researched in the global context, in this paper, a maiden attempt is made to identify, through an extensive literature review, the CSFs for Six Sigma implementation followed by their validation using primary data collection from Malaysian manufacturing companies. A total of 33 indicators have thus been compiled through an extensive literature review which then been grouped into 6 contributing factors. These contributing success factors are then validated through an empirical research of selected Malaysian manufacturing companies at various stages of implementation of the Six Sigma process improvement methodology. There has been an overemphasis on the role and commitment of the management in the success of a Six Sigma program. Though it is undoubted, certain other factors also play an equally important role in ensuring that the Six Sigma programs are successful. The factor analysis of CSFs of the Malaysian manufacturing organizations selected in this study demonstrates that the top factor is a composite factor showing combination of the ability of the project teams to use the process management on quality initiative and a training using a proper analysis in problem solving. The CSFs extracted through the factor analysis could provide a basis for manufacturing organizations embarking on the Six Sigma journey to look beyond just management involvement. Thus, one can develop an integrated framework of other factors as outlined and give them appropriate priority and focus.

  7. Changes in the competitive advantages of Croatia’s manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Galović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to analyse the position and detecte competitive advantages of Croatia’s manufacturing industry in foreign exchange trading. The methodology of this research is based on the application of indices of openness to foreign trade and detected competitive advantages, as well as the complete analysis of the manufacturing industry structure of the Republic of Croatia. In order to analyse the competitive advantages of the manufacturing industry in the Republic of Croatia the following quantitative methods were used: Revealed Comparative Advantage (RCA, as a method for detecting comparative advantages of exporting goods of some countries, Export Competitiveness Indices (XS, as a method for measuring export competitiveness of the observed countries, Export Specialization Index (ES, as a method for comparing export activities of the manufacturing industry in the Republic of Croatia and the European Union, and the Relative Trade Advantage Index (RTA that incorporates the RCA and the RMA indices. The main results of the research indicate competitive advantages detected by measuring, evaluation of the Croatian manufacturing industry particularly on foreign markets, recommendations and proposals in order to reach a higher level of export competitiveness. The main conclusion of this research is that there is a need to establish prerequisites and to define measures for structural changes in the Croatian manufacturing industry.Key words: JEL classification: O18, O12, F18, R11

  8. Cybersecurity for industry 4.0 analysis for design and manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces readers to cybersecurity and its impact on the realization of the Industry 4.0 vision. It covers the technological foundations of cybersecurity within the scope of the Industry 4.0 landscape and details the existing cybersecurity threats faced by Industry 4.0, as well as state-of-the-art solutions with regard to both academic research and practical implementations. Industry 4.0 and its associated technologies, such as the Industrial Internet of Things and cloud-based design and manufacturing systems are examined, along with their disruptive innovations. Further, the book analyzes how these phenomena capitalize on the economies of scale provided by the Internet. The book offers a valuable resource for practicing engineers and decision makers in industry, as well as researchers in the design and manufacturing communities and all those interested in Industry 4.0 and cybersecurity.

  9. Industrial image processing visual quality control in manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Demant, Christian; Garnica, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    This practical introduction focuses on how to build integrated solutions to industrial vision problems from individual algorithms. It gives a hands-on guide for setting up automated visual inspection systems using the NeuroCheck software package.

  10. Simple, cost effective & result oriented framework for supplier performance measurement in sports goods manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergences of global markets have increased competition worldwide. For the Sports Goods Manufacturing Industry which is considered to be an intensive supplier base industry with limited resources to sustain in what is already a very competitive market there is a need for the entire supply chain viz. raw material and machinery suppliers and manufacturers to measure their supplier's performance to reduce business risks and revenue losses. How to design & execute a simple, cost effective & result oriented Framework for Supplier Performance Measurement for sports goods manufacturing small - medium enterprises is the main aim of this research paper.

  11. STATE AND SOME DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS OF RUSSIAN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Lezina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of domestic machine-building industry suffers with poor quality, hence it does not stand competition with similar products. Falling-off is characteristic for production of all branches of the industry. The state must create such economic conditions that would stimulate transition of these branches to the innovative development way. One of the main factors that brake innovative development of the Russian economy production sphere under examination is unsatisfactorymotivation and payment of personnel engaged.

  12. National Security and the Industrial Policy Debate: Modernizing Defense Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    industry. LEADERSHIP , VISION, AND PUBLIC BEHAVIOR The public debate over issues of industrial policy and the outcome of that debate are important to...Press, 1990) 123. 2. Ronald A. Heifetz and Riley M. Sinder, "Political Leadership : Managing the Public’s Problem Solving," The Power of Public Ideas...Beyond the Trade Deficit." Science 15 July 1988. Heifetz, Ronald A. and Riley M. Sinder. "Political Leadership : Managing the Public’s Problem Solving

  13. Emerging Issues from New Product Development in Food Manufacturing Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-19

    economy whose manufacturing sector iJs increasingly product- merchandising oriented. 31/ Until the late 19th and early 20th centuries, small businesses...average supermarket with 15,000 items, this means the store manager or buyer must make decisions on about 100 items each week (if presented with all new...oriented food products, however, is further extended by the private-label and generic products offered by large food distributors ( supermarket chains

  14. Ovarian cancer incidence in the United States in relation to manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Gary G; Sahmoun, Abe E

    2014-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is primarily a disease of the industrialized world. However, few factors associated with industrialization that contribute to the etiology of ovarian cancer have been identified. We sought to explore factors potentially associated with ovarian cancer by correlating ovarian cancer incidence rates in US states with the distribution of US manufacturing. Data on age-adjusted incidence rates for ovarian cancer per state in the United States and manufacturing rates per state were analyzed using multiple linear regression controlling for access to ovarian cancer care, fertility rate, and other potential confounders. In univariate analyses, ovarian cancer incidence rates were positively correlated with the extent of manufacturing, with dairy production, and with the manufacturing of pulp and paper. Using multiple linear regression, only the correlation of ovarian cancer with pulp and paper manufacturing industry was significant. The correlation of ovarian cancer with pulp and paper manufacturing industry remained significant after adjusting for access to ovarian cancer care, fertility rates, and other potential confounders (P paper mills are associated with exposures to known ovarian carcinogens. Further epidemiological study of exposures involved in the manufacturing of pulp and paper in relation to risk of ovarian cancer is warranted.

  15. Advantage Management Strategy in Competition via Technological Race Perspective: Empirical Evidence from the Taiwanese Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tsu-Yi; Hsiao, Yu-Ju; Wu, Shih-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the advantage management strategies of a firm regarding the technological race in the manufacturing sector. This is to reveal whether firms adopt a catch-up or leapfrogging strategy in the competition for innovation. The results show that competition is fierce in the Taiwanese manufacturing industry. Taiwanese manufacturing firms (mostly SMEs) tend to adopt the “catch-up” strategy to keep up with their competitors in order to remain in the technological race. The result indicates that, under financial constraints, Taiwanese manufacturing firms attempt to invest in R&D to catch up with their rivals or to avoid being eliminated from the race. PMID:25295307

  16. An assessment of training needs for the lumber manufacturing industry in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Denig; Scott Page; Yuhua Su; Karen Martinson

    2008-01-01

    A training needs assessment of the primary forest products industry was conducted for 33 eastern states. his publication presents in detail the statistical analysis of the study. Of the 2,570 lumber manufacturing companies, consisting of firms with more than six employees for the U.S. Department of Labor Standard Industrial Classification Code 2421, the response rate...

  17. CUSTOMIZATION IN THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY: SURVEY RESULTS IN SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Reis Graeml

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the advantage of using kanban, postponement, modularization, just-in-time, production sequencing, milk-run and cross-docking by companies that intend to increase their flexibility, agility and reliability in order to support web-based businesses. It presents the results of a survey carried out with more than 600 manufacturing companies in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and evaluates the changes that are taking place in operations, in order to make companies better suited to provide customized products, which are made to meet the individual requirements of each customer.

  18. Effects of environmental factors on corporate strategy and performance of manufacturing industries in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachmad Hidayat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine and obtain empirical evidence of the effects of external and internal environmental factors on the strategy and performance of manufacturing companies. Design/methodology/approach: This study used primary data obtained by distributing questionnaires to 150 respondents of manufacturing companies in Indonesia spreading over six major cities in Java such as Jakarta, Banten, Bandung, Yogyakarta, Semarang and Surabaya. Samples were taken by using the systematic random sampling technique. The technique was used since those major cities had different numbers of manufacturing companies. Subsequently, the feasibility of the model was tested. Several indices of model feasibility would be used to test the model developed in this structural equation model. In case of a sub-optimal model, a model modification was to be performed by adding or removing paths so that the chi-square values would decrease by the values of the index. Findings and Originality/value: Results showed that internal and external environmental factors, through the operating environments and the remote environments of manufacturing industries, jointly affected the companies’ understanding of the condition of the industrial environments to establish strategic goals in order to achieve optimal performance of manufacturing industry. Practical implications: The internal and external environmental factors through the operating and remote environments had effects on the strategy of manufacturing companies in Indonesia. However, both internal and external environments did not affect the performance of manufacturing companies in Indonesia. There was a tendency that manufacturing companies were to observe the occurring macro-economic conditions. Manufacturing industries were faced with the pressures from competition, customers and suppliers that affected companies’ revenue. Performance of manufacturing industries was more influenced by macro

  19. Estimates of emergency operating capacity in US manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belzer, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Serot, D.E. (D/E/S Research, Richland, WA (USA)); Kellogg, M.A. (ERCE, Inc., Portland, OR (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Development of integrated mobilization preparedness policies requires planning estimates of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. Such estimates must be developed in a manner that allows evaluation of current trends in capacity and the consideration of uncertainties in various data inputs and in engineering assumptions. This study, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), developed estimates of emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 446 manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level of aggregation and for 24 key non-manufacturing sectors. This volume presents tabular and graphical results of the historical analysis and projections for each SIC industry. (JF)

  20. INDUSTRIAL LAND DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURING DECONCENTRATION IN GREATER JAKARTA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudalah, Delik; Viantari, Dimitra; Firman, Tommy; Woltjer, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Industrial land development has become a key feature of urbanization in Greater Jakarta, one of the largest metropolitan areas in Southeast Asia. Following Suharto's market-oriented policy measures in the late 1980s, private developers have dominated the land development projects in Greater Jakarta.

  1. International Harmonization of Training and Qualification in the Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintino, L.; Fernandes, I.; Miranda, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to propose a model for international harmonization of the training and qualification of human resources for industrial professions. The outcome is a system based on training guidelines and a quality assurance methodology that is now in use in 42 countries around the world. Design/methodology/approach: The paper…

  2. Sales and operations planning based on a modularized view of supply chains : Supporting process industries and discrete manufacturing industries

    OpenAIRE

    Noroozi, Sayeh

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to propose a framework for sales and operations planning (S&OP), which is based on a modularized view of supply chains. The framework should support both process industries and discrete manufacturing industries in their quest for performance. S&OP has been highlighted in this framework due to its essential role in integrating different functions within a company and integrating a company with its supply chain partners (referred to as horizontal inte...

  3. Multiple criteria evaluation of current energy resources for Turkish manufacturing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onut, S.; Tuzkaya, U.R.; Saadet, N. [Yildiz Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-06-15

    Energy is the main component of natural resources of developing, as well as developed, countries like Turkey. Because of economic and social developments, the demand for energy, in general, has increased considerably in Turkey. Since Turkey is not an oil or natural gas (NG) producing country, the energy resource usage for energy consumption should be effective. The Turkish industrial sector comprises approximately 36% of Turkey's primary energy consumption, and the manufacturing industry is the largest industrial sector. In this study, the focus was on the manufacturing industry as the major energy consuming sector in Turkey, and it was analyzed in terms of efficient use of energy resources. The most widely used energy resources in the Turkish manufacturing industry, namely fuel-oil, coal, electricity, LPG and NG were taken into account. Evaluation and selection of current energy resources in this selected industry can be viewed as a multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) problem, including human judgments, tangible and intangible criteria and priorities and trade offs between goals and criteria. The analytic network process (ANP), one of the MCDM methods, was used to evaluate the most suitable energy resources for the manufacturing industry in this study.

  4. Multiple criteria evaluation of current energy resources for Turkish manufacturing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oenuet, Semih; Tuzkaya, Umut Rifat; Saadet, Narthan [Department of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Faculty, Yildiz Technical University, 34349 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-06-15

    Energy is the main component of natural resources of developing, as well as developed, countries like Turkey. Because of economic and social developments, the demand for energy, in general, has increased considerably in Turkey. Since Turkey is not an oil or natural gas (NG) producing country, the energy resource usage for energy consumption should be effective. The Turkish industrial sector comprises approximately 36% of Turkey's primary energy consumption, and the manufacturing industry is the largest industrial sector. In this study, the focus was on the manufacturing industry as the major energy consuming sector in Turkey, and it was analyzed in terms of efficient use of energy resources. The most widely used energy resources in the Turkish manufacturing industry, namely fuel-oil, coal, electricity, LPG and NG were taken into account. Evaluation and selection of current energy resources in this selected industry can be viewed as a multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) problem, including human judgments, tangible and intangible criteria and priorities and trade offs between goals and criteria. The analytic network process (ANP), one of the MCDM methods, was used to evaluate the most suitable energy resources for the manufacturing industry in this study. (author)

  5. The trade specialization of SANE: Evidence from manufacturing industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandrini, Michele

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the evolution of the foreign trade specialization in manufacturing sectors of South Africa, Algeria, Nigeria and Egypt. These four countries, the so-called SANE, have recently been viewed as Africa's best chance of producing an economic bloc whose role for Africa might be comparable to that of the BRIC economies of Brazil, Russia, India and China for the world economy. Using data on trade flows since mid-1970s, the results show that the SANE group has experienced few changes in its trade structure, which is still based on low-technology and slow-growth world demand sectors. The degree of persistence in the specialization model is higher in the case of Algeria and Nigeria, where the dependence on products based on natural resources is stronger.

  6. a Case Study: Exploring Industrial Agglomeration of Manufacturing Industries in Shanghai Using Duranton and Overman's K-Density Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, S.; Wang, J.; Gui, Z.; Wu, H.; Wang, Y.

    2017-09-01

    There has wide academic and policy attention on the issue of scale economy and industrial agglomeration, with most of the attention paid to industrial geography concentration. This paper adopted a scale-independent and distance-based measurement method, K-density function or known as Duranton and Overman (DO) index, to study the manufacturing industries localization in Shanghai, which is the most representative economic development zone in China and East Asia. The result indicates the industry has a growing tendency of localization, and various spatial distribution patterns in different distances. Furthermore, the class of industry also show significant influence on the concentration pattern. Besides, the method has been coded and published on GeoCommerce, a visualization and analysis portal for industrial big data, to provide geoprocessing and spatial decision support.

  7. A Review: Value stream mapping implementation in manufacturing industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nirav Patel; Prof. Naresh Chauhan

    2014-01-01

    .... Value Stream Mapping is a powerful lean tool for identifying the waste and this paper defines concept of Value Stream Mapping and various literatures related on VSM and will be useful for new research in current field. This paper illustrates the review of VSM techniques and its benefits in machining industry. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the effective utilization of the VSM tools for process and productivity improvements by different authors.

  8. Palm oil - towards a sustainable future? : Challanges and opportunites for the Swedish food industry

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The food industry faces problems relating to the sustainability of palm oil as a food commodity. These problem areas include social, environmental, economic and health issues. The food industry also competes with increasing palm oil demands from the energy sector. This case study identifies and analyzes different perspectives regarding sustainable palm oil as a food commodity in Sweden through interviews with palm oil experts in different businesses and organizations. This study focuses on ho...

  9. Industrial Production and Professional Application of Manufactured Nanomaterials-Enabled End Products in Dutch Industries: Potential for Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, C.; Brouwer, D.H.; Tielemans, E.; Pronk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In order to make full use of the opportunities while responsibly managing the risks of working with manufactured nanomaterials (MNM), we need to gain insight into the potential level of exposure to MNM in the industry. Therefore, the goal of this study was to obtain an overview of the

  10. The Influence Of Globalisation And Modern Technological Changes On Manufacturing Industries In Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri M. Triki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation and new technologies are having an intense impact on the manufacturing industries. This is affecting business global and might demand new strategies and policies for manufacturing companies. Libya like several other countries in the Middle East and also is among the few developing African economies has been facing problems related to its productivity in industrial sector. Manufacturing industries in Libya was reared to offer better products and services as part of the government plans to reconstruct their economy and improve its industrial companies. So as to face these problems manufacturing sectors need to increase their production and they also require a clear strategy and policies towards an efficient supply chain about modern technology. A new technology is one of the improvement initiatives that can be used to enhance industrial performance competitiveness and decrease its costs by eliminating of waste and increasing added value activities. The significance of new technology and modern systems in the industrial world has enhanced in this decade because of the benefits that they bring to the factories and companies. The aims of this research is to investigate new technology strategies that will enable the Libyan manufacturing industries to shift towards an increase production and reduce its costs as well as to quantify the modern technological changes and the role of globalisation in addition to declaration of its effect on the growth additionally development of the Libyan industrial sector and competitiveness lastly moreover this survey make a recommendations to establish systems that improve the emergent needs of the national industrial sector.

  11. Environmental evaluation of societal industrial ecology - Case studies of its implementation in the Swedish transport and building sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, L.

    2001-08-01

    This thesis is a study of how to environmentally evaluate the Swedish concept 'kretsloppsanpassning', here termed Societal Industrial Ecology (SIE). The thesis is based on three case studies of its implementation in the transport and building sectors. The aim of the thesis is to study to what extent the implementation of SIE in the transport and building sectors leads to changes in material and energy flows and their management. The environmental management (solely in the transport sector) was studied in order to check implemented measures against the governmental goal definitions and validate the measures' inclusion and scope in the SIE concept. In order to environmentally analyse and discuss the changes in environmental management regarding material and energy flows, the industrial metabolism perspective was used. Then, measures were analysed as to how environmental evaluation could be applied and what the possible result would be. Finally, the implications of environmental evaluation for environmental management were discussed. The implementation of SIE in the transport and building sectors has generally lead to that the main part of measures are implemented on material outflows. However, the monitoring of material flows was mainly found on the inflow side. This means that the measures taken were not audited and the quantified information concerning material inflows seem not to influence planning of measures. implemented and planned SIE measures sometimes take place in a wider context than the internal organisation and thereby affect other actors in society. Compared with traditional environmental measuring, this makes other demands on how to environmentally evaluated these measures. Especially, wider system boundaries are a prerequisite to address and evaluate SIE measures. Environmental. evaluation in a systems approach would not result in a precise answer, even if the system studied were less complex than an industrial system. There are a lot

  12. Industrial Pollution Control and Efficient Licensing Processes: The Case of Swedish Regulatory Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pettersson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Industrial pollution accounts for a large proportion of global pollution, and in the European Union, an integrated pollution and prevention approach based on individual performance standards has been implemented to regulate emissions from industrial plants. Crucial for the assessment of the licensing conditions are the Best Available Technique (BAT requirements, which should be set in accordance with the recently introduced Industrial Emissions Directive (IED. In this paper, we review and assess the licensing of industrial plants in one of the Member States, namely Sweden. Specifically, we discuss how the existing regulations (including the IED manage to address potential trade-offs between important regulatory design issues, such as flexibility, predictability and the need to provide continuous incentives for environmental improvements. The analysis indicates that while the EU regulations provide flexibility in terms of the choice of compliance measures, in Sweden, it enters an existing regulatory framework that adds a lot of uncertainty with respect to the outcome of the licensing processes. An important challenge for the implementation of the IED is to implement performance standards that lead to continuous incentives to improve environmental performance in industrial sectors without, at the same time, adding new uncertainties. While standards ideally should be both flexible and predictable, achieving one of these criteria may often come at the expense of the other.

  13. The potential for solar heat for industrial processes - A preliminary study of Swedish possibilities; Solenergi i industriell processvaerme. En foerstudie av svenska moejligheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, Peter; Quicklund, Henrik; Pettersson, Ulrik

    2003-06-01

    This report starts with a short introduction to solar thermal energy applications in Sweden and to the utilization of energy in general in the Swedish industry. The investigation is focusing on options for industrial solar heating applications. As waste heat recovery in many cases is competing with, or might be supplemented by solar heat, this field is also given some attention in the study. The conclusions are that possible applications are numerous, mainly within food- and mechanical industries, but that low prices on energy, unused potentials for heat recovery and low awareness about the possibilities for solar heat makes the situation tough today. Increasing prices on electricity and oil and decreasing costs for solar energy combined with a continuously growing awareness about environmental issues are key factors that speak for solar heating in a longer perspective. The large potential for industrial solar heat will be in countries further south and this may offer opportunities for Swedish industry to export products and knowledge. Some companies offers large scale solutions for solar heating and research competence within material science and optics will be needed in the development of new collector types. Swedish technology for district heating- and cooling and heat storage in boreholes could also be applied in large scale industrial applications. The literature study on waste heat recovery shows that 90 % of the waste heat comes from the large energy consumers in industry: Pulp and paper, chemical, petroleum and steel and metal industries. Almost everything is used for district heating. The potential for waste heat recovery in Sweden has been largely underestimated by several studies during the nineties and the development has been quite remarkable.

  14. [Ergonomics and productivity: an example applied to a manufacturing industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battevi, Natale; Vitelli, Nora

    2013-01-01

    The survival of manufacturing in the western world also depends on the ability to increase productivity. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to recover the efficiency of all workers suffering from upper limb biomechanical overload disease. Ergonomic methods can be a valuable tool in solving this apparent conflict: operatives'productivity and health. After carrying out an ergonomic education and training programme for all company employees and risk assessment for upper limb biomechanical overload through the OCRA checklist method, a programme of improvements on a production line was planned and tested, mainly based on international and European standards. Within approximately 2 years, thanks to changes in workplace layout and organization, a significant reduction of 22.7% in risk level was achieved and, at the same time, a 16% increase in productivity. An ergonomic approach based on global, interdisciplinary and participatory principles in the case considered showed that it is possible to match increased productivity with decreased risk. In this specific case application of ergonomic principles during product design was rather poor, which is typical of companies working for third party customers.

  15. Challenges and opportunities of fibre-reinforced polymers in additive manufacturing with focus on industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Pedersen, David Bue; Tosello, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Functional parts made by additive manufacturing of polymers have entered the area of industrial applications in recent years providing a wide range of materials with various mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. These additive manufacturing processes can be combined with known fibre......-reinforcements applying modified material parameters with the use of fibre-reinforced polymers. An increase of tensile strength and Young’s modulus result from the application of short fibres in a polymer matrix opening up perspectives for a variety of industrial applications such as injection moulding, biomedical...

  16. Supply Chain and Blade Manufacturing Considerations in the Global Wind Industry (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Ted [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Goodrich, Alan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-12

    This briefing provides an overview of supply chain developments in the global wind industry and a detailed assessment of blade manufacturing considerations for U.S. end-markets. The report discusses the international trade flows of wind power equipment, blade manufacturing and logistical costs, and qualitative issues that often influence factory location decisions. To help guide policy and research and development strategy decisions, this report offers a comprehensive perspective of both quantitative and qualitative factors that affect selected supply chain developments in the growing wind power industry.

  17. Past and Present of the Chinese and Korean Trainees and Survival of a Small Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihata, Mikio

    In 1973, the author established the Nippon Bell Parts Co., Ltd. in Funabashi-city under his estimation of the advances in communication, information, semiconductor and automotive industries, then he has focused on R&D and developed the manufacturing of precise parts. During the past 30 years, he has himself experienced the importance of the mutual exchange between Japan and China and Korea, for keeping the human capability as well as for the management and the technical development to avoid a bankruptcy. The author is intentionally acting for the education of craftsmen in small and medium-sized manufacturing industries.

  18. Estimation of capacity utilization for selected U.S. manufacturing industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niefer, M.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kokkelenberg, E.D. [State Univ. of New York, Binghamton, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This paper reports results from the nonparametric estimation of plant-level capacity and capacity utilization for selected four-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) industries for the years 1972-90. The estimates are constructed using establishment-level data from the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) drawn from the Census Bureau`s Longitudinal Research Database (LRD). This work represents the first broad-scale application of the nonparametric measurement of capacity and capacity utilization to manufacturing plants. Given that the measures are largely untried, we attempt to assess the quality of the reported nonparametric measures.

  19. Hazardous wastes and waste generation factors for plastic products manufacturing industries in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Salim Öncel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A project titled “Hazardous Waste Management in Compliance with European Union Environmental Regulations in Turkey” was carried out with the support of The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey on behalf of the Ministry of Environment and Urban Planning in Turkey. In this project, several industries were examined for improving an internet based system called “Hazardous Waste Declaration System” (HWDS and meeting the requirements of Turkey. Hazardous waste lists and hazardous waste generation quantities per unit manufacturing (hazardous waste generation factors, HWGFs for the plastic product manufacturing industry were determined based on the data obtained from these studies. At the same time, declarations of hazardous waste generation quantity made by the organizations in this industry in 2009 and 2010 to HWDS and the literature data were evaluated and the range of HWGFs was created by assessing possible minimum and maximum quantities for each waste. This paper presents the results of the studies conducted in plastic product manufacturing industry in Turkey. The waste lists determined along with the HWGF ranges are presented. HWGFs for manufacturing processes in the plastic industries were calculated in the range of 11.5–100 kg t−1 in this study and can be used to calculate the amount of hazardous waste for other similar process in the plastic industries. Therefore, it is believed that the results of the study will be useful for determining the types and quantities and the management of hazardous wastes generated by similar plastic product manufacturing industries in the developing world.

  20. DESIGNING STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfian Nur Ubay

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed at designing strategies for improving total quality management at CV XYZ and PT HIJ. The research locations were selected intentionally with the consideration that the company is a middle class company that started to apply a study in line with the research topic. The experts were chosen using an approach method. This research used a descriptive approach and quantitative analysis through questionnaires using purposive sampling. The stages began with data processing, i.e. testing the questionnaire quality through validity and reliability tests, making a causality diagram, evaluating the implementation levels of each company by giving evaluation scales based on the existing condition, making House of Quality (HOQ using QFD methods, and then analyzing the problem solutions produced from the QFD methods with 5W + IH analysis, and finally determining the improvement priorities using Fuzzy AHP methods. The results were the strategies for improving total quality management /TQM of CV XYZ, namely the factor that plays the most important role was improving the quality management performance. The actor that has the competence to carry out the TQM improvement is the director. The prioritized goal to be achieved is a commitment to improve the quality of goods and services.  The prioritized strategy used in improving TQM is carrying out SOP consistently.Keywords: strategies, improvement, TQM, manufacturing company, fuzzy AHPABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan merancang strategi peningkatan manajemen mutu terpadu pada CV XYZ dan PT HIJ. Pemilihan lokasi penelitian dilakukan secara sengaja dengan pertimbangan bahwa perusahaan tersebut merupakan perusahaan kelas menengah yang mulai menerapkan kajian sesuai dengan topik penelitian. Penentuan pakar dilakukan dengan metode pendekatan secara sengaja. Adapun penelitian ini menggunakan pendekatan deskriptif dan analisa kuantitatif dengan menyebarkan kuesioner secara sengaja (purposive sampling

  1. A Preliminary Review on Economies of Scale (EOS Towards Industrialized Building System (IBS Manufacturer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajul Ariffin Syazwana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrialized Building System (IBS is a potential technology to improve productivity of construction industry. Controlled production and minimum generation of construction waste are some of the benefits that can be achieved by replacing conventional construction with IBS. In business, IBS is giving a huge opportunity for manufacturer and supplier to expand their business while contributing to construction development. However, bad strategies will put the company in high risk due to higher initial capital for machines and equipment. Therefore, strategic planning for company’s growth, profit maximization, and enhancement of productivity is undeniable to ensure the success of business in construction industry. This preliminary paper is exploring associated factors that affect Economy of Scale (EOS and their relationships in catalyzing the IBS manufacturer especially precast concrete as the scope of study to continue their business in the construction industry. Thus, a framework of EOS is proposed to assist IBS manufacturers to ensure their company’s growth and stability, competitiveness in term of monopoly or an oligopoly, increasing productivity, leading constant returns to scale, and finally increasing the firm’s efficiency. The refined EOS’s conceptual framework is an important turning point to support the development of decision making tools for IBS manufacturer towards their stability and survival in this highly competitive industry.

  2. Comments from the Swedish Society for Nature Conservation, SSNC, and the Swedish NGO office for Nuclear Waste Review, MKG, on the industry's, SKB, research programme Fud-07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-06-15

    The Swedish Society for Nature Conservation and the Swedish NGO Office for Nuclear Waste Review recommends in response to Fud-07 that: - The Government must in its forthcoming decision regarding the industry's 2007 research and development program set out requirements that are needed to bring order to the ongoing work on nuclear waste disposition - The Government must assure an effective quality control of the industry's work - The Government needs to review the industry's use of resources from the Swedish Nuclear Waste Fund and empower the Radiation Safety Authority to ensure their proper use - The Government must make it clear that a permit to establish a final repository for high-level waste will not be given until sufficient evidence is available that supports the chosen method and chosen location, and that provide for guaranteed long-term safety - The Government must instruct the Radiation Safety Authority to develop its own full and independent assessment tools and knowledge base to be able to review the industry's research and development work, with particular emphasis on weaker aspects of the industry's work. - The Government must expand the budget of the Radiation Safety Authority to enable the Authority to perform a thorough examination of the industry's forthcoming application to construct a repository. - The Government must ensure that currently outstanding issues and unsolved problems in the industry's research and development project are thoroughly investigated, and solutions arrived at, before permission to begin construction can be given. - The Government must see to it that work commences on drafting public policy that sets out the objectives and functions that a final repository shall fulfil. - The Government must make it clear that it will not be possible for the industry to neglect or avoid giving alternative methods serious consideration in its environmental impact statement (EIS). - The Government should

  3. Fundamental Theories and Key Technologies for Smart and Optimal Manufacturing in the Process Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Given the significant requirements for transforming and promoting the process industry, we present the major limitations of current petrochemical enterprises, including limitations in decision-making, production operation, efficiency and security, information integration, and so forth. To promote a vision of the process industry with efficient, green, and smart production, modern information technology should be utilized throughout the entire optimization process for production, management, and marketing. To focus on smart equipment in manufacturing processes, as well as on the adaptive intelligent optimization of the manufacturing process, operating mode, and supply chain management, we put forward several key scientific problems in engineering in a demand-driven and application-oriented manner, namely: ① intelligent sensing and integration of all process information, including production and management information; ② collaborative decision-making in the supply chain, industry chain, and value chain, driven by knowledge; ③ cooperative control and optimization of plant-wide production processes via human-cyber-physical interaction; and ④ life-cycle assessments for safety and environmental footprint monitoring, in addition to tracing analysis and risk control. In order to solve these limitations and core scientific problems, we further present fundamental theories and key technologies for smart and optimal manufacturing in the process industry. Although this paper discusses the process industry in China, the conclusions in this paper can be extended to the process industry around the world.

  4. Strategic research on the sustainable development cost of manufacturing industry under the background of carbon allowance and trade policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhongmin; Cheng, Mengting; Wang, Mei

    2017-08-01

    The important subjects of energy consumption and carbon emission are manufacturing enterprises, with the deepening of international cooperation, and the implementation of carbon limit and trade policy, costs of manufacturing industry will rise sharply. How can the manufacturing industry survive in this reform, and it has to be a problem that the managers of the manufacturing industry need to solve. This paper analyses sustainable development cost connotation and value basis on the basis of sustainable development concept, discusses the influence of carbon allowance and trade policy for cost strategy of manufacturing industry, thinks that manufacturing industry should highlight social responsibility and realize maximization of social value, implement cost strategy the sustainable development, and pointed out the implementation way.

  5. Safety culture in the Finnish and Swedish nuclear industries - history and present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Pietikaeinen, E. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (RiskPilot AB (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2010-03-15

    The report presents results from an interview study that examined the characteristics of the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The study also tested the theoretical model of safety culture developed by the authors. The interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16). Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). The study gave insight into the nature of safety culture in the nuclear industry. It provided an overview on the variety of factors that people in the industry consider important for safety. The respondents rather coherently saw such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and safety and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Some of the respondents described a certain Nordic orientation towards safety. One characteristic was a sense of personal responsibility for safety. However, there was no clear agreement on the existence of a shared Nordic nuclear safety culture. Sweden and Finland were seen different for example in the way the co-operation between plants and nuclear safety authorities was arranged and re-search activities organized. There were also perceived differences in the way everyday activities like decision making were carried out in the organizations. There are multiple explanations for the differences. The industry in Sweden has been driven by the strong supplier. In Finland the regulator's role in shaping the culture has been more active. Other factors creating differences are e.g. national culture and company culture and the type of the power plant. Co-operation between Nordic nuclear power organizations was viewed valuable yet challenging from safety point of view. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide under-standing of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as

  6. 41 CFR 101-26.702 - Purchase of products manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Purchase of products manufactured by the Federal Prison Industries, Inc. 101-26.702 Section 101-26.702 Public Contracts and Property... PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM 26.7-Procurement Sources Other Than GSA and the Department of...

  7. Mixed reality system and objective ergonomics evaluation for designing work stations in manufacturing industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhijn, J.W. van; Bosch, T.; Looze, M.P. de

    2011-01-01

    Due to shorter productlife cycles in manufacturing industry there is a lot of pressure on the process of designing new work systems. Early attention for human factors would lower the costs compared to changes at a later stage. Low cost tools for workstations design could help especially small to

  8. 78 FR 41069 - Medical Device Reporting for Manufacturers; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Device Reporting for Manufacturers; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of...

  9. Innovation, Technology Transfer and Labor Productivity Linkages: Evidence from a Panel of Manufacturing Industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apergis, N.; Economidou, C.; Filippidis, I.

    2008-01-01

    The paper explores the linkages between labor productivity, innovation and technology spillovers in a panel of manufacturing industries. The roles of R&D, human capital and international trade are considered in stimulating innovation and/or facilitating technology transfer. Using panel-based unit

  10. Simulation and gaming as a support tool for lean manufacturing systems - a case example from industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, DJ; Slomp, J; Kuhl, M.E.; Steiger, N.M.; Armstrong, F.B.; Joines, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we illustrate how simulation and gaming can be used to support lean manufacturing systems. More in particular we study a case example from industry - a manual assembly line for mail-inserting systems - for which we have developed a simulation game. This paper focuses on the

  11. The application of Rapid Manufacturing technologies in the spare parts industry

    OpenAIRE

    S. Hasan; Rennie, A. E. W.

    2008-01-01

    The advancement of Rapid Manufacturing (RM) has ushered the possibility of realising complex designs. This paper identifies the potential of possible applications of RM in the spare parts industry. It further underlines the need for a fully functional RM supply chain before proposing an e-business enabled business model for RM technologies.

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF THE TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESS FOR MANUFACTURING THE VALVE OF THE TAPS IN THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFTIMIE Dorin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the optimization of the technological process for a valve which is a subset of a tap from the oil industry, following the steps of CAD, finite element analysis, achieving digital manufacturing (CAM, and type implementation in machine tools CNC.

  13. Jernberg Industries, Inc: Forging Facility Uses Plant-Wide Assessment to Aid Conversion to Lean Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-10-01

    Jernberg Industries conducted a plant-wide assessment while converting to lean manufacturing at a forging plant. Seven projects were identified that could yield annual savings of $791,000, 64,000 MMBtu in fuel and 6 million kWh.

  14. Relationship Between Lean Production and Operational Performance in the Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasi, Raja Zuraidah R. M.; Syamsyul Rakiman, Umol; Ahmad, Md Fauzi Bin

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, more and more manufacturing firms have started to implement lean production system in their operations. Lean production viewed as one of the mechanism to maintain the organisation's position and to compete globally. However, many fail to apply the lean concepts successfully in their operations. Based on previous studies, implementation of lean production in the manufacturing industry is more focused on the relationship between Lean and Operational Performance of one dimension only. Therefore, this study attempted to examine the relationship between Lean Production (LP) and Operational Performance in 4 dimensions which are quality, delivery, cost and flexibility. This study employed quantitative study using questionnaires. Data was collected from 50 manufacturing industries. The data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) 22.0. This study is hoped to shed new understanding on the concept of Lean Production (LP) in regards of Operational Performance covering the 4 dimensions.

  15. Evaluation of Practicing sustainable Industrial Solid Waste Minimization by Manufacturing Firms in Malaysia: Strengths and Weaknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallak, Shadi Kafi; Bakri Ishak, Mohd; Mohamed, Ahmad Fariz

    2016-09-13

    Malaysia is facing an increasing trend in industrial solid waste generation due to industrial development.Thus there is a paramount need in taking a serious action to move toward sustainable industrial waste management. The main aim of this study is to assess practicing solid waste minimization by manufacturing firms in Shah Alam industrial state, Malaysia. This paper presents a series of descriptive and inferential statistical analysis regarding the level and effects of practicing waste minimization methods, and seriousness of barriers preventing industries from practicing waste minimization methods. For this purpose the survey questions were designed such that both quantitative (questionnaire) and qualitative (semi-structures interview) data were collected concurrently. Analysis showed that, the majority of firms (92%) dispose their wastes rather than practice other sustainable waste management options. Also waste minimization methods such as segregation of wastes, on-site recycle and reuse, improve housekeeping and equipment modification were found to have significant contribution in waste reduction (pstrengths, weaknesses, threats and opportunities. Accordingly, ten policies were recommended for improvement of practicing waste minimization by manufacturing firms as the main aim of this research. Implications This manuscript critically analysis waste minimization practices by manufacturing firms in Malaysia. Both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis were conducted to formulate SWOT and TOWS matrix in order to recommend policies and strategies for improvement of solid waste minimization by manufacturing industries. The results contribute to the knowledge and the findings of this study provide a useful baseline information and data on industrial solid waste generation and waste minimization practice.

  16. Whole effluent assessment of industrial wastewater for determination of bat compliance: Part 1: Paper manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartiser, Stefan; Hafner, Christoph; Hercher, Christoph; Kronenberger-Schäfer, Kerstin; Paschke, Albrecht

    2010-05-01

    elimination 85% in 7 days). Thus, the algae toxicity of the respective paper mill cannot be explained with the TMP partial stream; presumably other raw materials such as biocides might be the source of algae toxicity. Comparative data from wastewater surveillance of authorities confirmed the range of ecotoxicity observed in the study. Wastewater from paper mills generally has no or a moderate ecotoxicity (median LID 1 and 2) while the maximum LID values, especially for the algae and daphnia tests, are considerably elevated (LIDA up to 128, LIDD up to 48). Wastewater from paper mills generally is low to moderately ecotoxic to aquatic organisms in acute toxicity tests. Some samples show effects in the chronic algae growth inhibition test which cannot be explained exclusively with colouration of the samples. The origin of elevated algae ecotoxicity could not be determined. In the algae test, often flat dose-response relationships and growth promotion at higher dilution factors have been observed, indicating that several effects are overlapping. At least one bioassay should be included in routine wastewater control of paper mills because the paper manufacturing industry is among the most water consuming. Although the algae test was the most sensitive test, it might not be the most appropriate test because of the complex relationship of colouration and inhibition and the smooth dose-effect relationship or even promotion of algae growth often observed. The Lemna test would be a suitable method which also detects inhibitors of photosynthesis and is not disturbed by wastewater colouration.

  17. China’s wood furniture manufacturing industry: industrial cluster and export competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hongqiang; Ji, Chunyi; Nie, Ning; Hong, Yinxing

    2012-01-01

    China is the largest furniture exporter in the world. Its wood furniture industry has become an important part of the country’s forestry economic development. Hence, investigating China’s furniture industry cluster and export competitiveness is favorable for the sustainable development of China’s forestry industry. This study indicates that, under the guidance of the export-oriented strategy of China’s reform and opening up for 30 years, the country’s furniture industry has formed three big i...

  18. Supply Chain and Blade Manufacturing Considerations in the Global Wind Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Ted [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Goodrich, Alan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-12

    Over the past decade, significant wind manufacturing capacity has been built in the United States in response to an increasingly large domestic market. Recent U.S. manufacturing production levels exceed anticipated near-term domestic demand for select parts of the supply chain, in part due to policy uncertainty, and this is resulting in some restructuring in the industry. Factor location decisions are influenced by a combination of quantitative and qualitative factors; proximity to end-markets is often a key consideration, especially for manufacturers of large wind turbine components. Technology advancements in the wind sector are continuing, and larger blade designs are being pursued in the market, which may increase U.S.-based manufacturing opportunities.

  19. Dynamics of vendor innovation capability: Evidence from the Electronics Manufacturing Services industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perunovic, Zoran; Mefford, Robert; Christoffersen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    , by traditional manufacturing capabilities, such as cost, quality, delivery, and flexibility. Taking a vendor’s perspective in outsourcing, we develop and present a conceptual framework for studying vendor innovation capability. We propose to test this framework in the Electronic Manufacturing Services Industry.......Recent developments suggest that an increasing number of companies outsource manufacturing with the hope that vendors will help them improve innovativeness. Still, the growing research in the topic has not yet studied two important dimensions of the relationship between manufacturing outsourcing...... and innovation. The first is the realization that vendor capabilities have been recognized as one of the most important factors for the success of outsourcing. The second refers to the fact that, even though innovation capability is required, vendors are still being selected, and their performance evaluated...

  20. INFRASTRUCTURAL BACKBONE OF ENABLING AND CONVERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR MASS CUSTOMIZATION MANUFACTURING SYSTEM IN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandkumar Gilke

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful implementation of Mass Customization can result in a challenging manufacturing environment with both high volume production and high product mix, where the customers expect individualized products at the same price they are paying for mass-produced items. Meeting this challenge requires changes in the manufacturing strategies, increase in the flexibility of the production equipments and the most importantly are the adaptable computer systems which make this possible in the manufacturing enterprise. The major requirement is to develop a system which can adapt quickly in order to start new production or to react quickly in failure scenario. Thus the system should have the ability of self improving, self-adaptable and self healing. Thus there is a need for technical migration from a well established flexible manufacturing system (FMS to intelligent and reconfigurable manufacturing system. This paper describes the major enabling and converging technologies facilitating mass customization manufacturing systems in automobile industries in Indian setting and also discusses the proposed architecture for Mass Customization Manufacturing System.

  1. Improvement of the Mechanism for the Management of Innovation Activity in the Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalii Nikolaevich Makoveev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The transition of Russia’s economy from raw materials exporting model of development to the innovation model is a national priority, since it contributes to intensive and sustainable economic growth and reduces economic dependence on external markets. GDP growth rate of 75–90% in the developed countries such as the USA, Japan, Germany, the UK, France, and also in the newly industrialized countries of Southeast Asia and China, is achieved due to the “progress of knowledge” – the intellectualization of the main production factors. Due to this fact, the increase in the standard of living in Russia, as well as overcoming its technological and economic lagging behind the more developed countries is possible only on the basis of the increase in productivity, enhancement of Russia’s competitiveness in international markets of innovative products, modernization and sustainable development of industrial enterprises through the creation of new innovation capabilities and the extensive utilization of that which have already been accumulated. The manufacturing industry is a powerful driving force of innovation economic development, since this sector concentrates the main production of the most technologically sophisticated and knowledgeintensive products with high added value. However, in the process of market transformations the products of domestic manufacturing enterprises have become much less competitive on international markets. There is a steady tendency toward the growth of imports and decrease of exports of enterprises of this sector. In this regard, the article identifies the factors that have the greatest influence on the development of innovation activities in the manufacturing industry. The author builds a multivariate regression model that determines the degree of influence of various socio-economic factors on the level of development of innovation activity in manufacturing. The paper proposes an organizational-economic mechanism

  2. Influence of subcontracting constraints on the performance of manufacturing industries in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Chukwunweike Nwokocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an attempt has been made to show the influence of subcontracting constraints on firm performance in Nigeria. The study in line with the literature identified a number of constraints hindering an effective subcontracting arrangement in the study area. While the constraints were found not to have affected the use of subcontracting in the country, low capital intensity, disclosure of commercial secrets, poor services and interest conflict were found to have restricted subcontracting arrangements in the study area to sharing of equipment and short-term contracts. These constraints however were found not have affected the performance of manufacturing industries in the study area. This paper keeping in mind the findings of this study suggested that manufacturing industries in Nigeria should invest more in machineries and tools so as to increase subcontracting co-operations among industries.

  3. Estimates of the economic contributions of the bidi manufacturing industry in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Arindam; Ashok, Ashvin; Guindon, G Emmanuel; Chaloupka, Frank J; Jha, Prabhat

    2015-07-01

    Bidis, the most common smoking tobacco product in India, remain largely untaxed and are subject to very few regulations to discourage their use. A major argument against tax increases is the large potential loss of economic activity and employment in the bidi industry from reduced consumption. We used a nationally representative survey of unorganised bidi manufacturing firms (n=2841) in India to estimate the economic contribution of the industry. We find that of the 35 states and union territories of India, the bidi industry operated across 17 states, with over 95% of its production concentrated in 10 states. Bidi manufacturing firms contributed 0.50% of total sales and 0.6% of the gross value added by the manufacturing economy in 2005-2006. The industry employed approximately 3.4 million full-time workers, which comprise about 0.7% of employment in all sectors. A further 0.7 million were part-time workers. Bidi workers were also among the lowest paid employees in India. The industry offered only 0.09% of all compensation provided in the manufacturing sector (organised and unorganised). Considering the relatively small economic footprint of the bidi industry in India, higher excise taxes and regulations on bidis are unlikely to disrupt economic growth at an aggregate level, or lead to mass unemployment and economic hardship among small bidi workers. On average, the economic annual output per bidi worker is about US$143, which is an order of magnitude smaller than the large economic losses from the several hundred thousand deaths due to bidi smoking per year. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Additive Manufacturing by selective laser melting the realizer desktop machine and its application for the dental industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Andreas; Schmidt, Frank-Michael; Hötter, Jan-Steffen; Sokalla, Wolfgang; Sokalla, Patrick

    Additive Manufacturing of metal parts by Selective Laser Melting has become a powerful tool for the direct manufacturing of complex parts mainly for the aerospace and medical industry. With the introduction of its desktop machine, Realizer targeted the dental market. The contribution describes the special features of the machine, discusses details of the process and shows manufacturing results focused on metal dental devices.

  5. The use of Tecnomatix software to simulate the manufacturing flows in an industrial enterprise producing hydrostatic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrila, S.; Brabie, G.; Chirita, B.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis performed on manufacturing flows within industrial enterprises producing hydrostatic components twos made on a number of factors that influence smooth running of production such: distance between pieces, waiting time from one surgery to another; time achievement of setups on CNC machines; tool changing in case of a large number of operators and manufacturing complexity of large files [2]. To optimize the manufacturing flow it was used the software Tecnomatix. This software represents a complete portfolio of manufacturing solutions digital manufactured by Siemens. It provides innovation by linking all production methods of a product from process design, process simulation, validation and ending the manufacturing process. Among its many capabilities to create a wide range of simulations, the program offers various demonstrations regarding the behavior manufacturing cycles. This program allows the simulation and optimization of production systems and processes in several areas such as: car suppliers, production of industrial equipment; electronics manufacturing, design and production of aerospace and defense parts.

  6. MODELING AND FORECASTING ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY IN SOUTH ASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muslima Zahan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to model energy consumption and Manufacturing Value Added (MVA in the industry level of five South Asian countries. Firstly, a cross-sectional model was developed by using R-statistical software to estimate the MVA with energy consumption being the independent variable. Secondly, a twenty years data series was analyzed to forecast volume of energy consumption in the manufacturing industry for five countries in a comparative manner. Thus, a prediction model was developed by using the time series forecasting system of the SAS statistical software and evaluated using Mean Square Error (MSE, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE, Mean Absolute Error (MAE and Mean Absolute Percent Error (MAPE with forecasts made up to year 2021. The forecasted energy consumption data might be used in the cross-sectional model to forecast MVA. Besides, based on the increasing trends in volume of energy, industry should prepare now for using efficient and clean energy in order to achieve an environment friendly and sustainable manufacturing industry.

  7. The Application of Industry 4.0 in Customized Furniture Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the background of industrial 4.0, this paper analyzes the developmental road about customized furniture factory. Based on the concepts and features of industry 4.0, this paper analyzes the composition of the customized furniture factory, the main operation system and the operation process of the intelligent customized furniture factory. In order to achieve efficient and accurate production targets, intelligent customized furniture factory should be set up through the establishment of cyber physical system( CPS to cover the intelligent network.

  8. Design, Manufacturing and Integration of LHC Cryostat Components an Example of Collaboration between CERN and Industry

    CERN Document Server

    Slits, Ivo; Canetti, Marco; Colombet, Thierry; Gangini, Fabrizio; Parma, Vittorio; Tock, Jean-Philippe

    2006-01-01

    The components for the LHC cryostats and interconnections are supplied by European industry. The manufacturing, assembly and testing of these components in accordance with CERN technical specifications require a close collaboration and dedicated approach from the suppliers. This paper presents the different phases of design, manufacturing, testing and integration of four LHC cryostat components supplied by RIAL Vacuum (Parma, Italy), including 112 Insulation Vacuum Barriers (IVB), 482 Cold-mass Extension Tubes (CET), 121 cryostat vacuum vessel Jumper Elbows (JE) and 10800 Interconnection Sleeves (IS). The Quality Assurance Plan, which the four projects have in common, is outlined. The components are all leak-tight thin stainless steel assemblies (<10-8 mbar l/s), most of them operating at cryogenic temperature (2 K), however each having specific requirements. The particularities of each component are presented with respect to manufacturing, assembly and testing. These components are being integrated ...

  9. Comparative Analysis of Two Industries for Validating Green Manufacturing (GM) Framework: An Indian Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Minhaj Ahemad Abdul; Shrivastava, Rakesh Lakshmikumar; Shrivastava, Rashmi Rakesh

    2017-04-01

    Green Manufacturing (GM) deals with manufacturing practices that reduces or eliminates the adverse environmental impact during any of its phases. It emphasizes the use of processes that do not contaminate the environment or hurt consumers, employees, or other stakeholders. This paper presents the comparative analysis of two Indian industries representing different sectors for validating GM framework. It also highlights the road map of the companies for achieving performance improvement through GM implementation and its impact on organisational performance. The case studies helps in evaluating the companies GM implementation and overall business performance. For this, a developed diagnostic instrument in the form of questionnaire was administered amongst employees in the companies respectively and their responses were analysed. In order to have a better understanding of the impact of GM implementation, the information about overall business performance was obtained over the last 3 years. The diagnostic instrument developed here may be used by manufacturing organisations to prioritise their management efforts to assess and implement GM.

  10. UNIVERSAL INDUSTRIAL SECTORS INTEGRATED SOLUTIONS MODEL FOR PULP AND PAPER MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY – UISIS-PNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a model for the pulp and paper sector that provides an integrated approach for investigating, developing, and evaluating strategies for reducing the emissions of interest. The Universal Industrial Sectors Integrated Sol...

  11. Estimates of emergency operating capacity in US manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries - Volume 1: Concepts and Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belzer, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Serot, D.E. (D/E/S Research, Richland, WA (USA)); Kellogg, M.A. (ERCE, Inc., Portland, OR (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Development of integrated mobilization preparedness policies requires planning estimates of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. Such estimates must be developed in a manner to allow evaluation of current trends in capacity and the consideration of uncertainties in various data inputs and in engineering assumptions. This study developed estimates of emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 446 manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level of aggregation and for 24 key nonmanufacturing sectors. This volume lays out the general concepts and methods used to develop the emergency operating estimates. The historical analysis of capacity extends from 1974 through 1986. Some nonmanufacturing industries are included. In addition to mining and utilities, key industries in transportation, communication, and services were analyzed. Physical capacity and efficiency of production were measured. 3 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs. (JF)

  12. Application of Lean Manufacturing Tools in the Food and Beverage Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Borges Lopes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have shown an increasing use of lean manufacturing (LM principles and tools in several industrial sectors. Already a well-established management philosophy, it has shown numerous successful applications even outside production environments. This work presents the application of some LM tools, and the corresponding shift in philosophy, in two Portuguese companies of the food and beverage industries. Main implementation issues are presented and discussed; followed by the results obtained from the application of LM tools in the production system of these companies. Significant gains are obtained in both companies and, more importantly, it instills a continuous improvement culture and increases production flexibility while reducing lead times.

  13. The determinants of advertising intensity in the Brazilian manufacturing industry: an econometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Resende

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper econometrically investigates the determinants of advertising intensity in the manufacturing industry of São Paulo, Brazil in 1996 taking as reference an extensive survey carried out by Fundação SEADE. The preliminary investigation indicated a substantial degree of endogeneity in structure and performance variables. The instrumental variables estimation also considered instruments referring to information technology and organizational practices and indicated relevant roles for industrial concentration, barriers to entry, profitability and prevalence of durable goods in explaining advertising intensity. The results lend some support to an informative role of advertising in the Brazilian case.

  14. Review of data mining applications for quality assessment in manufacturing industry: support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostami Hamidey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In many modern manufacturing industries, data that characterize the manufacturing process are electronically collected and stored in databases. Due to advances in data collection systems and analysis tools, data mining (DM has widely been applied for quality assessment (QA in manufacturing industries. In DM, the choice of technique to be used in analyzing a dataset and assessing the quality depend on the understanding of the analyst. On the other hand, with the advent of improved and efficient prediction techniques, there is a need for an analyst to know which tool performs better for a particular type of dataset. Although a few review papers have recently been published to discuss DM applications in manufacturing for QA, this paper provides an extensive review to investigate the application of a special DM technique, namely support vector machine (SVM to deal with QA problems. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature from various points of view as DM concepts, data preprocessing, DM applications for each quality task, SVM preliminaries, and application results. Summary tables and figures are also provided besides to the analyses. Finally, conclusions and future research directions are provided.

  15. Manufacturing capability as a technological development indicator in the pharmaceutical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jairo Gallo Castro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmaceutical industrial has five subsectors: medicines, cosmetics, phytotherapeutics, cleaning products and medical devices. The medicine subsector consists of organisations producing, importing and selling these products. Most studies about this industry have been guided by economic interests without assessing technological aspects of production. This article was aimed at proposing a methodology for assessing and describing the medicine sector according to its technological development by using the manufacturing capability concept. The main information was taken from the Colombian Medicaments and Food Surveillance Institute’s (Instituto Nacional de Vigilancia de Medicamentos y Alimentos - INVIMA databases related to pharmaceutical plant production in Bogotá, including material transformation facilities. This study led to three characteristics being identified for defining the pharmaceutical industry’s manufacturing capability: that related to the pharmacological group to which active pharmaceutical ingredients belong, that linked to specifications regarding medicines’ sterility and that related to the technology required for manufacturing each pharmaceutical product. An analysis of these features has thus been presented and some technologies have been identified which have not been transferred or assimilated by the organisations being studied. It was found that manufacturing capability should be considered as being an indicator of the degree of technological development in these subsectors in Colombia.

  16. APPLICATION AND ENHANCEMENT OF QUALITY ENGINEERING IN SOME SELECTED MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES OF ETHIOPIA

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. Kidu Gebrecherkos Weldeanenia*1

    2017-01-01

    This research is intended to enhance the quality engineering pillars in some selected manufacturing industries of Ethiopia. The products should attain high quality and serve to the provided function and life span. However due to different reasons including poor quality of raw material the products get low quality and are usually affected by different causes including improper use of quality pillars, quality parameters, machine failure and operators. The objective of this research was thus app...

  17. An ARIMA-Intervention Analysis Model for the Financial Crisis in China's Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.H. Ip

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Triggered by the subprime mortgage crisis in the United States (U.S., a financial tsunami has spread rapidly around the globe, from the U.S. to Europe and the rest of the world, causing the world economy to enter a recession. China is no exception, and has suffered a sharp reduction in the growth of its export and manufacturing sectors. In this paper, we attempt to model and analyze the impact of financial crisis on the manufacturing industry in China using data collected from March 2005 to November 2008 by the China Statistical Databases of the National Bureau of Statistics of China. The results indicate that China's manufacturing industry may have to tolerate a significant negative effect caused by the global financial crisis over a period of time, with its gross industrial output value declining continually throughout 2008 and 2009 before reaching a state of equilibrium. The intervention effect is described in this study as temporary but immediate and abrupt. It is found that the ARIMA-Intervention model is more precise at explaining and analyzing the intervention effects of the financial tsunami.

  18. INNOVATIONS AS AN IMPORTANT FACTOR INFLUENCING LABOUR PRODUCTIVITY IN THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Bušelić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Economic science has long recognized labour productivity as an important factor of economic growth. In the uncertain conditions of increasingly fierce and complex competition, it becomes one of the key prerequisites for an adequate response to global challenges. The development of labour productivity has to be observed as a multi-dimensional process including numerous interconnected quantitative and qualitative factors, in particular human factors and technological advancement realized through investments in research and development (innovations. The analysis of labour productivity in the manufacturing industry of the selected countries, Germany and China, is performed in the context of an important influential factor – innovations, and interdependently with the economic growth of the selected countries. The research results and the conducted regression analyses indicate a superiority of German labour productivity in the manufacturing industry, which is strongly affected by considerable investments in research and development. However, the technological convergence of China as the upcoming power is increasingly important, which shows that the gap in labour productivity is decreasing, making developed countries face new challenges posed by globalization. The analysis of the interdependence of economic growth (GDP and labour productivity in the manufacturing industry points to a positive link and the conclusion that the elasticity of the GDP to changes in labour productivity is greater in China than in Germany.

  19. Product manufacturing, quality, and reliability initiatives to maintain a competitive advantage and meet customer expectations in the semiconductor industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Gregory

    Semiconductor products are manufactured and consumed across the world. The semiconductor industry is constantly striving to manufacture products with greater performance, improved efficiency, less energy consumption, smaller feature sizes, thinner gate oxides, and faster speeds. Customers have pushed towards zero defects and require a more reliable, higher quality product than ever before. Manufacturers are required to improve yields, reduce operating costs, and increase revenue to maintain a competitive advantage. Opportunities exist for integrated circuit (IC) customers and manufacturers to work together and independently to reduce costs, eliminate waste, reduce defects, reduce warranty returns, and improve quality. This project focuses on electrical over-stress (EOS) and re-test okay (RTOK), two top failure return mechanisms, which both make great defect reduction opportunities in customer-manufacturer relationship. Proactive continuous improvement initiatives and methodologies are addressed with emphasis on product life cycle, manufacturing processes, test, statistical process control (SPC), industry best practices, customer education, and customer-manufacturer interaction.

  20. Industrial revolution - industry 4.0: Are German manufacturing SMEs the first victims of this revolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Sommer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Industry 4.0 represents a special challenge for businesses in general and for SMEs in particular. The study at hand will examine companies´ awareness, readiness and capability to meet this challenge taking into account the special role of SMEs. Methodology: The results of nine studies dealing with this range of topics are examined in the framework of a systematic review and compared with regard to the objective of the study at hand. Findings: The review showed that, as a rule, there is an awareness concerning the relevance of the topic. The readiness and the capability to meet this challenge exist in parts; however, they strongly depend on the enterprise size. The smaller SMEs are, the higher the risk that they will become victims instead of beneficiaries of this revolution.Originality/value: Considering different studies concerning Industry 4.0 the article gives an insight into the dependence of the Industry 4.0 readiness in reference to the company size. This deepens the knowledge in adaption deficits German SME still have and opens different approaches for further research and action plans.

  1. [An analysis of occupational hazard in manufacturing industry in Guangzhou, China, in 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haihong; Li, Yongqin; Zhou, Hailin; Rong, Xing; Zhu, Shaofang; He, Yinan; Zhai, Ran; Liu, Yiming

    2015-08-01

    To provide data for the occupational health supervision by analyzing the occupational health status in manufacturing industry in Guangzhou, China. The occupational health investigation was performed in 280 enterprises randomly selected from 8 industries based on industry stratification. According to the occupational health standards, 198 out of the 280 enterprises were supervised and monitored. Sample testing was performed in 3~5 workplaces where workers were exposed to the highest concentration/intensity of occupational hazard for the longest time. Comparative analyses of the overproof rates of hazard were performed among enterprises, workplaces, and testing items from different industries. The concentrations of occupational hazard in 42.93% (85/198) of enterprises and 22.96% (200/871) of workplaces were above the limit concentration. The most severe hazards were the noises in shipbuilding and wooden furniture industries and the welding fumes in shipbuilding industry. Less than 30% of enterprises were able to provide occupational health examination and periodic test reports of occupational hazard in workplaces. The rate of the workers with abnormal occupational health examination results and the need for reexamination reached 6.63% (832/12 549), and they were mostly from shipbuilding, wooden furniture, and chemical industries. The occupational health supervision should be strengthened in enterprises, and hazard from noises and dusts should be selectively controlled or reduced. The publication of relevant data and information of occupational health in enterprises should be promoted to enhance social supervision.

  2. Estimates of emergency operating capacity in U.S. manufacturing industries: 1994--2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belzer, D.B.

    1997-02-01

    To develop integrated policies for mobilization preparedness, planners require estimates and projections of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. This report develops projections of national emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 458 US manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level. These measures are intended for use in planning models that are designed to predict the demands for detailed industry sectors that would occur under conditions such as a military mobilization or a major national disaster. This report is part of an ongoing series of studies prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to support mobilization planning studies of the Federal Emergency Planning Agency/US Department of Defense (FEMA/DOD). Earlier sets of EOC estimates were developed in 1985 and 1991. This study presents estimates of EOC through 2005. As in the 1991 study, projections of capacity were based upon extrapolations of equipment capital stocks. The methodology uses time series regression models based on industry data to obtain a response function of industry capital stock to levels of industrial output. The distributed lag coefficients of these response function are then used with projected outputs to extrapolate the 1994 level of EOC. Projections of industrial outputs were taken from the intermediate-term forecast of the US economy prepared by INFORUM (Interindustry Forecasting Model, University of Maryland) in the spring of 1996.

  3. PROSPECTS OF APPLICATION OF THE CONCEPTOF QUICK RESPONSE MANUFACTURING AT THE RUSSIAN INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. V. Shipilova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to research of such concept of the organization of production, as Quick Response Manufacturing or Quick-response production, at the center which, time of implementation of the order is put. Today domestic producers are compelled to function in new conditions, competing with a great number of players of the global market, as a result the emphasis on timely implementation of orders and a tendency of reduction of time of production will allow to reach competitive advantages. Fundamental aspects of Quick Response Manufacturing within functioning of the enterprise of branch are considered, and also the essential lack of this concept is revealed.The purpose / objectives. The purpose of article is research of the economic contents of the concept of the organization of production Quick Response Manufacturing and area of its use at the modern industrial enterprises. Article tasks: to investigate economic contents of the concept of Quick Response Manufacturing, to reveal its features and scopes in the modern industry.Methods. A methodical basis of this article are comparative methods of the analysis.Results. The economic contents of the concept of Quick Response Manufacturing are investigated. Four main key aspects which are the cornerstone of this concept are investigated: time force, organizational structure of the enterprise, system dynamics and possibilities of its application in scales of all enterprise. Components of positive work of system dynamics of the industrial enterprise are revealed, the trend of critical process of production is built. Considering that modern conditions demand from the enterprises to react, adapt quickly for the changing conditions, the factor of time plays an important role. Therefore the concept of QRM has rather perspective character, focusing attention on time of implementation of the order, in that communication that this parameter is one of key both for the enterprise, and for increase of its

  4. A Literature Review on the Progression of Agile Manufacturing Paradigm and Its Scope of Application in Pump Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilak, V M M; Devadasan, S R; Sivaram, N M

    2015-01-01

    During the recent years, the manufacturing world has been witnessing the application of agile manufacturing paradigm. The literature review reported in this paper was carried out to study this progression. This literature review was carried out in two phases. In the first phase, the literature was reviewed to trace the origin of agile manufacturing paradigm and identify its enablers. Further, during this phase, the applications of agile manufacturing reported in literature arena were reviewed. It was also discernable that certain research works have been initiated to apply agile manufacturing paradigm in pump industry. During the second phase, the researches reported on applying agile manufacturing in pump industry were reviewed. At the end of this review, it was found that so far the implementation of agile manufacturing in pump industry has been examined by the researchers by considering only certain components of pumps. In fact, the holistic implementation of agile manufacturing in the pump industry is yet to be examined by the researchers. In the context of drawing this inference, this paper has been concluded by stating that high scope exists in examining the infusing of agility characteristics in designing and manufacturing of pumps.

  5. Profit Allocation in Fuzzy Cooperative Games in Manufacturing and Logistics Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Alliance between manufacturing and logistics industry is a new model of the joint development of the two industries. A reasonable profit allocation mechanism is the key to ensure the stable operation of the alliance, as well as to achieve the desired objectives. Based on uncertainty of alliance expected return as well as the inherent features of the alliance, this research establishes an improved model of profit allocation in manufacturing and logistics industry alliance.Design/methodology/approach: This article studies how to introduce comprehensive correction factors to improve interval Shapley value method, which is based on the fact that had been proved by exiting studies. In this study, interval Shapley value method is first applied to calculate the initial allocation of fuzzy cooperative games. Next AHP-GEM method and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method are incorporated. Based on those results, an improved model of profit allocation is established. After that, a case study is demonstrated the practicality and feasibility of the improved model.Findings: Profit allocation is a complex issue in fuzzy cooperative games. There’re impacts from partner risk sharing, collaborative effort market competition, innovative contribution as well as resource investment. All these factors should be involved in the profit allocation, and different factors have different weight in importance.Practical implications: The new model established in the paper is more scientific and reasonable, and more in line with the actual situation. This method also provides good incentives to each enterprise to ensure the healthy and stable development of the alliance.Originality/value: Based on alliance characteristics, this paper establishes an indicator system and a new model for profit allocation in manufacturing and logistics industry alliance, using AHP-GEM method.

  6. Extended FMEA for Sustainable Manufacturing: An Empirical Study in the Non-Woven Fabrics Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh-Lam Nguyen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Failure modes and effects analysis ( F M E A substantially facilitates the efforts of industrial manufacturers in prioritizing failures that require corrective actions to continuously improve product quality. However, the conventional approach fails to provide satisfactory explanation of the aggregate effects of a failure from different perspectives such as technical severity, economic severity, and production capacity in some practical applications. To fulfill the existing gap in the F M E A literature, this paper proposes an extension by considering associated quality cost and the capability of failure detection system as additional determinants to signify the priority level for each failure mode. The quality cost and capacity are considered as key factors for sustainable survival and development of an industrial manufacturer in the fierce competition market these days. The performance of the extended scheme was tested in an empirical case at a non-woven fabrics manufacturer. Analytical results indicate that the proposed approach outperforms the traditional one and remarkably reduces the percentage of defective fabrics from about 2.41% before the trial period to 1.13%,thus significantly reducing wastes and increasing operation efficiency, thereby providing valuable advantages to improve organizational competition power for their sustainable growth.

  7. Industrial consumption of energy survey - summary report of energy use in the Canadian manufacturing sector 1995-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-12-15

    An Industrial Consumption of Energy (ICE) survey is conducted annually to collect data on the energy use of institutions in Canada's manufacturing sector. It plays a necessary role in monitoring the evolution of energy consumption by manufacturing industries and helping the Office of Energy (OEE) to fulfill Canada's commitment to improving energy conservation and energy efficiency. A number of factors affect energy demand in the manufacturing sector but it is difficult to establish an exhaustive list of them. Certain factors affect total energy demand while others take effect in combination; with the result attributing changes in manufacturing energy consumption to any one specific factor is quite difficult. Energy use data collected by the ICE survey from establishments representing all 21 subsectors of the manufacturing sector (NAICS 31-33) show that there is rapid growth in energy consumption, both as to amounts and energy intensity, in the manufacturing sector.

  8. U.S. EPA Requires Guardian Industries Corp. to Cut Harmful Air Pollution at Glass Manufacturing Plants in Seven States

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOS ANGELES --The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice today announced a settlement with Guardian Industries Corp. that will resolve a Clean Air Act enforcement action involving Guardian's flat glass manufacturing facilit

  9. New Paradigms in International University/Industry/Government Cooperation. Canada-China Collaboration in Advanced Manufacturing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgak, Akif Asil; Liquan, He

    1996-01-01

    A Chinese university and a Canadian university collaborated on an advanced manufacturing technologies project designed to address human resource development needs in China. The project featured university/industry/government partnership and attention to environmental issues. (SK)

  10. The impact of innovation support programmes on SME innovation in traditional manufacturing industries: an evaluation for seven EU regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radicic, D.; Pugh, G.; Hollanders, H.J.G.M.; Wintjes, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of innovation support programmes on SME innovation in traditional manufacturing industries in seven EU regions. Recent literature identifying sources of potential government failure in innovation policy suggests that the effects of public support measures to

  11. Statistical applications for chemistry, manufacturing and controls (CMC) in the pharmaceutical industry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdick, Richard K; Pfahler, Lori B; Quiroz, Jorge; Sidor, Leslie; Vukovinsky, Kimberly; Zhang, Lanju

    2017-01-01

    This book examines statistical techniques that are critically important to Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Control (CMC) activities. Statistical methods are presented with a focus on applications unique to the CMC in the pharmaceutical industry. The target audience consists of statisticians and other scientists who are responsible for performing statistical analyses within a CMC environment. Basic statistical concepts are addressed in Chapter 2 followed by applications to specific topics related to development and manufacturing. The mathematical level assumes an elementary understanding of statistical methods. The ability to use Excel or statistical packages such as Minitab, JMP, SAS, or R will provide more value to the reader. The motivation for this book came from an American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) short course on statistical methods applied to CMC applications presented by four of the authors. One of the course participants asked us for a good reference book, and the only book recomm...

  12. A case study on implementing lean ergonomic manufacturing systems (LEMS) in an automobile industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Rao, P.; Niraj, Malay

    2016-09-01

    Lean manufacturing is a business strategy developed in Japan. In the present scenario, the global market is developing new techniques for getting more and more production rate with a good quality under low cost. In this context, human factors have to be given importance to their working conditions. The study demonstrates the adoption of ergonomic conditions in lean manufacturing for the improvement of organizational performance of the industry. The aim of ergonomics is to adapt the new techniques to their work in efficient and safe ways in order to optimize the human health conditions and increasing the production rate. By conducting survey on various disciplines and showed how the production rate and human ergonomic conditions is affected.

  13. Study on the Key Factor Parameters to Increase Productivity in Construction and Manufacturing Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazyed, K.; Alaswad, A.; Olabi, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    Proper management of human and non-human resources in construction and manufacturing projects can give-in considerable savings in time and cost. Construction and Manufacturing industry faces issues in connection with problems related with productivity and the problems are usually connected with performance of employees. The performance of employees is affected by many factors. In this paper a survey was made on respondents who are employed various projects of Saudi Arabia. The researcher developed a theoretical framework from the existing research which was used as a Model to collect and analyze the field data to test the hypothesis. In this research activity three predictors (commitment, job satisfaction and job performance) for determining the change in productivity. The results highlight that commitment and job performance (respectively) are the two predictors which are explaining 37% of variation in the productivity of the companies. The results also show that Job Satisfaction has no role in the prediction of productivity.

  14. The study and design of a national supply chain for the aerospace titanium components manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene van der Merwe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Titanium’s strength-to-density ratio, corrosion resistance and high thermal compatibility makes it the perfect metal for aerospace. Titanium is for instance used for the structural airframe, seat tracks, engine components and landing gear of aircraft. The Boeing 787 that had its test flight in 2009 is one of the latest aircraft designs that incorporates a substantially higher percentage of parts manufactured from titanium due to the weight benefit. Titanium’s extensive use in aerospace applications ensures that the aerospace market is the main driver of titanium metal demand. South Africa is the second largest titanium producer in the world after Australia. The abundance of titanium in South Africa together with the growing demand has led it to be identified as a beneficiation priority in a collaborative government initiative, called Titanium Beneficiation Initiative (TBI. The purpose of this paper is to develop a supply chain model for the anticipated South African titanium component manufacturing industry.

  15. System partners `97. Innovations of the component manufacturing industry; System Partners 97. Innovationen der Zulieferindustrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebenpfeiffer, W. [comp.

    1997-08-01

    Innovativeness and high product quality are the two key factors of the positive image of the German car industry. The author presents some examples to illustrate this point: German producers were the first to replace carburetors with fuel injection systems with electronic control, the first to offer an antilock system, and the first to have xenon headlights. Dynamic speed control systems are another example. The component manufacturing industry has made an important contribution to all this, and it is for this reason that ATZ/MTZ have dedicated this special issue to the component manufacturing industry. (orig./AKF) [Deutsch] Die Erfolge und das Image der deutschen Automobilindustrie haben sicherlich viele Gruende. Die wichtigsten sind Innovationen und Produktqualitaet, zu der auch die schnelle Umsetzung gehoert. Ein kurzer Rueckblick auf die letzten zwei Jahrzehnte verdeutlicht mit einigen Beispielen diese Aussage. Die Abloesung des Vergasers durch die elektronisch gesteuerte Benzineinspritzung ging von hier aus. Deutsche Automobilhersteller boten ihren Kunden weltweit als erste ein Antiblockiersystem an, das Xenonlicht ist bisher nur in deutschen Pkw lieferbar. An einer Fahrdynamikregelung arbeiten zwar weltweit viele Hersteller, bei Automobilen ``Made in Germany`` ist sie jedoch bereits in Serie. Bei allen Innovationen war auch immer die deutsche Zulieferindustrie federfuehrend beteiligt. Ein Grund genug fuer die Herausgabe dieses Sonderhefts. (orig./AKF)

  16. On the Right Approach to Selecting a Quality Improvement Project in Manufacturing Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Mittal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous improvement is the core of any successful firm. Talking about manufacturing industries, there is huge potential for continuous improvement to be made in various work areas. Such improvement can be made in any section of industry in any form such as quality improvement, waste minimization, system improvement, layout improvement, ergonomics, cost savings, etc. This case study considers an example of a manufacturing firm which wanted to start a quality improvement project (QIP on its premises. Various products were available, but with dwindling quality levels. However, the real task was the choice of a product for upcoming QIP, as it is well known that success heavily depends upon the selection of a particular project. This is also because of the amount of effort in terms of time, money and manpower that is put into a project nowadays. The authors' objective was to compare three techniques, namely, cost of poor quality (COPQ, conditional probability and fuzzy TOPSIS for selecting the right project based on this specific firm. The pros and cons of these approaches have also been discussed. This study should prove to be instructive for the realization of QIPs in similar types of industry. (original abstract

  17. The Fuzzy u-Chart for Sustainable Manufacturing in the Vietnam Textile Dyeing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim-Phung Truong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The inevitability of measurement errors and/or humans of subjectivity in data collection processes make accumulated data imprecise, and are thus called fuzzy data. To adapt to this fuzzy domain in a manufacturing process, a traditional u control chart for monitoring the average number of nonconformities per unit is required to extend. In this paper, we first generalize the u chart, named fuzzy u-chart, whose control limits are built on the basis of resolution identity, which is a well-known fuzzy set theory. Then, an approach to fuzzy-logic reasoning, incorporating the decision-maker’s varying levels of optimism towards the online process, is proposed to categorize the manufacturing conditions. In addition, we further develop a condition-based classification mechanism, where the process conditions can be discriminated into intermittent states between in-control and out-of-control. As anomalous conditions are monitored to some extent, this condition-based classification mechanism can provide the critical information to deliberate the cost of process intervention with respect to the gain of quality improvement. Finally, the proposed fuzzy u-chart is implemented in the Vietnam textile dyeing industry to replace its conventional u-chart. The results demonstrate that the industry can effectively evade unnecessary adjustments to its current processes; thus, the industry can substantially reduce its operational cost and potential loss.

  18. 75 FR 26967 - Guidance for Industry: Use of Water by Food Manufacturers in Areas Subject to a Boil-Water...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... Areas Subject to a Boil-Water Advisory; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Use of Water by Food Manufacturers in Areas Subject to a Boil-Water Advisory.'' This guidance is intended to advise food manufacturers that once a boil-water advisory has been...

  19. Detection and Prioritization of Significant Issues in Green Lean System in Small and Medium Scale Manufacturing Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayakumar, S.; N.Dhasarathan Alias Raja

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate of significant supply chain menace factors exist in small scale manufacturing industries (SSI) in India. The small scale segment is a manifestation of India’s socio-economic development model and has met with the country’s long term expectations in terms of contribution to GDP, industrial base, employment and exports. This segment forms a major part of Indian industrial base. Small scale industries contribute about 10% of total GDP. The small sca...

  20. The history of the peat manufacturing industry in The Netherlands: Peat moss litter and active carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.W. Gerding

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of three major forms of peat processing by the manufacturing industry in The Netherlands since the last quarter of the 19th century. At a time when peat as a fuel was gradually being replaced by coal, the first form was the peat moss litter industry. Peat moss litter was made from white peat that was ground and sieved in factories which were located mainly in bog areas in the south-east of the province of Drenthe. It served as excellent bedding for horses and cattle. The second form of industrial peat processing was the manufacture, from 1921 onwards, of active carbon made from black peat. The Purit (Norit factory, now part of the Cabot Corporation, is still the only active carbon factory using peat as a raw material. The third form of peat processing was the production of garden peat and potting soil. This is still a widespread activity in peat areas all over the world. The peat moss litter industry thrived from the 1880s until shortly after the First World War. The arrival of the horse-drawn tram in all of the major cities of Europe created a great demand for animal bedding to be used in the vast stables of the tramway companies. Peat moss litter was cleaner, healthier and easier to handle than straw. There was similar demand from the armies, which used millions of horses during the First World War. Owing to the development of motorised vehicles, the peat market collapsed after the war and this plunged the industry into a prolonged crisis which was not overcome until peat was found to be a suitable growing medium for horticulture in the 1950s. Living and working conditions in peatlands were harsh, earnings irregular and labourers’ rights limited. The peat manufacturing industry was the first to introduce collective labour agreements, medical benefits and pension plans. Nonetheless massive unemployment, poverty and the necessity to migrate to other parts of the country were clear signs that the era of

  1. Communication Strategies of the Chinese Dairy Industry Manufacturers to Rebuild Reputation and Maintain a Quality Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashi Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available After the Sanlu tainted milk powder crisis in China in 2008, the entire powdered milk manufacturing industry, and in many ways the food industry as a whole, faced a crisis of reputation and consumer confidence. Through a study of the organisation and public relationships of dairy companies, the crisis communication strategies they used, and how they cultivated relationships, this paper explores how companies within the milk industry rebuilt their reputations to a point where customers and other key elements of the public once again felt confident about their products. This study explores the organisation­-public relationships (OPRs cultivation strategies of the dairy companies and the communication strategies they used to rebuild the industry's reputation after the Sanlu crisis. The author interviewed dairy company personnel and consumers in China (N=18 and conducted secondary document research. The communication strategies that dairy companies used to maintain their relationship with the public are analysed. This study develops the theory of relationship management and provides suggestions for other companies to utilise should they face an industry crisis in the future. The cultivation strategies the dairy companies use to maintain their relationship with the public is hard to separate from communication strategy employed after the crisis.

  2. Exploring the Technological Collaboration Characteristics of the Global Integrated Circuit Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the intensification of international competition, there are many international technological collaborations in the integrated circuit manufacturing (ICM industry. The importance of improving the level of international technological collaboration is becoming more and more prominent. Therefore, it is vital for a country, a region, or an institution to understand the international technological collaboration characteristics of the ICM industry and, thus, to know how to enhance its own international technological collaboration. This paper depicts the international technological collaboration characteristics of the ICM industry based on patent analysis. Four aspects, which include collaboration patterns, collaboration networks, collaboration institutions, and collaboration impacts, are analyzed by utilizing patent association analysis and social network analysis. The findings include the following: first, in regard to international technological collaboration, the USA has the highest level, while Germany has great potential for future development; second, Asia and Europe have already formed clusters, respectively, in the cooperative network; last, but not least, research institutions, colleges, and universities should also actively participate in international collaboration. In general, this study provides an objective reference for policy making, competitiveness, and sustainability in the ICM industry. The framework presented in this paper could be applied to examine other industrial international technological collaborations.

  3. Effects of Wastes from the Brewing Industry in Lightweight Aggregates Manufactured with Clay for Green Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina D. Farías

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of sieved wastes generated from the brewing industry on lightweight aggregates manufactured with clay. Sludge from a wastewater treatment plant, bagasse and diatomaceous earth were used to obtain the samples. These wastes are usually dumped in landfills, but the current increase in restrictions on dumping and interest in improving the environment make our proposal for gaining value from these wastes a significant contribution. Laboratory tests show that the new aggregate has low bulk density and increased water absorption and porosity. The thermographic camera results provide evidence that new aggregates have significant insulating properties and are suitable for use on green roofs.

  4. Production of alkaline protease by Pseudomonas aeruginosa using proteinaceous solid waste generated from leather manufacturing industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh Kumar, A; Swarnalatha, S; Sairam, B; Sekaran, G

    2008-04-01

    Animal fleshing (ANFL), the major proteinaceous solid waste discharged from leather manufacturing industries was used as the substrate for the production of alkaline protease by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strain isolated from the tannery wastewater was selected for its ability to produce protease of activity in the range 1160-1175 U ml(-1). The selective removal of non-fibrillar proteins such as albumin and globulin from ANFL by the protease enzyme during the progress of hydrolysis was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The breakdown of ANFL was also confirmed from the amino acid release into the fermentation medium by P. aeruginosa using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  5. The Competitive status of the U.S. civil aviation manufacturing industry: a study of the influences of technology in determining international industrial competitive advantage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seitz, Frederick; Steele, Lowell W

    1985-01-01

    ... A Study of the Influences of Technology in Determining International Industrial Competitive Advantage Prepared by the U.S. Civil Aviation Manufacturing Industry Panel, Committee on Technology and International Economic and Trade Issues of the Office of the Foreign Secretary, National Academy of Engineering and the Commission on Engineering and Techni...

  6. Towards the re-industrialization of Europe a concept for manufacturing for 2030

    CERN Document Server

    Westkämper, Engelbert

    2014-01-01

    Not only are European industries shrinking and experiencing diminishment of their capability to add value, but Europe has lost more than a third of its GDP, which had been primarily based on manufacturing, and it suffers the consequences in high unemployment and weakened states finance. This book is intended as a significant contribution to the on-going European discussions after the economic crisis and the economic problems in many regions. It is meant to enrich actual political dialogues for overcoming the crises by activating new potentials of high added value. As such, it seeks to provide the necessary orientation for enacting fundamental changes of business models and factory capabilities in order to meet the challenges of the global economy and minimizing environmental impacts. It also opens perspectives for enterprise strategies and for further research topics. Concrete recommendations are made for fields of action and future development towards achieving a sustainable industrial sector in Europe. ‘T...

  7. Vaccine industry perspective of current issues of good manufacturing practices regarding product inspections and stability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, T R

    2001-12-15

    I address 2 important topics of current good manufacturing practices as they apply to vaccine products: product inspections and stability testing. The perspective presented is that of regulated industry. There are 2 major categories of product/facility inspections: those occurring before licensure of a vaccine product and those occurring after a vaccine product is licensed. The logistics and focus of each inspection type, the preapproval inspection, and the required biennial inspection are discussed, as are guidance and recommendations for achieving successful inspections. The requirements, guidance, and recommendations regarding the type, amount, and extensiveness of stability data for vaccine products are presented. The discussion details the potential differences in the amount and type of data required for products that are not yet licensed versus marketed products. Guidance, from a regulated industry perspective, regarding the design and implementation of a successful stability program is also discussed.

  8. Food and chemical industry. Freezed pilaf manufacturing method; Shokuhinn to kagaku kogaku. Reito pirafu no seiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, K. [Nippon Sanso K.K., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-05

    This paper described a method of manufacturing and the characteristics of freezed pilaf, a typical food among the foods using freezed boiled rice. In an industrial freezed pilaf manufacturing method devised by adding automation and mass production techniques to the ordinal home cooking method, the water-immersed rice in a pot is cooked or heated with steam, ingredients and seasonings are added to the cooked or steamed rice, and the rice is freezed in units of one grain or several grains. The pilaf freezing apparatuses include gas type apparatuses using liquid nitrogen (-196{degree}C) or liquid carbon dioxide (-79{degree}C), mechanical type apparatuses using a chlorofluorocarbon freezer, and air turbo type apparatuses for freezing pilaf by using cold air obtained by the expansion turbine of an air separator. For the production of freezed pilaf, gas type apparatuses having a simple structure and capable of manufacturing high-quality freezed pilaf were initially used. However, owing to the technical innovation of freezing apparatuses, mechanical type and air turbo type freezing apparatuses which require a heavy initial investment but which can be operated at a low running cost have been gradually substituted for the gas type apparatuses. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Investigation of the prominent barriers to lean manufacturing implementation in Malaysian food and beverages industry using Rasch Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusaini, N. S.; Ismail, A.; Rashid, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on the prominent barriers to lean manufacturing implementation in Malaysian Food and Beverages Industry. A survey was carried out to determine the most prominent barriers of lean manufacturing implementation that are currently being faced in this industry. The amount of barriers identified for this study is twenty seven. Out of 1309 available organizations, a total of 300 organizations have been randomly selected as respondents, and 53 organizations responded. From the variable map, the analysis shows that, the negative perception towards lean manufacturing top the list as the most agreeable barrier, while the technical barriers came after it. It can also be seen from the variable map that averagely, lack of vision and direction is the barrier that is being faced. Finally, this is perhaps the first attempt in investigating the prominent barriers to Lean Manufacturing implementation in Malaysian food and beverages industry using Rasch Model.

  10. A Cobb-Douglas estimation of labour productivity in the South African motor vehicle manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. van Zyl

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to demonstrate the use of an unique extention of the Cobb-Douglas efficiency criteria for the measurement and quantification of labour productivity. The South African motor vehicle manufacturing industry is used as a case study. This paper adopts the hypothesis that one of the more important factors contributing to the spiralling unit cost in the motor vehicle industry is the sluggish level of labour productivity. The results of the measurements are indeed interesting and it substantiates the hypothesis that the low level of labour productivity does contribute significantly to the increasing unit cost of the industry. Opsomming Die oogmerk van die artikel is om 'n unieke uitbreiding van die Cobb-Douglas doelmatigheidskriteria in die meting en kwantifisering van arbeidsproduktiwiteit bekend te stel. Die Suid-Afrikaanse motorindustrie is as 'n gevalle studie gebruik. Die artikel stel die hipotese dat een van die belangrike bydraende faktore tot die toenemende eenheidskoste in die Industrie die oenskynlike gebrek aan arbeidsproduktiwiteit is. Die resultate van die metings is interessant en staaf die hipotese dat die kontinue lae vlak van arbeidsproduktiwiteit in die bedryf 'n sterk bydraende faktor tot stygende eenheidskoste en die oneffektiewe samestelling van die arbeid/kapitaal insetkombinasie is.

  11. Manufacturing processes in the textile industry. Expert Systems for fabrics production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan BULLON

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry is characterized by the economic activity whose objective is the production of fibres, yarns, fabrics, clothing and textile goods for home and decoration,as well as technical and industrial purposes. Within manufacturing, the Textile is one of the oldest and most complex sectors which includes a large number of sub-sectors covering the entire production cycle, from raw materials and intermediate products, to the production of final products. Textile industry activities present different subdivisions, each with its own traits. The length of the textile process and the variety of its technical processes lead to the coexistence of different sub-sectors in regards to their business structure and integration. The textile industry is developing expert systems applications to increase production, improve quality and reduce costs. The analysis of textile designs or structures includes the use of mathematical models to simulate the behavior of the textile structures (yarns, fabrics and knitting. The Finite Element Method (FEM has largely facilitated the prediction of the behavior of that textile structure under mechanical loads. For classification problems Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs haveproved to be a very effective tool as a quick and accurate solution. The Case-Based Reasoning (CBR method proposed in this study complements the results of the finite element simulation, mathematical modeling and neural networks methods.

  12. The Impact of Soft Factors on Quality Improvement in Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Shiau Wei; Fauzi Ahmad, Md; Kong, Mei Wan

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays, soft factors have become the key factors of success in quality improvement of an organisation. Many organisations have neglected the importance of soft factors, this may influence the organisational performance. Hence, the purpose of this research is to examine the impact of soft factors on quality improvement in manufacturing industries. Six hypotheses were examined while considering six dimensions of soft factors including management commitment, customer focus, supplier relationship, employee involvement, training and education, and reward and recognition that have a positive impact on quality improvement. In this study, eighty one managers from the quality department were randomly selected in the manufacturing industry in Batu Pahat, Johor. The questionnaires were distributed to them. The researcher analysed the quantitatively collected data using descriptive analysis and correlation analysis. The findings of this study revealed that all soft factors are correlated to the quality improvement in an organisation with a high significant value but the regression analysis shows that the supplier relationship and employee involvement has more significant impact on quality improvement as compared to other soft factors which contributes of this study.

  13. Methodology to produce a water and energy stream map (WESM in the South African manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies, Edward

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for water and energy in South Africa, and the capacity constraints and restrictions of both resources, have led to a rapid increase in their cost. The manufacturing industry remains South Africa’s third-largest consumer of water and second- largest consumer of national energy. The improvement of water and energy efficiency is becoming an increasingly important theme for both organisational success and national economic sustainability. This paper presents the ‘lean based water and energy stream mapping framework’ developed for the manufacturing industry, with the specific objective of decreasing its water and energy intensity. As with the traditional value stream mapping tool, the water and energy stream mapping focuses on eliminating water- and energy-specific wastes within a process. Water and energy waste categories that will be used in conjunction with the framework will also be discussed. The key objective of this paper is to detail the process of creating the water and energy stream mapping, and the statistical forecasting methodology used to develop the baseline water and energy demand data. The outcome of the implementation of the framework is the future state water and energy stream mapping, which is effectively a blueprint for increased water and energy efficiency within a studied process.

  14. OICS: A Knowledge-based Cloud Manufacturing System for Machine Tool Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yin Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an Ontology inference cloud service (OICS with auto-scaling capability is designed and implemented for the CNC machine tool industry. The OICS is a knowledge-based cloud manufacturing system, and is used to recommend machine tools and cutting tools based on the Ontology inference techniques. Three core functional modules: the Ontology inference module, the VMT (Virtual Machine Tool module, and the request filtering module, are developed to allow multiple users to perform inference service, and verify the recommended machine tools or cutting tools via VMT simulations. The OICS is implemented and hosted in a cloud virtual machine, called a worker. Furthermore, the worker controller (WCR, is designed to automatically adjust the number of virtual machines to provide users splendid service quality. Finally, we deploy the developed OICS to a public cloud platform, namely Windows Azure, to conduct integrated tests. Testing results of a case study physically applying the OICS to a machine tool factory show that the OICS can successfully recommend suitable machine tools and cutting tools for machining tasks, and support multiple users in a reasonable performance. The results of this paper can be a useful reference for industrial practitioners to construct cloud-based manufacturing systems.

  15. Composting of de-inking sludge from the recycled paper manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, Teresa; Artola, Adriana; Sánchez, Antoni

    2005-07-01

    Composting of two different types of sludge from the recycled paper manufacturing industry was carried out at laboratory scale. Physico-chemical sludge (PCS) from the de-inking process and biological sludge (BS) from the wastewater treatment plant were composted and co-composted with and without addition of a bulking material. Despite its poor initial characteristics (relatively high C/N ratio, low organic content and moisture), PCS showed excellent behaviour in the composting process, reaching and maintaining thermophilic temperatures for more than 7 days at laboratory scale, and therefore complete hygienization. Pilot scale composting of PCS was also studied, and a respiratory quotient of 1.19 was obtained, indicating a full aerobic biological process. Respiration tests showed a complete stabilization of the material, with final values of the static respiration index in the range of 1.1 mg O2gTOM(-1)h(-1). Composting is proposed as a suitable technology for the effective recycling of this type of sludge from the recycled paper manufacturing industry.

  16. Pharmaceutical industry perspective on risk evaluation and mitigation strategies: manufacturer take heed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Susan; Peterson, Janet; Yektashenas, Behin

    2012-03-01

    Enactment of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA) authorized the FDA to require manufacturers to submit Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) when it was deemed necessary to ensure that a drug's benefit outweigh its risk. REMS apply to new drug applications (NDAs), abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) and biologics license applications (BLAs). The objective of this review is to describe the impact of REMS requirements on the pharmaceutical industry. Articles were identified in MEDLINE searches through October 11, 2011, using the MeSH terms and keywords pharmaceutical industry, risk management, United States Food and Drug Administration, REMS, ETASU, and Medication Guide in various combinations. The new powers ascribed to the FDA are notable, as they add enforceability to safety strategies that were not part of FDA's prior risk management tools, risk minimization action plans (RiskMAPs). Failure to comply with REMS can lead to financial penalties up to $10 million, and a drug could be deemed misbranded if the REMS is not followed. The new approach to risk management via FDAAA has elevated the rigor with which manufacturers must fulfill postmarketing safety commitments.

  17. Evaluation of Project Based Learning in the Area of Manufacturing and Statistics in the Degree of Industrial Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buj-Corral, Irene; Marco-Almagro, Lluís; Riba, Alex; Vivancos-Calvet, Joan; Tort-Martorell, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    In the subject Project I in the second year of the Degree in Industrial Technology Engineering taught at the School of Industrial Engineering of Barcelona (ETSEIB), subgroups of 3-4 students within groups of 20 students develop a project along a semester. Results of 2 projects are presented related to manufacturing, measurement of parts and the…

  18. Spatial Agglomeration, Human and Social Capital: The Case of Turkey Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özer Karakayacı

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades, new economic theories explode the factors depending on space and spatial characteristics. In this process, it is developed the theories on social-cultural aspects and spatial characteristics of regions instead of traditional economic theories. These theories have been main strategy for economic development and growth. Economic development has not been considered independently from space by these theories and economic performance of a region was emphasized importance of economic actors, institutional and economic infrastructure as well as geographic features. Geography or spatial features contribute to increase not only skilled workforce, knowledge spillover and distribution but also social relations and interaction. In other words, the social-cultural and humanity factors relating with spatial and geography are major factors affecting on the development and also growing of economic activities. Especially, while industrialization as engine of regional development has been benefiting from the advantages offered by spatial features, clustering of economic activities and relationships among actors are shaped according to socio-cultural and human factors revealed spatial features. In this context, clustering of economic activities has been one of the new areas of interest in the theory of economic geography. Therefore, clustering of economic activities and human-social-spatial resources has been emphasized to play a major role in growth and development of regions by essays of the new economic geography. In that context, the aim of this paper is to determine the effects of human and social capital in the spatial agglomeration of economic activities in case of Konya-Turkey. In this study, the agglomeration tendencies for manufacturing industry in Konya, which have major potentials in terms of human and social capital and manufacturing industry potential, is analysed comparatively depending on secondary resources and using

  19. Control of ammonia and urea emissions from urea manufacturing facilities of Petrochemical Industries Company (PIC), Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A R; Al-Awadi, L; Al-Rashidi, M S

    2016-06-01

    Petrochemical Industries Company (PIC) in Kuwait has mitigated the pollution problem of ammonia and urea dust by replacing the melting and prilling units of finished-product urea prills with an environmentally friendly granulation process. PIC has financed a research project conducted by the Coastal and Air Pollution Program's research staff at the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research to assess the impact of pollution control strategies implemented to maintain a healthy productive environment in and around the manufacturing premises. The project was completed in three phases: the first phase included the pollution monitoring of the melting and prilling units in full operation, the second phase covered the complete shutdown period where production was halted completely and granulation units were installed, and the last phase encompassed the current modified status with granulation units in full operation. There was substantial decrease in ammonia emissions, about 72%, and a 52.7% decrease in urea emissions with the present upgrading of old melting and prilling units to a state-of-the-art technology "granulation process" for a final finished product. The other pollutants, sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), have not shown any significant change, as the present modification has not affected the sources of these pollutants. Petrochemical Industries Company (PIC) in Kuwait has ammonia urea industries, and there were complaints about ammonia and urea dust pollution. PIC has resolved this problem by replacing "melting and prilling unit" of final product urea prills by more environmentally friendly "granulation unit." Environmental Pollution and Climate Program has been assigned the duty of assessing the outcome of this change and how that influenced ammonia and urea dust emissions from the urea manufacturing plant.

  20. Energy-Efficient Through-Life Smart Design, Manufacturing and Operation of Ships in an Industry 4.0 Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Hock Ang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy efficiency is an important factor in the marine industry to help reduce manufacturing and operational costs as well as the impact on the environment. In the face of global competition and cost-effectiveness, ship builders and operators today require a major overhaul in the entire ship design, manufacturing and operation process to achieve these goals. This paper highlights smart design, manufacturing and operation as the way forward in an industry 4.0 (i4 era from designing for better energy efficiency to more intelligent ships and smart operation through-life. The paper (i draws parallels between ship design, manufacturing and operation processes, (ii identifies key challenges facing such a temporal (lifecycle as opposed to spatial (mass products, (iii proposes a closed-loop ship lifecycle framework and (iv outlines potential future directions in smart design, manufacturing and operation of ships in an industry 4.0 value chain so as to achieve more energy-efficient vessels. Through computational intelligence and cyber-physical integration, we envision that industry 4.0 can revolutionise ship design, manufacturing and operations in a smart product through-life process in the near future.

  1. A Noble Approach of Process Automation in Galvanized Nut, Bolt Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash Samanta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion costs money”, The Columbus battle institute estimates that corrosion costs Americans more than $ 220 billion annually, about 4.3% of the gross natural product [1].Now a days due to increase of pollution, the rate of corrosion is also increasing day-by-day mainly in India, so, to save the steel structures, galvanizing is the best and the simplest solution. Due to this reason galvanizing industries are increasing day-by-day since mid of 1700s.Galvanizing is a controlled metallurgical combination of zinc and steel that can provide a corrosion resistance in a wide variety of environment. In fact, the galvanized metal corrosion resistance factor can be some 70 to 80 times greater that the base metal material. Keeping in mind the importance of this industry, a noble approach of process automation in galvanized nut-bolt  manufacturing plant is presented here as nuts and bolts are the prime ingredient of any structure. In this paper the main objectives of any industry like survival, profit maximization, profit satisfying and sales growth are fulfilled. Furthermore the environmental aspects i.e. pollution control and energy saving are also considered in this paper. The whole automation process is done using programmable logic controller (PLC which has number of unique advantages like being faster, reliable, requires less maintenance and reprogrammable. The whole system has been designed and tested using GE, FANUC PLC.

  2. Ergonomics issues among sewing machine operators in the textile manufacturing industry in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealetsa, O J; Thatcher, A

    2011-01-01

    Universally musculoskeletal disorders are among the leading causes of low productivity in today's work environment. The situation is reportedly even worse in developing countries with appalling working conditions in many industries. In addition, there is often an acute lack of awareness of ergonomics issues, education and training programmes, and certification within developing countries. Numerous studies internationally have highlighted musculoskeletal risk factors associated with the textile industry and garment-making jobs because of highly repetitive work in awkward work postures. The objective of this study was to identify and describe possible ergonomics deficiencies in the workstation of sewing machine operators in a textile industry in Botswana as well as their perception of workload and bodily discomfort. This study focused on one textile manufacturing factory in Botswana where 157 female sewing machine operators were recruited as participants. A modified Corlett and Bishop body map questionnaire and the NASA TLX were administered and relevant anthropometric and workplace layout measurements were collected. The results of the study revealed a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. Back, neck and shoulder discomfort are highly prevalent among these sewing machine operators. This study proposes intervention strategies including the re-design of the workstations and seating and the provision of training in basic ergonomics principles for improving the work-life of these operators and provides a base for further research on the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among sewing machine operators in developing countries.

  3. Export and Economic Growth in the Case of the Manufacturing Industry: Panel Data Analysis of Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Kılavuz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between growth in export and economic growth, which is called “Export-led Growth Hypothesis” in the literature, is still a current issue in both the theoretical and empirical literature. In the present study, the effect of different classifications of export and import on economic growth in 22 developing countries in the 1998–2006 period was tested based on two models, via panel data analysis. According to the results of the first model, the analysis of which included variables such as high and low-tech manufacturing industry exports, investment and population, it was found that only two variables, high-tech manufacturing industry export and investment, have a positive and significant effect on growth. In addition to the first model which included the analysis of all variables, the second model investigated the effect of high and low-tech manufacturing industry imports on growth. The findings revealed that only high-tech manufacturing industry export, investment and low-tech manufacturing industry import have a positive and significant effect on growth.

  4. Greenhouse gas emissions from production chain of a cigarette manufacturing industry in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Majid, E-mail: majid_qau86@yahoo.com [Environmental Biology and Ecotoxicology Laboratory, Department of Environmental Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, University of Haripur, Hattar Road, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Haripur 22620 (Pakistan); Zaidi, Syed Mujtaba Hasnian [Leaf Agronomy Manager, Pakistan Tobacco Company, Akora Khattak Factory, P.O. and District Nowshera, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Malik, Riffat Naseem, E-mail: r_n_malik2000@yahoo.co.uk [Environmental Biology and Ecotoxicology Laboratory, Department of Environmental Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Sharma, Benktesh Dash [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    This study quantified greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Pakistan Tobacco Company (PTC) production using a life cycle approach. The PTC production chain comprises of two phases: agricultural activities (Phase I) and industrial activities (Phase II). Data related to agricultural and industrial activities of PTC production chain were collected through questionnaire survey from tobacco growers and records from PTC manufacturing units. The results showed that total GHG emissions from PTC production chain were 44,965, 42,875, and 43,839 tCO{sub 2}e respectively in 2009, 2010, and 2011. Among the agricultural activities, firewood burning for tobacco curing accounted for about 3117, 3565, and 3264 tCO{sub 2}e, fertilizer application accounted for 754, 3251, and 4761 tCO{sub 2}e in 2009, 2010, and 2011, respectively. Among the industrial activities, fossil fuels consumption in stationary sources accounted for 15,582, 12,733, and 13,203 tCO{sub 2}e, fossil fuels used in mobile sources contributed to 2693, 3038, and 3260 tCO{sub 2}e, and purchased electricity consumed resulted in 15,177, 13,556, and 11,380 tCO{sub 2}e in 2009, 2010, and 2011, respectively. The GHG emissions related to the transportation of raw materials and processed tobacco amounted to 6800, 6301, and 7317 respectively in 2009, 2010, and 2011. GHG emissions from energy use in the industrial activities constituted the largest emissions (i.e., over 80%) of GHG emissions as PTC relies on fossil fuels and fossil fuel based electrical power in industrial processes. The total emissions of carbon footprint (CFP) from PTC production were 0.647 tCO{sub 2}e per million cigarettes produced in 2009, 0.675 tCO{sub 2}e per million cigarettes in 2010 and 0.59 tCO{sub 2}e per million cigarettes in 2011. Potential strategies for GHG emissions reductions for PTC production chain include energy efficiency, reducing reliance on fossil fuels in non-mobile sources, adoption of renewable fuels including solar energy, energy

  5. Evaluating the Total Factor Productivity Growth in Manufacturing Industries of Iran (Data Envelopment Analysis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Ahmadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the total factor productivity changes for 23 main manufacturing industries (2-digit ISIC group and country's provinces using data envelopment analysis during 2005 to 2007. The results show 2.3% increase in the productivity of the whole sector (average over the studied period, while the productivity of the country's provinces decreases by 7.3%, in the same period. We find Food and Beverage products and Khuzestan province having the highest productivity growth. Non-optimal allocation of resources and using of old equipments are the most important drawbacks of productivity growth for 23 main ISIC groups and provinces. Finally estimation of the regression models by panel data method reveals the privatization and increasing of labor’s available capital having a significant effect on productivity growth.

  6. Sustainable Product Service Systems in Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs: Opportunities in the Leather Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo J. Hernández Pardo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach to identify opportunities to develop sustainable Product Service Systems (PSS involving Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs. The purpose of the research is to build understanding of how the integration of product and service design and the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT can contribute to identify opportunities to develop sustainable PSS involving SMEs. In order to develop the approach, research with 16 Colombian Manufacturing SMEs was carried out. A reference model and four generic types of PSS according to the relationships between product and service design and ICT are used to analyse the data. Finally, the possibility of extending the approach into a general framework to work with other industries is discussed.

  7. Factors associated with the burnout syndrome among professionals in pharmaceutical manufacturing industry and marketing 1234

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Vesna R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Certain authors describe some professions in the healthcare industry as the more susceptible ones to developing a burnout syndrome, while others suggest psychosocial aspects of the workplace as the primary cause in its creation, but not the aspects of the job itself. The main objective of the research was to investigate which specific factors were associated with the burnout syndrome among professionals working in pharmaceutical manufacturing industry and marketing. The study was conducted in June of 2016 as a cross-sectional study and it included 75 university educated professionals from the area of pharmaceutical industry and marketing employed in several local as well as internationally renowned pharmaceutical companies located in Belgrade. The participants were surveyed anonymously. The instruments used in the study were: a general socio-demographic questionnaire, an assertiveness self-evaluation questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. An analysis of the responses in the burnout syndrome self-evaluation questionnaires showed that the highest level of burnout was expressed through reduced personal accomplishment (53%. The average assertiveness scores were the lowest in the individuals who demonstrated the highest level of emotional exhaustion (p=0.003, depersonalization (p=0.004, and the highest inefficiency on professional accomplishment scale (p=0.001. A statistically significant difference was observed in frequency and extent of emotional exhaustion with respect to respondents' gender (x2=10.779; p<0.05, as well as the line of business (x2=6.493; p<0.05. Levels of depersonalization are influenced by: line of work (x2=5.393; p<0.05, age (p=0.004, total years of service (p=0.009 and years of service in the profession (p=0.006. A sense of reduced personal accomplishment is influenced by a respondents' profession (x2=10.922; p<0.05 and line of business (x2=7.283; p<0.05. The results obtained in this study might help in identifying

  8. Regulation of drugs and chemicals used by the poultry industry. Good manufacturing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, L H

    1994-09-01

    Good manufacturing practices (GMP) are required to be followed in the use of animal drugs to produce medicated feeds. The authority is found in the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, which states that medicated feed can be deemed adulterated if GMP were not followed in its production. This authority has been translated into GMP regulations applicable to all medicated feed production. More detailed GMP are imposed on those using high potency sources of drugs that require a withdrawal period (Category II). Less detailed GMP are imposed on all other drug uses (Category I and lower potency sources of Category II). Facility registration, medicated feed applications, and biennial inspections are also imposed on those required to follow the more detailed GMP regulations. The basic thrust of the regulations is assurance that drug use is correct in all respects and that the integrity of all medicated and nonmedicated feeds is maintained. The objective is food free of illegal drug residues, i.e., food safety. The GMP regulations are based on joint industry-government endeavor and reflect the practical realities of feed manufacturing. They are, for all practical purposes, good business practices assuring that medicated feeds make a positive contribution to food production and consumer confidence.

  9. Creative strategies of businesses with the holistic eigensolution in manufacturing industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeichen, Gerfried; Huray, Paul G.

    1998-10-01

    It is a mission of this contribution to recognize and synthesize all the efforts in industry and in management science to strengthen our techniques and tools for successfully solving increasingly complex leadership problems in manufacturing industries. With the high standard of the work sharing method--the so called Taylorism principle--for cost efficient and mass production, invented at the beginning of the 20th century and the opening of the world market for global sales of goods and services a gigantic progress in living standards was reached. But at the beginning of the 21st century we are needing new ideas and methods for the guidance of overcoming increasing complexity. The holistic eigensolution presents a new operational framework for viewing and controlling the behavior of businesses. In contrast to the traditional process for viewing complex business systems through the intricate analysis of every part of that system, the authors have employed a technique used by physicists to understand the characteristic of `eigen' behaviors of complex physical systems. This method of systems analysis is achieved by observing interactions between the parts in a whole. This kind of analysis has a rigorous mathematical foundation in the physical world and it can be employed to understand most natural phenomena. Within a holistic framework, the observer is challenged to view the system form just the right perspective so that characteristic eigenmodes reveal themselves. The conclusion of the article describes why exactly the intelligent manufacturing science--especially in a broader sense--has the responsibility and chance to develop the holistic eigensolution framework as a Taylorism II-principle for the 21st century.

  10. Analysis of application of various materials for manufacturing parts of motor car bodies in automobile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вікторія Григорівна Гаврилова

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The work presents an analysis of applying various steels for manufacturing motor-car bodies. There is a brief description of cold-rolled sheet steels RRST 1405 produced according to the standards DIN 1623 and DIN 1541; UST 1203, UST 1303 according to DIN 1624 and DIN 1606; ST 4, 08MnSiAlTi, 07MnNbAl and also a classification and a brief description of steels made according to USLAB: IF-steel with increased formability, thermo-strengthened BH-steel, dual phase (DP steels, transformation induced plasticity (TRIP steels, martensitic (Mart steels, austenitic high-tensile steels – (TWIP steels, high strength steels of new generation of AHSS type (advanced high-strength steels and UHSS (ultra high-strength steels, high-strength steels and superplastic steels of new generation for lightweight constructions (TRIPLEX-steel, hot-rolled nano-structured steel NANOHITEN. It has been shown that the main tendency in modern approach to engineering and manufacturing sheet steel used in automotive industry is to increase strength while maintaining formability characteristics, reducing the coefficient of normal plastic anisotropy (Lankford value ratio, as well as increasing srengthening at deformation. The advantages and disadvantages of the materials used in the automotive industry have been shown, as well as ways of their improving. The work represents a compilation of several publications. The materials can be used for developing a training course «Materials to be used in transport» within the framework of the International Project on reforming curricula TEMPUS «MMATENG»: «Two-stage Training Program for Engineering Materials Curriculum Modernization»

  11. A prospective study of the development of hand eczema in an automobile manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, O

    1992-05-01

    We have not been able to find any prospective study of the risk of developing occupational dermatitis in the car manufacturing industry. To try to define individual predictive risk factors for the development of hand eczema and to determine the prevalence of hand eczema within 1 year in an automobile manufacturing industry, we investigated prospectively 1564 new employees during one year of employment. Only persons with previous atopic dermatitis or hand eczema were restricted to dry and clean workplaces. The employees were personally interviewed and examined before their employment. Written questionnaires were used at 3 and 12 months to obtain information on type of work, exposure, protection and hand dermatitis. All patients developing hand eczema were examined, patch tested and followed to determine the course and consequence of their eczema. The risk turned out to be only 4% on average, but significantly higher in females (6%). Certain sections within the factory such as wet work (canteen/kitchen and cleaning) and work in the paint shop with high exposure to organic solvents carried significantly higher risks. Heavy exposure to mineral oil, a known risk factor, was effectively counteracted by the extensive use of protective gloves to yield a lower than average prevalence in the press and body shop. Individual risk factors for the development of hand eczema were previous hand eczema, atopic dermatitis, but also wool intolerance and hay fever as isolated phenomena. Most cases of hand eczema were mild, of irritant contact type and only 1 employee developed an allergic contact dermatitis due to the working environment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Marital status and cardiovascular risk in French and Swedish automotive industry workers--cross sectional results from the Renault-Volvo Coeur study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumlin, L; Latscha, G; Orth-Gomér, K; Dimberg, L; Lanoiselée, C; Simon, A; Eriksson, B

    2001-04-01

    To compare the coronary risk profiles in a sample of the French and Swedish automotive industry employees who were married/cohabitant, divorced or single (never married). A cross-sectional study comparison from biological and questionnaire data between the French and Swedish samples. Occupational health departments at Renault (employees from the north-west of France) and Volvo (employees from the south-west of Sweden). Two random samples of males aged between 45 and 50 years were examined in 1993, from Renault 1000, and from Volvo 1000. Biological data including cholesterol, blood pressure as well as the Framingham risk index. Self reported information regarding marital status, smoking, exercise, alcohol habits, and work stress assessed by the Karasek method, private social support indices, and type A behaviour according to the Bortner scale. More employees were married/cohabitant and fewer divorced or single at Renault. Apart from waist/hip ratio being marginally lower in Swedish single men, compared with married and divorced, no significant difference in biological cardiac risk factors (total cholesterol, blood pressure or Framingham risk index) was seen between the subgroups from any of the two countries. Compared with married/cohabitant men, it was shown that in men living alone smoking was more prevalent at Renault and Volvo. These men also showed less type A behaviour, a lower work control and a lower work support and fewer close friends. Alcohol consumption was reported in smaller amounts for Volvo employees living alone compared with married or divorced employees. Married/cohabitant and divorced staff showed similar values regarding all measured variables when compared within each country. Employees living alone in both France (Renault) and Sweden (Volvo) automotive companies seem to have increased nontraditional cardiac risk factors pertaining to life style and social network compared with married or divorced men. These results, in combination with the

  13. Automotive Manufacturers' Cost/Revenue, Financial and Risk Analysis : Projected Impact of Automobile Manufacturing on the Plastics Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    The report is part of a study to update the historical and projected cost/revenue analysis of the U.S. domestic automobile manufacturers. It includes the evaluation of the historical and projected financial data to assess the corporate financial posi...

  14. PREFACE: 2013 International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering (MOIME 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Rizwan Hussain, Raja; Pandiangan, Tumpal; Desai, Amit

    2013-06-01

    Banner The 2013 International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering (MOIME 2013), was held at the Grand Royal Panghegar Hotel, Bandung, Indonesia, from 9-10 March 2013. The MOIME 2013 conference brought together researchers, engineers and scientists in the field from around the world. MOIME 2013 aimed to promote interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange was achieved in new and emerging areas within Material Engineering, Industrial Engineering and all areas that related to Optimization. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 103 papers and after rigorous review, 45 papers were accepted. The participants came from 16 countries. There were six Plenary and Invited Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contribution. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the conference sponsors for the financial support that contributed to the success of MOIME 2013. The Editors of the MOIME 2013 Dr Ford Lumban Gaol Dr Raja Rizwan Hussain Tumpal Pandiangan Dr Amit Desai The PDF contains the abstracts from the plenary and invited articles and the workshop.

  15. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering (MOIME 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Webb, Jeff; Ding, Jun

    2015-05-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering (MOIME 2015) was held at the Sheraton Kuta, Bali, Indonesia, from 28 - 29 March 2015. The MOIME 2015 conference is aimed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. MOIME 2015 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within Material Engineering, Industrial Engineering and all areas that relate to Optimization. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program, as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 99 papers and after rigorous review, 24 papers were accepted. The participants come from eight countries. There were four parallel sessions and two invited speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of MOIME 2015. The Editors of the MOIME 2015 Proceedings Dr. Ford Lumban Gaol Jeff Webb, Ph.D Prof. Jun DING, Ph.D

  16. UTILISATION OF BENCHMARKING TECHNIQUES FOR FUNDAMENTING DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES IN THE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geambasu Cristina Venera

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is a method used to measure the products, services and processes in comparison to an entity recognized as a leader in terms of performance of its operations. Used in the years 1970-1980 in the strategic management of the company currently has proven to be increasingly useful in many areas, including in international analysis models. In the European Union benchmarking indicators are used especially in the digital economy and as perspective indicators for 2011-2015 (Eurostat, Database. In the introduction we present and define forms of benchmarking, as well as a number of specific terms, which contribute to a better understanding of the content of this scientific work. Time series are used to highlight advances in labor productivity in EU countries, and the analysis is particularized for two countries: Romania and Germany. Quantitative data were collected from the source Eurostat website. A comprehensive indicator at macroeconomic level is resource productivity, representing GDP in relation with domestic consumption of material (DCM. DCM measures the amount of materials used directly by an economy. It is presented in tabular form for all European Union countries and Switzerland, as evolving over a period of eight years. Benchmarking method is used to highlight some differences (gaps between EU countries regarding productivity and particularly the one between Germany and Romania is highlighted, concerning the performance of manufacturing industries. It is expected that this gap will diminish. The gap was highlighted by relevant graphics and interpretations. The second part of the paper focuses on comparative analysis of factors productivity using the production function. We analyze labor and capital productivity and other factors that determine the level of production. For highlighting the contribution of the labour factor we used the number of hours worked, considering that it reflects the analyzed phenomenon more realistically. For

  17. Greenhouse gas emissions from production chain of a cigarette manufacturing industry in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Majid; Zaidi, Syed Mujtaba Hasnian; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Sharma, Benktesh Dash

    2014-10-01

    This study quantified greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Pakistan Tobacco Company (PTC) production using a life cycle approach. The PTC production chain comprises of two phases: agricultural activities (Phase I) and industrial activities (Phase II). Data related to agricultural and industrial activities of PTC production chain were collected through questionnaire survey from tobacco growers and records from PTC manufacturing units. The results showed that total GHG emissions from PTC production chain were 44,965, 42,875, and 43,839 tCO2e respectively in 2009, 2010, and 2011. Among the agricultural activities, firewood burning for tobacco curing accounted for about 3117, 3565, and 3264 tCO2e, fertilizer application accounted for 754, 3251, and 4761 tCO2e in 2009, 2010, and 2011, respectively. Among the industrial activities, fossil fuels consumption in stationary sources accounted for 15,582, 12,733, and 13,203 tCO2e, fossil fuels used in mobile sources contributed to 2693, 3038, and 3260 tCO2e, and purchased electricity consumed resulted in 15,177, 13,556, and 11,380 tCO2e in 2009, 2010, and 2011, respectively. The GHG emissions related to the transportation of raw materials and processed tobacco amounted to 6800, 6301, and 7317 respectively in 2009, 2010, and 2011. GHG emissions from energy use in the industrial activities constituted the largest emissions (i.e., over 80%) of GHG emissions as PTC relies on fossil fuels and fossil fuel based electrical power in industrial processes. The total emissions of carbon footprint (CFP) from PTC production were 0.647 tCO2e per million cigarettes produced in 2009, 0.675 tCO2e per million cigarettes in 2010 and 0.59 tCO2e per million cigarettes in 2011. Potential strategies for GHG emissions reductions for PTC production chain include energy efficiency, reducing reliance on fossil fuels in non-mobile sources, adoption of renewable fuels including solar energy, energy from crop residues, and promotion of organic

  18. Job rotation designed to prevent musculoskeletal disorders and control risk in manufacturing industries: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Rosimeire Simprini; Comper, Maria Luiza Caires; Sparer, Emily H; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2017-01-01

    To better understand job rotation in the manufacturing industry, we completed a systematic review asking the following questions: 1) How do job-rotation programs impact work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and related risk control for these MSDs, as well as psychosocial factors? and 2) How best should the job rotation programs be designed? We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Business Source Premier, ISI Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, PsyINFO, Scopus, and SciELO databases for articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Eligible studies were examined by two independent reviewers for relevance (population of manufacturing workers, outcomes of musculoskeletal disorders, physical factors, psychosocial factors, and strategies used in job-rotation implantation) and methodological quality rating. From 10,809 potential articles, 71 were read for full text analysis. Of the 14 studies included for data extraction, two were non-randomized control trial studies, one was a case-control study, and 11 were cross-sectional comparisons. Only one, with a case-control design, was scored with good methodological quality. Currently, weak evidence exists supporting job rotation as a strategy for the prevention and control of musculoskeletal disorders. Job rotation did not appear to reduce the exposure of physical risk factors; yet, there are positive correlations between job rotation and higher job satisfaction. Worker training has been described as a crucial component of a successful job-rotation program. The studies reported a range of parameters used to implement and measure job-rotation programs. More rigorous studies are needed to better understand the full impact of job rotation on production and health. CRD42014013319. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Job Rotation Designed to Prevent Musculoskeletal Disorders and Control Risk in Manufacturing Industries: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Rosimeire Simprini; Comper, Maria Luiza Caires; Sparer, Emily H.; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2017-01-01

    To better understand job rotation in the manufacturing industry, we completed a systematic review asking the following questions: 1) How do job-rotation programs impact work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and related risk control for these MSDs, as well as psychosocial factors? and 2) How best should the job rotation programs be designed? We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Business Source Premier, ISI Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, PsyINFO, Scopus, and SciELO databases for articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Eligible studies were examined by two independent reviewers for relevance (population of manufacturing workers, outcomes of musculoskeletal disease, physical factors, psychosocial factors, and strategies used in job-rotation implantation) and methodological quality rating. From 10,809 potential articles, 71 were read for full text analysis. Of the 14 studies included for data extraction, two were non-randomized control trial studies, one was a case-control study, and 11 were cross-sectional comparisons. Only one, with a case-control design, was scored with good methodological quality. Currently, weak evidence exists supporting job rotation as a strategy for the prevention and control of musculoskeletal disorders. Job rotation did not appear to reduce the exposure of physical risk factors; yet, there are positive correlations between job rotation and higher job satisfaction. Worker training has been described as a crucial component of a successful job-rotation program. The studies reported a range of parameters used to implement and measure job-rotation programs. More rigorous studies are needed to better understand the full impact of job rotation on production and health. PMID:27633235

  20. Case Study on Lean Manufacturing System Implementation in Batch Printing Industry Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Saihong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lean Manufacturing is a popular tool to be implemented in printing industry fields for the purpose of achieving the successful production goals and it is a well-organized method used to eliminate the waste or non-value added activities. Lean Manufacturing consists of several tools like 5S, TPM, Kanban, Kaizen and others. In this paper, the researcher is focus on TPM (Total Productive Maintenance. TPM is a concept used for maintaining plants and equipment with the involvement of all employees in the company in order to increase the overall equipment effectiveness (OEE. In this paper, the researcher will identify the problem faced in company’s production line and then implement lean tools in order to improve the productivity. Afterward, the researcher will carry out time study on company’s production line. The purpose of time study is to getting the result for OEE and the time taken for producing one piece of product. The researcher is then designed and suggested one-piece flow system to the management with showing the result on simulation that getting improvement in productivity. The result was simulated by using Flexsim and shows that 7.59 seconds was saved in producing one piece of calendar. At the end, the result shows that OEE increase from 34.3% to 60% and the company total save around 6 hours per month by implement one-piece flow. At last, by verifying the distribution of collected data, the researcher will perform Anderson Darling Normality test to ensure the distribution of data are normal.

  1. The optimal parameter design for a welding unit of manufacturing industry by Taguchi method and computer simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mojib Zahraee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Manufacturing systems include a complicated combination of resources, such as materials, labors, and machines. Hence, when the manufacturing systems are faced with a problem related to the availability of resources it is difficult to identify the root of the problem accurately and effectively. Managers and engineers in companies are trying to achieve a robust production line based on the maximum productivity. The main goal of this paper is to design a robust production line, taking productivity into account in the selected manufacturing industry. Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents the application of Taguchi method along with computer simulation for finding an optimum factor setting for three controllable factors, which are a number of welding machines, hydraulic machines, and cutting machines by analyzing the effect of noise factors in a selected manufacturing industry. Findings and Originality/value: Based on the final results, the optimal design parameter of welding unit of in the selected manufacturing industry will be obtained when factor A is located at level 2 and B and C are located at level 1. Therefore, maximum productive desirability is achieved when the number of welding machines, hydraulic machines, and cutting machines is equal to 17, 2, and 1, respectively. This paper has a significant role in designing a robust production line by considering the lowest cost and timely manner based on the Taguchi method.

  2. The optimal parameter design for a welding unit of manufacturing industry by Taguchi method and computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahraee, S.M.; Chegeni, A.; Toghtamish, A.

    2016-07-01

    Manufacturing systems include a complicated combination of resources, such as materials, labors, and machines. Hence, when the manufacturing systems are faced with a problem related to the availability of resources it is difficult to identify the root of the problem accurately and effectively. Managers and engineers in companies are trying to achieve a robust production line based on the maximum productivity. The main goal of this paper is to design a robust production line, taking productivity into account in the selected manufacturing industry. This paper presents the application of Taguchi method along with computer simulation for finding an optimum factor setting for three controllable factors, which are a number of welding machines, hydraulic machines, and cutting machines by analyzing the effect of noise factors in a selected manufacturing industry. Based on the final results, the optimal design parameter of welding unit of in the selected manufacturing industry will be obtained when factor A is located at level 2 and B and C are located at level 1. Therefore, maximum productive desirability is achieved when the number of welding machines, hydraulic machines, and cutting machines is equal to 17, 2, and 1, respectively. This paper has a significant role in designing a robust production line by considering the lowest cost and timely manner based on the Taguchi method. (Author)

  3. Preliminary definition and characterization of a solar industrial process heat technology and manufacturing plant for the year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prythero, T.; Meyer, R. T.

    1980-09-01

    A solar industrial process heat technology and an associated solar systems manufacturing plant for the year 2000 has been projected, defined, and qualitatively characterized. The technology has been defined for process heat applications requiring temperatures of 300/sup 0/C or lower, with emphasis on the 150/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C range. The selected solar collector technology is a parabolic trough collector of the line-focusing class. The design, structure, and material components are based upon existing and anticipated future technological developments in the solar industry. The solar system to be manufactured and assembled within a dedicated manufacturing plant is projected to consist of the collector and the major collector components, including reflector, absorber, parabolic trough structure, support stand, tracking drive mechanism, sun-sensing device and control system, couplings, etc. Major manufacturing processes to be introduced into the year 2000 plant operations are glassmaking, silvering, electroplating and plastic-forming. These operations will generate significant environmental residuals not encountered in present-day solar manufacturing plants. Important residuals include chemical vapors, acids, toxic elements (e.g. arsenic), metallic and chemical sludges, fumes from plastics, etc. The location, design, and operations of these sophisticated solar manufacturing plants will have to provide for the management of the environmental residuals.

  4. Workplace conflict resolution and the health of employees in the Swedish and Finnish units of an industrial company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Martin; Jappinen, Paavo; Theorell, Tores; Oxenstierna, Gabriel

    2006-10-01

    New patterns of working, the globalisation of production and the introduction of information technologies are changing the way we work. This new working environment has eliminated some risks whilst introducing others. The importance of the psychosocial working environment for the health of employees is now well documented, but the effects of managerial style have received relatively little attention. Yet management is an increasingly important aspect of companies' policies. In this paper, we examine the relationship between conflict management in the workplace and self-reported measures of stress, poor general health, exhaustion and sickness absence due to overstrain or fatigue. Our sample consists of non-supervisory employees (N = 9309) working in the Swedish and Finnish plants of a multinational forestry company who were surveyed in 2000. Bivariate analyses show that those who report that differences are resolved through discussion are least likely to report stress, poor general health, exhaustion or sickness absence. Those who report that authority is used or that no attempts are made to resolve differences have quite similar rates across all measures. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed for all health outcomes controlling for age, sex, occupational group, job complexity, job autonomy and support from superiors. Results show significantly lower likelihoods of reporting stress, poor general health, exhaustion or sickness absence amongst employees who report that differences of opinion are resolved through discussion compared to those who report that no attempts are made. No significant differences were found between those who reported that differences were resolved through use of authority and subjects in the 'no attempt' category. These results suggest that the workplace conflict resolution is important in the health of employees in addition to traditional psychosocial work environment risk factors.

  5. Application of PUF foam inserts for respirable dust measurements in the brick-manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vocht, Frank; Hirst, Adrian; Gardner, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Institute of Occupational Medicine dual-fraction samplers equipped with porous polyurethane foam inserts have been introduced as a cheaper alternative to cyclone pre-selectors for measuring respirable dust. Initial data from a variety of industries suggested that the dual-fraction sampler yielded similar results as personal cyclones and that the respirable selection of the foam was not adversely affected by particle loading. We conducted a similar study, but specifically in the brick industry to assess the validity of this dual-fraction sampler as an alternative to personal cyclones in this industry. A total of 72 side-by-side samples using Higgins-Dewell cyclones and dual-fraction samplers were taken in seven UK factories manufacturing a variety of bricks. A priori measurements were assigned to any of the three groups based on the dominant source of the particulates in the exposure matrix (clay, sand or mixed) at the location in the factories where the measurements were taken. After log transformation, Higgins-Dewell cyclone-measured concentrations were on average 1.9 times higher than the concentrations measured by the dual-fraction samplers, with a Pearson correlation of 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.66-0.85). Stratified analysis by main source of exposure suggested that the correlation was best for silica dust-based exposures r(p) = 0.88 (0.63-0.96), but decreased with the relative importance of clay particulates in the exposure matrix to r(p) = 0.82 (0.59-0.93) in the 'mixed-source' group and r(p) = 0.74 (0.55-0.85) in the 'clay particulates' group. Similarly, performance of the dual-fraction sampler relative to the cyclone sampler was negatively associated with increased relative importance of clay particulates in the exposure matrix and ranged from similar measured concentration beta = 0.96 (0.54-1.39) for silica to 50% under sampling beta = 0.50 (0.33-0.67) for clay particulates. These results suggested that the overall performance of the dual

  6. The Integration of Technology and Management in the Competitiveness of the United States Short Staple Yarn Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvalee T. Tangboonritruthai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to investigate whether a balance of technology and management could be used in order to sustain a viable United States (US short staple yarn production industry. The methodology used in this study consisted of primary research comprising two phases. The first phase consisted of interviews with industry executives in order to find out what US yarn manufacturers think are the important factors in maintaining a competitive yarn industry. The second phase was an online survey with industry customers in order to find out why weavers and knitters buy from US manufacturers. Results reveal that US manufacturers have competitive advantages over other countries because of skill level of workforce, variety of products offered, customer relationships, innovation and technology, and product quality. In order to keep these competitive advantages, “technology” and “management” strategies should be implemented. Results also reveal the areas in which the US yarn manufacturers should focus their resources in order to stay competitive or indeed survive.

  7. Make or buy decisions in and levels of logistics outsourcing: an empirical analysis in the food manufacturing industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsin-I Hsiao, L.; Kemp, R.G.M.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the determinants of outsourcing of different levels of logistics activities in the food manufacturing industry. In our research, four different levels of logistics activities were examined: (1st level) transportation, (2nd level) packaging, (3rd level)

  8. Industrial manufacture of parenteral products in the Netherlands. A survey of eight years of media fills and sterility testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Doorne, H; Van Kampen, BJ; Rummenie, L; Van der Veen, AJ; De Vries, WJ; Van Der Lee, R.

    1998-01-01

    Sterility testing and media fills are essential requirements in the pharmaceutical industry. With the results obtained the manufacturer must ensure that the aseptic filling process is under control. In an eight year (1988-1995) retrospective survey of three major Dutch pharmaceutical companies the

  9. BARRIERS TO THE USE OF RADIATION-CURABLE ADHESIVES IN THE COATED AND LAMINATED SUBSTRATE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an investigation of barriers to the use of radiation-cured technology in the coated and laminated substrate manufacturing industry. t presents information gathered from radiation-curable coating and equipment suppliers as well as technical publications....

  10. Environmental and risk screening for prioritizing pollution prevention opportunities in the U.S. printed wiring board manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Carl W; Lim, Seong-Rin; Schoenung, Julie M

    2011-05-15

    Modern manufacturing of printed wiring boards (PWBs) involves extensive use of various hazardous chemicals in different manufacturing steps such as board preparation, circuit design transfer, etching and plating processes. Two complementary environmental screening methods developed by the U.S. EPA, namely: (i) the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and Other Environmental Impacts (TRACI) and (ii) Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI), are used to quantify geographic and chemical environmental impacts in the U.S. PWB manufacturing industry based on Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data. Although the release weight percentages of industrial chemicals such as methanol, glycol ethers and dimethylformamide comprise the larger fraction of reported air and water emissions, results indicate that lead, copper and their compounds' releases correspond to the highest environmental impact from toxicity potentials and risk-screening scores. Combining these results with further knowledge of PWB manufacturing, select alternative chemical processes and materials for pollution prevention are discussed. Examples of effective pollution prevention options in the PWB industry include spent etchant recovery technologies, and process and material substitutions. In addition, geographic assessment of environmental burden highlights states where promotion of pollution prevention strategies and emissions regulations can have the greatest effect to curb the PWB industry's toxic release impacts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Jernberg Industries, Inc.: Forging Facility Uses Plant-Wide Energy Assessment to Aid Conversion to Lean Manufacturing (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-10-01

    Jernberg Industries conducted a plant-wide assessment while converting to lean manufacturing at a forging plant. Seven projects were identified that could yield annual savings of $791,000, 64,000 MMBtu in fuel and 6 million kWh

  12. Evaluation of Technological Trends and Demands of the Manufacturing Industry to a Center of R&D&I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leone Peter Correia da Silva Andrade

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing industry is fairly representative in the Brazilian economy. The research activities in technology, development and innovation promoted by technology centers are of great importance to boost the competitiveness of this segment. In this context, this work aims presenting the development of the strategic planning for a Center of R&D&I (Research & Development & Innovation, looking 20 years ahead, on a macro level, creating a master plan which summarizes the future focus areas of competence for technology research, development and innovation, coping with manufacturing trends, using a participative workshop approach. Thus, it is expected that this center offer integrated technological solutions with high added value that promote the development and competitiveness of the manufacturing industry, in the prospects for medium and long term. In order to achieve the project objectives taking the principle of strategic planning was followed. On the one hand, focus was placed on the internal perspective analyzing the current status of the Center. On the other hand, the environment of the Center (external perspective was analyzed. Matching the analysis results regarding both perspectives future competence areas were derived, according to global technological trends as well as national and local industrial demand. Thus, the competencies required to be developed by a technology center to meet the manufacturing industry over the next twenty years would be derived.

  13. Effectiveness of Direct Safety Regulations on Manufacturers and Users of Industrial Machines: Its Implications on Industrial Safety Policies in Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gi Heung

    2017-03-01

    Despite considerable efforts made in recent years, the industrial accident rate and the fatality rate in the Republic of Korea are much higher than those in most developed countries in Europe and North America. Industrial safety policies and safety regulations are also known to be ineffective and inefficient in some cases. This study focuses on the quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of direct safety regulations such as safety certification, self-declaration of conformity, and safety inspection of industrial machines in the Republic of Korea. Implications on safety policies to restructure the industrial safety system associated with industrial machines are also explored. Analysis of causes in industrial accidents associated with industrial machines confirms that technical causes need to be resolved to reduce both the frequency and the severity of such industrial accidents. Statistical analysis also confirms that the indirect effects of safety device regulation on users are limited for a variety of reasons. Safety device regulation needs to be shifted to complement safety certification and self-declaration of conformity for more balanced direct regulations on manufacturers and users. An example of cost-benefit analysis on conveyor justifies such a transition. Industrial safety policies and regulations associated with industrial machines must be directed towards eliminating the sources of danger at the stage of danger creation, thereby securing the safe industrial machines. Safety inspection further secures the safety of workers at the stage of danger use. The overall balance between such safety regulations is achieved by proper distribution of industrial machines subject to such regulations and the intensity of each regulation. Rearrangement of industrial machines subject to safety certification and self-declaration of conformity to include more movable industrial machines and other industrial machines with a high level of danger is also suggested.

  14. Systematic review of the application of quality improvement methodologies from the manufacturing industry to surgical healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolay, C R; Purkayastha, S; Greenhalgh, A; Benn, J; Chaturvedi, S; Phillips, N; Darzi, A

    2012-03-01

    The demand for the highest-quality patient care coupled with pressure on funding has led to the increasing use of quality improvement (QI) methodologies from the manufacturing industry. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and evaluate the application and effectiveness of these QI methodologies to the field of surgery. MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, British Nursing Index, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Embase, Health Business(™) Elite, the Health Management Information Consortium and PsycINFO(®) were searched according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Empirical studies were included that implemented a described QI methodology to surgical care and analysed a named outcome statistically. Some 34 of 1595 articles identified met the inclusion criteria after consensus from two independent investigators. Nine studies described continuous quality improvement (CQI), five Six Sigma, five total quality management (TQM), five plan-do-study-act (PDSA) or plan-do-check-act (PDCA) cycles, five statistical process control (SPC) or statistical quality control (SQC), four Lean and one Lean Six Sigma; 20 of the studies were undertaken in the USA. The most common aims were to reduce complications or improve outcomes (11), to reduce infection (7), and to reduce theatre delays (7). There was one randomized controlled trial. QI methodologies from industry can have significant effects on improving surgical care, from reducing infection rates to increasing operating room efficiency. The evidence is generally of suboptimal quality, and rigorous randomized multicentre studies are needed to bring evidence-based management into the same league as evidence-based medicine. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Manufacturing Improvement Program for the Oil and Gas Industry Supply Chain and Marketing Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Robert [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2016-09-28

    This project supported upgrades for manufacturing companies in the oil and natural gas supply chain in Oklahoma. The goal is to provide assistance that will lead to the improved efficiency advancement of the manufacturing processes currently used by the existing manufacturing clients. The basis for the work is to improve the economic environment for the clients and the communities they serve.

  16. Tensions in Stakeholder Relations for a Swedish Football Club

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junghagen, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Swedish football is an industry not yet being as commercial as the big leagues and is regulated in terms of ownership of clubs. This implies a need for management of stakeholder relations for a Swedish football club. This paper identifies important stakeholders in Swedish football and discusses...

  17. Geographical patterns in blood lead in relation to industrial emissions and traffic in Swedish children, 1978-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Emilie; Lundh, Thomas; Oudin, Anna; Skerfving, Staffan; Strömberg, Ulf

    2009-07-10

    Blood lead concentrations (B-Pb) were measured in 3 879 Swedish school children during the period 1978-2007. The objective was to study the effect of the proximity to lead sources based on the children's home and school location. The children's home address and school location were geocoded and their proximity to a lead smelter and major roads was calculated using geographical information system (GIS) software. All the statistical analyses were carried out using means of generalized log-linear modelling, with natural-logarithm-transformed B-Pb, adjusted for sex, school year, lead-exposing hobby, country of birth and, in the periods 1988-1994 and 1995-2007, parents' smoking habits. The GIS analysis revealed that although the emission from the smelter and children's B-Pb levels had decreased considerably since 1978, proximity to the lead smelter continued to affect levels of B-Pb, even in recent years (geometric mean: near smelter: 22.90 microg/l; far from smelter 19.75 microg/l; p = 0.001). The analysis also revealed that proximity to major roads noticeably affected the children's B-Pb levels during the period 1978-1987 (geometric mean near major roads: 44.26 microg/l; far from roads: 38.32 microg/l; p = 0.056), due to the considerable amount of lead in petrol. This effect was, however, not visible after 1987 due to prohibition of lead in petrol. The results show that proximity to the lead smelter still has an impact on the children's B-Pb levels. This is alarming since it could imply that living or working in the vicinity of a former lead source could pose a threat years after reduction of the emission. The analysis also revealed that urban children exposed to lead from traffic were only affected during the early period, when there were considerable amounts of lead in petrol, and that the prohibition of lead in petrol in later years led to reduced levels of lead in the blood of urban children.

  18. Geographical patterns in blood lead in relation to industrial emissions and traffic in Swedish children, 1978–2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skerfving Staffan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood lead concentrations (B-Pb were measured in 3 879 Swedish school children during the period 1978–2007. The objective was to study the effect of the proximity to lead sources based on the children's home and school location. Methods The children's home address and school location were geocoded and their proximity to a lead smelter and major roads was calculated using geographical information system (GIS software. All the statistical analyses were carried out using means of generalized log-linear modelling, with natural-logarithm-transformed B-Pb, adjusted for sex, school year, lead-exposing hobby, country of birth and, in the periods 1988–1994 and 1995–2007, parents' smoking habits. Results The GIS analysis revealed that although the emission from the smelter and children's B-Pb levels had decreased considerably since 1978, proximity to the lead smelter continued to affect levels of B-Pb, even in recent years (geometric mean: near smelter: 22.90 μg/l; far from smelter 19.75 μg/l; p = 0.001. The analysis also revealed that proximity to major roads noticeably affected the children's B-Pb levels during the period 1978–1987 (geometric mean near major roads: 44.26 μg/l; far from roads: 38.32 μg/l; p = 0.056, due to the considerable amount of lead in petrol. This effect was, however, not visible after 1987 due to prohibition of lead in petrol. Conclusion The results show that proximity to the lead smelter still has an impact on the children's B-Pb levels. This is alarming since it could imply that living or working in the vicinity of a former lead source could pose a threat years after reduction of the emission. The analysis also revealed that urban children exposed to lead from traffic were only affected during the early period, when there were considerable amounts of lead in petrol, and that the prohibition of lead in petrol in later years led to reduced levels of lead in the blood of urban children.

  19. Influence of Big Data on Manufacturing Industry and Strategies of Enterprises: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the rapid development of information technologies, such as cloud computing, mobile internet and internet of things, and the promotion of IT application, all kinds of data are generated and accumulated rapidly in various ways, big data era is coming, in which enterprises are faced with both opportunities and unprecedented challenges. Various processes, from decision making to operation and from designing to marketing, are being influenced by big data in manufacturing industry. This paper, according to the nature and features of big data, analyzes and extends a classical model of organizational change, Leavitt’s model of organizational change, in order to explore the ways for enterprises to cope with challenges and seize chances of development in big data era. Then, using the extended Leavitt’s model, opportunities and challenges derive from big data are combed, and approaches to making use of big data and coping with big data are generalized from five perspectives, including task, structure, people, technology and environment.

  20. Manufacturing Economics of Plant-Made Biologics: Case Studies in Therapeutic and Industrial Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusé, Daniel; McDonald, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant biologics in plants has received considerable attention as an alternative platform to traditional microbial and animal cell culture. Industrially relevant features of plant systems include proper eukaryotic protein processing, inherent safety due to lack of adventitious agents, more facile scalability, faster production (transient systems), and potentially lower costs. Lower manufacturing cost has been widely claimed as an intuitive feature of the platform by the plant-made biologics community, even though cost information resides within a few private companies and studies accurately documenting such an advantage have been lacking. We present two technoeconomic case studies representing plant-made enzymes for diverse applications: human butyrylcholinesterase produced indoors for use as a medical countermeasure and cellulases produced in the field for the conversion of cellulosic biomass into ethanol as a fuel extender. Production economics were modeled based on results reported with the latest-generation expression technologies on Nicotiana host plants. We evaluated process unit operations and calculated bulk active and per-dose or per-unit costs using SuperPro Designer modeling software. Our analyses indicate that substantial cost advantages over alternative platforms can be achieved with plant systems, but these advantages are molecule/product-specific and depend on the relative cost-efficiencies of alternative sources of the same product. PMID:24977145

  1. Microbubble enhanced ozonation process for advanced treatment of wastewater produced in acrylic fiber manufacturing industry

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Tianlong

    2015-02-02

    This work investigated microbubble-ozonation for the treatment of a refractory wet-spun acrylic fiber wastewater in comparison to macrobubble-ozonation. CODcr, NH3-N, and UV254 of the wastewater were removed by 42%, 21%, and 42%, respectively in the microbubble-ozonation, being 25%, 9%, and 35% higher than the removal rates achieved by macrobubble-ozonation at the same ozone dose. The microbubbles (with average diameter of 45μm) had a high concentration of 3.9×105 counts/mL at a gas flow rate of 0.5L/min. The gas holdup, total ozone mass-transfer coefficient, and average ozone utilization efficiency in the microbubble-ozonation were 6.6, 2.2, and 1.5 times higher than those of the macrobubble-ozonation. Greater generation of hydroxyl radicals and a higher zeta potential of the bubbles were also observed in the microbubble ozonation process. The biodegradability of the wastewater was also significantly improved by microbubble-ozonation, which was ascribed to the enhanced degradation of alkanes, aromatic compounds, and the many other bio-refractory organic compounds in the wastewater. Microbubble-ozonation can thus be a more effective treatment process than traditional macrobubble-ozonation for refractory wastewater produced by the acrylic fiber manufacturing industry.

  2. Injuries related to forklifts and other powered industrial vehicles in automobile manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J W; Smith, G S; Baker, S P; Warner, M

    1999-11-01

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, estimates that approximately 100 workers are fatally injured each year in forklift and other powered industrial vehicle (PIV) incidents, and an estimated 34,000 work-related injuries involving forklifts are treated in U.S. emergency rooms each year. This paper presents a descriptive analysis of 916 incidents involving forklifts and other PIVs that occurred in 54 plants operated by a major U.S. automobile manufacturer over a 3-year period. The injury data were obtained from a company-wide occupational injury and illness surveillance system which was implemented in 1989. The 916 PIV-related incidents resulted in 3 fatalities and 913 nonfatal injuries. The most common incident involved pedestrians (35%) who were struck by a PIV, or the load being carried by a PIV, or a rack or bin that had been struck by a PIV. Of the 913 nonfatal injuries, 41% resulted in an employee missing work and incurred a total of 22,730 lost workdays, an average of 61 days per lost workday incident. Recommendations are presented to reduce the risk of injury, for example by separating PIV and pedestrian traffic, restricting the use of forklifts in an area where a large number of pedestrians travel and improving the training of all personnel who drive PIVs. Am. J. Ind. Med. 36:513-521, 1999. Published 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. ORC technology for waste-wood to energy conversion in the furniture manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moro Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exploitation of low and medium temperature thermal sources, in particular those based on biomass combustion and on industrial residual heat recovery, has been increasingly investigated in the last decades, accordingly to the growing interest towards reduction in primary energy consumption and environmental issues. Organic Rankine cycle technology allows designing power plants that are less demanding in terms of auxiliaries, safety systems, maintenance and operating costs when compared to conventional water steam power plants. To support the preliminary technical and economic design of this kind of plants in different contexts, a simulation code of part load and off-design operation of an organic Rankine cycle unit for combined heat and power has been developed. In the paper, taking the real situation of a furniture manufacturing factory as a starting point, it is shown how all energy flows occurring all year long inside the combined heat and power plant, can be estimated on the basis of the thermal user duty time profile, the available biomass flow rate and the adopted operation strategy. This information is the basis in order to correctly evaluate the energetic, economic and environmental advantages of the proposed technical solution, with respect to a particular context, as it is shown in the concluding part of the paper.

  4. A Concept of Water Usage Efficiency to Support Water Reduction in Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu Sachidananda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing pressures on freshwater supplies, continuity of supply uncertainties, and costs linked to legislative compliance, such as for wastewater treatment, are driving water use reduction up the agenda of manufacturing businesses. A survey is presented of current analysis methods and tools generally available to industry to analyze environmental impact of, and to manage, water use. These include life cycle analysis, water footprinting, strategic planning, water auditing, and process integration. It is identified that the methods surveyed do not provide insight into the operational requirements from individual process steps for water, instead taking such requirements as a given. We argue that such understanding is required for a proactive approach to long-term water usage reduction, in which sustainability is taken into account at the design stage for both process and product. As a first step to achieving this, we propose a concept of water usage efficiency which can be used to evaluate current and proposed processes and products. Three measures of efficiency are defined, supported by a framework of a detailed categorization and representation of water flows within a production system. The calculation of the efficiency measures is illustrated using the example of a tomato sauce production line. Finally, the elements required to create a useable tool based on the efficiency measures are discussed.

  5. Manufacturing Economics of Plant-Made Biologics: Case Studies in Therapeutic and Industrial Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tusé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of recombinant biologics in plants has received considerable attention as an alternative platform to traditional microbial and animal cell culture. Industrially relevant features of plant systems include proper eukaryotic protein processing, inherent safety due to lack of adventitious agents, more facile scalability, faster production (transient systems, and potentially lower costs. Lower manufacturing cost has been widely claimed as an intuitive feature of the platform by the plant-made biologics community, even though cost information resides within a few private companies and studies accurately documenting such an advantage have been lacking. We present two technoeconomic case studies representing plant-made enzymes for diverse applications: human butyrylcholinesterase produced indoors for use as a medical countermeasure and cellulases produced in the field for the conversion of cellulosic biomass into ethanol as a fuel extender. Production economics were modeled based on results reported with the latest-generation expression technologies on Nicotiana host plants. We evaluated process unit operations and calculated bulk active and per-dose or per-unit costs using SuperPro Designer modeling software. Our analyses indicate that substantial cost advantages over alternative platforms can be achieved with plant systems, but these advantages are molecule/product-specific and depend on the relative cost-efficiencies of alternative sources of the same product.

  6. Reparatory and Manufacturing Hard-Facing of Working Parts Made of Stainless Steels in Confectionary Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rakic

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, for the sake of improving the reparatory hard-facing technology is especially analyzed reparatory hard-facing of tools for manufacturing compressed products in confectionary industry. Those products are being made of a mixture consisting of several powdery components, which is compressed under high pressure. In that way the connection between particles is realized, thus achieving certain hardness and strength of the confectionary product. The considered tool is made of high-alloyed stainless steel. The tool contains 30 identical working places. Besides the production process wear, on those tools, from time to time, appear mechanical damage on some of the products' shape punches, as cracks at the edges, where the products' final shapes are formed. Those damages are small, size wise, but they cause strong effect on the products' final shape. The aggravating circumstance is that the shape punch is extremely loaded in pressure, thus after the reparatory hard-facing, the additional heat treatment is necessary. Mechanical properties in the heat affected zone (HAZ are being leveled by annealing and what also partially reduces the residual internal stresses.

  7. Determining Technological Innovation and Competitiveness: A Cross Organizational Analysis of the Malaysian Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlus Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the determinants of technological innovation in the Malaysian manufacturing industry. Its main purpose is to identify a set of management- related variables characterizing Malaysian innovative firms. Moreover, the study aimed to test whether the set of determinant differs for firms with different technological trajectories. A sample of 204 Malaysian firms was used for the investigation, with one respondent from each firm. The questionnaire measured the technological innovation, as well as 5 main potential determinants of innovation adopted from literature. Statistical analysis used, including bivariate correlation and multivariate regression, in identifying association between the technological innovation and the determining variables. The results of the analysis lead the researcher to the model of 5 important determining factors of technological innovation. The important factors were intensity of R&D, trvhnoogical trajectories,intensity of marketing, engineers, scientist and managers with experience locally and technical competency of personnel,. The analysis of technological trajectories confirmed the hypotheses that set of important determinants of innovation as well as the extent of technological innovation differs for firms in different innovation processes.Keywords: Technologies trajectories, technological innovation, intensity of R&D.

  8. Manufacturing Growth with Social Deficits. Environmental and Labour Issues in the High Tech Industry of Penang, Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangel, Arne

    2001-01-01

    The economic downturn in 1997 was less severe in Malaysia compared to other countries in the region. However, as the manufacturing sector, in particular the high tech industries, lacks a strong national technological base and depends on exports, structural problems remain. The first part of the p......The economic downturn in 1997 was less severe in Malaysia compared to other countries in the region. However, as the manufacturing sector, in particular the high tech industries, lacks a strong national technological base and depends on exports, structural problems remain. The first part...... hazards and build corporate responsibility towards local labour. The paper also concludes that there is a need for a re-orientation of development policies integrating concerns about the globalisation of firms, industrial and regional development objectives, and the welfare of local workers. However...

  9. Development of an industry-government cooperative energy conservation program for small manufacturers: phase I. Final report, Project 8978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fejer, M. E.; Ketels, P. A.

    1976-11-01

    The ultimate objective of this program is to determine the industrial energy conservation measures for small manufacturers that are practical, specific, rapidly implementable, and of reasonable cost. The approach being taken in this program is one in which the trade associations representing the various small manufacturers agree to cooperate in providing the necessary contacts and data for evaluating their respective industries. The program is divided into three phases, and this is the final report for the first phase. The objective of this phase was to seek the participation of the trade associations in the next two phases. At the conclusion of this phase, eight associations had volunteered to participate. These include: Aluminum Recycling Association; American Die Casting Institute; American Foundrymen's Society; Forging Industry Association; Glass Crafts of America; Metal Treating Institute; Non-Ferrous Founders Society; and The Fertilizer Institute.

  10. El reto del crecimiento económico en México: industrias manufactureras y política industrial /The challenge of economic growth in Mexico. Manufacturing industries and industrial policy/O desafio do crescimento econômico no México: indústrias manufatureiras e política industrial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaac Leobardo Sánchez Juárez; Juan Carlos Moreno Brid

    2016-01-01

    .... It is argued that the manufacturing industries are the engine of economic growth. In this sense, it is assumed that one of them main causes of low growth in Mexico is the insufficient dynamic of the manufacturers...

  11. Sustaining Competitiveness: Moving Towards Upstream Manufacturing in Specialized-Market-Based Clusters in the Chinese Toy Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huasheng Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Western industrial cluster literature pays little attention to specialized markets (SMs and the geographical agglomeration of distributors or sale agencies (SAs. This paper takes Linyin, Shandong, a famous commodity city in Northeastern China, as an example, to discuss the determinants that make SAs in SMs of the toy industry move towards upstream manufacturing. A structured questionnaire survey and subsequent interviews were carried out during 2011 and 2012 to collect data, and a Binary Logistic Regression Model was used to process the data. This paper looks from the perspective of global production networks theory, establishes an analytical framework that combines individual motivations of intra-firm coordination, local inter-firm relationships and dynamic cross-regional level relationships. The findings indicate that the expansion of SAs towards manufacturing allows them to sustain competitiveness under changing circumstances. The local inter-firm relationships within SM-based clusters not only makes it easy to obtain material and human resources with lower manufacturing costs, but also facilitates the access to production knowledge and technologies for an expansion of production scale. Cross-regional relationships with suppliers provide an informal channel for SAs to obtain skills, which is fundamental for an expansion into manufacturing. In addition, it is a preference for strengthening competitiveness rather than the simple pursuit of economic profit that encourages SAs to invest in manufacturing.

  12. The impact of fit manufacturing on green manufacturing: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ang Nian; Sin, Tan Chan; Fathullah, M.; Lee, C. C.

    2017-09-01

    Fit manufacturing and Green manufacturing are a new trend principle and concept. They are getting popular in industrial. This paper is identifying the impact between Fit manufacturing and Green manufacturing. Besides Fit manufacturing, Lean manufacturing, Agile manufacturing and Sustainable manufacturing gives big impacts to Green Manufacturing. On top of that, this paper also discuss the benefits of applying Fit manufacturing and Green manufacturing in industrial as well as environment. Hence, applications of Fit manufacturing and Green Manufacturing are increasing year by year.

  13. A Swedish success story: How to get astonishing results in energy efficiency due to implementation of a long term agreement with energy intensive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersson, Karolina; Moberg, Johanna; Bjoerkman, Thomas (Swedish Energy Agency, Eskilstuna (Sweden))

    2011-07-01

    The Swedish long term agreement (LTA) for energy efficiency for energy intensive industries (PFE) gives energy-intensive companies the opportunity to obtain tax exemption on electricity use, in line with the EU Tax Directive. In return the companies commit themselves to several actions in order to improve their energy efficiency. More than 100 companies from e.g. pulp and paper industry, wood product, chemical, food and beverages, steel, iron and metallurgy, ore and mining joined the programme in 2004-2005. During the autumn 2009, these companies presented their final reports on their energy efficiency improvements. The companies have thoroughly gone through their use of electricity, fuels and heat, and found and carried out measures for energy efficiency. The reported results and figures were above all expectations - about three times more electricity than expected had been saved. The major success factors have been the systematic work outlined by the Energy Management System, starting from the thorough energy review, as well as the enhanced status of the energy efficiency issue and the network meetings among the participants. During the five year programme, the companies have increased their energy efficiency by 1.45 TWh - and this on electricity alone. Furthermore the participants have: - invested 708 MSEK (approx. 70 Million Euro) in more than 1,200 electricity efficiency measures, - carried out more than 350 other measures in order to increase their energy performance, e.g. converted energy use from fossils to renewables, increased production of electricity (approx. 1 TWh) and increased delivery of surplus heat to external parties, - implemented and certified standardized energy management systems. This paper will present the PFE-programme and the participating companies as well as the results from the final reports together with lessons learned from the use of this policy program

  14. Statistical Analyses and Modeling of the Implementation of Agile Manufacturing Tactics in Industrial Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad D. AL-Tahat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review and introduction on agile manufacturing. Tactics of agile manufacturing are mapped into different production areas (eight-construct latent: manufacturing equipment and technology, processes technology and know-how, quality and productivity improvement, production planning and control, shop floor management, product design and development, supplier relationship management, and customer relationship management. The implementation level of agile manufacturing tactics is investigated in each area. A structural equation model is proposed. Hypotheses are formulated. Feedback from 456 firms is collected using five-point-Likert-scale questionnaire. Statistical analysis is carried out using IBM SPSS and AMOS. Multicollinearity, content validity, consistency, construct validity, ANOVA analysis, and relationships between agile components are tested. The results of this study prove that the agile manufacturing tactics have positive effect on the overall agility level. This conclusion can be used by manufacturing firms to manage challenges when trying to be agile.

  15. Implementation Of ISO 9000 Quality Management System Within The Manufacturing And Service Industry Of Ivory Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borget Alfred Anoye

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this paper was to present the factors that impede the implementation of ISO 9000 QMS within the manufacturing and service Industry of Ivory Coast. It wasnt the intention of the author to provide detailed strategies for the readers to implement ISO 9000. It was an effort to present the relationship if any between the lack of ISO 9000 adoption and the perception of Ivoirians business organization leaders. For that purpose five research questions were associated with this study. The population for this study was all non-ISO certified business organizations in both public and private sector and was physically located in Ivory Coast. The population sample for this study was the 5044 members of the Chambre de Commerce et dIndustrie de Cote dIvoire CCI from which the author utilized the sample size of 60 business organizations randomly selected. This study utilized a survey questionnaire of face to face interview as data collection method. The survey questionnaire contained thirty three 33 questions organized in six parts and was proposed to 60 business organizations leaders. The result showed that business organization leaders in Ivory Coast were aware of the ISO 900 QMS but do not have enough knowledge on the ISO 9000 QMS implementation and certification. This could be due to the poor job done by CODIMORM the local national bureau of standards as a source of information. However it was found that business organization leaders in Ivory Coast intended to pursue and obtain ISO 9000 QMS certification. With respect to perceived benefits they indicated customer satisfaction improvement as the most important benefit that ISO 9000 QMS certification could bring to their general management activities. With respect to perceived improvements they selected quality of productsservices as the most important improvement that ISO 9000 QMS implementation and certification could help to achieve. Overall business organization leaders in Ivory

  16. Ethylene oxide sterilization in the medical-supply manufacturing industry: assessment and control of worker exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yeh-Chung; Liu, Hung-Hsin; Lin, Yi-Chang; Su, Po-Chi; Li, Lien-Hsiung; Chang, Cheng-Ping; Tang, Da-Toung; Chen, Chang-Yuh

    2007-11-01

    In 2005, the Taiwan Institute of Occupational Safety and Health started an on-site consulting program for the medical supplies manufacturing industry, which use ethylene oxide (EO) as a sterilant, with the goal of enhancing occupational hygiene practices and controlling EO-related risks. This study presents EO exposure assessment results and examines the effectiveness of control measures. Detailed surveys, including exposure monitoring, were conducted at 10 factories. Airborne EO was collected using an HBr-coated charcoal tube and analyzed using GC/MS. Sterilizer operators had an average short-term EO exposure level of 27.61 ppm during unloading; mean time-weighted average workshift exposure was 7.35 ppm. High EO concentrations were also present throughout the facilities. Specifically, mean EO concentrations in the aeration area, near the sterilizer and in the warehouse were 10.19, 5.75, and 8.78 ppm, respectively. These findings indicate that immediate controls are needed, and that EO emissions from sterilized products during storage cannot be overlooked. Worker short-term exposures during unloading was inversely correlated (p < 0.05) with the numbers of poststerilization purge cycle applied. The specific controls implemented and their usefulness is discussed. Increasing the number of poststerilization purge cycles is a simple approach to eliminating extremely high exposure during unloading. Improvements to ventilation, particularly in the aeration area and warehouse, were also effective in minimizing worker exposures. Use of effective respirator is recommended until the EO exposure levels, averaging 3.41 ppm after the controls, fall below the permissible exposure limit.

  17. [The application of two occupation health risk assessment models in a wooden furniture manufacturing industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A H; Leng, P B; Bian, G L; Li, X H; Mao, G C; Zhang, M B

    2016-10-20

    Objective: To explore the applicability of 2 different models of occupational health risk assessment in wooden furniture manufacturing industry. Methods: American EPA inhalation risk model and ICMM model of occupational health risk assessment were conducted to assess occupational health risk in a small wooden furniture enterprises, respectively. Results: There was poor protective measure and equipment of occupational disease in the plant. The concentration of wood dust in the air of two workshops was over occupational exposure limit (OEL) , and the CTWA was 8.9 mg/m3 and 3.6 mg/m3, respectively. According to EPA model, the workers who exposed to benzene in this plant had high risk (9.7×10-6 ~34.3×10-6) of leukemia, and who exposed to formaldehyde had high risk (11.4 × 10-6) of squamous cell carcinoma. There were inconsistent evaluation results using the ICMM tools of standard-based matrix and calculated risk rating. There were very high risks to be attacked by rhinocarcinoma of the workers who exposed to wood dust for the tool of calculated risk rating, while high risk for the tool of standard-based matrix. For the workers who exposed to noise, risk of noise-induced deafness was unacceptable and medium risk using two tools, respectively. Conclusion: Both EPA model and ICMM model can appropriately predict and assessthe occupational health risk in wooden furniture manufactory, ICMM due to the relatively simple operation, easy evaluation parameters, assessment of occupational- disease-inductive factors comprehensively, and more suitable for wooden furniture production enterprise.

  18. Directory of the manufacturers and suppliers for the French wind power industry; Annuaire des fabricants et fournisseurs de l'industrie eolienne 2010-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-11-15

    With over 5, 660 MW installed in end-2010, France ranks fourth in Europe, behind Germany, Spain and Italy. The wind power industry currently employs almost 11, 000 people in France throughout the value chain. In 2009, the first edition of this directory listed over one hundred companies working in around twenty different areas. Encouraged by these initial positive results, and with the help of ADEME, the French syndicate for renewable energies (SER) asked Capgemini Consulting to undertake a study to identify and raise awareness among French industrials likely to enter into the wind energy market. The French Ministry for Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development and the Sea, along with the Ministry for the Economy, Finance and Employment, were involved in the work. 400 companies were questioned as part of the study. Over 150 replies testified to the dynamic character of the wind power market in France and overseas, and the opportunities for diversification that it represents for traditional industries like metallurgy, aeronautics, defence and shipyards, etc. The study led to the creation of the initiative Windustry France, which currently groups over 300 companies either active in the French wind power market or set to enter it. Windustry France is a showcase of the industrial know-how that can be used in the wind power industry both onshore and offshore. It includes local set-ups developed around major fields of activity (e.g. car industry, aeronautics, mechanics, etc.) and industrial port zones (Dunkerque, Rouen/Le Havre, Brest, Nantes Saint-Nazaire, Bordeaux, etc.). Several ministries, regional stakeholders and authorities are also involved (local authorities, Regional directorates for industry, research and the environment (DReal) networks and chambers of commerce and industry), all of which contribute to making Windustry France a collective approach to industrial policy. The 2010-2011 edition of the directory of manufacturers and suppliers for the wind power

  19. Greening up Auto Part Manufacturing: A Collaboration between Academia and Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneas, Kristi A.; Armstrong, Drew L.; Brank, Alice R.; Johnson, Amanda L.; Kissinger, Chelsea A.; Mabe, Adam R.; Sezer, Ozge; Fontinell, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Historically, manufacture of automotive electronic components and screen-printing of automotive instrument clusters at DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee, Inc. required washing of equipment such as screens, stencils, and jigs with sizable quantities of volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Collaborative efforts between the Maryville…

  20. A Road Map for Success: How Northwest Manufactured Housing Conservation Efforts Revolutionized an Industry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbertson, William L.

    1993-04-01

    The evolution of an ongoing Bonneville Power Administration effort to improve the energy efficiency of manufactured homes is chronicled in this informal history. Over the past nine years, Bonneville`s manufactured housing project has undertaken many activities, including technical studies, cooperative ventures, design studies, and information dissemination. These activities are covered.

  1. Swedish electricity market 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The organization of the Swedish electricity market has been in a state of continual change since the electricity market reform was started in the early 1990s. The conditions for the development of the electricity market have changed since the new Electricity Act came into force on 1 January 1996. The purpose of the reform is to introduce greater competition on the electricity market and provide the consumers with greater freedom of choice and, by open trade in electricity, to create the conditions for more efficient pricing. Being the central energy authority, the Swedish National Board for Industrial and Technical Development, NUTEK, was entrusted by the Government with the task of following developments on the Swedish electricity market. The Network Authority, which has the supervisory function for the new electricity market, were entrusted by the Government with the task of following developments on the Swedish electricity market and regularly compiling and reporting current market information. The new electricity market has now been operative for ten months. The Network Authority has submitted to the Government a detailed report entitled `Developments on the electricity market`, dealing with the experience gained from the electricity market reform. The purpose of the publication is to provide the players on the electricity market - the decision makers, the media and the general public - with comprehensive and easily accessible information on the market conditions. The publication includes summaries of information on electricity production and use in recent years, the structure of the electricity market from the perspective of a player, electricity trade in Sweden and in northern Europe, electricity prices in Sweden and other countries, and the impact of the electricity sector on the environment

  2. The Influence of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Rewards on Employee Results: An Empirical Analysis in Turkish Manufacturing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hatice Ozutku

    2012-01-01

    The study discussed in this article questions whether certain reward practices used by organizations are better than others when comparing the employee results based on TQM. We first examine reward systems and TQM relevant literature. After related literature review, reward practices have been handled in two groups as intrinsic rewards and extrinsic rewards. In the sample, which consists of 217 businesses that operate in Turkish manufacturing industry and apply TQM, intrinsic and extrinsic re...

  3. AN ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON OF PLASTIC AND PAPER CONSUMER CARRIER BAGS IN SOUTH AFRICA: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE LOCAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    J. Sevitz; A.C. Brent; Fourie, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The conventional consumer carrier bags have recently received considerable attention in South Africa. The choice of material for these bags, based on environmental preferences in the South African context, could significantly influence the local manufacturing industry. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), an environmental management tool, has been applied to objectively evaluate and compare the overall environmental impacts of the complete life cycles (from raw material ext...

  4. [Manufacture of upholstered furniture and work-related upper limb musculoskeletal disorders: an industrial sector prevention project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leone, G; Carino, M; Nicoletti, S; Trani, G; Ambrosi, L

    2008-01-01

    In cooperation with the IRCCS Fondazione Maugeri and the IRCCS Fondazione Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico - EPM-CEMOC, of Milan, the Local Health Unit in Bari, Italy carried out a research project, sponsored partly by the Italian Ministry of Health, on upper limb work-related musculoskeletal disorders (UL-WMSDs) in a specific manufacturing sector, the upholstered furniture industry. This "sofa district" is widely represented with approximately 14,000 workers and 500 factories over a wide geographic area of southern Italy. Advanced technology in the manufacturing process is combined with workers performing intensive arm-hand tasks. The aim of the study included: a) assessment of exposure to repetitive strain and movements of the upper limb in a representative sample of the factories using the OCRA method, b) analysis of the annual prevalence and incidence rates, c) definition of possible improvement via ergonomic solutions in the various factories. Via a network of occupational physicians a total of more than 6000 subjects were examined over a 5-year period. Case-definition was assessed through standardized procedures. A detailed description of the manufacturing process of the upholstered furniture industry and of the characteristics of the working population is provided Exposed groups at risk were:filling preparation workers, leather-cutting operators, sewing and upholstery-assembly workers. Data collected in private companies of different size in this extensive industrial "sofa area" emphasize the importance of prevention through adequate ergonomic solutions and the need to improve training programmes covering the whole area.

  5. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume III. Energy data on 15 selected states' manufacturing subsector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-11-01

    An examination is made of the current and future energy demands, and uses, and cost to characterize typical applications and resulting services in the US and industrial sectors of 15 selected states. Volume III presents tables containing data on selected states' manufacturing subsector energy consumption, functional uses, and cost in 1974 and 1976. Alabama, California, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin were chosen as having the greatest potential for replacing conventional fuel with solar energy. Basic data on the quantities, cost, and types of fuel and electric energy purchased by industr for heat and power were obtained from the 1974 and 1976 Annual Survey of Manufacturers. The specific indutrial energy servic cracteristics developed for each selected state include. 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuels and electricity consumption by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (quantity and relative share); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuel consumption by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (quantity and relative share); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector average cost of purchsed fuels and electricity per million Btu by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (in 1976 dollars); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuels and electric energy intensity by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (in 1976 dollars); manufacturing subsector average annual growth rates of (1) fuels and electricity consumption, (2) fuels and electric energy intensity, and (3) average cost of purchased fuels and electricity (1974 to 1976). Data are compiled on purchased fuels, distillate fuel oil, residual ful oil, coal, coal, and breeze, and natural gas. (MCW)

  6. Manufacturing DTaP-based combination vaccines: industrial challenges around essential public health tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidor, Emmanuel; Soubeyrand, Benoit

    2016-12-01

    The manufacture of DTP-backboned combination vaccines is complex, and vaccine quality is evaluated by both batch composition and conformance of manufacturing history. Since their first availability, both the manufacturing regulations for DTP combination vaccines and their demand have evolved significantly. This has resulted in a constant need to modify manufacturing and quality control processes. Areas covered: Regulations that govern the manufacture of complex vaccines can be inconsistent between countries and need to be aligned with the regulatory requirements that apply in all countries of distribution. Changes in product mix and quantities can lead to uncertainty in vaccine supply maintenance. These problems are discussed in the context of the importance of these products as essential public health tools. Expert commentary: Increasing demand for complex vaccines globally has led to problems in supply due to intrinsically complex manufacturing and regulatory procedures. Vaccine manufacturers are fully engaged in the resolution of these challenges, but currently changes in demand need ideally to be anticipated approximately 3 years in advance due to long production cycle times.

  7. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  8. Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions Combustion Technology for Manufacturing Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, Arvind

    2013-04-15

    The purpose of this research was to develop and test a transformational combustion technology for high temperature furnaces to reduce the energy intensity and carbon footprint of U.S. manufacturing industries such as steel, aluminum, glass, metal casting, and petroleum refining. A new technology based on internal and/or external Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) along with significant enhancement in flame radiation was developed. It produces "Radiative Flameless Combustion (RFC)" and offers tremendous energy efficiency and pollutant reduction benefits over and above the now popular "flameless combustion." It will reduce the energy intensity (or fuel consumption per unit system output) by more than 50% and double the furnace productivity while significantly reducing pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions (10^3 times reduction in NOx and 10 times reduction in CO & hydrocarbons and 3 times reduction in CO2). Product quality improvements are also expected due to uniform radiation, as well as, reduction in scale/dross formation is expected because of non-oxidative atmosphere. RFC is inexpensive, easy to implement, and it was successfully tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at the University of Michigan during the course of this work. A first-ever theory with gas and particulate radiation was also developed. Numerical programs were also written to design an industrial-scale furnace. Nine papers were published (or are in the process of publication). We believe that this early stage research adequately proves the concept through laboratory experiments, modeling and computational models. All this work is presented in the published papers. Important conclusions of this work are: (1) It was proved through experimental measurements that RFC is not only feasible but a very beneficial technology. (2) Theoretical analysis of RFC was done in (a) spatially uniform strain field and (b) a planar momentum jet where the strain rate is neither prescribed nor uniform. Four important non

  9. RAND Research Brief: Lean Manufacturing and the Defense Industry. Lessons for Cost Analysts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... Largely in response to these measures, U.S. defense firms have in recent years begun to embrace lean manufacturing, a broad collection of principles and practices whose aim is to refashion the production process in a manner that includes...

  10. 76 FR 13629 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls Information-Fermentation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Controls Information--Fermentation-Derived Intermediates, Drug Substances, and Related Drug Products for... 216 entitled ``Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls (CMC) Information-- Fermentation-Derived... fermentation-derived intermediates, drug substances, and related drug products for veterinary medicinal use...

  11. 77 FR 14022 - Guidance for Industry on Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls Information-Fermentation-Derived...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... Controls Information--Fermentation-Derived Intermediates, Drug Substances, and Related Drug Products for... entitled ``Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls (CMC) Information-- Fermentation-Derived Intermediates... fermentation-derived intermediates, drug substances, and related drug products for veterinary medicinal use...

  12. How Small Businesses Market Their Products during the Different Phases of the Product Life Cycle: The Case of Swedish Ice Cream Manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Hallberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Swedish ice cream market of today is dominated by a few major market leaders, which makes it a challenge for small firms to make themselves visible and survive on a long-term basis. The aim of this article is to investigate and understand how small firms in the ice cream business market their products, based on the marketing mix and the portfolio matrix, during the different phases of the product life cycle. The combination of the two models for strategic planning enables the marketing manager to conduct a more complete analysis of existing products and their place on the market and in the product life cycle. Eight CEOs of small-scale ice cream companies were interviewed. This study found that the marketing activities and strategies of large companies cannot be transferred to and implemented in small-scale businesses. Different marketing theories are developed for big businesses that have many employees and expert knowledge, which small companies do not possess. They also have less resources and knowledge to invest in expensive marketing activities in the marketing mix, and therefore the marketing mix models need to incorporate more of inexpensive marketing.

  13. N-K Manufacturing Technologies: Industrial Energy Assessment Yields Savings of More than $27,000 Per Year for Molded Plastics Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-09-01

    Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices case study based on a comprehensive plant assessment conducted at N-K Manufacturing Technologies by ITP's Industrial Assessment Center in conjunction with The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

  14. The Relation Between Process Management and Innovation : A comparison of the IT and Manufacturing Industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thom Cats; Pascal Ravesteijn

    2017-01-01

    From the paper: "Abstract This study investigates whether there are major differences between process management and innovation between the IT and more traditional industries. Although both industries are quite similar, the research results show that the IT industry is more innovative in comparison

  15. INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FURNITURE AND ACCESSORIES MANUFACTURERS IN NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES IN TURKISH FURNITURE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enver Tatlısu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will investigate the relationship between furniture manufacturers and furniture accessory producers for new product development (NPD in Turkish home furniture industry. A rich body of knowledge exists on supplier integration in NPD process in various industries such as automotive, textiles and consumer electronics whereas little is known on the subject in furniture industry. The importance of supplier integration in NPD processes especially in products consisting of multiple components is widely accepted. With the increase in the complexity of products and high requirement of efficiency and specialization, management of a network of suppliers to introduce meaningful products into the market has become crucial. This paper will represent partial findings of a study into the relationship between furniture manufacturers and furniture accessory producers in Turkish home furniture industry. The paper will depend on the data received through semi structured interviews with the representatives of both parties. The study aims to find out the channels of communication and collaboration between the companies designing whole sets of furniture and suppliers of components for these sets. The paper will discuss the findings of the semi structured interviews so far.

  16. Scope of Value Stream Mapping to Initiate Lean Manufacturing: An Analysis in the Apparel Industry of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimnun Sultana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Bangladesh readymade garments sector has started the trend of implementing ‘lean manufacturing’. To remain competitive in the global market the most important task for garments industry is to reduce the lead time which is also important for long-term stable development. A headlong rush to reduce lead time by becoming lean has created urgency for researchers and practitioners to apply new tools and techniques for dictating wastages. This research addresses the application of value stream mapping in garments industry to implement lean manufacturing. Value stream mapping is different than conventional recording approaches as it helps in the visualization of Material Flow, Information Flow, cycle times and utilization of resources. With the assurance of effective integration and communication, lean systems can be achieved with better efficiency. This research will stand as a benchmark to implement lean for other garment industries in Bangladesh.

  17. Roadmap for Lean implementation in Indian automotive component manufacturing industry: comparative study of UNIDO Model and ISM Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, J. R.; Mantha, S. S.; Rane, S. B.

    2014-07-01

    The demands for automobiles increased drastically in last two and half decades in India. Many global automobile manufacturers and Tier-1 suppliers have already set up research, development and manufacturing facilities in India. The Indian automotive component industry started implementing Lean practices to fulfill the demand of these customers. United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) has taken proactive approach in association with Automotive Component Manufacturers Association of India (ACMA) and the Government of India to assist Indian SMEs in various clusters since 1999 to make them globally competitive. The primary objectives of this research are to study the UNIDO-ACMA Model as well as ISM Model of Lean implementation and validate the ISM Model by comparing with UNIDO-ACMA Model. It also aims at presenting a roadmap for Lean implementation in Indian automotive component industry. This paper is based on secondary data which include the research articles, web articles, doctoral thesis, survey reports and books on automotive industry in the field of Lean, JIT and ISM. ISM Model for Lean practice bundles was developed by authors in consultation with Lean practitioners. The UNIDO-ACMA Model has six stages whereas ISM Model has eight phases for Lean implementation. The ISM-based Lean implementation model is validated through high degree of similarity with UNIDO-ACMA Model. The major contribution of this paper is the proposed ISM Model for sustainable Lean implementation. The ISM-based Lean implementation framework presents greater insight of implementation process at more microlevel as compared to UNIDO-ACMA Model.

  18. ISO in the Construction and Manufacturing Companies: A Case Study from the Construction Industry of Hyderabad and Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafees Ahmed Memon

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Construction industry plays very important role in development of any country. The development of construction industry depends to a larger extent on quality of construction productions and projects. Quality of construction productions and projects is linked with the implementation of QMS (Quality Management System in construction organizations. ISO certification is one of the QMS which has been adopted in manufacturing and construction industry at the global level. The construction companies of developing countries have reaped many advantages from the effective implementation of ISO standards. The rate of adoption of ISO standards has remained slow in the construction sector of some developing countries like Pakistan. This paper presents the literature review of ISO in global construction industry. It highlights the advantages, disadvantages and barriers faced by construction companies in the implementation of ISO standards. This study also investigates the level of adoption of ISO standards in construction and manufacturing companies of Pakistan through a questionnaire survey. It presents the comparison of ISO standards\\\\\\' adoption in both construction and manufacturing sectors. The paper puts forward some suggestions and recommendation for the better adoption and improvement of ISO implementation in the construction sector of Pakistan. This study emphasizes that construction companies of Pakistan should learn from the benefits reaped by the construction companies of developed countries and take appropriate measures for implementing ISO standards. It also suggests that public sector clients should make it obligatory for the contractors and consultants to have ISO certification before awarding the works in order to enhance the the adoption of ISO standards in construction sector.

  19. A study of brand name and country of production congruity : A consumer study – assessed with the example of a Swedish luxury bed manufacturer

    OpenAIRE

    Ericsson, Anna; Linnander Obermayer, Erik

    2013-01-01

    As companies become ever more globalised, manufacture firms choose to outsource production to lower labour cost countries. However, as studies have shown, such a relocation of production may lead to undesirably decreased quality perceptions by consumers as the brand origin and country of production are de-coupled. This quality perception linked to congruity between brand origin and country of production has been studied for various products and product classes, but little has been written abo...

  20. INTRODUCTION OF LEAN MANUFACTURING PHILOSOPHY BY KAIZEN EVENT: CASE STUDY ON A METALMECHANICAL INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Mitsuo Kojima Campos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The competitive scenario requires organizational strategies increasingly elaborated, creating the need of companies to structure their management models in order to absorb these conflicts generated by competition. The manufacturing area is financially affecting deeply the company's results, thus process improvement comes as the organization's survival guideline, and the rationalization of waste without the need for high investments, shown a great competitive alternative. The application of Kaizen event seeks to measure the benefits generated by the implementation of the philosophy of lean manufacturing, working setup aspects of machinery, the manufacturing process flow, reduced delivery lead-time and inventory process. The Kaizen Blitz was applied in a production cell of stamping and spirt processes. The obtained major improvements have been the reduction of machine setup time, reducing lead-time of item processing, the material flow within the production cell, and creating conditions for a more flexible management of the production schedule.

  1. LEAN MANUFACTURING PERCEPTIONS AND ACTUAL PRACTICE AMONG MALAYSIAN SME’S IN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N.M. Rose

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Stiff business challenges and product competition faced by automotive component manufacturers has forced them to look into lean manufacturing (LM. Presently there are more than 100 LM practices. However, small and medium enterprises (SMEs are not able to implement all LM practices due to financial, expertise and skill constraints. Therefore, in this study the authors investigated the level of perception and actual practice within 24 LM practices, regarding actions believed feasible to be implemented in SMEs. In addition, the authors gathered LM information sources, reasons for implementing LM and its benefits to SMEs. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 35 SMEs involves in manufacturing automotive components. The majority of SMEs have a high perception of the importance of LM practices but in reality are not undertaking them. The SMEs mainly received their LM information from their customers, and they strongly believe that LM practices could improve their long-term business sustainability and competitiveness in the market place.

  2. Experimental investigations of thermophysical properties of some paraffin waxes industrially manufactured in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbińkowski, Piotr; Zmywaczyk, Janusz; Koniorczyk, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    Phase-change materials (PCM) can be applied as a heat absorbing/releasing medium in passive cooling systems. Such systems can be used in cooling and temperature stabilization of electronic components, i.e., Li-ion batteries, photovoltaic modules or light emitting diodes (LED). In order to optimize heat transfer in passive cooling systems experimental studies of PCM thermophysical properties are necessary. A good PCM candidate for passive cooling systems may be paraffin waxes due to their relatively high latent heat of fusion (L 200 J.g-1), suitable for working of electronic devices range of melting temperatures (22 °C - 68 °C) and a reasonable price. However, their main drawback is a relatively low thermal conductivity k ranging from 0.148 W.m-1.K-1 to 0.358 W.m-1.K-1. In this paper were presented results of experimentally determined temperature characteristics of thermophysical parameters of four paraffin waxes industrially manufactured in Jasło/Poland by POLWAX. The density ρ of the test paraffin waxes determined at room temperature (20 °C) using a laboratory balance RADWAG X/60/220 comprised from 0.82 g.cm-3 to 0.94 g.cm-3. The thermal diffusivity κ of paraffin waxes was tested within temperature range from -50 °C to 30 °C every 20 °C interval using the NETZSCH LFA 467 HyperFlash. The test specimens having form of cylinder were 12.7 mm in diameter and 2.15 - 2.20 mm in height. Prior to the experiment the face and the back surface of each specimen were coated with a thin layer of graphite 33 having a thickness of several micrometers in accordance with the recommendation given by NETZSCH. The thermal diffusivity of the test paraffin waxes within temperature interval -40 °C - 20 °C was determined to be 0.083 mm2.s-1 to 0.216 mm2.s-1. Thermal effects and the apparent heat capacity cp of the tested materials were measured in the temperature range from -10 °C to 100 °C using the NETZSCH DSC 404 F1 Pegasus at 10 K.min-1 heating/cooling rates in an

  3. An academic, clinical and industrial update on electrospun, additive manufactured and imprinted medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Christina N M; Fuller, Kieran P; Larrañaga, Aitor; Biggs, Manus; Bayon, Yves; Sarasua, Jose R; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning, additive manufacturing and imprint lithography scaffold fabrication technologies have attracted great attention in biomedicine, as they allow production of two- and three- dimensional constructs with tuneable topographical and geometrical features. In vitro data demonstrate that electrospun and imprinted substrates offer control over permanently differentiated and stem cell function. Advancements in functionalisation strategies have further enhanced the bioactivity and reparative capacity of electrospun and additive manufactured devices, as has been evidenced in several preclinical models. Despite this overwhelming success in academic setting, only a few technologies have reached the clinic and only a fraction of them have become commercially available products.

  4. An Approach for Implementing ISA 95-Compliant Big Data Observation, Analysis and Diagnosis Features in Industry 4.0 Vision Following Manufacturing Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nagorny, Kevin; Scholze, Sebastian; Barata, José; Colombo, Armando,

    2016-01-01

    Part 4: Manufacturing Systems; International audience; Current trends are showing a technological evolution to an unified Industrial Internet of Things network where smart manufacturing devices are loosely coupled over a cloud to realize comprehensive collaboration and analysis possibilities, and to increase the dynamic and volatile of manufacturing environments. This rising complexity generates also higher ranges of error possibilities and analog a growing demand of new diagnostic approaches...

  5. Evaluation of waste management, manufacturing industries, from an environmental standpoint (Case Study: Savojbolagh city Alborz Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mashaalah nikzad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction and Purpose: The quantity and quality of industrial wastewater is variable owing to the different lines of production and product variety of industry. Meeting the effluent standards requires proper environmental management. The current study aimed to evaluate the industrial wastewater management in Savojbolagh, Alborz, Iran from an environmental perspective in 2013-2014. Methods: This study was cross-sectional. The data were collected through field visits, questionnaire (of Iran's Environmental Protection Agency, and controlling data from industrial plants with more than 50 workers (totally 108 units. The questionnaire included questions about the quantity, quality, and management of wastewater. Based on an environmental perspective, the way of managing industrial wastewater was classified into four index: wastewater production, per capita production, BOD (Biochemical oxygen demand per capita, and COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand per capita which were rated from1 to 6. For each index, a higher score was defined for better management. Results: The wastewater produced by industries was estimated to be 1942 cubic meters per day. Food industry alone produced 59% of the entire industrial wastewater. The industry related to animal slaughtering was shown to have the highest BOD per capita, 320 g/day per every worker; and the cellulose industry enjoyed the highest COD per capita, 561 g/day per every worker. 76% of the industries under investigation had no strategy to reduce the wastewater production. 34% of these industries possessed treatment plants, while only 17% of them were following the effluent discharge standards. The most common method of treated and untreated wastewater disposal was found to be absorbing well. Conclusion: Based on this assessment, the management of wastewater was revealed to be favorable in non-metallic minerals industry, but unfavorable in agriculture industry as the wastewater produced by

  6. Industrial sector-based volatile organic compound (VOC) source profiles measured in manufacturing facilities in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Junyu; Yu, Yufan; Mo, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Xinming; Yin, Shasha; Peng, Kang; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaoqiong; Cai, Huihua

    2013-07-01

    Industrial sector-based VOC source profiles are reported for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, based source samples (stack emissions and fugitive emissions) analyzed from sources operating under normal conditions. The industrial sectors considered are printing (letterpress, offset and gravure printing processes), wood furniture coating, shoemaking, paint manufacturing and metal surface coating. More than 250 VOC species were detected following US EPA methods TO-14 and TO-15. The results indicated that benzene and toluene were the major species associated with letterpress printing, while ethyl acetate and isopropyl alcohol were the most abundant compounds of other two printing processes. Acetone and 2-butanone were the major species observed in the shoemaking sector. The source profile patterns were found to be similar for the paint manufacturing, wood furniture coating, and metal surface coating sectors, with aromatics being the most abundant group and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) as the second largest contributor in the profiles. While OVOCs were one of the most significant VOC groups detected in these five industrial sectors in the PRD region, they have not been reported in most other source profile studies. Such comparisons with other studies show that there are differences in source profiles for different regions or countries, indicating the importance of developing local source profiles. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The German model of capitalism and the persistence of outward foreign direct investment: evidence from German manufacturing industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin T Bohl

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Against the backdrop of critique on the German model of capitalism in general, and German public policy in particular as to the ability to successfully adjust to rapid change and exogenous shocks in wake of economic globalisation, this paper investigates the degree of shock persistence in foreign direct investment (FDI of ten German manufacturing industries for the period 1976 to 2003. Theory on exports and non-FDI investment suggests that FDI should exhibit a considerable degree of shock persistence because they are subject to high sunk costs because of high entry and exit costs associated with the high level of asset specificity that is normally connected to FDI. Persistence in foreign direct investment time series data is established by applying various unit root tests. The results are robust to the potential presence of structural breaks in the data. The empirical analysis shows that German outward FDI in mature manufacturing industries, with one exception, exhibits a high degree of shock persistence. The results suggest, at least for mature German industries, that the sunk costs view on shock persistency is confirmed for outward FDI. The results furnish evidence for a tentative assessment of the relationship between German public policy and FDI strategies of multinational firms.

  8. 76 FR 82308 - Guidance for Industry: Current Good Tissue Practice and Additional Requirements for Manufacturers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Current Good Tissue Practice and... document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Current Good Tissue Practice (CGTP) and Additional Requirements... consistent with FDA's good guidance practices regulation (21 CFR 10.115). The guidance represents FDA's...

  9. Examining the Role of Emotional Intelligence between Organizational Learning and Adaptive Performance in Indian Manufacturing Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Rabindra Kumar; Jena, Lalatendu Kesari; Singh, Sanjay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between organisational learning and adaptive performance. Furthermore, the study investigates the moderating role of emotional intelligence in the perspective of organisational learning for addressing adaptive performance of executives employed in manufacturing organisations.…

  10. Mind maps of employment development in Swedish sparse regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Wiberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Employment options are forming an essential part of living conditions for individuals and households. In this paper we present how people in Sweden perceive current and future job options. The empirical case is the northern half of the Swedish territory, which is divided into four counties. The analysis is based on data from a questionnaire which was distributed to 4 000 inhabitants aged 15-85 years during October 2008 - January 2009. The ANOTA method is used as analytical instrument. Two categories of determinants behind attitudes to job options in general at the local labor market have been chosen. The first category includes a set of personal attributes, while the second category includes a set of locational characteristics. Further is analyzed how the respondents perceived the specific role of manufacturing industry, service industry and R&D for the development in their county. Also in this part the two categories of determinants are used. The analysis reveals a rather widely spread anxiety about both current and future provision of job options. The most satisfied and optimistic respondents were young, male and high income earners living in coastal municipal with a low unemployment level. There were also some striking differences in views among sub groups on the role of manufacturing industry, service industry and R&D. The biggest contrasts were between manufacturing industry and R&D. The highest share of respondents who regarded manufacturing industry as very important was found among men, over 30 years, with a low education and living in municipalities with a high unemployment level. The highest share of respondents who regarded R&D as very important was found among women, younger than 30 years, highly educated and living in coastal municipalities with a low unemployment level.

  11. The Competitiveness of Exports from Manufacturing Industries in Croatia and Slovenia to the EU-15 Market: A Dynamic Panel Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebojša Stojčić

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It is often stated that the growth prospects of nations are closely related to patterns of competitiveness exercised by their firms and industries in the international market. Building on foundations of endogenous growth and new trade theories academics and policy-makers postulate that quality-driven competitiveness bears higher growth potential than the ability to compete in terms of prices. The transition of Central and Eastern European Countries has been characterised by movement from the latter towards the former pattern of competitiveness. This process was facilitated by the transfer of knowledge and skills through the outsourcing of production from their most important trading partners, the West European members of the European Union (EU-15 countries, which paved the way for the development of intra-industry trade. This paper explores the competitiveness of manufacturing industries from Croatia and Slovenia in the EU-15 market. Using dynamic panel analysis we find that between 2002 and 2007 producers from the two countries followed different patterns of competitiveness. While in Slovenia the quality of exports is the main determinant of EU-15 market share, the competitiveness of Croatian producers still depends on their labour costs. We also find a strong impact of intra-industry trade on the competiveness of industries from the two countries in the EU-15 market.

  12. Packages of participation: Swedish employees' experience of Lean depends on how they are involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännmark, Mikael; Holden, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Lean Production is a dominant approach in Swedish and global manufacturing and service industries. Studies of Lean's employee effects are few and contradictory. Employee effects from Lean are likely not uniform. This paper investigates the effect of employees' participation on their experiences of Lean. This study investigated how different packages of employee participation in Lean affected manufacturing workers' experiences of Lean. During 2008-2011, qualitative and quantitative data were collected from Swedish manufacturing companies participating in the national Swedish Lean Production program Produktionslyftet. Data from 129 surveys (28 companies), 39 semi-structured interviews, and 30 reports were analyzed. In the main analysis, comparisons were made of the survey-reported Lean experiences of employees in three groups: temporary group employees (N = 36), who participated in Lean mostly through intermittent projects; continuous group employees (N = 69), who participated through standing improvement groups; and combined group employees (N = 24), who participated in both ways. Continuous group employees had the most positive experience of Lean, followed by the combined group. Temporary group employees had the least positive experiences, being less likely than their counterparts to report that Lean improved teamwork, occupational safety, and change-related learning, decision making, and authority. These findings support the importance of continuous, structured opportunities for participation but raise the possibility that more participation may result in greater workload and role overload, mitigating some benefits of employee involvement. Consequently, companies should consider involving employees in change efforts but should attend to the specific design of participation activities.

  13. Leadership for the next Industrial Revolution: Driving the Digital Enterprise in Product Development and Manufacturing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Leinen, R

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available .com Digitalization changes everything ” The next trillion dollars will be earned with data – for our customers and for our industries. Michael Dell, founder of Dell Inc. ” Digital is the main reason just over half of the companies on the Fortune 500 have... and Development: FDI inward flow ; 2015: UNCTAD Global Investment Trends Monitor No.22 | 6) Cisco: The Internet of Everything (2013) | 7) IDC: The Digital Universe (2012) © Siemens AG 2017 April 2017 Page 6 siemens.com From Industry 1.0 to Industry 4...

  14. Modular industrial robots as the tool of process automation in robotized manufacturing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwiazda, A.; Banas, W.; Sekala, A.; Foit, K.; Hryniewicz, P.; Kost, G.

    2015-11-01

    Recently the number of designed modular machine was increased. The term modular machine is used to denote different types of machinery, equipment and production lines, which are created using modular elements. Modular could be both mechanic elements, and drives, as well as control systems. This method of machine design is more and more popular because it allows obtaining flexible and relatively cheap solutions. So it is worth to develop the concept of modularity in next areas of application. The advantages of modular solutions are: simplification of the structure, standardization of components, and faster assembly process of the complete machine Additional advantages, which is particularly important for manufacturers, are shorter manufacturing times, longer production series and reduced manufacturing costs. Modular designing is also the challenge for designers and the need for a new approach to the design process, to the starting process and to the exploitation process. The purpose for many manufacturers is the standardization of the components used for creating the finished products. This purpose could be realized by the application of standard modules which could be combined together in different ways to create the desired particular construction as much as possible in accordance with the order. This solution is for the producer more favorable than the construction of a large machine whose configuration must be matched to each individual order. In the ideal case each module has its own control system and the full functionality of the modular machine is obtained due to the mutual cooperation of all modules. Such a solution also requires the modular components which create the modular machine are equipped with interfaces compatible one with another to facilitate their communication. The individual components of the machine could be designed, manufactured and used independently and production management task could be divided into subtasks. They could be also

  15. An initiative for integrating problem-based learning into a lean manufacturing course of an industrial engineering graduate program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Tortorella

    Full Text Available Abstract The interest in improving the quality of engineering education is widely deemed. Due to an increasingly worldwide competition, Lean Manufacturing (LM has been a relevant subject among industrial engineering graduate programs. Despite the advances in teaching LM principles and techniques, the practical character inherent to LM undermines learning and development of students. In this sense, this study aims at demonstrating a proposal to enhance LM learning in an industrial engineering program. It is a blended proposal that combines traditional teaching methods to problem-based learning (PBL approach based on real problems of companies undergoing a lean implementation. A first phase of the proposal introduction is illustrated with an example of introducing it in a Brazilian federal university. The findings indicate that PBL may be an effective complementary method for LM learning, especially if graduate students are exposed to real problems in companies that are undergoing a lean implementation and related it to the current body of literature.

  16. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; McDonald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, Tomoko (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Mazwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

    1989-12-01

    This document describes the research work completed in five areas in fiscal year 1989. (1) The analysis of the US industrialized housing industry includes statistics, definitions, a case study, and a code analysis. (2) The assessment of foreign technology reviews the current status of design, manufacturing, marketing, and installation of industrialized housing primarily in Sweden and Japan. (3) Assessment of industrialization applications reviews housing production by climate zone, has a cost and energy comparison of Swedish and US housing, and discusses future manufacturing processes and emerging components. (4) The state of computer use in the industry is described and a prototype design tool is discussed. (5) Side by side testing of industrialized housing systems is discussed.

  17. THE STUDY OF ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR ON FISHERY MANUFACTURE INDUSTRIES EMPLOYEES PERFORMANCES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agung Wahyu Handaru; Umi Mardiyati

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the employee performance of fish-based food processing industries in West Java, which driven by variables of organizational culture, job satisfaction and motivation...

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY (CASE STUDY: PT MCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardus Hardjo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available IT Department in PT MCM has to carry out the duties and functions of developing solution to support the business unit in their operation and gain some benefits which should be obtained by using IT in manufacturing such as increasing efficiency, improving the effectivity in making decision and helping to promote the products. This study aims to design information technology strategic planning in accordance with the strategic plan. The research method is using the IT Strategic Planning framework of Alex Cullen and Marc Cecere. This study uses SWOT and IT Balanced Scorecard to analyze the needs of IT at PT MCM. The results of this study are recommended strategic steps to optimize the implementation of IT in the company to improve the performance from IT division to obtain the benefits by implementing IT in manufacturing and to form IT Blueprint, which is part of the information technology strategic plan in PT MCM.

  19. Internet and international trade by manufacturers: An approach using industrial sectors data

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique Bernal-Jurado; Encarnación Moral-Pajares

    2010-01-01

    Some evidences show how the potential generated by using the Internet as a tool able to open new commercial markets is not being fulfilled. The study´s purpose is to analyze the possible intensity with which the industrial sectors incorporate and take advantage of the Internet and the volume of business generated in international markets, based on statistical information referring to Spanish industry. Starting from the available statistical information on the incorporation and commercia...

  20. Potential health risk of heavy metals in the leather manufacturing industries in Sialkot, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Junaid, Muhammad; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Tang, Yu-Mei; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Pei, De-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    This is a systematical report on the potential health risk of heavy metals from the leather industries in Pakistan based on multiple biological matrices of the exposed workers and indoor dust samples. The adverse impacts of heavy metals on the oxidative enzyme and their risks to workers? health were also explored. Our results indicated that the level of Cr in indoor industrial dust was more than twice, compared to the background household dust. Blood, urine and hair samples of exposed workers...

  1. Identifying Critical Manufacturing Technologies Required for Transforming the Army Industrial Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    other defense needs. Since the commercial market for these items may be small, or nonexistent, the Army must identify and maintain a manufacturing...Ericsson, Prietula, and Cokely (2007, p. 2) maintain that “expertise is not captured by knowledge management systems,” because they are simply... Cokely , E. T. (2007). The making of an expert. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved from http://hbr.org/2007/07/the-making-of-an-expert/ar/1 42

  2. Improving production planning and scheduling processes at an Industrial/Agricultural Chain Manufacturer

    OpenAIRE

    Tandon, Ramit

    2008-01-01

    A key question which every manufacturing firm, irrespective of its scale faces is about deriving an appropriate production planning and control mechanism that enables it to effectively cater to the market demand along with improving profitability. This project looks at applicability of Material Requirement Planning, Just in Time and Theory of Constraints as production planning and control mechanisms with a specific focus on applying them at Renold Chain Plant in Bredbuy, Stockport, Manchester...

  3. Indirect Costs of Financial Distress in Durable Goods Industries: The Case of Auto Manufacturers

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Hortaçsu; Gregor Matvos; Chad Syverson; Sriram Venkataraman

    2013-01-01

    Financial distress can disrupt a durable goods producer's provision of complementary goods and services such as warranties, spare parts and maintenance. This reduces consumers' demand for the core product, causing indirect costs of financial distress. We test this hypothesis in the market for used cars sold at wholesale auctions. An increase in a manufacturer's credit default swaps significantly decreases the prices of its cars at auction, especially cars with longer expected service lives. O...

  4. Technological Leadership and Productivity Leadership in Manufacturing since the Industrial Revolution: Implications for the Convergence Debate.

    OpenAIRE

    Broadberry, S. N.

    1994-01-01

    The United States has been the labor productivity leader in manufacturing since the early nineteenth century despite changes in technological leadership from Britain to the United States and then to Germany and Japan. U.S. productivity leadership is based on the more widespread use of mass production rather than craft production methods, determined by resource and factor endowments and demand patterns. The two systems can coexist so long as the technologically lagging system imitates and adap...

  5. Industry 4.0: Reality, Future or just Science Fiction? How to Convince Today's Management to Invest in Tomorrow's Future! Successful Strategies for Industry 4.0 and Manufacturing IT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentner, Stephan

    Manufacturing IT and Industry 4.0 is the Fourth Industrial Revolution with a potential of 12 bn Euros in Germany's chemicals industry. But Switzerland is currently the best prepared of all countries in Europe. Many of the ideas are still very vague. This article discusses how to identify what is already reality, which ideas might become reality in the future and which ideas will stay science fiction. As projects in Manufacturing IT and Industry 4.0 are different from classical technical projects other strategies, for example agile project management, are necessary to secure success.

  6. Development of Functionally Graded Materials for Manufacturing Tools and Dies and Industrial Processing Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lherbier, Louis, W.; Novotnak, David, J.; Herling, Darrell, R.; Sears, James, W.

    2009-03-23

    Hot forming processes such as forging, die casting and glass forming require tooling that is subjected to high temperatures during the manufacturing of components. Current tooling is adversely affected by prolonged exposure at high temperatures. Initial studies were conducted to determine the root cause of tool failures in a number of applications. Results show that tool failures vary and depend on the operating environment under which they are used. Major root cause failures include (1) thermal softening, (2) fatigue and (3) tool erosion, all of which are affected by process boundary conditions such as lubrication, cooling, process speed, etc. While thermal management is a key to addressing tooling failures, it was clear that new tooling materials with superior high temperature strength could provide improved manufacturing efficiencies. These efficiencies are based on the use of functionally graded materials (FGM), a new subset of hybrid tools with customizable properties that can be fabricated using advanced powder metallurgy manufacturing technologies. Modeling studies of the various hot forming processes helped identify the effect of key variables such as stress, temperature and cooling rate and aid in the selection of tooling materials for specific applications. To address the problem of high temperature strength, several advanced powder metallurgy nickel and cobalt based alloys were selected for evaluation. These materials were manufactured into tooling using two relatively new consolidation processes. One process involved laser powder deposition (LPD) and the second involved a solid state dynamic powder consolidation (SSDPC) process. These processes made possible functionally graded materials (FGM) that resulted in shaped tooling that was monolithic, bi-metallic or substrate coated. Manufacturing of tooling with these processes was determined to be robust and consistent for a variety of materials. Prototype and production testing of FGM tooling showed the

  7. Assessment of water pollution in different bleaching based paper manufacturing and textile dyeing industries in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, K; Jeyapaul, S; Sharma, D C

    2007-11-01

    Paper industries using different raw materials such as hard wood, bamboo, baggase, rice-straw and waste papers and bleaching chemicals like chlorine, hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, sulphite and oxygen were studied to estimate organic pollution load and Adsorbable Organic Halides (AOX) per ton of production. The hard wood based paper industries generate higher Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) loads (105-182 kg t(-1)) and Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) loads (32.0-72 kg t(-1)) compared to the agro and waste paper based industrial effluents. The bleaching sequences such as C-EP-H-H, C-E-H-H, C-E-Do-D1 and O-Do-EOP-D1 are adopted in the paper industries and the molecular elemental chlorine free bleaching sequence discharges low AOX in the effluent. The range of AOX concentration in the final effluent from the paper industries was 0.08-0.99 kg t(-1) of production. Water consumption was in the range of 100-130 m(3) t(-1) of paper production for wood based industries and 30-50 m(3) for the waste paper based industries. Paper machine effluents are partially recycled after treatment and pulp mill black liquor are subject to chemical recovery after evaporation to reduce the water consumption and the total pollution loads. Hypochlorite bleaching units of textile bleaching processes generate more AOX (17.2-18.3 mg l(-1)) and are consuming more water (45-80 l kg(-1)) whereas alkali peroxide bleaching hardly generates the AOX in the effluents and water consumption was also comparatively less (40 l kg(-1) of yarn/cloth).

  8. Argonne National Laboratory study of the transfer of federal computational technology to manufacturing industry in the State of Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a pilot study to develop, initiate the implementation, and document a process to identify computational technology capabilities resident within Argonne National Laboratory to small and medium-sized businesses in the State of Michigan. It is a derivative of a program entitled ``Technology Applications Development Process for the State of Michigan`` undertaken by the Industrial Technology Institute and MERRA under funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The overall objective of the latter program is to develop procedures which can facilitate the discovery and commercialization of new technologies for the benefit of small and medium-size manufacturing firms. Federal laboratories such as Argonne, along with universities, have been identified by the Industrial Technology Institute as key sources of technology which can be profitably commercialized by the target firms. The scope of this study limited the investigation of technology areas for technology transfer to that of computational science and engineering featuring high performance computing. This area was chosen as the broad technological capability within Argonne to investigate for technology transfer to Michigan firms for several reasons. First, and most importantly, as a multidisciplinary laboratory, Argonne has the full range of scientific and engineering skills needed to utilize leading-edge computing capabilities in many areas of manufacturing.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory study of the transfer of federal computational technology to manufacturing industry in the State of Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a pilot study to develop, initiate the implementation, and document a process to identify computational technology capabilities resident within Argonne National Laboratory to small and medium-sized businesses in the State of Michigan. It is a derivative of a program entitled Technology Applications Development Process for the State of Michigan'' undertaken by the Industrial Technology Institute and MERRA under funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The overall objective of the latter program is to develop procedures which can facilitate the discovery and commercialization of new technologies for the benefit of small and medium-size manufacturing firms. Federal laboratories such as Argonne, along with universities, have been identified by the Industrial Technology Institute as key sources of technology which can be profitably commercialized by the target firms. The scope of this study limited the investigation of technology areas for technology transfer to that of computational science and engineering featuring high performance computing. This area was chosen as the broad technological capability within Argonne to investigate for technology transfer to Michigan firms for several reasons. First, and most importantly, as a multidisciplinary laboratory, Argonne has the full range of scientific and engineering skills needed to utilize leading-edge computing capabilities in many areas of manufacturing.

  10. Factors and Drivers Effecting the Decision of Using Off-Site Manufacturing (OSM Systems in House Building Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Elnaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Much has been written on Off-site Manufacturing (OSM in construction, particularly regarding the perceived benefits and barriers to implementation. However, there seems to be a wide misunderstanding of the state of OSM associated with the concept of decision by many of those involved in decision making process within the house building industry. This has led to a demand for guidance’s on decision making process for construction project leaders particularly at early project stages. Choosing a construction method for a project will require an optimum decision strategy which involves careful understanding, measurement and evaluation of a number of decision factors that can have the most influence on successful decision action. This paper, therefore, aims to identify the key decision factors to be considered at evaluation stage when choosing to use Off-Site Manufacturing (OSM as a construction strategy in house building projects. This will reveal the key drivers for change in the industry towards the use of OSM in house building.

  11. Correlations in between EAWS and OCRA Index concerning the repetitive loads of the upper limbs in automobile manufacturing industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavatelli, Ivan; Schaub, Karlheinz; Caragnano, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Upper limbs repetitive tasks are one of the main sources of risk for the workers of the manufacturing industries and the standards ISO 11228-3 and EN 1005-5 addressed this issue since 2007. EAWS (European Assembly Worksheet) is a 1st level ergonomic risk assessment method and it provides in its 4th section a score to measure the load level for the upper limbs based on a traffic light scheme. According to the relevant ISO/CEN standards, the OCRA Index is the preferred system to refer to in the evaluation of the biomechanical stress of hand-harm-shoulder system. This correlation study is based on a 45 workstations sample coming from the automobile manufacturing industry. According to the results, EAWS4 shows an excellent correlation with OCRA index (Spearman's rho correlation index 0.95). Being EAWS based on biometric statistical data distribution, its typical application is the process design phase, but adopting a conservative approach in the interpretation of EAWS4 score for risk mapping purposes, it provides an equivalent "reaction" pattern (countermeasures to be taken in the production phase) with respect of OCRA Index with an Odds Ratio ranging from 0.89 (OR-matched) to 1.00 (OR-conservative).

  12. Industrialization of Biology. A Roadmap to Accelerate the Advanced Manufacturing of Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Douglas C. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The report stresses the need for efforts to inform the public of the nature of industrial biotechnology and of its societal benefits, and to make sure that concerns are communicated effectively between the public and other stakeholders. In addition to scientific advances, a number of governance and societal factors will influence the industrialization of biology. Industry norms and standards need to be established in areas such as read/write accuracy for DNA, data and machine technology specifications, and organism performance in terms of production rates and yields. An updated regulatory regime is also needed to accelerate the safe commercialization of new host organisms, metabolic pathways, and chemical products, and regulations should be coordinated across nations to enable rapid, safe, and global access to new technologies and products.

  13. Urinary Bisphenol A (BPA) Concentrations among Workers in Industries that Manufacture and Use BPA in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Cynthia J; Jackson, Matthew V; Deddens, James A; Clark, John C; Ye, Xiaoyun; Christianson, Annette L; Meadows, Juliana W; Calafat, Antonia M

    2017-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) toxicity and exposure risk to humans has been the subject of considerable scientific debate; however, published occupational exposure data for BPA are limited. In 2013-2014, 77 workers at six US companies making BPA, BPA-based resins, or BPA-filled wax provided seven urine samples over two consecutive work days (151 worker-days, 525 samples). Participant information included industry, job, tasks, personal protective equipment used, hygiene behaviors, and canned food/beverage consumption. Total (free plus conjugated) BPA, quantified in urine by mass spectrometry, was detected in all samples. The geometric mean (GM) creatinine-adjusted total BPA (total BPACR) concentration was 88.0 µg g-1 (range 0.78-18900 µg g-1), ~70 times higher than in US adults in 2013-2014 (1.27 µg g-1). GM total BPACR increased during Day 1 (26.6-127 µg g-1), decreased by pre-shift Day 2 (84.4 µg g-1) then increased during Day 2 to 178 µg g-1. By industry, baseline and post-baseline total BPACR was highest in BPA-filled wax manufacturing/reclaim (GM = 111 µg g-1) and lowest in phenolic resin manufacturing (GM = 6.56 µg g-1). By job, total BPACR was highest at baseline in maintenance workers (GM = 157 µg g-1) and post-baseline in those working with molten BPA-filled wax (GM = 441 µg g-1). Workers in the job of flaking a BPA-based resin had the lowest concentrations at baseline (GM = 4.81 µg g-1) and post-baseline (GM = 23.2 µg g-1). In multiple regression models, at baseline, industry significantly predicted increased total BPACR (P = 0.0248); post-baseline, handling BPA containers (P = 0.0035), taking ≥3 process/bulk samples with BPA (P = 0.0002) and wearing a Tyvek® coverall (P = 0.0042) significantly predicted increased total BPACR (after adjusting for total BPACR at baseline, time point, and body mass index). Several work-related factors, including industry, job, and certain tasks performed, were associated with increased urinary total BPACR concentrations

  14. The incoming global technological and industrial revolution towards competitive sustainable manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jovane, F.; Yoshikawa, H.; Alting, Leo

    2008-01-01

    , knowledge-based, competitive sustainable manufacturing (CSM) has been widely considered as main enabler. This paper presents the necessary steps from economic growth to sustainable development. The reference model for proactive action (RMfPA) is proposed to develop and implement CSM, at national and global...... levels. Furthermore, we also review strategies to pursue CSM at the macro-meso-field level in addition to ongoing national initiatives in different countries and by international organizations. A case study concerning the European Manufuture initiative is cited. The overall results conclude that RMf...

  15. Start-up conditions and the performance of women - and men - controlled businesses in manufacturing industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otilia Driga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research into the economic performance of women-controlled firms suggests that their underperformance may not be the result of differences in the managerial ability of women as compared to men, and that it may in fact be a consequence of differing levels of start-up resources. Using accounting data, we examine the effects that selected start-up conditions have had on the observed economic performance of a sample of 4450 Spanish manufacturing firms. The results, which indicate significant differences in the initial conditions and show lower levels of assets and employee numbers in women-controlled firms, have implications for the economic performance of such firms.

  16. Internet and international trade by manufacturers: An approach using industrial sectors data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Bernal-Jurado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Some evidences show how the potential generated by using the Internet as a tool able to open new commercial markets is not being fulfilled. The study´s purpose is to analyze the possible intensity with which the industrial sectors incorporate and take advantage of the Internet and the volume of business generated in international markets, based on statistical information referring to Spanish industry. Starting from the available statistical information on the incorporation and commercial use of ICT, the foreign trade and production of various Spanish industries are assigned different variables and the lineal relationships among them are contrasted. Those industries with the largest importing and exporting activities are, at the same time, those that get more and more business via electronic commerce, particularly through different communication channels, such as EDI, Minitel or Internet. However, it is interesting to note the absence of this kind of relationship when we look at the e-commerce carried out exclusively through the Internet. The results justify the necessity of taking more intensive actions to improve the use of the new electronic systems in the international commercialization, especially in the environment of the small and medium sized companies.

  17. A Study of Supervisor and Employee Perceptions of Work Attitudes in Information Age Manufacturing Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Md. Shafiqul; Brauchle, Paul E.

    2003-01-01

    The self-perceived work ethic of industrial employees in information jobs (N=304) and non-information jobs (N=277), and employees' work ethic as assessed by their supervisors, were examined using the Occupational Work Ethic Inventory (OWEI). A Principle Components Analysis yielded four factors (Teamwork, Dependability, Ambition and Self-Control)…

  18. Development of a Computer Vision Technology for the Forest Products Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Earl Kline; Richard Conners; Philip A. Araman

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this research is to create an automated processing/grading system for hardwood lumber that will be of use to the forest products industry. The objective of creating a full scale machine vision prototype for inspecting hardwood lumber will become a reality in calendar year 1992. Space for the full scale prototype has been created at the Brooks Forest...

  19. Potential health risk of heavy metals in the leather manufacturing industries in Sialkot, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaid, Muhammad; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Tang, Yu-Mei; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Pei, De-Sheng

    2017-08-18

    This is a systematical report on the potential health risk of heavy metals from the leather industries in Pakistan based on multiple biological matrices of the exposed workers and indoor dust samples. The adverse impacts of heavy metals on the oxidative enzyme and their risks to workers' health were also explored. Our results indicated that the level of Cr in indoor industrial dust was more than twice, compared to the background household dust. Blood, urine and hair samples of exposed workers showed significantly high concentrations of heavy metals, compared to those in the control group. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) level in the blood samples expressed significant positive correlation with Cr and Ni. Total hazard quotients (HQs)/hazard index (HI) were >1, and Cr (VI) exhibited higher cancer risks than that of Cd in the exposed workers. In addition, the PCA-MLR analysis confirmed that the industrial sections; cutting, shivering/crusting, and stitching were the principal contributors of heavy metals in the biological entities of the workers. Taken together, our results highlighted the occupationally exposed groups would likely to experience the potential health risks due to excessive exposure to the heavy metals from the leather industries.

  20. Portuguese Child Labour: Manufacturing for Change or Continuing Exploitation in the Textiles Industry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Martin; da Silva, Carlos Pereira

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of the role of Portuguese child laborers, focusing on the textile, clothing, and footwear industries. Argues that in the long term, positive outcomes will be based upon improved education; an alteration in the views of the factory owners, parents, and their children; and greater knowledge of innovative working practices among…

  1. Evaluation of coupling agents to manufacture hybrid hardboard made from industrial waste fiberglass and wood fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Hunt; Charles B. Vick

    2004-01-01

    Every day, tons of fibrous material are landfilled that could otherwise be used for structural panel products. In this study, we looked at combining fibers from industrial fiberglass insulation trimwaste with commercial hardboard fibers and with recycled corrugated container fibers to improve the properties of a structural hardboard-like panel. This study also...

  2. Competitiveness of U.S. wood furniture manufacturers - Lessons learned from the softwood moulding industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Schuler; Russ Taylor; Philip A. Araman

    2001-01-01

    The furniture industry in the United States has been losing market share to imports for the past two decades. This article focuses on the market segment where most of the loss has occurred: the important wood household (non-upholstered) sector (SIC code 2511). In the upholstered furniture sector, exports are still larger than imports. But the wood household furniture...

  3. Guardian Industries Corp. to Cut Harmful Air Pollution at Flat Glass Manufacturing Plants in Seven States

    Science.gov (United States)

    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) today announced a settlement with Guardian Industries Corp. that will resolve alleged violations of the Clean Air Act at Guardian's flat glass manu

  4. Using manufacturing simulators to evaluate important processing decisions in the furniture and cabinet industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice K. Wiedenbeck; Philip A. Araman

    1995-01-01

    We've been telling the wood industry about our process simulation modeling research and development work for several years. We've demonstrated our crosscut-first and rip-first rough mill simulation and animation models. Weâve advised companies on how they could use simulation modeling to help make critically important, pending decisions related to mill layout...

  5. Interoperability for Space Mission Monitor and Control: Applying Technologies from Manufacturing Automation and Process Control Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael K.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with interoperability for space mission monitor and control are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Space Project Mission Operations Control Architecture (SuperMOCA) goals and methods for achieving them; 2) Specifics on the architecture: open standards ad layering, enhancing interoperability, and promoting commercialization; 3) An advertisement; 4) Status of the task - government/industry cooperation and architecture and technology demonstrations; and 5) Key features of messaging services and virtual devices.

  6. Factors Affecting the Supply of Strategic Raw Materials with Particular Reference to the Aerospace Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Corrosion Protection of Superalloy» in Gas Turbines. Coatings for Fuel Economy or Materials Substitution. The Navy Program to Develop Replacements for...of it being used in the metallurgical industry. Its properties are tc strengthen the steel in its own right and to desulphurise it. Nickel would...provide some substitute but is expensive, while effective desulphurising agents are available but are themselves scarce. Sources Production at about

  7. Innovation assessment in a local branch of a rail transport manufacture industry - A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Boavida, Nuno; Moretto, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Based on a poster submitted to CONCORD 2011 - Conference on Corporate R&D: The dynamics of Europe's industrial structure and the growth of innovative firms, Sevilla, IPTS, 6 Out. 2011, Seville, http://www.eventisimo.com/concord2011/recibido.html In the context of the revitalization of the Portuguese railway sector with the construction of the high-speed railway network, the working paper proposes an analysis of the results found from the application of an innovation scoring to the Portugue...

  8. 78 FR 22887 - Guidance for Industry on Non-Penicillin Beta-Lactam Drugs: A Current Good Manufacturing Practices...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Current Good Manufacturing Practices Framework for Preventing Cross- Contamination; Availability AGENCY... health risks associated with cross-reactivity. Although the existing current good manufacturing practices (CGMP) regulations require separation of manufacturing facilities to avoid cross-contamination, the only...

  9. An industrial big data pipeline for data-driven analytics maintenance applications in large-scale smart manufacturing facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O’Donovan, P; Leahy, K; Bruton, K; O’Sullivan, D T. J

    2015-01-01

    The term smart manufacturing refers to a future-state of manufacturing, where the real-time transmission and analysis of data from across the factory creates manufacturing intelligence, which can be...

  10. Employees' skills, manufacturing flexibility and operational performance: a structural equation modelling applied to the automotive industry

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, José Cândido Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Flexibility and human resources, have a great importance in our days, in our industries, in a competitive environment, who can not be flexible loses market share to their opponents. The survival depends how you can deal with the unpredictability and volatility. In this field, human resources are fundamental, no one can be flexible if don’t have available a multi – task team prepared to learn and improve daily. The main goal of this research is to show the importance of the relatio...

  11. Voluntary Safety Management System in the Manufacturing Industry – To What Extent does OHSAS 18001 Certification Help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paas Õnnela

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Occupational risk prevention can be managed in several ways. Voluntary safety management standard OHSAS 18001 is a tool, which is considered to give contribution in effective risk management in the manufacturing industry. The current paper examines the benefits of OHSAS 18001 based on the statistical analysis. MISHA method is used for safety audit in 16 Estonian enterprises. The results demonstrate the objectives why companies implement or are willing to implement OHSAS 18001, bring out differences in safety activities for 3 types of companies and determine correlations among different safety activity areas. The information is valuable for enterprises that are willing to improve their safety activities via a voluntary safety management system.

  12. The need for powder characterisation in the additive manufacturing industry and the establishment of a national facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson, Jeffrey Malcolm

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of powders used in additive manufacturing can have significant effects on process efficiencies and the quality of the final products. Powder sizes and morphologies need to be optimised for a particular process, and this requires the facilities to perform these measurements as well as provide a quality check on powder batches that are purchased. The establishment of a national powder characterisation facility has been identified by the Titanium Centre of Competence (a DST-funded initiative as a critical form of support for the development of a South African titanium metal industry. This paper discusses what effect the different powder characteristics can have on the selective laser sintering processes, as well as the state of development of this national facility.

  13. Evaluation of exposure to the airborne asbestos in an automobile brake and clutch manufacturing industry in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakooei, Hossein; Marioryad, Hossein

    2010-03-01

    About 2000 tons of chrysotile is used annually to produce friction materials in Islamic Republic of Iran. Approximately, 3000 workers are exposed to the asbestos fibers in the different processes of brake and clutch manufacturing. In the current study, asbestos fiber concentrations during brake and clutch manufacture were measured. This study also evaluated the fiber size and morphology distribution according to the Asbestos International Association (AIA) for standardization analytical method for asbestos. The airborne asbestos fiber concentrations and its chemical composition of 92 personal samples were analyzed by phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX). Personal monitoring of fiber levels demonstrated counts that ranged from 0.31 to 1.3 PCM f/ml (15.5-51.5 SEM f/ml). Geometric means of the asbestos concentrations were 1.3 PCM f/ml (51.5 SEM f/ml) and 0.86 PCM f/ml (42.1 SEM f/ml) according to the brake weighting and mixing and clutch mixing process, respectively. The geometrical mean concentrations were 0.63 PCM f/ml (31 SEM f/ml), which is considerably higher than threshold limit value (TLV) of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) which is 0.1f/ml. The SEM data demonstrate that the fibrous particles consisted, approximately, of chrysotile (50%), tremolite (30%), and actinolite (20%). Based on these findings, the 50% of airborne fibers inhaled by the workers were amphiboles asbestos with fibers equal and greater than 5 microm in length and 0.2 microm in diameter, and thus not included in the PCM-based fiber counts. Therefore, it might be expected that workers who worked in the brake and clutch manufacture will suffer from negative health effects of exposing to the amphibole asbestos fibers. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Similarities of lean manufacturing approaches implementation in SMEs towards the success: Case study in the automotive component industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose A.N.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, manufacturing companies are striving for a better system like lean manufacturing (LM. The primary objective of LM is to identify and eliminate wastes. LM can be applied successfully in all industries providing a full understanding of lean ingredients i.e. concept, principles, and practices. There are a lot of practices which are necessary to be implemented in order to gain full benefits of LM. However, small and medium enterprises (SMEs are lack of knowledge in LM and facing difficulties to adopt all of the LM principles. Therefore, it is necessary to the researchers to come out with a simple guideline for LM implementation. The objective of this paper is to explore the journey of LM implementation including preliminary, in process and post of LM. This research was conducted through multi-case study research. There were four SMEs and two large companies. The gathered information shows that the preliminary stage of LM implementation is similar to each other including large companies. The result shows SMEs still have a potential to success in LM. This finding might give an opportunity to SMEs to prepare the basis for LM implementation effectively. As a result, SMEs able compete in the competitive global marketplace and strive for world class performance through implementation of LM.

  15. Quality-by-Design approach to monitor the operation of a batch bioreactor in an industrial avian vaccine manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largoni, Martina; Facco, Pierantonio; Bernini, Donatella; Bezzo, Fabrizio; Barolo, Massimiliano

    2015-10-10

    Monitoring batch bioreactors is a complex task, due to the fact that several sources of variability can affect a running batch and impact on the final product quality. Additionally, the product quality itself may not be measurable on line, but requires sampling and lab analysis taking several days to be completed. In this study we show that, by using appropriate process analytical technology tools, the operation of an industrial batch bioreactor used in avian vaccine manufacturing can be effectively monitored as the batch progresses. Multivariate statistical models are built from historical databases of batches already completed, and they are used to enable the real time identification of the variability sources, to reliably predict the final product quality, and to improve process understanding, paving the way to a reduction of final product rejections, as well as to a reduction of the product cycle time. It is also shown that the product quality "builds up" mainly during the first half of a batch, suggesting on the one side that reducing the variability during this period is crucial, and on the other side that the batch length can possibly be shortened. Overall, the study demonstrates that, by using a Quality-by-Design approach centered on the appropriate use of mathematical modeling, quality can indeed be built "by design" into the final product, whereas the role of end-point product testing can progressively reduce its importance in product manufacturing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modernization of boiler for manufacturing factories in an industrial area of Nanping City, Fujian Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An investigational study was conducted of the project for energy conservation and greenhouse effect gas reduction by introducing the energy utilization system combined with CCS equipment and cogeneration system to general industry plants at the industrial complex in Nanping City, Fujian Province, China. As a result of the field survey, it was concluded that the capacity suitable for CCS center was 200,000 t/y and the size suitable for pulverized coal boiler at each site was 35 t/h. The energy conservation amount in this project was the coal use reduction amount by 88,000 t/y (48,000 toe/y), and the greenhouse effect gas reduction amount was approximately 90,000 t-CO2/y. As to the economical efficiency of the project, the period of ROI was about 5.1 years, and the internal earning rate at each site was 14-23%. The materialization of the project was confirmed. However, in the case of raising the required funds from city banks in China, financing conditions are strict, and the financing seems to be difficult at each site. It is necessary to raise low-interest funds such as the special environment yen credit. (NEDO)

  17. Does External Knowledge Sourcing Enhance Market Performance? Evidence from the Korean Manufacturing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kibaek; Yoo, Jaeheung; Choi, Munkee; Zo, Hangjung; Ciganek, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Firms continuously search for external knowledge that can contribute to product innovation, which may ultimately increase market performance. The relationship between external knowledge sourcing and market performance is not well-documented. The extant literature primarily examines the causal relationship between external knowledge sources and product innovation performance or to identify factors which moderates the relationship between external knowledge sourcing and product innovation. Non-technological innovations, such as organization and marketing innovations, intervene in the process of external knowledge sourcing to product innovation to market performance but has not been extensively examined. This study addresses two research questions: does external knowledge sourcing lead to market performance and how does external knowledge sourcing interact with a firm's different innovation activities to enhance market performance. This study proposes a comprehensive model to capture the causal mechanism from external knowledge sourcing to market performance. The research model was tested using survey data from manufacturing firms in South Korea and the results demonstrate a strong statistical relationship in the path of external knowledge sourcing (EKS) to product innovation performance (PIP) to market performance (MP). Organizational innovation is an antecedent to EKS while marketing innovation is a consequence of EKS, which significantly influences PIP and MP. The results imply that any potential EKS effort should also consider organizational innovations which may ultimately enhance market performance. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed as well as concluding remarks.

  18. Assessment of exposure to voices and noise via earphones in manufacturing industry workers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Tomo; Kakei, Masazumi; Araki, Ikuno; Tsutsui, Takao; Satoh, Noriaki; Inoue, Jinro; Horie, Seichi

    2014-01-01

    There is concern that sound via earphones and headphones attached to headsets used in workplaces may be a risk factor for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Although there are some previous studies investigating exposure to noise from headphones, almost none have assessed the risks to workers who use earphones. We assessed exposure to noise among workers who regularly wear earphones in noisy workplaces. The subjects of this study were 21 workers who regularly wear earphones in three manufacturing companies in Japan. The sound pressure output from earphones and personal exposure to occupational noise was measured for each worker. A noise-dosimeter was used to measure individual exposure to occupational noise. The sound pressure output from the earphones was measured by recording the electric signal with a data recorder attached to the earphones, and the recording was analyzed by playing it back in the laboratory through a sound analyzer via an ear simulator. The mean scores for personal exposure and earphone output LAeq were 87.9 dB and 87.6 dB, respectively. Earphone output LAeq exceeded 85 dB for two-thirds of the subjects. Nearly all the subjects lacked hearing protection devices (HPDs) on their earphones. The results suggest that workers who use earphones in noisy workplaces are exposed to the following NIHL risk factors: (1) they are deprived of the opportunity to fit appropriate HPDs, and (2) the sound pressure output from the earphones themselves exceeds the occupational exposure limit.

  19. Application of Lean Manufacturing Tools in a Garment Industry as a Strategy for Productivity Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Nunesca

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to use and apply lean tools as ways of improving manufacturing systems that lead to reduction of wastes and standardization of cycle time. Model A in Line 1 at sewing section was the focus of the study. The researcher used questionnaires, 5S Audit checklists, and Time Study forms in information-gathering and cycle time-computation. Based on the observation done, the company does not have a standard operation time. Similarly, the researcher observed non-value activities such as unnecessary transportation and manual counting, and there were also product defects due to poor 5S and WIP inventories. After considering lean tools, using process flow and cycle time analysis, the standard time was determined. Likewise, the non-value added activities were reduced, thus productivity was improved. After lean implementation, 100% efficiency was achieved, the rejection rate was reduced to 0.08% and zero WIP inventories in Line 1 became a practice. Lean tools brought significant changes in providing smooth process flow and productive operations, which in turn, give a remarkable contribution in achieving company’s goals, focus on the customers, giving quality products at the right time and at the right place. Therefore, the full implementation of BY Garments would contribute in gaining more profits.

  20. Digital manufacturing, industry 4.0, clould computing and thing internet: Brazilian contextualization and reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Cardoso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The digital era represents significant changes in the design of IT projects with an emphasis on digital infrastructure, especially in terms of investment and professional qualification, which requires, in Brazil, the creation of specific lines of financing by government development agencies. The creation of demonstration platforms could be an effective initiative to stimulate the dissemination of the concept and the establishment of partnerships between customers and suppliers of new technologies. On the other hand, and particularly for the consumer market, corporations can create new business models and modify their relationships with their consumers, users and even competitors. In fact, today, "Thing Internet" has come to significantly modify the paradigms of perception, production and distribution of the capitalist world. This article discusses, covering and understanding the main reasons for the existence of this gap between theory and practice regarding digital manufacturing and adjacencies, the perspectives of technological innovations in the digital era specifically in Brazil. Its content is the result of a bibliographical review carried out from April to June 2016.

  1. Compressed Air System Optimization Saves Energy and Improves Production at a Textile Manufacturing Mill (Peerless Division, Thomaston Mills, Inc.): Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Technical Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wogsland, J.

    2001-06-18

    This case study is one in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. This case study documents the activities, savings, and lessons learned on the textile manufacturing mill project.

  2. Antecedents of the Productive Efficiency in Manufacturing: experiences from Brazilian furniture industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Impelizieri Moura da Silveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to identify productive characteristics that differentiate technically efficient and inefficient firms in the furniture industry in Brazil. The sampling of companies obeyed especially the accessibility criteria, ensuring, however, the assumptions of homogeneity and reliability of the data. Data collection occurred in loco (May-September 2011 with the respondents, mostly corporate managers. The data analysis is based on efficiency scores obtained using Data Envelopment Analysis. Companies that has efficient production can be defined as those midsized and with pushed production. Additionally, they develop internally much of its processes, using outsourcing with less emphasis on the research and development of new products and with the client research, are relatively recent in the market and have a more innovative profile. But are those companies who have better control of production systems, presenting products with higher quality and at lower unit costs of production.

  3. Internationalisation Barriers of Small and Medium-sized Manufacturing Enterprises in Ethiopia: Leather and Leather Products Industry in Focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehualashet Demeke Lakew

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine internationalisation barriers of manufacturing SMEs operating in Leather and Leather Products Industry located in the capital city of Ethiopia. The small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs sector in Ethiopia is a significant group within the economy in terms of firm numbers and total employment. However, the SMEs sector’s share of exports is disproportionately small, which raised considerable research concerns. Firm export propensity was the dependent variable and internal and external export barrier factors were used as explanatory variables. The study was conducted through mixed research design of quantitative survey and case study. From the population of manufacturing SMEs operating in the Leather and Leather products Industry, a sample was selected through the use of stratified random sampling to ensure the effective representation of the population of exporting and non-exporting SMEs in the capital of Ethiopia. In order to complement survey results nine (4 exporting and 5 non-exporting SMEs were selected through critical case purposive sampling and an in-depth interviews were conducted. Statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS 20 was used to analyse the quantitative data whereas, qualitative data were analysed manually. Exploratory factor analysis with Varimax rotation and Binary logistic regression analysis are the analytical methods used. The statistical result showed that, logistics problem, insufficient finance, functional barriers, lack of export knowledge and information, procedural barriers and international trade barriers are the most significant obstacles of export trade in Ethiopia. The overall results revealed that explanatory variables used in the analysis significantly predict the dependent variable at 95% confidence level. Taken together, these results prompted the presentation of numerous implications for theory, practice, and future research. Finally, the paper recommended

  4. Tribology in Manufacturing Technology

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The present book aims to provide research advances on tribology in manufacturing technology for modern industry. This book can be used as a research book for final undergraduate engineering course (for example, mechanical, manufacturing, materials, etc) or as a subject on manufacturing at the postgraduate level. Also, this book can serve as a useful reference for academics, manufacturing and tribology researchers, mechanical, mechanical, manufacturing and materials engineers, professionals in related industries with manufacturing and tribology.

  5. Occupational exposure to styrene in the fibreglass reinforced plastic industry: comparison between two different manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranfo, Giovanna; Gherardi, Monica; Paci, E; Gatto, Mariapia; Gordiani, A; Caporossi, Lidia; Capanna, Silvia; Sisto, Renata; Papaleo, B; Fiumalbi, Carla; Garofani, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    Styrene is used in manufacturing fiberglass reinforced plastics: and occupational exposure was related to neurotoxicology and genotoxicity. The sum of the metabolites mandelic and phenylglyoxylic acids is the ACGIH biomarker for occupational exposure with a BEI of 400 mg/g of creatinine in end shift urine corresponding to a airborne styrene concentration of 85 mg/m3. There are two main molding processes, open and closed, the last more effective at controlling worker's styrene exposure. To compare the open molding process to the compression of fiber reinforced resin foils, a kind of closed molding, monitoring the styrene exposure of workers in two production sites (A and B). Environmental Monitoring was carried out by Radiello samplers and Biological Monitoring by means of the determination of MA and PGA with HPLC/MS/MS in 10 workers at Site A and 14 at Site B. The median values for styrene exposure resulted 31.1 mg/m3 for Site A and 24.4 mg/m for Site B, while the medians for the sum of the two metabolites in the end shift urine were 86.7 e 33.8 mg/g creatinine respectively. There is a significant linear correlation between personal styrene exposure and the excretion of styrene metabolites (R = 0.74). As expected the exposure markers of the workers of the two production sites resulted higher in the open process. The analytical results of both environmental and biological monitoring were all below the occupational exposure limits, confirming the efficacy of the protective devices.

  6. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to- Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Dougall, James [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    2016-02-05

    Many U.S. manufacturing facilities generate unrecovered, low-grade waste heat, and also generate or are located near organic-content waste effluents. Bioelectrochemical systems, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells, provide a means to convert organic-content effluents into electric power and useful chemical products. A novel biochemical electrical system for industrial manufacturing processes uniquely integrates both waste heat recovery and waste effluent conversion, thereby significantly reducing manufacturing energy requirements. This project will enable the further development of this technology so that it can be applied across a wide variety of US manufacturing segments, including the chemical, food, pharmaceutical, refinery, and pulp and paper industries. It is conservatively estimated that adoption of this technology could provide nearly 40 TBtu/yr of energy, or more than 1% of the U.S. total industrial electricity use, while reducing CO2 emissions by more than 6 million tons per year. Commercialization of this technology will make a significant contribution to DOE’s Industrial Technology Program goals for doubling energy efficiency and providing a more robust and competitive domestic manufacturing base.

  7. Swedish nuclear waste efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydberg, J.

    1981-09-01

    After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

  8. The use of hearing protection devices with approach risk perception of noise induced hearing loss in several manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Fouladi Deahghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective : Noise is a widespread physical agent and although is a most risk factors in workplaces that workers of health to exposed. Thus, different actions is done for reduce exposure to it in work places, which one of them is use of hearing protection devices. The use of hearing protection devices with approach risk perception of noise induced hearing loss in several manufacturing industry Method: This study was Cross-sectional study and done in five industrial unit with a sound pressure level more of 85 dB-A with the participation of 340 workers. To collect data , individual risk perception and self-investigator questionnaires were used. After collecting data, statistical analysis including Cronbach's alpha and regression were used to analyze the data. Results : Range use of hearing protection devices during shifts work by workers, respectively equal to: 50.4% sometimes, 31.58% never and 18.2% at all times. Also, results indicate significant differences between individual differences and hearing protection devices. Conclusion : Results of this study showed that individual risk perception as an important factor, can do a significant role in predicting the behavior of personals in the use of hearing protection devices, which should be considered in any design and implementation of hearing protection program.

  9. Human factors identification and classification related to accidents'causality on hand injuries in the manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Martínez, Rosa María; Maldonado-Macías, Aide; Prado-León, Lilia Roselia

    2012-01-01

    The causes of occupational accidents from the perspective of human factors have been a subject which has received little attention into the field of scientific research. The aim of this research was to identify and classify the human factors that influence human errors and failures that cause accidents and injuries specifically on hands. Available studies related to the topic have been developed mainly for aerospace applications and are found insufficient to explain accidents causalities in the manufacturing industry. This research was developed in the assembly industry of automotive harnesses and was conducted following a mixed Cognitive Anthropological approach. This study was developed in two phases. During the first qualitative phase, participants freely listed their knowledge to identify elements of the cultural domain, then and in the second phase they performed the successive pile sort technique for the collection data to classify elements in the cultural domain. Statistical models like Cluster Analysis and Multidimensional Scaling were applied for results' validation purposes. As results, 70 different human factors were identified and in the second phase they were classified into 4 main categories which were: human error, unsafe conditions, individual factors, and organizational factors. Statistical methods validated these results.

  10. Assessment of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) levels in soil samples near an electric capacitor manufacturing industry in Morelos, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Maldonado, Ivan N; Salazar, Rogelio Costilla; Ilizaliturri-Hernandez, Cesar A; Espinosa-Reyes, Guillermo; Perez-Vazquez, Francisco J; Fernandez-Macias, Juan C

    2014-09-19

    In Mexico, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were principally used as heat transfer chemicals in electric transformers and capacitors as well as hydraulic fluids and lubricants in heavy electrical equipment since the early 1940s. However, although PCBs have been banned in Mexico, their past and present improper disposal has resulted in environmental contamination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the PCBs levels in soil samples in the immediate area of an electric capacitor manufacturing industry, which was established several years ago in Alpuyeca, Morelos, Mexico. To confirm the presence of PCBs, surface soil samples (1-5 cm in depth) were collected from the vicinity of the industry. We determined the concentrations of 40 PCB congeners in soil samples using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The total PCBs levels in the soil samples ranged from 6.2 to 108460.6 μg kg(-1). Moreover, when we analyzed the results of the congeners (non-dioxin-like PCBs and dioxin-like PCBs), the levels of non-dioxin-like PCB congeners ranged from 5.7 to 103469 μg kg(-1) and the levels of dioxin-like PCB congeners ranged from 0.5 to 4992 μg kg(-1). Considering that soil is an important pathway of exposure in humans, analysis of PCBs levels in blood (as a biomarker of exposure) is necessary in individuals living in Alpuyeca, Morelos.

  11. Laser beam welded tailored sheets made of aluminium for industrial manufacture; Laserstrahlgeschweisste massgeschneiderte Bleche aus Aluminium fuer die industrielle Fertigung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, K.; Beyer, E. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Lasertechnik, Aachen (Germany); Berkmanns, J. [Fraunhofer Resource Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Meyer, Y. [PSA, Bievres (France); Winderlich, B. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnologie, Dresden (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    The results described for the use of laser beam welding for the manufacture of tailored blanks made of aluminium show the different suitability for welding of alloys of the 5000 and 6000 series, the ability to use Nd:YAG and CO{sub 2} lasers for this application, possibilities of improving process behaviour and the results of welding and the similar or improved seam properties compared to other melting welding processes. This and the different activities of developments orientated towards industry make it clear that laser beam welding technique is very suitable for joints on aluminium. However, the material and process-specific aspects must be observed when introduced to industry. (orig./RHM) [Deutsch] Die dargestellten Ergebnisse zum Einsatz des Laserstrahlschweissens fuer die Herstellung von Tailored Blanks aus Aluminium zeigen die unterschiedliche Schweisseignung von Legierungen der 5000- und 6000-Serie; die Einsatzfaehigkeit von Nd:YAG- und CO{sub 2}-Laser fuer diesen Anwendungsfall; Moeglichkeiten zur Verbesserung von Prozessverhalten und Schweissergebnissen; die im Vergleich zu anderen Schmelzschweissverfahren aehnlichen, z.T. verbesserten Nahteigenschaften. Dies und die verschiedenen Aktivitaeten industrieorientierter Entwicklungen verdeutlichen, dass die Laserstrahlschweisstechnik sehr gut zur Verbindung von Aluminium geeignet ist. Allerdings muessen material- und verfahrensspezifische Aspekte bei der industriellen Umsetzung beachtet werden. (orig./RHM)

  12. Model for Environmental Assessment of Industrial Production Systems: A Case Study in a Plastic Manufacturing Firm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Comunello

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The environmental issue has been discussed sharply in the organizational environment, as consumers, and society in general, have been increasingly concerned about the environment. In this sense, the companies, especially the factories, seek to minimize the environmental impact caused by its production processes through actions that combine the organization's economic interests with environmental concerns. Thus, this article aims to analyze how environmental management of the productive sector is being carried out at Industria Beta Chapecó/SC. Therefore, we developed a qualitative and descriptive research in order to apply the Model for Environmental Assessment of Industrial Production Systems (MAASPI in the production of Industria Beta sector. The results showed the main environmental interventions caused by the production process of the organization, particularly the interventions for the consumption of electricity, plant location and chip storage. As main proposals to minimize negative environmental impacts, we have the installation of translucent tiles in the production environment, a study on energy efficiency, construction of water and soil testing, construction of waste storage terminals and implementation of the pre-selection of the raw material. The realization of the suggested adjustments enables Industria Beta to foresee the legal environmental requirements, to aim for enviromental certifications and seals and to strengthen its image as environment-friendly with collaborators and society in general.

  13. The North Texas aerospace manufacturing and aviation industries: An explanatory case study of school-to-work collaborative networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cynthia Ann

    The purpose of this study is to explore how educators, business partners and facilitators developed ties or networks to initiate a school-to-work collaboration to prepare students for jobs and careers in the aerospace manufacturing and aviation industries. There is growing concern about preparing a future workforce supply in these industries in North Texas. Workforce projections call for 8000 additional jobs between 2010 and 2020 (North Central Texas Council of Governments, 2013). Collaboration is recognized as a valuable asset to connect disjointed segments within the K-16 trajectory. This study explores the contradiction between the stated need for collaborative strategies and the inability of stakeholders attempting to collaborate across organizational and institutional boundaries to sustain these connections. Through the lens of networking theory, the roles of facilitators and the operation of networks and ties between and among partners are investigated. Ten participants in a high school curriculum development project were interviewed, representing a business, community college, and K-12 education. Data analysis revealed findings associated with three major themes: facilitation, project activity and relationships. Nine individuals were identified as facilitators, and facilitators were perceived as helping the project move forward. Project activity benefited from the structured curriculum development process. Although relationships characterized by strong ties helped start the project, weak ties predominated among project participants. Implications for theory include the need for more knowledge about facilitator roles and group dynamics. Further research about the functioning of weak and strong ties and facilitator skill sets relating to collaborative leadership would be valuable. Implications for practice include capturing lessons learned to apply to other industries, and overtly acknowledging the existence and importance of facilitators.

  14. Swedish encapsulation station review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Sven Olof; Brunzell, P.; Heibel, R.; McCarthy, J.; Pennington, C.; Rusch, C.; Varley, G. [NAC International, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1998-06-01

    In the Encapsulation Station (ES) Review performed by NAC International, a number of different areas have been studied. The main objectives with the review have been to: Perform an independent review of the cost estimates for the ES presented in SKB`s document `Plan 1996`. This has been made through comparisons between the ES and BNFL`s Waste Encapsulation Plant (WEP) at Sellafield as well as with the CLAB facility. Review the location of the ES (at the CLAB site or at the final repository) and its interaction with other parts of the Swedish system for spent fuel management. Review the logistics and plant capacity of the ES. Identify important safety aspects of the ES as a basis for future licensing activities. Based on NAC International`s experience of casks for transport and storage of spent fuel, review the basic design of the copper/steel canister and the transport cask. This review insides design, manufacturing, handling and licensing aspects. Perform an overall comparison between the ES project and the CLAB project with the objective to identify major project risks and discuss their mitigation 19 refs, 9 figs, 35 tabs

  15. Exposure assessment in the hard metal manufacturing industry with special regard to tungsten and its compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, T; Schramel, P; Schaller, K H; Zöbelein, P; Weber, A; Angerer, J

    2001-10-01

    To assess the exposure to tungsten, cobalt, and nickel in a plant producing hard metals. The main components of hard metals are tungsten carbide and cobalt metal. According to recent studies, these two components may be responsible for both fibrogenic and carcinogenic effects. 87 workers were investigated (86 male, one female) with a median age of 42 (range 22-58) and a mean duration of exposure of 13 years (range 1-27 years). Stationary and personal air sampling, and biological monitoring were carried out. Ambient monitoring yielded maximum tungsten concentrations of 417 microg/m3 in the production of heavy alloys. A maximum cobalt concentration of 343 microg/m3 and a maximum nickel concentration of 30 microg/m3 were found at the sintering workshop. The highest urinary cobalt concentrations were found in the powder processing department. The mean concentration was 28.5 microg/g creatinine and the maximum value was 228 microg/g creatinine. The maximum nickel concentration in urine of 6.3 microg/g creatinine was detected in the department producing heavy alloys. The highest tungsten concentrations excreted in urine were found in grinders and had a mean value of 94.4 microg/g creatinine and a maximum of 169 microg/g creatinine. Due to the different solubility and bioavailability of the substance, there was no correlation between the tungsten concentrations in air and urine on a group basis. Despite its low solubility, tungsten carbide is bioavailable. The different bioavailability of tungsten metal and tungsten compounds has to be considered in the interpretation of ambient and biological monitoring data in the hard metal producing industry. The bioavailability increases in the order: tungsten metal, tungsten carbide, tungstenate. Only if both monitoring strategies are considered in combination can a valid and effective definition of high risk groups be derived.

  16. A study on the manufacturing technology of material for fine chemical and electronic industry use.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sang-Keun; Kim, Byoung-Gon; Chung, Hun-Saeng [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    The research results are summarized as follows; (1) An investigation on ultra-fine grinding characteristics of crystalline graphite on dry base system by vacuum technique was performed. Natural graphite grinding is inefficient, since graphite has lamella structures which cause the high lubrication by slipping of the layers. However, this lamella structure causes difficulty in grinding. Interposition states of grinding obstacle materials between graphite layers was proposed. (2) An investigation on the oxygen adsorption characteristics of ultrafine crystalline graphite powders(produced by grinding in vacuum) by surface treatment using an attrition mill on dry base was carried out. Adsorbed oxygen on graphite surface was known to influence the suspension stability of graphite particles. (3) The result of scale-up test shows that sericite concentrate obtained about 31.91% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 9.76% K{sub 2}0 and 1.45% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The process of grinding and classification is obtained fine mica mean size of 2.39 {mu}m such as 3.5 wt.% yield. (4) The dry process of surface modification has been achieved up to 91 for whiteness as 20 min ground samples. Polymer microcapsulation was carried out on the mica surface. The results are excellent hydrophobic properties which is applied cosmetics industry. The results shows a possibility of producing nano size composite materials of 200-500nm and emitting test on purified sericite appears 0.914-0.915 intensity in wave length of 5-20 {mu}m. The delamination effect of surface coated sericite and Muscovite by using Theta-composer. (author). 105 refs., 56 tabs., 139 figs.

  17. Genotoxicity assessments of alluvial soil irrigated with wastewater from a pesticide manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Reshma; Krakat, Niclas

    2015-10-01

    In this study, organochlorine pesticides (OCP) and heavy metals were analyzed from wastewater- and groundwater- irrigated soils (control samples) by gas chromatography (GC) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS), respectively. Gas chromatographic analysis revealed the presence of high concentration of pesticides in soil irrigated with wastewater (WWS). These concentrations were far above the maximum residue permissible limits indicating that alluvial soils have high binding capacity of OCP. AAS analyses revealed higher concentration of heavy metals in WWS as compared to groundwater (GWS). Also, the DNA repair (SOS)-defective Escherichia coli K-12 mutant assay and the bacteriophage lambda system were employed to estimate the genotoxicity of soils. Therefore, soil samples were extracted by hexane, acetonitrile, methanol, chloroform, and acetone. Both bioassays revealed that hexane-extracted soils from WWS were most genotoxic. A maximum survival of 15.2% and decline of colony-forming units (CFUs) was observed in polA mutants of DNA repair-defective E. coli K-12 strains when hexane was used as solvent. However, the damage of polA (-) mutants triggered by acetonitrile, methanol, chloroform, and acetone extracts was 80.0, 69.8, 65.0, and 60.7%, respectively. These results were also confirmed by the bacteriophage λ test system as hexane extracts of WWS exhibited a maximum decline of plaque-forming units for lexA mutants of E. coli K-12 pointing to an elevated genotoxic potential. The lowest survival was observed for lexA (12%) treated with hexane extracts while the percentage of survival was 25, 49.2, 55, and 78% with acetonitrile, methanol, chloroform, and acetone, respectively, after 6 h of treatment. Thus, our results suggest that agricultural soils irrigated with wastewater from pesticide industries have a notably high genotoxic potential.

  18. Computer Aided Drafting and Design, Industrial Manufacturing Technician, and Mechanical Engineering Technician and Machine Tool, Die and Moldmaking Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mid-East Ohio Tech Prep Consortium, Zanesville.

    This document contains competency profiles in four areas: computer-aided drafting and design; industrial manufacturing technician; mechanical engineering technician; and machine tool, die, and moldmaking technology occupations. The profiles are intended for use in articulating tech prep programs from high school through associate degrees in Ohio.…

  19. Production Technology Requirements with Respect to Agile Manufacturing - A survey on how the metal forming industry can adapt to volatile times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Oswald

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Agile manufacturing is a production concept that was originally developed at the Iaccoca Institute of Lehigh University (USA. The purpose was to develop a proposal on how the US could regain its supremacy in manufacturing. The objective of this thesis is to apply the agile manufacturing concept to the metal forming industry and to develop a recommendation of action how the press manufacturers can support their customers in dealing with volatile markets in an efficient way. For that reason production technology requirements are developed that should highlight characteristics of a production line that is essential to become “agile”. As a point of departure a literature research has been carried out to determine what has already been published about “agile” production requirements and how other industries deal with volatile markets. In a next step interviews with industry experts have been carried out to verify the findings of the literature review. The findings were documented in case studies which where the basis for the derivation of the production technology requirements that are relevant for the metal forming industry

  20. Industrial Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    Industrial engineering is a discipline that is concerned with increasing the effectiveness of (primarily) manufacturing and (occasionally).......Industrial engineering is a discipline that is concerned with increasing the effectiveness of (primarily) manufacturing and (occasionally)....

  1. PENINGKATAN KUALITAS PRODUKSI PUPUK ORGANIK P-126 DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN METODE LEAN MANUFACTURING (STUDI KASUS : PT. MOLINDO RAYA INDUSTRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Desryadi Ilyas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available PT. Molindo Raya Industrial merupakan perusahaan penghasil pupuk organik P-126 yang berlokasi di Lawang, Kabupaten Malang dengan kapasitas produksi lebih dari 10.000 ton per tahun. Untuk memenangkan persaingan di bidang produksi pupuk organik, perusahaan dituntut untuk melakukan peningkatan kualitas proses produksi secara berkelanjutan dengan mereduksi waste yang ada. Meskipun produksi pupuk organik P-126 di PT. Molindo Raya Industrial mengalami peningkatan, namun masih terdapat beberapa waste, diantaranya waiting yang disebabkan oleh breakdown mesin produksi yang mengakibatkan kerugian perusahaan lebih dari Rp. 500.000.000 per tahun. Waste kedua ialah defect berupa granul yang tidak memenuhi spesfikasi diameter, material hasil cleaning dan karung finished good yang sobek dan waste ketiga ialah over production yang mengakibatkan kerugian perusahaan lebih dari Rp. 400.000.000 per tahun. Untuk mengatasi permasalahan tersebut dilakukan perbaikan dengan menggunakan metode lean manufacturing yang fokus dalam mereduksi waste dan non value added activity. Pada penelitian ini menggunakan framework DMIC six sigma, tahapan pertama ialah tahap define untuk mengidentifikasi permasalahan dengan menggunakan tools Big Picture Mapping, Activity Classification dan identifikasi waste berdasarkan E-DOWNTIME. Tahapan kedua ialah measure yang digunakan untuk mengukur kerugian perusahaan yang diakibatkan adanya waste. Selanjutnya adalah tahap analyze menggunakan tools 5 Why’s dan FMEA untuk mengetahui root cause adanya waste, kemudian tahap terakhir ialah tahap improve, pada tahap improve dilakukan penyusunan dan pemilihan alternatif usulan perbaikan dengan mengunakan pendekatan value engineering. Usulan perbaikan terpilih dalam upaya meningkatkan proses produksi pupuk organik P-126 diantaranya mengevaluasi penjadwalan preventif maintenance mesin produksi, menyusun penjadwalan mesin produksi yang kritis, evaluasi SOP dan penerapan SOP, melaksanakan pelatihan untuk

  2. Rubber pad forming - Efficient approach for the manufacturing of complex structured sheet metal blanks for food industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Paul; Djakow, Eugen; Homberg, Werner

    2017-10-01

    The production of complex organic shapes in sheet metals is gaining more importance in the food industry due to increasing functional and hygienic demands. Hence it is necessary to produce parts with complex geometries promoting cleanability and general sanitation leading to improvement of food safety. In this context, and especially when stainless steel has to be formed into highly complex geometries while maintaining desired surface properties, it is inevitable that alternative manufacturing processes will need to be used which meet these requirements. Rubber pad forming offers high potential when it comes to shaping complex parts with excellent surface quality, with virtually no tool marks and scratches. Especially in cases where only small series are to be produced, rubber pad forming processes offers both technological and economic advantages. Due to the flexible punch, variation in metal thickness can be used with the same forming tool. The investments to set-up Rubber pad forming is low in comparison to conventional sheet metal forming processes. The process facilitates production of shallow sheet metal parts with complex contours and bends. Different bending sequences in a multiple tool set-up can also be conducted. The planned contribution thus describes a brief overview of the rubber pad technology. It shows the prototype rubber pad forming machine which can be used to perform complex part geometries made from stainless steel (1.4301). Based on an analysis of the already existing systems and new machines for rubber pad forming processes, together with their process properties, influencing variables and areas of application, some relevant parts for the food industry are presented.

  3. Strategic Roles of Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng

    Addressing three development trends of manufacturing, this thesis aims to explore: (1) facing challenges on manufacturing (globalisation, knowledge-based manufacturing and servitisation of manufacturing), what kinds of roles does manufacturing play within industrial companies; (2) along...... with the trend of globalisation, how do industrial companies develop their global manufacturing networks? These two questions are actually interlinked. On the one hand, facing increasing offshoring and outsourcing of production activities, industrial companies have to understand how to develop their global...... manufacturing networks. On the other hand, ongoing globalisation also brings tremendous impacts to post-industrial economies (e.g. Denmark). A dilemma therefore arises, i.e. whether it is still necessary to keep manufacturing in these post-industrial economies; if yes, what kinds of roles manufacturing should...

  4. Quality Tools and TRIZ Based Quality Improvement Case Study at PT ‘X’ A Plastic Moulding Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirawan, Christina; Chandra, Fory

    2016-02-01

    Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ) is a creative encouraging problem solving method. TRIZ is prepared by Altshuller for product design. Altshuller prepared contradiction matrix and suggestion to solve contradictions usually occur in product design. This paper try to combine TRIZ with quality tools such as Pareto and Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) to solve contradiction in quality improvement problem, neither than product design problem. Pareto used to identify defect priority, FTA used to analysis and identify root cause of defect. When there is contradiction in solving defect causes, TRIZ used to find creative problem solving. As a case study, PT ’X’, a plastic molding manufacturing industry was taken. PT ‘X’ using traditional press machine to produce plastic thread cone. There are 5 defect types that might occur in plastic thread cone production, incomplete form, dirty, mottle, excessive form, rugged. Research about quality improvement effort using DMAIC at PT ‘X’ have been done by Fory Candra. From this research, defect types, priority, root cause from FTA, recommendation from FMEA. In this research, from FTA reviewed, contradictions found among causes troublesome quality improvement efforts. TRIZ used to solve the contradictions and quality improvement effort can be made effectively.

  5. An integrated continuous improvement model of TPM, TPS and TQM for boosting profitability of manufacturing industries: An innovative model & guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haftu Hailu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to develop an integrated literature based TPM, TPS and TQM mod-el through PDCA cycle, and implementation guideline for the implementation of the model. At this time very few studies are available on this research area, even this research on integrated model of TPM, TPS and TQM practices, and implementation guideline are not corresponding. The method-ology to develop the model and the implementation guideline is based on identifying the uniqueness and common practices of TPM, TPS and TQM systems, existing practice of the integration and implementation guideline, identifying the existing gaps on the model and implementation guideline, developing new integrated TPM, TPS and TQM practice model, and implementation guideline. Previous very few studies of uniqueness, common practices and implementation guideline of the three systems are preserved. The findings of this research, an integrated cutting-edge model of TPM, TPS and TQM practices and implementation guidelines are developed. The originality / value of the developed model and implementation guideline enable manufacturing industries continuously to be competitive and profitable.

  6. Stereoscopic displays for virtual reality in the car manufacturing industry: application to design review and ergonomic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Guillaume; Fuchs, Philippe

    2002-05-01

    In the car manufacturing industry the trend is to drastically reduce the time-to-market by increasing the use of the Digital Mock-up instead of physical prototypes. Design review and ergonomic studies are specific tasks because they involve qualitative or even subjective judgements. In this paper, we present IMAVE (IMmersion Adapted to a VEhicle) designed for immersive styling review, gaps visualization and simple ergonomic studies. We show that stereoscopic displays are necessary and must fulfill several constraints due to the proximity and size of the car dashboard. The duration fo the work sessions forces us to eliminate all vertical parallax, and 1:1 scale is obviously required for a valid immersion. Two demonstrators were realized allowing us to have a large set of testers (over 100). More than 80% of the testers saw an immediate use of the IMAVE system. We discuss the good and bad marks awarded to the system. Future work include being able to use several rear-projected stereo screens for doors and central console visualization, but without the parallax presently visible in some CAVE-like environments.

  7. An Integrated Approach to Assess Exposure and Health-Risk from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a Fastener Manufacturing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsin-I; Lin, Ming-Yeng; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Wang-Yi; Yoon, Chungsik; Chen, Mei-Ru; Tsai, Perng-Jy

    2014-01-01

    An integrated approach was developed to assess exposure and health-risk from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in oil mists in a fastener manufacturing industry. One previously developed model and one new model were adopted for predicting oil mist exposure concentrations emitted from metal work fluid (MWF) and PAHs contained in MWF by using the fastener production rate (Pr) and cumulative fastener production rate (CPr) as predictors, respectively. By applying the annual Pr and CPr records to the above two models, long-term workplace PAH exposure concentrations were predicted. In addition, true exposure data was also collected from the field. The predicted and measured concentrations respectively served as the prior and likelihood distributions in the Bayesian decision analysis (BDA), and the resultant posterior distributions were used to determine the long-term exposure and health-risks posed on workers. Results show that long term exposures to PAHs would result in a 3.1%, 96.7%, and 73.4% chance of exceeding the PEL-TWA (0.2 mg/m3), action level (0.1 mg/m3), and acceptable health risk (10−3), respectively. In conclusion, preventive measures should be taken immediately to reduce workers’ PAH exposures. PMID:25226413

  8. Total and free fatty acids content during the ripening of artisan and industrially manufactured “Chorizo de cebolla”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco, Inmaculada

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available "Chorizo de cebolla" is a traditional sausage made in the north west of Spain. In four batches manufactured by artisanal methods and 4 manufactured by industrial ones the contents of total and free fatty acids were assessed throughout ripening, taking from every batch samples of the mass before stuffing (0 days and of the sausage after 2, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 42 days of ripening. The profile of total fatty acids of the two types of sausage basically coincide with that found by other authors in pork fat. However, both types of sausage (artisanal and industrial differ significantly (pEl chorizo de cebolla es un embutido tradicional elaborado en el noroeste de España. En cuatro partidas fabricadas por procedimientos artesanales y 4 elaboradas industrialmente se determinó a lo largo de la maduración los contenidos en ácidos grasos totales y libres, tomando en cada partida muestras de masa antes de embutir (0 días y de chorizo a los 2, 7, 14, 21, 28 y 42 días de maduración. El perfil de ácidos grasos totales de los dos tipos de embutidos coincide básicamente con el encontrado por otros autores en grasa de cerdo. Sin embargo, ambos tipos de chorizo (artesanal e industrial difirieron significativamente (p< 0.05 en el porcentaje de ácidos grasos totales saturados e insaturados. Los chorizos elaborados artesanalmente presentaron porcentajes de ácidos grasos saturados significativamente superiores a los encontrados en los chorizos industriales. El contenido en ácidos grasos libres totales experimentó a lo largo de la maduración un incremento significativo (p< 0.05 desde valores medios de 459 ± 243 mg/100 g de grasa en la masa hasta 3687 ± 1670 mg/100 g de grasa en chorizo de 42 días, en los chorizos artesanales, y desde 560 ± 317 mg/100 g de grasa hasta 5157 ± 3673 mg/100 g en los industriales. Debido a la gran variabilidad entre las diferentes partidas, no se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas en los

  9. Industrial based volume manufacturing of lightweight aluminium alloy panel components with high-strength and complex-shape for car body and chassis structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyasodor, Gerald; Koroschetz, Christian

    2017-09-01

    To achieve the high volume manufacture of lightweight passenger cars at economic cost as required in the automotive industry, low density materials and new process route will be needed. While high strength aluminium alloy grades: AA7075 and AA6082 may provide the alternative material solution, hot stamping process used for high-strength and ultrahigh strength steels such as boron steel 22mnb5 can enable the volume manufacture of panel components with high-strength and complex-shape for car body and chassis structures. These aluminium alloy grades can be used to manufacture panel components with possible yield strengths ≥ 500 MPa. Due to the differences in material behaviors, hot stamping process of 22mnb5 cannot be directly applied to high strength aluminium alloy grades. Despite recorded successes in laboratories, researches and niche hot forming processes of high strength aluminium alloy grades, not much have been achieved for adequate and efficient volume manufacturing system applicable in the automotive industry. Due to lack of such system and based on expert knowledge in hot stamping production-line, AP&T presents in this paper a hot stamping processing route for high strength aluminium alloys been suitable for production-line development and volume manufacturing.

  10. Modeling plant-level industrial energy demand with the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) database and the Longitudinal Research Database (LRD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, G.A.; Neifer, M.J.; Ross, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses Phase 1 of a project to help the US Department of Energy determine the applicability of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) database and the Longitudinal Research Database (LRD) for industrial modeling and analysis. Research was conducted at the US Bureau of the Census; disclosure of the MECS/LRD data used as a basis for this report was subject to the Bureau`s confidentiality restriction. The project is designed to examine the plant-level energy behavior of energy-intensive industries. In Phase 1, six industries at the four-digit standard industrial classification (SIC) level were studied. The utility of analyzing four-digit SIC samples at the plant level is mixed, but the plant-level structure of the MECS/LRD makes analyzing samples disaggregated below the four-digit level feasible, particularly when the MECS/LRD data are combined with trade association or other external data. When external data are used, the validity of using value of shipments as a measure of output for analyzing energy use can also be examined. Phase 1 results indicate that technical efficiency and the distribution of energy intensities vary significantly at the plant level. They also show that the six industries exhibit monopsony-like behavior; that is, energy prices vary significantly at the plant level, with lower prices being correlated with a higher level of energy consumption. Finally, they show to what degree selected energy-intensive products are manufactured outside their primary industry.

  11. Combining U.S.-based prioritization tools to improve screening level accountability for environmental impact: the case of the chemical manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Schoenung, Julie M

    2009-12-15

    There are two quantitative indicators that are most widely used to assess the extent of compliance of industrial facilities with environmental regulations: the quantity of hazardous waste generated and the amount of toxics released. These indicators, albeit useful in terms of some environmental monitoring, fail to account for direct or indirect effects on human and environmental health, especially when aggregating total quantity of releases for a facility or industry sector. Thus, there is a need for a more comprehensive approach that can prioritize a particular chemical (or industry sector) on the basis of its relevant environmental performance and impact on human health. Accordingly, the objective of the present study is to formulate an aggregation of tools that can simultaneously capture multiple effects and several environmental impact categories. This approach allows us to compare and combine results generated with the aid of select U.S.-based quantitative impact assessment tools, thereby supplementing compliance-based metrics such as data from the U.S. Toxic Release Inventory. A case study, which presents findings for the U.S. chemical manufacturing industry, is presented to illustrate the aggregation of these tools. Environmental impacts due to both upstream and manufacturing activities are also evaluated for each industry sector. The proposed combinatorial analysis allows for a more robust evaluation for rating and prioritizing the environmental impacts of industrial waste.

  12. Effectiveness of Direct Safety Regulations on Manufacturers and Users of Industrial Machines: Its Implications on Industrial Safety Policies in Republic of Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi Heung Choi

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Industrial safety policies and regulations associated with industrial machines must be directed towards eliminating the sources of danger at the stage of danger creation, thereby securing the safe industrial machines. Safety inspection further secures the safety of workers at the stage of danger use. The overall balance between such safety regulations is achieved by proper distribution of industrial machines subject to such regulations and the intensity of each regulation. Rearrangement of industrial machines subject to safety certification and self-declaration of conformity to include more movable industrial machines and other industrial machines with a high level of danger is also suggested.

  13. Ferro Corporation: Industrial Energy Assessment Identifies $210,000 in Savings Opportunities for Glaze and Coatings Manufacturer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-09-01

    Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices case study based on a comprehensive plant assessment conducted at the Ferro Corporation by ITP's Industrial Assessment Center in conjunction with The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

  14. Packages of participation: Swedish employees’ experience of Lean depends on how they are involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännmark, Mikael; Holden, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Lean Production is a dominant approach in Swedish and global manufacturing and service industries. Studies of Lean’s employee effects are few and contradictory. Purpose Employee effects from Lean are likely not uniform. This paper investigates the effect of employees' participation on their experiences of Lean. Method This study investigated how different packages of employee participation in Lean affected manufacturing workers’ experiences of Lean. During 2008–2011, qualitative and quantitative data were collected from Swedish manufacturing companies participating in the national Swedish Lean Production program Produktionslyftet. Data from 129 surveys (28 companies), 39 semi-structured interviews, and 30 reports were analyzed. In the main analysis, comparisons were made of the survey-reported Lean experiences of employees in three groups: temporary group employees (N = 36), who participated in Lean mostly through intermittent projects; continuous group employees (N = 69), who participated through standing improvement groups; and combined group employees (N = 24), who participated in both ways. Results Continuous group employees had the most positive experience of Lean, followed by the combined group. Temporary group employees had the least positive experiences, being less likely than their counterparts to report that Lean improved teamwork, occupational safety, and change-related learning, decision making, and authority. Conclusions These findings support the importance of continuous, structured opportunities for participation but raise the possibility that more participation may result in greater workload and role overload, mitigating some benefits of employee involvement. Consequently, companies should consider involving employees in change efforts but should attend to the specific design of participation activities. PMID:24665370

  15. Capability Switching along the Technology Life Cycle in Local Manufacturing within the High-Tech Electronics Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Brumme (Hendrik)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractResponsible for running a $2.5 billion HP computer factory in a high-cost country like Germany, the author perceived constant pressure defining new manufacturing strategies to keep a competitive advantage for the factory over all internal and external manufacturing alternatives around

  16. From National Policy-Making to Global Edu-Business: Swedish Edu-Preneurs on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Linda

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the movements of some Swedish former education policy-makers that are currently active as commercial edu-business actors with the ambition to expand in the Global Education Industry (GEI). The aim is to map and analyze how a selection of Swedish edu-preneurs affiliated with a particular Swedish school chain enter the GEI and…

  17. On Upbringing of Pupils' Self-Educational Ability in Industrial Arts Eeducation (2) : On Improvement of Manufacture Desire on Woodworking Technology Education with Teaching Materials on Computer-

    OpenAIRE

    大迫, 靖雄; 田口, 浩継; オオサコ, ヤスオ; タグチ, ヒロツグ; Ohsako, Yasuo; Taguchi, Hirotugu

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we do woodworking technology education in the two teaching methods (both the normal teaching plan and the teaching plan with teaching materials on computer) at junior high school, and investigate on improvement of the manufacture desire connected with upbringing of pupils' self-educatinal ability of industrial arts education with teaching materials on computer. The results obtained are summarized as follows : (1) Woodworking technology education by the teaching plan with teachi...

  18. Best Available Techniques (BAT) Reference Document:for:Manufacture of Glass:Industrial Emissions Directive 2010/75/EU:(Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control)

    OpenAIRE

    SCALET Bianca Maria; GARCIA MUNOZ Marcos; SISSA Aivi; ROUDIER Serge; DELGADO SANCHO Luis

    2012-01-01

    The BREF entitled ‘Manufacture of Glass’ forms part of a series presenting the results of an exchange of information between EU Member States, the industries concerned, non-governmental organisations promoting environmental protection, and the Commission, to draw up, review, and where necessary, update BAT reference documents as required by Article 13(1) of the Directive. This document is published by the European Commission pursuant to Article 13(6) of the Directive. This BREF for the gl...

  19. An Exploratory Study on Implementation of Lean Manufacturing Practices(With Special Reference to Automobile Sector Industry(Yalın İmalat Faaliyetine Yönelik Bir Uygulama (Otomobil Endüstrisi Örneği

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er. Rajesh Kumar MEHTA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available At present scenario, Lean Manufacturing has become a world wide phenomenon. It is quite successful in drawing the attention of companies of all sizes. A large number of organizations are following Lean technologies and experiencing vast improvements in quality, production, customer service, and profitability. Lean Manufacturing is a systematic approach to identifying and eliminating waste through continuous improvement. The manufacturing industry in India must also look to leverage its advantages, its large domestic market, good conditions in terms of raw materials and skilled labour, and the quality focus. In India at the state level, there are few companies that are implementing Lean manufacturing techniques. In Dewas city, the industrial town of Madhya Pradesh, some of the automobile companies are vigorously following the Lean manufacturing techniques to eliminate waste and downsize the cost. Hence, all these factors prompted the researchers to analyze and study the implication of Lean Manufacturing Practices in Automobile Industries.

  20. The Effects of Financial Ratio and Market Based Ratio toward the Stock Price of Manufacturing Industry Sector in Indonesia Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyono Mulyono

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The research objectives to examine the magnitude of the significant influence between financial ratios and the market based ratio toward the stock price of manufacturing industry sector in Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX. In accordance IDX data by December 2013, the number of companies, included in the stock of the manufacturing industry sector, is 139 companies. Based on the analysis, it is concluded that the variable return on assets (ROA and price to book value (PBV has positive influence on stock prices. It can be interpreted that the higher the return on assets ratio and price to book value, the more positive influence on the increase of the stock price. The variable debt to equity ratio (DER and price earnings ratio (PER has negatively influence the stock price on the stock of manufacturing industry sector. This can be interpreted the higher the value of the debt to equity ratio and price earnings ratio, the more negatively influence on the decrease stock price.

  1. Incidence of cancer and exposure to toluene diisocyanate and methylene diphenyldiisocyanate: a cohort based case-referent study in the polyurethane foam manufacturing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmar, L; Strömberg, U; Welinder, H; Mikoczy, Z

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the association between occupational exposure to toluene diisocyanate or methylene diphenyldiisocyanate and risk of cancer. DESIGN--A cohort based case-referent study. STUDY BASE--7023 subjects employed during the period 1958 to 1987 in nine Swedish polyurethane foam manufacturing plants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Odds ratios adjusted with respect to the matching factors (age at risk, calendar year at risk, sex, and plant), calculated from the conditional logistic regression model. RESULTS--A non-significant association was found between high exposure to isocyanates and prostate cancer (OR 2.66, 90% confidence interval (90% CI) 0.39-18.1), which was not enhanced when an induction latency period of 10 years was applied. An association between isocyanate exposure and colon cancer was even weaker. No associations were seen for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rectal cancer. CONCLUSIONS--The tentative associations, derived from a previous cohort study, between isocyanate exposure and excess risk for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rectal cancer were not supported. Instead, non-significant associations with prostate cancer, and possibly colon cancer, were seen. PMID:8280625

  2. Cancer incidence in cohorts of workers in the rubber manufacturing industry first employed since 1975 in the UK and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniol, M; Koechlin, A; Sorahan, T; Jakobsson, K; Boyle, P

    2017-06-01

    Increased cancer risks have been reported among workers in the rubber manufacturing industry employed before the 1960s, but it is unclear for workers hired subsequently. The present study focused on cancer incidence among rubber workers first employed after 1975 in Sweden and the UK. Two cohorts of rubber workers employed for at least 1 year were analysed. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), based on country-specific and period-specific incidence rates, were analysed for all cancers combined (except non-melanoma skin), bladder, lung, stomach cancer, leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Exploratory analyses were conducted for other cancers with a minimum of 10 cases in both genders combined. 16 026 individuals (12 441 men; 3585 women) contributed to 397 975 person-years of observation, with 846 cancers observed overall (437 in the UK, 409 in Sweden). No statistically significant increased risk was observed for any site of cancer. A reduced risk was evident for all cancers combined (SIR=0.83, 95% CI (0.74 to 0.92)), lung cancer (SIR=0.74, 95% CI (0.59 to 0.93)), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR=0.67, 95% CI (0.45 to 1.00)) and prostate cancer (SIR=0.77, 95% CI (0.64 to 0.92)). For stomach cancer and multiple myeloma, SIRs were 0.93 (95% CI (0.61 to 1.43)) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.44 to 1.91), respectively. No increased risk of bladder cancer was observed (SIR=0.88, 95% CI (0.61 to 1.28)). No significantly increased risk of cancer incidence was observed in the combined cohort of rubber workers first employed since 1975. Continued surveillance of the present cohorts is required to confirm absence of long-term risk and confirmatory findings from other cohorts would be important. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. AN ENVIRONMENTAL COMPARISON OF PLASTIC AND PAPER CONSUMER CARRIER BAGS IN SOUTH AFRICA: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE LOCAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sevitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The conventional consumer carrier bags have recently received considerable attention in South Africa. The choice of material for these bags, based on environmental preferences in the South African context, could significantly influence the local manufacturing industry. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA, an environmental management tool, has been applied to objectively evaluate and compare the overall environmental impacts of the complete life cycles (from raw material extraction to final disposal of consumer plastic and paper carrier bags in South Africa. Paper bags have a higher carrying capacity compared to plastic bags and different use ratios were subsequently evaluated. Plastic bags have a lower environmental impact for use ratios of up to 2.5 plastic bags to one paper bag. Above this ratio the conclusions are not reliable. Paper bags would need to increase its recycled content significantly to be competitive in terms of environmental impacts. The re-use of thicker plastic, as proposed by the new plastic bag legislation, has the potential to significantly lower the impact of plastic bags.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die konvensionele gebruikersdrasakke het onlangs aansienlike aandag in Suid Afrika ontvang. Die keuse van materiaal vir hierdie sakke, wat gebaseer is op omgewingsvoorkeure in die Suid-Afrikaanse konteks, kan 'n wesenlike invloed uitoefen op die plaaslike vervaardigingsindustrie. Lewenssiklusanalise (LCA, 'n omgewingsbestuurgereedskap, is aangewend vir 'n objektiewe evaluasie en vergelyking van die algehele omgewingsimpakte van die totale lewenssiklus (vanaf grondstofekstraksie tot finale wegdoening van gebruikersplastiek- en papierdrasakke in Suid-Afrika. Aangesien papiersakke 'n hoër drakapasiteit het in vergelyking met plastieksakke, is verskillende gebruiksverhoudings evalueer. Plastieksakke het 'n laer omgewingsimpak vir gebruiksverhoudings tot en met 2.5 plastieksakke vir elke papiersak. Die gevolgtrekkings

  4. The Influence Of Leadership Role Competencies On Organisation Change Outcome In The Manufacturing Industry In South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Smit

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the influence leadership role congruence has on organisation change within three South African organisations in the manufacturing industry. The research was done in two phases. Phase I investigated the utilisation of leaders in specific leadership change roles. Four leadership change roles (Initiator, Shaper, Monitor, and Assessor were identified, each for which a set of competencies (competence cluster was developed. A questionnaire (Leadership Role Competence Questionnaire measuring the perceived level of competence for each role was designed. Phase II investigated the influence of the congruence results on organisational change outcome. A questionnaire (Change Outcome Questionnaire measuring the soft dimensions of organisation change was developed. All three respondent organisations’ leaders involved with their organisations’ change initiatives were selected for Phase I. A random sample of 120 employees per organisation was used for Phase II. The main findings were that congruence existed for two roles (Initiator and Assessor. In addition to this it was found that role congruence for the Initiator and Assessor roles influenced change outcome positively, and that a lack of congruence for the Shaper and Monitor roles had a negative influence on change outcome. OpsommingHierdie artikel fokus op die invloed wat rolkongruensie het op organisasieverandering binne drie Suid Afrikaanse maatskappye in die vervaardigingsektor. Die navorsing is gedoen in twee fases. Fase I het die aanwending van leiers in spesifieke leierskapsveranderingsrolle ondersoek. Vier leierskapsveranderingsrolle (Inisieerder, Vormer, Moniteerder, en Assessor was geïdentifiseer waarvoor vir elk ’n stel vaardighede (vaardigheidsbondel ontwikkel is. ’n Vraelys (Leierskaps-Rol-Vaardigheid Vraelys wat die waargenome vlak van vaardigheid in elke rol meet, is ontwikkel. Fase II het die invloed wat die kongruensieresultate op die

  5. WP 2010-1 Global Defeminization? Industrial Upgrading, Occupational Segmentation and Manufacturing Employment in Middle-Income Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Sheba Tejani, William Millberg

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates whether the stylized fact relating globalization with the “feminization” of labor still holds, or if the de-feminization of manufacturing employment in developing countries has set in.

  6. Micro Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing deals with systems that include products, processes, materials and production systems. These systems have functional requirements, constraints, design parameters and process variables. They must be decomposed in a systematic manner to achieve the best possible system performance....... If a micro manufacturing system isn’t designed rationally and correctly, it will be high-cost, unreliable, and not robust. For micro products and systems it is a continuously increasing challenge to create the operational basis for an industrial production. As the products through product development...... processes are made applicable to a large number of customers, the pressure in regard to developing production technologies that make it possible to produce the products at a reasonable price and in large numbers is growing. The micro/nano manufacturing programme at the Department of Manufacturing...

  7. Key success factors : The internationalisation of Swedish fashion companies

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, Stefan; Knudsen, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Background: The Swedish fashion market today quickly becomes too small, even for the new companies, and they are quick to take the step abroad and launch their internationalisation process. With a focus on the four Swed-ish fashion companies Filippa K, Acne Jeans, Nudie Jeans and Whyred, we have analysed how these representatives of the industry have interna-tionalised themselves. The companies have chosen different ways to promote their brand and how to control the perceived image of the bra...

  8. Additive manufacturing – a sustainable manufacturing route

    OpenAIRE

    Frăţilă Domniţa; Rotaru Horaţiu

    2017-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies allow developing and manufacturing very complex shaped parts and functional products with a high level of customization, being a great alternative to Traditional Manufacturing (TM) methods like injection molding, die-casting or machining. Due to the importance of cleaner production in the field of manufacturing processes, sustainability of AM processes needs to be assessed in order to make easier its acceptance and implementation in the industry. Furth...

  9. Additive manufacturing – a sustainable manufacturing route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frăţilă Domniţa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive Manufacturing (AM technologies allow developing and manufacturing very complex shaped parts and functional products with a high level of customization, being a great alternative to Traditional Manufacturing (TM methods like injection molding, die-casting or machining. Due to the importance of cleaner production in the field of manufacturing processes, sustainability of AM processes needs to be assessed in order to make easier its acceptance and implementation in the industry. Furthermore, the manufacturers can improve their competitiveness and profitability by considering the ecological aspects during the manufacturing step of a product. This paper gives a survey on sustainability issues related to AM.

  10. Systemic culture in global manufacturing virtual networks within the aeronautical industry; Cultura sistemaca en las redes virtuales de fabricacion global de la industria aeronautica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Monroy, C.

    2010-07-01

    This paper analyzes the existence of a systemic culture in global manufacturing virtual networks (GMVN). In order to validate the proposed model, based on a conceptual model of systemic culture, the case methodology have been applied to an example within the aeronautical industry that has been one of the most successful relationships within GMVNs, the collaboration between GE and SNECMA for the CFM 56 engine manufacturing. These organizations are formed by very dynamic companies that manufacture all types of products or services, and vertical relations between themselves, ( in some cases even direct competitors), where it is not necessary maintaining large internal manufacturing resources, just managing and sharing these resources efficiently in the network. This study about organizational culture at the network level includes aspects such as cultural similarity among its actors, social embeddedness, tacit knowledge transfer or the importance of trust at inter-firm collaborations. The presence under a systemic perspective, of homogeneous cultural values and practices in which network actors can be identified may strengthen the group membership or establish a social network that underlies the own GMVN and facilitates interactions among its members. The feasibility of this approach would facilitate the formation of new GMVNs, by establishing, ex ante, a cultural prescriptive model at the network level. (Author) 14 refs.

  11. The Swedish Academy Dictionary Project

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    (bo.wendt@svenskaakademien.se), Dictionary Staff of the Swedish Academy,. Lund, Sweden. Abstract: The Swedish Academy Dictionary is one of the world's largest dictionary projects. Work on it was started in 1884 and it will be completed by 2017. The dictionary describes the writ- ten standard language of Swedish from ...

  12. COMPUTER-ASSISTED DEVELOPMENT OF OPERATIONAL PLANS OF THE MANUFACTURING OF CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS AT FACTORIES OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efimenko Anatoliy Zakharovich

    2012-12-01

    The proposed model is used to develop a production schedule for the manufacturing of different articles for each day of a month to assure such throughput and daily stock of articles in the warehouse that could meet the demand for the products and structures in question. Presently, the criterion to serve as the basis for the computer-aided identification of the production schedule within the framework of the process of manufacturing of different articles should include maximal revenues; however, the final selection of the production schedule option should be made by decision makers on the basis of the feasibility study.

  13. Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 2147. Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 2011-08-04 (LAd34) to 2017-09-27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 2147. Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 2011-08-04 (LAd34) to 2017-09-27

  14. Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 21 Subchap J, 2147--Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 1998-02-02 (LAc74) to more..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 21 Subchap J, 2147--Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 1998-02-02 (LAc74) more...

  15. An Exploratory Study on Implementation of Lean Manufacturing Practices(With Special Reference to Automobile Sector Industry)(Yalın İmalat Faaliyetine Yönelik Bir Uygulama (Otomobil Endüstrisi Örneği)

    OpenAIRE

    Er Rajesh Kumar MEHTA; Dhermendra MEHTA; Mehta, Naveen K.

    2012-01-01

    At present scenario, Lean Manufacturing has become a world wide phenomenon. It is quite successful in drawing the attention of companies of all sizes. A large number of organizations are following Lean technologies and experiencing vast improvements in quality, production, customer service, and profitability. Lean Manufacturing is a systematic approach to identifying and eliminating waste through continuous improvement. The manufacturing industry in India must also look to leverage its advant...

  16. Do wood-based panels made with agro-industrial residues provide environmentally benign alternatives? An LCA case study of sugarcane bagasse addition to particle board manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Diogo Aparecido Lopes; Lahr, Francisco Antonio Rocco; Pavan, Ana Laura Raymundo

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is one of the main agro-industrial residues which can be used to produce wood-based panels. However, more investigations related to its environmental performance assessment are needed, focusing on questions such as: Does it provide environmental benefits? What are its main...... environmental impacts? Could it substitute wood as raw material? Accordingly, this paper presents a life cycle assessment (LCA) study of particle board manufactured with sugarcane bagasse residues.The cradle-to-gate assessment of 1 m3 of particle board made with sugarcane bagasse (PSB) considered three main......, it is suggested that the sugarcane bagasse be mixed up to 75 % during particle board manufacturing so that good quality properties and environmental performance of panels can be provided....

  17. Reduction of pollutants in painting operation and suggestion of an optimal technique for extracting titanium dioxide from paint sludge in car manufacturing industries--case study (SAIPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khezri, Seyed Mostafa; Shariat, Seyed Mahmood; Tabibian, Sahar

    2012-06-01

    Paint sludge of car manufacturing industries are not disposed in landfills, since they contain hazardous materials with a high concentration of chromium, aluminum, titanium, barium, copper, Iron, magnesium, strontium, and so on. Thus, it is essential to find solutions in order to neutralize them or suggest cost-effective techniques, which are also environmentally acceptable. Because, this sludge contains considerable amounts of Ti pigments and unbaked resins, recycling these pigments--which could be used in a variety of industries such as paint factories--is an appropriate subject for further research. In this article, with the aim of identification of main pollutants in order to eliminate them and suggest a cost-effective solution to recover the sludge, a large number of tests including X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X ray diffraction spectroscopy, and diffusion thermal analysis are conducted to determine types and concentration of elements, and combinations of paint sludge in car manufacturing industries. As titanium dioxide (TiO₂) is widely used as the main pigment of automobile paints, an optimal technique is suggested for extracting TiO₂ with high purity percentage through adopting scientific methods such as membrane and electrolysis.

  18. Intra- and inter-industry Externalities from Foreign Direct Investment in the Mexican Manufacturing Sector: New Evidence from Mexican Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordaan, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents new empirical evidence on externalities from Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in several Mexican regions in the early 1990s. The main findings are threefold. First, the presence of FDI creates negative externalities within industries and positive externalities between industries

  19. Continuous improvement in the Netherlands: current practices and experiences in Dutch manufacturing industry (awarded with ANBAR Citation of excellence)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieskes, J.F.B.; Baudet, F.C.M.; Baudet, Frank; Schuring, R.W.; Boer, Harm

    1997-01-01

    In order to get insight into the current continuous-improvement practices in European industry, EuroCINet carried out a survey in its member countries. In this article, continuous-improvement activities in a sample of 135 Dutch industrial companies are described. The results show that CI is a

  20. Workplace Literacy in a Total Quality Management Environment for the Manufacturing and Financial Services Industries. Final Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrowicki, Linda; And Others

    A project was conducted for the following purposes: (1) improve the productivity and efficiency of 21 companies by providing workplace literacy instruction to workers lacking basic skills required for their jobs; and (2) improve the capability of educational providers to meet the basic skill needs of the manufacturing and financial services…

  1. Process for the manufacture of a filter material for cleaning industrial or internal combustion engine exhaust gases and filter material manufactured according to the process. Verfahren zur Herstellung eines Filterstoffes zur Reinigung von industriellen oder Brennkraftmaschinen-Abgasen und ein hiernach hergestellter Filterstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumbalek, A.

    1986-01-02

    This is a process for the manufacture of a filter material for cleaning industrial or internal combustion engine exhaust gases and filter material manufactured according to the process. The filter material is manufactured from the mineralized combustion product of peel of tropical fruits burnt at a temperature of 820/sup 0/C to 840/sup 0/C in an oxidising atmosphere excluding the production of carbon, particularly using banana skins and orange peels, which product is granulated with carrier materials or compressed.

  2. Health hazards of child labor in the leather products and surgical instrument manufacturing industries of Sialkot, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaid, Muhammad; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Pei, De-Sheng

    2017-07-01

    Child labor is a major challenge in the developing countries and comprehensive health hazard identification studies on this issue are still lacking. Therefore, the current study is an effort to highlight the health concerns of child labor exposed in the key small scale industries of Sialkot, Pakistan. Our findings revealed jolting levels of heavy metals in the urine, blood, serum, saliva, and hair samples collected from the exposed children. For example, in the urine samples, Cd, Cr, Ni, and Pb were measured at the respective concentrations of 39.17, 62.02, 11.94 and 10.53 μg/L in the surgical industries, and 2.10, 4.41, 1.04 and 5.35 μg/L in the leather industries. In addition, source apportionment revealed polishing, cutting, and welding sections in the surgical industries and surface coating, crusting, and stitching sections in the leather industries were the highest contributors of heavy metals in the bio-matrices of the exposed children, implying the dusty, unhygienic, and unhealthy indoor working conditions. Further, among all the bio-matrices, the hair samples expressed the highest bioaccumulation factor for heavy metals. In accordance with the heavy metal levels reported in the exposed children, higher oxidative stress was found in the children working in the surgical industries than those from the leather industries. Moreover, among heavy metals' exposure pathways, inhalation of industrial dust was identified as the primary route of exposure followed by the ingestion and dermal contact. Consequently, chemical daily intake (CDI), carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic hazard quotients (HQs) of heavy metals were also reported higher in the exposed children and were also alarmingly higher than the corresponding US EPA threshold limits. Taken all together, children were facing serious health implications in these industries and need immediate protective measures to remediate the current situation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Usefulness of a large field of view sensor for physicochemical, textural, and yield predictions under industrial goat cheese (Murcia al Vino) manufacturing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, S; García, V; Ferrandini, E; Carrión, J; Castillo, M; López, M B

    2012-11-01

    The applicability of a light backscatter sensor with a large field of view was tested for on-line monitoring of coagulation and syneresis in a goat cheese (Murcia al Vino) manufactured under industrial conditions. Cheesemaking was carried out concurrently in a 12-L pilot vat and a 10,000-L industrial vat following the normal cheesemaking protocol. Cheese moisture, whey fat content, hardness, springiness, and adhesiveness were measured during syneresis. The results obtained show that cutting time is best predicted by considering the coagulation ratio at the inflection point and the percentage increase in the ratio during coagulation, with no need for the first derivative. The large field of view reflectance ratio provided good results for the prediction of moisture content, yield, hardness, springiness, and adhesiveness of the final cheese. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pioneering the combined use of agile and stage-gate models in new product development–cases from the manufacturing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema; Daalhuizen, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Stage gate models have long been the norm in manufacturing industries. Whereas agile models, such as scrum, are standard amongst software industries. These two models have been traditionally been pitted against one another, each with its own advantages and limitations. A new trend is being observed......, where gated models are becoming more agile, and agile models more gated. This trend indicates a need to combine the models, recognizing the limitations of both. We explore a number of cases where the models have been combined, very much based on trial and error, with adaptions being made as needed....... The findings are relevant to product- and engineering design theory and education as stage gate models are commonly seen as the basis for modeling and teaching design. Certain qualities of agile are expected to be integrated into stage gate models, from which new process models might emerge. Such processes...

  5. Micro/Nano manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Micro- and nano-scale manufacturing has been the subject of an increasing amount of interest and research effort worldwide in both academia and industry over the past 10 years.Traditional (MEMS) manufacturing, but also precision manufacturing technologies have been developed to cover micro...

  6. Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries: Main Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-10-01

    This report assesses steam generation and use in the pulp and paper, chemical, and petroleum refining industries, and estimates the potential for energy savings from implementation of steam system performance and efficiency improvements.

  7. Steam system opportunity assessment for the pulp and paper, chemical manufacturing, and petroleum refining industries: Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-10-01

    This report assesses steam generation and use in the pulp and paper, chemical, and petroleum refining industries, and estimates the potential for energy savings from implementation of steam system performance and efficiency improvements.

  8. Supplier Performance Monitoring and Improvement (SPMI through SIPOC Analysis and PDCA Model to the ISO 9001 QMS in Sports Goods Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasing global competition and customer expectations are forcing companies to improve their supplier performance as part of their supply chain governance initiative. A sport goods manufacturing industry is intensive supplier base industry and majority of these comes under small medium enterprises with limited resources. Developing an easy - deploy, cost effective and result oriented frame work for this industry is a critical business competency. Methods: This paper lays out a framework - a "standard operating system" - for continuous supplier performance monitoring and improvement (SPMI and is composed of following sections. In the first section supplier performance monitoring and improvement is overviewed with its basic concepts, and then improvement methods used in the paper are explained based on literature review. The third and fourth section focus on the methodology, explaining the way of SIPOC Analysis and PDCA application with using ISO 9001; 2008 QMS standards and example showing its results. Results: The existing process of Supplier Performance Monitoring and Improvement (SPMI was defined and mapped and then analyzed and revised through SIPOC Analysis by incorporating to PDCA Cycle and ISO 9001 QMS to identify problem areas, variations and unnecessary activities. Corrective actions were recommended to deal with problem areas and an improved and revised Supplier Performance Monitoring and Improvement (SPMI Process is suggested. Conclusions: Every organization needs to use a proper combination and selection of quality tools, methodologies and techniques for implementing continuous quality improvement process. This framework will provide a guidance for anyone who wants to develop supplier performance measurement system in sports goods manufacturing industry and other small - medium enterprises.

  9. Industrialization

    OpenAIRE

    Blundel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization, the historical development that saw cheesemaking transformed from a largely craft-based or artisanal activity, often located on a dairy farm, to a production process that, for the most part, takes place in large ‘cheese factories’ or creameries [See ARTISANAL]. The principal features of modern industrialized cheesemaking, which set it apart from traditional approaches include: high production volumes; sourcing of milk from multiple dairy herds; pasteurization and re-balanci...

  10. Worker exposure and health risks from volatile organic compounds utilized in the paint manufacturing industry of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, K L; Jumba, I O; Wandiga, S; Zhang, J; Kammen, D M

    2001-11-01

    This study provides a means for the evaluation of cleaner manufacturing and the provision of cost-effective worker health improvements in developing nations. Individual worker exposure to volatile organic compounds was measured in the paint manufacturing plants of Nairobi, Kenya. A variety of different paint production jobs were monitored, including laboratory researchers, mixers, tinters, fillers, cleaners, raw materials deliverers, and resins producers. Exposure levels were calculated based on a time-weighted average over an entire 8-10 hour workday. The paint solvents used can cause both acute and chronic health problems for the workers exposed. For example, over half of the organics monitored, i.e. benzene, styrene, and xylene, exhibit carcinogenic properties. The lifetime cancer risk from exposure to these paint solvents was estimated utilizing published cancer potencies, and the risks range from 1.90 x 10(-4) for raw materials deliverers to 2.60 x 10-2 for cleaners. The highest exposure tasks included cleaning the mixing vats and mixing the paint product, ranging from risks of 8.5 x 10(-4) to 2.6 x 10(-2), providing evidence that solvent exposure occurs due to point sources. Because of this, simple and inexpensive technologies should significantly reduce the excess exposure of workers in these manufacturing facilities. The cost of minor-innovations in the plants themselves, such as fans, drum and mixing vat covers, and respirators, could amount to as much as five times less than the estimated cost of treating workers who develop cancer due to paint solvent exposure.

  11. How will industry 4.0 reshape South African Manufacturing: Observations from a Design and Development perspective

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Toit, J

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ” point: New and creative Business Strategies understanding the various drivers and solutions around Industry 4, will need to be established. You also need to be creative in how you can leverage income from your products (over and over again... & Restricted Access Content Industry 4.0 However… To help solve problems all over the world, or collect data all over the world, you will need the correct collaboration, data protection and creative tools and skills. You will likely need to invest...

  12. The strategic importance of motivational rewards for lower-level employees in the manufacturing and retailing industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CA Arnolds

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest challenges that managers face in executing business strategies to achieve competitive advantage, is the employment of motivational techniques that build wholehearted commitment to operating excellence. Much confusion however still exists on the question of which rewards really motivate employees. This study investigates which rewards motivate lower-level employees (N = 367 in both manufacturing and clothing retail firms. The results show that the most important individual motivational reward for blue-collar employees is paid holidays and for frontline employees, retirement plans. The most important motivational reward category for both blue-collar and frontline employees is fringe benefits (paid holidays, sick leave and housing loans.

  13. Manufacturing in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Johannes; Boer, Henrike Engele Elisabeth; Boer, Harry

    This report compares the manufacturing strategies, practices, performances and improvement activities of 39 companies that are representative for the Danish assembly industry with those of 804 companies from 19 other countries. The data supporting this report were collected in 2013 and concern......: • Manufacturing strategies pursued and implemented between 2010 and 2012. • Performance improvements achieved during that period. • Actual manufacturing practices and performances as well as competitive priorities in 2012. • Manufacturing strategies pursued for the years 2010-2012....

  14. An approach to industrial water conservation--a case study involving two large manufacturing companies based in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agana, Bernard A; Reeve, Darrell; Orbell, John D

    2013-01-15

    This study presents the application of an integrated water management strategy at two large Australian manufacturing companies that are contrasting in terms of their respective products. The integrated strategy, consisting of water audit, pinch analysis and membrane process application, was deployed in series to systematically identify water conservation opportunities. Initially, a water audit was deployed to completely characterize all water streams found at each production site. This led to the development of a water balance diagram which, together with water test results, served as a basis for subsequent enquiry. After the water audit, commercially available water pinch software was utilized to identify possible water reuse opportunities, some of which were subsequently implemented on site. Finally, utilizing a laboratory-scale test rig, membrane processes such as UF, NF and RO were evaluated for their suitability to treat the various wastewater streams. The membranes tested generally showed good contaminant rejection rates, slow flux decline rates, low energy usage and were well suited for treatment of specific wastewater streams. The synergy between the various components of this strategy has the potential to reduce substantial amounts of Citywater consumption and wastewater discharge across a diverse range of large manufacturing companies. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Microstructural Development and Technical Challenges in Laser Additive Manufacturing: Case Study with a 316L Industrial Part

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marya, Manuel; Singh, Virendra; Marya, Surendar; Hascoet, Jean Yves

    2015-08-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) brings disruptive changes to the ways parts, and products are designed, fabricated, tested, qualified, inspected, marketed, and sold. These changes introduce novel technical challenges and concerns arising from the maturity and diversity of today's AM processes, feedstock materials, and process parameter interactions. AM bears a resemblance with laser and electron beam welding in the so-called conduction mode, which involves a multitude of dynamic physical events between the projected feedstock and a moving heat source that eventually influence AM part properties. For this paper, an air vent was selected for its thin-walled, hollow, and variable cross section, and limited size. The studied air vents, randomly selected from a qualification batch, were fabricated out of 316L stainless steel using a 4 kW fiber laser powder-fed AM system, referred to as construction laser additive direct (CLAD). These were systematically characterized by microhardness indentation, visual examination, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and electron-back-scattering diffraction in order to determine AM part suitability for service and also broadly discuss metallurgical phenomena. The paper then briefly expands the discussion to include additional engineering alloys and further analyze relationships between AM process parameters and AM part properties, consistently utilizing past experience with the same powder-fed CLAD 3D printer, the well-established science and technology of welding and joining, and recent publications on additive manufacturing.

  16. Trends and Possible Future Developments in Global Forest-Product Markets—Implications for the Swedish Forest Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnar Jonsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes trends and possible future developments in global wood-product markets and discusses implications for the Swedish forest sector. Four possible futures, or scenarios, are considered, based on qualitative scenario analysis. The scenarios are distinguished principally by divergent futures with respect to two highly influential factors driving change in global wood-product markets, whose future development is unpredictable. These so-called critical uncertainties were found to be degrees to which: (i current patterns of globalization will continue, or be replaced by regionalism, and (ii concern about the environment, particularly climate change, related policy initiatives and customer preferences, will materialize. The overall future of the Swedish solid wood-product industry looks bright, irrespective of which of the four possible futures occurs, provided it accommodates the expected growth in demand for factory-made, energy-efficient construction components. The prospects for the pulp and paper industry in Sweden appear more ambiguous. Globalization is increasingly shifting production and consumption to the Southern hemisphere, adversely affecting employment and forest owners in Sweden. Further, technical progress in information and communication technology (ICT is expected to lead to drastic reductions in demand for newsprint and printing paper. Chemical pulp producers may profit from a growing bio-energy industry, since they could manufacture new, high-value products in integrated bio-refineries. Mechanical pulp producers cannot do this, however, and might suffer from higher prices for raw materials and electricity.

  17. Salmonella in Swedish cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Ågren, Estelle

    2017-01-01

    In Sweden, all herds detected with salmonella are put under restrictions and measures aiming at eradication are required. The purpose of these studies was to provide a basis for decisions on how surveillance and control of salmonella in Swedish cattle can be made more cost-efficient. Results from a bulk milk screening were used to investigate seroprevalence of salmonella and to study associations between salmonella status and geographical location, local animal density, number of test pos...

  18. Swedish Family Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrstrom, Staffan

    1986-01-01

    Family policy remains one of the leading issues of Swedish domestic politics. All parties are agreed that families with children must be given a better deal in the wake of the economic crisis. But how is this to be done and how quickly can it be achieved? Is the expansion of day nursery facilities to be speeded up, or are parents to be given a…

  19. Review of the impact of the Ukraine-EU free trade agreement on manufacturing industries (mechanical engineering, chemical and light industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Usenko

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a definition to the concept of ‘deep integration’ taken by the Ukrainian Government as a framework concept for the establishment of a Ukraine-EU free trade area. The paper uses the term ‘deep free trade’ or ‘free trade area +’. It offers a review of the Ukrainian economy and its readiness to open such industries as mechanical engineering, chemical and light industry to free trade with the EU. It examines which cooperative steps might be taken in the sectors in question in the framework of a free trade area by identifying specific features of those sectors in Ukraine and the EU through SWOT analysis and review of certain provisions in relevant agreements between the EU and other countries. It proposes to forecast the possible impact of a free trade area on stakeholders’ position regarding the agreement by using the ‘stakeholder approach’ (identifying and classifying interest groups and the European Commission’s method of ‘impact assessment’. Based on the results of this research, conclusions are made concerning the fundamental negotiation principles for talks between Ukraine and the EU as to the economic and trade component of the new ‘enhanced agreement.

  20. Flexible fermentation of organically loaded industrial waste waters using a beverage manufacturer as an example; Flexible Vergaerung organisch belasteter Industrie-Abwaesser am Beispiel eines Getraenkeherstellers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganagin, Waldemar; Loewen, Achim; Nelles, Michael [HAWK Hochschule fuer Angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst Hildesheim/Holzminden/Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany). Fachgebiet Nachhaltige Energie- und Umwelttechnik (NEUTec)

    2013-10-01

    Industrial organic waste water is usually treated directly in an own or public sewage treatment plant which is highly cost-intensive. The anaerobic digestion of those waste waters is sometimes difficult to control. HAWK is working in a project about this topic, where a fixed bed reactor is investigated for the operation as a flexible plant. For this reason a semi-industrial pilot plant was developed and the capability will be tested on several sites. The gas production ought to run according to the companies demands and is integrated in the operation and processes. This flexible plant is specifically designed to deal with small amounts of waste water with low organic components and even sometimes discontinuously loads. This process is tested in a beverage factory. The reactor was implemented in the existing infrastructure and their waste water is treated. The assessment of the measurements shows, that the fixed bed reactor can handle the organic compounds of the waste water very well and reduce them significantly. Even fluctuating loads and a low organic concentration do not harm the process. The effect of power generation is an additional benefit for this system This innovative approach with low energy input and additional profit from the power sale makes the waste water treatment on site as a real alternative to the conventional treatment. (orig.)

  1. The Eco Lean Method - a combined approach for low cost economic and ecologic optimization in the manufacturing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Miehe, Robert; Bogdanov, Ivan; Schneider, Ralph; Hirsch, Marius; Bauernhansl, Thomas; Pawlik, Elzbieta; Horbal, Remigiusz

    2016-01-01

    Rising resource efficiency is essential for a future green economy. Research and business activities in this field have thus increased dramatically during the past decades. While most environmentally oriented methods suffice to provide deep transparency, few have the ability to depict optimization potential and/or provide procedural methods of improvement. The general approach of ecological amendments in industries thus often is investment intensive. Numerous companies however do not dispose ...

  2. Trust and communication as predictors of customer satisfaction in business-to-business relationship marketing in the South African cement manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phineas Mbango

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Customer satisfaction has become relevant in the South African cement industry as it leads to customer loyalty and cooperation. In the current climate, to ensure long-term profitability, cement suppliers need to adopt strategies to ensure customer satisfaction. This study’s literature search has revealed that there is limited published research, particularly in South Africa, which deals with customer satisfaction determinants in the cement industry. The major objective of the study was to test if trust and communication influence customer satisfaction in the context of business-to-business relationship marketing in the South African cement manufacturing industry. The methodology involved a survey and was quantitative in nature. Data were collected from 362 major business-to-business cement customers throughout South Africa’s nine provinces using the face-to-face interview technique using a seven-point Likert scale structured self-administered questionnaires. The data collected in the empirical study were analysed using descriptive, correlation and regression analysis. The empirical results of this study suggest that, in order to maintain customer satisfaction, a cement supplier has to invest in ways of enhancing customer trust and communication. As a result this study makes both theoretical and practical contribution in the field of relationship marketing

  3. The relationship between serum vitamin D levels and sleep quality in fixed day indoor field workers in the electronics manufacturing industry in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young Saeng; Chae, Chang Ho; Kim, Young Ouk; Son, Jun Seok; Kim, Chan Woo; Park, Hyoung Ouk; Lee, Jun Ho; Shin, Young Hoo; Kwak, Ho Sung

    2017-01-01

    Although recent studies have investigated the influence of vitamin D on sleep patterns, there is a lack of research on the relationship between vitamin D and sleep patterns in Korean workers. This study focused on the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and sleep in fixed day indoor field workers in the electronics manufacturing industry in Korea. The 1472 subjects who were included in this study were selected from fixed day workers in the electronics manufacturing industry who had received a worker's special health examination at a hospital in Changwon, South Gyeongsang Province between January 2015 and December 2015. Nighttime workers and those who showed symptoms of depression were excluded from this study. The sociodemographic and lifestyle variables of the participants were investigated, including age, sex, marital status, level of education, body mass index, smoking habits, alcohol consumption habits, and regular exercise. Work-related factors were evaluated, such as employee tenure and occupational stress. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured as an indicator of vitamin D levels, and quality of sleep was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) translated into Korean. The subjects had a mean serum vitamin D level of 13.70 ± 5.93 ng/mL. Vitamin D deficiency, defined as a serum vitamin D level of difference ( P  = .007). Multiple logistic regression analysis adjusting for significant variables found that poor sleep quality was more likely in those with vitamin D deficiency than those with higher serum vitamin D levels (odds ratio = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01-1.82). A comparison of serum vitamin D levels and PSQI components showed that the mean scores for subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, and sleep duration were significantly higher in the vitamin D-deficient participants, indicating that the vitamin D-deficient participants had poorer sleep quality. This study investigated serum vitamin D levels in fixed day indoor field

  4. Board Structure in Swedish Mutual Funds Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kolosov, Pavel; Soltanmammedov, Shageldi

    2011-01-01

    Mutual funds attracted great attention of both shareholders and academics in last few decades. Mutual funds provide benefits like diversification, professional managements and reduced costs for individual shareholders. Shareholders invest their assets into mutual funds managed by professionals. Managers may have an incentive to use those assets to satisfy their own interests. They can achieve this by charging excessive fees or spending more on the perquisites. These unmatched interests of sha...

  5. Studies in Swedish Energy Opinion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Soeren; Hedberg, Per

    2012-07-01

    the 1970s, energy production was politicized big time in the industrialized world. The birth of the environmental movement, the oil crises in 1973 - 74 and the beginning conflict surrounding civilian nuclear power, put energy issues center stage on the political agenda. Energy policies - especially related to the development of nuclear power - came to dominate election campaigns, like in Sweden in 1976 or be the subject of referendums, like in Austria in 1978 or in Sweden in 1980. Critical voices toward the peaceful use of nuclear power - having started in America before being exported to Europe - gained real strength and public support all over the Western world by the nuclear accident at the Three Mile Island plant in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania in 1979. The energy genie was out of the bottle and out to stay. Fueled by the nuclear meltdowns in Chernobyl in 1986 and in Fukushima in 2011 and supplemented by conflicts over how to reduce the use of oil and coal, how to sensibly exploit the waste gas reserves, and how to develop renewable energy sources based on sun, wind and waves – have made all kinds of energy issues the focal point of political contentions ever since the early 1970s. In Sweden, as in many other countries, energy policies - often with nuclear power in the center - have been one of the most fought-over policy areas during the last thirty-forty years. And the contentious character of energy policies is not limited to the elite level of politics - to politicians, to media pundits or to lobbyists. It is also manifest among ordinary citizens. Energy issues - nuclear power and wind power in particular - are highly polarizing among voters as well. Given this historic background, starting in the 1970s, it was rather natural that energy questions - featuring most prominently questions related to nuclear power - would be important parts of the voter surveys performed by the Swedish National Elections Studies (SNES) at the Univ. of Gothenburg. The first book

  6. 78 FR 67117 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... small- and medium-sized enterprises. The Secretary of Commerce appoints all Council members. All Council.... manufacturing industry to fill five vacant positions on the Manufacturing Council (Council). The purpose of the... from representatives of the U.S. manufacturing industry for five vacant positions on the Council for...

  7. Evaluating levels and health risk of heavy metals in exposed workers from surgical instrument manufacturing industries of Sialkot, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaid, Muhammad; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2016-09-01

    The study aimed to monitor heavy metal (chromium, Cr; cadmium, Cd; nickel, Ni; copper, Cu; lead, Pb; iron, Fe; manganese, Mn; and zinc, Zn) footprints in biological matrices (urine, whole blood, saliva, and hair), as well as in indoor industrial dust samples, and their toxic effects on oxidative stress and health risks in exposed workers. Overall, blood, urine, and saliva samples exhibited significantly higher concentrations of toxic metals in exposed workers (Cr; blood 16.30 μg/L, urine 58.15 μg/L, saliva 5.28 μg/L) than the control samples (Cr; blood 5.48 μg/L, urine 4.47 μg/L, saliva 2.46 μg/L). Indoor industrial dust samples also reported to have elevated heavy metal concentrations, as an example, Cr quantified with concentration of 299 mg/kg of dust, i.e., more than twice the level of Cr in household dust (136 mg/kg). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) level presented significant positive correlation (p ≤ 0.01) with Cr, Zn, and Cd (Cr > Zn > Cd) which is an indication of heavy metal's associated raised oxidative stress in exposed workers. Elevated average daily intake (ADI) of heavy metals resulted in cumulative hazard quotient (HQ) range of 2.97-18.88 in workers of different surgical units; this is an alarming situation of health risk implications. Principal component analysis-multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR)-based pie charts represent that polishing and cutting sections exhibited highest metal inputs to the biological and environmental matrices than other sources. Heavy metal concentrations in biological matrices and dust samples showed a significant positive correlation between Cr in dust, urine, and saliva samples. Current study will help to generate comprehensive base line data of heavy metal status in biomatrices and dust from scientifically ignored industrial sector. Our findings can play vital role for health departments and industrial environmental management system (EMS) authorities in policy making and implementation.

  8. Analytical evaluation of work ability index and its determining factors among workers of a car manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eyvazlou

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available   Background and aims : The ability of work is the basis of well-being for all of us. Many factors affect the work ability such as work and work condition, work organization and human resource. The aim of this study was to assess the work ability among car manufacturing workers and determine the relationship between the work ability index with individual characteristics and life style factors.   Methods : The study was a descriptive cross-sectional investigation. The subjects comprised of 271 workers­ with mean age of 35 years who occupied by a car manufacturing Company. They completed the Work Ability Index Questionnaire during semi interview sessions. The job groups of Painting Shop, assembling line, office department, and technical section were studied. Statistical tests including one-way­ ANOVA, t-test, Kruskal wallis were used for analyzing the relationship between work ability index and individual characteristic as well as life style factors. To test the distribution of work ability index score categories, a chi-square test was used and finally, Spearman correlation coefficient was used in order to determine correlation between the final of work ability index score with any of questionnaire items.   Results : The mean value of work ability index in this study was (37.67 with SD=5.87. The WAI categories were 17.71% in "excellent", 38.75% in "good", 36.16% in "moderate", and 7.4% in "poor" levels. Association between life style factors (obesity, smoking, exercise and WAI was statistically significant (P< .0.001 . Lower WAI was associated with increasing the age, high work experience and lower education (P<.0.001. Meanwhile, physical demand of the jobs was strongly associated with the WAI score (P<.0.001. Conclusion : On the basis of Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, the value of work ability in current study was in good category(37-43; but, concerning the mean age (35 years of the studied population the mean value of work

  9. An econometric analysis of electricity demand response to price changes at the intra-day horizon: The case of manufacturing industry in West Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Framroze Møller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of renewable energy implies a more variable supply of power. Market efficiency may improve if demand can absorb some of this variability by being more flexible, e.g. by responding quickly to changes in the market price of power. To learn about this, in particular, whether demand responds already within the same day, we suggest an econometric model for hourly consumption- and price time series. This allows for multi-level seasonality and that information about day-ahead prices does not arrive every hour but every 24th hour (as a vector of 24 prices. We confront the model with data from the manufacturing industry of West Denmark (2007-2011. The results clearly suggest a lack of response. The policy implication is that relying exclusively on hourly price response by consumers for integrating volatile renewable electricity production is questionable. Either hourly price variation has to increase considerably or demand response technologies be installed.

  10. Survey of the impact of manufactured exports from industrializing countries in Asia and Latin America: must export-oriented growth be disruptive. [Monograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franko, L.G.

    1979-01-01

    Trade adjustments may become necessary as industrializing less-developed countries (LDCs) put their new manufactured goods in competition on the world market. The problems of displaced workers in the importing countries may require a form of protectionism by the developed countries during this period of transition and economic development. Data were collected from a survey of LDC export thrusts and the impacts on US and Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) economies to provide information on an international discussion of the issues. The present debate on present trade agreements and the need for protective barriers has tended to polarize the discussion. The material presented in this report is intended to produce a more productive, long-term approach. 45 references, 14 tables. (DCK)

  11. Air, hand wipe, and surface wipe sampling for Bisphenol A (BPA) among workers in industries that manufacture and use BPA in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Cynthia J; Jackson, Matthew V; Christianson, Annette L; Clark, John C; Arnold, James E; Pretty, Jack R; Deddens, James A

    2017-11-01

    For decades, bisphenol A (BPA) has been used in making polycarbonate, epoxy, and phenolic resins and certain investment casting waxes, yet published exposure data are lacking for U.S. manufacturing workers. In 2013-2014, BPA air and hand exposures were quantified for 78 workers at six U.S. companies making BPA or BPA-based products. Exposure measures included an inhalable-fraction personal air sample on each of two consecutive work days (n = 146), pre- and end-shift hand wipe samples on the second day (n = 74 each), and surface wipe samples (n = 88). Potential determinants of BPA air and end-shift hand exposures (after natural log transformation) were assessed in univariate and multiple regression mixed models. The geometric mean (GM) BPA air concentration was 4.0 µg/m 3 (maximum 920 µg/m 3 ). The end-shift GM BPA hand level (26 µg/sample) was 10-times higher than the pre-shift level (2.6 µg/sample). BPA air and hand exposures differed significantly by industry and job. BPA air concentrations and end-shift hand levels were highest in the BPA-filled wax manufacturing/reclaim industry (GM Air = 48 µg/m 3 , GM Hand-End = 130 µg/sample) and in the job of working with molten BPA-filled wax (GM Air = 43 µg/m 3 , GM Hand-End = 180 µg/sample), and lowest in the phenolic resins industry (GM Air = 0.85 µg/m 3 , GM Hand-End = 0.43 µg/sample) and in the job of flaking phenolic resins (GM AIR = 0.62 µg/m 3 , GM Hand-End = 0.38 µg/sample). Determinants of increased BPA air concentration were industry, handling BPA containers, spilling BPA, and spending ≥50% of the shift in production areas; increasing age was associated with lower air concentrations. BPA hand exposure determinants were influenced by high values for two workers; for all other workers, tasks involving contact with BPA-containing materials and spending ≥50% of the shift in production areas were associated with increased BPA hand levels. Surface wipe BPA levels were significantly lower in

  12. How do We Know Who Knows Who: An Empirical Assessment of Social Capital Usage for Turkish and Greek Cypriot Steel Manufacturing Industry Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Sağsan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the social capital measurement of Turkish Cypriot and Greek Cypriot steel-manufacturing industry managers studied through the social network analysis method. The aim of this research undertaking is to find out the social capital usage of managers constructed on a relational basis. The comparative analysis between the two communities is conducted to understand to what extent Cypriot managers employed in steel-manufacturing companies fill in structural holes occurring in the Cypriot community. The epistemological dimension of this study is based on the anti-positivist paradigm. For this reason, the methodology refers to the quantitative analysis.10 Turkish Cypriot and 10 Greek Cypriot managers are involved in this study by using the focus group techniques in the context of quantitative methodology. The brief definition on social capital is given to the respondents and asked them to mark their social relationhip between 0, which represents no relationship, to 10, which refers to the strongest level of relationship. After gathering data, UCINET software program was used by mapping out the social relationship among the managers. The evidences approved that social capital has played a vital role in the creation of new social networks in the case of Cyprus. The analysis has highlighted the inadequacy of the social interactions between the two communities, likely stemming from the political and economic issues and challenges of the Island.

  13. Spatial distribution of organic pollutants in industrial construction and demolition waste and their mutual interaction on an abandoned pesticide manufacturing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng; Zhao, Xin; Sun, Yanqiu; Ma, Jianli; Gao, Xiaofeng; Xie, Tian; Xu, Dongsheng; Yu, Yi; Zhao, Youcai

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive field investigation of organic pollutants was examined in industrial construction and demolition waste (ICDW) inside an abandoned pesticide manufacturing plant. Concentrations of eight types of pesticides, a metabolite and two intermediates were studied. The ICDW was under severe and long-term contamination by organophosphorus, intermediates and pyrethroid pesticide with mean concentrations of 23,429, 3538 and 179.4 mg kg(-1), respectively. FT-IR analysis suggested that physical absorption and chemical bonding were their mutual interaction forms. Patterns of total pesticide spatial distribution showed good correlations with manufacturing processes spreading all over the plant both in enclosed workshops and in residues randomly dumped outside, while bricks and coatings were the most vulnerable to pollutants. Ultimately the fate of the OPPs was diversified as the immersion of ICDW in water largely transferred the pollutants into aquatic systems while exposure outside did not largely lead to pesticide degradation. The adoption of centralized collections for the disposal of wastes could only eliminate part of the contaminated ICDW, probably due to lack of knowledge and criteria. Correlation matrix and cluster analysis indicated that regulated disposal and management of polluted ICDW was effective, thus presenting the requirement for its appropriate disposal.

  14. Molecular isotopic engineering (MIE): industrial manufacture of naproxen of predetermined stable carbon-isotopic compositions for authenticity and security protection and intellectual property considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, J. P.; Farina, P.; Pearson, A.; Mezes, P. S.; Sabatelli, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular Isotopic Engineering (MIE) is the directed stable-isotopic synthesis of chemical products for reasons of product identification and of product security, and also for intellectual property considerations. We report here a generally excellent correspondence between the observed and predicted stable carbon-isotopic (δ13C) results for a successful directed synthesis of racemic mixture from its immediate precursors. The observed results are readily explained by the laws of mass balance and isotope mass balance. Oxygen- and hydrogen isotopic results which require an additional assessment of the effects of O and H exchange, presumably due to interaction with water in the reaction solution, are addressed elsewhere. A previous, cooperative study with the US FDA-DPA showed that individual manufacturers of naproxen could readily be differentiated by their stable-isotopic provenance (δ13C, δ18O, and δD ref. 1). We suggest that MIE can be readily employed in the bio/pharmaceutical industry without alteration of present manufacturing processes other than isotopically selecting and/or monitoring reactants and products.

  15. Body mass index, blood pressure, and glucose and lipid metabolism among permanent and fixed-term workers in the manufacturing industry: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Mariko; Minami, Masahide; Yano, Eiji

    2014-02-27

    Temporary employment, a precarious form of employment, is recognized as social determinant of poor health. However, evidence supporting precarious employment as a risk factor for health is mainly obtained from subjective data. Studies using objective clinical measurement data in the assessment of health status are limited. This study compared body mass index (BMI), lipid and glucose metabolism, and health-related lifestyle factors between permanent workers and fixed-term workers employed in the manufacturing industry. Data of 1,701 male manufacturing industry workers 4.0%), whereas the overweight population (BMI ≥ 25.0) was greater among permanent workers (21.4%) compared with fixed-term workers (18.1%). Although fixed-term workers tended not to be overweight, regression analysis adjusted for age and lifestyle factors suggested that fixed-term employment was significantly associated with higher blood pressure (systolic β = 2.120, diastolic β = 2.793), triglyceride (β = 11.147), fasting blood glucose (β = 2.218), and HbA1c (β = 0.107) compared with permanent workers (all p < 0.01). Fixed-term workers showed more health risks, such as poorer blood pressure and lipid and glucose metabolism, even when adjusted for age and lifestyle variables, although BMI of fixed-term workers were lower than permanent workers. Precarious work might contribute to a deteriorating health status even among less overweight populations.

  16. CHALLENGES FOR CLEANER PRODUCTION IN INTERNATIONAL MANUFACTURING SUBCONTRACTING: THE CASE OF THE MAQUILADORA INDUSTRY IN NORTHERN MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Montalvo Corral

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available En el ámbito global, las autoridades nacionales y locales enfrentan nuevas formas de organización industrial que hacen más difícil la regulación ambiental de estas actividades. Después de la última oleada de privatizaciones acompañadas de concentración económica en diversos sectores y de la maduración de la manufactura globalizada, se puede esperar que los organismos encargados de regular la actividad industrial tengan poca independencia y poder para diseñar y aplicar esquemas regulatorios. Éste es particularmente el caso en la promoción de innovación tecnológica encaminada a proteger el medio ambiente. Este artículo argumenta la tesis de que el ciclo de negocios en la industria maquiladora y la carencia de capacidad institucional de las autoridades ambientales regionales son las limitantes estructurales directas en la promoción de la produción limpia en la región fronteriza de Estados Unidos y México.

  17. Information technology use in the food and beverage industry: a planning model for small and medium manufacturing enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Barcelos Reggiani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The determinant variables of the performance of small and medium companies (SMEs are associated to aspects of entrepreneurial capacity, regional economy, positioning in the market and type of operational management. These aspects are all influenced by the use of information technology (IT. This paper presents the intervening factors in the management process of these companies and a model that contemplates IT as an integrant part of the enterprise planning. The model, based on the Competence Theory, identifies in the business context of the company the critical factors to its success, the capacities and resources necessary to its sustain and the metrical which should reflect the evolution of the results of the company in relation to its objectives. Associated to these capacities IT resources are identified to be applied to upgrade the existing competences, or to develop new ones, according to the strategic focus and positioning of the company in the market. It is presented also a case study of a manufacturing SME of beverages where the model is being applied. The case shows some metrical results which certify the effectiveness of the model, although the short time of implantation. In spite of still being in the validation phase, with implementations in companies of other sectors, the model has shown favorable aspects mainly due to its  cognitive and recurrent approach, which is well appropriate to the management process of  SMEs.

  18. Maternal use of Swedish snuff (snus) and risk of stillbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikström, Anna-Karin; Cnattingius, Sven; Stephansson, Olof

    2010-11-01

    Swedish snuff has been discussed internationally as a safer alternative to tobacco smoking. International cigarette manufacturers are promoting new snuff products, and the use of Swedish snuff is increasing, especially among women of childbearing age. The effect of Swedish snuff on pregnancy complications is unknown. In this population-based cohort study, we estimated the risk of stillbirth in snuff users (n = 7629), light smokers (1-9 cigarettes/day; n = 41,488), and heavy smokers (≥10 cigarettes/day; n = 17,014), using nontobacco users (n = 504,531) as reference. Compared with nontobacco users, snuff users had an increased risk of stillbirth (adjusted odds ratio = 1.6 [95% confidence interval = 1.1-2.3]); the risk was higher for preterm (stillbirth (2.1 [1.3-3.4]). For light smokers, the adjusted odds ratio of stillbirth was 1.4 (1.2-1.7) and the corresponding risk for heavy smokers was 2.4 (2.0-3.0). When we excluded women with preeclampsia or antenatal bleeding and infants who were small for gestational age, the smoking-related risks of stillbirth was markedly attenuated; the elevated risk for snuff users remained the same level. Use of Swedish snuff during pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of stillbirth. The mechanism behind this increased risk seems to differ from the underlying mechanism in smokers. Swedish snuff does not appear to be a safe alternative to cigarette smoking during pregnancy.

  19. The Swedish Bohus granite - a stone with a fascinating history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouenborg, Björn; Eliasson, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    One of the most well-known and well spread Swedish stone types used as building stones is the Bonus granite. It outcrops in an area north of Gothenburgh (SW Sweden), along the coastline, approximately 35 km wide and 85 km long. The granite continues into Norway as the Iddefjord granite. The Bohus granite is one of Sweden's youngest granites. Isotopic dating shows that the magma cooled at about 920 M years ago and thus marking the end of the Sveconorwegian orogoney. It is a composite granite massif area with several granitic intrusions but with rather homogeneous mineralogy. However, colour and texture varies quite a lot and the colour ranges from red to reddish grey although some pure grey varieties occur sparsely. The grain size ranges from medium grained to coarse grained and even with some porphyric parts. Quarrying in an industrial scale started 1842. The merchant A C Kullgren opened the first quarry and produced stones for the construction of the 86 km long Trollhättan channel connecting lake Vänern and the Atlantic ocean in the SW Sweden The stone was used for constructing harbors and wharves along the channel. Several quarries opened in the late 1800 around 1870 - 1890 and the export increased steadily with deliveries to Germany, Denmark, Holland, England and even to South America. The stone industries in Bohuslän (Bohus county), at its peak in 1929, engaged around 7 000 employees. During the depression in 1930 almost all of them became unemployed. However, as a curiosity, production and export continued to Germany for construction of Germania, the future World capital city ("Welthauptstadt Germania"), planned by Adolf Hitler and Albert Speer. About 500 stone workers were kept employed for this project during the late thirties. Today several varieties are still produced: Evja/Ävja, Tossene, Brastad, Näsinge, Broberg, Nolby, Allemarken and Skarstad. However, the number of stone workers is far from that of the early 1900. The Swedish production is mainly

  20. galenicals in modern medicine: focus on swedish bitters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Galenicals were very popular in clinical medicine till late 1960s at which time the pharmaceutical industry revolutionized drug research and production. Almost four decades later, old but useful galenicals such as SWEDISH BITTERS® have been rediscovered and registered in conformity with Food and Drug Administration ...