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Sample records for sward canopy structure

  1. Estrutura da pastagem e padrões de desfolhação em capim-mombaça em diferentes alturas do dossel forrageiro Sward structure and defoliation patterns in mombaçagrass according to different canopy heights

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    Ana Luisa Palhano

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar o padrão de desfolhação em pastagens de capim-mombaça (Panicum maximum, Jacq., novilhas leiteiras da raça HPB foram submetidas, em testes de pastejo, a cinco alturas de dossel (60, 80, 100, 120 e 140 cm, em um delineamento completamente casualizado, com duas repetições. Caracterizou-se a estrutura do dossel por meio de: altura; oferta de forragem, massa de forragem e de lâminas foliares; densidade volumétrica da forragem, de colmos mais bainhas e de lâminas foliares; densidade populacional de perfilhos; número e comprimento de lâminas foliares expandidas e em expansão. Com o aumento da altura do dossel, observou-se redução linear (Y= 0,369606 + 0,001555 x, R² = 0,5560, P = 0,008 na probabilidade de desfolhação das plantas, como resultado da maior massa de forragem. Com o incremento em altura do dossel, notadamente à altura de 85 cm, os animais passaram a ingerir maior proporção de lâminas foliares expandidas à medida que as mesmas apresentaram-se mais acessíveis, apesar da maior preferência por lâminas foliares em expansão. A intensidade de desfolhação das folhas expandidas diminuiu linearmente (Y= 80,866791 – 0,370979 x, R² = 0,6076, P = 0,004, refletindo o aumento em seu comprimento (Y= -104,311106 + 2,877570 x – 0,012035 x², R² = 0,9271, P = 0,002 e também a maior resistência à apreensão, imposta pela idade das folhas. Com o aumento em altura do dossel, o padrão de desfolhação foi alterado, de maneira que os animais passaram a executar um pastejo mais periférico nas touceiras e com acesso reduzido às folhas em expansão, de melhor valor nutritivo.To evaluate the pattern of defoliation in a Mombaça (Panicum maximum grass pasture, experimental paddocks were grazed by Holstein heifers to maintain canopy height of: 60, 80, 100, 120 and 140 cm height. The experimental design was completely randomized, with two replications. The assessed sward structures were: canopy height

  2. Sward structure and livestock performance in guinea grass cv: Tanzania pastures managed by rotational stocking strategies

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    Valéria Pacheco Batista Euclides

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Grazing strategy is a key element in the determination of sward structure, herbage nutritive value and animal performance. We aimed to compare the herbage characteristics and performance of livestock in pastures of Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania managed, using two rotational stocking strategies, which provided either a fixed-length rest period (FRP of 35 days in the spring and fall and 30 days in the summer, or a variable-length rest period (VRP, determined by the time required for the canopy to achieve 70 cm in height. The pastures were evaluated in the pregrazing condition for forage mass (FM; leaf (LP, stem (SP and dead matter (DP percentages; and nutritive value (NV. The animals were weighed every 28 days. Pastures managed with the FRPs exhibited greater FMs, SPs and DPs and lower LPs and NVs than those managed with the VRPs. The average daily livestock weight gain was greater during the spring and summer for the VRP than for the FRP pastures, resulting in an average animal weight gain per area of 990 and 860 kg ha−¹ wet period−¹ for the pastures managed with the VRPs and FRPs, respectively. Thus, pasture rest periods that were maintained after the sward reached 70 cm in height reduced the animal performance on Tanzania guinea grass.

  3. Linking Management, Environment and Morphogenetic and Structural Components of a Sward for Simulating Tiller Density Dynamics in Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum

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    Masahiko Hirata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A model which describes tiller density dynamics in bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flügge swards has been developed. The model incorporates interrelationships between various morphogenetic and structural components of the sward and uses the inverse of the self-thinning rule as the standard relationship between tiller density and tiller weight (a density-size equilibrium toward which tiller density progressively changes over time under varying nitrogen (N rates, air temperature and season. Water and nutrient limitations were not considered except partial consideration of N. The model was calibrated against data from swards subjected to different N rates and cutting intensities, and further validated against data from a grazed sward and swards under different cutting intensities. As the calibration and validation results were satisfactory, the model was used as a tool to investigate the responses of tiller density to various combinations of defoliation frequencies and intensities. Simulations identified defoliation regimes required for stabilizing tiller density at an arbitrary target level, i.e., sustainable use of the sward. For example, the model predicted that tiller density can be maintained at a medium level of about 4000 m−2 under conditions ranging from weekly cuttings to an 8 cm height to 8-weekly cuttings to 4 cm. More intense defoliation is needed for higher target tiller density and vice versa.

  4. Effects of sward structure on herbivore foraging behaviour in a South-African savanna: an investigation of the forage maturation hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drescher, M.F.; Heitkönig, I.M.A.; Brink, van den P.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2006-01-01

    The grass layer of savannas is characterized by strong temporal and spatial heterogeneity in the quantity and quality of forage. Besides this, there is strong variation in other aspects of sward structure, here defined as sward chemistry, morphology, architecture and species composition. The forage

  5. The Impact of Tourist Traffic on the Condition and Cell Structures of Alpine Swards

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    Marlena Kycko

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the effect of trampling on vegetation in high-mountain ecosystems through the electromagnetic spectrum’s interaction with plant pigments, cell structure, water content and other substances that have a direct impact on leaf properties. The aim of the study was to confirm with the use of fluorescence methods of variability in the state of high-mountain vegetation previously measured spectrometrically. The most heavily visited part of the High Tatras in Poland was divided into polygons and, after selecting the dominant species within alpine swards, a detailed analysis of trampled and reference patterns was performed. The Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD FieldSpec 3/4 were used to acquire high-resolution spectral properties of plants, their fluorescence and the leaf chlorophyll content with the difference between the plant surface temperature (ts, and the air temperature (ta as well as fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (fAPAR used as reference data. The results show that, along tourist trails, vegetation adapts to trampling with the impact depending on the species. A lower chlorophyll value was confirmed by a decrease in fluorescence, and the cellular structures were degraded in trampled compared to reference species, with a lower leaf reflectance. In addition, at the extreme, trampling can eliminate certain species such as Luzula alpino-pilosa, for which significant changes were noted due to trampling.

  6. Wildlife Habitat Quality (Sward Structure and Ground Cover Response of Mixed Native Warm-Season Grasses to Harvesting

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    Vitalis W. Temu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural intensification in America has replaced native warm-season grasses (NWSG with introduced forages causing wildlife habitat loss and population declines for the northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus and similar ground-nesting birds. Reintroducing NWSGs onto managed grasslands to reverse grassland bird population declines lacks information about appropriate multi-purpose management. Post-season nesting habitat quality of mixed NWSGs (indiangrass (IG, Sorghastrum nutans, big bluestem (BB, Andropogon gerardii and little bluestem (LB, Schizachyrium scoparium responding to previous-year(s harvest intervals (treatments, 30-, 40-, 60-, 90 or 120-d and duration (years in production, were assessed on late-spring-early-summer re-growths. Yearly phased harvestings were initiated in May on sets of randomized plots, ≥90-cm apart, in five replications (blocks to produce one-, two-, and three-year old stands by the third year. Sward heights and canopy closure were recorded a day before harvest, followed a week after by visual estimates of ground cover of plant species and litter. Harvesting increased post-season grass cover and reduced forbs following a high rainfall year. Harvested plot swards showed no treatment differences, but were shorter and intercepted more sunlight. Similarly, harvest duration increased grass cover with no year effect but reduced forbs following a high rainfall year. One- or two-year full-season harvesting of similar stands may not compromise subsequent bobwhite nesting-cover provided post-season harvesting starts after the breeding cycle is completed.

  7. SWARD STRUCTURE AND NUTRITIVE VALUE OF UROCHLOA RUZIZIENSIS UNDER NITROGEN AND POTASSIUM FERTILISATION

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    KARLA RODRIGUES DE LIMA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the effect of nitrogen (N and potassium (K fertilisation on the forage accumulation and nutritive value of Urochloa ruziziensis during the summer of 2010/2011 and autumn, winter, spring and summer of 2011/2012. A complete randomised block design with four treatments (0, 120, 240 and 360 kg ha-1 year-1 N and K2O and five replicates were used. The data were analysed under the PROC MIXED of SAS®. The following variables were evaluated: sward height; forage mass; forage bulk density; percentages of leaf blade dry matter, stem dry matter, and dead material dry matter; leaf blade:stem ratio; contents of dry matter and crude protein; in vitro digestibility of dry matter; neutral detergent fibre content; and lignin content of Urochloa ruziziensis. There was an interaction between the N and K levels of fertilisation and the season for all variables. In addition, there was a positive linear effect of the N and K levels of fertilisation on the forage accumulation rate, the crude protein content and the in vitro digestibility of dry matter and a negative linear effect these levels on the neutral detergent fibre and lignin contents during the spring and summer of 2011/2012. N and K fertilisation and the climate changes characteristic of each season jointly affected the accumulation and nutritive value of Urochloa ruziziensis. N and K fertilisation up to 360 kg ha-1 year-1 improved the forage accumulation and nutritive value of Urochloa ruziziensis.

  8. CANOPY STRUCTURE AND DEPOSITION EFFICIENCY OF VINEYARD SPRAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Gianfranco Pergher; Raffaella Petris

    2007-01-01

    A field study was performed to analyse how deposition efficiency from an axial-fan sprayer was affected by the canopy structure of vines trained to the High Cordon, Low Cordon and Casarsa systems, at beginning of flowering and beginning of berry touch growth stages. An empirical calibration method, providing a dose rate adjustment roughly proportional to canopy height, was used. The canopy structure was assessed using the Point Quadrat method, and determining the leaf area index (LAI) and the...

  9. Canopy foliar nitrogen retrieved from airborne hyperspectral imagery by correcting for canopy structure effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Wang, Tiejun; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Heiden, Uta; Heurich, Marco; Latifi, Hooman; Hearne, John

    2017-02-01

    A statistical relationship between canopy mass-based foliar nitrogen concentration (%N) and canopy bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) has been repeatedly demonstrated. However, the interaction between leaf properties and canopy structure confounds the estimation of foliar nitrogen. The canopy scattering coefficient (the ratio of BRF and the directional area scattering factor, DASF) has recently been suggested for estimating %N as it suppresses the canopy structural effects on BRF. However, estimation of %N using the scattering coefficient has not yet been investigated for longer spectral wavelengths (>855 nm). We retrieved the canopy scattering coefficient for wavelengths between 400 and 2500 nm from airborne hyperspectral imagery, and then applied a continuous wavelet analysis (CWA) to the scattering coefficient in order to estimate %N. Predictions of %N were also made using partial least squares regression (PLSR). We found that %N can be accurately retrieved using CWA (R2 = 0.65, RMSE = 0.33) when four wavelet features are combined, with CWA yielding a more accurate estimation than PLSR (R2 = 0.47, RMSE = 0.41). We also found that the wavelet features most sensitive to %N variation in the visible region relate to chlorophyll absorption, while wavelet features in the shortwave infrared regions relate to protein and dry matter absorption. Our results confirm that %N can be retrieved using the scattering coefficient after correcting for canopy structural effect. With the aid of high-fidelity airborne or upcoming space-borne hyperspectral imagery, large-scale foliar nitrogen maps can be generated to improve the modeling of ecosystem processes as well as ecosystem-climate feedbacks.

  10. Smartphone based hemispherical photography for canopy structure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xuefen; Cui, Jian; Jiang, Xueqin; Zhang, Jingwen; Yang, Yi; Zheng, Tao

    2018-01-01

    The canopy is the most direct and active interface layer of the interaction between plant and environment, and has important influence on energy exchange, biodiversity, ecosystem matter and climate change. The measurement about canopy structure of plant is an important foundation to analyze the pattern, process and operation mechanism of forest ecosystem. Through the study of canopy structure of plant, solar radiation, ambient wind speed, air temperature and humidity, soil evaporation, soil temperature and other forest environmental climate characteristics can be evaluated. Because of its accuracy and effectiveness, canopy structure measurement based on hemispherical photography has been widely studied. However, the traditional method of canopy structure hemispherical photogrammetry based on SLR camera and fisheye lens. This method is expensive and difficult to be used in some low-cost occasions. In recent years, smartphone technology has been developing rapidly. The smartphone not only has excellent image acquisition ability, but also has the considerable computational processing ability. In addition, the gyroscope and positioning function on the smartphone will also help to measure the structure of the canopy. In this paper, we present a smartphone based hemispherical photography system. The system consists of smart phones, low-cost fisheye lenses and PMMA adapters. We designed an Android based App to obtain the canopy hemisphere images through low-cost fisheye lenses and provide horizontal collimation information. In addition, the App will add the acquisition location tag obtained by GPS and auxiliary positioning method in hemisphere image information after the canopy structure hemisphere image acquisition. The system was tested in the urban forest after it was completed. The test results show that the smartphone based hemispherical photography system can effectively collect the high-resolution canopy structure image of the plant.

  11. Grazing behavior and performance of beef cattle as a function of sward structure and herbage quality under rotational and continuous stocking on species-rich upland pasture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stejskalová, Michaela; Hejcmanová, Pavla; Pavlů, Vilém; Hejcman, Michal

    2013-08-01

    An experiment to reveal functional response and heifers' performance to sward characteristics and forage chemical composition was conducted for 5 years in rotational (RSS) and continuous (CSS) stocking systems on native species-rich upland grassland. We measured sward characteristics, forage chemical composition, heifers' grazing behavior and live-weight gains from July to September. Mean sward surface height was lower on CSS than on RSS; grass and forb density, and white clover stolon length, were similar. Herbage on CSS had higher crude protein content and lower crude fiber content than on RSS. No difference existed in time budgets of grazing, ruminating and resting between stocking systems and season, while grazing rates were higher on CSS. Stocking rate was 1671 and 1332 kg per ha on CSS and RSS, individual daily live-weight gain 683 and 652 g on CSS and RSS. Gain per ha was 20 kg higher on CSS. Results suggested stocking systems on native species-rich grassland had no effect on activity time budgets or animal performance. Both RSS and CSS allow similar outputs for stocking rates in terms of individual daily live-weight gain. Key parameters determining heifers' behavior and performance were sward height, grass and forb density in the sward, and content of crude fiber and protein in forage. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Sward structure and nutritive value of tanzania guineagrass subjected to rotational stocking managements Estrutura do pasto e valor nutritivo do capim-tanzânia submetido a estratégias de pastejo rotativo

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    Gelson dos Santos Difante

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the sward structure and nutritive value of Panicum maximum Jacq. cv. Tanzânia subjected to rotational stocking managements characterised by a common pre-grazing condition of 95% canopy light interception (LI and two post-grazing residues, 25 and 50 cm. Treatments (95/25, 95/50 - LI/residue were assigned to experimental units (groups of six 2500 m² paddocks per treatment according to a complete randomised block design, with two replications. The variables measured corresponded to: canopy light interception, pre and post-grazing sward height, herbage mass and pre and post-grazing morphological composition, herbage bulk density, herbage accumulation and nutritive value (including to IVOMD of the morphological components. Pre-grazing herbage mass did not differ between residues, although the herbage accumulation rate was higher for the 50 than the 25 cm (164.9 and 90.6 kg/ha.day DM, respectively. Post-grazing herbage mass values were higher for the 50 cm residue and were characterised by a higher proportion of leaf blade in relation to the 25 cm treatment, which presented a higher proportion of dead material. On average, the contents of crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fibre (NDF and lignin in acid detergent (LAD as well as the values of the "in vitro" organic matter digestibility (IVOMD were similar for both treatments. Crude protein and IVOMD decreased and NDF and LAD increased from top to the bottom of the sward, indicating grazing intensity as an important variable for promoting adjustments in the grazing efficiency and nutritive value of the consumed herbage by the grazing animals.Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar a estrutura e o valor nutritivo de pastos de Panicum maximum Jacq. cv. Tanzânia sob regime de desfolhação intermitente submetido a duas intensidades de desfolhação e a duas alturas de resíduo (25 e 50 cm associadas à condição pré-pastejo definida por 95% de

  13. CANOPY STRUCTURE AND DEPOSITION EFFICIENCY OF VINEYARD SPRAYERS

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    Gianfranco Pergher

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A field study was performed to analyse how deposition efficiency from an axial-fan sprayer was affected by the canopy structure of vines trained to the High Cordon, Low Cordon and Casarsa systems, at beginning of flowering and beginning of berry touch growth stages. An empirical calibration method, providing a dose rate adjustment roughly proportional to canopy height, was used. The canopy structure was assessed using the Point Quadrat method, and determining the leaf area index (LAI and the leaf layer index (LLI. Spray deposits were measured by colorimetry, using a water soluble dye (Tartrazine as a tracer. Correlation between deposits and canopy parameters were analysed and discussed. Foliar deposits per unit leaf area were relatively constant, suggesting that empirical calibration can reduce deposit variability associated with different training systems and growth stages. Total foliar deposition ranged from 33.6% and 82.3% of total spray volume, and increased proportionally with the LLI up to LLI<4. Deposits on bunches significantly decreased with the LLI in the grape zone. The results suggest that sprayer efficiency is improved by a regular, symmetrical canopy, with few leaf layers in the grape zone as in Low Cordon. However, a LLI<3 over the whole canopy and >40% gaps in the foliage both reduced total deposition, and may increase the risk for larger drift losses.

  14. Structural characteristics of marandu palisadegrass swards subjected to continuous stocking and contrasting rhythms of growth Características estruturais de pastos de capim-marandu submetidos à lotação contínua e ritmos de crescimento contrastantes

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    Priscila de Mesquita

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of sward target has been used recently to characterise grazing management practices, but its efficiency to monitor and control sward structure questioned since it corresponds to a single sward structural feature, usually sward surface height. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate sward structure and its patterns of variation throughout the year on continuously stocked marandu palisadegrass swards maintained at 30 cm and subjected to contrasting rhythms of growth from January 2007 to April 2008. Treatments corresponded to three nitrogen application rates (150, 300 and 450 kg ha-1 of N plus the control (no N fertilisation, and were allocated to experimental units according to a complete randomised block design, with four replications. Sward herbage mass, morphological composition, leaf area index (LAI, foliage angle and light interception were evaluated. The increase in nitrogen application rates resulted in increased sward herbage mass, proportion of leaf and stem, and reduction in the proportion of dead material. These modifications were in line with the increase in LAI and reduction in foliage angle, although they did not modify sward light interception. Despite the wide range of nitrogen application rates used, there was a common pattern of variation in sward structure. Overall, changes in sward structural characteristics generated by the range of growth rhythms studied were small, indicating that sward height corresponded to an efficient way to monitor and control the grazing process and sward structure, and can be used to define targets of grazing management.O conceito de alvo de manejo tem sido utilizado recentemente para caracterizar estratégias de manejo do pastejo, mas sua eficiência em permitir controle e monitoramento da estrutura do dossel forrageiro questionada desde que corresponde a uma única característica estrutural, geralmente a altura do pasto. O objetivo deste experimento foi avaliar a estrutura do

  15. Canopy structure effects on the wind at a complex forested site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudreault, Louis-Etienne; Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of the canopy description in a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method based on key flow results from a complex forested site. The canopy structure in RANS is represented trough the frontal area of canopy elements per unit volume, a variable required as input in canopy...

  16. Floristic Composition, Tree Canopy Structure and Regeneration in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Floristic composition, plant species diversity, tree canopy structure and regeneration were assessed in a degraded tropical humid rainforest in Nigeria using a systematic line transect sampling technique for plot demarcation. All plants in a plot were identified and classified into families while the diameters and heights of ...

  17. Examining conifer canopy structural complexity across forest ages and elevations with LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van R. Kane; Jonathan D. Bakker; Robert J. McGaughey; James A. Lutz; Rolf F. Gersonde; Jerry F. Franklin

    2010-01-01

    LiDAR measurements of canopy structure can be used to classify forest stands into structural stages to study spatial patterns of canopy structure, identify habitat, or plan management actions. A key assumption in this process is that differences in canopy structure based on forest age and elevation are consistent with predictions from models of stand development. Three...

  18. Monitoring grass swards using imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, A.G.T.; Ketelaars, J.J.M.H.

    2003-01-01

    The potential of an imaging spectroscopy system with high spatial (0.16-1.45 mm2) and spectral resolution (5-13 nm) was explored for monitoring light interception and biomass of grass swards. Thirty-six Lolium perenne L. mini-swards were studied for a total of eleven consecutive growth periods.

  19. Canopy structure on forest lands in western Oregon: differences among forest types and stand ages

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    Anne C.S. McIntosh; Andrew N. Gray; Steven L. Garman

    2009-01-01

    Canopy structure is an important attribute affecting economic and ecological values of forests in the Pacific Northwest. However, canopy cover and vertical layering are rarely measured directly; they are usually inferred from other forest measurements. In this study, we quantified and compared vertical and horizontal patterns of tree canopy structure and understory...

  20. Imaging spectroscopy for characterisation of grass swards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, A.G.T.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Imaging spectroscopy, imaging spectrometry, remote sensing, reflection, reflectance, grass sward, white clover, recognition, characterisation, ground cover, growth monitoring, stress detection, heterogeneity quantificationThe potential of imaging spectroscopy as a tool for characterisation

  1. Marsh canopy structure changes and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E.

    2016-01-01

    Marsh canopy structure was mapped yearly from 2009 to 2012 in the Barataria Bay, Louisiana coastal region that was impacted by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. Based on the previously demonstrated capability of NASA's UAVSAR polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) image data to map Spartina alterniflora marsh canopy structure, structure maps combining the leaf area index (LAI) and leaf angle distribution (LAD, orientation) were constructed for yearly intervals that were directly relatable to the 2010 LAI-LAD classification. The yearly LAI-LAD and LAI difference maps were used to investigate causes for the previously revealed dramatic change in marsh structure from prespill (2009) to postspill (2010, spill cessation), and the occurrence of structure features that exhibited abnormal spatial and temporal patterns. Water level and salinity records showed that freshwater releases used to keep the oil offshore did not cause the rapid growth from 2009 to 2010 in marsh surrounding the inner Bay. Photointerpretation of optical image data determined that interior marsh patches exhibiting rapid change were caused by burns and burn recovery, and that the pattern of 2010 to 2011 LAI decreases in backshore marsh and extending along some tidal channels into the interior marsh were not associated with burns. Instead, the majority of 2010 to 2011 shoreline features aligned with vectors displaying the severity of 2010 shoreline oiling from the DWH spill. Although the association is not conclusive of a causal oil impact, the coexistent pattern is a significant discovery. PolSAR marsh structure mapping provided a unique perspective of marsh biophysical status that enhanced detection of change and monitoring of trends important to management effectiveness.

  2. Validating spatial structure in canopy water content using geostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, E. W.; Zhang, M. H.; Ustin, S. L.; Rejmankova, E.; Haxo, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneity in ecological phenomena are scale dependent and affect the hierarchical structure of image data. AVIRIS pixels average reflectance produced by complex absorption and scattering interactions between biogeochemical composition, canopy architecture, view and illumination angles, species distributions, and plant cover as well as other factors. These scales affect validation of pixel reflectance, typically performed by relating pixel spectra to ground measurements acquired at scales of 1m(exp 2) or less (e.g., field spectra, foilage and soil samples, etc.). As image analysis becomes more sophisticated, such as those for detection of canopy chemistry, better validation becomes a critical problem. This paper presents a methodology for bridging between point measurements and pixels using geostatistics. Geostatistics have been extensively used in geological or hydrogeolocial studies but have received little application in ecological studies. The key criteria for kriging estimation is that the phenomena varies in space and that an underlying controlling process produces spatial correlation between the measured data points. Ecological variation meets this requirement because communities vary along environmental gradients like soil moisture, nutrient availability, or topography.

  3. Phylogenetic Structure of Foliar Spectral Traits in Tropical Forest Canopies

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    Kelly M. McManus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Spectranomics approach to tropical forest remote sensing has established a link between foliar reflectance spectra and the phylogenetic composition of tropical canopy tree communities vis-à-vis the taxonomic organization of biochemical trait variation. However, a direct relationship between phylogenetic affiliation and foliar reflectance spectra of species has not been established. We sought to develop this relationship by quantifying the extent to which underlying patterns of phylogenetic structure drive interspecific variation among foliar reflectance spectra within three Neotropical canopy tree communities with varying levels of soil fertility. We interpreted the resulting spectral patterns of phylogenetic signal in the context of foliar biochemical traits that may contribute to the spectral-phylogenetic link. We utilized a multi-model ensemble to elucidate trait-spectral relationships, and quantified phylogenetic signal for spectral wavelengths and traits using Pagel’s lambda statistic. Foliar reflectance spectra showed evidence of phylogenetic influence primarily within the visible and shortwave infrared spectral regions. These regions were also selected by the multi-model ensemble as those most important to the quantitative prediction of several foliar biochemical traits. Patterns of phylogenetic organization of spectra and traits varied across sites and with soil fertility, indicative of the complex interactions between the environmental and phylogenetic controls underlying patterns of biodiversity.

  4. A polar grid estimator of forest canopy structure metrics using airborne laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas R. Vaughn; Greg P. Asner; Christian P. Giardina

    2013-01-01

    The structure of a forest canopy is the key determinant of light transmission, use and understory availability. Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) has been used successfully to measure multiple canopy structural properties, thereby greatly reducing the fieldwork required to map spatial variation in structure. However, lidar metrics to date do not reflect the...

  5. A LiDAR method of canopy structure retrieval for wind modeling of heterogeneous forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudreault, Louis-Etienne; Bechmann, Andreas; Taryainen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    The difficulty of obtaining accurate information about the canopy structure is a current limitation towards higher accuracy in numerical predictions of the wind field in forested terrain. The canopy structure in computational fluid dynamics is specified through the frontal area density...

  6. Estimation of canopy structure parameters from multiangular measurements of scattering components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Kristian; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    Structure parameters for characterization of vegetation canopies are often estimated from remote optical measurements. Existing methods include those based on measurements of gap fraction, spectral vegetation indices, or the inversion of spectral canopy reflectance models. This paper proposes...... a novel method based on inversion of multiangular measurements of the abundances of light scattering components, which may be estimated using spectral unmixing. An algorithm is described for predicting the abundances of various scattering components using Monte Carlo simulation with a Poisson canopy model...

  7. Organized turbulent motions in a hedgerow vineyard: effect of evolving canopy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Nadia; Tezza, Luca; Tha Paw U, Kyaw; Pitacco, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Vegetation-atmosphere exchanges are determined by functional and structural properties of the plants together with environmental forcing. However, a fundamental aspect is the interaction of the canopy with the lower atmosphere. The vegetation deeply alters the composition and physical properties of the air flow, exchanging energy, matter and momentum with it. These processes take place in the bottom part of the atmospheric boundary layer where turbulence is the main mechanism transporting within-canopy air towards the mid- and upper atmospheric boundary layer and vice versa. Canopy turbulence is highly influenced by vegetation drag elements, determining the vertical profile of turbulent moments within the canopy. Canopies organized in rows, like vineyards, show peculiar turbulent transport dynamics. In addition, the morphological structure (phenology) of the vineyard is greatly variable seasonally, shifting from an empty canopy during vine dormancy to dense foliage in summer. The understanding of the canopy ventilation regime is related to several practical applications in vineyard management. For example, within-canopy turbulent motion is very important to predict small particles dispersion, like fungal spores, and minimize infection studying the effect on leaf wetness duration. Our study aims to follow the continuous evolution of turbulence characteristics and canopy structure during the growing season of a hedgerow vineyard, from bud break to fully developed canopy. The field experiment was conducted in a flat extensive vineyard in North-Eastern Italy, using a vertical array of five synchronous sonic anemometers within and above the canopy. Turbulent flow organization was greatly influenced by canopy structure. Turbulent coherent structures involved in momentum transport have been investigated using the classical quadrant analysis and a novel approach to identify dominant temporal scales. Momentum transport in the canopy was dominated by downward gusts showing

  8. Novel Imaging Spectroscopy for Grass Sward Characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, A.G.T.; Ketelaars, J.J.M.H.; Meuleman, J.; Kornet, J.G.; Lokhorst, C.

    2002-01-01

    Attempts to improve grassland management may benefit from the use of new sensing techniques, such as imaging spectroscopy. In order to explore the potential of hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy for rapid and objective characterization of grass swards an experimental prototype has been developed.

  9. Analysis of coherent structures and atmosphere-canopy coupling strength during the CABINEX field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Steiner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent coherent structures can be responsible for a large fraction of the exchange between a forest canopy and the atmosphere. Quantifying their contribution to momentum and heat fluxes is necessary to interpret measurements of trace gases and aerosols within and above forest canopies. The primary objective of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX field campaign (10 July 2009 to 9 August 2009 was to study the chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOC within and above a forest canopy. In this manuscript we provide an analysis of coherent structures and canopy-atmosphere exchange during CABINEX to support in-canopy gradient measurements of VOC. We quantify the number and duration of coherent structure events and their percent contribution to momentum and heat fluxes with two methods: (1 quadrant-hole analysis, and (2 wavelet analysis. Despite differences in the duration and number of events, both methods predict that coherent structures contribute 40–50% to momentum fluxes and 44–65% to heat fluxes during the CABINEX campaign. Contributions associated with coherent structures are slightly greater under stable atmospheric conditions. By comparing heat fluxes within and above the canopy, we determine the degree of coupling between upper canopy and atmosphere, and find that they are coupled the majority of the time. Uncoupled canopy-atmosphere events occur in the early morning (4–8 a.m. local time approximately 30% of the time. This study confirms that coherent structures contribute significantly to the exchange of heat and momentum between the canopy and atmosphere at the CABINEX site, and indicates the need to include these transport processes when studying the mixing and chemical reactions of trace gases and aerosols between a forest canopy and the atmosphere.

  10. Analysis of coherent structures and atmosphere-canopy coupling strength during the CABINEX field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. L.; Pressley, S. N.; Botros, A.; Jones, E.; Chung, S. H.; Edburg, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Intermittent coherent structures can be responsible for a large fraction of the exchange between a forest canopy and the atmosphere. Quantifying their contribution to momentum and heat fluxes is necessary to interpret measurements of trace gases and aerosols within and above forest canopies. The primary objective of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX) field campaign (10 July 2009 to 9 August 2009) was to study the chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOC) within and above a forest canopy. In this manuscript we provide an analysis of coherent structures and canopy-atmosphere exchange during CABINEX to support in-canopy gradient measurements of VOC. We quantify the number and duration of coherent structure events and their percent contribution to momentum and heat fluxes with two methods: (1) quadrant-hole analysis, and (2) wavelet analysis. Despite differences in the duration and number of events, both methods predict that coherent structures contribute 40-50% to momentum fluxes and 44-65% to heat fluxes during the CABINEX campaign. Contributions associated with coherent structures are slightly greater under stable atmospheric conditions. By comparing heat fluxes within and above the canopy, we determine the degree of coupling between upper canopy and atmosphere, and find that they are coupled the majority of the time. Uncoupled canopy-atmosphere events occur in the early morning (4-8 a.m. local time) approximately 30% of the time. This study confirms that coherent structures contribute significantly to the exchange of heat and momentum between the canopy and atmosphere at the CABINEX site, and indicates the need to include these transport processes when studying the mixing and chemical reactions of trace gases and aerosols between a forest canopy and the atmosphere.

  11. SAFARI 2000 Canopy Structural Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains leaf area index (LAI), leaf inclination angle, and canopy dimension data from study sites along the Kalahari Transect in southwest Botswana....

  12. Waveform- and Terrestrial Lidar Assessment of the Usual (Structural) Suspects in a Forest Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aardt, J. A.; Romanczyk, P.; Kelbe, D.; van Leeuwen, M.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; Gough, C. M.; Kampe, T. U.

    2015-12-01

    Forest inventory has evolved from standard stem diameter-height relationships, to coarse canopy metrics, to more involved ecologically-meaningful variables, such as leaf area index (LAI) and even canopy radiative transfer as a function of canopy gaps, leaf clumping, and leaf angle distributions. Accurate and precise measurement of the latter set of variables presents a challenge to the ecological and modeling communities; however, relatively novel remote sensing modalities, e.g., waveform lidar (wlidar) and terrestrial lidar systems (TLS), have the potential to adress this challenge. Research teams at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) and the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) have been collaborating with the National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) to assess vegetation canopy structure and variation at the University of Michigan Biological Research Station and the NEON Northeast domain (Harvard Forest, MA). Airborne small-footprint wlidar data, in-situ TLS data, and first-principles, physics-based simulation tools are being used to study (i) the impact of vegetation canopy geometric elements on wlidar signals (twigs and petioles have been deemed negligible), (ii) the analysis of airborne wlidar data for top-down assessment of canopy metrics such as LAI, and (iii) our ability to extract "bottom-up" canopy structure from TLS using scans registered to each other using a novel marker-free registration approach (e.g., basal area: R2=0.82, RMSE=7.43 m2/ha). Such studies indicate that we can potentially assess radiative transfer through vegetation canopies remotely using a vertically-stratified approach with wlidar, and augment such an approach via rapid-scan TLS technology to gain a better understanding of fine-scale variation in canopy structure. This in turn is key to quantifying and modeling radiative transfer based on understanding of forest canopy structural change as a function of ecosystem development, climate, and anthropogenic drivers.

  13. Sunfleck dynamics and canopy structure in a Phaseolus vulgaris L. canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradas, Victor L.; Jones, Hamlyn G.; Clark, Jerry A.

    Photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) fluctuations were quantified in crops of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in the field as the canopy developed between July and October. Two different methods were used to select sunflecks and shadeflecks. Four ranges of zenith angles (60-70°, 50-60°, 40-50° and 30-40°) were selected for analysing PPFD fluctuations. At the base of the canopy, sunflecks contributed 18%, 53%, 10% and 4% during the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th week of growth, respectively. At a height of 20 cm above the soil surface, the respective contributions were 28% and 21% during the 6th and 7th weeks. Sunfleck lengths of 0-5 s were the most frequent, with the greatest number being found with smaller zenith angles. The proportion of short duration sunflecks increased as the growth period advanced. The number of long sunflecks decreased with time, with very few longer than 100 s by the 5th and 7th weeks. The distributions of sunfleck irradiance were similar to normal distributions and irradiance ranged in μmol m-2 s-1 from 600-900, 800-1500 and 1000-1600 respectively at zenith angles of 50-60°, 40-50° and 30-40°. A multiple regression showed that short sunflecks (100 s) depended on zenith angle and Ls. Shadefleck distributions were similar to those for sunflecks but there were fewer of the shortest examples and more of the longest. The best statistical distribution to describe sunflecks and shadeflecks was the gamma distribution, which could provide the basis for the future development of a good model for sunfleck and shadefleck distributions.

  14. Coupling Fine-Scale Root and Canopy Structure Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady S. Hardiman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem physical structure, defined by the quantity and spatial distribution of biomass, influences a range of ecosystem functions. Remote sensing tools permit the non-destructive characterization of canopy and root features, potentially providing opportunities to link above- and belowground structure at fine spatial resolution in functionally meaningful ways. To test this possibility, we employed ground-based portable canopy LiDAR (PCL and ground penetrating radar (GPR along co-located transects in forested sites spanning multiple stages of ecosystem development and, consequently, of structural complexity. We examined canopy and root structural data for coherence (i.e., correlation in the frequency of spatial variation at multiple spatial scales ≤10 m within each site using wavelet analysis. Forest sites varied substantially in vertical canopy and root structure, with leaf area index and root mass more becoming even vertically as forests aged. In all sites, above- and belowground structure, characterized as mean maximum canopy height and root mass, exhibited significant coherence at a scale of 3.5–4 m, and results suggest that the scale of coherence may increase with stand age. Our findings demonstrate that canopy and root structure are linked at characteristic spatial scales, which provides the basis to optimize scales of observation. Our study highlights the potential, and limitations, for fusing LiDAR and radar technologies to quantitatively couple above- and belowground ecosystem structure.

  15. Stochastic Transport Theory for Investigating the Three-Dimensional Canopy Structure from Space Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Wang, Weile; Deering, Donald W,; Stenberg, Pauline; Shabanov, Nikolay; Tan, Bin; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation reflected from vegetation canopies exhibits high spatial variation. Satellite-borne sensors measure the mean intensities emanating from heterogeneous vegetated pixels. The theory of radiative transfer in stochastic media provides the most logical linkage between satellite observations and the three-dimensional canopy structure through a closed system of simple equations which contains the mean intensity and higher statistical moments directly as its unknowns. Although this theory has been a highly active research field in recent years, its potential for satellite remote sensing of vegetated surfaces has not been fully realized because of the lack of models of a canopy pair-correlation function that the stochastic radiative transfer equations require. The pair correlation function is defined as the probability of finding simultaneously phytoelements at two points. This paper presents analytical and Monte Carlo generated pair correlation functions. Theoretical and numerical analyses show that the spatial correlation between phytoelements is primarily responsible for the effects of the three-dimensional canopy structure on canopy reflective and absorptive properties. The pair correlation function, therefore, is the most natural and physically meaningful measure of the canopy structure over a wide range of scales. The stochastic radiative transfer equations naturally admit this measure and thus provide a powerful means to investigate the three-dimensional canopy structure from space. Canopy reflectances predicted by the stochastic equations are assessed by comparisons with the PARABOLA measurements from coniferous and broadleaf forest stands in the BOREAS Southern Study Areas. The pair correlation functions are derived from data on tree structural parameters collected during field campaigns conducted at these sites. The simulated canopy reflectances compare well with the PARABOLA data.

  16. Changes in canopy structure and ant assemblages affect soil ecosystem variables as a foundation species declines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kendrick, Joseph A.; Ribbons, Relena Rose; Classen, Aimee Taylor

    2015-01-01

    , we built ant exclosure subplots within all of the canopy manipulation plots to examine direct and interactive effects of canopy change and ant assemblage composition on soil and litter variables. Throughout HF-HeRE, T. canadensis was colonized by the adelgid in 2009, and the infested trees are now...... declining. The experimental removal of T. canadensis from the canopy was associated with an increase in the rate of cellulose decomposition by >50%, and exclosure of ants from subplots directly reduced their soil nitrate availability by 56%. Partial least squares path models revealed sequential interactive...... effects prior to adelgid infestation: canopy change (as a proxy for associated environmental changes) altered both decomposition and ant assemblage structure; changes in ant assemblage structure and decomposition rates altered nitrogen availability. The results illustrate that biotic changes directly...

  17. Quantifying Ancient Maya Land Use Legacy Effects on Contemporary Rainforest Canopy Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N. Hightower

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human land use legacies have significant and long-lasting ecological impacts across landscapes. Investigating ancient (>400 years legacy effects can be problematic due to the difficulty in detecting specific, historic land uses, especially those hidden beneath dense canopies. Caracol, the largest (~200 km2 Maya archaeological site in Belize, was abandoned ca. A.D. 900, leaving behind myriad structures, causeways, and an extensive network of agricultural terraces that persist beneath the architecturally complex tropical forest canopy. Airborne LiDAR enables the detection of these below-canopy archaeological features while simultaneously providing a detailed record of the aboveground 3-dimensional canopy organization, which is indicative of a forest’s ecological function. Here, this remote sensing technology is used to determine the effects of ancient land use legacies on contemporary forest structure. Canopy morphology was assessed by extracting LiDAR point clouds (0.25 ha plots from LiDAR-identified terraced (n = 150 and non-terraced (n = 150 areas on low (0°–10°, medium (10°–20°, and high (>20° slopes. We calculated the average canopy height, canopy openness, and vertical diversity from the LiDAR returns, with topographic features (i.e., slope, elevation, and aspect as covariates. Using a PerMANOVA procedure, we determined that forests growing on agricultural terraces exhibited significantly different canopy structure from those growing on non-terraced land. Terraces appear to mediate the effect of slope, resulting in less structural variation between slope and non-sloped land and yielding taller, more closed, more vertically diverse forests. These human land uses abandoned >1000 years ago continue to impact contemporary tropical rainforests having implications related to arboreal habitat and carbon storage.

  18. Effect of canopy density on litter invertebrate community structure in pine forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brygadyrenko Viktor V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the structure of the litter invertebrate community in 141 pine (Pinus sylvestris Linnaeus, 1753 forest sites with five variants of canopy density (30-44, 45-59, 60-74, 75-89 and 90-100% in the steppe zone of Ukraine. The total number of litter macrofauna specimens collected at each site decreased from an average of 84/100 trap-days in the sparsest stands (30-40% density to 4-39 specimens/100 trap-days in the forests with a denser canopy. The number of macrofauna species caught in the pitfall traps does not vary significantly with different degrees of canopy density. The Shannon-Weaver and Pielou diversity indexes show increases corresponding to increasing stages of canopy density. The average share of phytophages in the trophic structure of the litter macrofauna does not vary with canopy density. The relative number of saprophages decreases from 54% in the forests with the sparsest canopy to 11-13% in the forests with denser canopies. The relative number of saprophages in pine forests (22% is lower than that in deciduous forests (40%. The share of zoophages in the trophic structure of the litter macrofauna increases significantly with the increase in the pine forest canopy density (from 21% in the sparsest plots to 59% in the densest. The relative number of polyphages is highest (47-65% when the canopy density is 45-89%. At canopy densities below or above this range, the share of polyphages in the community decreases to 20 and 24%, respectively. Regardless of canopy density, Formicidae and Lycosidae invariably rank amongst the first three dominant families. Nine families of invertebrates dominate in the pine forest stands with the highest density (90-100%, and 5-7 families dominate in the stands with lower density. For the pine forest litter macrofauna, we have observed an extreme simplification of the community size structure compared with natural and planted deciduous forests of the steppe zone of Ukraine.

  19. Forest canopy water fluxes can be estimated using canopy structure metrics derived from airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Johannes; Christiansen, Jesper Riis

    2015-01-01

    Forests contribute to improve water quality, affect drinking water resources, and therefore influence water supply on a regional level. The forest canopy structure affects the retention of precipitation (Pr) in the canopy and hence the amount of water transferred to the forest floor termed canopy...... throughfall (TF). We investigated the possibilities of estimating TF based on bulk Pr and canopy structure estimated from airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. Bulk Pr and TF fluxes combined with airborne LiDAR data from 11 locations representing the most common forest types (mono......-species broadleaf/coniferous and mixed forests) in Denmark were used to develop empirical models to estimate TF on a monthly, seasonal, and annual basis. This new approach offers the opportunity to greatly improve predictions of TF on catchment wide scales. Overall, results show that TF can be estimated by Pr...

  20. Hydrologic properties of grazed perennial swards in semiarid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hypothesis was tested that grazed perennial swards have similar hydrologic properties and threshold removal levels below which runoff increases markedly. Infiltration capacity for the perennial swards increased with increasing stubble height before leveling off towards the highest stubble height. A 50% removal of ...

  1. Hydrologic properties of grazed perennial swards in semiarid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2009-02-07

    Feb 7, 2009 ... The results support the existence of a threshold level of sward stubble height for minimizing runoff. Key words: Perennial swards, water infiltration capacity, runoff thresholds. INTRODUCTION. The trade-offs .... include different drought tolerant varieties of maize, sorghum, millet, pigeon peas and beans.

  2. Influence of sward characteristics on grazing behaviour and short ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The review showed that cattle prefer short dense leafy swards compared to senescent plant materials. This is based on research results suggesting that short dense sward possess high quantity of green materials which is relished by ruminants during grazing. The feasibility of intensifying grazing studies in the tropics, ...

  3. Ecohydrological responses of dense canopies to environmental variability: 1. Interplay between vertical structure and photosynthetic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewry, D. T.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation acclimation to changing climate, in particular elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), has been observed to include modifications to the biochemical and ecophysiological functioning of leaves and the structural components of the canopy. These responses have the potential to significantly modify plant carbon uptake and surface energy partitioning, and have been attributed with large-scale changes in surface hydrology over recent decades. While the aggregated effects of vegetation acclimation can be pronounced, they often result from subtle changes in canopy properties that require the resolution of physical, biochemical and ecophysiological processes through the canopy for accurate estimation. In this paper, the first of two, a multilayer canopy-soil-root system model developed to capture the emergent vegetation responses to environmental change is presented. The model incorporates both C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways, and resolves the vertical radiation, thermal, and environmental regimes within the canopy. The tight coupling between leaf ecophysiological functioning and energy balance determines vegetation responses to climate states and perturbations, which are modulated by soil moisture states through the depth of the root system. The model is validated for three growing seasons each for soybean (C3) and maize (C4) using eddy-covariance fluxes of CO2, latent, and sensible heat collected at the Bondville (Illinois) Ameriflux tower site. The data set provides an opportunity to examine the role of important environmental drivers and model skill in capturing variability in canopy-atmosphere exchange. Vertical variation in radiative states and scalar fluxes over a mean diurnal cycle are examined to understand the role of canopy structure on the patterns of absorbed radiation and scalar flux magnitudes and the consequent differences in sunlit and shaded source/sink locations through the canopies. An analysis is made of the impact of

  4. Contrasting effects of sampling scale on insect herbivores distribution in response to canopy structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico S. Neves

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Species diversity of insect herbivores associated to canopy may vary local and geographically responding to distinct factors at different spatial scales. The aim of this study was to investigate how forest canopy structure affects insect herbivore species richness and abundance depending on feeding guilds´ specificities. We tested the hypothesis that habitat structure affects insect herbivore species richness and abundance differently to sap-sucking and chewing herbivore guilds. Two spatial scales were evaluated: inside tree crowns (fine spatial scale and canopy regions (coarse spatial scale. In three sampling sites we measured 120 tree crowns, grouped in five points with four contiguous tree crowns. Insects were sampled by beating method from each crown and data were summed up for analyzing each canopy region. In crowns (fine spatial scale we measured habitat structure: trunk circumference, tree height, canopy depth, number of ramifications and maximum ramification level. In each point, defined as a canopy region (coarse spatial scale, we measured habitat structure using a vertical cylindrical transect: tree species richness, leaf area, sum of strata heights and maximum canopy height. A principal component analysis based on the measured variables for each spatial scale was run to estimate habitat structure parameters. To test the effects of habitat structure upon herbivores, different general linear models were adjusted using the first two principal components as explanatory variables. Sap-sucking insect species richness and all herbivore abundances increased with size of crown at fine spatial scale. On the other hand, chewer species richness and abundance increased with resource quantity at coarse scale. Feeding specialization, resources availability, and agility are discussed as ecological causes of the found pattern.

  5. Spatial Structure of Soil Macrofauna Diversity and Tree Canopy in Riparian Forest of Maroon River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Sayad

    2017-02-01

    with a mean temperature of 24.5oc. Plant cover, mainly comprises Populus euphratica Olivie and Tamarix arceuthoides Bge and Lycium shawii Roemer & Schultes. Soil macrofauna were sampled using 175 sampling point along parallel transects (perpendicular to the river. The distance between transects was 100m. We considered distance between samples as 50 m. tree canopy were measured in 5* 5 plots. soil macrofauna were extracted from 50 cm×50 cm×10 cm soil monolith by hand-sorting procedure. All soil macrofauna were identified to family level. Evenness (Sheldon index, richness (Menhinich index and diversity (Shannon H’ index by using PAST version 1.39, were determined in each sample. Classical statistical parameters, i.e. mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, minimum and maximum, were calculated using SPSS17 software. For analysis of the relationship between Soil macrofauna diversity indices and tree canopy (Total canopy, Populous canopy, Tamarix canopy and Serim canopy we calculated the correlation among soil properties and macrofauna using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Next, to determining the spatial structure, we calculated the semivariances. Semivariance quantifies the spatial dependence of spatially ordered variable values. In order to gather information about the spatial connection between any two variables, and to compare the similarity of their spatial structure patterns, cross-variograms were constructed. Cross-variograms are plots of cross-semivariance against the lag distance. Results and Discussion: Soil macrofauna communities were dominated by earthworm, diplopods, coleoptera, gastropoda, araneae, and insect larvae. Correlation analysis of soil macrofauna and tree canopy indicated weak relationships between them. Weak, but significant relationships were found between macrofauna diversity, evenness, richness and total canopy, Populous canopy and Tamarix canopy (positive. Macrofauna indices and tree canopy(excepted Tamarix canopy were

  6. Effects of structural complexity on within-canopy light environments and leaf traits in a northern mixed deciduous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotis, Alexander T; Curtis, Peter S

    2017-10-01

    Canopy structure influences forest productivity through its effects on the distribution of radiation and the light-induced changes in leaf physiological traits. Due to the difficulty of accessing and measuring forest canopies, few field-based studies have quantitatively linked these divergent scales of canopy functioning. The objective of our study was to investigate how canopy structure affects light profiles within a forest canopy and whether leaves of mature trees adjust morphologically and biochemically to the light environments characteristic of canopies with different structural complexity. We used a combination of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and hemispherical photographs to quantify canopy structure and light environments, respectively, and a telescoping pole to sample leaves. Leaf mass per area (LMA), nitrogen on an area basis (Narea) and chlorophyll on a mass basis (Chlmass) were measured in red maple (Acer rubrum), american beech (Fagus grandifolia), white pine (Pinus strobus), and northern red oak (Quercus rubra) at different heights in plots with similar leaf area index but contrasting canopy complexity (rugosity). We found that more complex canopies had greater porosity and reduced light variability in the midcanopy while total light interception was unchanged relative to less complex canopies. Leaf phenotypes of F. grandifolia, Q. rubra and P. strobus were more sun-acclimated in the midstory of structurally complex canopies while leaf phenotypes of A. rubrum were more shade-acclimated (lower LMA) in the upper canopy of more complex stands, despite no differences in total light interception. Broadleaf species showed further differences in acclimation with increased Narea and reduced Chlmass in leaves with higher LMA, while P. strobus showed no change in Narea and Chlmass with higher LMA. Our results provide new insight on how light distribution and leaf acclimation in mature trees might be altered when natural and anthropogenic

  7. Centennial impacts of fragmentation on the canopy structure of tropical montane forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Nicholas R; Asner, Gregory P; Giardina, Christian P

    Fragmentation poses one of the greatest threats to tropical forests with short-term changes to the structure of forest canopies affecting microclimate, tree mortality, and growth. Yet the long-term effects of fragmentation are poorly understood because (1) most effects require many decades to materialize, but long-term studies are very rare, (2) the effects of edges on forest canopy structure as a function of fragment size are unknown, and (3) edge effects are often confounded by fragment shape. We quantified the long-term (centennial) effects of fragmentation on forest canopy structure using airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) of 1060 Hawaiian rain forest fragments ranging in size from 0.02 to 1000 ha, created more than 130 years ago by flowing lava. Along with distance from edge, we developed a metric, minimum span, to gain additional insight into edge effects on three measures of canopy structure: canopy height, height variation, and gap fraction. Fragment size was a strong determinant of the three structural variables. Larger fragments had greater average height, larger variation in height, and smaller gap fraction. Minimum span had a large effect on the depth and magnitude of edge effects for the three structural variables. Locations associated with high span values (those surrounded by more forest habitat) showed little effect of distance to fragment edge. In contrast, locations with low span values (those more exposed to edges) were severely limited in canopy height, showed lower height variation, and were associated with greater gap fraction values. The minimum span attribute allows for a more accurate characterization of edge as well as fragment-level effects, and when combined with high resolution imagery, can improve planning of protected areas for long-term ecological sustainability and biodiversity protection.

  8. Exploring canopy structure and function as a potential mechanism of sustain carbon sequestration in aging forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotis, A. T.; Curtis, P.; Ricart, R.

    2013-12-01

    The notion that old-growth forests reach carbon neutrality has recently been challenged, but the mechanisms responsible for continued productivity have remained elusive. Increases in canopy structural complexity, defined by high horizontal and vertical variability in leaf distribution (rugosity), has been proposed as a mechanism for sustained high rates of above ground net primary production (ANPPw) in forests up to ~170 years by enhancing light use efficiency (LUE) and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). However, a detailed understanding of how rugosity affects resource distribution within and among trees leading to greater LUE and NUE is not known. We propose that leaves in high rugosity plots receive greater photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) than leaves in low rugosity plots, causing shifts from shade- to sun- adapted leaves into deeper portions of the canopy, which is thought to increase the photosynthetic capacity of individuals and lead to higher carbon assimilation in forests. The goal of this research was to: 1) quantify different canopy structural characteristics using a portable canopy LiDAR (PCL) and; 2) assess how these structural characteristics affect resource distribution and subsequent changes in leaf morphological, physiological and biochemical traits in three broadleaf species (e.g., Acer rubrum, Quercus rubra and Fagus grandifolia) and one conifer species (e.g., Pinus strobus) at different levels in the canopy in plots with similar leaf are index (LAI) but highly contrasting rugosity levels. We found that gap fraction had a strong positive correlation with rugosity. High rugosity plots had a bimodal distribution of LAI that was concentrated at the top and bottom of the canopy with an open midstory (between 10-50% of total canopy height) whereas low rugosity plots had a more even distribution of leaves. Leaf mass per area (LMA) of all broadleaved species had a strong positive correlation with cumulative gap fraction (P. strobus had a relatively

  9. Influences of Third Crop Plucking on Autumn Canopy Structure for Mature Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) Bush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takayuki

    Changes in autumn canopy structure of tea bushes between early-plucked (here after EP,yield was 421 kg/10a on Aug. 1st in 2005), late-plucked (LP, 827 kg/10a on Aug. 8th) and not-plucked(NP) of the third crop was investigated by a stratiform clip method. All canopies of three bushes were cut with every 2 cm layer by a self-rail-tracking tea plucker on Oct. 19th in 2005. The result of vertical distribution of canopy biomass showed that the third crop plucking caused a decrease in leaf weight and bud number at the upper layers of the autumn canopy, but caused an increase in their lower layers. Although leaf weight of EP was same as that of LP, Leaf area index of EP was smaller however leaf specific weight was larger than LP. An analysis of relationship between autumn skiffing positions and bud number of the canopy surface was performed in order to estimate influences of the third crop plucking on new shoot number of the next first crop. The result was follows; the bud number of EP and LP was larger than that of NP at a lower autumn skiffing position (4 cm upper above the second plucking position), while bud number of NP was larger than EP and LP at a higher autumn skiffing position (6 cm upper).

  10. Centennial impacts of fragmentation on the canopy structure of tropical montane forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas Vaughn; Greg Asner; Christian Giardina

    2014-01-01

    Fragmentation poses one of the greatest threats to tropical forests with short-term changes to the structure of forest canopies affecting microclimate, tree mortality, and growth. Yet the long-term effects of fragmentation are poorly understood because (1) most effects require many decades to materialize, but long-term studies are very rare, (2) the effects of edges on...

  11. Amazon Forest Structure from IKONOS Satellite Data and the Automated Characterization of Forest Canopy Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Palace; Michael Keller; Gregory P. Asner; Stephen Hagen; Bobby . Braswell

    2008-01-01

    We developed an automated tree crown analysis algorithm using 1-m panchromatic IKONOS satellite images to examine forest canopy structure in the Brazilian Amazon. The algorithm was calibrated on the landscape level with tree geometry and forest stand data at the Fazenda Cauaxi (3.75◦ S, 48.37◦ W) in the eastern Amazon, and then compared with forest...

  12. Assessing the Performance of LVIS Waveform Lidar Topography and Canopy Structure Measurements in Gabon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofton, M. A.; Blair, J. B.; Rabine, D.; Brooks, C.; Cornejo, H.; Story, S.

    2016-12-01

    In February-March 2016, NASA's Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS) was used to image sub-canopy topography, canopy topography and structure at several sites in Gabon. Data were collected as part of the NASA and ESA Afrisar Campaign, a joint remote sensing mission involving multiple airborne and ground-based data collection activities that support the calibration and validation of future spaceborne missions, particularly GEDI, NISAR and BIOMASS, as well as other investigations. LVIS is a wide-swath, medium-footprint, waveform recording laser altimeter (lidar) sensor that can collect contiguous data within a 2 km-wide swath using 20m wide footprints from 10km altitude. For the Gabon deployment, the sensor was mounted in the NASA Langley King Air aircraft and flown at 8 km altitude over five, 70x15km-wide areas and along multiple country-wide transects. Data products include footprint-level canopy height, ground topography and canopy metrics, as well as vertically and horizontally-geolocated lidar return waveforms that enable end users to produce additional georeferenced data products as needed. We present a summary of the data products from the campaign, as well as a performance assessment of the ground and canopy structure data using available airborne and ground based data. Uses of the data include the simulation of GEDI-like data and the derivation of canopy height and profile metric algorithms for implementation in GEDI level2 products, as well as to improve our understanding of ground-finding errors in dense vegetation environments from waveform lidar.

  13. Perdas de forragem em capim-Tanzânia (Panicum maximum Jacq cv. Tanzania-1 manejado sob diferentes alturas sob pastejo Forage losses in Tanzania grass (Panicum maximum Jacq cv. Tanzania-1 managed in different sward height under grazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulysses Cecato

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO - O experimento foi conduzido com objetivo de avaliar as perdas de forragem e a acumulação de liteira em uma pastagem de capim-Tanzânia (Panicum maximum Jacq cv. Tanzania-1 manejada sob diferentes alturas. Os níveis de altura (tratamentos estudados foram: 29,8; 32,0; 47,1; 51,5; 57,9; 62,7; 72,6 e 80,0 cm, em um delineamento completamente casualizado e com duas repetições. As taxas de acúmulo e acumulação de liteira e as perdas de forragem foram iguais em todas as alturas. A porcentagem de forragem senescente foi influenciada de forma quadrática pelos níveis de altura. Os resultados indicam que foram altos os níveis de acumulação de liteira e as perdas de forragem, em média, 38,9 kg/ha/dia de MS e 2179 kg/ha de MS, respectivamente. Devido à possibilidade de se reduzirem a persistência da pastagem e a modificação da estrutura das plantas, recomenda-se não utilizar pastagens de capim-Tanzânia em alturas próximas ou iguais a 20 e 80 cm, sob lotações contínuas.The experiment was conducted to evaluate, the forage losses and litter accumulation, in a pasture of Tanzania grass (Panicum maximun Jacq cv. Tanzania managed in different sward height levels. The studied levels of sward heights (treatments were: 29.8, 32.0, 47.1, 51.5, 57.9, 62.7, 72.6 and 80.0 cm, in a completely randomized design and two replications. The litter accumulation rate, litter accumulation and forage losses were similar in all heights. The percentage of senescent forage in the plant canopy was influenced on a quadratic way by the sward height levels. The results show that the litter accumulation and forage losses were high, with average DM of 38.9 kg/ha.day and 2179 kg/ha of DM, respectively. Due to the possibility to reduce the pasture persistence and plant structure deteriorate, it is not recommended to utilize Tanzania grass pastures, in levels sward height near or equal of 20 and 80 cm, under continuous stocking rate.

  14. Analyzing canopy structure in Pacific Northwest old-growth forests with a stand-scale crown model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Van Pelt; Malcolm P. North

    1996-01-01

    I n forests, the canopy is the locale of critical ecosystem processes such as photosynthesis and evapotranspiration. and it provides essential habitat for a highly diverse array of animals, plants, and other organisms. Despite its importance, the structure of the canopy as a whole has had little quantitative study because limited access makes quantification difficult...

  15. Turbulence structure in a diabatically heated forest canopy composed of fractal Pythagoras trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröttle, Josef; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the turbulent flow through a heterogeneous forest canopy by high-resolution numerical modeling. For this purpose, a novel approach to model individual trees is implemented in our large-eddy simulation (LES). A group of sixteen fractal Pythagoras trees is placed in the computational domain and the tree elements are numerically treated as immersed boundaries. Our objective is to resolve the multiscale flow response starting at the diameter of individual tree elements up to the depth of the atmospheric surface layer. A reference run, conducted for the forest flow under neutral thermal stratification, produces physically meaningful turbulence statistics. Our numerical results agree quantitatively with data obtained from former field-scale LESs and wind tunnel experiments. Furthermore, the numerical simulations resolve vortex shedding behind individual branches and trunks as well as the integral response of the turbulent flow through the heterogeneous forest canopy. A focus is the investigation of the turbulence structure of the flow under stable thermal stratification and in response to the heating of the fractal tree crowns. For the stratified flows, statistical quantities, e.g. turbulent kinetic energy and vorticity, are presented and the turbulent exchange processes of momentum and heat are considered in detail. The onset and formation of coherent structures such as elevated shear layers above the diabatically heated forest canopy are analyzed. For the stably stratified flow, temperature ramps above the forest canopy were simulated in agreement with previous observations. Thermally driven vortices with a typical diameter of the canopy height were simulated when the tree crowns were diabatically heated. The impact of the coherent flow structures on the heat flux is investigated.

  16. Analysis of coherent structures and atmosphere-canopy coupling strength during the CABINEX field campaign: implications for atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. L.; Pressley, S. N.; Botros, A.; Jones, E.; Chung, S. H.; Edburg, S. L.

    2011-07-01

    Intermittent coherent structures can be responsible for a large fraction of the chemical exchange between the vegetation canopy and the atmosphere. Quantifying their contribution to fluxes is necessary to interpret measurements of trace gases and aerosols within and above forest canopies. The primary objective of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX) field campaign (10 July 2009 to 9 August 2009) was to study the chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOC) within and above a forest canopy. In this manuscript, we provide an analysis of coherent structures and canopy-atmosphere exchange during CABINEX to support in-canopy gradient measurements of VOC. We quantify the number and duration of coherent structure events and their percent contribution to momentum and heat fluxes with two methods: (1) quadrant-hole analysis and (2) wavelet analysis. Despite differences in the duration and number of events, both methods predict that coherent structures contribute 40-50 % to total momentum fluxes and 44-65 % to total heat fluxes during the CABINEX campaign. Contributions associated with coherent structures are slightly greater under stable rather than unstable conditions. By comparing heat fluxes within and above the canopy, we determine the degree of coupling between upper canopy and atmosphere and find that they are coupled to the majority of the campaign time period. Uncoupled canopy-atmosphere events occur in the early morning (04:00-08:00 LT) approximately 30 % of the time. This study confirms that coherent structures contribute significantly to the exchange of heat and momentum between the canopy and atmosphere at the CABINEX site, and indicates the need to include these transport processes when studying the mixing and chemical reactions of trace gases and aerosols between a forest canopy and the atmosphere.

  17. Detecting forest canopy layering: applying lidar remote sensing to further understand the role of vertical structure in species habitat preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, A. S.; Dubayah, R.; Swatantran, A.

    2011-12-01

    Full waveform lidar reflects off all forest canopy elements, showing not only height, but also the structure within the canopy from the top to the forest floor, making it an ideal remote sensing technology for research in forest ecosystem dynamics. Vertical stratification or canopy layering has long been noted as an essential element in the forest ecosystem and of importance for species habitat. This project explores the utility of lidar for characterizing forest canopy layering and applying canopy layering information to better understand species habitat preference. Canopy layering will be mapped across the landscape using full-waveform lidar remote sensing data from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). Two methods for quantifying layering have been developed from LVIS data collected during the summer of 2009 for Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire. The two layering datasets (one categorical, one continuous) describe how vertical stratification varies across the forest with canopy height and elevation. The relationships between of canopy layering and avian species habitat preference will also be assessed for bird species within Hubbard Brook Experimental forest. These results will provide ecologically meaningful information and a relevant method for quantifying canopy layering at the landscape scale, which will aid in a better understanding of forest ecosystem dynamics for forest management and species habitat research.

  18. Marsh canopy leaf area and orientation calculated for improved marsh structure mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E.; Bannister, Terri

    2015-01-01

    An approach is presented for producing the spatiotemporal estimation of leaf area index (LAI) of a highly heterogeneous coastal marsh without reliance on user estimates of marsh leaf-stem orientation. The canopy LAI profile derivation used three years of field measured photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) vertical profiles at seven S. alterniflora marsh sites and iterative transform of those PAR attenuation profiles to best-fit light extinction coefficients (KM). KM sun zenith dependency was removed obtaining the leaf angle distribution (LAD) representing the average marsh orientation and the LAD used to calculate the LAI canopy profile. LAI and LAD reproduced measured PAR profiles with 99% accuracy and corresponded to field documented structures. LAI and LAD better reflect marsh structure and results substantiate the need to account for marsh orientation. The structure indexes are directly amenable to remote sensing spatiotemporal mapping and offer a more meaningful representation of wetland systems promoting biophysical function understanding.

  19. How is light interception efficiency related to shoot structure in tall canopy species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Noriyuki; Hiura, Tsutom

    2017-08-11

    Coexistence of multiple species is a fundamental aspect of plant and forest ecology. Although spatial arrangement of leaves within crowns is an important determinant of light interception and productivity, shoot structure varies considerably among coexisting canopy species. We investigated the relative importance of structural traits in determining the light availability of leaves (I) and light interception efficiency at the current-year shoot level (LIECS; the total light interception of leaves divided by shoot biomass) at the top of crowns of 11 canopy species in a cool-temperate forest in Japan. In accordance with Corner's rules, the total mass, stem mass, total mass of leaf laminae, individual leaf area, and stem cross-sectional area of current-year shoot were positively correlated with each other, and branching intensity (the number of current-year shoots per branch unit of 1-m length) was inversely correlated with these traits across species. In contrast, I was correlated not with these traits, but with leaf elevation angle (a L). Moreover, variation in LIECS across species was caused by variation in I (thus in a L). Thus, a L is a key parameter for the leaf light interception of canopy shoots in this cool-temperate forest. Differences in a L across species might be related to different physiological strategies that developed in the high light and water-limited environment of forest canopies. Small variation in the length of current-year shoots among species implies that variations in I and LIECS would be important for the coexistence of these canopy species.

  20. Mapping Mangrove Canopy Structure Using Lidar, inSAR and Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, M.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a remote sensing method to map mangrove canopy structure at the landscape scale using synergy between Lidar and inSAR. While the inSAR data allows landscape scale mapping of canopy height, the Lidar data is used with an inversion model to retrieve tree size distribution within the footprint. The tree size distribution is then used as an input to a mangrove ecological model to estimate ecosystem productivity throughout the landscape. The inversion uses mangrove tree architecture and assumes the Lidar measures the canopy surface. This assumption was verified using coincident airborne Lidar and Spaceborne ICEsat/GLAS data in Everglades National Park. A user-friendly web interface is presented to examine inSAR derived canopy height and examine ICEsat/GLAS Lidar waveforms over several mangrove sites around the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. The interface also allows the user to interactively analyze the waveforms and estimate local ecosystem productivity with user-defined input parameters on nutrient availability and stressors

  1. Decoupling Contributions from Canopy Structure and Leaf Optics is Critical for Remote Sensing Leaf Biochemistry (Reply to Townsend, et al.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazikhin, Yuri; Lewis, Philip; Disney, Mathias I.; Stenberg, Pauline; Mottus, Matti; Rautianinen, Miina; Kaufmann, Robert K.; Marshak, Alexander; Schull, Mitchell A.; Carmona, Pedro Latorre; hide

    2013-01-01

    Townsend et al. (1) agree that we explained that the apparent relationship (2) between foliar nitrogen (%N) and near-infrared (NIR) canopy reflectance was largely attributable to structure (which is in turn caused by variation in fraction of broadleaf canopy). Our conclusion that the observed correlation with %N was spurious (i.e., lacking a causal basis) is, thus, clearly justified: we demonstrated that structure explained the great majority of observed correlation, where the structural influence was derived precisely via reconciling the observed correlation with radiative-transfer theory. What this also suggests is that such correlations, although observed, do not uniquely provide information on canopy biochemical constituents.

  2. Canopy characteristics and behavior of Nellore heifers in Brachiaria brizantha pastures under different grazing heights at a continuous stocking rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rume Casagrande

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu canopy structure maintained at different grazing heights under a continuous stocking rate and with a dietary supplementation strategy for the animals during the rainy season. This study also intended to observe the relationships of these variables with the grazing behaviors of the heifers. The effects of three canopy heights (15, 25 and 35 cm were evaluated in association with three types of supplements: one mineral and two protein/energy supplements, the first with a high rumen degradable protein and energy and the others with a low ratio. Both the protein/energy supplements were provided at 0.3% of body weight/day. The experimental design was completely randomized, with two replications and repeated measures, and took place during the period from January to April 2008. The supplementation strategies did not affect any variable related to the canopy structure. Total and green herbage masses and the ratio of green/dead material increased with canopy height. The leaf/stem ratio was higher in the lowest canopy height: 15 cm. Changes in the canopy structure caused variations in the grazing behavior of the animals. Animals maintained in the 15-cm-tall pasture grazed for a longer time, increasing the time for each meal, but the number of meals was lower than that of the animals grazing within the 35-cm-tall pasture. The grazing time of animals receiving the energy/protein supplement was lower only in the period of the day during which it was supplied. Canopy structure is affected by sward height, and changes animal behavior. Supplementation does not affect the canopy structure of the pastures with similar heights.

  3. Turbulent Flow Structure Inside a Canopy with Complex Multi-Scale Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Kunlun; Katz, Joseph; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Particle image velocimetry laboratory measurements are carried out to study mean flow distributions and turbulent statistics inside a canopy with complex geometry and multiple scales consisting of fractal, tree-like objects. Matching the optical refractive indices of the tree elements with those of the working fluid provides unobstructed optical paths for both illuminations and image acquisition. As a result, the flow fields between tree branches can be resolved in great detail, without optical interference. Statistical distributions of mean velocity, turbulence stresses, and components of dispersive fluxes are documented and discussed. The results show that the trees leave their signatures in the flow by imprinting wake structures with shapes similar to the trees. The velocities in both wake and non-wake regions significantly deviate from the spatially-averaged values. These local deviations result in strong dispersive fluxes, which are important to account for in canopy-flow modelling. In fact, we find that the streamwise normal dispersive flux inside the canopy has a larger magnitude (by up to four times) than the corresponding Reynolds normal stress. Turbulent transport in horizontal planes is studied in the framework of the eddy viscosity model. Scatter plots comparing the Reynolds shear stress and mean velocity gradient are indicative of a linear trend, from which one can calculate the eddy viscosity and mixing length. Similar to earlier results from the wake of a single tree, here we find that inside the canopy the mean mixing length decreases with increasing elevation. This trend cannot be scaled based on a single length scale, but can be described well by a model, which considers the coexistence of multi-scale branches. This agreement indicates that the multi-scale information and the clustering properties of the fractal objects should be taken into consideration in flows inside multi-scale canopies.

  4. Structural attributes of stand overstory and light under the canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Angelini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available  This paper reviews the literature relating to the relationship between light availability in the understory and the main qualitative and quantitative attributes of stand overstory usually considered in forest management and planning (species composition, density, tree sizes, etc. as well as their changes as consequences of harvesting. The paper is divided in two sections: the first one reviews studies which investigated the influence of species composition on understory light conditions; the second part examines research on the relationships among stand parameters determined from dendrometric field data and the radiation on understory layer. The objective was to highlight which are the most significant stand traits and management features to build more practical models for predicting light regimes in any forest stand and, in more general terms, to support forest managers in planning and designing silvicultural treatments that retain structure in different way in order to meet different objectives.

  5. Polarimetric, Two-Color, Photon-Counting Laser Altimeter Measurements of Forest Canopy Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, David J.; Dabney, Philip W.; Valett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Laser altimeter measurements of forest stands with distinct structures and compositions have been acquired at 532 nm (green) and 1064 nm (near-infrared) wavelengths and parallel and perpendicular polarization states using the Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon Counting Lidar (SIMPL). The micropulse, single photon ranging measurement approach employed by SIMPL provides canopy structure measurements with high vertical and spatial resolution. Using a height distribution analysis method adapted from conventional, 1064 nm, full-waveform lidar remote sensing, the sensitivity of two parameters commonly used for above-ground biomass estimation are compared as a function of wavelength. The results for the height of median energy (HOME) and canopy cover are for the most part very similar, indicating biomass estimations using lidars operating at green and near-infrared wavelengths will yield comparable estimates. The expected detection of increasing depolarization with depth into the canopies due to volume multiple-scattering was not observed, possibly due to the small laser footprint and the small detector field of view used in the SIMPL instrument. The results of this work provide pathfinder information for NASA's ICESat-2 mission that will employ a 532 nm, micropulse, photon counting laser altimeter.

  6. Spectroscopic Remote Sensing of Non-Structural Carbohydrates in Forest Canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P. Asner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC are products of photosynthesis, and leaf NSC concentration may be a prognostic indicator of climate-change tolerance in woody plants. However, measurement of leaf NSC is prohibitively labor intensive, especially in tropical forests, where foliage is difficult to access and where NSC concentrations vary enormously by species and across environments. Imaging spectroscopy may allow quantitative mapping of leaf NSC, but this possibility remains unproven. We tested the accuracy of NSC remote sensing at leaf, canopy and stand levels using visible-to-shortwave infrared (VSWIR spectroscopy with partial least squares regression (PLSR techniques. Leaf-level analyses demonstrated the high precision (R2 = 0.69–0.73 and accuracy (%RMSE = 13%–14% of NSC estimates in 6136 live samples taken from 4222 forest canopy species worldwide. The leaf spectral data were combined with a radiative transfer model to simulate the role of canopy structural variability, which led to a reduction in the precision and accuracy of leaf NSC estimation (R2 = 0.56; %RMSE = 16%. Application of the approach to 79 one-hectare plots in Amazonia using the Carnegie Airborne Observatory VSWIR spectrometer indicated the good precision and accuracy of leaf NSC estimates at the forest stand level (R2 = 0.49; %RMSE = 9.1%. Spectral analyses indicated strong contributions of the shortwave-IR (1300–2500 nm region to leaf NSC determination at all scales. We conclude that leaf NSC can be remotely sensed, opening doors to monitoring forest canopy physiological responses to environmental stress and climate change.

  7. Exploring the spatial distribution of light interception and photosynthesis of canopies by means of a functional-structural plant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlikioti, V; de Visser, P H B; Marcelis, L F M

    2011-04-01

    At present most process-based models and the majority of three-dimensional models include simplifications of plant architecture that can compromise the accuracy of light interception simulations and, accordingly, canopy photosynthesis. The aim of this paper is to analyse canopy heterogeneity of an explicitly described tomato canopy in relation to temporal dynamics of horizontal and vertical light distribution and photosynthesis under direct- and diffuse-light conditions. Detailed measurements of canopy architecture, light interception and leaf photosynthesis were carried out on a tomato crop. These data were used for the development and calibration of a functional-structural tomato model. The model consisted of an architectural static virtual plant coupled with a nested radiosity model for light calculations and a leaf photosynthesis module. Different scenarios of horizontal and vertical distribution of light interception, incident light and photosynthesis were investigated under diffuse and direct light conditions. Simulated light interception showed a good correspondence to the measured values. Explicitly described leaf angles resulted in higher light interception in the middle of the plant canopy compared with fixed and ellipsoidal leaf-angle distribution models, although the total light interception remained the same. The fraction of light intercepted at a north-south orientation of rows differed from east-west orientation by 10 % on winter and 23 % on summer days. The horizontal distribution of photosynthesis differed significantly between the top, middle and lower canopy layer. Taking into account the vertical variation of leaf photosynthetic parameters in the canopy, led to approx. 8 % increase on simulated canopy photosynthesis. Leaf angles of heterogeneous canopies should be explicitly described as they have a big impact both on light distribution and photosynthesis. Especially, the vertical variation of photosynthesis in canopy is such that the

  8. Comparison of Aerial and Terrestrial Remote Sensing Techniques for Quantifying Forest Canopy Structural Complexity and Estimating Net Primary Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, R. T.; Tallant, J.; Gough, C. M.; Hardiman, B. S.; Atkins, J.; Scheuermann, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Canopy structure can be an important driver of forest ecosystem functioning - affecting factors such as radiative transfer and light use efficiency, and consequently net primary production (NPP). Both above- (aerial) and below-canopy (terrestrial) remote sensing techniques are used to assess canopy structure and each has advantages and disadvantages. Aerial techniques can cover large geographical areas and provide detailed information on canopy surface and canopy height, but are generally unable to quantitatively assess interior canopy structure. Terrestrial methods provide high resolution information on interior canopy structure and can be cost-effectively repeated, but are limited to very small footprints. Although these methods are often utilized to derive similar metrics (e.g., rugosity, LAI) and to address equivalent ecological questions and relationships (e.g., link between LAI and productivity), rarely are inter-comparisons made between techniques. Our objective is to compare methods for deriving canopy structural complexity (CSC) metrics and to assess the capacity of commonly available aerial remote sensing products (and combinations) to match terrestrially-sensed data. We also assess the potential to combine CSC metrics with image-based analysis to predict plot-based NPP measurements in forests of different ages and different levels of complexity. We use combinations of data from drone-based imagery (RGB, NIR, Red Edge), aerial LiDAR (commonly available medium-density leaf-off), terrestrial scanning LiDAR, portable canopy LiDAR, and a permanent plot network - all collected at the University of Michigan Biological Station. Our results will highlight the potential for deriving functionally meaningful CSC metrics from aerial imagery, LiDAR, and combinations of data sources. We will also present results of modeling focused on predicting plot-level NPP from combinations of image-based vegetation indices (e.g., NDVI, EVI) with LiDAR- or image-derived metrics of

  9. Canopy structure and topography effects on snow distribution at a catchment scale: Application of multivariate approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenicek Michal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of snowpack distribution at a catchment scale is important to predict the snowmelt runoff. The objective of this study is to select and quantify the most important factors governing the snowpack distribution, with special interest in the role of different canopy structure. We applied a simple distributed sampling design with measurement of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE at a catchment scale. We selected eleven predictors related to character of specific localities (such as elevation, slope orientation and leaf area index and to winter meteorological conditions (such as irradiance, sum of positive air temperature and sum of new snow depth. The forest canopy structure was described using parameters calculated from hemispherical photographs. A degree-day approach was used to calculate melt factors. Principal component analysis, cluster analysis and Spearman rank correlation were applied to reduce the number of predictors and to analyze measured data. The SWE in forest sites was by 40% lower than in open areas, but this value depended on the canopy structure. The snow ablation in large openings was on average almost two times faster compared to forest sites. The snow ablation in the forest was by 18% faster after forest defoliation (due to the bark beetle. The results from multivariate analyses showed that the leaf area index was a better predictor to explain the SWE distribution during accumulation period, while irradiance was better predictor during snowmelt period. Despite some uncertainty, parameters derived from hemispherical photographs may replace measured incoming solar radiation if this meteorological variable is not available.

  10. Canopy structure in savannas along a moisture gradient on Kalahari sands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info scholes_2004.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 45718 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name scholes_2004.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Canopy structure... for the prediction of stem area index (SAI) in southern African woodlands. For individual stems projectedstemarea ? 0:004C2diameter1:97; r2 ? 0:86; n ? 165; P50:001; where the projected stem area is in square metres and the stem diameter at the base is in centimetres...

  11. [Impact of canopy structural characteristics on inner air temperature and relative humidity of Koelreuteria paniculata community in summer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhong; Li, Zhan-dong; Cheng, Fang-yun; Sha, Hai-feng

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the diurnal variation of the correlations between the cooling and humidifying effects and canopy structural characteristics of the Koelreuteria paniculata community, the measurements of air temperature, relative humidity, canopy density, leaf area index (LAI) and mean leaf angle (MLA) were performed on calm sunny summer days in the community in Beijing Olympic Forest Park, China. There were significant correlations between the canopy density, LAI and MLA, which affected the cooling and humidifying effects together. The cooling effect reached its maximum by 12:00, whereas the humidifying effect reached its peak at 10:00. Compared with the control open space site, the community appeared to lower the air temperature by 0.43 to 7.53 °C and to increase the relative humidity by 1%-22% during the daytime. However, the cooling and humidifying effects seem to be not effective during the night. The canopy density and LAI were better for determining the cooling and humidifying effects from 9:00 to 12:00. However, these effects were largely controlled only by the canopy density from 12:00 to 14:00 and were significantly correlated with the canopy density and LAI afterwards until 18:00.

  12. Performance of trees in forest canopies: explorations with a bottom-up functional-structural plant growth model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterck, F.J.; Schieving, F.; Lemmens, A.; Pons, T.L.

    2005-01-01

    Here we present a functional-structural plant model that integrates the growth of metamers into a growing, three-dimensional tree structure, and study the effects of different constraints and strategies on tree performance in different canopies. The tree is a three-dimensional system of connected

  13. Large-scale variation in combined impacts of canopy loss and disturbance on community structure and ecosystem functioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasman P Crowe

    Full Text Available Ecosystems are under pressure from multiple human disturbances whose impact may vary depending on environmental context. We experimentally evaluated variation in the separate and combined effects of the loss of a key functional group (canopy algae and physical disturbance on rocky shore ecosystems at nine locations across Europe. Multivariate community structure was initially affected (during the first three to six months at six locations but after 18 months, effects were apparent at only three. Loss of canopy caused increases in cover of non-canopy algae in the three locations in southern Europe and decreases in some northern locations. Measures of ecosystem functioning (community respiration, gross primary productivity, net primary productivity were affected by loss of canopy at five of the six locations for which data were available. Short-term effects on community respiration were widespread, but effects were rare after 18 months. Functional changes corresponded with changes in community structure and/or species richness at most locations and times sampled, but no single aspect of biodiversity was an effective predictor of longer-term functional changes. Most ecosystems studied were able to compensate in functional terms for impacts caused by indiscriminate physical disturbance. The only consistent effect of disturbance was to increase cover of non-canopy species. Loss of canopy algae temporarily reduced community resistance to disturbance at only two locations and at two locations actually increased resistance. Resistance to disturbance-induced changes in gross primary productivity was reduced by loss of canopy algae at four locations. Location-specific variation in the effects of the same stressors argues for flexible frameworks for the management of marine environments. These results also highlight the need to analyse how species loss and other stressors combine and interact in different environmental contexts.

  14. Large-Scale Variation in Combined Impacts of Canopy Loss and Disturbance on Community Structure and Ecosystem Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Tasman P.; Cusson, Mathieu; Bulleri, Fabio; Davoult, Dominique; Arenas, Francisco; Aspden, Rebecca; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Bevilacqua, Stanislao; Davidson, Irvine; Defew, Emma; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Golléty, Claire; Griffin, John N.; Herkül, Kristjan; Kotta, Jonne; Migné, Aline; Molis, Markus; Nicol, Sophie K.; Noël, Laure M-L J.; Pinto, Isabel Sousa; Valdivia, Nelson; Vaselli, Stefano; Jenkins, Stuart R.

    2013-01-01

    Ecosystems are under pressure from multiple human disturbances whose impact may vary depending on environmental context. We experimentally evaluated variation in the separate and combined effects of the loss of a key functional group (canopy algae) and physical disturbance on rocky shore ecosystems at nine locations across Europe. Multivariate community structure was initially affected (during the first three to six months) at six locations but after 18 months, effects were apparent at only three. Loss of canopy caused increases in cover of non-canopy algae in the three locations in southern Europe and decreases in some northern locations. Measures of ecosystem functioning (community respiration, gross primary productivity, net primary productivity) were affected by loss of canopy at five of the six locations for which data were available. Short-term effects on community respiration were widespread, but effects were rare after 18 months. Functional changes corresponded with changes in community structure and/or species richness at most locations and times sampled, but no single aspect of biodiversity was an effective predictor of longer-term functional changes. Most ecosystems studied were able to compensate in functional terms for impacts caused by indiscriminate physical disturbance. The only consistent effect of disturbance was to increase cover of non-canopy species. Loss of canopy algae temporarily reduced community resistance to disturbance at only two locations and at two locations actually increased resistance. Resistance to disturbance-induced changes in gross primary productivity was reduced by loss of canopy algae at four locations. Location-specific variation in the effects of the same stressors argues for flexible frameworks for the management of marine environments. These results also highlight the need to analyse how species loss and other stressors combine and interact in different environmental contexts. PMID:23799082

  15. A specific PFT and sub-canopy structure for simulating oil palm in the Community Land Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.; Knohl, A.; Roupsard, O.; Bernoux, M.; LE Maire, G.; Panferov, O.; Kotowska, M.; Meijide, A.

    2015-12-01

    Towards an effort to quantify the effects of rainforests to oil palm conversion on land-atmosphere carbon, water and energy fluxes, a specific plant functional type (PFT) and sub-canopy structure are developed for simulating oil palm within the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). Current global land surface models only simulate annual crops beside natural vegetation. In this study, a multilayer oil palm subroutine is developed in CLM4.5 for simulating oil palm's phenology and carbon and nitrogen allocation. The oil palm has monopodial morphology and sequential phenology of around 40 stacked phytomers, each carrying a large leaf and a fruit bunch, forming a natural multilayer canopy. A sub-canopy phenological and physiological parameterization is thus introduced, so that multiple phytomer components develop simultaneously but according to their different phenological steps (growth, yield and senescence) at different canopy layers. This specific multilayer structure was proved useful for simulating canopy development in terms of leaf area index (LAI) and fruit yield in terms of carbon and nitrogen outputs in Jambi, Sumatra (Fan et al. 2015). The study supports that species-specific traits, such as palm's monopodial morphology and sequential phenology, are necessary representations in terrestrial biosphere models in order to accurately simulate vegetation dynamics and feedbacks to climate. Further, oil palm's multilayer structure allows adding all canopy-level calculations of radiation, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and respiration, beside phenology, also to the sub-canopy level, so as to eliminate scale mismatch problem among different processes. A series of adaptations are made to the CLM model. Initial results show that the adapted multilayer radiative transfer scheme and the explicit represention of oil palm's canopy structure improve on simulating photosynthesis-light response curve. The explicit photosynthesis and dynamic leaf nitrogen calculations per canopy

  16. Contrasting effects of sampling scale on insect herbivores distribution in response to canopy structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico S. Neves

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Species diversity of insect herbivores associated to canopy may vary local and geographically responding to distinct factors at different spatial scales. The aim of this study was to investigate how forest canopy structure affects insect herbivore species richness and abundance depending on feeding guilds´ specificities. We tested the hypothesis that habitat structure affects insect herbivore species richness and abundance differently to sap-sucking and chewing herbivore guilds. Two spatial scales were evaluated: inside tree crowns (fine spatial scale and canopy regions (coarse spatial scale. In three sampling sites we measured 120 tree crowns, grouped in five points with four contiguous tree crowns. Insects were sampled by beating method from each crown and data were summed up for analyzing each canopy region. In crowns (fine spatial scale we measured habitat structure: trunk circumference, tree height, canopy depth, number of ramifications and maximum ramification level. In each point, defined as a canopy region (coarse spatial scale, we measured habitat structure using a vertical cylindrical transect: tree species richness, leaf area, sum of strata heights and maximum canopy height. A principal component analysis based on the measured variables for each spatial scale was run to estimate habitat structure parameters. To test the effects of habitat structure upon herbivores, different general linear models were adjusted using the first two principal components as explanatory variables. Sap-sucking insect species richness and all herbivore abundances increased with size of crown at fine spatial scale. On the other hand, chewer species richness and abundance increased with resource quantity at coarse scale. Feeding specialization, resources availability, and agility are discussed as ecological causes of the found pattern.La diversidad de especies de insectos herbívoros asociados con el dosel puede variar geográficamente y responder a distintos

  17. Field and Laboratory Investigation of USS3 Ultrasonic Sensors Capability for Non-contact Measurement of Pistachio Canopy Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Maghsoudi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Electronic canopy characterization to determine structural properties is an important issue in tree crop management. Ultrasonic and optical sensors are the most used sensors for this purpose. The objective of this work was to assess the performance of an ultrasonic sensor under laboratory and field conditions in order to provide reliable estimations of distance measurements to apple tree canopies. To achieve this purpose, a methodology has been designed to analyze sensor performance in relation to foliage distance and to the effects of interference with adjacent sensors when working simultaneously. Results showed that the average error in distance measurement using the ultrasonic sensor in laboratory conditions was 0.64 cm. However, the increase of variability in field conditions reduced the accuracy of this kind of sensors when estimating distances to canopies. The average error in such situations was 3.19 cm. When analyzing interferences of adjacent sensors 30 cm apart, the average error was ±14.65 cm. When adjacent sensors were placed apart by 60 cm, the average error became 6.73 cm. The ultrasonic sensor tested has been proven to be suitable to estimate distances to the canopy in pistachio garden conditions when sensors are 60 cm apart or more and can, therefore, be used in a system to estimate structural canopy parameters in precision horticulture.

  18. Horizontal, but not vertical canopy structure is related to stand functional diversity in a subtropical slope forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lang, A.C.; Härdtle, W.; Bruelheide, H.; Kröber, W.; Schröter, M.; Wehrden, von H.; Oheimb, von G.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the relation of horizontal and vertical canopy structure to tree functional diversity of a highly diverse subtropical broad-leaved slope forest, stratified for different successional stages. This is of particular interest because many key ecosystem processes and

  19. Characterization and classification of vegetation canopy structure and distribution within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park using LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitendra Kumar; Jon Weiner; William W. Hargrove; Steve Norman; Forrest M. Hoffman; Doug Newcomb

    2016-01-01

    Vegetation canopy structure is a critically important habitat characteristic for many threatened and endangered birds and other animal species, and it is key information needed by forest and wildlife managers for monitoring and managing forest resources, conservation planning and fostering biodiversity. Advances in Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technologies have...

  20. Measuring and modeling stemflow by two xerophytic shrubs in the Loess Plateau: The role of dynamic canopy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Shi, F.; Wu, H.; WU, X.; Pei, T.

    2016-12-01

    Stemflow plays an important role in hydrological processes in dryland shrubs, but it still remains poorly understood, especially regarding the effects of dynamic canopy structure on stemflow. This study aimed to measure and model the stemflow of two dominant xerophytic shrub (Hippophae rhamnoides and Spiraea pubescens) communities and to identify the key controlling factors of stemflow yield. We quantified and scaled-up stemflow from branches and leaves to stand levels. Correlations and stepwise regression analysis between stemflow and meteorological and biological factors indicated that at branch level, the rainfall amount and the branch diameter were the best variables for modelling and predicting stemflow for Hippophae rhamnoides, while the rainfall amount and the aboveground biomass were the best variables for modelling and predicting stemflow for Spiraea pubescens. At stand level, the stemflow yield is mostly affected by rainfall amount and leaf area index for both shrubs. The stemflow fluxes account for 3.5±0.9% of incident rainfall for H. rhamnoides community and 9.4±2.1% for S. pubescens community, respectively. The differences in percentages of stemflow between the two shrub communities was attributed to differences in canopy structures and water storage capacities. This evaluation of the effects of canopy structure dynamics on stemflow, and of the developed model, provided a better understanding of the effect of the canopy structure on the water cycles in dryland shrub ecosystems.

  1. Fire frequency and tree canopy structure influence plant species diversity in a forest-grassland ecotone

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Peterson; Peter B. Reich

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances and environmental heterogeneity are two factors thought to influence plant species diversity, but their effects are still poorly understood in many ecosystems. We surveyed understory vegetation and measured tree canopy cover on permanent plots spanning an experimental fire frequency gradient to test fire frequency and tree canopy effects on plant species...

  2. Predicting understorey structure from the presence and composition of canopies: an assembly rule for marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Andrew D; Connell, Sean D

    2006-06-01

    Assembly rules provide a useful framework for predicting patterns of community assembly under defined environmental conditions. Habitat created by canopy-forming algae (such as kelps) provides a promising system for identifying assembly rules because canopies typically have a large and predictable influence on understorey communities. Across >1,000 km of subtidal South Australian coastline, we identified natural associations between assemblages of understorey algae and (1) monospecific canopies of Ecklonia radiata, (2) canopies comprised of E. radiata mixed with Fucales (Cystophora spp. and Sargassum spp.), and (3) gaps among canopies of algae. We were able to recreate these associations with experimental tests that quantified the assembly of understorey algae among these three habitat types. We propose the assembly rule that understorey communities on subtidal rocky coast in South Australia will be (1) monopolised by encrusting coralline algae beneath monospecific canopies of E. radiata, (2) comprised of encrusting corallines, encrusting non-corallines, and sparse covers of articulated corallines, beneath mixed E. radiata-Fucales canopies, and (3) comprised of extensive covers of articulated corallines and filamentous turfs, as well as sparse covers of foliose algae and juvenile canopy-formers, within gaps. Consistencies between natural patterns and experimental effects demonstrate how algal canopies can act as a filter to limit the subsets of species from the locally available pool that are able to assemble beneath them. Moreover, the subsets of species that assemble to subtidal rocky substrata in South Australia appear to be predictable, given knowledge of the presence and composition of canopies incorporating E. radiata.

  3. The influence of current speed and vegetation density on flow structure in two macrotidal eelgrass canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jessica R.; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    The influence of eelgrass (Zostera marina) on near-bed currents, turbulence, and drag was investigated at three sites in two eelgrass canopies of differing density and at one unvegetated site in the San Juan archipelago of Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Eelgrass blade length exceeded 1 m. Velocity profiles up to 1.5 m above the sea floor were collected over a spring-neap tidal cycle with a downward-looking pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler above the canopies and two acoustic Doppler velocimeters within the canopies. The eelgrass attenuated currents by a minimum of 40%, and by more than 70% at the most densely vegetated site. Attenuation decreased with increasing current speed. The data were compared to the shear-layer model of vegetated flows and the displaced logarithmic model. Velocity profiles outside the meadows were logarithmic. Within the canopies, most profiles were consistent with the shear-layer model, with a logarithmic layer above the canopy. However, at the less-dense sites, when currents were strong, shear at the sea floor and above the canopy was significant relative to shear at the top of the canopy, and the velocity profiles more closely resembled those in a rough-wall boundary layer. Turbulence was strong at the canopy top and decreased with height. Friction velocity at the canopy top was 1.5–2 times greater than at the unvegetated, sandy site. The coefficient of drag CD on the overlying flow derived from the logarithmic velocity profile above the canopy, was 3–8 times greater than at the unvegetated site (0.01–0.023 vs. 2.9 × 10−3).

  4. Spatial Upscaling of Soil Respiration under a Complex Canopy Structure in an Old‐Growth Deciduous Forest, Central Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilanee Suchewaboripont

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural complexity, especially canopy and gap structure, of old‐growth forests affects the spatial variation of soil respiration (Rs. Without considering this variation, the upscaling of Rs from field measurements to the forest site will be biased. The present study examined responses of Rs to soil temperature (Ts and water content (W in canopy and gap areas, developed the best fit modelof Rs and used the unique spatial patterns of Rs and crown closure to upscale chamber measurements to the site scale in an old‐growth beech‐oak forest. Rs increased with an increase in Ts in both gap and canopy areas, but the effect of W on Rs was different between the two areas. The generalized linear model (GLM analysis identified that an empirical model of Rs with thecoupling of Ts and W was better than an exponential model of Rs with only Ts. Moreover, because of different responses of Rs to W between canopy and gap areas, it was necessary to estimate Rs in these areas separately. Consequently, combining the spatial patterns of Rs and the crown closure could allow upscaling of Rs from chamber‐based measurements to the whole site in the present study.

  5. SAFARI 2000 Leaf Area Index and Canopy Structure, Kalahari Transect, 1999-2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Data from the Tracing Radiation and Architecture of Canopies (TRAC) instrument were collected at five sites along the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme...

  6. SAFARI 2000 Leaf Area Index and Canopy Structure, Kalahari Transect, 1999-2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Data from the Tracing Radiation and Architecture of Canopies (TRAC) instrument were collected at five sites along the International Geosphere-Biosphere...

  7. A Lidar Point Cloud Based Procedure for Vertical Canopy Structure Analysis And 3D Single Tree Modelling in Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunsheng; Weinacker, Holger; Koch, Barbara

    2008-06-12

    A procedure for both vertical canopy structure analysis and 3D single tree modelling based on Lidar point cloud is presented in this paper. The whole area of research is segmented into small study cells by a raster net. For each cell, a normalized point cloud whose point heights represent the absolute heights of the ground objects is generated from the original Lidar raw point cloud. The main tree canopy layers and the height ranges of the layers are detected according to a statistical analysis of the height distribution probability of the normalized raw points. For the 3D modelling of individual trees, individual trees are detected and delineated not only from the top canopy layer but also from the sub canopy layer. The normalized points are resampled into a local voxel space. A series of horizontal 2D projection images at the different height levels are then generated respect to the voxel space. Tree crown regions are detected from the projection images. Individual trees are then extracted by means of a pre-order forest traversal process through all the tree crown regions at the different height levels. Finally, 3D tree crown models of the extracted individual trees are reconstructed. With further analyses on the 3D models of individual tree crowns, important parameters such as crown height range, crown volume and crown contours at the different height levels can be derived.

  8. How the environment, canopy structure and canopy physiological functioning influence carbon, water and energy fluxes of a temperate broad-leaved deciduous forest -- an assessment with the biophysical model CANOAK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldocchi, D. D.; Gu, L. [Univ. of California-Berkeley, Dept. of Environmental Science, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wilson, K. B. [NOAA. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Divison, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2002-11-01

    The interaction of the environment, canopy structure and its physiological functioning in controlling and driving the exchange of carbon dioxide and water vapour between a temperate forest and the atmosphere are described. The modulation of carbon dioxide and water vapour by temporal and spatial variations in canopy structure and physiological functioning is reviewed. This review is followed by quantification of the effects of leaf dimension and thickness, vertical variations in leaf area and photosynthetic capacity, leaf clumping, leaf inclination angle stomatal conductance and weather on the annual sums of carbon dioxide and water vapour and sensible heat exchange, using the biophysical model CANOAK. The paper also attempts to estimate the amount of detail required in a model to reliably predict fluxes of carbon dioxide and water vapour. A closer coupling between detailed biophysical models like CANOAK, with modules that compute the dynamics of canopy structure is envisaged. 105 refs., 10 tabs., 3 figs.

  9. A Forest Structure Dynamics Model for Driving Three-Dimensional Canopy Radiative Transfer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W.; Kobayashi, H.; Kondoh, A.

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) Monte Carlo (MC)-based radiative transfer (RT) models can simulate highly detailed forest environments, and have produced simulations that agree well with observations; thus, they are routinely used for benchmarking in intercomparisons of RT models. However, MC-based RT models have not been widely applied to the development of inversion algorithms for generating global remote sensing products of forests, due mainly to the difficulties in obtaining realistic forest structures for a variety of forest biomes. In this study, we developed a Forest Structure Dynamics Model (FSDM) to facilitate the application of MC-based RT models to global forests. In this model, the tree architectures are determined based on allometric equations, and the tree locations within a study domain are determined by statistical distributions. The performance of the FSDM was evaluated using field measurements of forest landscapes at two sites located at Järvselja, Estonia and the Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR), USA, respectively. The bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) for the two study sites was simulated by an MC-based RT model, based on the measured forest stands and modeled stands from the FSDM. A comparison of the results demonstrated that the simulated BRF based on the measured forest stands agreed well with the simulated BRF based on the modeled stands from the FSDM for the two study sites. The applicability of the FSDM to a leaf area index (LAI) retrieval algorithm was also verified using simulations from the MC-based RT model. The results indicate that the FSDM can provide reasonable forest structures to drive 3-D canopy RT models, with no loss of simulation accuracy. When combined with several existing field data sets and satellite products, the FSDM can be used to generate a typical stand structure database for global forest biomes.

  10. The Potential of Spaceborne Remote Sensing for Deriving Canopy Structure Metrics and Informing Biodiversity and Habitat Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, S. J.; Dubayah, R.

    2016-12-01

    Research on characterization of canopy structure with remote sensing has exploded as airborne data sets have become more widely available to the biodiversity science and habitat management communities. While these advances are important in the context of increasing pressure on both habitat and wildlife, airborne data acquisitions are necessarily limited in geographic scope and thus in their general applicability to biome-scale biodiversity research initiatives, including international programs striving to implement the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the associated Aichi Biodiversity Targets. The lack of systematic metrics of canopy structure across large geographic domains also makes it difficult to implement the CBD Strategic Plan systematically across nations, as outlined in National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans. The Group on Earth Observations, Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON) has proposed a set of Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) that could be used as a global-scale basis for biodiversity monitoring, but several of those EBVs are still limited by the availability of data on habitat 3D structure. Those limitations will be overcome in the near future with a suite of satellite missions that will provide an unprecedented level of active remote sensing measurements useful for deriving structure information, including Tandem-X, ICESat-2, BIOMASS and the Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI). We will provide a brief overview of the rapid advance of measurements of canopy structure and the applications that have evolved in recent years in terms of 3D habitat characterization, species-specific habitat utilization, and the potential of these new space-based measurements. In this talk we will focus primarily on GEDI, a lidar mission to be installed on the International Space Station that is optimized for retrieving 3D canopy structure. GEDI and the other new missions will provide long-desired consistent

  11. Soil types and forest canopy structures in southern Missouri: A first look with AIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G. M.; Arvidson, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral reflectance properties of deciduous oak-hickory forests covering the eastern half of the Rolla Quadrangle were examined using Thematic Mapper (TM) data acquired in August and December, 1982 and Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data acquired in August, 1985. For the TM data distinctly high relative reflectance values (greater than 0.3) in the near infrared (Band 4, 0.73 to 0.94 micrometers) correspond to regions characterized by xeric (dry) forests that overlie soils with low water retention capacities. These soils are derived primarily from rhyolites. More mesic forests characterized by lower TM band 4 relative reflectances are associated with soils of higher retention capacities derived predominately from non-cherty carbonates. The major factors affecting canopy reflectance appear to be the leaf area index (LAI) and leaf optical properties. The Suits canopy reflectance model predicts the relative reflectance values for the xeric canopies. The mesic canopy reflectance is less well matched and incorporation of canopy shadowing caused by the irregular nature of the mesic canopy may be necessary. Preliminary examination of high spectral resolution AIS data acquired in August of 1985 reveals no more information than found in the broad band TM data.

  12. Amazon Forests Maintain Consistent Canopy Structure and Greenness During the Dry Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Douglas C.; Nagol, Jyoteshwar; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Rosette, Jacqueline; Palace, Michael; Cook, Bruce D.; Vermote, Eric F.; Harding, David J.; North, Peter R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The seasonality of sunlight and rainfall regulates net primary production in tropical forests. Previous studies have suggested that light is more limiting than water for tropical forest productivity, consistent with greening of Amazon forests during the dry season in satellite data.We evaluated four potential mechanisms for the seasonal green-up phenomenon, including increases in leaf area or leaf reflectance, using a sophisticated radiative transfer model and independent satellite observations from lidar and optical sensors. Here we show that the apparent green up of Amazon forests in optical remote sensing data resulted from seasonal changes in near-infrared reflectance, an artefact of variations in sun-sensor geometry. Correcting this bidirectional reflectance effect eliminated seasonal changes in surface reflectance, consistent with independent lidar observations and model simulations with unchanging canopy properties. The stability of Amazon forest structure and reflectance over seasonal timescales challenges the paradigm of light-limited net primary production in Amazon forests and enhanced forest growth during drought conditions. Correcting optical remote sensing data for artefacts of sun-sensor geometry is essential to isolate the response of global vegetation to seasonal and interannual climate variability.

  13. Interactions between Canopy Structure and Herbaceous Biomass along Environmental Gradients in Moist Forest and Dry Miombo Woodland of Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deo D Shirima

    Full Text Available We have limited understanding of how tropical canopy foliage varies along environmental gradients, and how this may in turn affect forest processes and functions. Here, we analyse the relationships between canopy leaf area index (LAI and above ground herbaceous biomass (AGBH along environmental gradients in a moist forest and miombo woodland in Tanzania. We recorded canopy structure and herbaceous biomass in 100 permanent vegetation plots (20 m × 40 m, stratified by elevation. We quantified tree species richness, evenness, Shannon diversity and predominant height as measures of structural variability, and disturbance (tree stumps, soil nutrients and elevation as indicators of environmental variability. Moist forest and miombo woodland differed substantially with respect to nearly all variables tested. Both structural and environmental variables were found to affect LAI and AGBH, the latter being additionally dependent on LAI in moist forest but not in miombo, where other factors are limiting. Combining structural and environmental predictors yielded the most powerful models. In moist forest, they explained 76% and 25% of deviance in LAI and AGBH, respectively. In miombo woodland, they explained 82% and 45% of deviance in LAI and AGBH. In moist forest, LAI increased non-linearly with predominant height and linearly with tree richness, and decreased with soil nitrogen except under high disturbance. Miombo woodland LAI increased linearly with stem density, soil phosphorous and nitrogen, and decreased linearly with tree species evenness. AGBH in moist forest decreased with LAI at lower elevations whilst increasing slightly at higher elevations. AGBH in miombo woodland increased linearly with soil nitrogen and soil pH. Overall, moist forest plots had denser canopies and lower AGBH compared with miombo plots. Further field studies are encouraged, to disentangle the direct influence of LAI on AGBH from complex interrelationships between stand

  14. Pasture intake and milk production of dairy cows rotationally grazing on multi-species swards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Fernández, A I; Peyraud, J L; Delaby, L; Delagarde, R

    2016-09-01

    Increasing plant species diversity has been proposed as a means for enhancing annual pasture productivity and decreasing seasonal variability of pasture production facing more frequent drought scenarios due to climate change. Few studies have examined how botanical complexity of sown swards affects cow performance. A 2-year experiment was conducted to determine how sward botanical complexity, from a monoculture of ryegrass to multi-species swards (MSS) (grasses-legumes-forb), affect pasture chemical composition and nutritive value, pasture dry matter (DM) intake, milk production and milk solids production of grazing dairy cows. Five sward species: perennial ryegrass (L as Lolium), white clover and red clover (both referred to as T as Trifolium because they were always sown together), chicory (C as Cichorium) and tall fescue (F as Festuca) were assigned to four grazing treatments by combining one (L), three (LT), four (LTC) or five (LTCF) species. Hereafter, the LT swards are called mixed swards as a single combination of ryegrass and clovers, whereas LTC and LTCF swards are called MSS as a combination of at least four species from three botanical families. The experimental area (8.7 ha) was divided into four block replicates with a mineral nitrogen fertilisation of 75 kg N/ha per year for each treatment. In total, 13 grazing rotations were carried out by applying the same grazing calendar and the same pasture allowance of 19 kg DM/cow per day above 4 cm for all treatments. Clover represented 20% of DM for mixed and MSS swards; chicory represented 30% of DM for MSS and tall fescue represented 10% of DM for LTCF swards. Higher milk production (+1.1 kg/day) and milk solids production (+0.08 kg/day) were observed for mixed swards than for ryegrass swards. Pasture nutritive value and pasture DM intake were unaffected by the inclusion of clover. Pasture DM, organic matter and NDF concentrations were lower for MSS than for mixed swards. Higher milk production (+0.8 kg

  15. Investigating Bedrock through Canopy Structure, Organization and Connectivity of an Arctic Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafflon, B.; Leger, E.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Soom, F.; Biraud, S.; Tran, A. P.; Wainwright, H. M.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Improving understanding of Arctic ecosystem functioning and parameterization of process-rich models that simulate feedbacks to a changing climate require advances in quantifying ecosystem properties, from within the bedrock to the top of the canopy. In Arctic regions having significant elevation gradients and subsurface heterogeneity (bedrock, permafrost, ground ice), quantifying surface and subsurface structure, organization and connectivity of watershed elements is particularly challenging yet is critical for predicting the storage and flux of carbon in a changing climate. In this study, we evaluate linkages between physical properties (incl. fraction of soil constituents, bedrock depth, permafrost characteristics), hydrological conditions and geomorphic characteristics. This study takes place in a Seward Peninsula Watershed near Nome AK, which is characterized by an elevation gradient, extensive bedrock, and discontinuous permafrost. We use a multi-method acquisition strategy to characterize below and above ground properties and their linkages, including point-scale measurements, electrical resistivity tomography, seismic refraction and UAS-based low-altitude aerial imaging. Data integration and analysis is supported by numerical approaches that simulate dynamic hydrological and thermal processes. Overall, this study enables the identification of watershed structure and the links between various soil (incl., water content, temperature, electrical conductivity), landscape properties (incl. wetness conditions, vegetation, topographic metrics) and the bedrock/permafrost distribution and characteristics in a representative Arctic watershed. Low-altitude aerial imaging shows promise to extend the landscape organization analysis approach to larger regions in the Arctic. The obtained information about organization and connectivity of the landscape is expected to be useful for improving predictions of Arctic ecosystem feedbacks to climate.

  16. Characterization and classification of vegetation canopy structure and distribution within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park using LiDAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL; HargroveJr., William Walter [United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), United States Forest Service (USFS); Norman, Steven P [United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), United States Forest Service (USFS); Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Newcomb, Doug [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation canopy structure is a critically important habit characteristic for many threatened and endangered birds and other animal species, and it is key information needed by forest and wildlife managers for monitoring and managing forest resources, conservation planning and fostering biodiversity. Advances in Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technologies have enabled remote sensing-based studies of vegetation canopies by capturing three-dimensional structures, yielding information not available in two-dimensional images of the landscape pro- vided by traditional multi-spectral remote sensing platforms. However, the large volume data sets produced by airborne LiDAR instruments pose a significant computational challenge, requiring algorithms to identify and analyze patterns of interest buried within LiDAR point clouds in a computationally efficient manner, utilizing state-of-art computing infrastructure. We developed and applied a computationally efficient approach to analyze a large volume of LiDAR data and to characterize and map the vegetation canopy structures for 139,859 hectares (540 sq. miles) in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This study helps improve our understanding of the distribution of vegetation and animal habitats in this extremely diverse ecosystem.

  17. Structure of the Western Gulf of Mexico Salt Canopy Surface Imaged by Regional 2D Multichannel Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, W. W.; Robla, V.; Emmet, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    The morphology of the continental slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) shifts going from the smoother offshore Texas (TX) margin to the rugose central Louisiana (LA) offshore. This change is considered a reflection of the structure of mobile Jurassic salt residing within the margin sediment column. To test this hypothesis, the structure of the top of salt across the TX and western LA continental slopes has been imaged and compared to the bathymetry using a regional grid of 2D industry multichannel seismic data. The 2D data, provided by TGS, were analyzed using IHS Kingdom software. Prior studies, regional well data, and satellite gravity data were examined to support and constrain interpretations. Seafloor (SF) and top-of-salt (TOS) time picks from seismic profiles were gridded to make regional time-structure maps of these surfaces. Comparison of SF and TOS contours demonstrates the expected correlation. A closer inspection reveals that the preponderance of SF is coincident with the underlying highs and lows of the TOS and that the study area is characterized by a transition in salt morphology that corresponds to bathymetric expression. The western slope is dominated by large, shallow, circular, isolated salt bodies and the overlying seafloor is smooth with exception of large, circular high relief above nearly all of the interpreted salt structures. The TOS texture gradually changes going eastward where individual salt bodies increase in number and coalesce into large, shallow canopies of increasing rugosity. Again, the outline of the canopies, and many of the crests of the constitute salt bodies, are observable on the SF. Elongate salt structures dominate the north central and northeast study area, while a relatively continuous, highly rugged canopy spans the southern and outer margin of the slope. While some of the northern-most elongate bodies are less correlated with the SF, most are and the undulating relief of the canopy clearly translates to SF

  18. Phylogenetic Structure of Tree Species across Different Life Stages from Seedlings to Canopy Trees in a Subtropical Evergreen Broad-Leaved Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi; Qian, Hong; Yu, Mingjian

    2015-01-01

    Investigating patterns of phylogenetic structure across different life stages of tree species in forests is crucial to understanding forest community assembly, and investigating forest gap influence on the phylogenetic structure of forest regeneration is necessary for understanding forest community assembly. Here, we examine the phylogenetic structure of tree species across life stages from seedlings to canopy trees, as well as forest gap influence on the phylogenetic structure of forest regeneration in a forest of the subtropical region in China. We investigate changes in phylogenetic relatedness (measured as NRI) of tree species from seedlings, saplings, treelets to canopy trees; we compare the phylogenetic turnover (measured as βNRI) between canopy trees and seedlings in forest understory with that between canopy trees and seedlings in forest gaps. We found that phylogenetic relatedness generally increases from seedlings through saplings and treelets up to canopy trees, and that phylogenetic relatedness does not differ between seedlings in forest understory and those in forest gaps, but phylogenetic turnover between canopy trees and seedlings in forest understory is lower than that between canopy trees and seedlings in forest gaps. We conclude that tree species tend to be more closely related from seedling to canopy layers, and that forest gaps alter the seedling phylogenetic turnover of the studied forest. It is likely that the increasing trend of phylogenetic clustering as tree stem size increases observed in this subtropical forest is primarily driven by abiotic filtering processes, which select a set of closely related evergreen broad-leaved tree species whose regeneration has adapted to the closed canopy environments of the subtropical forest developed under the regional monsoon climate.

  19. The Impact of Unsteady Reconfiguration on Turbulence Structure within a Flexible Canopy: Large-Eddy Simulation Study of a Cornfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, M.; Pan, Y.; Nepf, H. M.; Follett, E.

    2014-12-01

    Flexible plants bend in response to fluid motion and this reconfiguration mechanism allows plants to minimize the increase of drag force with increasing velocity, ensuring survival in flow-dominated habitats. The effect of reconfiguration on the flow field can be modeled by introducing a drag coefficient that decreases with increasing velocity. Typically, a power-law decrease of the drag coefficient with increasing velocity is used, and the negative exponent is known as the Vogel number. In practice, the Vogel number is a function of canopy rigidity and flow conditions. In this work we show that accounting for the effect of reconfiguration is required for large-eddy simulation (LES) models to reproduce the skewness of the streamwise and vertical velocity components and the distribution of sweeps and ejections observed in a large cornfield. Additional LES runs are conducted to investigate the structure of turbulence in different reconfiguration regimes, with mean vertical momentum flux constrained by measurements. The change of the Vogel number has negligible effects on LES predictions of the total vertical momentum flux and the components of turbulent kinetic energy, but produces profound changes in the mechanisms of momentum transport. This work demonstrates the necessity to model the effect of reconfiguration in LES studies of canopy flows. It also highlights the impacts of reconfiguration on the structure of turbulence and the dynamics of momentum fluxes, as well as any other process that depends on velocity fluctuations above and within the canopy region.

  20. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on canopy structure of Ulva communities from southern Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischof, K; Peralta, G; Krabs, G; van de Poll, WH; Perez-Llorens, JL; Breeman, AM

    2002-01-01

    Within the sheltered creeks of Cadiz bay, Ulva thalli form extended mat-like canopies. The effect of solar ultraviolet radiation on photosynthetic activity, the composition of photosynthetic and xanthophyll cycle pigments, and the amount of RubisCO, chaperonin 60 (CPN 60), and the induction of DNA

  1. The impact of forest canopy structure on simulations of atmosphere-biosphere NO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firanj, Ana; Lalic, Branislava; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Podrascanin, Zorica

    2015-01-01

    The concentrations and fluxes of reactive nitrogen species in the land-atmosphere system are controlled by complex interactions between emissions, turbulent transfer, dry deposition and chemical transformations. The forest canopy can significantly affect turbulent fluxes between the atmosphere,

  2. Strong and weak, unsteady reconfiguration and its impact on turbulence structure within plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ying; Follett, Elizabeth; Chamecki, Marcelo; Nepf, Heidi

    2014-10-01

    Flexible terrestrial and aquatic plants bend in response to fluid motion and this reconfiguration mechanism reduces drag forces, which protects against uprooting or breaking under high winds and currents. The impact of reconfiguration on the flow can be described quantitatively by introducing a drag coefficient that decreases as a power-law function of velocity with a negative exponent known as the Vogel number. In this paper, two case studies are conducted to examine the connection between reconfiguration and turbulence dynamics within a canopy. First, a flume experiment was conducted with a model seagrass meadow. As the flow rate increased, both the mean and unsteady one-dimensional linear elastic reconfiguration increased. In the transition between the asymptotic regimes of negligible and strong reconfiguration, there is a regime of weak reconfiguration, in which the Vogel number achieved its peak negative value. Second, large-eddy simulation was conducted for a maize canopy, with different modes of reconfiguration characterized by increasingly negative values of the Vogel number. Even though the mean vertical momentum flux was constrained by field measurements, changing the mode of reconfiguration altered the distribution, strength, and fraction of momentum carried by strong and weak events. Despite the differences between these two studies, similar effects of the Vogel number on turbulence dynamics were demonstrated. In particular, a more negative Vogel number leads to a more positive peak of the skewness of streamwise velocity within the canopy, which indicates a preferential penetration of strong events into a vegetation canopy. We consider different reconfiguration geometry (one- and two-dimensional) and regime (negligible, weak, and strong) that can apply to a wide range of terrestrial and aquatic canopies.

  3. Could the canopy structure of bryophytes serve as an indicator of microbial biodiversity? A test for testate amoebae and microcrustaceans from a subtropical cloud forest in Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Mercado, D; Cancel-Morales, N; Chinea, J D; Santos-Flores, C J; De Jesús, I Sastre

    2012-07-01

    The mechanisms that ultimately regulate the diversity of microbial eukaryotic communities in bryophyte ecosystems remain a contentious topic in microbial ecology. Although there is robust consensus that abiotic factors, such as water chemistry of the bryophyte and pH, explain a significant proportion of protist and microcrustacean diversity, there is no systematic assessment of the role of bryophyte habitat complexity on such prominent microbial groups. Water-holding capacity is correlated with bryophyte morphology and canopy structure. Similarly, canopy structure explains biodiversity dynamics of the macrobiota suggesting that canopy structure may also be a potential parameter for understanding microbial diversity. Canopy roughness of the dominant bryophyte species within the Bahoruco Cloud Forest, Cachote, Dominican Republic, concomitant with their associated diversity of testate amoebae and microcrustaceans was estimated to determine whether canopy structure could be added to the list of factors explaining microbial biodiversity in bryophytes. We hypothesized that smooth (with high moisture content) canopies will have higher species richness, density, and biomass of testate amoebae and higher richness and density of microcrustaceans than rough (desiccation-prone) canopies. For testate amoebae, we found 83 morphospecies with relative low abundances. Species richness and density differed among bryophytes with different bryophyte canopy structures and based on non-metric multidimensional scaling, canopy roughness explained 25% of the variation in species composition although not as predicted. Acroporium pungens (low roughness, LR) had the lowest species richness (2 ± 0.61 SD per gram dry weight bryophyte), and density (2.1 ± 0.61 SD individual per gram of dry weight bryophyte); whereas Thuidium urceolatum (high roughness) had the highest richness (24 ± 10.82 SD) and density (94 ± 64.30 SD). The fact that the bryophyte with the highest roughness had the highest

  4. Dynamic quantification of canopy structure to characterize early plant vigour in wheat genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, T; Chapman, S C; Holland, E; Rebetzke, G J; Guo, Y; Zheng, B

    2016-08-01

    Early vigour is an important physiological trait to improve establishment, water-use efficiency, and grain yield for wheat. Phenotyping large numbers of lines is challenging due to the fast growth and development of wheat seedlings. Here we developed a new photo-based workflow to monitor dynamically the growth and development of the wheat canopy of two wheat lines with a contrasting early vigour trait. Multiview images were taken using a 'vegetation stress' camera at 2 d intervals from emergence to the sixth leaf stage. Point clouds were extracted using the Multi-View Stereo and Structure From Motion (MVS-SFM) algorithm, and segmented into individual organs using the Octree method, with leaf midribs fitted using local polynomial function. Finally, phenotypic parameters were calculated from the reconstructed point cloud including: tiller and leaf number, plant height, Haun index, phyllochron, leaf length, angle, and leaf elongation rate. There was good agreement between the observed and estimated leaf length (RMSE=8.6mm, R (2)=0.98, n=322) across both lines. Significant contrasts of phenotyping parameters were observed between the two lines and were consistent with manual observations. The early vigour line had fewer tillers (2.4±0.6) and larger leaves (308.0±38.4mm and 17.1±2.7mm for leaf length and width, respectively). While the phyllochron of both lines was quite similar, the non-vigorous line had a greater Haun index (more leaves on the main stem) on any date, as the vigorous line had slower development of its first two leaves. The workflow presented in this study provides an efficient method to phenotype individual plants using a low-cost camera (an RGB camera is also suitable) and could be applied in phenotyping for applications in both simulation modelling and breeding. The rapidity and accuracy of this novel method can characterize the results of specific selection criteria (e.g. width of leaf three, number of tillers, rate of leaf appearance) that have

  5. The influence of apical and basal defoliation on the canopy structure and biochemical composition of Vitis vinifera cv. Shiraz grapes and wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pangzhen; Wu, Xiwen; Needs, Sonja; Liu, Di; Fuentes, Sigfredo; Howell, Kate

    2017-07-01

    Defoliation is a commonly used viticultural technique to balance the ratio between grapevine vegetation and fruit. Defoliation is conducted around the fruit zone to reduce the leaf photosynthetic area, and to increase sunlight exposure of grape bunches. Apical leaf removal is not commonly practiced, and therefore its influence on canopy structure and resultant wine aroma is not well studied. This study quantified the influences of apical and basal defoliation on canopy structure parameters using canopy cover photography and computer vision algorithms. The influence of canopy structure changes on the chemical compositions of grapes and wines was investigated over two vintages (2010-11 and 2015-16) in Yarra Valley, Australia. The Shiraz grapevines were subjected to five different treatments: no leaf removal (Ctrl); basal (TB) and apical (TD) leaf removal at veraison and intermediate ripeness, respectively. Basal leaf removal significantly reduced the leaf area index and foliage cover and increased canopy porosity, while apical leaf removal had limited influences on canopy parameters. However, the latter tended to result in lower alcohol level in the finished wine. Statistically significant increases in pH and decreases in TA was observed in shaded grapes, while no significant changes in the color profile and volatile compounds of the resultant wine were found. These results suggest that apical leaf removal is an effective method to reduce wine alcohol concentration with minimal influences on wine composition.

  6. The Influence of Apical and Basal Defoliation on the Canopy Structure and Biochemical Composition of Vitis vinifera cv. Shiraz Grapes and Wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pangzhen Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Defoliation is a commonly used viticultural technique to balance the ratio between grapevine vegetation and fruit. Defoliation is conducted around the fruit zone to reduce the leaf photosynthetic area, and to increase sunlight exposure of grape bunches. Apical leaf removal is not commonly practiced, and therefore its influence on canopy structure and resultant wine aroma is not well-studied. This study quantified the influences of apical and basal defoliation on canopy structure parameters using canopy cover photography and computer vision algorithms. The influence of canopy structure changes on the chemical compositions of grapes and wines was investigated over two vintages (2010–2011 and 2015–2016 in Yarra Valley, Australia. The Shiraz grapevines were subjected to five different treatments: no leaf removal (Ctrl; basal (TB and apical (TD leaf removal at veraison and intermediate ripeness, respectively. Basal leaf removal significantly reduced the leaf area index and foliage cover and increased canopy porosity, while apical leaf removal had limited influences on canopy parameters. However, the latter tended to result in lower alcohol level in the finished wine. Statistically significant increases in pH and decreases in TA was observed in shaded grapes, while no significant changes in the color profile and volatile compounds of the resultant wine were found. These results suggest that apical leaf removal is an effective method to reduce wine alcohol concentration with minimal influences on wine composition.

  7. Canopy-forming seaweeds in urchin-dominated systems in eastern Canada: structuring forces or simple prey for keystone grazers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Caitlin; Gagnon, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Models of benthic community dynamics for the extensively studied, shallow rocky ecosystems in eastern Canada emphasize kelp-urchin interactions. These models may bias the perception of factors and processes that structure communities, for they largely overlook the possible contribution of other seaweeds to ecosystem resilience. We examined the persistence of the annual, acidic (H2SO4), brown seaweed Desmarestia viridis in urchin barrens at two sites in Newfoundland (Canada) throughout an entire growth season (February to October). We also compared changes in epifaunal assemblages in D. viridis and other conspicuous canopy-forming seaweeds, the non-acidic conspecific Desmarestia aculeata and kelp Agarum clathratum. We show that D. viridis can form large canopies within the 2-to-8 m depth range that represent a transient community state termed "Desmarestia bed". The annual resurgence of Desmarestia beds and continuous occurrence of D. aculeata and A. clathratum, create biological structure for major recruitment pulses in invertebrate and fish assemblages (e.g. from quasi-absent gastropods to >150,000 recruits kg(-1) D. viridis). Many of these pulses phase with temperature-driven mass release of acid to the environment and die-off in D. viridis. We demonstrate experimentally that the chemical makeup of D. viridis and A. clathratum helps retard urchin grazing compared to D. aculeata and the highly consumed kelp Alaria esculenta. In light of our findings and related studies, we propose fundamental changes to the study of community shifts in shallow, rocky ecosystems in eastern Canada. In particular, we advocate the need to regard certain canopy-forming seaweeds as structuring forces interfering with top-down processes, rather than simple prey for keystone grazers. We also propose a novel, empirical model of ecological interactions for D. viridis. Overall, our study underscores the importance of studying organisms together with cross-scale environmental variability to

  8. Canopy-forming seaweeds in urchin-dominated systems in eastern Canada: structuring forces or simple prey for keystone grazers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Blain

    Full Text Available Models of benthic community dynamics for the extensively studied, shallow rocky ecosystems in eastern Canada emphasize kelp-urchin interactions. These models may bias the perception of factors and processes that structure communities, for they largely overlook the possible contribution of other seaweeds to ecosystem resilience. We examined the persistence of the annual, acidic (H2SO4, brown seaweed Desmarestia viridis in urchin barrens at two sites in Newfoundland (Canada throughout an entire growth season (February to October. We also compared changes in epifaunal assemblages in D. viridis and other conspicuous canopy-forming seaweeds, the non-acidic conspecific Desmarestia aculeata and kelp Agarum clathratum. We show that D. viridis can form large canopies within the 2-to-8 m depth range that represent a transient community state termed "Desmarestia bed". The annual resurgence of Desmarestia beds and continuous occurrence of D. aculeata and A. clathratum, create biological structure for major recruitment pulses in invertebrate and fish assemblages (e.g. from quasi-absent gastropods to >150,000 recruits kg(-1 D. viridis. Many of these pulses phase with temperature-driven mass release of acid to the environment and die-off in D. viridis. We demonstrate experimentally that the chemical makeup of D. viridis and A. clathratum helps retard urchin grazing compared to D. aculeata and the highly consumed kelp Alaria esculenta. In light of our findings and related studies, we propose fundamental changes to the study of community shifts in shallow, rocky ecosystems in eastern Canada. In particular, we advocate the need to regard certain canopy-forming seaweeds as structuring forces interfering with top-down processes, rather than simple prey for keystone grazers. We also propose a novel, empirical model of ecological interactions for D. viridis. Overall, our study underscores the importance of studying organisms together with cross-scale environmental

  9. Spatial variability and temporal stability of throughfall deposition under beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in relationship to canopy structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staelens, Jeroen [Ghent University, Laboratory of Forestry, Geraardsbergsesteenweg 267, 9090 Gontrode (Belgium)]. E-mail: jeroen_staelens@yahoo.com; De Schrijver, An [Ghent University, Laboratory of Forestry, Geraardsbergsesteenweg 267, 9090 Gontrode (Belgium); Verheyen, Kris [Ghent University, Laboratory of Forestry, Geraardsbergsesteenweg 267, 9090 Gontrode (Belgium); Verhoest, Niko E.C. [Ghent University, Laboratory of Hydrology and Water Management, Coupure links 653, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2006-07-15

    Although the spatial variability of throughfall (TF) in forest ecosystems can have important ecological implications, little is known about the driving factors of within-stand TF variability, particularly in deciduous forests. While the spatial variability of TF water amount and H{sup +} deposition under a dominant beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) tree was significantly higher in the leafed period than in the leafless period, the spatial TF deposition patterns of most major ions were similar in both periods. The semiannual TF depositions of all ions other than H{sup +} were significantly positively correlated (r = 0.68-0.90, p < 0.05) with canopy structure above sample locations throughout the entire year. The amounts of TF water and H{sup +} deposition during the leafed period were negatively correlated with branch cover. We conclude that the spatial heterogeneity of ion deposition under beech was significantly affected by leaves in the growing period and by branches in non-foliated conditions. - Ion deposition under a deciduous beech tree was strongly affected by the canopy structure throughout the entire year.

  10. Forest-atmosphere BVOC exchange in diverse and structurally complex canopies: 1-D modeling of a mid-successional forest in northern Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Alexander M.; Cheng, Susan J.; Ashworth, Kirsti; Guenther, Alex B.; Hardiman, Brady; Bohrer, Gil; Steiner, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    Foliar emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC)dimportant precursors of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosolsdvary widely by vegetation type. Modeling studies to date typi-cally represent the canopy as a single dominant tree type or a blend of tree types, yet many forests are diverse with trees of varying height. To assess the sensitivity of biogenic emissions to tree height vari-ation, we compare two 1-D canopy model simulations in which BVOC emission potentials are homo-geneous or heterogeneous with canopy depth. The heterogeneous canopy emulates the mid-successional forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). In this case, high-isoprene-emitting fo-liage (e.g., aspen and oak) is constrained to the upper canopy, where higher sunlight availability increases the light-dependent isoprene emission, leading to 34% more isoprene and its oxidation products as compared to the homogeneous simulation. Isoprene declines from aspen mortality are 10% larger when heterogeneity is considered. Overall, our results highlight the importance of adequately representing complexities of forest canopy structure when simulating light-dependent BVOC emissions and chemistry.

  11. Forest-atmosphere BVOC exchange in diverse and structurally complex canopies: 1-D modeling of a mid-successional forest in northern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Alexander M.; Cheng, Susan J.; Ashworth, Kirsti; Guenther, Alex B.; Hardiman, Brady S.; Bohrer, Gil; Steiner, Allison L.

    2015-11-01

    Foliar emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC)-important precursors of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols-vary widely by vegetation type. Modeling studies to date typically represent the canopy as a single dominant tree type or a blend of tree types, yet many forests are diverse with trees of varying height. To assess the sensitivity of biogenic emissions to tree height variation, we compare two 1-D canopy model simulations in which BVOC emission potentials are homogeneous or heterogeneous with canopy depth. The heterogeneous canopy emulates the mid-successional forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). In this case, high-isoprene-emitting foliage (e.g., aspen and oak) is constrained to the upper canopy, where higher sunlight availability increases the light-dependent isoprene emission, leading to 34% more isoprene and its oxidation products as compared to the homogeneous simulation. Isoprene declines from aspen mortality are 10% larger when heterogeneity is considered. Overall, our results highlight the importance of adequately representing complexities of forest canopy structure when simulating light-dependent BVOC emissions and chemistry.

  12. Impact of combined management on the newly established pasture sward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlína Hakrová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the combined grazing and cutting management on the phytocenological characteristics was examined at the submountain paddock in the South Bohemia. The botanical scans were sampled during the five-years study (2006–2010 starting after the sowing the pasture sward in the originally arable field and 0–2 years after the beginning of the grazing (paddock A and paddock B, respectively. The paddock A was grazed all year round, whereas the paddock B was grazed in spring and autumn and cut in summer for hay. At both paddocks, Lolium perenne, Trifolium repens and Taraxacum sect. Ruderalia dominated the community of total 43 and 47 species (paddock A and B, respectively. Among the sowing species, Lolium perenne, Festuca pratensis, Poa pratensis, Festuca rubra and Trifolium repens increased its cover on both paddocks, while Phleum pratense increased its cover only at paddock B. Lolium multiflorum decreased it cover at both paddocks. Most of arable field weeds disappeared (paddock A or decreased its cover (paddock B. The cover of herb layer was higher at paddock A than at paddock B, whereas the number of species (N, the diversity (H and the equitability (J was higher at paddock B than at paddock A. The cover of herb layer increased during the study at both the paddocks, while the number of species declined at paddock A and increased at paddock B.

  13. Investigating the European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) leaf characteristics along the vertical canopy profile: leaf structure, photosynthetic capacity, light energy dissipation and photoprotection mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scartazza, Andrea; Di Baccio, Daniela; Bertolotto, Pierangelo; Gavrichkova, Olga; Matteucci, Giorgio

    2016-09-01

    Forest functionality and productivity are directly related to canopy light interception and can be affected by potential damage from high irradiance. However, the mechanisms by which leaves adapt to the variable light environments along the multilayer canopy profile are still poorly known. We explored the leaf morphophysiological and metabolic responses to the natural light gradient in a pure European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) forest at three different canopy heights (top, middle and bottom). Structural adjustment through light-dependent modifications in leaf mass per area was the reason for most of the variations in photosynthetic capacity. The different leaf morphology along the canopy influenced nitrogen (N) partitioning, water- and photosynthetic N-use efficiency, chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence and quali-quantitative contents of photosynthetic pigments. The Chl a to Chl b ratio and the pool of xanthophyll-cycle pigments (VAZ) increased at the highest irradiance, as well as lutein and β-carotene. The total pool of ascorbate and phenols was higher in leaves of the top and middle canopy layers when compared with the bottom layer, where the ascorbate peroxidase was relatively more activated. The non-photochemical quenching was strongly and positively related to the VAZ/(Chl a + b) ratio, while Chl a/Chl b was related to the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II. Along the multilayer canopy profile, the high energy dissipation capacity of leaves was correlated to an elevated redox potential of antioxidants. The middle layer gave the most relevant contribution to leaf area index and carboxylation capacity of the canopy. In conclusion, a complex interplay among structural, physiological and biochemical traits drives the dynamic leaf acclimation to the natural gradients of variable light environments along the tree canopy profile. The relevant differences observed in leaf traits within the canopy positions of the beech forest should be considered for

  14. Spatial Partitioning of CO2 Fluxes Based on Canopy Structure Within a Heterogeneous Managed Boreal Wetland Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasmer, L.; Petrone, R.; Quinton, W.; Brown, S.; Hopkinson, C.

    2009-05-01

    Vegetation canopy structural characteristics play an important role in the transfer of mass and energy exchanges through time. The spatial variability of biomass surrounding the eddy covariance flux measurement system (EC) will result in differences in a) the amount of surface area available for flux exchanges, b) aerodynamic roughness of the ecosystem, and c) the source area (biophysical influences) on fluxes, depending on wind direction. The following study classifies CO2 fluxes based on wind direction and land cover/vegetation type using a combination of EC flux measurements, footprint model parameterization, and airborne lidar within a heterogeneous boreal wetland ecosystem. CO2 and H2O fluxes have been examined within the Utikuma Regional Study Area, Alberta, using EC methods since 2005. This site is unique because, in most cases, EC are deployed in flat and homogeneous land cover types with large fetch. The wetland/upland complex examined here is heterogeneous and is characterised by low-lying wetlands to the south and south-west of the EC and upland aspen forests to the north and north-east. Further, airborne lidar provides spatially explicit, high resolution three-dimensional measurements of the vegetation canopy, understory, and ground surface that are both time consuming and expensive to measure using typical forest mensuration/survey methods. The influences of vegetation structure, specifically surface area of leaves (leaf area index), aerodynamic properties of vegetation surrounding the EC, and land cover types on fluxes are examined. Spatial partitioning of fluxes based on land cover type and wind direction is used to examine both wetland and upland exchange processes.

  15. Linking canopy reflectance to crop structure and photosynthesis to capture and interpret spatiotemporal dimensions of per-field photosynthetic productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei; Jeong, Seungtaek; Ko, Jonghan; Tenhunen, John

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen and water availability alter canopy structure and physiology, and thus crop growth, yielding large impacts on ecosystem-regulating/production provisions. However, to date, explicitly quantifying such impacts remains challenging partially due to lack of adequate methodology to capture spatial dimensions of ecosystem changes associated with nitrogen and water effects. A data fitting, where close-range remote-sensing measurements of vegetation indices derived from a handheld instrument and an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system are linked to in situ leaf and canopy photosynthetic traits, was applied to capture and interpret inter- and intra-field variations in gross primary productivity (GPP) in lowland rice grown under flooded conditions (paddy rice, PD) subject to three nitrogen application rates and under rainfed conditions (RF) in an East Asian monsoon region of South Korea. Spatial variations (SVs) in both GPP and light use efficiency (LUEcabs) early in the growing season were enlarged by nitrogen addition. The nutritional effects narrowed over time. A shift in planting culture from flooded to rainfed conditions strengthened SVs in GPP and LUEcabs. Intervention of prolonged drought late in the growing season dramatically intensified SVs that were supposed to seasonally decrease. Nevertheless, nitrogen addition effects on SV of LUEcabs at the early growth stage made PD fields exert greater SVs than RF fields. SVs of GPP across PD and RF rice fields were likely related to leaf area index (LAI) development less than to LUEcabs, while numerical analysis suggested that considering strength in LUEcabs and its spatial variation for the same crop type tends to be vital for better evaluation in landscape/regional patterns of ecosystem photosynthetic productivity at critical phenology stages.

  16. Exploring the spatial distribution of light interception and photosynthesis of canopies by means of a functional-structural plant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarlikioti, V.; Visser, de P.H.B.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims - At present most process-based models and the majority of three-dimensional models include simplifications of plant architecture that can compromise the accuracy of light interception simulations and, accordingly, canopy photosynthesis. The aim of this paper is to analyse canopy

  17. The relationship between Gross Primary Productivity and Sun-Induced Fluorescence in a nutrient manipulated Mediterranean grassland is controlled primarily by canopy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliavacca, Mirco

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies have shown how human induced N/P imbalances affect essential ecosystem processes, and might be particularly important in water-limited ecosystems. Hyperspectral information can be used to directly infer nutrient-induces variation in structural and functional changes of vegetation under different nutrient availability. Among those, sun-induced fluorescence in the far-red region provides a new non-invasive measurement approach that has the potential to quantify dynamic changes in light-use efficiency and photosynthetic carbon dioxide uptake (Gross Primary Production, GPP). However, the mechanistic link between GPP and sun-induced fluorescence under different environmental conditions is not completely understood. In this contribution we investigated the structural and functional factors controlling the emission of SIF at 760 nm in a Mediterranean grassland with different levels of nutrient availability (Nitrogen (N), Phosphorous (P), and Nitrogen and Phosphorous (NP)). We showed how nutrient-induced changes in canopy structure (i.e. changes in plant forms abundance that influence leaf inclination distribution function, LIDF) and functional traits (e.g. nitrogen content per dry mass of leaves, N%, Chlorophyll ab concentration - Cab, and maximum carboxylation capacity, Vcmax) affected the observed relationship between SIF and GPP. Simultaneous measurements of canopy scale GPP and SIF were conducted with transparent transient-state canopy chambers and narrow-band spectrometers, respectively. To disentangle the main drivers of the GPP-SIF relationship we performed a factorial modeling exercise with the Soil-Canopy Observation of Photosynthesis and Energy (SCOPE) model. We conclude that the addition of nutrients imposed a change in the abundance of different plant forms and biochemistry of the canopy. This lead to changes in canopy structure (leaf area index, leaf inclinaton distribution function LIDF parameters) and functional traits (N%, P%, Cab and Vcmax

  18. The effect of sward type, cutting frequency and fertilizer-N ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... grass/legume mixed swards), three cutting regimes (4, 8 and 12 weeks) and two nitrogen fertilizer rates. (0 and 300 kg N ... however, increased (P < 0.05) from 11 to 14% with fertilizer application compared with the control in. 2006. Type of ... The required quantity of nitrogen as Urea (46%N) was divided ...

  19. Effect of owersowing on yields and botanical composition of pasture sward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Müller

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several metods of permanent pasture renovation. Different technologies were investigated on a pasture sward. Three seeders (Einböck seeder with the tine harrow, no-till Sulky disc seeder and SPP 8 strip seeder and two fertilization regimes (with no fertilization and with mineral fertilization N90P30K60 kg.ha−1 were used to determine optimum methods of establishment and the use of oversowed pasture swards. In the first year, renovated plots had a higher DM production than control plots. The pasture oversowing had no effect on herbage production in the second production year. The fertilization had no effect in the first production year with a higher clover content in the sward. The share of clovers was higher in plots oversown with the Einböck and Sulky seeders but only in the second and third cuts of the first production year and in the third cut of the second production year. The highest content of clovers was observed in the second and third cuts. There was a positive correlation between the clover content in DM yield and herbage DM production. The oversowing did not show any effect on the grass content in the pasture sward.

  20. Seasonal selection of soil types and grass swards by roan antelope in a South African savanna.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heitkönig, I.M.A.; Owen-Smith, N.

    1997-01-01

    Roan antelope are distributed mainly in regions characterized by infertile soils, offering food of low quality. We hypothesized that roan may select localities with higher soil nutrient levels and/or grass swards with more favourable properties in terms of food abundance or quality than generally

  1. Complementary effects of red clover inclusion in ryegrass-white clover swards for grazing and cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Askegaard, Margrethe; Søegaard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Increasing plant species diversity in grasslands may improve productivity and stability of yields. In a field experiment, we investigated the herbage dry-matter (DM) yield and crude protein content of two-species swards of perennial ryegrass–white clover (Lolium perenne L.–Trifolium repens L...

  2. Nitrogen fertilization of grass/clover swards under cutting or grazing by dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søegaard, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Intensively managed perennial ryegrass/white clover (Lolium perenne L. and Trifolium repens L.) swards receive relatively high levels of fertilizer N, and high N surpluses can subsequently be found. The N-fertilization effects on growth, yield, and herbage quality were therefore examined on three...

  3. A sub-canopy structure for simulating oil palm in the Community Land Model: phenology, allocation and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.; Roupsard, O.; Bernoux, M.; Le Maire, G.; Panferov, O.; Kotowska, M. M.; Knohl, A.

    2015-06-01

    Land surface modelling has been widely used to characterize the two-way interactions between climate and human activities in terrestrial ecosystems such as deforestation, agricultural expansion, and urbanization. Towards an effort to quantify the effects of forests to oil palm conversion occurring in the tropics on land-atmosphere carbon, water and energy fluxes, we introduce a new perennial crop plant functional type (PFT) for oil palm. Due to the modular and sequential nature of oil palm growth (around 40 stacked phytomers) and yield (fruit bunches axillated on each phytomer), we developed a specific sub-canopy structure for simulating palm's growth and yield within the framework of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5). In this structure each phytomer has its own prognostic leaf growth and fruit yield capacity like a PFT but with shared stem and root components among all phytomers. Phenology and carbon and nitrogen allocation operate on the different phytomers in parallel but at unsynchronized steps, so that multiple fruit yields per annum are enabled in terms of carbon and nitrogen outputs. An important phenological phase is identified for the palm PFT - the storage growth period of bud and "spear" leaves which are photosynthetically inactive before expansion. Agricultural practices such as transplanting, fertilization, and leaf pruning are represented. Parameters introduced for the new PFT were calibrated and validated with field measurements of leaf area index (LAI) and yield from Sumatra, Indonesia. In calibration with a mature oil palm plantation, the cumulative yields from 2005 to 2014 matched perfectly between simulation and observation (mean percentage error = 4 %). Simulated inter-annual dynamics of PFT-level and phytomer-level LAI were both within the range of field measurements. Validation from eight independent oil palm sites shows the ability of the model to adequately predict the average leaf growth and fruit yield across sites but also indicates that

  4. Remote canopy hemispherical image collection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xuefen; Liu, Bingyu; Yang, Yi; Han, Fang; Cui, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Canopies are major part of plant photosynthesis and have distinct architectural elements such as tree crowns, whorls, branches, shoots, etc. By measuring canopy structural parameters, the solar radiation interception, photosynthesis effects and the spatio-temporal distribution of solar radiation under the canopy can be evaluated. Among canopy structure parameters, Leaf Area Index (LAI) is the key one. Leaf area index is a crucial variable in agronomic and environmental studies, because of its importance for estimating the amount of radiation intercepted by the canopy and the crop water requirements. The LAI can be achieved by hemispheric images which are obtained below the canopy with high accuracy and effectiveness. But existing hemispheric images canopy-LAI measurement technique is based on digital SLR camera with a fisheye lens. Users need to collect hemispheric image manually. The SLR camera with fisheye lens is not suit for long-term canopy-LAI outdoor measurement too. And the high cost of SLR limits its capacity. In recent years, with the development of embedded system and image processing technology, low cost remote canopy hemispheric image acquisition technology is becoming possible. In this paper, we present a remote hemispheric canopy image acquisition system with in-field/host configuration. In-field node based on imbed platform, low cost image sensor and fisheye lens is designed to achieve hemispherical image of plant canopy at distance with low cost. Solar radiation and temperature/humidity data, which are important for evaluating image data validation, are obtained for invalid hemispherical image elimination and node maintenance too. Host computer interacts with in-field node by 3G network. The hemispherical image calibration and super resolution are used to improve image quality in host computer. Results show that the remote canopy image collection system can make low cost remote canopy image acquisition for LAI effectively. It will be a potential

  5. Kinetic energy of Throughfall in subtropical forests of SE China - effects of tree canopy structure, functional traits, and biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Geißler

    Full Text Available Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE plays an important role in soil erosion in forests. We studied TKE as a function of biodiversity, functional diversity as well as structural stand variables in a secondary subtropical broad-leaved forest in the Gutianshan National Nature Reserve (GNNR in south-east China, a biodiversity hotspot in the northern hemisphere with more than 250 woody species present. Using a mixed model approach we could identify significant effects of all these variables on TKE: TKE increased with rarefied tree species richness and decreased with increasing proportion of needle-leaved species and increasing leaf area index (LAI. Furthermore, for average rainfall amounts TKE was decreasing with tree canopy height whereas for high rainfall amounts this was not the case. The spatial pattern of throughfall was stable across several rain events. The temporal variation of TKE decreased with rainfall intensity and increased with tree diversity. Our results show that more diverse forest stands over the season have to cope with higher cumulative raindrop energy than less diverse stands. However, the kinetic energy (KE of one single raindrop is less predictable in diverse stands since the variability in KE is higher. This paper is the first to contribute to the understanding of the ecosystem function of soil erosion prevention in diverse subtropical forests.

  6. Kinetic energy of Throughfall in subtropical forests of SE China - effects of tree canopy structure, functional traits, and biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, Christian; Nadrowski, Karin; Kühn, Peter; Baruffol, Martin; Bruelheide, Helge; Schmid, Bernhard; Scholten, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Throughfall kinetic energy (TKE) plays an important role in soil erosion in forests. We studied TKE as a function of biodiversity, functional diversity as well as structural stand variables in a secondary subtropical broad-leaved forest in the Gutianshan National Nature Reserve (GNNR) in south-east China, a biodiversity hotspot in the northern hemisphere with more than 250 woody species present. Using a mixed model approach we could identify significant effects of all these variables on TKE: TKE increased with rarefied tree species richness and decreased with increasing proportion of needle-leaved species and increasing leaf area index (LAI). Furthermore, for average rainfall amounts TKE was decreasing with tree canopy height whereas for high rainfall amounts this was not the case. The spatial pattern of throughfall was stable across several rain events. The temporal variation of TKE decreased with rainfall intensity and increased with tree diversity. Our results show that more diverse forest stands over the season have to cope with higher cumulative raindrop energy than less diverse stands. However, the kinetic energy (KE) of one single raindrop is less predictable in diverse stands since the variability in KE is higher. This paper is the first to contribute to the understanding of the ecosystem function of soil erosion prevention in diverse subtropical forests.

  7. Canopy characteristics, animal behavior and forage intake by goats grazing on Tanzania-grass pasture with different heights - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v34i4.14544

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurílio Souza dos Santos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of Tanzania-grass sward height (30, 50, 70 and 90 cm on the morphological characteristics of the canopy, grazing behavior and forage intake by adult Anglo Nubian female goats. A completely randomized experimental design was employed, with two replicates in space and two replicates in time. Six animals were used to assess the grazing behavior, and four, the ingestion process. The rise in sward height increased the forage and leaf mass, the percentages of stem and dead material, and reduced the leaf stem-1 ratio. Above 50 cm there was an increase in grazing time and a decrease in leisure time. A positive linear correlation was detected between sward height and bite depth. The consumed forage mass, ingestion rate and daily intake were higher at 50 cm, indicating that the other heights reduced the intake process. The sward height was negatively correlated to the bite rate and positively to the bite time. The sward height of 50 cm presents the best combination of features, favoring the grazing and ingestive behavior of female adult goats.

  8. Spectroscopic Remote Sensing of Non-Structural Carbohydrates in Forest Canopies

    OpenAIRE

    Asner, Gregory P.; Martin, Roberta E.

    2015-01-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) are products of photosynthesis, and leaf NSC concentration may be a prognostic indicator of climate-change tolerance in woody plants. However, measurement of leaf NSC is prohibitively labor intensive, especially in tropical forests, where foliage is difficult to access and where NSC concentrations vary enormously by species and across environments. Imaging spectroscopy may allow quantitative mapping of leaf NSC, but this possibility remains unproven. We test...

  9. Quantification of the effects of architectural traits on dry mass production and light interception of tomato canopy under different temperature regimes using a dynamic functional-structural plant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsu-Wei; Nguyen, Thi My Nguyet; Kahlen, Katrin; Stützel, Hartmut

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing interest in evaluating the environmental effects on crop architectural traits and yield improvement. However, crop models describing the dynamic changes in canopy structure with environmental conditions and the complex interactions between canopy structure, light interception, and dry mass production are only gradually emerging. Using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) as a model crop, a dynamic functional-structural plant model (FSPM) was constructed, parameterized, and evaluated to analyse the effects of temperature on architectural traits, which strongly influence canopy light interception and shoot dry mass. The FSPM predicted the organ growth, organ size, and shoot dry mass over time with high accuracy (>85%). Analyses of this FSPM showed that, in comparison with the reference canopy, shoot dry mass may be affected by leaf angle by as much as 20%, leaf curvature by up to 7%, the leaf length:width ratio by up to 5%, internode length by up to 9%, and curvature ratios and leaf arrangement by up to 6%. Tomato canopies at low temperature had higher canopy density and were more clumped due to higher leaf area and shorter internodes. Interestingly, dry mass production and light interception of the clumped canopy were more sensitive to changes in architectural traits. The complex interactions between architectural traits, canopy light interception, dry mass production, and environmental conditions can be studied by the dynamic FSPM, which may serve as a tool for designing a canopy structure which is 'ideal' in a given environment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. The effect of sward type, cutting frequency and fertilizer-N ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tiller number per m-2 was higher (P < 0.05) in pure grass sward compared with where grass was in mixture with legume in 2007. Increasing cutting interval from 4 to 12 weeks reduced (P < 0.05) the proportion of leaf fraction from 55 to 40% in 2006. The stem fraction was increased (P < 0.05) from 32 to 42%, while the ...

  11. Canopy Height and Vertical Structure from Multibaseline Polarimetric InSAR: First Results of the 2016 NASA/ESA AfriSAR Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavalle, M.; Hensley, S.; Lou, Y.; Saatchi, S. S.; Pinto, N.; Simard, M.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Duncanson, L.; Dubayah, R.; Hofton, M. A.; Blair, J. B.; Armston, J.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we explore the derivation of canopy height and vertical structure from polarimetric-interferometric SAR (PolInSAR) data collected during the 2016 AfriSAR campaign in Gabon. AfriSAR is a joint effort between NASA and ESA to acquire multi-baseline L- and P-band radar data, lidar data and field data over tropical forests and savannah sites to support calibration, validation and algorithm development in preparation for the NISAR, GEDI and BIOMASS missions. Here we focus on the L-band UAVSAR dataset acquired over the Lope National Park in Central Gabon to demonstrate mapping of canopy height and vertical structure using PolInSAR and tomographic techniques. The Lope site features a natural gradient of forest biomass from the forest-savanna boundary ( 400 Mg/ha). Our dataset includes 9 long-baseline, full-polarimetric UAVSAR acquisitions along with field and lidar data from the Laser Vegetation Ice Sensor (LVIS). We first present a brief theoretical background of the PolInSAR and tomographic techniques. We then show the results of our PolInSAR algorithms to create maps of canopy height generated via inversion of the random-volume-over-ground (RVOG) and random-motion-over-ground (RVoG) models. In our approach multiple interferometric baselines are merged incoherently to maximize the interferometric sensitivity over a broad range of tree heights. Finally we show how traditional tomographic algorithms are used for the retrieval of the full vertical canopy profile. We compare our results from the different PolInSAR/tomographic algorithms to validation data derived from lidar and field data.

  12. Assessment of Hyperspectral Remote Sensing for Analyzing the Impact of Human Trampling on Alpine Swards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena Kycko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tourist traffic has been observed to cause changes in vegetation cover, particularly in alpine areas. These changes can be monitored using remote-sensing methods. This paper presents an analysis of the condition of the dominant sward species surrounding the most frequented alpine tourist trails in the Tatra National Park, one of the most visited natural mountain parks in Poland and a UNESCO Man and the Biosphere Reserve. Hyperspectral measurements of interactions between the electromagnetic spectrum and the morphology and physiology of plants were presented. The spectral properties of plants and remote-sensing vegetation indices could be used at a later date for monitoring, for example from the air. The results identified the species' sensitivity and resistance to trampling and allowed an assessment of their physiological condition. Differences were observed in the conditions of trampled and control plants. The alpine swards in the Tatra National Park were assessed as being in good condition, with only small areas located close to the most popular trails showing damage. The proposed method for analyzing the condition of alpine swards could be a useful tool for the future management of protected areas.

  13. Steers production in integrated crop-livestock systems: pasture management under different sward heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane de Lima Wesp

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different grazing intensities on forage production and animal performance of yearling steers kept under permanent grazing in an integrated crop-livestock system. The treatments consisted of areas with sward heights of 10; 20; 30 and 40 cm, and one treatment with no grazing. The pastures were of bristle oat (Avena strigosa Schreb. and annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam. following soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr.. The variables forage mass, forage allowance and residual straw showed a positive and linear fit to the increasing sward height (P≤0.0001. Average daily gain of steers displayed a quadratic response (P = 0.0017, being optimal with increases in grazing height up to values of near 30 cm, showing a weight gain per animal of approximately 1.0 kg day-1. A similar response was seen for live weight at slaughter and carcass characteristics (P≤0.0305. The results suggest that sward heights close to 30 cm provide greater individual gains, due to the increase in forage available to each animal and the better quality of the consumed forage without compromising the residual straw destined for the following crop.

  14. Extracting forest canopy structure from spatial information of high resolution optical imagery: tree crown size versus leaf area index

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Song; M.B. Dickinson

    2008-01-01

    Leaves are the primary interface where energy, water and carbon exchanges occur between the forest ecosystems and the atmosphere. Leaf area index (LAI) is a measure of the amount of leaf area in a stand, and the tree crown size characterizes how leaves are clumped in the canopy. Both LAI and tree crown size are of essential ecological and management value. There is a...

  15. Effects of canopy structural variables on retrieval of leaf dry matter content and specific leaf area from remotely sensed data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, A.M.; Darvishzadeh, R.; Skidmore, A.K.; van Duren, I.C.

    2016-01-01

    Leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and specific leaf area (SLA) are two important traits in measuring biodiversity. To use remote sensing for the estimation of these traits, it is essential to understand the underlying factors that influence their relationships with canopy reflectance. The effect of

  16. Comparative measurements of transpiration an canopy conductance in two mixed deciduous woodlands differing in structure and species composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Mathias; Rosier, Paul T.W.; Morecroft, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    a continuous hazel (Corylus avellana L.) understory. Wytham Woods, which had an LAI of 3.6, was dominated by ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) and had only a sparse understory. Annual canopy transpiration was 367 mm for Grimsbury Wood and 397 mm for Wytham Woods. These values...

  17. Quantifying structural and physiological controls on variation in canopy transpiration among planted pine and hardwood species in the southern Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelcy R. Ford; Robert M. Hubbard; James M. Vose

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that planted pine stands exhibit higher evapotranspiration (ET) and are more sensitive to climatic conditions compared with hardwood stands. Whether this is due to management and stand effects, biological effects or their interaction is poorly understood. We estimated growing season canopy- and sap flux-scaled leaf-level transpiration (Ec and...

  18. Developing a global mixed-canopy, height-variable vegetation structure dataset for estimating global vegetation albedo by a clumped canopy radiative transfer scheme in the NASA Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model and GISS GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Carlo; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Yang, Wenze; Schaaf, Crystal; Aleinov, Igor; Jonas, Jeffrey A.; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Tian; Wang, Zhuosen; Sun, Qingsong; Carrer, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Processes determining biosphere-atmosphere coupling are strongly influenced by vegetation structure. Thus, ecosystem carbon sequestration and evapotranspiration affecting global carbon and water balances will depend upon the spatial extent of vegetation, its vertical structure, and its physiological variability. To represent this globally, Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) coupled to General Circulation Models (GCMs) make use of satellite and/or model-based vegetation classifications often composed by homogeneous communities. This work aims at developing a new Global Vegetation Structure Dataset (GVSD) by incorporating varying vegetation heights for mixed plant communities to be used as boundary conditions to the Analytical Clumped Two-Stream (ACTS) canopy radiative transfer scheme (Ni-Meister et al., 2010) incorporated into the NASA Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), the DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. Information sources about land surface and vegetation characteristics obtained from a number of earth observation platforms and algorithms include the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover and plant functional types (PFTs) (Friedl et al., 2010), soil albedo derived from MODIS (Carrer et al., 2014), along with vegetation height from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on board ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) (Simard et al., 2011; Tang et al., 2014). Three widely used Leaf Area Index (LAI) products are compared as input to the GVSD and ACTS forcing in terms of vegetation albedo: Global Data Sets of Vegetation (LAI)3g (Zhu et al. 2013), Beijing Normal University LAI (Yuan et al., 2011), and MODIS MOD15A2H product (Yang et al., 2006). Further PFT partitioning is performed according to a climate classification utilizing the Climate Research Unit (CRU; Harris et al., 2013) and the NOAA Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC; Scheider et al., 2014) data. Final

  19. Using a semi-automated filtering process to improve large footprint lidar sub-canopy elevation models and forest structure metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, G. A.; Saatchi, S.; Meyer, V.; Gillespie, T.; Sheng, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Quantification of sub-canopy topography and forest structure is important for developing a better understanding of how forest ecosystems function. This study focuses on a three-step method to adapt discrete return lidar (DRL) filtering techniques to Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) large-footprint lidar (LFL) waveforms to improve the accuracy of both sub-canopy digital elevation models (DEMs), as well as forest structure measurements. The results of the experiment demonstrate that LFL ground surfaces can be effectively filtered using methods adapted from DRL point filtering methods, and the resulting data will produce more accurate digital elevation models, as well as improved estimates of forest structure. The first step quantifies the slope present at the center of each LFL pulse, and the average error expected at each particular degree of slope is modeled. Areas of high terrain slope show consistently more error in LFL ground detection, and empirical relationships between terrain angle and expected LVIS ground detection error are established. These relationships are then used to create an algorithm for LFL ground elevation correction. The second step uses an iterative, expanding window filter to identify outlier points which are not part of the ground surface, as well as manual editing to identify laser pulses which are not at ground level. The semi-automated methods improved the LVIS DEM accuracy significantly by identifying significant outliers in the LVIS point cloud. The final step develops an approach which utilizes both the filtered LFL DEMs, and the modeled error introduced by terrain slope to improve both sub-canopy elevation models, and above ground LFL waveform metrics. DRL and LVIS data from Barro Colorado Island, Panama, and La Selva, Costa Rica were used to develop and test the algorithm. Acknowledgements: Special thanks to Dr. Jim Dilling for providing the DRL lidar data for Barro Colorado Island.

  20. ASSESSING THE CANOPY INTEGRITY USING CANOPY DIGITAL IMAGES IN SEMIDECIDUOUS FOREST FRAGMENT IN SÃO CARLOS - SP- BRAZIL1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Yamada

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is well-known that conducting experimental research aiming the characterization of canopy structure of forests can be a difficult and costly task and, generally, requires an expert to extract, in loco, relevant information. Aiming at easing studies related to canopy structures, several techniques have been proposed in the literature and, among them, various are based on canopy digital image analysis. The research work described in this paper empirically compares two techniques that measure the integrity of the canopy structure of a forest fragment; one of them is based on central parts of canopy cover images and, the other, on canopy closure images. For the experiments, 22 central parts of canopy cover images and 22 canopy closure images were used. The images were captured along two transects: T1 (located in the conserved area and T2 (located in the naturally disturbance area. The canopy digital images were computationally processed and analyzed using the MATLAB platform for the canopy cover images and the Gap Light Analyzer (GLA, for the canopy closure images. The results obtained using these two techniques showed that canopy cover images and, among the employed algorithms, the Jseg, characterize the canopy integrity best. It is worth mentioning that part of the analysis can be automatically conducted, as a quick and precise process, with low material costs involved.

  1. Effects of chicory/perennial ryegrass swards compared with perennial ryegrass swards on the performance and carcass quality of grazing beef steers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Marley

    Full Text Available An experiment investigated whether the inclusion of chicory (Cichorium intybus in swards grazed by beef steers altered their performance, carcass characteristics or parasitism when compared to steers grazing perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne. Triplicate 2-ha plots were established with a chicory/ryegrass mix or ryegrass control. Forty-eight Belgian Blue-cross steers were used in the first grazing season and a core group (n = 36 were retained for finishing in the second grazing season. The experiment comprised of a standardisation and measurement period. During standardisation, steers grazed a ryegrass/white clover pasture as one group. Animals were allocated to treatment on the basis of liveweight, body condition and faecal egg counts (FEC determined 7 days prior to the measurement period. The measurement period ran from 25 May until 28 September 2010 and 12 April until 11 October 2011 in the first and second grazing year. Steers were weighed every 14 days at pasture or 28 days during housing. In the first grazing year, faecal samples were collected for FEC and parasite cultures. At the end of the first grazing year, individual blood samples were taken to determine O. ostertagi antibody and plasma pepsinogen levels. During winter, animals were housed as one group and fed silage. In the second grazing year, steers were slaughtered when deemed to reach fat class 3. Data on steer performance showed no differences in daily live-weight gain which averaged 1.04 kg/day. The conformation, fat grade and killing out proportion of beef steers grazing chicory/ryegrass or ryegrass were not found to differ. No differences in FEC, O. ostertagi antibody or plasma pepsinogen levels of beef steers grazing either chicory/ryegrass or ryegrass were observed. Overall, there were no detrimental effects of including chicory in swards grazed by beef cattle on their performance, carcass characteristics or helminth parasitism, when compared with steers grazing ryegrass.

  2. Modelling canopy fuel and forest stand variables and characterizing the influence of thinning in the stand structure using airborne LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hevia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Forest fires are a major threat in NW Spain. The importance and frequency of these events in the area suggests the need for fuel management programs to reduce the spread and severity of forest fires. Thinning treatments can contribute for fire risk reduction, because they cut off the horizontal continuity of forest fuels. Besides, it is necessary to conduct a fire risk management based on the knowledge of fuel allocation, since fire behaviour and fire spread study is dependent on the spatial factor. Therefore, mapping fuel for different silvicultural scenarios is essential. Modelling forest variables and forest structure parameters from LiDAR technology is the starting point for developing spatially explicit maps. This is essential in the generation of fuel maps since field measurements of canopy fuel variables is not feasible. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of LiDAR technology to estimate canopy fuel variables and other stand variables, as well as to identify structural differences between silvicultural managed and unmanaged P. pinaster Ait. stands. Independent variables (LiDAR metrics of greater explanatory significance were identified and regression analyses indicated strong relationships between those and field-derived variables (R2 varied between 0.86 and 0.97. Significant differences were found in some LiDAR metrics when compared thinned and unthinned stands. Results showed that LiDAR technology allows to model canopy fuel and stand variables with high precision in this species, and provides useful information for identifying areas with and without silvicultural management.

  3. Characterization of the horizontal structure of the tropical forest canopy using object-based LiDAR and multispectral image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Stéphane; Lainé, Gérard; Tassin, Jacques; Sarrailh, Jean-Michel

    2013-12-01

    This article's goal is to explore the benefits of using Digital Surface Model (DSM) and Digital Terrain Model (DTM) derived from LiDAR acquisitions for characterizing the horizontal structure of different facies in forested areas (primary forests vs. secondary forests) within the framework of an object-oriented classification. The area under study is the island of Mayotte in the western Indian Ocean. The LiDAR data were the data originally acquired by an airborne small-footprint discrete-return LiDAR for the "Litto3D" coastline mapping project. They were used to create a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) at a spatial resolution of 1 m and a Digital Canopy Model (DCM) using median filtering. The use of two successive segmentations at different scales allowed us to adjust the segmentation parameters to the local structure of the landscape and of the cover. Working in object-oriented mode with LiDAR allowed us to discriminate six vegetation classes based on canopy height and horizontal heterogeneity. This heterogeneity was assessed using a texture index calculated from the height-transition co-occurrence matrix. Overall accuracy exceeds 90%. The resulting product is the first vegetation map of Mayotte which emphasizes the structure over the composition.

  4. Performance Considerations for the SIMPL Single Photon, Polarimetric, Two-Color Laser Altimeter as Applied to Measurements of Forest Canopy Structure and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Philip W.; Harding, David J.; Valett, Susan R.; Vasilyev, Aleksey A.; Yu, Anthony W.

    2012-01-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) is a multi-beam, micropulse airborne laser altimeter that acquires active and passive polarimetric optical remote sensing measurements at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. SIMPL was developed to demonstrate advanced measurement approaches of potential benefit for improved, more efficient spaceflight laser altimeter missions. SIMPL data have been acquired for wide diversity of forest types in the summers of 2010 and 2011 in order to assess the potential of its novel capabilities for characterization of vegetation structure and composition. On each of its four beams SIMPL provides highly-resolved measurements of forest canopy structure by detecting single-photons with 15 cm ranging precision using a narrow-beam system operating at a laser repetition rate of 11 kHz. Associated with that ranging data SIMPL provides eight amplitude parameters per beam unlike the single amplitude provided by typical laser altimeters. Those eight parameters are received energy that is parallel and perpendicular to that of the plane-polarized transmit pulse at 532 nm (green) and 1064 nm (near IR), for both the active laser backscatter retro-reflectance and the passive solar bi-directional reflectance. This poster presentation will cover the instrument architecture and highlight the performance of the SIMPL instrument with examples taken from measurements for several sites with distinct canopy structures and compositions. Specific performance areas such as probability of detection, after pulsing, and dead time, will be highlighted and addressed, along with examples of their impact on the measurements and how they limit the ability to accurately model and recover the canopy properties. To assess the sensitivity of SIMPL's measurements to canopy properties an instrument model has been implemented in the FLIGHT radiative transfer code, based on Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport. SIMPL data collected in 2010 over

  5. Do Phytomer Turnover Models of Plant Morphology Describe Perennial Ryegrass Root Data from Field Swards?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to elucidate seasonal dynamics of ryegrass root systems in field swards. Established field swards of perennial ryegrass with white clover removed by herbicide and fertilised with nitrogen (N to replace clover N fixation were subjected to lax and hard grazing management and root biomass deposition monitored using a root ingrowth core technique over a 13 month period. A previously published phytomer-based model of plant morphology that assumes continuous turnover of the root system was used to estimate mean individual root weight (mg not previously available for field swards. The predicted root weights compared credibly with root data from hydroponic culture and the model output explained much of the seasonal variation in the field data. In particular, root deposition showed a seasonality consistent with influence of an architectural signal (AS determined by plant morphology. This AS arises because it is theoretically expected that with rising temperatures and decreasing phyllochron in early summer, more than one leaf on average would feed each root bearing node. Conversely, in autumn the reverse would apply and root deposition is expected to be suppressed. The phytomer-based model was also able to explain deeper root penetration in summer dry conditions, as seen in the field data. A prediction of the model is that even though total root deposition is reduced by less than 10% under hard grazing, individual root weight is reduced proportionately more because the available substrate is being shared between a higher population of tillers. Two features of the field data not explained by the phytomer based model, and therefore suggestive of hormonal signaling, were peaks of root production after summer drought and in late winter that preceded associated herbage mass rises by about one month. In summary, this research supports a view that the root system of ryegrass is turning over on a continuous basis, like the leaves above ground

  6. Sward and milk production response to early turnout of dairy cows to pasture in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Virkajärvi, Perttu; Sairanen, Auvo; Nousiainen, Jouni I.; Khalili, Hannele

    2003-01-01

    The timing of turnout is an important factor affecting the grazing management of dairy cows. However, its consequences are not well known in the short grazing season of northern Europe. Thus, the effect of the turnout date of dairy cows to pasture on sward regrowth, herbage mass production and milk production was studied in two experiments, 1) a grazing trial with 16 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows and 2) a plot trial where the treatments simulated the grazing trial. The treatments were early tu...

  7. Estimated metabolizable energy yields of perennial and annual grass swards compared with those of spring barley and oat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. NIEMELÄINEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The dry matter yields of cultivar trials (from 1976 to 1998 at 15 sites in Finland of perennial grass sward (meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis cv. Boris, annual grass sward (Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum, cv. Barmultra and Mitos, spring barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Otra, Arra, Arve and oat (Avena sativa cv. Veli were used to estimate metabolisable energy yields (MEY by using the feeds metabolisable energy concentration values (MJ/kg DM from ruminant feed tables. Harvest index (HI of barley and oat was set to 50%, and straw yields and whole crop cereal silage (WCCS yields were generated from grain yields accordingly. The MEY in the third year of perennial grass (81.4 GJ/ha was significantly lower than that in the first (90.0 GJ/ha and second years (90.7 GJ/ha. However, on average, the one to three year old perennial grass-swards had significantly higher MEY than the annual grass swards (87.7 vs. 83.3 GJ/ha, respectively. The MEYs of perennial and annual grass swards were substantially higher than the MEY of barley grain (52.7 GJ/ha and oat grain (47. 8 GJ/ha. When the total herbage of cereals, i.e. straw and grain, was used in the calculations, at a ME value of 6.0 MJ/ kg dry matter (DM for straw, the MEY of barley rose to 75.8 GJ/ha and that of oat to 72.6 GJ/ha. Additionally, the MEY of barley was estimated in the WCCS production situation by converting total herbage to MEY by using ME value 9.9 MJ/kg DM. The MEY of barley in the WCCS calculations was 77.4 GJ/ha, which was significantly lower than the MEY of annual and perennial grass swards. The MEY of barley was a 60%, b 86%, and c 88% of the average MEY of one to three year old perennial grass sward when the MEY of barley was calculated according to a grain, b grain + straw, and c whole crop cereal silage. Perennial grass sward was the most productive of the studied crops in metabolisable energy production for ruminants.

  8. Matgrass sward plant species benefit from soil organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, E.P.; Raaijmakers, C.E.; Bakx-Schotman, J.M.T.; Hannula, S.E.; Kemmers, R.H.; Boer, de W.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Soil organisms are important in the structuring of plant communities. However, little is known about how to apply this knowledge to vegetation management. Here, we examined if soil organisms may promote plant species of characteristic habitats, and suppress plant species of disturbed habitats. We

  9. Forage intake processes by goats on a massai grass pasture with different sward heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcônio Martins Rodrigues

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the forage-intake process of goats feeding on Massai grass pastures with different heights (40, 50, 60, and 70 cm. The experimental design was completely randomized, with treatments corresponding to four sward heights with two replicates over time and space. Collected data were related to the forage-intake process and the chemical and morphological composition of the pasture. Grazing trials (45 min were performed with four Anglo-Nubian crossbred goats. Total forage mass intake, bite mass, and intake rate were expressed in relation to animal weight. Pasture density, forage mass, and leaf blade increased as forage height increased. The chemical composition of forage at the evaluated heights was similar, except for reduced crude protein content at 70-cm height. Bite rate, intake rate, and time per bite had a quadratic relationship with increasing sward height. The greatest intake rate was observed at 54.7 cm of height, with 0.136 g DM min-1 kg-1 LW. Bite rate exhibited a linear and positive correlation with increase in intake. At the 50-cm height, goats harvested a mass of 3.65 g DM bite-1 kg-1 LW, when they performed 34.5 bites per minute. Adult goats had a greater forage intake on 50-cm high Massai grass pastures because they could obtain a greater bite mass in a shorter time per bite.

  10. Dairy cow excreta patches change the boreal grass swards from sink to source of methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Elisa Maljanen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied methane (CH4 flux rates from experimental excreta patches on a dairy pasture with a chamber technique during snow free seasons and with a gas gradient technique during winter from timothy-meadow fescue sward with mineral N fertilization (220 kg ha-1 and from grass-white clover mixture without fertilization. The dung and urine patches were applied in June or August two consecutive grazing seasons and the measurements were carried out for a year following each application. There were no significant differences in CH4 fluxes between plant species and emissions originated mainly from the fresh dung pats. The average annual CH4 fluxes from the control sites without excreta were -0.60±0.1 and with the excreta 0.47±0.3 kg CH4 ha-1. Thus, excreta originating from dairy cows can turn boreal swards from weak sinks to small sources of CH4. However, these emissions are only 0.2% of the total CH4 emissions from a dairy cow.

  11. Canopy Chemistry (OTTER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Canopy characteristics: leaf chemistry, specific leaf area, LAI, PAR, IPAR, NPP, standing biomass--see also: Meteorology (OTTER) for associated meteorological...

  12. ForestCrowns: a software tool for analyzing ground-based digital photographs of forest canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew F. Winn; Sang-Mook Lee; Phillip A. Araman

    2013-01-01

    Canopy coverage is a key variable used to characterize forest structure. In addition, the light transmitted through the canopy is an important ecological indicator of plant and animal habitat and understory climate conditions. A common ground-based method used to document canopy coverage is to take digital photographs from below the canopy. To assist with analyzing...

  13. Herbage and animal production responses to fertilizer nitrogen in perennial ryegrass swards. II. rotational grazing and cutting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lantinga, E.A.; Deenen, P.J.A.G.; Keulen, van H.

    1999-01-01

    The yield response of grass swards to fertilizer nitrogen (N) differs under cutting and grazing, as grazing cattle exert positive and negative effects on pasture production, with varying negative effects on different soil types. Nevertheless, current N fertilization recommendations in the

  14. Effects of cultivar and cutting frequency on dynamics of stolon growth and leaf appearance in white clover in mixed swards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgersma, A.; Li Fengrui,

    1997-01-01

    The hypothesis that dynamics of growth, branching of stolons and appearance of leaves are important for the persistence of white clover (Trifolium repens) in mixed swards was tested. The effect of cutting frequency and white clover cultivar on stolon and leaf dynamics was studied throughout the

  15. Effects of white clover cultivar and companion grass on winter survival of seedlings in autumn-sown swards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elgersma, A.; Schlepers, H.

    2003-01-01

    The aim was to study the effects of white clover cultivar and combinations with perennial ryegrass cultivars on seedling establishment in autumn-sown swards and on winter survival of seedlings. Large-leaved white clover cv. Alice and small-leaved white clover cv. Gwenda, and an erect and a prostrate

  16. Effect of canopy structures and their steric interactions on CO2 sorption behavior of liquid-like nanoparticle organic hybrid materials

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Youngjune

    2014-01-01

    Liquid-like NOHMs with different grafting densities of polymeric canopy were synthesized to evaluate their solvating properties as CO2 solvents. The in situ ATR FT-IR study of NOHMs with linear and branched canopies revealed distinct CO2 capture and corresponding swelling behaviors. These observations suggested that the entropic contribution for CO2 sorption in NOHMs can be tuned via the canopy design. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. The canopy camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry E. Brown

    1962-01-01

    The canopy camera is a device of new design that takes wide-angle, overhead photographs of vegetation canopies, cloud cover, topographic horizons, and similar subjects. Since the entire hemisphere is photographed in a single exposure, the resulting photograph is circular, with the horizon forming the perimeter and the zenith the center. Photographs of this type provide...

  18. Performance of beef cattle on pasture of Brachiaria brizantha cv. Xaraés maintained at different sward heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Alves de Freitas Barbosa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of grazing cattle has been very interesting, due to the low cost to produce fodder, compared to other sources of forage used to feed these animals, but the adequate management pasture has high influence on the success and profitability of cattle production systems. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the optimum grazing height of Brachiaria brizantha cv. Xaraés, which provides the highest individual weight gain and gain per area. The stocking rate was continuous, with variable stocking rate. The experimental period was from January to December 2010. Three Nellore males were used in each experimental plot, and, when needed, additional animals were used for adjusting the desired heights. Monthly sampling was obtained to estimate forage mass (kg.ha-1 of DM and the structural characteristics of the pastures, such as, leaf: stem ratio. The animals were weighed at the beginning of the experiment and every 28 days, after 12 hours of fasting, to measure the average daily gain (ADG After weighings were performed adjustments stocking rate to desired heights. Throughout the experimental period the animals received mineral supplementation. The desired sward heights were 15, 30, 45 and 60 cm, with three replicates each. The experimental design was completely randomized with four treatments and three replications. To body weight gain (BWG and average daily gain (ADG, each animal was considered an experimental unit. To gain per area and stocking rate, the paddock was considered the experimental unit. The leaf: stem ratio showed a linear increasing behavior in the spring and summer seasons. The smaller grazing heights provided higher gain per unit area (812.15 kg ha-1, while the highest grazing heights promoted high individual weight gain (0.790 kg.dia-1. The results suggest that Xaraés grass pastures should be grazed between 30 and 45 cm to allow reasonable performances by area and individual performances.

  19. A sub-canopy structure for simulating oil palm in the Community Land Model (CLM-Palm): phenology, allocation and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.; Roupsard, O.; Bernoux, M.; Le Maire, G.; Panferov, O.; Kotowska, M. M.; Knohl, A.

    2015-11-01

    of yield and remaining small-scale site-to-site variability of NPP are driven by processes not yet implemented in the model or reflected in the input data. The new sub-canopy structure and phenology and allocation functions in CLM-Palm allow exploring the effects of tropical land-use change, from natural ecosystems to oil palm plantations, on carbon, water and energy cycles and regional climate.

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF NITROGEN FERTILIZATION APPLIED IN DIFFERENT DOSES ON FODDER QUALITY OF MEADOW SWARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Jankowski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was organized in four replicants in arrangement split-plot with plots having a surface equal 9 m2. The basic fertilization was applied under the first regrowth. It was a mixture of unary fertilizers (ammonium nitrate, superphosphate, potassic salt or polifoska. One form of supplementary fertilization was applied under the second and third regrowth. It was the stable form of fertilizer applied to soil. This form of supplemented nitrogen gave respectively: 50 kg N·ha-l; 80 kg N·ha-l; 110 kg N·ha-1 per each moving. During the vegetation season three movings were harvested. From each movings the sampIes of green matter were taken for chemical analyses, i.e. total protein content, soluble carbohydrates and net energy (NEL. The obtained results showed large differences in fodder quality of the meadow sward fertilized with three doses of nitrogen.

  1. Sward and milk production response to early turnout of dairy cows to pasture in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. VIRKAJÄRVI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The timing of turnout is an important factor affecting the grazing management of dairy cows. However,its consequences are not well known in the short grazing season of northern Europe. Thus, the effect of the turnout date of dairy cows to pasture on sward regrowth, herbage mass production and milk production was studied in two experiments,1a grazing trial with 16 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows and 2a plot trial where the treatments simulated the grazing trial.The treatments were early turnout (1 Juneand normal turnout (6 June.Early turnout decreased the annual herbage mass (HM production in the plot trial (P =0.005,but due to a higher average organic matter (OMdigestibility (P 0.05. Although early turnout had no effect on milk yields it meant easier management of pastures.;

  2. The share of roots, sward and stubble biomass in biological yield of selected grass species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Kacorzyk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study assessed the share of harvested yield and share of root stem bases and stolon biomass in biological yield of 6 grass species grown in pure sowing. The biological yield included harvested yield from 3 regrowth and biomass of RSS (roots, sward and stubble, which was taken after 3 th cut. The highest biological yield was observed in Festuca rubra, next in Arrhenatherum elatiusand Poa pratensis, and the smallest in Holcus lanatus and Agropyron repens. In F. rubra harvested yield held 13.8% of biological yield, and RSS biomass held 86.2%. In contrast, in H. lanatusharvested yield was 44.7% and RSS biomass was 55.3% of biological yield.

  3. Characterization of Canopy Layering in Forested Ecosystems Using Full Waveform Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Dubayah

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Canopy structure, the vertical distribution of canopy material, is an important element of forest ecosystem dynamics and habitat preference. Although vertical stratification, or “canopy layering,” is a basic characterization of canopy structure for research and forest management, it is difficult to quantify at landscape scales. In this paper we describe canopy structure and develop methodologies to map forest vertical stratification in a mixed temperate forest using full-waveform lidar. Two definitions—one categorical and one continuous—are used to map canopy layering over Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire with lidar data collected in 2009 by NASA’s Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS. The two resulting canopy layering datasets describe variation of canopy layering throughout the forest and show that layering varies with terrain elevation and canopy height. This information should provide increased understanding of vertical structure variability and aid habitat characterization and other forest management activities.

  4. Simple equations to estimate light interception by isolated trees from canopy structure features: assessment with three-dimensional digitized apple trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinoquet, H; Stephan, J; Sonohat, G; Lauri, P E; Monney, Ph

    2007-01-01

    * Simple models of light interception are useful to identify the key structural parameters involved in light capture. We developed such models for isolated trees and tested them with virtual experiments. Light interception was decomposed into the projection of the crown envelope and the crown porosity. The latter was related to tree structure parameters. * Virtual experiments were conducted with three-dimensional (3-D) digitized apple trees grown in Lebanon and Switzerland, with different cultivars and training. The digitized trees allowed actual values of canopy structure (total leaf area, crown volume, foliage inclination angle, variance of leaf area density) and light interception properties (projected leaf area, silhouette to total area ratio, porosity, dispersion parameters) to be computed, and relationships between structure and interception variables to be derived. * The projected envelope area was related to crown volume with a power function of exponent 2/3. Crown porosity was a negative exponential function of mean optical density, that is, the ratio between total leaf area and the projected envelope area. The leaf dispersion parameter was a negative linear function of the relative variance of leaf area density in the crown volume. * The resulting models were expressed as two single equations. After calibration, model outputs were very close to values computed from the 3-D digitized databases.

  5. The Impact of Unsteady Reconfiguration on Turbulence Structure within a Flexible Canopy: Experimental Study of a Model Seagrass Meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepf, H. M.; Follett, E.; Chamecki, M.; Pan, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Flexible plants bend in response to fluid motion and this reconfiguration reduces drag forces, which protects against uprooting and breaking. The impact of reconfiguration can be described quantitatively by introducing a drag coefficient (CD) that decreases as a power-law function of velocity (U) with a negative exponent known as the Vogel number (B). That is, CD is proportional to UB. In this experimental study, we explored the link between reconfiguration and turbulence dynamics using a model seagrass meadow. As the flow rate in the channel increased, both the mean and unsteady reconfiguration increased. The unsteady reconfiguration, called monami, provides visual evidence that stronger turbulent events cause greater reconfiguration, and we hypothesize that the greater reconfiguration leads to proportionally lower drag, as reflected in a lower drag coefficient, such that stronger turbulent events preferentially penetrate deeper into the meadow. The preferential penetration of stronger events is reflected in the skewness of the streamwise velocity, which increases as the penetration of strong events gain greater preference. The measurements confirmed that a more negative Vogel number led to a higher skewness peak within the canopy. Previous studies were used to link the Vogel number and the Cauchy number. In the transition between the asymptotic regimes of negligible (B = 0) and strong (B = -2/3) reconfiguration, there is a regime of weak reconfiguration that extends over Ca = 10 to 100. The Vogel number achieved its peak negative value (B = -1.1) within the weak reconfiguration regime. The peak skewness also occurred within the regime of weak reconfiguration.

  6. Linking physiological processes with mangrove forest structure: phosphorus deficiency limits canopy development, hydraulic conductivity and photosynthetic carbon gain in dwarf Rhizophora mangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Catherine E; Ball, Marilyn C; Choat, Brendan; Engelbrecht, Bettina M J; Holbrook, N Michelle; Feller, Ilka C

    2006-05-01

    Spatial gradients in mangrove tree height in barrier islands of Belize are associated with nutrient deficiency and sustained flooding in the absence of a salinity gradient. While nutrient deficiency is likely to affect many parameters, here we show that addition of phosphorus (P) to dwarf mangroves stimulated increases in diameters of xylem vessels, area of conductive xylem tissue and leaf area index (LAI) of the canopy. These changes in structure were consistent with related changes in function, as addition of P also increased hydraulic conductivity (Ks), stomatal conductance and photosynthetic assimilation rates to the same levels measured in taller trees fringing the seaward margin of the mangrove. Increased xylem vessel size and corresponding enhancements in stem hydraulic conductivity in P fertilized dwarf trees came at the cost of enhanced mid-day loss of hydraulic conductivity and was associated with decreased assimilation rates in the afternoon. Analysis of trait plasticity identifies hydraulic properties of trees as more plastic than those of leaf structural and physiological characteristics, implying that hydraulic properties are key in controlling growth in mangroves. Alleviation of P deficiency, which released trees from hydraulic limitations, reduced the structural and functional distinctions between dwarf and taller fringing tree forms of Rhizophora mangle.

  7. Relationships among vegetation structure, canopy composition, and avian richness patterns across an aspen-conifer forest gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Swift; Kerri T. Vierling; Andrew T. Hudak; Lee A. Vierling

    2017-01-01

    Ecologists have a long-term interest in understanding the relative influence of vegetation composition and vegetation structure on avian diversity. LiDAR remote sensing is useful in studying local patterns of avian diversity because it characterizes fine-scale vegetation structure across broad extents. We used LiDAR, aerial and satellite imagery, and avian field data...

  8. Características do pasto e acúmulo de forragem em capim-tanzânia submetido a alturas de manejo do pasto Sward characteristics and herbage accumulation of Tanzania grass submitted to sward heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Weber do Canto

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste experimento foi avaliar alturas de manejo do pasto (20, 40, 60 e 80 cm em capim-tanzânia (Panicum maximum Jacq., em regime de lotação contínua, nas características do dossel e acúmulo de matéria seca. Os animais utilizados foram novilhos Nelore (Bos indicus, e a taxa de lotação foi variável. Foram avaliados: a massa de forragem, a massa de lâmina de folha verde, a razão folha:colmo, a composição morfológica e a taxa de acúmulo de matéria seca. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, com duas repetições. A massa de forragem aumentou linearmente com o aumento da altura do pasto. As médias de massa de forragem foram 2.767, 3.105, 3.657 e 4.436 kg ha-1, respectivamente, para as alturas de 20, 40, 60 e 80 cm. As taxas de acúmulo de matéria seca, a 20, 40, 60 e 80 cm, foram, respectivamente, 104, 108, 90 e 81 kg ha-1 por dia, o que indica que houve redução dessas taxas com a elevação da altura do pasto. A razão folha:colmo decresceu linearmente com o aumento da altura do pasto. Pastagens de capim-tanzânia, sob lotação contínua ao final da primavera e durante o verão, devem ser utilizadas entre 40 e 60 cm de altura.The objective of this experiment was to evaluate different sward height (20, 40, 60 e 80 cm in Tanzania grass (Panicum maximum Jacq. pastures managed under continuous stocking. The animals used were Nellore steers, and the control of sward height was done with put-and-take techniques. Evaluations were made for: forage mass, green leaf mass, leaf:stem ratio, morphological composition and dry matter accumulation rate. The experimental design was completely randomized with two replications. Forage mass increased linearly with sward height with overall mean of 2,767, 3,105, 3,657 and 4,436 kg ha-1 at sward heights 20, 40, 60 and 80 cm, respectively. Rates of dry matter accumulation decreased with increasing sward heights and were 104, 108, 90 and 81 kg ha-1 per day for sward

  9. Multiangular Observation of Canopy Sun-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence by Combining Imaging Spectroscopy and Stereoscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francisco Pinto; Mark Müller-Linow; Anke Schickling; M Pilar Cendrero-Mateo; Agim Ballvora; Uwe Rascher

    2017-01-01

    The effect that the canopy structure and the viewing geometry have on the intensity and the spatial distribution of passively measured sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence at canopy scale is still not well understood...

  10. Evaluation of fecal contamination indicators (fecal coliforms, somatic phages, and helminth eggs) in ryegrass sward farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Martha; Moreno, Gerardo; Campos, Claudia

    2009-02-15

    The effect of soil supplementation with biosolids at various ratios on fecal-origin microorganism activity was evaluated in a ryegrass sward farm. Fifteen plots with 3 different soil and biosolid mixture ratios were assessed. Soil and grass were sampled over a period of 4 months (days 0, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 120) for soil and on days 75 and 120 for grass, corresponding to first and second grass harvest periods. We analyzed fecal coliforms, somatic phages, helminth eggs, and environmental factors, such as rainfall, temperature, and moisture. The fecal coliforms decreased by 2 logarithmic units (LU) in all soils containing biosolids and by 1 LU in the soil alone and in biosolid control plots alone. The concentration of somatic phages decreased to 2 to 3 LU in the soil containing biosolids and to 1 to 2 LU in the control plots. In contrast, however, there was a noticeable increase in helminth eggs on days 75 ad 120, but not in the soil control alone. Maximum concentrations (10(2) CFU/g TS; colony forming units per gram total solids) of fecal coliforms were found on the grass and in other samples, but the concentrations of phages and helminth eggs were below detection limits. Environmental factors did not significantly influence the results, and grass production increased from 35 to 50 Ton/Ha (tons per hectare) with biosolid supplementation, as compared with controls (14 Ton/Ha).

  11. An experimental analysis of canopy flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalini, Antonio; Fransson, Jens H. M.; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2011-12-01

    An analysis of forest canopy flows with a wind tunnel model at high Reynolds number is presented and discussed. Measured mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles agree with observations made in real canopies with no sensible Reynolds number dependence, adding confidence to the results obtained with the present setup. The analysis of power density spectra of the three velocity components and of the shear stress co-spectra is reported with new coordinate scalings able to improve the collapse of the spectra compared to standard normalizations. This scaling is mostly based on the respective integral time scale and a simple fit is proposed to estimate such a quantity in real canopies. From the analysis of joint probability density functions, three different regions have been localized where a change in the coherent structure behavior is supposed to take place, similarly to what happens in rough wall turbulent boundary layers.

  12. Linking ice accretion and crown structure: towards a model of the effect of freezing rain on tree canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, Charles A; Lecigne, Bastien; Taugourdeau, Olivier; Greene, David F; Dauzat, Jean; Delagrange, Sylvain; Messier, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Despite a longstanding interest in variation in tree species vulnerability to ice storm damage, quantitative analyses of the influence of crown structure on within-crown variation in ice accretion are rare. In particular, the effect of prior interception by higher branches on lower branch accumulation remains unstudied. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intra-crown ice accretion can be predicted by a measure of the degree of sheltering by neighbouring branches. Freezing rain was artificially applied to Acer platanoides L., and in situ branch-ice thickness was measured directly and from LiDAR point clouds. Two models of freezing rain interception were developed: 'IceCube', which uses point clouds to relate ice accretion to a voxel-based index (sheltering factor; SF) of the sheltering effect of branch elements above a measurement point; and 'IceTree', a simulation model for in silico evaluation of the interception pattern of freezing rain in virtual tree crowns. Intra-crown radial ice accretion varied strongly, declining from the tips to the bases of branches and from the top to the base of the crown. SF for branches varied strongly within the crown, and differences among branches were consistent for a range of model parameters. Intra-crown variation in ice accretion on branches was related to SF (R(2) = 0·46), with in silico results from IceTree supporting empirical relationships from IceCube. Empirical results and simulations confirmed a key role for crown architecture in determining intra-crown patterns of ice accretion. As suspected, the concentration of freezing rain droplets is attenuated by passage through the upper crown, and thus higher branches accumulate more ice than lower branches. This is the first step in developing a model that can provide a quantitative basis for investigating intra-crown and inter-specific variation in freezing rain damage. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of

  13. Electron transport efficiency at opposite leaf sides: effect of vertical distribution of leaf angle, structure, chlorophyll content and species in a forest canopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mänd, Pille; Hallik, Lea; Peñuelas, Josep; Kull, Olevi

    2013-02-01

    We investigated changes in chlorophyll a fluorescence from alternate leaf surfaces to assess the intraleaf light acclimation patterns in combination with natural variations in radiation, leaf angles, leaf mass per area (LMA), chlorophyll content (Chl) and leaf optical parameters. Measurements were conducted on bottom- and top-layer leaves of Tilia cordata Mill. (a shade-tolerant sub-canopy species, sampled at heights of 11 and 16 m) and Populus tremula L. (a light-demanding upper canopy species, sampled at canopy heights of 19 and 26 m). The upper canopy species P. tremula had a six times higher PSII quantum yield (Φ(II)) and ratio of open reaction centres (qP), and a two times higher LMA than T. cordata. These species-specific differences were also present when the leaves of both species were in similar light conditions. Leaf adaxial/abaxial fluorescence ratio was significantly larger in the case of more horizontal leaves. Populus tremula (more vertical leaves), had smaller differences in fluorescence parameters between alternate leaf sides compared with T. cordata (more horizontal leaves). However, optical properties on alternate leaf sides showed a larger difference for P. tremula. Intraspecifically, the measured optical parameters were better correlated with LMA than with leaf Chl. Species-specific differences in leaf anatomy appear to enhance the photosynthetic potential of leaf biochemistry by decreasing the interception of excess light in P. tremula and increasing the light absorptance in T. cordata. Our results indicate that intraleaf light absorption gradient, described here as leaf adaxial/abaxial side ratio of chlorophyll a fluorescence, varies significantly with changes in leaf light environment in a multi-layer multi-species tree canopy. However, this variation cannot be described merely as a simple function of radiation, leaf angle, Chl or LMA, and species-specific differences in light acclimation strategies should also be considered.

  14. Momentum and scalar transport within a vegetation canopy following atmospheric stability and seasonal canopy changes: the CHATS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dupont

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Momentum and scalar (heat and water vapor transfer between a walnut canopy and the overlying atmosphere are investigated for two seasonal periods (before and after leaf-out, and for five thermal stability regimes (free and forced convection, near-neutral condition, transition to stable, and stable. Quadrant and octant analyses of momentum and scalar fluxes followed by space-time autocorrelations of observations from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study's (CHATS thirty meter tower help characterize the motions exchanging momentum, heat, and moisture between the canopy layers and aloft.

    During sufficiently windy conditions, i.e. in forced convection, near-neutral and transition to stable regimes, momentum and scalars are generally transported by sweep and ejection motions associated with the well-known canopy-top "shear-driven" coherent eddy structures. During extreme stability conditions (both unstable and stable, the role of these "shear-driven" structures in transporting scalars decreases, inducing notable dissimilarity between momentum and scalar transport.

    In unstable conditions, "shear-driven" coherent structures are progressively replaced by "buo-yantly-driven" structures, known as thermal plumes; which appear very efficient at transporting scalars, especially upward thermal plumes above the canopy. Within the canopy, downward thermal plumes become more efficient at transporting scalars than upward thermal plumes if scalar sources are located in the upper canopy. We explain these features by suggesting that: (i downward plumes within the canopy correspond to large downward plumes coming from above, and (ii upward plumes within the canopy are local small plumes induced by canopy heat sources where passive scalars are first injected if there sources are at the same location as heat sources. Above the canopy, these small upward thermal plumes aggregate to form larger scale upward thermal plumes. Furthermore, scalar

  15. Grazing intensity affects insect diversity via sward structure and heterogeneity in a long‐term experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jerrentrup, Jana Sabrina; Wrage‐Mönnig, Nicole; Röver, Klaus‐Ulrich; Isselstein, Johannes; McKenzie, Ailsa

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, we investigate the long‐term influence of grazing and the potential for spatial patterns created by different grazing intensities to enhance insect diversity. In a long‐term experiment (2002–2011...

  16. High within-canopy variation in isoprene emission potentials in temperate trees: Implications for predicting canopy-scale isoprene fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, ÜLo; Copolovici, Lucian; Hüve, Katja

    2010-12-01

    Isoprene emission potential (ES) varies in tree canopies, and such variations have potentially major implications for predicting canopy level emissions. So far, quantitative relationships of ES with irradiance are missing, and interspecific variation in ES plasticity and potential effects on canopy level emissions have not been characterized. ES, foliage structural, chemical, and photosynthetic characteristics were studied relative to integrated within-canopy daily quantum flux density (Qint) in temperate deciduous tree species Quercus robur, Populus tremula, Salix alba, and Salix caprea, and canopy isoprene emissions were calculated considering observed variation in ES and under different simplifying assumptions. Strong positive curvilinear relationships between nitrogen and dry mass per unit area, photosynthetic potentials and ES per area with Qint were observed. Structural, chemical, and photosynthetic traits varied 1.5-fold to 4-fold and ES per area 3-fold to 27-fold within the canopy. ES variation reflected accumulation of mesophyll cell layers and greater emission capacity of average cells. Species with largest structural and photosynthetic plasticity had greatest plasticity in ES. Relative to the simulation considering within-canopy variation in ES, the bias from assuming a constant ES varied between -8% and +68%, and it scaled positively with ES plasticity. The bias of big-leaf simulations varied between -22% and -35%, and it scaled negatively with ES plasticity. A generalized canopy response function of ES developed for all species resulted in the lowest bias between -11% and 6% and can be recommended for practical applications. The results highlight huge within-canopy and interspecific variation in ES and demonstrate that ignoring these variations strongly biases canopy emission predictions.

  17. Effects of Tree Canopy Structure and Understory Vegetation on the Effectiveness of Open-Top-Chamber in Manipulating Boreal Forest Microclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuber, L. M.; Nilsson, M. C.; Wardle, D.; Dorrepaal, E.

    2014-12-01

    Open-top chambers (OTCs) are widely used to passively increase soil and air temperature in various open habitats, such as alpine and arctic tundra, and temperate grasslands. Several studies report warming effects of 1-2 °C in arctic and alpine tundra, and up to 6 °C in temperate grasslands. The variation between studies can be mostly attributed to differences in the abiotic environment, such as snow cover and solar irradiance. Vegetation height and openness affects the amount of irradiance that reaches the ground and may therefore indirectly impact the effectiveness of OTCs. The use of OTCs in forested ecosystems might therefore be limited by reduced canopy openness, while their effect on changes in soil temperature and soil moisture content might additionally be affected by the understory vegetation type and cover. Nevertheless, OTC's are an immensely useful tool in climate-change studies, and could benefit research in forest ecosystems. In this study we therefore investigated whether OTCs can be used to manipulate microclimate in the northern boreal forest and how tree canopy cover and understory vegetation influence OTC effects on air and soil temperature and on soil moisture content.We compared OTC effects at ten sites that were situated along a fire chronosequence in the northern boreal forest in Sweden. Sites were dominated by Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies, and time since the last fire ranged from 47-367 years, resulting in varying degrees of tree canopy openness. We applied full factorial combinations of OTC warming and dwarf shrub removal and moss removal at each site. We measured canopy cover using hemispherical photography; air and soil temperature as well as soil moisture were measured hourly from June until September. Preliminary analyses indicate that OTCs increased monthly mean air temperatures by up to 0.9 °C across all treatments and forest stands. However, the degree of warming showed clear relations with the presence or absence of the

  18. Tree Death Not Resulting in Gap Creation: An Investigation of Canopy Dynamics of Northern Temperate Deciduous Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois Senécal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several decades of research have shown that canopy gaps drive tree renewal processes in the temperate deciduous forest biome. In the literature, canopy gaps are usually defined as canopy openings that are created by partial or total tree death of one or more canopy trees. In this study, we investigate linkages between tree damage mechanisms and the formation or not of new canopy gaps in northern temperate deciduous forests. We studied height loss processes in unmanaged and managed forests recovering from partial cutting with multi-temporal airborne Lidar data. The Lidar dataset was used to detect areas where canopy height reduction occurred, which were then field-studied to identify the tree damage mechanisms implicated. We also sampled the density of leaf material along transects to characterize canopy structure. We used the dataset of the canopy height reduction areas in a multi-model inference analysis to determine whether canopy structures or tree damage mechanisms most influenced the creation of new canopy gaps within canopy height reduction areas. According to our model, new canopy gaps are created mainly when canopy damage enlarges existing gaps or when height is reduced over areas without an already established dense sub-canopy tree layer.

  19. Coherence Effects in L-Band Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Quasi-Periodic Corn Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utku, Cuneyt; Lang, Roger H.

    2011-01-01

    Due to their highly random nature, vegetation canopies can be modeled using the incoherent transport theory for active and passive remote sensing applications. Agricultural vegetation canopies however are generally more structured than natural vegetation. The inherent row structure in agricultural canopies induces coherence effects disregarded by the transport theory. The objective of this study is to demonstrate, via Monte-Carlo simulations, these coherence effects on L-band scattering and thermal emission from corn canopies consisting of only stalks.

  20. Gainesville's urban forest canopy cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco Escobedo; Jennifer A. Seitz; Wayne Zipperer

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystem benefits from trees are linked directly to the amount of healthy urban forest canopy cover. Urban forest cover is dynamic and changes over time due to factors such as urban development, windstorms, tree removals, and growth. The amount of a city's canopy cover depends on its land use, climate, and people's preferences. This fact sheet examines how...

  1. Canopy for VERAView Installation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ronald W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-12

    With the addition of the 3D volume slicer widget, VERAView now relies on Mayavi and its dependents. Enthought's Canopy Python environment provides everything VERAView needs, and pre-built Canopy versions for Windows, Mac OSX, and Linux can be downloaded.

  2. Structure and diversity of invertebrate communities in the presence and absence of canopy-forming Fucus vesiculosus in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikström, Sofia A.; Kautsky, Lena

    2007-03-01

    Canopy-forming seaweeds are regarded as important habitat-formers in shallow coastal zones and their present decline or disappearance in many coastal areas can potentially affect diversity and abundance of associated species. Here, we evaluate potential effects of large-scale disappearance of the dominant canopy-forming species Fucus vesiculosus L. on vegetation-associated invertebrates in the Baltic Sea. We compare the macroalgal and invertebrate assemblages between sites where F. vesiculosus has disappeared over a larger area and adjacent sites with intact Fucus vegetation. The species richness of animals did not differ between sites with and without F. vesiculosus and no species were clearly confined to sites with Fucus. However, total animal abundance and biomass were generally lower when F. vesiculosus was absent and the animal assemblage at sites without Fucus differed consistently from adjacent Fucus sites. Since the assemblage of epiphytic and turf-forming macroalgae also differed with the presence of Fucus, the differences in invertebrate assemblages can be explained either by direct effects of the Fucus plants or by altered abundance of other macroalgal species. Based on these observations we suggest that large-scale disappearance of F. vesiculosus in the Baltic Sea may result in a changed composition and biomass of vegetation-associated invertebrates, with potential effects on higher trophic levels.

  3. Developing a global mixed-canopy, height-variable vegetation structure dataset for estimating global vegetation albedo and biomass in the NASA Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model and GISS GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, C.; Kiang, N. Y.; Yang, W.; Ni-Meister, W.; Schaaf, C.; Aleinov, I. D.; Jonas, J.; Zhao, F. A.; Yao, T.; Wang, Z.; Sun, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Processes determining biosphere-atmosphere coupling are strongly influenced by vegetation structure. Thus, ecosystem carbon sequestration and evapotranspiration affecting global carbon and water balances will depend upon the spatial extent of vegetation, its vertical structure, and its physiological variability. To represent this globally, Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) coupled to General Circulation Models (GCMs) make use of satellite and/or model-based vegetation classifications often composed by homogeneous communities. This work aims at developing a new Global Vegetation Structure Dataset (GVSD) by incorporating varying vegetation heights for mixed plant communities to be used as input to the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), the DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. Information sources include the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover and plant functional types (PFTs) (Friedl et al., 2010), vegetation height from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on board ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) (Simard et al., 2011; Tang et al., 2014) along with the Global Data Sets of Vegetation Leaf Area Index (LAI)3g (Zhu et al. 2013). Further PFT partitioning is performed according to a climate classification utilizing the Climate Research Unit (CRU) and the NOAA Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) data. Final products are a GVSD consisting of mixed plant communities (e.g. mixed forests, savannas, mixed PFTs) following the Ecosystem Demography model (Moorcroft et al., 2001) approach represented by multi-cohort community patches at the sub-grid level of the GCM, which are ensembles of identical individuals whose differences are represented by PFTs, canopy height, density and vegetation structure sensitivity to allometric parameters. To assess the sensitivity of the GISS GCM to vegetation structure, we produce a range of estimates of Ent TBM biomass and plant

  4. Influence of a Second Crop Plucking and Subsequent Trimming on Canopy Structure in Autumn and on the First Crop of Subsequent Year for Mature Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) Bush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayuki, Nakano

    I performed 3 experiments at Shizuoka Tea Experiment Station to study the influence of trimming after the plucking of a second crop on the canopy structure in autumn and on the first crop of the subsequent year. Almost all my data revealed that the trimming reduced the number of new shoots but increased the weight of 100 new shoots in the first crop of the subsequent year. However, low trimming after late plucking of a second crop with a large yield remarkably reduced the tea canopy biomass and the number of buds on the skiffing surface in autumn, and it often led to a low yield in the first crop of the subsequent year. An excessively high yield in the second crop and low trimming might induce poor reverse of shoot growth in summer. A combination of low trimming and high skiffing in autumn delayed the growth of new shoots and reduced the free amino acid concentrations in new shoots in the first crop of the subsequent year. These results can be extrapolated for the main temperate zone of Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan.

  5. Design of a Parachute Canopy Instrumentation Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahin, Wahab M.; Daum, Jared S.; Holley, James J.; Litteken, Douglas A.; Vandewalle, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the current technology available to design and develop a reliable and compact instrumentation platform for parachute system data collection and command actuation. Wireless communication with a parachute canopy will be an advancement to the state of the art of parachute design, development, and testing. Embedded instrumentation of the parachute canopy will provide reefing line tension, skirt position data, parachute health monitoring, and other telemetry, further validating computer models and giving engineering insight into parachute dynamics for both Earth and Mars entry that is currently unavailable. This will allow for more robust designs which are more optimally designed in terms of structural loading, less susceptible to adverse dynamics, and may eventually pave the way to currently unattainable advanced concepts of operations. The development of this technology has dual use potential for a variety of other applications including inflatable habitats, aerodynamic decelerators, heat shields, and other high stress environments.

  6. Estimating Canopy Dark Respiration for Crop Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje Mejia, Oscar Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Crop production is obtained from accurate estimates of daily carbon gain.Canopy gross photosynthesis (Pgross) can be estimated from biochemical models of photosynthesis using sun and shaded leaf portions and the amount of intercepted photosyntheticallyactive radiation (PAR).In turn, canopy daily net carbon gain can be estimated from canopy daily gross photosynthesis when canopy dark respiration (Rd) is known.

  7. Plant photomorphogenesis and canopy growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballare, C.L.; Scopel, A.L. [Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1994-12-31

    An important motivation for studying photomorphogenesis is to understand the relationships among plant photophysiology in canopies, canopy productivity, and agronomic yield. This understanding is essential to optimize lighting systems used for plant farming in controlled environments (CE) and for the design of genetically engineered crop strains with altered photoresponses. This article provides an overview of some basic principles of plant photomorphogenesis in canopies and discusses their implications for (1) scaling up information on plant photophysiology from individual plants in CE to whole canopies in the field, and (2), designing lighting conditions to increase plant productivity in CE used for agronomic purposes [e.g. space farming in CE Life-Support-Systems]. We concentrate on the visible ({lambda} between 400 and 700 nm) and far red (FR; {lambda} > 700 nm) spectral regions, since the ultraviolet (UV; 280 to 400 nm) is covered by other authors in this volume.

  8. Moose (Alces alces) reacts to high summer temperatures by utilizing thermal shelters in boreal forests - an analysis based on airborne laser scanning of the canopy structure at moose locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Markus; Matala, Juho; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Tiilikainen, Raisa; Tikkanen, Olli-Pekka; Maltamo, Matti; Pusenius, Jyrki; Packalen, Petteri

    2014-04-01

    The adaptation of different species to warming temperatures has been increasingly studied. Moose (Alces alces) is the largest of the ungulate species occupying the northern latitudes across the globe, and in Finland it is the most important game species. It is very well adapted to severe cold temperatures, but has a relatively low tolerance to warm temperatures. Previous studies have documented changes in habitat use by moose due to high temperatures. In many of these studies, the used areas have been classified according to how much thermal cover they were assumed to offer based on satellite/aerial imagery data. Here, we identified the vegetation structure in the areas used by moose under different thermal conditions. For this purpose, we used airborne laser scanning (ALS) data extracted from the locations of GPS-collared moose. This provided us with detailed information about the relationships between moose and the structure of forests it uses in different thermal conditions and we were therefore able to determine and differentiate between the canopy structures at locations occupied by moose during different thermal conditions. We also discovered a threshold beyond which moose behaviour began to change significantly: as day temperatures began to reach 20 °C and higher, the search for areas with higher and denser canopies during daytime became evident. The difference was clear when compared to habitat use at lower temperatures, and was so strong that it provides supporting evidence to previous studies, suggesting that moose are able to modify their behaviour to cope with high temperatures, but also that the species is likely to be affected by warming climate. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Integration of lidar and Landsat ETM+ data for estimating and mapping forest canopy height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Michael A. Lefsky; Warren B. Cohen; Mercedes Berterretche

    2002-01-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data provide accurate measurements of forest canopy structure in the vertical plane; however, current LIDAR sensors have limited coverage in the horizontal plane. Landsat data provide extensive coverage of generalized forest structural classes in the horizontal plane but are relatively insensitive to variation in forest canopy height...

  10. Automated detection of branch dimensions in woody skeletons of leafless fruit tree canopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucksch, A.; Fleck, S.

    2009-01-01

    Light driven physiological processes of tree canopies need to be modelled based on detailed 3Dcanopy structure – we explore the possibilities offered by terrestrial LIDAR to automatically represent woody skeletons of leafless trees as a basis for adequate models of canopy structure. The automatic

  11. The canopy spiders (Araneae of the floodplain forest in Leipzig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The canopy spiders of the floodplain forest in Leipzig have become a focus of ecological studies in recent years. In 2006 we sampled 30 tree canopies in the ‘Burgaue’ nature reserve with pyrethrum knock-down fogging, recording 502 adult spiders belonging to 48 species and 11 families. Based on these data and the results of a previous fogging study, the studied spider community was dominated by forest and forest-edge species with a preference for the shrub and canopy strata as well as by spiders of the web spider feeding guild. The community structure was typical for arboreal spider communities from northern temperate forests but very different from communities in the tropics. Species richness and evenness were similar to the old growth near-primary Białowieża Forest in Poland. The checklist of 96 canopy spider species of the floodplain forest of Leipzig includes 54 additions to the spider fauna of Leipzig and vicinity by recent canopy studies and eight first canopy records for Leipzig from our field work. The theridiid Dipoena torva (Thorell, 1875 was recorded for the first time in Saxony. The floodplain forest of Leipzig sustains a large and species-rich arboreal spider community and is thus a valuable habitat for a large proportion of endangered species (12%.

  12. Hurricane disturbance and recovery of energy balance, CO2 fluxes and canopy structure in a mangrove forest of the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jordan G.; Engel, Vic; Smith, Thomas J.; Fuentes, Jose D.

    2012-01-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes and energy balance are examined to investigate the functional responses of a mature mangrove forest to a disturbance generated by Hurricane Wilma on October 24, 2005 in the Florida Everglades. At the EC site, high winds from the hurricane caused nearly 100% defoliation in the upper canopy and widespread tree mortality. Soil temperatures down to -50 cm increased, and air temperature lapse rates within the forest canopy switched from statically stable to statically unstable conditions following the disturbance. Unstable conditions allowed more efficient transport of water vapor and CO2 from the surface up to the upper canopy layer. Significant increases in latent heat fluxes (LE) and nighttime net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were also observed and sensible heat fluxes (H) as a proportion of net radiation decreased significantly in response to the disturbance. Many of these impacts persisted through much of the study period through 2009. However, local albedo and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer) data (the Enhanced Vegetation Index) indicated a substantial proportion of active leaf area recovered before the EC measurements began 1 year after the storm. Observed changes in the vertical distribution and the degree of clumping in newly emerged leaves may have affected the energy balance. Direct comparisons of daytime NEE values from before the storm and after our measurements resumed did not show substantial or consistent differences that could be attributed to the disturbance. Regression analyses on seasonal time scales were required to differentiate the storm's impact on monthly average daytime NEE from the changes caused by interannual variability in other environmental drivers. The effects of the storm were apparent on annual time scales, and CO2 uptake remained approximately 250 g C m-2 yr-1 lower in 2009 compared to the average annual values measured in 2004–2005. Dry season CO2

  13. UPSCALING OF SOLAR INDUCED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE FROM LEAF TO CANOPY USING THE DART MODEL AND A REALISTIC 3D FOREST SCENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Solar induced chlorophyll a fluorescence (SIF has been shown to be an excellent proxy of photosynthesis at multiple scales. However, the mechanical linkages between fluorescence and photosynthesis at the leaf level cannot be directly applied at canopy or field scales, as the larger scale SIF emission depends on canopy structure. This is especially true for the forest canopies characterized by high horizontal and vertical heterogeneity. While most of the current studies on SIF radiative transfer in plant canopies are based on the assumption of a homogeneous canopy, recently codes have been developed capable of simulation of fluorescence signal in explicit 3-D forest canopies. Here we present a canopy SIF upscaling method consisting of the integration of the 3-D radiative transfer model DART and a 3-D object model BLENDER. Our aim was to better understand the effect of boreal forest canopy structure on SIF for a spatially explicit forest canopy.

  14. Upscaling of Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence from Leaf to Canopy Using the Dart Model and a Realistic 3d Forest Scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Atherton, J.; Mõttus, M.; MacArthur, A.; Teemu, H.; Maseyk, K.; Robinson, I.; Honkavaara, E.; Porcar-Castell, A.

    2017-10-01

    Solar induced chlorophyll a fluorescence (SIF) has been shown to be an excellent proxy of photosynthesis at multiple scales. However, the mechanical linkages between fluorescence and photosynthesis at the leaf level cannot be directly applied at canopy or field scales, as the larger scale SIF emission depends on canopy structure. This is especially true for the forest canopies characterized by high horizontal and vertical heterogeneity. While most of the current studies on SIF radiative transfer in plant canopies are based on the assumption of a homogeneous canopy, recently codes have been developed capable of simulation of fluorescence signal in explicit 3-D forest canopies. Here we present a canopy SIF upscaling method consisting of the integration of the 3-D radiative transfer model DART and a 3-D object model BLENDER. Our aim was to better understand the effect of boreal forest canopy structure on SIF for a spatially explicit forest canopy.

  15. THE FERTILIZATION EFFECT OF PERMANENT MEADOWS WITH SPENT MUSHROM SUBSTRATE ON THE UPTAKING OF MANGANESE, COPPER AND ZINC BY THE MEADOW SWARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Wiśniewska-Kadżajan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in the years 1999–2001 in a meadow with the following fertilizer combinations: control object (without fertilizer, NPK mineral fertilization, fertilizing with manure, manure with NPK fertilization, fertilizing with spent mushroom substrate; spent mushroom substrate with NPK fertilization. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of permanent grassland fertilization both with spent mushroom substrate and the one supplemented with NPK on the uptaking of manganese, copper and zinc by the meadow sward. After the cultivation of mushrooms, in comparison to the standard manure, the substrate used in the experiment was characterized by more than twice higher amount of manganese and zinc. However, the amount of copper in the organic materials was similar. In spite of having supplied lager amount of manganese, zinc and similar amount of copper to the mushrooms substrate, it caused the reduction of the uptake of the elements in the meadow sward. In spite of supplying larger amounts of manganese, zinc and copper the reduction of their uptaking by meadow sward was observed in comparison to manure mushroom substrate. This may be connected with a slightly alkaline reaction of the soil environment, thus limiting the uptake of the studied micronutrients.

  16. How neighbor canopy architecture affects target plant performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremmel, D.C.; Bazzaz, F.A. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Plant competition occurs through the negative effects that individual plants have on resource availability to neighboring individuals. Therefore competition experiments need to examine how different species change resource availability to their neighbors, and how different species respond to these changes-allocationally, architecturally, and physiologically-through time. In a greenhouse study we used a model system of annuals to examine how canopies of species having differing morphologies differed in their architectures and light-interception abilities, and how different species performed when grown in these canopies. Abutilon theophrasti, Datura stramonium, and Polygonum pensylvanicum were grown as [open quotes]targets[close quotes]. Plants were grown in pots, with one target plant and four neighbor plants. Detailed measurements of neighbor canopy structure and target plant canopy architecture were made at five harvests. Species with different morphologies showed large differences in canopy structure, particularly when grass and forb species were compared. Setaria, a grass, had a more open canopy than the other species (all forbs), and was a consistently weak competitor. Overall, however, the relative effects of different neighbors on target biomass varied with target species. Target biomass was poorly correlated with neighbor biomass and leaf area, but was highly correlated with a measure of target light-interception ability that took into account both target leaf deployment and neighbor light interception. Despite clear differences among neighbor species in canopy structure and effect on light penetration, the results suggest no broad generalizations about the effects of different species as neighbors. Knowledge of morphological, physiological, and life history characteristics of both the target and neighbor species may be necessary to explain the results of their competition. 53 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Modeling radiative transfer in tropical rainforest canopies: sensitivity of simulated albedo to canopy architectural and optical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Sílvia N M; Costa, Marcos H

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of the surface albedo simulated by the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to a set of Amazonian tropical rainforest canopy architectural and optical parameters. The parameters tested in this study are the orientation and reflectance of the leaves of upper and lower canopies in the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The results are evaluated against albedo measurements taken above the K34 site at the INPA (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia) Cuieiras Biological Reserve. The sensitivity analysis indicates a strong response to the upper canopy leaves orientation (χup) and to the reflectivity in the near-infrared spectral band (ρNIR,up), a smaller sensitivity to the reflectivity in the visible spectral band (ρVIS,up) and no sensitivity at all to the lower canopy parameters, which is consistent with the canopy structure. The combination of parameters that minimized the Root Mean Square Error and mean relative error are χup = 0.86, ρVIS,up = 0.062 and ρNIR,up = 0.275. The parameterizations performed resulted in successful simulations of tropical rainforest albedo by IBIS, indicating its potential to simulate the canopy radiative transfer for narrow spectral bands and permitting close comparison with remote sensing products.

  18. Forests and Their Canopies: Achievements and Horizons in Canopy Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Akihiro; Kitching, Roger L; Cao, Min; Creedy, Thomas J; Fayle, Tom M; Freiberg, Martin; Hewitt, C N; Itioka, Takao; Koh, Lian Pin; Ma, Keping; Malhi, Yadvinder; Mitchell, Andrew; Novotny, Vojtech; Ozanne, Claire M P; Song, Liang; Wang, Han; Ashton, Louise A

    2017-06-01

    Forest canopies are dynamic interfaces between organisms and atmosphere, providing buffered microclimates and complex microhabitats. Canopies form vertically stratified ecosystems interconnected with other strata. Some forest biodiversity patterns and food webs have been documented and measurements of ecophysiology and biogeochemical cycling have allowed analyses of large-scale transfer of CO2, water, and trace gases between forests and the atmosphere. However, many knowledge gaps remain. With global research networks and databases, and new technologies and infrastructure, we envisage rapid advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that drive the spatial and temporal dynamics of forests and their canopies. Such understanding is vital for the successful management and conservation of global forests and the ecosystem services they provide to the world. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Isotopic characteristics of canopies in simulated leaf assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Heather V.; Patzkowsky, Mark E.; Wing, Scott L.; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2014-11-01

    site where leaves were sampled. The model predicts a persistent ∼1‰ difference in δ13Clitter for the two sites which is consistent with higher water availability in the tropical forests. This work provides a new framework for linking contemporary ecological observations to the geochemical record using flux-weighted isotope data and lends insights to the effect of forest architecture on organic and isotopic records of ancient terrestrial ecosystems. How many leaves from a litter assemblage are necessary to distinguish the isotopic gradient characteristics of canopy closure? Are mean δ13Cleaf values for a litter assemblage diagnostic of a forest biome? Can we predict the δ13C values of cumulative litter, soil organic matter, and organic carbon in sedimentary archives using litter flux and isotope patterns in canopies? We determined the δ13C range and mean for different sized assemblages of leaves sampled from data for each forest. We re-sampled very high numbers of leaves in order to estimate the isotopic composition of cumulative carbon delivered to soils as litter, and compared these results to available data from forest soils. Modeled leaf and soil organic carbon isotope patterns in this study offer insights to how forest structure can be derived from carbon isotope measurements of fossil leaves, as well as secondary material - such as teeth, hair, paleosol carbonates, or organic soil carbon (van der Merwe and Medina, 1989; Koch, 1998; Secord et al., 2008; Levin et al., 2011).Distinct climate and seasonal difference in the Panamá and Maryland, USA forests are reflected in their canopy isotope gradients. In the tropical forest of Panamá, leaves are produced throughout the year within a canopy that is both extensively and persistently closed (Leigh, 1975; Lowman and Wittman, 1996). In the temperate forest of Maryland leaves are produced during the spring when canopy conditions are relatively open (Korner and Basler, 2010).

  20. Electromagnetic Scattering from Vegetation Canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabandi, Kamal

    Satellite-borne imaging radar has been proposed by the remote sensing community as a potential sensor for the acquisition of quantitative information about forested area on a global scale. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to develop retrieved algorithms that can provide reasonable estimate of vegetation biomass, leaf moisture content, and other physical parameters of tree canopies from multifrequency/multipolarization observations of their radar backscattering coefficients. Retrieval algorithms often are called "inverse problem" because their input/output parameters are the inverse of those associated with the direct problem, which in the present case refers to the development of a radar scattering model that relates the radar response to the canopy architecture and associated parameters. This thesis provides electromagnetic solutions to several problems associated with scattering from tree canopies. The forest canopy is modelled in the form of layers comprised of randomly distributed particles with known statistical properties. In Chapters 2-8 effective scattering models for different constituent particles of vegetation canopies are developed by employing appropriate asymptotic solutions and approximations. The effects of various physical features of the particles, such as curvature and variation in thickness for planar leaves and roughness for tree trunks, on their scattering behavior are examined. In Chapter 9 the scattering problem of inhomogeneous layered media is formulated via the vector radiative transfer equations and a first-order solution for the radar scattering coefficients is obtained. The radiative transfer solution is formulated in terms of two sets of input functions: the scattering matrices of the constituent particles, which are given in Chapters 2-8, and the size and orientation distribution functions of the particles. The radar scattering model and associated input functions can be used to conduct sensitivity analyses to determine the

  1. Components of the leaf area index of marandu palisadegrass swards subjected to strategies of intermittent stocking Componentes do índice de área foliar de pastos de capim-marandu submetidos a estratégias de lotação intermitente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Aparecida Giacomini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaf area index is the main sward characteristic related to the processes of light interception and competition in plant communities. The objective of this experiment was to quantify and evaluate the composition of the leaf area on tillers of marandu palisadegrass (Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu subjected to strategies of intermittent stocking. The experiment was carried out in Piracicaba, state of São Paulo, Brazil, from October/2004 to December/2005. Swards were grazed at 95 and 100% canopy light interception (LI to post-grazing heights of 10 and 15 cm, following a 2 ' 2 factorial arrangement with four replications in a randomised complete block design. Estimates were made of sward leaf area index, site filling, specific leaf area and the dimensionless ratio between tiller leaf area and volume (R, as well as the relative contribution of basal and aerial tillers to these variables. In early spring, values of leaf area index and specific leaf area were low when compared to the other seasons, and swards grazed at 95% LI presented higher site filling and specific leaf area than those grazed at 100% LI. This resulted in higher tillering activity and increase in leaf area index in late spring, indicating quick recovery and early return of swards grazed at 95% LI to growing conditions. Aerial tillers corresponded to an important morphological adaptation of marandu palisadegrass to increase its competitive ability. Treatment 100/10 resulted in the highest and 95/15 in the lowest R values throughout the experiment, suggesting an allometric pattern of growth of tillers during regrowth in order to compensate low tiller population and optimise the leaf area index. Grazing management practices can benefit from this knowledge by promoting ideal sward conditions to maximise and accelerate growth.O índice de área foliar é a principal característica do dossel relacionada com os processos de interceptação e competição por luz em comunidades de

  2. Towards Automated Characterization of Canopy Layering in Mixed Temperate Forests Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reik Leiterer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Canopy layers form essential structural components, affecting stand productivity and wildlife habitats. Airborne laser scanning (ALS provides horizontal and vertical information on canopy structure simultaneously. Existing approaches to assess canopy layering often require prior information about stand characteristics or rely on pre-defined height thresholds. We developed a multi-scale method using ALS data with point densities >10 pts/m2 to determine the number and vertical extent of canopy layers (canopylayer, canopylength, seasonal variations in the topmost canopy layer (canopytype, as well as small-scale heterogeneities in the canopy (canopyheterogeneity. We first tested and developed the method on a small forest patch (800 ha and afterwards tested transferability and robustness of the method on a larger patch (180,000 ha. We validated the approach using an extensive set of ground data, achieving overall accuracies >77% for canopytype and canopyheterogeneity, and >62% for canopylayer and canopylength. We conclude that our method provides a robust characterization of canopy layering supporting automated canopy structure monitoring.

  3. Ground-Based Robotic Sensing of an Agricultural Sub-Canopy Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, A.; Peschel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne remote sensing is a useful method for measuring agricultural crop parameters over large areas; however, the approach becomes limited to above-canopy characterization as a crop matures due to reduced visual access of the sub-canopy environment. During the growth cycle of an agricultural crop, such as soybeans, the micrometeorology of the sub-canopy environment can significantly impact pod development and reduced yields may result. Larger-scale environmental conditions aside, the physical structure and configuration of the sub-canopy matrix will logically influence local climate conditions for a single plant; understanding the state and development of the sub-canopy could inform crop models and improve best practices but there are currently no low-cost methods to quantify the sub-canopy environment at a high spatial and temporal resolution over an entire growth cycle. This work describes the modification of a small tactical and semi-autonomous, ground-based robotic platform with sensors capable of mapping the physical structure of an agricultural row crop sub-canopy; a soybean crop is used as a case study. Point cloud data representing the sub-canopy structure are stored in LAS format and can be used for modeling and visualization in standard GIS software packages.

  4. Performance of an Ultrasonic Ranging Sensor in Apple Tree Canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Escolà

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Electronic canopy characterization is an important issue in tree crop management. Ultrasonic and optical sensors are the most used for this purpose. The objective of this work was to assess the performance of an ultrasonic sensor under laboratory and field conditions in order to provide reliable estimations of distance measurements to apple tree canopies. To this purpose, a methodology has been designed to analyze sensor performance in relation to foliage ranging and to interferences with adjacent sensors when working simultaneously. Results show that the average error in distance measurement using the ultrasonic sensor in laboratory conditions is ±0.53 cm. However, the increase of variability in field conditions reduces the accuracy of this kind of sensors when estimating distances to canopies. The average error in such situations is ±5.11 cm. When analyzing interferences of adjacent sensors 30 cm apart, the average error is ±17.46 cm. When sensors are separated 60 cm, the average error is ±9.29 cm. The ultrasonic sensor tested has been proven to be suitable to estimate distances to the canopy in field conditions when sensors are 60 cm apart or more and could, therefore, be used in a system to estimate structural canopy parameters in precision horticulture.

  5. Performance of an Ultrasonic Ranging Sensor in Apple Tree Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolà, Alexandre; Planas, Santiago; Rosell, Joan Ramon; Pomar, Jesús; Camp, Ferran; Solanelles, Francesc; Gracia, Felip; Llorens, Jordi; Gil, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Electronic canopy characterization is an important issue in tree crop management. Ultrasonic and optical sensors are the most used for this purpose. The objective of this work was to assess the performance of an ultrasonic sensor under laboratory and field conditions in order to provide reliable estimations of distance measurements to apple tree canopies. To this purpose, a methodology has been designed to analyze sensor performance in relation to foliage ranging and to interferences with adjacent sensors when working simultaneously. Results show that the average error in distance measurement using the ultrasonic sensor in laboratory conditions is ±0.53 cm. However, the increase of variability in field conditions reduces the accuracy of this kind of sensors when estimating distances to canopies. The average error in such situations is ±5.11 cm. When analyzing interferences of adjacent sensors 30 cm apart, the average error is ±17.46 cm. When sensors are separated 60 cm, the average error is ±9.29 cm. The ultrasonic sensor tested has been proven to be suitable to estimate distances to the canopy in field conditions when sensors are 60 cm apart or more and could, therefore, be used in a system to estimate structural canopy parameters in precision horticulture. PMID:22163749

  6. Performance of an ultrasonic ranging sensor in apple tree canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolà, Alexandre; Planas, Santiago; Rosell, Joan Ramon; Pomar, Jesús; Camp, Ferran; Solanelles, Francesc; Gracia, Felip; Llorens, Jordi; Gil, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Electronic canopy characterization is an important issue in tree crop management. Ultrasonic and optical sensors are the most used for this purpose. The objective of this work was to assess the performance of an ultrasonic sensor under laboratory and field conditions in order to provide reliable estimations of distance measurements to apple tree canopies. To this purpose, a methodology has been designed to analyze sensor performance in relation to foliage ranging and to interferences with adjacent sensors when working simultaneously. Results show that the average error in distance measurement using the ultrasonic sensor in laboratory conditions is ±0.53 cm. However, the increase of variability in field conditions reduces the accuracy of this kind of sensors when estimating distances to canopies. The average error in such situations is ±5.11 cm. When analyzing interferences of adjacent sensors 30 cm apart, the average error is ±17.46 cm. When sensors are separated 60 cm, the average error is ±9.29 cm. The ultrasonic sensor tested has been proven to be suitable to estimate distances to the canopy in field conditions when sensors are 60 cm apart or more and could, therefore, be used in a system to estimate structural canopy parameters in precision horticulture.

  7. What is the most prominent factor limiting photosynthesis in different layers of a greenhouse cucumber canopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsu-Wei; Henke, Michael; de Visser, Pieter H B; Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard; Wiechers, Dirk; Kahlen, Katrin; Stützel, Hartmut

    2014-09-01

    Maximizing photosynthesis at the canopy level is important for enhancing crop yield, and this requires insights into the limiting factors of photosynthesis. Using greenhouse cucumber (Cucumis sativus) as an example, this study provides a novel approach to quantify different components of photosynthetic limitations at the leaf level and to upscale these limitations to different canopy layers and the whole plant. A static virtual three-dimensional canopy structure was constructed using digitized plant data in GroIMP. Light interception of the leaves was simulated by a ray-tracer and used to compute leaf photosynthesis. Different components of photosynthetic limitations, namely stomatal (S(L)), mesophyll (M(L)), biochemical (B(L)) and light (L(L)) limitations, were calculated by a quantitative limitation analysis of photosynthesis under different light regimes. In the virtual cucumber canopy, B(L) and L(L) were the most prominent factors limiting whole-plant photosynthesis. Diffusional limitations (S(L) + M(L)) contributed Photosynthesis in the lower canopy was more limited by the biochemical capacity, and the upper canopy was more sensitive to light than other canopy parts. Although leaves in the upper canopy received more light, their photosynthesis was more light restricted than in the leaves of the lower canopy, especially when the light condition above the canopy was poor. An increase in whole-plant photosynthesis under diffuse light did not result from an improvement of light use efficiency but from an increase in light interception. Diffuse light increased the photosynthesis of leaves that were directly shaded by other leaves in the canopy by up to 55%. Based on the results, maintaining biochemical capacity of the middle-lower canopy and increasing the leaf area of the upper canopy would be promising strategies to improve canopy photosynthesis in a high-wire cucumber cropping system. Further analyses using the approach described in this study can be expected to

  8. Pasture management effects on diet composition and cattle performance on continuously stocked rhizoma peanut-mixed grass swards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, E; Williams, M J; Chase, C C; Sollenberger, L E; Hammond, A C; Kalmbacher, R S; Kunkle, W E

    2001-09-01

    In Florida, rhizoma peanut (RP; Arachis glabrata Benth.), a tropical legume, combines the attributes of excellent nutritive value, competitive ability with tropical grasses, and high animal performance. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of spring N fertilization (0 vs 35 kg/ha) and summer stocking rate (1.5 and 2.5 bulls/ha) on herbage mass, nutritive value, herbage allowance, and diet botanical composition of grazed RP-grass swards and their interaction with growth and development of bulls (Senepol, and Brahman or Angus). The study was conducted in 1995 and 1996 at the USDA, ARS, Subtropical Agriculture Research Station in Brooksville, FL. Nitrogen was applied in April of each year, and all pastures were stocked with 1.5 bulls/ha until approximately July of each year, when stocking rate was increased on half the pastures to 2.5 bulls/ha. Herbage mass (HM, kg/ha), herbage allowance (HA, kg/kg BW), nutritive value (CP and in vitro organic matter digestibility [IVOMD]), and diet botanical composition (fecal microhistological) readings were determined. Animal measurements included total and seasonal (spring vs summer), ADG, hip height (cm), scrotal circumference (SC, cm), and plasma urea nitrogen (PUN, mg/dL). Herbage mass (3.0 +/- 0.12 Mg/ha and 3.4 +/- 0.13 Mg/ha in 1995 and 1996, respectively) was not affected by nitrogen fertilization or stocking rate but was affected by season (P Senepol or Brahman. There were no differences in final BW, SC, BCS, hip height, or PUN due to treatments, but breed differences were noted (P < 0.05) for all measures except BCS.

  9. Spatial variability of leaf wetness duration in different crop canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentelhas, Paulo C.; Gillespie, Terry J.; Batzer, Jean C.; Gleason, Mark L.; Monteiro, José Eduardo B. A.; Pezzopane, José Ricardo M.; Pedro, Mário J.

    2005-07-01

    The spatial variability of leaf wetness duration (LWD) was evaluated in four different height-structure crop canopies: apple, coffee, maize, and grape. LWD measurements were made using painted flat plate, printed-circuit wetness sensors deployed in different positions above and inside the crops, with inclination angles ranging from 30 to 45°. For apple trees, the sensors were installed in 12 east-west positions: 4 at each of the top (3.3 m), middle (2.1 m), and bottom (1.1 m) levels. For young coffee plants (80 cm tall), four sensors were installed close to the leaves at heights of 20, 40, 60, and 80 cm. For the maize and grape crops, LWD sensors were installed in two positions, one just below the canopy top and another inside the canopy. Adjacent to each experiment, LWD was measured above nearby mowed turfgrass with the same kind of flat plate sensor, deployed at 30 cm and between 30 and 45°. We found average LWD varied by canopy position for apple and maize (P<0.05). In these cases, LWD was longer at the top, particularly when dew was the source of wetness. For grapes, cultivated in a hedgerow system and for young coffee plants, average LWD did not differ between the top and inside the canopy. The comparison by geometric mean regression analysis between crop and turfgrass LWD measurements showed that sensors at 30 cm over turfgrass provided quite accurate estimates of LWD at the top of the crops, despite large differences in crop height and structure, but poorer estimates for wetness within leaf canopies.

  10. Forests and their canopies: Archievements and horizons in canopy science

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nakamura, A.; Kitching, R. L.; Cao, M.; Creedy, T. J.; Fayle, Tom Maurice; Freiberg, M.; Hewitt, C. N.; Itioka, T.; Koh, L. P.; Ma, K.; Malhi, Y.; Mitchell, A.; Novotný, Vojtěch; Ozanne, C. M. P.; Song, L.; Wang, H.; Ashton, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2017), s. 438-451 ISSN 0169-5347 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09427S; GA ČR GB14-36098G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 669609 - Diversity6continents Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biodiversity * canopy * cranes Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 15.268, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169534717300599

  11. Comparação de três métodos para estimativa do índice de área foliar em pastos de capim-marandu sob lotação contínua Comparison of three methods for estimating leaf area index of marandu palisadegrass swards under continuous stocking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Fischer Sbrissia

    2008-02-01

    , destructive (LAI DM; (2 Indirect, destructive, based on the use of tiller population density and mean leaf area per tiller (LAI TPD; and (3 Indirect, non-destructive, based on the use of a LAI-2000 canopy analyser equipment (LAI LICOR. LAI DM was estimated on herbage samples harvested using four 0.30 × 0.37 m metallic frames per paddock. Measurements were carried out in a monthly basis and results grouped into five seasons of the year: summer, autumn, winter, early and late spring. The experiment was carried out according to a complete randomised block design, with four replications and a split-plot arrangement, where sward heights were allocated to plots and LAI estimation methods to sub-plots. The results showed that the canopy analyser overestimated LAI values in relation to the other two methods. This overestimation is mainly due to the excessive accumulation of dead material at the base of swards, particularly on those kept taller (30 and 40 cm. The LAI DM was the method that better detected variations in sward height and seasons of the year, and the LAI TPD showed intermediate values, with a pattern of variation in absolute values similar to that obtained for the LAI DM. The canopy analyser should not be used when LAI estimates are being generated for simulation and mathematical modelling purposes and to estimate the efficiency of incident radiation use.

  12. The response of sward-dwelling arthropod communities to reduced grassland management intensity in pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helden Alvin J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We compared arthropod taxon richness, diversity and community structure of two replicated grassland husbandry experiments to investigate effects of reduced management intensity, as measured by nutrient input levels (390, 224 and 0 kg/ha per year N in one experiment, and 225 and 88 kg/ha per year N in another. Suction sampling was used to collect Araneae, Coleoptera, Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, with Araneae and Coleoptera also sampled with pitfall trapping. Univariate analyses found no significant differences in abundance and species density between treatments. However, with multivariate analysis, there were significant differences in arthropod community structure between treatments in both experiments.

  13. Weak Environmental Controls of Tropical Forest Canopy Height in the Guiana Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youven Goulamoussène

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Canopy height is a key variable in tropical forest functioning and for regional carbon inventories. We investigate the spatial structure of the canopy height of a tropical forest, its relationship with environmental physical covariates, and the implication for tropical forest height variation mapping. Making use of high-resolution maps of LiDAR-derived Digital Canopy Model (DCM and environmental covariates from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM acquired over 30,000 ha of tropical forest in French Guiana, we first show that forest canopy height is spatially correlated up to 2500 m. Forest canopy height is significantly associated with environmental variables, but the degree of correlation varies strongly with pixel resolution. On the whole, bottomland forests generally have lower canopy heights than hillslope or hilltop forests. However, this global picture is very noisy at local scale likely because of the endogenous gap-phase forest dynamic processes. Forest canopy height has been predictively mapped across a pixel resolution going from 6 m to 384 m mimicking a low resolution case of 3 points·km − 2 . Results of canopy height mapping indicated that the error for spatial model with environment effects decrease from 8.7 m to 0.91 m, depending of the pixel resolution. Results suggest that, outside the calibration plots, the contribution of environment in shaping the global canopy height distribution is quite limited. This prevents accurate canopy height mapping based only on environmental information, and suggests that precise canopy height maps, for local management purposes, can only be obtained with direct LiDAR monitoring.

  14. Thermal Imaging of Forest Canopy Temperatures: Relationships with Biological and Biophysical Drivers and Ecosystem Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, C. J.; Kim, Y.; Hanson, C. V.; Law, B. E.; Kwon, H.; Schulze, M.; Pau, S.; Detto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature is a primary environmental control on plant processes at a range of spatial and temporal scales, affecting enzymatic reactions, ecosystem biogeochemistry, and species distributions. Although most focus is on air temperature, the radiative or skin temperature of plants is more relevant. Canopy skin temperature dynamics reflect biophysical, physiological, and anatomical characteristics and interactions with environmental drivers, and can be used to examine forest responses to stresses like droughts and heat waves. Direct measurements of plant canopy temperatures using thermocouple sensors have been challenging and offer limited information. Such measurements are usually conducted over short periods of time and a limited spatial extent of the canopy. By contrast, thermal infrared (TIR) imaging allows for extensive temporal and spatial measurement of canopy temperature regimes. We present results of TIR imaging of forest canopies at a range of well-studied forest sites in the United States and Panama. These forest types include temperate rainforests, a semi­arid pine forest, and a semi­deciduous tropical forest. Canopy temperature regimes at these sites are highly variable spatially and temporally and display frequent departures from air temperature, particularly during clear sky conditions. Canopy tissue temperatures are often warmer (daytime) and colder (nighttime) than air temperature, and canopy structure seems to have a large influence on the thermal regime. Additionally, comparison of canopy temperatures to eddy covariance fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy reveals relationships not apparent using air temperature. Initial comparisons between our forest canopy temperatures and remotely sensed skin temperature using Landsat and MODIS data show reasonably good agreement. We conclude that temporal and spatial changes in canopy temperature and its relationship to biological and environmental factors can improve our understanding of how

  15. Changes of ndvi across vertical canopy layers in temperate deciduous forest during a litterfall period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. M.; Ryu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is a key variable indicating changes in vegetation dynamics and carbon flux. Previous studies have paid little attention to the changes in NDVI during litterfall period. In this study, we report the changes of NDVI across vertical canopy layers in a temperate deciduous forest during a litterfall period. To monitor changes in canopy structure, functions, and spectral properties during the litterfall period, we combined automatic observations of NDVI derived from LED-spectral sensors and LAI derived from digital cover photography installed at multiple canopy layer depths. Furthermore, we collected hyperspectral optical properties of leaves across multiple canopy layers and hyperspectral reflectance of forest background using ASD-FieldSpec. We found that NDVI in forest floor became greater than the NDVI measured from the top of canopy during the litterfall period. We discuss what satellite-derived NDVI exactly sees during the litterfall period, which will be useful to better understand forest autumn phenology at large scales.

  16. Bark beetles and dwarf mistletoe interact to alter downed woody material, canopy structure, and stand characteristics in northern Colorado ponderosa pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer G. Klutsch; Russell D. Beam; William R. Jacobi; Jose F. Negron

    2014-01-01

    Due to the recent outbreaks of bark beetles in western U.S.A., research has focused on the effects of tree mortality on forest conditions, such as fuel complexes and stand structure. However, most studies have addressed outbreak populations of bark beetles only and there is a lack of information on the effect of multiple endemic, low level populations of biotic...

  17. Worldwide variation in within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation: differences in temporal and environmental controls among plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Keenan, Trevor

    2017-04-01

    Major light gradients, characteristically 10- to 50-fold, constitute the most prominent feature of plant canopies. These gradients drive within-canopy variation in foliage structural, chemical and physiological traits. As a key acclimation response to variation in light availability, foliage photosynthetic capacity per area (Aarea) increases with increasing light availability within the canopy, maximizing whole canopy photosynthesis. Recently, a worldwide database including 831 within-canopy gradients with standardized light estimates for 304 species belonging to major vascular plant functional types was constructed and within-canopy variation in photosynthetic acclimation was characterized (Niinemets Ü, Keenan TF, Hallik L (2015) Tansley review. A worldwide analysis of within-canopy variations in leaf structural, chemical and physiological traits across plant functional types. The New Phytologist 205: 973-993). However, the understanding of how within-canopy photosynthetic gradients vary during the growing season and in response to site and stand characteristics is still limited. Here we analyzed temporal, environmental and site (nutrient availability, stand density, ambient CO2 concentration, water availability) sources of variation in within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation in different plant functional types. Variation in key structural (leaf dry mass per unit area, MA), chemical (nitrogen content per dry mass, NM, and area, NA) and physiological (photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, EN) photosynthetic capacity per dry mass, Amass and area, Aarea) was examined. The analysis demonstrates major, typically 1.5-2-fold, time-, environment and site-dependent modifications in within-canopy variation in foliage photosynthetic capacity. However, the magnitude and direction of temporal and environmental variations in plasticity significantly varied among functional types. Species with longer leaf life span and low rates of canopy expansion or flush-type canopy

  18. Leaf-on canopy closure in broadleaf deciduous forests predicted during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Ayala, Andrea J.; Shickel, Madeline R.

    2015-01-01

    Forest canopy influences light transmittance, which in turn affects tree regeneration and survival, thereby having an impact on forest composition and habitat conditions for wildlife. Because leaf area is the primary impediment to light penetration, quantitative estimates of canopy closure are normally made during summer. Studies of forest structure and wildlife habitat that occur during winter, when deciduous trees have shed their leaves, may inaccurately estimate canopy closure. We estimated percent canopy closure during both summer (leaf-on) and winter (leaf-off) in broadleaf deciduous forests in Mississippi and Louisiana using gap light analysis of hemispherical photographs that were obtained during repeat visits to the same locations within bottomland and mesic upland hardwood forests and hardwood plantation forests. We used mixed-model linear regression to predict leaf-on canopy closure from measurements of leaf-off canopy closure, basal area, stem density, and tree height. Competing predictive models all included leaf-off canopy closure (relative importance = 0.93), whereas basal area and stem density, more traditional predictors of canopy closure, had relative model importance of ≤ 0.51.

  19. Long-term structural canopy changes sustain net photosynthesis per ground area in high arctic Vaccinium uliginosum exposed to changes in near-ambient UV-B levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesgaard, Kristine S; Albert, Kristian R; Ro-Poulsen, Helge; Michelsen, Anders; Mikkelsen, Teis N; Schmidt, Niels M

    2012-08-01

    Full recovery of the ozone layer is not expected for several decades and consequently, the incoming level of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) will only slowly be reduced. Therefore to investigate the structural and photosynthetic responses to changes in solar UV-B we conducted a 5-year UV-B exclusion study in high arctic Greenland. During the growing season, the gas exchange (H₂O and CO₂) and chlorophyll-a fluorescence were measured in Vaccinium uliginosum. The leaf dry weight, carbon, nitrogen, stable carbon isotope ratio, chlorophyll and carotenoid content were determined from a late season harvest. The net photosynthesis per leaf area was on average 22% higher in 61% reduced UV-B treatment across the season, but per ground area photosynthesis was unchanged. The leaf level increase in photosynthesis was accompanied by increased leaf nitrogen, higher stomatal conductance and F(v)/F(m). There was no change in total leaf biomass, but reduction in total leaf area caused a pronounced reduction of specific leaf area and leaf area index in reduced UV-B. This demonstrates the structural changes to counterbalance the reduced plant carbon uptake seen per leaf area in ambient UV-B as the resulting plant carbon uptake per ground area was not affected. Thus, our understanding of long-term responses to UV-B reduction must take into account both leaf level processes as well as structural changes to understand the apparent robustness of plant carbon uptake per ground area. In this perspective, V. uliginosum seems able to adjust plant carbon uptake to the present amount of solar UV-B radiation in the High Arctic. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  20. Long-term structural canopy changes sustain net photosynthesis per ground area in high arctic Vaccinium uliginosum exposed to changes in near-ambient UV-B levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard, Kristine Stove; Albert, Kristian Rost; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    2012-01-01

    Full recovery of the ozone layer is not expected for several decades and consequently, the incoming level of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) will only slowly be reduced. Therefore to investigate the structural and photosynthetic responses to changes in solar UV-B we conducted a 5-year UV-B exclusion s...... seems able to adjust plant carbon uptake to the present amount of solar UV-B radiation in the High Arctic.......Full recovery of the ozone layer is not expected for several decades and consequently, the incoming level of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) will only slowly be reduced. Therefore to investigate the structural and photosynthetic responses to changes in solar UV-B we conducted a 5-year UV-B exclusion...... study in high arctic Greenland. During the growing season, the gas exchange (H(2) O and CO(2) ) and chlorophyll-a fluorescence were measured in Vaccinium uliginosum. The leaf dry weight, carbon, nitrogen, stable carbon isotope ratio, chlorophyll and carotenoid content were determined from a late season...

  1. Canopy Dynamics in Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Jespersen, Michael L.

    2010-07-27

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMS) are organic - inorganic hybrids in which a core nanostructure is functionalized with a covalently attached corona and an ionically tethered organic canopy. NIMS are engineered to be liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and are of interest for a variety of applications. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and pulse-field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments to measure the canopy dynamics of NIMS prepared from 18-nm silica cores modified by an alkylsilane monolayer possessing terminal sulfonic acid functionality, paired with an amine-terminated ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymer canopy. Carbon NMR studies show that the block copolymer canopy is mobile both in the bulk and in the NIMS and that the fast (ns) dynamics are insensitive to the presence of the silica nanoparticles. Canopy diffusion in the NIMS is slowed relative to the neat canopy, but not to the degree predicted from the diffusion of hard-sphere particles. Canopy diffusion is not restricted to the surface of the nanoparticles and shows unexpected behavior upon addition of excess canopy. Taken together, these data indicate that the liquid-like behavior in NIMS is due to rapid exchange of the block copolymer canopy between the ionically modified nanoparticles. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  2. VitiCanopy: A Free Computer App to Estimate Canopy Vigor and Porosity for Grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bei, Roberta; Fuentes, Sigfredo; Gilliham, Matthew; Tyerman, Steve; Edwards, Everard; Bianchini, Nicolò; Smith, Jason; Collins, Cassandra

    2016-04-23

    Leaf area index (LAI) and plant area index (PAI) are common and important biophysical parameters used to estimate agronomical variables such as canopy growth, light interception and water requirements of plants and trees. LAI can be either measured directly using destructive methods or indirectly using dedicated and expensive instrumentation, both of which require a high level of know-how to operate equipment, handle data and interpret results. Recently, a novel smartphone and tablet PC application, VitiCanopy, has been developed by a group of researchers from the University of Adelaide and the University of Melbourne, to estimate grapevine canopy size (LAI and PAI), canopy porosity, canopy cover and clumping index. VitiCanopy uses the front in-built camera and GPS capabilities of smartphones and tablet PCs to automatically implement image analysis algorithms on upward-looking digital images of canopies and calculates relevant canopy architecture parameters. Results from the use of VitiCanopy on grapevines correlated well with traditional methods to measure/estimate LAI and PAI. Like other indirect methods, VitiCanopy does not distinguish between leaf and non-leaf material but it was demonstrated that the non-leaf material could be extracted from the results, if needed, to increase accuracy. VitiCanopy is an accurate, user-friendly and free alternative to current techniques used by scientists and viticultural practitioners to assess the dynamics of LAI, PAI and canopy architecture in vineyards, and has the potential to be adapted for use on other plants.

  3. Euler-Lagrange coupling for porous parachute canopy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Aquelet

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We apply a new Euler-Lagrange coupling method to 3-D parachute problems, which generally involve fluid-structure interactions between a flexible, elastic, porous parachute canopy and a high-speed airflow. The method presented couples an Arbitrary Lagrange Euler formulation for the fluid dynamics and an updated Lagrangian finite element formulation for the parachute canopy. The Euler-Lagrange coupling handles fluid-structure interaction without matching the fluid and structure meshes. In order to take account of the effect of the parachute permeability, this coupling computes interaction forces based on the Ergun porous flow model. This paper provides validations for the technique when considering parachute applications and discusses the interest of this development to the parachute designer.

  4. Amazonian functional diversity from forest canopy chemical assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P; Martin, Roberta E; Tupayachi, Raul; Anderson, Christopher B; Sinca, Felipe; Carranza-Jiménez, Loreli; Martinez, Paola

    2014-04-15

    Patterns of tropical forest functional diversity express processes of ecological assembly at multiple geographic scales and aid in predicting ecological responses to environmental change. Tree canopy chemistry underpins forest functional diversity, but the interactive role of phylogeny and environment in determining the chemical traits of tropical trees is poorly known. Collecting and analyzing foliage in 2,420 canopy tree species across 19 forests in the western Amazon, we discovered (i) systematic, community-scale shifts in average canopy chemical traits along gradients of elevation and soil fertility; (ii) strong phylogenetic partitioning of structural and defense chemicals within communities independent of variation in environmental conditions; and (iii) strong environmental control on foliar phosphorus and calcium, the two rock-derived elements limiting CO2 uptake in tropical forests. These findings indicate that the chemical diversity of western Amazonian forests occurs in a regionally nested mosaic driven by long-term chemical trait adjustment of communities to large-scale environmental filters, particularly soils and climate, and is supported by phylogenetic divergence of traits essential to foliar survival under varying environmental conditions. Geographically nested patterns of forest canopy chemical traits will play a role in determining the response and functional rearrangement of western Amazonian ecosystems to changing land use and climate.

  5. Simulations of tropical rainforest albedo: is canopy wetness important?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvia N.M. Yanagi; Marcos H. Costa

    2011-01-01

    .... Therefore, it was investigated the role of canopy wetness on the simulated albedo of a tropical rainforest by modifying the IBIS canopy radiation transfer code to incorporate the effects of canopy...

  6. Using post-grazing sward height to impose dietary restrictions of varying duration in early lactation: its effects on spring-calving dairy cow production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosse, M; O'Donovan, M; Boland, T M; Delaby, L; Ganche, E; Kennedy, E

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the immediate and carryover effects of imposing two post-grazing sward heights (PGSH) for varying duration during early lactation on sward characteristics and dairy cow production. The experiment was a randomised block design with a 2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments. A total of 80 spring-calving (mean calving date - 6 February) dairy cows were randomly assigned, pre-calving, to one of the two (n=40) PGSH treatments - S (2.7 cm) and M (3.5 cm) - from 13 February to 18 March, 2012 (P1). For the subsequent 5-week period (P2: 19 March to 22 April, 2012), half the animals from each P1 treatment remained on their treatment, whereas the other half of the animals switched to the opposing treatment. Following P2, all cows were managed similarly for the remainder of the lactation (P3: 23 April to 4 November, 2012) to measure the carryover effect. Milk production, BW and body condition score were measured weekly, and grass dry matter intake (GDMI) was measured on four occasions - approximately weeks 5, 10, 15 and 20 of lactation. Sward utilisation (above 2.7 cm; P1 and P2) was significantly improved by reducing the PGSH from 3.5 (0.83) to 2.7 cm (0.96). There was no effect of PGSH on cumulative annual grass dry matter (DM) production (15.3 t DM/ha). Grazing to 2.7 cm reduced GDMI by 1.7 and 0.8 kg DM/cow in P1 and P2, respectively, when compared with 3.5 cm (13.3 and 14.0 kg/cow per day, respectively). Cows grazing to 2.7 cm for both P1 and P2 (SS) tended to have reduced cumulative 10-week milk yield (-105 kg) and milk solids yield (-9 kg) when compared with cows grazing to 3.5 cm for both periods (MM; 1608 and 128 kg/cow, respectively). Treatments that alternated PGSH at the end of P1, SM and MS had intermediate results. There was no interaction between P1 and P2 treatments. There was also no carryover effect of early lactation grazing regime on milk and milk solids production in P3, given the reduction in early lactation

  7. Nondestructive, stereological estimation of canopy surface area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulfsohn, Dvora-Laio; Sciortino, Marco; Aaslyng, Jesper M.

    2010-01-01

    a canopy using the smooth fractionator, (ii) sampling of leaves from the selected plants using the fractionator, and (iii) area estimation of the sampled leaves using point counting. We apply this procedure to estimate the total area of a chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium L.) canopy and evaluate both...

  8. The impact of modifying antenna size of photosystem II on canopy photosynthetic efficiency – development of a new canopy photosynthesis model scaling from metabolism to canopy level processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canopy photosynthesis describes photosynthesis of an entire crop field and positively correlates with biomass production. Much effort in crop breeding has focused on improving canopy architecture and hence light distribution inside the canopy. Here, we develop a new integrated canopy photosynthesis ...

  9. Long-term fragmentation effects on the distribution and dynamics of canopy gaps in a tropical montane forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas R. Vaughn; Gregory P. Asner; Christian P. Giardina

    2015-01-01

    Fragmentation alters forest canopy structure through various mechanisms, which in turn drive subsequent changes to biogeochemical processes and biological diversity. Using repeated airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) mappings, we investigated the size distribution and dynamics of forest canopy gaps across a topical montane forest landscape in Hawaii naturally...

  10. Microwave Propagation Through Cultural Vegetation Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Ahad

    The need to understand the interaction of microwaves with vegetation canopies has markedly increased in recent years. This is due to advances made in remote sensing science, microwave technology, and signal processing circuits. One class of the earth's vegetation cover is man-made canopies, such as agricultural fields, orchards, and artificial forests. Contrary to natural vegetation terrain, location, spacing, and density of plants in a man-made vegetation canopy are deterministic quantities. As a result, the semi-deterministic nature of cultural vegetation canopies violate the random assumption of the radiative transfer theory and leads to experimented results that are in variance with model calculations. Hence, an alternative approach is needed to model the interaction of microwaves with such canopies. This thesis examines the propagation behavior through a canopy of corn plants. The corn canopy was selected as a representative of cultural vegetation canopies that are planted in parallel rows with an approximately fixed spacing between adjacent plants. Several experimental measurements were conducted to determine the transmission properties of a corn canopy in the 1-10 GHz range. The measurements which included horizontal propagation through the canopy as well as propagation at oblique incidence, were performed for defoliated canopies and for canopies with leaves. Through experimental observations and model development, the propagation behavior was found to be strongly dependent on the wavelength and the path length. At a wavelength in the neighborhood of 20 cm, for example, it was found that scattering by the stalks was coherent in nature for waves propagating horizontally through the canopy, which necessitated the development of a coherent-field model that uses Bragg scattering to account for the observed interference pattern in the transmitted beam. As the wavelength is made shorter, the semi-random spacing between plants becomes significant relative to the

  11. Total canopy transmittance estimated from small-footprint, full-waveform airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Milutin; Wagner, Wolfgang; Quast, Raphael; Hollaus, Markus; Ressl, Camillo; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2017-06-01

    Canopy transmittance is a directional and wavelength-specific physical parameter that quantifies the amount of radiation attenuated when passing through a vegetation layer. The parameter has been estimated from LiDAR data in many different ways over the years. While early LiDAR methods treated each returned echo equally or weighted the echoes according to their return order, recent methods have focused more on the echo energy. In this study, we suggest a new method of estimating the total canopy transmittance considering only the energy of ground echoes. Therefore, this method does not require assumptions for the reflectance or absorption behavior of vegetation. As the oblique looking geometry of LiDAR is explicitly considered, canopy transmittance can be derived for individual laser beams and can be mapped spatially. The method was applied on a contemporary full-waveform LiDAR data set collected under leaf-off conditions and over a study site that contains two sub regions: one with a mixed (coniferous and deciduous) forest and another that is predominantly a deciduous forest in an alluvial plain. The resulting canopy transmittance map was analyzed for both sub regions and compared to aerial photos and the well-known fractional cover method. A visual comparison with aerial photos showed that even single trees and small canopy openings are visible in the canopy transmittance map. In comparison with the fractional cover method, the canopy transmittance map showed no saturation, i.e., there was better separability between patches with different vegetation structure.

  12. Ultrasonic and LIDAR sensors for electronic canopy characterization in vineyards: advances to improve pesticide application methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Jordi; Gil, Emilio; Llop, Jordi; Escolà, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Canopy characterization is a key factor to improve pesticide application methods in tree crops and vineyards. Development of quick, easy and efficient methods to determine the fundamental parameters used to characterize canopy structure is thus an important need. In this research the use of ultrasonic and LIDAR sensors have been compared with the traditional manual and destructive canopy measurement procedure. For both methods the values of key parameters such as crop height, crop width, crop volume or leaf area have been compared. Obtained results indicate that an ultrasonic sensor is an appropriate tool to determine the average canopy characteristics, while a LIDAR sensor provides more accuracy and detailed information about the canopy. Good correlations have been obtained between crop volume (C(VU)) values measured with ultrasonic sensors and leaf area index, LAI (R(2) = 0.51). A good correlation has also been obtained between the canopy volume measured with ultrasonic and LIDAR sensors (R(2) = 0.52). Laser measurements of crop height (C(HL)) allow one to accurately predict the canopy volume. The proposed new technologies seems very appropriate as complementary tools to improve the efficiency of pesticide applications, although further improvements are still needed.

  13. Surface renewal analysis to obtain sensible heat flux in rice, maize and soybean canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, A.; Paw U, K.; Snyder, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    The thermal environment in the plant canopy affects plants' growth processes such as flowering and ripening. High temperatures often cause grain sterility and poor filling, and reduce crop production in tropical and temperate regions. With global warming predicted, these effects have become a major concern worldwide. In this study, surface renewal analysis, which is a novel method for estimating scalar fluxes, was applied to rice, maize and soybean canopies to understand the dynamics of sensible heat in crop canopies. Surface renewal analysis has advantages of (1) lower cost of equipment, (2) a shorter fetch requirement and (3) less disturbance in the field. The temperature of the atmosphere (T) at multiple heights was measured at 10 Hz with fine-wire thermocouples to calculate sensible heat flux (H) from the ramp pattern of T. Variations in H determined from the T measurements at canopy top was from -80 to 120 Wm-2 for rice, and it showed reasonable diurnal variation. However, H values determined from the T measurements within the canopies were smaller because of differences in temperature ramp frequency with height. These results suggest that not all turbulent structures penetrate deeply into canopies. The results for rice, maize and soybean canopies will be presented at the meeting.

  14. Stomatal Conductance, Plant Hydraulics, and Multilayer Canopies: A New Paradigm for Earth System Models or Unnecessary Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, G. B.

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture stress is a key regulator of canopy transpiration, the surface energy budget, and land-atmosphere coupling. Many land surface models used in Earth system models have an ad-hoc parameterization of soil moisture stress that decreases stomatal conductance with soil drying. Parameterization of soil moisture stress from more fundamental principles of plant hydrodynamics is a key research frontier for land surface models. While the biophysical and physiological foundations of such parameterizations are well-known, their best implementation in land surface models is less clear. Land surface models utilize a big-leaf canopy parameterization (or two big-leaves to represent the sunlit and shaded canopy) without vertical gradients in the canopy. However, there are strong biometeorological and physiological gradients in plant canopies. Are these gradients necessary to resolve? Here, I describe a vertically-resolved, multilayer canopy model that calculates leaf temperature and energy fluxes, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf water potential at each level in the canopy. In this model, midday leaf water stress manifests in the upper canopy layers, which receive high amounts of solar radiation, have high leaf nitrogen and photosynthetic capacity, and have high stomatal conductance and transpiration rates (in the absence of leaf water stress). Lower levels in the canopy become water stressed in response to longer-term soil moisture drying. I examine the role of vertical gradients in the canopy microclimate (solar radiation, air temperature, vapor pressure, wind speed), structure (leaf area density), and physiology (leaf nitrogen, photosynthetic capacity, stomatal conductance) in determining above canopy fluxes and gradients of transpiration and leaf water potential within the canopy.

  15. Spectrodirectional Investigation of a Geometric-Optical Canopy Reflectance Model by Laboratory Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Adam Christopher

    Canopy reflectance models (CRMs) can accurately estimate vegetation canopy biophysical-structural information such as Leaf Area Index (LAI) inexpensively using satellite imagery. The strict physical basis which geometric-optical CRMs employ to mathematically link canopy bidirectional reflectance and structure allows for the tangible replication of a CRM's geometric abstraction of a canopy in the laboratory, enabling robust CRM validation studies. To this end, the ULGS-2 goniometer was used to obtain multiangle, hyperspectral (Spectrodirectional) measurements of a specially-designed tangible physical model forest, developed based upon the Geometric-Optical Mutual Shadowing (GOMS) CRM, at three different canopy cover densities. GOMS forward-modelled reflectance values had high levels of agreement with ULGS-2 measurements, with obtained reflectance RMSE values ranging from 0.03% to 0.1%. Canopy structure modelled via GOMS Multiple-Forward-Mode (MFM) inversion had varying levels of success. The methods developed in this thesis can potentially be extended to more complex CRMs through the implementation of 3D printing.

  16. Bone Canopies in Pediatric Renal Osteodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Renata C; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Friedman, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    . This finding contrasts with the thin appearance reported in healthy individuals with normal kidney function. Furthermore, canopies in pediatric CKD patients showed immunoreactivity to the PTH receptor (PTHR1) as well as to the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The number of surfaces...... with visible canopy coverage was associated with plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, bone formation rate, and the extent of remodeling surfaces. Collectively, these data support the conclusion that canopies respond to the elevated PTH levels in CKD and that they possess the molecular machinery necessary...

  17. Two-flow simulation of the natural light field within a canopy of submerged aquatic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackleson, S. G.; Klemas, V.

    1986-01-01

    A two-flow model is developed to simulate a light field composed of both collimated and diffuse irradiance within natural waters containing a canopy of bottom-adhering plants. To account for the effects of submerging a canopy, the transmittance and reflectance terms associated with each plant structure (leaves, stems, fruiting bodies, etc.) are expressed as functions of the ratio of the refractive index of the plant material to the refractive index of the surrounding media and the internal transmittance of the plant stucture. Algebraic solutions to the model are shown to yield plausible physical explanations for unanticipated variations in volume reflectance spectra. The effect of bottom reflectance on the near-bottom light field is also investigated. These indicate that within light-limited submerged aquatic plant canopies, substrate reflectance may play an important role in determining the amount of light available to the plants and, therefore, canopy productivity.

  18. Assimilating satellite-based canopy height within an ecosystem model to estimate aboveground forest biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joetzjer, E.; Pillet, M.; Ciais, P.; Barbier, N.; Chave, J.; Schlund, M.; Maignan, F.; Barichivich, J.; Luyssaert, S.; Hérault, B.; von Poncet, F.; Poulter, B.

    2017-07-01

    Despite advances in Earth observation and modeling, estimating tropical biomass remains a challenge. Recent work suggests that integrating satellite measurements of canopy height within ecosystem models is a promising approach to infer biomass. We tested the feasibility of this approach to retrieve aboveground biomass (AGB) at three tropical forest sites by assimilating remotely sensed canopy height derived from a texture analysis algorithm applied to the high-resolution Pleiades imager in the Organizing Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic Ecosystems Canopy (ORCHIDEE-CAN) ecosystem model. While mean AGB could be estimated within 10% of AGB derived from census data in average across sites, canopy height derived from Pleiades product was spatially too smooth, thus unable to accurately resolve large height (and biomass) variations within the site considered. The error budget was evaluated in details, and systematic errors related to the ORCHIDEE-CAN structure contribute as a secondary source of error and could be overcome by using improved allometric equations.

  19. Sub-canopy radiant energy during snowmelt in non-uniform forests spanning a latitudinal transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, T. E.; Essery, R.; Marks, D.; Pomeroy, J.; Hardy, J.; Sicart, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    In mountainous, forested environments, snowcover dynamics exert a strong control on hydrologic and atmospheric processes. Snowcover ablation patterns in forests are controlled by a complex combination of depositional patterns coupled with radiative and turbulent heat flux patterns related to topographic and canopy cover variations. Quantification of small-scale variations of radiant energy in forested environments is necessary to understand how canopy structure affects snowcover energetics to improve the representation of snowmelt processes in spatially-explicit physically-based snowmelt models. Incoming solar and thermal radiation were measured during the melt season within continuous and discontinuous forest stands, and at the interface between forest patches and small clearings along a transect spanning the North American Cordillera. Results indicate that reductions in solar radiation at the snow surface are partially balanced by increased thermal radiation from the forest canopy, relative to open locations. The differences between the transfer processes for solar and thermal radiation can produce two net incoming and net snowcover radiation paradoxes in heterogeneous environments. In discontinuous canopies, net radiation in forested areas may exceed radiation in open sites, whereas in other situations, net radiation may be less than net radiation in closed canopy forests. The empirical results coupled with theoretical modeling indicates that the effects of forest canopies on the radiative regimes at the snow surface are controlled by complex interactions of slope, aspect, gap sizes, canopy height, canopy density, canopy temperature, snow surface temperature and snowcover albedo. In higher latitude, closed canopy forests, radiative regimes may be characterized by relatively simple geometric optical radiation transfer methods, whereas at lower latitude and more non- uniform forests, other processes such as canopy and stem heating must be considered. These net

  20. Modification of VanWagner's canopy fire propagation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Dickinson; Andrew Robinson; Richy Harrod; Paul Gessler; Alistair Smith

    2007-01-01

    The conditions necessary for the combustion of canopy fuels are not well known but are assumed to be highly influenced by the volume through which the canopy fuels are dispersed, known as canopy bulk density (CBD). Propagating crown fire is defined as a continuous wall of flame from the bottom to the top of the canopy, implying crown fire propagation is actually...

  1. VitiCanopy: A Free Computer App to Estimate Canopy Vigor and Porosity for Grapevine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta De Bei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Leaf area index (LAI and plant area index (PAI are common and important biophysical parameters used to estimate agronomical variables such as canopy growth, light interception and water requirements of plants and trees. LAI can be either measured directly using destructive methods or indirectly using dedicated and expensive instrumentation, both of which require a high level of know-how to operate equipment, handle data and interpret results. Recently, a novel smartphone and tablet PC application, VitiCanopy, has been developed by a group of researchers from the University of Adelaide and the University of Melbourne, to estimate grapevine canopy size (LAI and PAI, canopy porosity, canopy cover and clumping index. VitiCanopy uses the front in-built camera and GPS capabilities of smartphones and tablet PCs to automatically implement image analysis algorithms on upward-looking digital images of canopies and calculates relevant canopy architecture parameters. Results from the use of VitiCanopy on grapevines correlated well with traditional methods to measure/estimate LAI and PAI. Like other indirect methods, VitiCanopy does not distinguish between leaf and non-leaf material but it was demonstrated that the non-leaf material could be extracted from the results, if needed, to increase accuracy. VitiCanopy is an accurate, user-friendly and free alternative to current techniques used by scientists and viticultural practitioners to assess the dynamics of LAI, PAI and canopy architecture in vineyards, and has the potential to be adapted for use on other plants.

  2. Physically-based Canopy Reflectance Model Inversion of Vegetation Biophysical-Structural Information from Terra-MODIS Imagery in Boreal and Mountainous Terrain for Ecosystem, Climate and Carbon Models using the BIOPHYS-MFM Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddle, D. R.; Hall, F.

    2009-12-01

    The BIOPHYS algorithm provides innovative and flexible methods for the inversion of canopy reflectance models (CRM) to derive essential biophysical structural information (BSI) for quantifying vegetation state and disturbance, and for input to ecosystem, climate and carbon models. Based on spectral, angular, temporal and scene geometry inputs that can be provided or automatically derived, the BIOPHYS Multiple-Forward Mode (MFM) approach generates look-up tables (LUTs) that comprise reflectance data, structural inputs over specified or computed ranges, and the associated CRM output from forward mode runs. Image pixel and model LUT spectral values are then matched. The corresponding BSI retrieved from the LUT matches is output as the BSI results. BIOPHYS-MFM has been extensively used with agencies in Canada and the USA over the past decade (Peddle et al 2000-09; Soenen et al 2005-09; Gamon et al 2004; Cihlar et al 2003), such as CCRS, CFS, AICWR, NASA LEDAPS, BOREAS and MODIS Science Teams, and for the North American Carbon Program. The algorithm generates BSI products such as land cover, biomass, stand volume, stem density, height, crown closure, leaf area index (LAI) and branch area, crown dimension, productivity, topographic correction, structural change from harvest, forest fires and mountain pine beetle damage, and water / hydrology applications. BIOPHYS-MFM has been applied in different locations in Canada (six provinces from Newfoundland to British Columbia) and USA (NASA COVER, MODIS and LEDAPS sites) using 7 different CRM models and a variety of imagery (e.g. MODIS, Landsat, SPOT, IKONOS, airborne MSV, MMR, casi, Probe-1, AISA). In this paper we summarise the BIOPHYS-MFM algorithm and results from Terra-MODIS imagery from MODIS validation sites at Kananaskis Alberta in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, and from the Boreal Ecosystem Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) in Saskatchewan Canada. At the montane Rocky Mountain site, BIOPHYS-MFM density estimates were within

  3. Vegetation Indices for Mapping Canopy Foliar Nitrogen in a Mixed Temperate Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral remote sensing serves as an effective tool for estimating foliar nitrogen using a variety of techniques. Vegetation indices (VIs are a simple means of retrieving foliar nitrogen. Despite their popularity, few studies have been conducted to examine the utility of VIs for mapping canopy foliar nitrogen in a mixed forest context. In this study, we assessed the performance of 32 vegetation indices derived from HySpex airborne hyperspectral images for estimating canopy mass-based foliar nitrogen concentration (%N in the Bavarian Forest National Park. The partial least squares regression (PLSR was performed for comparison. These vegetation indices were classified into three categories that are mostly correlated to nitrogen, chlorophyll, and structural properties such as leaf area index (LAI. %N was destructively measured in 26 broadleaf, needle leaf, and mixed stand plots to represent the different species and canopy structure. The canopy foliar %N is defined as the plot-level mean foliar %N of all species weighted by species canopy foliar mass fraction. Our results showed that the variance of canopy foliar %N is mainly explained by functional type and species composition. The normalized difference nitrogen index (NDNI produced the most accurate estimation of %N (R2CV = 0.79, RMSECV = 0.26. A comparable estimation of %N was obtained by the chlorophyll index Boochs2 (R2CV = 0.76, RMSECV = 0.27. In addition, the mean NIR reflectance (800–850 nm, representing canopy structural properties, also achieved a good accuracy in %N estimation (R2CV = 0.73, RMSECV = 0.30. The PLSR model provided a less accurate estimation of %N (R2CV = 0.69, RMSECV = 0.32. We argue that the good performance of all three categories of vegetation indices in %N estimation can be attributed to the synergy among plant traits (i.e., canopy structure, leaf chemical and optical properties while these traits may converge across plant species for evolutionary reasons. Our

  4. BOREAS HYD-03 Canopy Density Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The BOREAS HYD-03 team collected several data sets related to the hydrology of forested areas. This data set contains measurements of canopy density...

  5. BOREAS HYD-03 Canopy Density Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The BOREAS HYD-03 team collected several data sets related to the hydrology of forested areas. This data set contains measurements of canopy density (closure) from a...

  6. Bone Canopies in Pediatric Renal Osteodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Renata C; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Friedman, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is characterized by changes in bone turnover, mineralization, and volume that are brought about by alterations in bone resorption and formation. The resorptive and formative surfaces on the cancellous bone are separated from the marrow cavity by canopies...... and their association with biochemical and bone histomorphometric parameters in 106 pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients (stage 2-5) across the spectrum of ROD. Canopies in CKD patients often appeared as thickened multilayered canopies, similar to previous reports in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism....... This finding contrasts with the thin appearance reported in healthy individuals with normal kidney function. Furthermore, canopies in pediatric CKD patients showed immunoreactivity to the PTH receptor (PTHR1) as well as to the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The number of surfaces...

  7. Is methane released from the forest canopy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Ambus, Per

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that rates of CH4 emission from plant material depend exponentially on temperature and linearly on UV irradiance. The UV irradiance shall be spectrally weighted and shorter wavelengths results in higher CH4 emissions. Global upscaling models for estimating aerobic CH4......, based on lab results, have be conducted with varying results, but until now field measurements based on profile and eddy covariance measurements have failed to show CH4 emissions from forest canopies. To detect CH4 production or consumption in the canopy of a beech stand we connected a CH4 analyzer...... indications of periodic CH4 emissions in the canopy, but more data need to be analyzed before the magnitude of the canopy source of CH4 can be established....

  8. Modelling the canopy development of bambara groundnut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunaratne, A.S.; Azam-Ali, S.N.; Al-Shareef, I.

    2010-01-01

    Canopy development of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc) is affected by temperature stress, drought stress and photoperiod. The quantification of these documented effects by means of a suitable crop model, BAMGRO is presented in this paper. Data on canopy development from five growth...... and drought stress. The leaf area expansion is calculated as a function of leaf number and individual leaf size. The canopy development of bambara groundnut is modelled (and tested) in BAMGRO model by means of leaf initiation and leaf area expansion and branching and stem production are not considered. Nash.......80) with maximum MAE less than ±0.50 thus explaining canopy development under temperature stress, drought stress and variable photoperiods....

  9. Stochastic radiative transfer model for mixture of discontinuous vegetation canopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabanov, Nikolay V. [Department of Geography, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)]. E-mail: shabanov@bu.edu; Huang, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Environmental Sciences Department, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Knjazikhin, Y. [Department of Geography, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Dickinson, R.E. [School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Myneni, Ranga B. [Department of Geography, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Modeling of the radiation regime of a mixture of vegetation species is a fundamental problem of the Earth's land remote sensing and climate applications. The major existing approaches, including the linear mixture model and the turbid medium (TM) mixture radiative transfer model, provide only an approximate solution to this problem. In this study, we developed the stochastic mixture radiative transfer (SMRT) model, a mathematically exact tool to evaluate radiation regime in a natural canopy with spatially varying optical properties, that is, canopy, which exhibits a structured mixture of vegetation species and gaps. The model solves for the radiation quantities, direct input to the remote sensing/climate applications: mean radiation fluxes over whole mixture and over individual species. The canopy structure is parameterized in the SMRT model in terms of two stochastic moments: the probability of finding species and the conditional pair-correlation of species. The second moment is responsible for the 3D radiation effects, namely, radiation streaming through gaps without interaction with vegetation and variation of the radiation fluxes between different species. We performed analytical and numerical analysis of the radiation effects, simulated with the SMRT model for the three cases of canopy structure: (a) non-ordered mixture of species and gaps (TM); (b) ordered mixture of species without gaps; and (c) ordered mixture of species with gaps. The analysis indicates that the variation of radiation fluxes between different species is proportional to the variation of species optical properties (leaf albedo, density of foliage, etc.) Gaps introduce significant disturbance to the radiation regime in the canopy as their optical properties constitute major contrast to those of any vegetation species. The SMRT model resolves deficiencies of the major existing mixture models: ignorance of species radiation coupling via multiple scattering of photons (the linear mixture

  10. Modeling the Variability of Canopy Resistance and Evapotranspiration over a Desert Steppe Site in Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G.; Zhou, G.; Chen, F.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The land-atmospheric exchange of heat and water vapor in the transitional semi-arid region is often heterogeneous due to large spatial variability in physical and physiological properties (surface albedo, roughness length, vegetation fraction, canopy resistance, etc.). That significantly affects daytime development of boundary-layer structure and summer precipitation. This study analyzed the variability of canopy resistance, evapotranpiration, and associated driving environmental factors over a desert steppe site in Inner Mongolia, China, using eddy-flux and meteorological data collected from 2008 to 2010. Distinct seasonal and interannual variabilities in canopy resistance were identified within those three years. Based on the principal component regression method, the analysis of the relative contribution of five major environmental factors including soil water content, leaf-area index, photosynthetically active radiation, vapor pressure deficit, and air temperature to canopy resistance showed that canopy-resistance variation was most responsive to soil water content. This study revealed that the canopy resistance decreased exponentially with soil water content. Therefore, the linear soil moisture stress function in Jarvis scheme was replaced by this new exponential water-stress function for the desert steppe site and it produced better canopy resistance. With this modified Jarvis scheme, the Noah land surface model improved the simulation of latent heat flux over the desert steppe. This study indicated that there is a need to analyze the statistical distributions of canopy properties and to incorporate parameters more specific to the given land covers.

  11. A Photogrammetric Workflow for the Creation of a Forest Canopy Height Model from Small Unmanned Aerial System Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lejeune

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of operational small unmanned aerial systems (UASs opens the door for their extensive use in forest mapping, as both the spatial and temporal resolution of UAS imagery better suit local-scale investigation than traditional remote sensing tools. This article focuses on the use of combined photogrammetry and “Structure from Motion” approaches in order to model the forest canopy surface from low-altitude aerial images. An original workflow, using the open source and free photogrammetric toolbox, MICMAC (acronym for Multi Image Matches for Auto Correlation Methods, was set up to create a digital canopy surface model of deciduous stands. In combination with a co-registered light detection and ranging (LiDAR digital terrain model, the elevation of vegetation was determined, and the resulting hybrid photo/LiDAR canopy height model was compared to data from a LiDAR canopy height model and from forest inventory data. Linear regressions predicting dominant height and individual height from plot metrics and crown metrics showed that the photogrammetric canopy height model was of good quality for deciduous stands. Although photogrammetric reconstruction significantly smooths the canopy surface, the use of this workflow has the potential to take full advantage of the flexible revisit period of drones in order to refresh the LiDAR canopy height model and to collect dense multitemporal canopy height series.

  12. Assessment of Light Environment Variability in Broadleaved Forest Canopies Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry Van der Zande

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Light availability inside a forest canopy is of key importance to many ecosystem processes, such as photosynthesis and transpiration. Assessment of light availability and within-canopy light variability enables a more detailed understanding of these biophysical processes. The changing light-vegetation interaction in a homogeneous oak (Quercus robur L. stand was studied at different moments during the growth season using terrestrial laser scanning datasets and ray tracing technology. Three field campaigns were organized at regular time intervals (24 April 2008; 07 May 2008; 23 May 2008 to monitor the increase of foliage material. The laser scanning data was used to generate 3D representations of the forest stands, enabling structure feature extraction and light interception modeling, using the Voxel-Based Light Interception Model (VLIM. The VLIM is capable of estimating the relative light intensity or Percentage of Above Canopy Light (PACL at any arbitrary point in the modeled crown space. This resulted in a detailed description of the dynamic light environments inside the canopy. Mean vertical light extinction profiles were calculated for the three time frames, showing significant differences in light attenuation by the canopy between April 24 on the one hand, and May 7 and May 23 on the other hand. The proposed methodology created the opportunity to link these within-canopy light distributions to the increasing amount of photosynthetically active leaf material and its distribution in the considered 3D space.

  13. Canopy induced aberration correction in airborne electro-optical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, James A.; Sprague, Michaelene W.

    2011-11-01

    An increasing number of electro-optical systems are being used by pilots in tactical aircraft. This means that the afore mentioned systems must operate through the aircrafts canopy, unfortunately the canopy functions as a less than ideal lens element in the electro-optical sensor optical path. The canopy serves first and foremost as an aircraft structural component, considerations like minimizing the drag co-efficient and the ability to survive bird strikes take precedence over achieving optimal optical characteristics. This paper describes how the authors characterized the optical characteristics of an aircraft canopy. Families of modulation transfer functions were generated, for various viewing geometries through the canopy and for various electro-optical system entrance pupil diameters. These functions provided us with the means to significantly reduce the effect of the canopy "lens" on the performance of a representative electro-optical system, using an Astigmatic Corrector Lens. A comparison of the electro-optical system performance with and without correction is also presented.

  14. Impact of Canopy Openness on Spider Communities: Implications for Conservation Management of Formerly Coppiced Oak Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Košulič

    Full Text Available Traditional woodland management created a mosaic of differently aged patches providing favorable conditions for a variety of arthropods. After abandonment of historical ownership patterns and traditional management and the deliberate transformation to high forest after World War II, large forest areas became darker and more homogeneous. This had significant negative consequences for biodiversity. An important question is whether even small-scale habitat structures maintained by different levels of canopy openness in abandoned coppiced forest may constitute conditions suitable for forest as well as open habitat specialists. We investigated the effect of canopy openness in former traditionally coppiced woodlands on the species richness, functional diversity, activity density, conservation value, and degree of rareness of epigeic spiders. In each of the eight studied locations, 60-m-long transect was established consisting of five pitfall traps placed at regular 15 m intervals along the gradient. Spiders were collected from May to July 2012. We recorded 90 spider species, including high proportions of xeric specialists (40% and red-listed threatened species (26%. The peaks of conservation indicators, as well as spider community abundance, were shifted toward more open canopies. On the other hand, functional diversity peaked at more closed canopies followed by a rapid decrease with increasing canopy openness. Species richness was highest in the middle of the canopy openness gradient, suggesting an ecotone effect. Ordinations revealed that species of conservation concern tended to be associated with sparse and partly opened canopy. The results show that the various components of biodiversity peaked at different levels of canopy openness. Therefore, the restoration and suitable forest management of such conditions will retain important diversification of habitats in formerly coppiced oak forest stands. We indicate that permanent presence of small

  15. Impact of Canopy Openness on Spider Communities: Implications for Conservation Management of Formerly Coppiced Oak Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košulič, Ondřej; Michalko, Radek; Hula, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Traditional woodland management created a mosaic of differently aged patches providing favorable conditions for a variety of arthropods. After abandonment of historical ownership patterns and traditional management and the deliberate transformation to high forest after World War II, large forest areas became darker and more homogeneous. This had significant negative consequences for biodiversity. An important question is whether even small-scale habitat structures maintained by different levels of canopy openness in abandoned coppiced forest may constitute conditions suitable for forest as well as open habitat specialists. We investigated the effect of canopy openness in former traditionally coppiced woodlands on the species richness, functional diversity, activity density, conservation value, and degree of rareness of epigeic spiders. In each of the eight studied locations, 60-m-long transect was established consisting of five pitfall traps placed at regular 15 m intervals along the gradient. Spiders were collected from May to July 2012. We recorded 90 spider species, including high proportions of xeric specialists (40%) and red-listed threatened species (26%). The peaks of conservation indicators, as well as spider community abundance, were shifted toward more open canopies. On the other hand, functional diversity peaked at more closed canopies followed by a rapid decrease with increasing canopy openness. Species richness was highest in the middle of the canopy openness gradient, suggesting an ecotone effect. Ordinations revealed that species of conservation concern tended to be associated with sparse and partly opened canopy. The results show that the various components of biodiversity peaked at different levels of canopy openness. Therefore, the restoration and suitable forest management of such conditions will retain important diversification of habitats in formerly coppiced oak forest stands. We indicate that permanent presence of small-scale improvements

  16. Responses of plant biochemical substances to reflectance spectra at leaf and canopy scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Runhe; Zhang, Huifang; Sun, Juan; Gao, Wei; Zhuang, Dafang; Niu, Zheng

    2008-08-01

    Plants cover more than 70% of our earth's land surface and play an important role in the exchange of materials and energy between land and atmosphere. The biochemical substances existing in leaves have been proven to be critical factors in influencing, or even controlling, this exchange by means of various physiological processes, including photosynthesis, evaportranspiration, litter decomposition, etc. Compared to traditional wet chemistry methods, estimation of their contents through leaf and canopy reflectance spectra has become a rapid, efficient, and promising method over the past few decades, which had been physically based on the selective absorption features of a particular substance. This paper discusses the responses of plant biochemical substances to the reflectance spectra at both leaf and canopy scales. We use a leaf optical model PROSPECT and a leaf-canopy coupled optical model PROSAIL to generate large amounts of leaf and canopy spectra. Both of these models contain three biochemical parameters: cab-chlorophyll concentration, Cw-equivalent leaf water thickness, and Cm-dry matter concentration. Local and global sensitivity analysis (SA) methods are used on the simulated spectra to differentiate their contributions to the outcome spectra at both scales so as to investigate their scale effects. Results show that the maximum sensitivities of chlorophyll and water are much higher than that of dry matter at leaf scale, and they tend to decrease at canopy scale because canopy shape, soil, and incident/reflected geometric factors have a large influence on canopy spectra. However, the sensitivity of dry matter exceeds the maximum sensitivity of mesophyll structure parameters at canopy scale and becomes the top contributor at the beginning of near infrared.

  17. Impact of Canopy Openness on Spider Communities: Implications for Conservation Management of Formerly Coppiced Oak Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košulič, Ondřej; Michalko, Radek; Hula, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Traditional woodland management created a mosaic of differently aged patches providing favorable conditions for a variety of arthropods. After abandonment of historical ownership patterns and traditional management and the deliberate transformation to high forest after World War II, large forest areas became darker and more homogeneous. This had significant negative consequences for biodiversity. An important question is whether even small-scale habitat structures maintained by different levels of canopy openness in abandoned coppiced forest may constitute conditions suitable for forest as well as open habitat specialists. We investigated the effect of canopy openness in former traditionally coppiced woodlands on the species richness, functional diversity, activity density, conservation value, and degree of rareness of epigeic spiders. In each of the eight studied locations, 60-m-long transect was established consisting of five pitfall traps placed at regular 15 m intervals along the gradient. Spiders were collected from May to July 2012. We recorded 90 spider species, including high proportions of xeric specialists (40%) and red-listed threatened species (26%). The peaks of conservation indicators, as well as spider community abundance, were shifted toward more open canopies. On the other hand, functional diversity peaked at more closed canopies followed by a rapid decrease with increasing canopy openness. Species richness was highest in the middle of the canopy openness gradient, suggesting an ecotone effect. Ordinations revealed that species of conservation concern tended to be associated with sparse and partly opened canopy. The results show that the various components of biodiversity peaked at different levels of canopy openness. Therefore, the restoration and suitable forest management of such conditions will retain important diversification of habitats in formerly coppiced oak forest stands. We indicate that permanent presence of small-scale improvements

  18. Elements of a dynamic systems model of canopy photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xin-Guang; Song, Qingfeng; Ort, Donald R

    2012-06-01

    Improving photosynthesis throughout the full canopy rather than photosynthesis of only the top leaves of the canopy is central to improving crop yields. Many canopy photosynthesis models have been developed from physiological and ecological perspectives, however most do not consider heterogeneities of microclimatic factors inside a canopy, canopy dynamics and associated energetics, or competition among different plants, and most models lack a direct linkage to molecular processes. Here we described the rationale, elements, and approaches necessary to build a dynamic systems model of canopy photosynthesis. A systems model should integrate metabolic processes including photosynthesis, respiration, nitrogen metabolism, resource re-mobilization and photosynthate partitioning with canopy level light, CO(2), water vapor distributions and heat exchange processes. In so doing a systems-based canopy photosynthesis model will enable studies of molecular ecology and dramatically improve our insight into engineering crops for improved canopy photosynthetic CO(2) uptake, resource use efficiencies and yields. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Amazon forest carbon dynamics predicted by profiles of canopy leaf area and light environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. C. Stark; V. Leitold; J. L. Wu; M. O. Hunter; C. V. de Castilho; F. R. C. Costa; S. M. McMahon; G. G. Parker; M. Takako Shimabukuro; M. A. Lefsky; M. Keller; L. F. Alves; J. Schietti; Y. E. Shimabukuro; D. O. Brandao; T. K. Woodcock; N. Higuchi; P. B de Camargo; R. C. de Oliveira; S. R. Saleska

    2012-01-01

    Tropical forest structural variation across heterogeneous landscapes may control above-ground carbon dynamics. We tested the hypothesis that canopy structure (leaf area and light availability) – remotely estimated from LiDAR – control variation in above-ground coarse wood production (biomass growth). Using a statistical model, these factors predicted biomass growth...

  20. Mechanistic study of aerosol dry deposition on vegetated canopies; Etude mecaniste du depot sec d'aerosols sur les couverts vegetaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petroff, A

    2005-04-15

    The dry deposition of aerosols onto vegetated canopies is modelled through a mechanistic approach. The interaction between aerosols and vegetation is first formulated by using a set of parameters, which are defined at the local scale of one surface. The overall deposition is then deduced at the canopy scale through an up-scaling procedure based on the statistic distribution parameters. This model takes into account the canopy structural and morphological properties, and the main characteristics of the turbulent flow. Deposition mechanisms considered are Brownian diffusion, interception, initial and turbulent impaction, initially with coniferous branches and then with entire canopies of different roughness, such as grass, crop field and forest. (author)

  1. Estimating Canopy Nitrogen Content in a Heterogeneous Grassland with Varying Fire and Grazing Treatments: Konza Prairie, Kansas, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohua Ling

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative, spatially explicit estimates of canopy nitrogen are essential for understanding the structure and function of natural and managed ecosystems. Methods for extracting nitrogen estimates via hyperspectral remote sensing have been an active area of research. Much of this research has been conducted either in the laboratory, or in relatively uniform canopies such as crops. Efforts to assess the feasibility of the use of hyperspectral analysis in heterogeneous canopies with diverse plant species and canopy structures have been less extensive. In this study, we use in situ and aircraft hyperspectral data to assess several empirical methods for extracting canopy nitrogen from a tallgrass prairie with varying fire and grazing treatments. The remote sensing data were collected four times between May and September in 2011, and were then coupled with the field-measured leaf nitrogen levels for empirical modeling of canopy nitrogen content based on first derivatives, continuum-removed reflectance and ratio-based indices in the 562–600 nm range. Results indicated that the best-performing model type varied between in situ and aircraft data in different months. However, models from the pooled samples over the growing season with acceptable accuracy suggested that these methods are robust with respect to canopy heterogeneity across spatial and temporal scales.

  2. Fossil Leaves and Fossil Leaf n-Alkanes: Reconstructing the First Closed Canopied Rainforests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, H. V.; Freeman, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Although the age and location is disputed, the rise of the first closed-canopy forest is likely linked with the expansion of angiosperms in the late Cretacous or early Cenozoic. The carbon isotope 'canopy effect' reflects the extent of canopy closure, and is well documented in δ13C values of the leaves and leaf lipids in modern forests. To test the extent of canopy closure among the oldest documented angiosperm tropical forests, we analyzed isotopic characteristics of leaf fossils and leaf waxes from the Guaduas and Cerrejón Formations. The Guaduas Fm. (Maastrichtian) contains some of the earliest angiosperm fossils in the Neotropics, and both leaf morphology and pollen records at this site suggest an open-canopy structure. The Cerrejón Fm. (Paleocene) contains what are believed to be the first recorded fossil leaves from a closed-canopy forest. We analyzed the bulk carbon isotope content (δ13Cleaf) of 199 fossil leaves, as well as the n-alkane concentration and chain-length distribution, and δ13C of alkanes (δ13Clipid) of 73 fossil leaves and adjacent sediment samples. Fossil leaves are dominated by eudicots and include ten modern plant families (Apocynaceae, Bombaceae, Euphorbaceae, Fabaceae, Lauraceae, Malvaceae, Meliaceae, Menispermaceae, Moraceae, Sapotaceae). We interpreted extent of canopy coverage based on the range of δ13Cleaf values. The narrow range of δ13C values in leaves from the Guaduas Fm (2.7‰) is consistent with an open canopy. A significantly wider range in values (6.3‰) suggests a closed-canopy signature for site 0315 of the Cerrejón Fm,. In contrast, at Site 0318, a lacustrine deposit, leaves had a narrow range (3.3‰) in δ13C values, and this is not consistent with a closed-canopy, but is consistent with leaf assemblages from a forest edge. Leaves that accumulate in lake sediments tend to be biased toward plants living at the lake edge, which do not experience closed-canopy conditions, and do not express the isotopic

  3. Flow and Dispersion in Urban Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britter, Rex; Hanna, Steven

    2001-11-01

    Atmospheric flow and pollutant dispersion within and above the urban canopy are important for urban air quality, for assessing the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous material within cities, for assessing the air exchange between buildings and their environment, and consequently for rationalising energy usage. Different techniques for parameterising the urban canopy will be described including the application of digital elevation models to several European and American cities. Models have been developed, guided by theory and experiment, to describe the flow and turbulence within and above cities and some observations based on these models will be discussed as will the exchange processes between the urban canopy and the flow above. The work has been extended to the dispersion of active and passive pollutants. The results of a novel field study in the City of Birmingham will be presented.

  4. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Canopy Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Charest, Martin; Sy, Mikailou

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set contains canopy biochemistry data collected in 1994 in the NSA at the YJP, OJR, OBS, UBS, and OA sites, including biochemistry lignin, nitrogen, cellulose, starch, and fiber concentrations. These data were collected to study the spatial and temporal changes in the canopy biochemistry of boreal forest cover types and how a high-resolution radiative transfer model in the mid-infrared could be applied in an effort to obtain better estimates of canopy biochemical properties using remote sensing. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  5. [Standardization of technical methods for apple fluorescence canopy spectral detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi-Cun; Zhao, Geng-Xing; Lei, Tong; Wang, Ling; Dong, Fang; Wang, Jing-An

    2010-06-01

    Aiming at spectral detection of apple fluorescence canopy, the present paper carried out spectral detection tests under different weather conditions, different detection times, and different detection heights and angles to apple canopy in the two years of 2008 and 2009, so as to analyze impacts of these factors on apple canopy spectral characteristics and explore standardized spectral detection methods for apple fluorescence canopy. The results indicated the regularity in spectral reflectance of apple fluorescence canopy to a certain degree under different conditions, especially in the 760-1 350 nm near-infrared bands. The authors found that canopy spectral reflectance declined along with the decrease in sunshine and it is appropriate to detect canopy spectrum in sunny days with few clouds. In addition, spectral reflectance tended to be stable when the wind scale was below grade 2. The discrepancy of canopy spectra is small during the time period from 10:00 to 15:00 of a day compared to that of other times. For maintaining stable spectral curves, the height of detector to apple canopy needed to be adjusted to cover the whole canopy within the field of view according to detection angle of the detector. The vertical or approximately vertical detection was the best for canopy spectral reflectance acquisition. The standardization of technical methods of spectral detection for apple fluorescence canopy was proposed accordingly, which provided theoretical references for spectral detection and information extraction of apple tree canopy.

  6. Mean and Turbulent Flow Statistics in a Trellised Agricultural Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan E.; Stoll, Rob; Mahaffee, Walter F.; Pardyjak, Eric R.

    2017-10-01

    Flow physics is investigated in a two-dimensional trellised agricultural canopy to examine that architecture's unique signature on turbulent transport. Analysis of meteorological data from an Oregon vineyard demonstrates that the canopy strongly influences the flow by channelling the mean flow into the vine-row direction regardless of the above-canopy wind direction. Additionally, other flow statistics in the canopy sub-layer show a dependance on the difference between the above-canopy wind direction and the vine-row direction. This includes an increase in the canopy displacement height and a decrease in the canopy-top shear length scale as the above-canopy flow rotates from row-parallel towards row-orthogonal. Distinct wind-direction-based variations are also observed in the components of the stress tensor, turbulent kinetic energy budget, and the energy spectra. Although spectral results suggest that sonic anemometry is insufficient for resolving all of the important scales of motion within the canopy, the energy spectra peaks still exhibit dependencies on the canopy and the wind direction. These variations demonstrate that the trellised-canopy's effect on the flow during periods when the flow is row-aligned is similar to that seen by sparse canopies, and during periods when the flow is row-orthogonal, the effect is similar to that seen by dense canopies.

  7. Chlorophyll fluorescence tracks seasonal variations of photosynthesis from leaf to canopy in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hualei; Yang, Xi; Zhang, Yongguang; Heskel, Mary A; Lu, Xiaoliang; Munger, J William; Sun, Shucun; Tang, Jianwu

    2017-07-01

    Accurate estimation of terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP) remains a challenge despite its importance in the global carbon cycle. Chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) has been recently adopted to understand photosynthesis and its response to the environment, particularly with remote sensing data. However, it remains unclear how ChlF and photosynthesis are linked at different spatial scales across the growing season. We examined seasonal relationships between ChlF and photosynthesis at the leaf, canopy, and ecosystem scales and explored how leaf-level ChlF was linked with canopy-scale solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) in a temperate deciduous forest at Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, USA. Our results show that ChlF captured the seasonal variations of photosynthesis with significant linear relationships between ChlF and photosynthesis across the growing season over different spatial scales (R2  = 0.73, 0.77, and 0.86 at leaf, canopy, and satellite scales, respectively; P < 0.0001). We developed a model to estimate GPP from the tower-based measurement of SIF and leaf-level ChlF parameters. The estimation of GPP from this model agreed well with flux tower observations of GPP (R2  = 0.68; P < 0.0001), demonstrating the potential of SIF for modeling GPP. At the leaf scale, we found that leaf Fq '/Fm ', the fraction of absorbed photons that are used for photochemistry for a light-adapted measurement from a pulse amplitude modulation fluorometer, was the best leaf fluorescence parameter to correlate with canopy SIF yield (SIF/APAR, R2  = 0.79; P < 0.0001). We also found that canopy SIF and SIF-derived GPP (GPPSIF ) were strongly correlated to leaf-level biochemistry and canopy structure, including chlorophyll content (R2  = 0.65 for canopy GPPSIF and chlorophyll content; P < 0.0001), leaf area index (LAI) (R2  = 0.35 for canopy GPPSIF and LAI; P < 0.0001), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) (R2  = 0.36 for canopy GPPSIF

  8. Patterns of Canopy and Surface Layer Consumption in a Boreal Forest Fire from Repeat Airborne Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Michael; Morton, Douglas C.; Cook, Bruce D.; Andersen, Hans-Erik; Babcock, Chad; Pattison, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Fire in the boreal region is the dominant agent of forest disturbance with direct impacts on ecosystem structure, carbon cycling, and global climate. Global and biome-scale impacts are mediated by burn severity, measured as loss of forest canopy and consumption of the soil organic layer. To date, knowledge of the spatial variability in burn severity has been limited by sparse field sampling and moderate resolution satellite data. Here, we used pre- and post-fire airborne lidar data to directly estimate changes in canopy vertical structure and surface elevation for a 2005 boreal forest fire on Alaskas Kenai Peninsula. We found that both canopy and surface losses were strongly linked to pre-fire species composition and exhibited important fine-scale spatial variability at sub-30m resolution. The fractional reduction in canopy volume ranged from 0.61 in lowland black spruce stands to 0.27 in mixed white spruce and broad leaf forest. Residual structure largely reflects standing dead trees, highlighting the influence of pre-fire forest structure on delayed carbon losses from above ground biomass, post-fire albedo, and variability in understory light environments. Median loss of surface elevation was highest in lowland black spruce stands (0.18 m) but much lower in mixed stands (0.02 m), consistent with differences in pre-fire organic layer accumulation. Spatially continuous depth-of-burn estimates from repeat lidar measurements provide novel information to constrain carbon emissions from the surface organic layer and may inform related research on post-fire successional trajectories. Spectral measures of burn severity from Landsat were correlated with canopy (r = 0.76) and surface (r = -0.71) removal in black spruce stands but captured less of the spatial variability in fire effects for mixed stands (canopy r = 0.56, surface r = -0.26), underscoring the difficulty in capturing fire effects in heterogeneous boreal forest landscapes using proxy measures of burn severity

  9. West Coast Canopy-Forming Kelp, 1989-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — These data include the general extents of canopy-forming kelp surveys from 1989 to 2014 and a compilation of existing data sets delineating canopy-forming kelp beds...

  10. West Coast Canopy-Forming Kelp, 1989-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data include the general extents of canopy-forming kelp surveys from 1989 to 2014 and a compilation of existing data sets delineating canopy-forming kelp beds...

  11. 100-Meter Resolution Tree Canopy of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer contains tree canopy data for Alaska, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection and at a resolution of 100 meters. The tree canopy data were derived...

  12. Seedling Canopy Reflectance Spectra, 1992-1993 (ACCP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The reflectance spectra of Douglas-fir and bigleaf maple seedling canopies were measured. Canopies varied in fertilizer treatment and leaf area density...

  13. Mapping Forest Canopy Height Across Large Areas by Upscaling ALS Estimates with Freely Available Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Wilkes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Operational assessment of forest structure is an on-going challenge for land managers, particularly over large, remote or inaccessible areas. Here, we present an easily adopted method for generating a continuous map of canopy height at a 30 m resolution, demonstrated over 2.9 million hectares of highly heterogeneous forest (canopy height 0–70 m in Victoria, Australia. A two-stage approach was utilized where Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS derived canopy height, captured over ~18% of the study area, was used to train a regression tree ensemble method; random forest. Predictor variables, which have a global coverage and are freely available, included Landsat Thematic Mapper (Tasselled Cap transformed, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Normalized Difference Vegetation Index time series, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission elevation data and other ancillary datasets. Reflectance variables were further processed to extract additional spatial and temporal contextual and textural variables. Modeled canopy height was validated following two approaches; (i random sample cross validation; and (ii with 108 inventory plots from outside the ALS capture extent. Both the cross validation and comparison with inventory data indicate canopy height can be estimated with a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE of ≤ 31% (~5.6 m at the 95th percentile confidence interval. Subtraction of the systematic component of model error, estimated from training data error residuals, rescaled canopy height values to more accurately represent the response variable distribution tails e.g., tall and short forest. Two further experiments were carried out to test the applicability and scalability of the presented method. Results suggest that (a no improvement in canopy height estimation is achieved when models were constructed and validated for smaller geographic areas, suggesting there is no upper limit to model scalability; and (b training data can be captured over a small

  14. Climatic, biological, and land cover controls on the exchange of gas-phase semivolatile chemical pollutants between forest canopies and the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizzetto, Luca; Perlinger, Judith A

    2012-03-06

    An ecophysiological model of a structured broadleaved forest canopy was coupled to a chemical fate model of the air-canopy exchange of gaseous semivolatile chemicals to dynamically assess the short-term (hours) and medium term (days to season) air-canopy exchange and the influence of biological, climatic, and land cover drivers on the dynamics of the air-canopy exchange and on the canopy storage for airborne semivolatile pollutants. The chemical fate model accounts for effects of short-term variations in air temperature, wind speed, stomatal opening, and leaf energy balance, all as a function of layer in the canopy. Simulations showed the potential occurrence of intense short/medium term re-emission of pollutants having log K(OA) up to 10.7 from the canopy as a result of environmental forcing. In addition, relatively small interannual variations in seasonally averaged air temperature, canopy biomass, and precipitation can produce relevant changes in the canopy storage capacity for the chemicals. It was estimated that possible climate change related variability in environmental parameters (e.g., an increase of 2 °C in seasonally averaged air temperature in combination with a 10% reduction in canopy biomass due to, e.g., disturbance or acclimatization) may cause a reduction in canopy storage capacity of up to 15-25%, favoring re-emission and potential for long-range atmospheric transport. On the other hand, an increase of 300% in yearly precipitation can increase canopy sequestration by 2-7% for the less hydrophobic compounds.

  15. Modeling percent tree canopy cover: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Coulston; Gretchen G. Moisen; Barry T. Wilson; Mark V. Finco; Warren B. Cohen; C. Kenneth Brewer

    2012-01-01

    Tree canopy cover is a fundamental component of the landscape, and the amount of cover influences fire behavior, air pollution mitigation, and carbon storage. As such, efforts to empirically model percent tree canopy cover across the United States are a critical area of research. The 2001 national-scale canopy cover modeling and mapping effort was completed in 2006,...

  16. Canopy dynamics of a tropical rain forest in French Guiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The canopy dynamics (i.e. the formation and closure of canopy gaps) of a tropical rain forest in French Guiana are described. The formation of canopy gaps is investigated. The difficulties with gap size measurements are studied, and causes and consequences of treefalls and branchfalls are

  17. Regulation of leaf traits in canopy gradients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pons, T.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069365822

    2016-01-01

    The gradient of leaf traits in a canopy from sunlit upper regions to shaded lower ones is regulated in response to the density of its leaf area. The gradients of environmental factors act as signals for the regulation. The result is improved resource use efficiency for carbon gain at the whole plant

  18. Analysis of algorithms for predicting canopy fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katharine L. Gray; Elizabeth Reinhardt

    2003-01-01

    We compared observed canopy fuel characteristics with those predicted by existing biomass algorithms. We specifically examined the accuracy of the biomass equations developed by Brown (1978. We used destructively sampled data obtained at 5 different study areas. We compared predicted and observed quantities of foliage and crown biomass for individual trees in our study...

  19. Canopy Photosynthesis: From Basics to Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikosaka, Kouki; Niinemets, Ülo; Anten, N.P.R.

    2016-01-01

    A plant canopy, a collection of leaves, is an ecosystem-level unit of photosynthesis that assimilates carbon dioxide and exchanges other gases and energy with the atmosphere in a manner highly sensitive to ambient conditions including atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor concentrations, light

  20. Four things we don't know about scalar transfer from plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnigan, J. J.

    2009-04-01

    In terrestrial plant canopies, turbulent exchange of water through evapotranspiration is intimately bound up with exchange of other scalars, heat and carbon dioxide in particular. Turbulent transport is rarely the process limiting exchange of these scalars between the biosphere and the atmosphere. However, in measurement programs like FLUXNET or when we parameterise surface exchange at the canopy scale in climate or weather models we must understand the mechanism of turbulent exchange in detail. In this talk we survey four current obstacles to extending our understanding of canopy turbulence from the idealised case of homogeneous flow in neutral stratification to complex flows in stable and unstable conditions. 1. Canopy eddy structure and the hydrodynamic instability Recent analysis of canopy LES and wind tunnel simulations has revealed the ‘two hairpin' structure of a characteristic canopy eddy. This structure explains a large body of results from a wide range of canopies and redefines the Roughness Sub Layer (RSL) as an asymptotic layer similar to the logarithmic and outer layers of the Planetary Boundary Layer. However, the nature of the non-linear ‘mixing-layer' instability process that gives canopy/RSL eddies their coherence and enhanced transport efficiency (as compared to eddies in the logarithmic layer above) is poorly understood so we do not know how resilient this instability and the eddies that depend upon it are to large scale flow perturbations or to changes in stability. 2. Turbulent Schmidt and Prandtl Numbers The scalar RSL can be defined as the layer across which the turbulent Schmidt (Sc) and Prandtl (Pr) numbers in neutral stratification change from their canopy top values of ~0.5, typical of mixing layers, to their logarithmic layer values of ~1.0, typical of boundary layers. The value of Sc or Pr is a critical parameter when adjusting Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) for the proximity of the canopy. The need for such adjustments has

  1. Developing a regional canopy fuels assessment strategy using multi-scale lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Birgit E.; Nelson, Kurtis

    2011-01-01

    Accurate assessments of canopy fuels are needed by fire scientists to understand fire behavior and to predict future fire occurrence. A key descriptor for canopy fuels is canopy bulk density (CBD). CBD is closely linked to the structure of the canopy; therefore, lidar measurements are particularly well suited to assessments of CBD. LANDFIRE scientists are exploring methods to integrate airborne and spaceborne lidar datasets into a national mapping effort. In this study, airborne lidar, spaceborne lidar, and field data are used to map CBD in the Yukon Flats Ecoregion, with the airborne lidar serving as a bridge between the field data and the spaceborne observations. The field-based CBD was positively correlated with airborne lidar observations (R2=0.78). Mapped values of CBD using the airborne lidar dataset were significantly correlated with spaceborne lidar observations when analyzed by forest type (R2=0.62, evergreen and R2=0.71, mixed). Though continued research is necessary to validate these results, they do support the feasibility of airborne and, most importantly, spaceborne lidar data for canopy fuels assessment.

  2. Simulation of canopy CO2 flux for a rubber plantation: the effect of the regular spacing of trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, T.; Mudd, R. G.; Miyazawa, Y.; Liu, W.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Kobayashi, N.; LimKhan, T.; Jomura, M.; Matsumoto, K.; Huang, M.; Chen, Q.; Yin, S.

    2012-12-01

    Rubber plantations are rapidly expanding to not only optimal but also sub-optimal environments throughout mainland Southeast Asia region. What the environmental problems are induced by this vast land-use change and how the changed environment influences the rubber plantation productivities have been concerned. For this investigation, describing the biosphere-atmosphere exchange in the rubber plantations with understanding the environmental process is essential, and soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model coupling ecophysiological and biogeochemical principles at the leaf scale with detailed turbulent transport mechanics is the promising tool. A regular spacing of trees is a marked characteristic of rubber plantations and generate their peculiar canopy structure. The SVAT models, however, have paid less attention to how to account for such a canopy properties in the model and how to evaluate it in the field observation. In this study, we developed the SVAT model applicable to the rubber plantation and an evaluation method for its canopy structure, and examine how the peculiar canopy structure affect the canopy CO2 exchange by comparing model results with measurements conducted at a rubber plantation in Cambodia. The findings suggest that it is impossible to reproduce the observed rubber plantation flux without accounting for the intensive canopy clumping.

  3. Canopy arthropod responses to experimental canopy opening and debris deposition in a tropical rainforest subject to hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy D. Schowalter; Michael R. Willig; Steven J. Presley

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed responses of canopy arthropods on seven representative early and late successional overstory and understory tree species to a canopy trimming experiment designed to separate effects of canopy opening and debris pulse (resulting from hurricane disturbance) in a tropical rainforest ecosystem at the Luquillo Experimental Forest Long-Term Ecological Research (...

  4. Características fermentativas da silagem do capim Marandu manejado em diferentes alturas de dossel Marandu grass silage fermentative characteristic managed under different sward heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgílio Jamir Gonçalves Mota

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar as características fermentativas da silagem de Brachiaria brizantha (Hochst ex. Rich Stapf cv. Marandu manejada em diferentes alturas de dossel. Utilizou-se o delineamento em blocos ao acaso, com quatro alturas de dossel (30; 45; 60 e 75cm em cinco blocos, totalizando 20 unidades experimentais. A gramínea foi ensilada em silos experimentais de PVC, com peso conhecido. A abertura dos silos foi realizada aos 56 dias após a ensilagem. Momentos antes da abertura, os silos foram pesados para avaliar as perdas por gases, e em seguida, abertos para retirada da silagem e quantificação das perdas por efluentes. Foram determinados os valores de pH, nitrogênio amoniacal, teores de ácidos orgânicos (lático, acético e butírico e matéria seca. Os dados coletados foram submetidos à análise de variância, e quando significativa, as médias de tratamentos foram submetidas ao estudo de regressão. A gramínea manejada a 30 e a 45cm de dossel resultou em silagens com melhores características fermentativas, com maior conteúdo de ácido lático, menores conteúdos de ácido butírico e nitrogênio amoniacal, e menores perdas durante a fermentação. A gramínea manejada a 60 e a 75cm apresentou processo fermentativo totalmente inadequado à conservação da forragem, portanto classificada como de péssima qualidade. Conclui-se que a altura de dossel de 30 e de 45cm do capim Marandu resultou em silagem com melhores características fermentativas, quando comparada com as silagens das demais alturas avaliadas, porém não atingiu um nível de qualidade desejada.The objective of this study was to evaluate the fermentation characteristics of Brachiaria brizantha Hochst ex. Rich Stapf cv. Marandu managed under different sward heights. We used a complete randomized block delimitation layout, with four sward heights (30; 45; 60 and 75cm in 5 blocks totaling 20 experimental units. The grass was packed and weighted in PVC silos. The silos

  5. Building capacity for providing canopy cover and canopy height at FIA plot locations using high-resolution imagery and leaf-off LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel Riemann; Jarlath O' Neil-Dunne; Greg C. Liknes

    2012-01-01

    Tree canopy cover and canopy height information are essential for estimating volume, biomass, and carbon; defining forest cover; and characterizing wildlife habitat. The amount of tree canopy cover also influences water quality and quantity in both rural and urban settings. Tree canopy cover and canopy height are currently collected at FIA plots either in the field or...

  6. Relationship between LiDAR-derived forest canopy height and Landsat images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristina Pascual; Antonio Garcia-Abril; Warren B. Cohen; Susana. Martin-Fernandez

    2010-01-01

    The mean and standard deviation (SD) of light detection and ranging (LiDAR)-derived canopy height are related to forest structure. However, LiDAR data typically cover a limited area and have a high economic cost compared with satellite optical imagery. Optical images may be required to extrapolate LiDAR height measurements across a broad landscape. Different spectral...

  7. Canopy gaps decrease microbial densities and disease risk for a shade-intolerant tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt O. Reinhart; Alejandro A. Royo; Stacie A. Kageyama; Keith. Clay

    2010-01-01

    Canopy disturbances such as windthrowevents have obvious impacts on forest structure and composition aboveground, but changes in soil microbial communities and the consequences of these changes are less understood.We characterized the densities of a soil-borne pathogenic oomycete (Pythium) and a common saprotrophic zygomycete (Mortierella...

  8. Relating FIA data to habitat classifications via tree-based models of canopy cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Nelson; Brian G. Tavernia; Chris Toney; Brian F. Walters

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife species-habitat matrices are used to relate lists of species with abundance of their habitats. The Forest Inventory and Analysis Program provides data on forest composition and structure, but these attributes may not correspond directly with definitions of wildlife habitats. We used FIA tree data and tree crown diameter models to estimate canopy cover, from...

  9. Comparative physiology of a central hardwood old-growth forest canopy and forest gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. R. Gillespie; J. Waterman; K. Saylors

    1993-01-01

    Concerns of poor oak regeneration, changing climate, biodiversity patterns, and carbon cycling in the Central Hardwoods have prompted ecological and physiological studies of old-growth forests and their role in maintaining the landscape. To examine the effects of old-growth canopy structure on the physiological productivity of overstory and understory species, we...

  10. Radiative transfer modeling within a heterogeneous canopy for estimation of forest fire fuel properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetz, B.; Schaepman, M.E.; Morsdorf, F.; Bowyer, P.; Itten, K.I.; Allgower, B.

    2004-01-01

    Imaging spectrometer data were acquired over conifer stands to retrieve spatially distributed information on canopy structure and foliage water content, which may be used to assess fire risk and to manage the impact of forest fires. The study relied on a comprehensive field campaign using stratified

  11. Linking terrace geomorphology and canopy characteristics in the Peruvian Amazon using high resolution airborne remote sensing (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, K.; Asner, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Peruvian Amazon is home to over half a million square kilometers of forest, nearly three quarters of which is supported by terrace landforms with variable histories. Characteristics of these terrace ecosystems have been contrasted with neighboring floodplain systems along riverine transportation corridors, but the ecological complexity within these terrace landscapes has remained largely unexplored. Airborne remote measurements provide an opportunity to consider the relationship between forest canopy characteristics and geomorphic gradients at high resolution over large spatial extents. In 2011 the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) was used to map a large section of intact lowland humid tropical forest in the southwestern Peruvian Amazon, including over nine thousand hectares of terrace forest. The CAO collected high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy data with its Visible-Shortwave Imaging Spectrometer (VSWIR) and digital elevation and canopy structure data with its high-resolution dual waveform LiDAR. These data, supplemented with field data collection, were used to quantify relationships between forest canopy traits and geomorphic gradients. Results suggest that both spectral properties of the canopy with known relationships to canopy chemistry, including pigment and nutrient concentrations, and canopy structural traits, including vegetation height and leaf area, are associated with geomorphic characteristics of this terrace landscape.

  12. Patterns of diversity in leaves from canopies of Ginkgo biloba are revealed using Specific Leaf Area as a morphological character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Michael L; Niklas, Karl J

    2011-07-01

    The difference reported in the literature for the Specific Leaf Area (SLA, cm(2)/g) of leaves on short- and long-shoots of Acer rubrum could mean that SLA can serve as a quantitative morphological trait. Our survey of SLA in canopies of Ginkgo biloba sampled a different clade of seed plants to investigate this morphological phenomenon. Such a survey in this dioecious taxon, and one in which a single canopy may have juvenile and reproductive portions, as well as one where canopies bear leaves of several shapes, examine these additional morphological factors as well as any long-shoot short-shoot differences. We measured SLA for a set of 642 dried leaves, a sampling across all morphological levels in canopies of large landscape specimens. The tabulated values were analyzed as distributions. Populations of leaves of G. biloba, sorted by morphological features of canopy structure, differ between long- and short-shoots (175%), on the two genders of tree (131%), in the juvenile and reproductive portions of a canopy (183%), and with the presence or absence of seed on short-shoots in the reproductive portion of megasporangiate canopies (114%). Basipetal leaves of long-shoots and leaves of short-shoots have similar values of SLA. With the exception of the acropetal decrease in SLA along long-shoots, the differences among the several classes of leaf seem to reflect local sink strength, even though the sink itself develops after leaves mature. The large overall range in the values of SLA in Ginkgo underscores the relevance of the details of canopy structure to parsing ecological phenomena.

  13. Modeling radiative transfer in tropical rainforest canopies: sensitivity of simulated albedo to canopy architectural and optical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia N. M. Yanagi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the sensitivity of the surface albedo simulated by the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS to a set of Amazonian tropical rainforest canopy architectural and optical parameters. The parameters tested in this study are the orientation and reflectance of the leaves of upper and lower canopies in the visible (VIS and near-infrared (NIR spectral bands. The results are evaluated against albedo measurements taken above the K34 site at the INPA (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia Cuieiras Biological Reserve. The sensitivity analysis indicates a strong response to the upper canopy leaves orientation (x up and to the reflectivity in the near-infrared spectral band (rNIR,up, a smaller sensitivity to the reflectivity in the visible spectral band (rVIS,up and no sensitivity at all to the lower canopy parameters, which is consistent with the canopy structure. The combination of parameters that minimized the Root Mean Square Error and mean relative error are Xup = 0.86, rVIS,up = 0.062 and rNIR,up = 0.275. The parameterizations performed resulted in successful simulations of tropical rainforest albedo by IBIS, indicating its potential to simulate the canopy radiative transfer for narrow spectral bands and permitting close comparison with remote sensing products.Este estudo avalia a sensibilidade do albedo da superfície pelo Simulador Integrado da Biosfera (IBIS a um conjunto de parâmetros que representam algumas propriedades arquitetônicas e óticas do dossel da floresta tropical Amazônica. Os parâmetros testados neste estudo são a orientação e refletância das folhas do dossel superior e inferior nas bandas espectrais do visível (VIS e infravermelho próximo (NIR. Os resultados são avaliados contra observações feitas no sítio K34 pertencente ao Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA na Reserva Biológica de Cuieiras. A análise de sensibilidade indica uma forte resposta aos parâmetros de orienta

  14. Electromagnetic wave extinction within a forested canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, M. A.; Fung, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    A forested canopy is modeled by a collection of randomly oriented finite-length cylinders shaded by randomly oriented and distributed disk- or needle-shaped leaves. For a plane wave exciting the forested canopy, the extinction coefficient is formulated in terms of the extinction cross sections (ECSs) in the local frame of each forest component and the Eulerian angles of orientation (used to describe the orientation of each component). The ECSs in the local frame for the finite-length cylinders used to model the branches are obtained by using the forward-scattering theorem. ECSs in the local frame for the disk- and needle-shaped leaves are obtained by the summation of the absorption and scattering cross-sections. The behavior of the extinction coefficients with the incidence angle is investigated numerically for both deciduous and coniferous forest. The dependencies of the extinction coefficients on the orientation of the leaves are illustrated numerically.

  15. Improved Windshield and Canopy Protection Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    canopy shots, i.e., 8" from the beam, 12" from the forward arch. The Impact resulted in a penetration with a football -shaped plug blown Inward...i7;«MpiWW.,i«iS,i»f.«.^^^ CVJ Cte / teä <%1 ^ u- o ro O in H UJ o to o L HH Hh o «^ o = —I ro O \\ N__ o a. CM X UJ

  16. The wave-driven current in coastal canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolahpour, Maryam; Hambleton, Magnus; Ghisalberti, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Wave-driven flows over canopies of aquatic vegetation (such as seagrass) are characterized by the generation of a strong, shoreward mean current near the top of the canopy. This shoreward drift, which is observed to be up to 75% of the RMS above-canopy orbital velocity, can have a significant impact on residence times within coastal canopies. There have been limited observations of this current and an accurate formulation of its magnitude is still lacking. Accordingly, this study aims to develop a practical relationship to describe the strength of this current as a function of both wave and canopy characteristics. A simple model for the Lagrangian drift velocity indicates that the magnitude of the wave-driven current increases with the above-canopy oscillatory velocity, the vertical orbital excursion at the top of the canopy, and the canopy density. An extensive laboratory study, using both rigid and (dynamically scaled) flexible model vegetation, was carried out to evaluate the proposed model. Experimental results reveal a strong agreement between predicted and measured current velocities over a wide and realistic range of canopy and wave conditions. The validity of this model is also confirmed through available field measurements. Characterization of this wave-induced mean current will allow an enhanced capacity for predicting residence time, and thus key ecological processes, in coastal canopies.

  17. Canopy soil bacterial communities altered by severing host tree limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody R. Dangerfield

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Trees of temperate rainforests host a large biomass of epiphytic plants, which are associated with soils formed in the forest canopy. Falling of epiphytic material results in the transfer of carbon and nutrients from the canopy to the forest floor. This study provides the first characterization of bacterial communities in canopy soils enabled by high-depth environmental sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Canopy soil included many of the same major taxonomic groups of Bacteria that are also found in ground soil, but canopy bacterial communities were lower in diversity and contained different operational taxonomic units. A field experiment was conducted with epiphytic material from six Acer macrophyllum trees in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA to document changes in the bacterial communities of soils associated with epiphytic material that falls to the forest floor. Bacterial diversity and composition of canopy soil was highly similar, but not identical, to adjacent ground soil two years after transfer to the forest floor, indicating that canopy bacteria are almost, but not completely, replaced by ground soil bacteria. Furthermore, soil associated with epiphytic material on branches that were severed from the host tree and suspended in the canopy contained altered bacterial communities that were distinct from those in canopy material moved to the forest floor. Therefore, the unique nature of canopy soil bacteria is determined in part by the host tree and not only by the physical environmental conditions associated with the canopy. Connection to the living tree appears to be a key feature of the canopy habitat. These results represent an initial survey of bacterial diversity of the canopy and provide a foundation upon which future studies can more fully investigate the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of these communities.

  18. Automatic detection of regions in spinach canopies responding to soil moisture deficit using combined visible and thermal imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-e-Ahmed Raza

    Full Text Available Thermal imaging has been used in the past for remote detection of regions of canopy showing symptoms of stress, including water deficit stress. Stress indices derived from thermal images have been used as an indicator of canopy water status, but these depend on the choice of reference surfaces and environmental conditions and can be confounded by variations in complex canopy structure. Therefore, in this work, instead of using stress indices, information from thermal and visible light imagery was combined along with machine learning techniques to identify regions of canopy showing a response to soil water deficit. Thermal and visible light images of a spinach canopy with different levels of soil moisture were captured. Statistical measurements from these images were extracted and used to classify between canopies growing in well-watered soil or under soil moisture deficit using Support Vector Machines (SVM and Gaussian Processes Classifier (GPC and a combination of both the classifiers. The classification results show a high correlation with soil moisture. We demonstrate that regions of a spinach crop responding to soil water deficit can be identified by using machine learning techniques with a high accuracy of 97%. This method could, in principle, be applied to any crop at a range of scales.

  19. Assessment of Canopy Chlorophyll Content Retrieval in Maize and Soybean: Implications of Hysteresis on the Development of Generic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Peng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Canopy chlorophyll content (Chl closely relates to plant photosynthetic capacity, nitrogen status and productivity. The goal of this study is to develop remote sensing techniques for accurate estimation of canopy Chl during the entire growing season without re-parameterization of algorithms for two contrasting crop species, maize and soybean. These two crops represent different biochemical mechanisms of photosynthesis, leaf structure and canopy architecture. The relationships between canopy Chl and reflectance, collected at close range and resampled to bands of the Multi Spectral Instrument (MSI aboard Sentinel-2, were analyzed in samples taken across the entirety of the growing seasons in three irrigated and rainfed sites located in eastern Nebraska between 2001 and 2005. Crop phenology was a factor strongly influencing the reflectance of both maize and soybean. Substantial hysteresis of the reflectance vs. canopy Chl relationship existed between the vegetative and reproductive stages. The effect of the hysteresis on vegetation indices (VI, applied for canopy Chl estimation, depended on the bands used and their formulation. The hysteresis greatly affected the accuracy of canopy Chl estimation by widely-used VIs with near infrared (NIR and red reflectance (e.g., normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, enhanced vegetation index (EVI and simple ratio (SR. VIs that use red edge and NIR bands (e.g., red edge chlorophyll index (CIred edge, red edge NDVI and the MERIS terrestrial chlorophyll index (MTCI were minimally affected by crop phenology (i.e., they exhibited little hysteresis and were able to accurately estimate canopy Chl in two crops without algorithm reparameterization and, thus, were found to be the best candidates for generic algorithms to estimate crop Chl using the surface reflectance products of MSI Sentinel-2.

  20. A model of canopy photosynthesis incorporating protein distribution through the canopy and its acclimation to light, temperature and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ian R.; Thornley, John H. M.; Frantz, Jonathan M.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The distribution of photosynthetic enzymes, or nitrogen, through the canopy affects canopy photosynthesis, as well as plant quality and nitrogen demand. Most canopy photosynthesis models assume an exponential distribution of nitrogen, or protein, through the canopy, although this is rarely consistent with experimental observation. Previous optimization schemes to derive the nitrogen distribution through the canopy generally focus on the distribution of a fixed amount of total nitrogen, which fails to account for the variation in both the actual quantity of nitrogen in response to environmental conditions and the interaction of photosynthesis and respiration at similar levels of complexity. Model A model of canopy photosynthesis is presented for C3 and C4 canopies that considers a balanced approach between photosynthesis and respiration as well as plant carbon partitioning. Protein distribution is related to irradiance in the canopy by a flexible equation for which the exponential distribution is a special case. The model is designed to be simple to parameterize for crop, pasture and ecosystem studies. The amount and distribution of protein that maximizes canopy net photosynthesis is calculated. Key Results The optimum protein distribution is not exponential, but is quite linear near the top of the canopy, which is consistent with experimental observations. The overall concentration within the canopy is dependent on environmental conditions, including the distribution of direct and diffuse components of irradiance. Conclusions The widely used exponential distribution of nitrogen or protein through the canopy is generally inappropriate. The model derives the optimum distribution with characteristics that are consistent with observation, so overcoming limitations of using the exponential distribution. Although canopies may not always operate at an optimum, optimization analysis provides valuable insight into plant acclimation to environmental

  1. Simulation of Canopy CO2/H2O Fluxes for a Rubber (Hevea Brasiliensis) Plantation in Central Cambodia: The Effect of the Regular Spacing of Planted Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Tomo' omi; Mudd, Ryan; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Liu, Wen; Giambelluca, Thomas; Kobayashi, N.; Lim, Tiva Khan; Jomura, Mayuko; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Huang, Maoyi; Chen, Qi; Ziegler, Alan; Yin, Song

    2013-09-10

    We developed a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model applicable to simulating CO2 and H2O fluxes from the canopies of rubber plantations, which are characterized by distinct canopy clumping produced by regular spacing of plantation trees. Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.) plantations, which are rapidly expanding into both climatically optimal and sub-optimal environments throughout mainland Southeast Asia, potentially change the partitioning of water, energy, and carbon at multiple scales, compared with traditional land covers it is replacing. Describing the biosphere-atmosphere exchange in rubber plantations via SVAT modeling is therefore essential to understanding the impacts on environmental processes. The regular spacing of plantation trees creates a peculiar canopy structure that is not well represented in most SVAT models, which generally assumes a non-uniform spacing of vegetation. Herein we develop a SVAT model applicable to rubber plantation and an evaluation method for its canopy structure, and examine how the peculiar canopy structure of rubber plantations affects canopy CO2 and H2O exchanges. Model results are compared with measurements collected at a field site in central Cambodia. Our findings suggest that it is crucial to account for intensive canopy clumping in order to reproduce observed rubber plantation fluxes. These results suggest a potentially optimal spacing of rubber trees to produce high productivity and water use efficiency.

  2. Voxel-Based Spatial Filtering Method for Canopy Height Retrieval from Airborne Single-Photon Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Tang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Airborne single-photon lidar (SPL is a new technology that holds considerable potential for forest structure and carbon monitoring at large spatial scales because it acquires 3D measurements of vegetation faster and more efficiently than conventional lidar instruments. However, SPL instruments use green wavelength (532 nm lasers, which are sensitive to background solar noise, and therefore SPL point clouds require more elaborate noise filtering than other lidar instruments to determine canopy heights, particularly in daytime acquisitions. Histogram-based aggregation is a commonly used approach for removing noise from photon counting lidar data, but it reduces the resolution of the dataset. Here we present an alternate voxel-based spatial filtering method that filters noise points efficiently while largely preserving the spatial integrity of SPL data. We develop and test our algorithms on an experimental SPL dataset acquired over Garrett County in Maryland, USA. We then compare canopy attributes retrieved using our new algorithm with those obtained from the conventional histogram binning approach. Our results show that canopy heights derived using the new algorithm have a strong agreement with field-measured heights (r2 = 0.69, bias = 0.42 m, RMSE = 4.85 m and discrete return lidar heights (r2 = 0.94, bias = 1.07 m, RMSE = 2.42 m. Results are consistently better than height accuracies from the histogram method (field data: r2 = 0.59, bias = 0.00 m, RMSE = 6.25 m; DRL: r2 = 0.78, bias = −0.06 m and RMSE = 4.88 m. Furthermore, we find that the spatial-filtering method retains fine-scale canopy structure detail and has lower errors over steep slopes. We therefore believe that automated spatial filtering algorithms such as the one presented here can support large-scale, canopy structure mapping from airborne SPL data.

  3. Crown plasticity and competition for canopy space: a new spatially implicit model parameterized for 250 North American tree species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew W Purves

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Canopy structure, which can be defined as the sum of the sizes, shapes and relative placements of the tree crowns in a forest stand, is central to all aspects of forest ecology. But there is no accepted method for deriving canopy structure from the sizes, species and biomechanical properties of the individual trees in a stand. Any such method must capture the fact that trees are highly plastic in their growth, forming tessellating crown shapes that fill all or most of the canopy space. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce a new, simple and rapidly-implemented model--the Ideal Tree Distribution, ITD--with tree form (height allometry and crown shape, growth plasticity, and space-filling, at its core. The ITD predicts the canopy status (in or out of canopy, crown depth, and total and exposed crown area of the trees in a stand, given their species, sizes and potential crown shapes. We use maximum likelihood methods, in conjunction with data from over 100,000 trees taken from forests across the coterminous US, to estimate ITD model parameters for 250 North American tree species. With only two free parameters per species--one aggregate parameter to describe crown shape, and one parameter to set the so-called depth bias--the model captures between-species patterns in average canopy status, crown radius, and crown depth, and within-species means of these metrics vs stem diameter. The model also predicts much of the variation in these metrics for a tree of a given species and size, resulting solely from deterministic responses to variation in stand structure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This new model, with parameters for US tree species, opens up new possibilities for understanding and modeling forest dynamics at local and regional scales, and may provide a new way to interpret remote sensing data of forest canopies, including LIDAR and aerial photography.

  4. Application of Semi-Automated Filter to Improve Waveform Lidar Sub-Canopy Elevation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yongwei Sheng; Gillespie, Thomas W.; Geoffrey A. Fricker; Victoria Meyer; Saatchi, Sassan S.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling sub-canopy elevation is an important step in the processing of waveform lidar data to measure three dimensional forest structure. Here, we present a methodology based on high resolution discrete-return lidar (DRL) to correct the ground elevation derived from large-footprint Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) and to improve measurement of forest structure. We use data acquired over Barro Colorado Island, Panama by LVIS large-footprint lidar (LFL) in 1998 and DRL in 2009. The study...

  5. Radiation Distribution Within a Canopy Profile Calculated by a Multiple-Layer Canopy Scattering Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, R. J.; Zhao, W.

    2004-05-01

    Remote sensing technology has tremendous potential for use in natural resource studies, agriculture, water and land use management because of the spatial information contained in remote sensing images and because of the ease and/or frequency of acquiring vast amounts of surface information. However, the quantitative application of remotely sensed data is restricted by several problems. One of them is that the entities a remote sensor views are not single targets. For example, measurement show that the skin temperature of many crops can exhibit more than a 10° C difference between the leaves at the bottom and those at the top of the canopy, in addition to the usually large difference between leaves and soil substrate. Directional radiometric surface temperatures measured from above a crop represent neither the skin temperature of the crop nor the surface temperature of the soil substrate but a complex aggregate of all elements viewed. When a remote sensing device views a vegetated surface from different view angles, different combinations of canopy and soil elements at different temperatures will be seen, producing different values of "remotely sensed surface temperature." As the first step in a series of models to be developed to simulate energy balance, sensible and latent heat fluxes, and temperature profiles within a vegetation canopy, a multiple-layer canopy scattering model to estimate short wave radiation distribution within a wheat canopy was developed. This model incorporates processes of radiation penetration through gaps between leaves, and radiation absorption, reflection and transmission in leaf layers. It is able to simulate the multiple scattering processes that occur among different canopy layers, and determine the vertical distributions of upwelling, downwelling, and reflected short wave radiation within the canopy, and at the soil surface. One of the primary advantages of this model, in contrast to other models, is that the multiple scattering

  6. Summertime canopy albedo is sensitive to forest thinning

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, J.; Berveiller, D.; F. M. Bréon; Delpierre, N.; Geppert, G.; Granier, A.; Jans, W.W.P.; Knohl, A.; MOORS, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an emerging body of literature linking canopy albedo to forest management, understanding of the process is still fragmented. We combined a stand-level forest gap model with a canopy radiation transfer model and satellite-derived model parameters to quantify the effects of forest thinning, that is removing trees at a certain time during the forest rotation, on summertime canopy albedo. The effects of different forest species (pine, beech, oak) and four thinning strategies (light to int...

  7. Sistema de integração lavoura-pecuária: efeito do manejo da altura em pastagem de aveia preta e azevém anual sobre o rendimento da cultura da soja Crop-livestock integration system: effect of oat and italian ryegrass sward height management on soybean yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Lazzarotto Terra Lopes

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos da altura de manejo em pastagem de aveia preta e azevém anual sobre o estabelecimento e o rendimento de grãos da cultura de soja. Os tratamentos utilizados foram quatro alturas de manejo do pasto: 10, 20, 30 e 40cm e um tratamento sem pastejo. Foram avaliados atributos referentes à pastagem (altura do pasto, oferta de forragem, massa de forragem, taxa de acúmulo, taxa de lotação animal e palhada residual e à cultura da soja (estande inicial de plantas e rendimento de grãos. As alturas reais do pasto ficaram próximas daquelas pretendidas, havendo um aumento linear da oferta de forragem e da massa de forragem quando foi observado aumento das alturas de manejo do pasto. A taxa de acúmulo não foi afetada pelos tratamentos. A taxa de lotação apresentou resposta linear decrescente com o aumento da altura do pasto. A massa de forragem remanescente aumentou na medida em que houve incremento na altura de manejo do pasto. Foi observada diferença entre os tratamentos para palhada residual e estande inicial de plantas de soja, porém essas diferenças não afetaram o rendimento de grãos da cultura. Os resultados sugerem que a presença dos animais não prejudica o cultivo subsequente, possibilitando aumento da renda do produtor pela oportunidade de utilização das áreas durante a entressafra da soja.This trial aimed to evaluate the effects of sward height management of pastures composed by black oat and Italian ryegrass upon soybean establishment and yield. The treatments were four sward management heights: 10, 20, 30 and 40cm; and no grazing control. Pasture (sward height, herbage allowance, herbage mass, stocking rate and post grazing herbage mass and soybean (initial stand of plants and yield attributes were evaluated. The observed sward heights were very similar to those previously intended. There was a linear increase in herbage allowance and herbage mass with increasing sward height

  8. Canopy interception variability in changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicz, Péter; Herceg, András; Kisfaludi, Balázs; Csáki, Péter; Gribovszki, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Tree canopies play a rather important role in forest hydrology. They intercept significant amounts of precipitation and evaporate back into the atmosphere during and after precipitation event. This process determines the net intake of forest soils and so important factor of hydrological processes in forested catchments. Average amount of interception loss is determined by the storage capacity of tree canopies and the rainfall distribution. Canopy storage capacity depends on several factors. It shows strong correlation with the leaf area index (LAI). Some equations are available to quantify this dependence. LAI shows significant variability both spatial and temporal scale. There are several methods to derive LAI from remote sensed data which helps to follow changes of it. In this study MODIS sensor based LAI time series are used to estimate changes of the storage capacity. Rainfall distribution derived from the FORESEE database which is developed for climate change related impact studies in the Carpathian Basin. It contains observation based precipitation data for the past and uses bias correction method for the climate projections. In this study a site based estimation is outworked for the Sopron Hills area. Sopron Hills is located at the eastern foothills of the Alps in Hungary. The study site, namely Hidegvíz Valley experimental catchment, is located in the central valley of the Sopron Hills. Long-term interception measurements are available in several forest sites in Hidegvíz Valley. With the combination of the ground based observations, MODIS LAI datasets a simple function is developed to describe the average yearly variations in canopy storage. Interception measurements and the CREMAP evapotranspiration data help to calibrate a simple interception loss equation based on Merriam's work. Based on these equation and the FORESEE bias corrected precipitation data an estimation is outworked for better understanding of the feedback of forest crown on hydrological

  9. Influence of canopy seasonal changes on turbulence parameterization within the roughness sublayer over an orchard canopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapkalijevski, M.; Moene, A.F.; Ouwersloot, Huug; Patton, E.G.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this observational study, the role of tree phenology on the atmospheric turbulence parameterization over 10-m-tall and relatively sparse deciduous vegetation is quantified. Observations from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) field experiment are analyzed to establish the

  10. Evaporation from rain-wetted forest in relation to canopy wetness, canopy cover, and net radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    2001-01-01

    Evaporation from wet canopies is commonly calculated using E-PM, the Penman-Monteith equation with zero surface resistance. However, several observations show a lower evaporation from rain-wetted forest. Possible causes for the difference between E-PM and experiments are evaluated to provide rules

  11. Relationships between leaf nitrogen and limitations of photosynthesis in canopies of Solidago altissima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Philipp; Schmid, Bernhard

    1999-09-01

    Vertical distribution patterns of light, leaf nitrogen, and leaf gas exchange through canopies of the clonal perennial Solidago altissima were studied in response to mowing and fertilizer application in a field experiment. Consistent with the distribution of light, average leaf nitrogen content followed a `smooth' exponential decline along the fertilized stands both in control and mown plots. The nitrogen profile along the unfertilized stands in mown plots, however, was `disrupted' by high-nitrogen leaves at the top of shorter ramets that only reached intermediate strata of the canopies. Hence, in these stands leaf nitrogen was significantly increased in short ramets compared with tall ramets for a given light environment, suggesting suboptimal stand structure but not necessarily suboptimal single-ramet architecture. However, at least under the climatic conditions observed during measurements, such disrupture had no substantial effect on stand productivity: model calculations showed that vertical distribution patterns of leaf nitrogen along ramets only marginally influenced the photosynthetic performance of ramets and stands. This is explained by the observed photosynthesis-nitrogen relationship: the rate of photosynthesis per unit amount of leaf nitrogen did not increase with leaf nitrogen content even under saturating light levels indicating that leaf photosynthesis was not nitrogen limited during the measurement periods. Nevertheless, our study indicates that consideration of how architecture(s) of adjacent individual plants interact could be essential for a better understanding of the trade-offs between individual and canopy characteristics for maximizing carbon gain. Such trade-offs may end up in a suboptimal canopy structure, which could not be predicted and understood by classical canopy optimization models.

  12. Testing the Application of Terrestrial Laser Scanning to Measure Forest Canopy Gap Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mark Danson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS have the potential to revolutionise measurement of the three-dimensional structure of vegetation canopies for applications in ecology, hydrology and climate change. This potential has been the subject of recent research that has attempted to measure forest biophysical variables from TLS data, and make comparisons with two-dimensional data from hemispherical photography. This research presents a systematic comparison between forest canopy gap fraction estimates derived from TLS measurements and hemispherical photography. The TLS datasets used in the research were obtained between April 2008 and March 2009 at Delamere Forest, Cheshire, UK. The analysis of canopy gap fraction estimates derived from TLS data highlighted the repeatability and consistency of the measurements in comparison with those from coincident hemispherical photographs. The comparison also showed that estimates computed considering only the number of hits and misses registered in the TLS datasets were consistently lower than those estimated from hemispherical photographs. To examine this difference, the potential information available in the intensity values recorded by TLS was investigated and a new method developed to estimate canopy gap fraction proposed. The new approach produced gap fractions closer to those estimated from hemispherical photography, but the research also highlighted the limitations of single return TLS data for this application.

  13. Using a stand-level model to predict light absorption in stands with vertically and horizontally heterogeneous canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I Forrester

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Forest ecosystem functioning is strongly influenced by the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation (APAR, and therefore, accurate predictions of APAR are critical for many process-based forest growth models. The Lambert-Beer law can be applied to estimate APAR for simple homogeneous canopies composed of one layer, one species, and no canopy gaps. However, the vertical and horizontal structure of forest canopies is rarely homogeneous. Detailed tree-level models can account for this heterogeneity but these often have high input and computational demands and work on finer temporal and spatial resolutions than required by stand-level growth models. The aim of this study was to test a stand-level light absorption model that can estimate APAR by individual species in mixed-species and multi-layered stands with any degree of canopy openness including open-grown trees to closed canopies. Methods The stand-level model was compared with a detailed tree-level model that has already been tested in mixed-species stands using empirical data. Both models were parameterised for five different forests, including a wide range of species compositions, species proportions, stand densities, crown architectures and canopy structures. Results The stand-level model performed well in all stands except in the stand where extinction coefficients were unusually variable and it appears unlikely that APAR could be predicted in such stands using (tree- or stand-level models that do not allow individuals of a given species to have different extinction coefficients, leaf-area density or analogous parameters. Conclusion This model is parameterised with species-specific information about extinction coefficients and mean crown length, diameter, height and leaf area. It could be used to examine light dynamics in complex canopies and in stand-level growth models.

  14. Spider assemblage (Arachnida: Araneae associated with canopies of Vochysia divergens (Vochysiaceae in the northern region of the Brazilian Pantanal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro D. Battirola

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study describes the composition and temporal variation of the spider assemblage (Arachnida: Araneae associated with canopies of Vochysia divergens Pohl. (Vochysiaceae in the northern region of the Brazilian Pantanal. Three V. divergens plants were sampled in 2004, at each seasonal period of the northern Pantanal (high water, receding water, dry season and rising water, using thermonebulization of the canopies with insecticide, totaling 396 m2 of sampled canopies. Analysis of abundance and richness of spider families were based on Non-Metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS and Variance Analysis (ANOVA and MANOVA. A total of 7,193 spiders were collected (6,330 immatures; 88.0%; 863 adults, 12.0% distributed in 30 families. Araneidae (1,676 individuals, Anyphaenidae (1,631 individuals, Salticidae (1,542 individuals and Pisauridae (906 individuals, were predominant, representing 80.0% of the sample. Ten different guilds were registered: aerial hunters, orb-weavers, nocturnal aerial runners and diurnal space web weavers dominated, sharing most ecological niches. The spider assemblage is affected by changes in the habitat structure, especially by the seasonal hydrological regime and variations in the phenology of V. divergens . The assemblage is composed of different groups of spiders. The dominant taxa and behavioral guilds differ in the different seasonal periods. Spiders were more abundant during the dry and rising water seasons, most likely reflecting a greater supply of potential prey, associated with new foliage and flowering at the canopy. The displacement of soil dwelling spiders to the trunks and canopies before and during the seasonal floods can change the structure and composition of the canopy assemblages. Oonopidae, Gnaphosidae and Caponiidae, were more frequent during the rising and high water seasons, which indicates that these taxa use the canopies of V. divergens as a refuge during the seasonal flooding in the Pantanal.

  15. Characterizing tree canopy temperature heterogeneity using an unmanned aircraft-borne thermal imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, M.; Powell, R.; Silman, M.; Wright, M.; Nicholson, W.

    2013-12-01

    Leaf temperature (Tleaf) is an important control on many physiological processes such as photosynthesis and respiration, is a key variable for characterizing canopy energy fluxes, and is a valuable metric for identifying plant water stress or disease. Traditional methods of Tleaf measurement involve either the use of thermocouples, a time and labor-intensive method that samples sparsely in space, or the use of air temperature (Tair) as a proxy measure, which can introduce inaccuracies due to near constant canopy-atmosphere energy flux. Thermal infrared (TIR) imagery provides an efficient means of collecting Tleaf for large areas. Existing satellite and aircraft-based TIR imagery is, however, limited by low spatial and/or temporal resolution, while crane-mounted camera systems have strictly limited spatial extents. Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) offer new opportunities to acquire high spatial and temporal resolution imagery on demand. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of collecting tree canopy Tleaf data using a small multirotor UAS fitted with a high spatial resolution TIR imager. The goals of this pilot study were to a) characterize basic patterns of within crown Tleaf for 4 study species and b) identify trends in Tleaf between species with varying leaf morphologies and canopy structures. TIR imagery was acquired for individual tree crowns of 4 species common to the North Carolina Piedmont ecoregion (Quercus phellos, Pinus strobus, Liriodendron tulipifera, Magnolia grandiflora) in an urban park environment. Due to significantly above-average summer precipitation, we assumed that none of the sampled trees was limited by soil water availability. We flew the TIR imaging system over 3-4 individuals of each of the 4 target species on 3 separate days. Imagery of all individuals was collected within the same 2-hour period in the afternoon on all days. There was low wind and partly cloudy skies during imaging. Tair, relative humidity, and wind speed were recorded at

  16. AIRBORNE X-HH INCIDENCE ANGLE IMPACT ON CANOPY HEIGHT RETREIVAL: IMPLICATIONS FOR SPACEBORNE X-HH TANDEM-X GLOBAL CANOPY HEIGHT MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Tighe

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To support international climate change mitigation efforts, the United Nations REDD+ initiative (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation seeks to reduce land use induced greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. It requires independent monitoring of forest cover and forest biomass information in a spatially explicit form. It is widely recognised that remote sensing is required to deliver this information. Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry (InSAR techniques have gained traction in the last decade as a viable technology from which vegetation canopy height and bare earth elevations can be derived. The viewing geometry of a SAR sensor is side-looking where the radar pulse is transmitted out to one side of the aircraft or satellite, defining an incidence angle (θ range. The incidence angle will change from near-range (NR to far-range (FR across of the track of the SAR platform. InSAR uses image pairs and thus, contain two set of incidence angles. Changes in the InSAR incidence angles can alter the relative contributions from the vegetation canopy and the ground surface and thus, affect the retrieved vegetation canopy height. Incidence angle change is less pronounced in spaceborne data than in airborne data and mitigated somewhat when multiple InSAR-data takes are combined. This study uses NEXTMap® single- and multi-pass X-band HH polarized InSAR to derive vegetation canopy height from the scattering phase centre height (hspc. Comparisons with in situ vegetation canopy height over three test sites (Arizona-1, Minnesota-2; the effect of incidence angle changes across swath on the X-HH InSAR hspc was examined. Results indicate at steep incidence angles (θ = 35º, more exposure of lower vegetation canopy structure (e.g. tree trunks led to greater lower canopy double bounce, increased ground scattering, and decreased volume scattering. This resulted in a lower scattering phase centre height (hspc or a greater underestimation of

  17. Spatial distribution of Guaiacum sanctum (Zygophyllaceae seedlings and saplings relative to canopy cover in Palo Verde National Park, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Fuchs

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of individuals is a fundamental property of most species and constitutes essential information for the development of restoration and conservation strategies, especially for endangered plant species. In this paper we describe the spatial distribution of different size classes of the endangered tropical tree Guaiacum sanctum and the effect of canopy cover on spatial aggregation. Adult G. sanctum were located and mapped in a 50ha plot in Palo Verde National Park, Costa Rica. Seedlings, saplings and juveniles were mapped to the nearest centimetre and permanently marked in three 50x50m subplots. Within each subplot spatial aggregation was assessed using Ripley’s K statistic and canopy opening readings were performed every 5m using a densitometer. Kriging spatial interpolation and Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine if average canopy cover differed among size classes. Individuals of G. sanctum were spatially aggregated at all size classes with seedlings being the most frequent size class in all subplots. Seedlings were found predominantly in areas with significantly higher canopy cover. In contrast, juveniles were more likely found in areas with higher light availability. The high number of seedlings, saplings, and juveniles relative to adults suggests that populations of G. sanctum in PVNP are expanding. Light availability and canopy structure are important factors shaping the spatial distribution of this species. The contemporary demographic structure of G. sanctum is dependent on forest gap dynamics and changes in human disturbance during the past 25 years.

  18. The fauna and flora of a kelp bed canopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fauna and flora of the canopy of a kelp bed off. Oudekraal, on the Cape Peninsula, is surveyed. Four species of epiphytic algae occur in the kelp canopy, three restricted to. Ecklonia maxima and the fourth to Laminaria pal/ida. Epiphyte biomass is equivalent to 4 - 9% of host standing crop amongst E. maxima, but less ...

  19. Hierarchical Canopy Dynamics of Electrolyte-Doped Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Jespersen, Michael L.

    2013-12-23

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are organic-inorganic hybrids prepared from ionically functionalized nanoparticles (NP) neutralized by oligomeric polymer counterions. NIMs are designed to behave as liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and have no volatile organic content, making them useful for a number of applications. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and pulsed-field gradient NMR to probe local and collective canopy dynamics in NIMs based on 18-nm silica NPs with a covalently bound anionic corona, neutralized by amine-terminated ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymers. The NMR relaxation studies show that the nanosecond-scale canopy dynamics depend on the degree of neutralization, the canopy radius of gyration, and crowding at the ionically modified NP surface. Two canopy populations are observed in the diffusion experiments, demonstrating that one fraction of the canopy is bound to the NP surface on the time scale (milliseconds) of the diffusion experiment and is surrounded by a more mobile layer of canopy that is unable to access the surface due to molecular crowding. The introduction of electrolyte ions (Na+ or Mg2+) screens the canopy-corona electrostatic interactions, resulting in a reduced bulk viscosity and faster canopy exchange. The magnitude of the screening effect depends upon ion concentration and valence, providing a simple route for tuning the macroscopic properties of NIMs. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  20. Synthesis and Experiments of Inherently Balanced Umbrella Canopy Designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijk, V.; Kiper, G.; Yasir, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows how umbrella canopies and umbrella canopy-like mechanisms can be designed inherently balanced. Inherently balanced means that the center of mass of the moving parts remains stationary at a single point for any position of the mechanism simply because of the specific design of the

  1. Water stress effects on spatially referenced cotton crop canopy properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    rop canopy temperature is known to be affected by water stress. Canopy reflectance can also be impacted as leaf orientation and color respond to the stress. As sensor systems are investigated for real-time management of irrigation and nitrogen, it is essential to understand how the data from the sen...

  2. Soil carbon estimation from eucalyptus grandis using canopy spectra

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mapping soil fertility parameters, such as soil carbon (C), is fundamentally important for forest management and research related to forest growth and climate change. This study seeks to establish the link between Eucalyptus grandis canopy spectra and soil carbon using raw and continuum-removed spectra. Canopy-level ...

  3. Forest canopy BRDF simulation using Monte Carlo method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Wu, B.; Zeng, Y.; Tian, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo method is a random statistic method, which has been widely used to simulate the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of vegetation canopy in the field of visible remote sensing. The random process between photons and forest canopy was designed using Monte Carlo method.

  4. Crop canopy BRDF simulation and analysis using Monte Carlo method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Wu, B.; Tian, Y.; Zeng, Y.

    2006-01-01

    This author designs the random process between photons and crop canopy. A Monte Carlo model has been developed to simulate the Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of crop canopy. Comparing Monte Carlo model to MCRM model, this paper analyzes the variations of different LAD and

  5. Use spectral derivatives for estimating canopy water content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, J.G.P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing has demonstrated great potential for accurate retrieval of canopy water content (CWC). This CWC is defined by the product of the leaf equivalent water thickness (EWT) and the leaf area index (LAI). In this paper the spectral information provided by the canopy water

  6. Estimating wood volume from canopy area in deciduous woodlands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we tested the predictive ability of canopy area in estimating wood volume in deciduous woodlands of Zimbabwe. The study was carried out in four sites of different climatic conditions. We used regression analysis to statistically quantify the prediction of wood volume from canopy area at species and stand level ...

  7. Summertime canopy albedo is sensitive to forest thinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, J.; Berveiller, D.; Bréon, F.M.; Delpierre, N.; Geppert, G.; Granier, A.; Jans, W.W.P.; Knohl, A.; Moors, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an emerging body of literature linking canopy albedo to forest management, understanding of the process is still fragmented. We combined a stand-level forest gap model with a canopy radiation transfer model and satellite-derived model parameters to quantify the effects of forest thinning,

  8. Compliance of secondary production and eco-exergy as indicators of benthic macroinvertebrates assemblages' response to canopy cover conditions in Neotropical headwater streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Marden Seabra; Callisto, Marcos; Marques, João Carlos

    2018-02-01

    Riparian vegetation cover influences benthic assemblages structure and functioning in headwater streams, as it regulates light availability and autochthonous primary production in these ecosystems.Secondary production, diversity, and exergy-based indicators were applied in capturing how riparian cover influences the structure and functioning of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in tropical headwater streams. Four hypotheses were tested: (1) open canopy will determine the occurrence of higher diversity in benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages; (2) streams with open canopy will exhibit more complex benthic macroinvertebrate communities (in terms of information embedded in the organisms' biomass); (3) in streams with open canopy benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages will be more efficient in using the available resources to build structure, which will be reflected by higher eco-exergy values; (4) benthic assemblages in streams with open canopy will exhibit more secondary productivity. We selected eight non-impacted headwater streams, four shaded and four with open canopy, all located in the Neotropical savannah (Cerrado) of southeastern Brazil. Open canopy streams consistently exhibited significantly higher eco-exergy and instant secondary production values, exemplifying that these streams may support more complex and productive benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Nevertheless, diversity indices and specific eco-exergy were not significantly different in shaded and open canopy streams. Since all the studied streams were selected for being considered as non-impacted, this suggests that the potential represented by more available food resources was not used to build a more complex dissipative structure. These results illustrate the role and importance of the canopy cover characteristics on the structure and functioning of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in tropical headwater streams, while autochthonous production appears to play a crucial role as food

  9. Patterns of canopy and surface layer consumption in a boreal forest fire from repeat airborne lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Michael; Morton, Douglas C.; Cook, Bruce D.; Andersen, Hans-Erik; Babcock, Chad; Pattison, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Fire in the boreal region is the dominant agent of forest disturbance with direct impacts on ecosystem structure, carbon cycling, and global climate. Global and biome-scale impacts are mediated by burn severity, measured as loss of forest canopy and consumption of the soil organic layer. To date, knowledge of the spatial variability in burn severity has been limited by sparse field sampling and moderate resolution satellite data. Here, we used pre- and post-fire airborne lidar data to directly estimate changes in canopy vertical structure and surface elevation for a 2005 boreal forest fire on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula. We found that both canopy and surface losses were strongly linked to pre-fire species composition and exhibited important fine-scale spatial variability at sub-30 m resolution. The fractional reduction in canopy volume ranged from 0.61 in lowland black spruce stands to 0.27 in mixed white spruce and broadleaf forest. Residual structure largely reflects standing dead trees, highlighting the influence of pre-fire forest structure on delayed carbon losses from aboveground biomass, post-fire albedo, and variability in understory light environments. Median loss of surface elevation was highest in lowland black spruce stands (0.18 m) but much lower in mixed stands (0.02 m), consistent with differences in pre-fire organic layer accumulation. Spatially continuous depth-of-burn estimates from repeat lidar measurements provide novel information to constrain carbon emissions from the surface organic layer and may inform related research on post-fire successional trajectories. Spectral measures of burn severity from Landsat were correlated with canopy (r = 0.76) and surface (r = -0.71) removal in black spruce stands but captured less of the spatial variability in fire effects for mixed stands (canopy r = 0.56, surface r = -0.26), underscoring the difficulty in capturing fire effects in heterogeneous boreal forest landscapes using proxy measures of burn

  10. Measurement and Simulation of the Dew Profile in the Plant Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, A.; Kuwagata, T.; Watanabe, T.; Ohba, K.

    2005-12-01

    Dew on the leaves of the plant plays an important role not only on nocturnal local climate but also on the evapotranspiration on next daytime and the outbreaks of plant diseases. Most of disease germs colonize at particular sites of the plant, so that the dew distribution in the plant canopy is important factor that affect the germ development. We measured vertical variation of the dew in the rice plant canopy on summer season under warm temperate climate, and simulate it by using mechanistic micrometeorological model to study the relationship between dew formation and canopy structure. Dew on the leaves and panicles were measured with two hours intervals during the nighttime at clear sky days on mid-stage (August 19, 21 and 24) and late-stage (October 1) of 2005 rice growing season in Kumamoto plain, Japan. Vertical one-dimensional Double Source Model (DSM) and Multi Layer Model (MLM) were used as the simulation model, which based on the radiation transfer, heat budget and mass diffusion theories on soil-plant-atmosphere. DSM separates the land surface for soil layer and plant layer, and solves the heat budget equations of both layers to calculate the dew formation flux. MLM additionally separates the plant layer for vertical multi layer, and solves the heat budget equations to calculate the dew formation flux on each layer. Maximum values of measured total weight of the dew in the plant on unit ground area were 0.14 kg m-2 on August 19, 0.09 kg m-2 on August 21, 0.18 kg m-2 on August 24 and 0.38 kg m-2 on October 1. These maximum values were observed at 6:00 am on every case. Simulated values of total dew weight using DSM were smaller than measured values, whereas that using MLM showed good agreement with measured values. The reason could be comes from the difference between two models that MLM calculate the temperature and humidity profile of the atmosphere in the canopy that was not calculated in DSM. Since the atmospheric humidity in the canopy was higher than

  11. Estimation of canopy carotenoid content of winter wheat using multi-angle hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weiping; Huang, Wenjiang; Liu, Jiangui; Chen, Pengfei; Qin, Qiming; Ye, Huichun; Peng, Dailiang; Dong, Yingying; Mortimer, A. Hugh

    2017-11-01

    Precise estimation of carotenoid (Car) content in crops, using remote sensing data, could be helpful for agricultural resources management. Conventional methods for Car content estimation were mostly based on reflectance data acquired from nadir direction. However, reflectance acquired at this direction is highly influenced by canopy structure and soil background reflectance. Off-nadir observation is less impacted, and multi-angle viewing data are proven to contain additional information rarely exploited for crop Car content estimation. The objective of this study was to explore the potential of multi-angle observation data for winter wheat canopy Car content estimation. Canopy spectral reflectance was measured from nadir as well as from a series of off-nadir directions during different growing stages of winter wheat, with concurrent canopy Car content measurements. Correlation analyses were performed between Car content and the original and continuum removed spectral reflectance. Spectral features and previously published indices were derived from data obtained at different viewing angles and were tested for Car content estimation. Results showed that spectral features and indices obtained from backscattering directions between 20° and 40° view zenith angle had a stronger correlation with Car content than that from the nadir direction, and the strongest correlation was observed from about 30° backscattering direction. Spectral absorption depth at 500 nm derived from spectral data obtained from 30° backscattering direction was found to reduce the difference induced by plant cultivars greatly. It was the most suitable for winter wheat canopy Car estimation, with a coefficient of determination 0.79 and a root mean square error of 19.03 mg/m2. This work indicates the importance of taking viewing geometry effect into account when using spectral features/indices and provides new insight in the application of multi-angle remote sensing for the estimation of crop

  12. The Influence of Hilly Terrain on Canopy-Atmosphere Carbon Dioxide Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, G. G.; Finnigan, J. J.; Poggi, D.; Leuning, R.; Belcher, S. E.

    2006-01-01

    Topography influences many aspects of forest-atmosphere carbon exchange; yet only a small number of studies have considered the role of topography on the structure of turbulence within and above vegetation and its effect on canopy photosynthesis and the measurement of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (Nee) using flux towers. Here, we focus on the interplay between radiative transfer, flow dynamics for neutral stratification, and ecophysiological controls on CO2 sources and sinks within a canopy on a gentle cosine hill. We examine how topography alters the forest-atmosphere CO2 exchange rate when compared to uniform flat terrain using a newly developed first-order closure model that explicitly accounts for the flow dynamics, radiative transfer, and nonlinear eco physiological processes within a plant canopy. We show that variation in radiation and airflow due to topography causes only a minor departure in horizontally averaged and vertically integrated photosynthesis from their flat terrain values. However, topography perturbs the airflow and concentration fields in and above plant canopies, leading to significant horizontal and vertical advection of CO2. Advection terms in the conservation equation may be neglected in flow over homogeneous, flat terrain, and then Nee = Fc, the vertical turbulent flux of CO2. Model results suggest that vertical and horizontal advection terms are generally of opposite sign and of the same order as the biological sources and sinks. We show that, close to the hilltop, Fc departs by a factor of three compared to its flat terrain counterpart and that the horizontally averaged Fc-at canopy top differs by more than 20% compared to the flat-terrain case.

  13. Assessing grapevine canopy health in the Texas Hill Country with remote sensing and GIS techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Adam J.

    Vineyards are typically managed uniformly over space, although known spatial variation exists in the performance of vines within and across vineyard blocks. Identifying spatial variability in crop performance at a large scale (one or a few vineyard blocks) is useful to vineyard managers wishing to address such variation by enacting separate management plans for differing areas of performance. Zonal management and the institution of precision viticultural practices (i.e. use of GIS and remote sensing techniques to study this spatial variation) has proven profitable for a number of reasons, namely zonal harvesting based on zone performance. This dissertation implements cutting-edge, practical, and low-cost equipment and techniques, specifically an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), digital cameras, and Structure from Motion (SfM), to identify spatial variation in grapevine canopy vigor at a vineyard in the Texas Hill Country American Viticultural Area. Three research objectives were addressed in this dissertation including: (1) the setup and implementation of a practical imaging system and processing methodology (digital cameras and a UAV) to produce very high spatial resolution orthophotomosaics of vineyards with visible and near-infrared bands, (2) observation of spatial and temporal variation in grapevine canopy vigor that can aid in improving vineyard management practice, and (3) development of a three-dimensional method for visualizing and quantifying vineyard canopy density. Results concluded that the low-cost tools and techniques outlined in this study provided a practical means by which to identify spatial variation in canopy vigor at the study vineyard. Of the three methods used to identify this variation, spectrally-based (NDVI), planimetrically-based (canopy extent), and three-dimensionally-derived (SfM point clouds), the latter two were most successful and would be recommended for future use. Most importantly, due to the low cost of the technology used to

  14. An integrated model of soil-canopy spectral radiances, photosynthesis, fluorescence, temperature and energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. van der Tol

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the model SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes, which is a vertical (1-D integrated radiative transfer and energy balance model. The model links visible to thermal infrared radiance spectra (0.4 to 50 μm as observed above the canopy to the fluxes of water, heat and carbon dioxide, as a function of vegetation structure, and the vertical profiles of temperature. Output of the model is the spectrum of outgoing radiation in the viewing direction and the turbulent heat fluxes, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence. A special routine is dedicated to the calculation of photosynthesis rate and chlorophyll fluorescence at the leaf level as a function of net radiation and leaf temperature. The fluorescence contributions from individual leaves are integrated over the canopy layer to calculate top-of-canopy fluorescence. The calculation of radiative transfer and the energy balance is fully integrated, allowing for feedback between leaf temperatures, leaf chlorophyll fluorescence and radiative fluxes. Leaf temperatures are calculated on the basis of energy balance closure. Model simulations were evaluated against observations reported in the literature and against data collected during field campaigns. These evaluations showed that SCOPE is able to reproduce realistic radiance spectra, directional radiance and energy balance fluxes. The model may be applied for the design of algorithms for the retrieval of evapotranspiration from optical and thermal earth observation data, for validation of existing methods to monitor vegetation functioning, to help interpret canopy fluorescence measurements, and to study the relationships between synoptic observations with diurnally integrated quantities. The model has been implemented in Matlab and has a modular design, thus allowing for great flexibility and scalability.

  15. The importance of volumetric canopy morphology when modelling drag around riparian vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, Richard; Hardy, Richard; Warburton, Jeff; Marjoribanks, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    Riparian vegetation has a significant impact on the hydraulic functioning of river systems. The bulk of past work concerned with modelling the influence of vegetation on flow has considered vegetation to be morphologically simple, and has generally neglected the complexity and porosity of natural plants, defined herein as the volumetric canopy morphology. However, the volumetric canopy morphology can influence the mean and turbulent properties of the flow, producing spatially heterogeneous downstream velocity fields. By explicitly accounting for this in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, and representing the plant as a porous blockage, complex flow structures and drag can be modelled. For a riparian species, Hebe odora, good agreement with flume measurements are found. Plant shear layer turbulence is shown to be dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz and Görtler-type vortices, generated through shear instability. Porous representations of the plants, that allow for flow to pass through the plant canopy interior, are compared against fully impermeable plant representations. Penetration of fluid through the canopy in the porous case resembles 'bleed-flow', and this results in a plant wake region that significantly differs from the impermeable case, which is characteristic of wake flow around a traditional bluff body. These results demonstrate the significant effect that the volumetric canopy morphology and porosity of natural plants has on the three-dimensional flow and in-stream drag, and enables a re-evaluation of vegetative flow resistance. The modelled results allow a species dependent Manning's n to be calculated, and this presents an opportunity to move away from the conventional methods of representing vegetation in hydraulic models, in favour of a more physically determined approach. Given the importance of vegetation in river corridor management, and the increasing application of UAV imagery to map riparian vegetation, the numerical scheme developed here

  16. Ground based remote sensing and physiological measurements provide novel insights into canopy photosynthetic optimization in arctic shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magney, T. S.; Griffin, K. L.; Boelman, N.; Eitel, J.; Greaves, H.; Prager, C.; Logan, B.; Oliver, R.; Fortin, L.; Vierling, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Because changes in vegetation structure and function in the Arctic are rapid and highly dynamic phenomena, efforts to understand the C balance of the tundra require repeatable, objective, and accurate remote sensing methods for estimating aboveground C pools and fluxes over large areas. A key challenge addressing the modelling of aboveground C is to utilize process-level information from fine-scale studies. Utilizing information obtained from high resolution remote sensing systems could help to better understand the C source/sink strength of the tundra, which will in part depend on changes in photosynthesis resulting from the partitioning of photosynthetic machinery within and among deciduous shrub canopies. Terrestrial LiDAR and passive hyperspectral remote sensing measurements offer an effective, repeatable, and scalable method to understand photosynthetic performance and partitioning at the canopy scale previously unexplored in arctic systems. Using a 3-D shrub canopy model derived from LiDAR, we quantified the light regime of leaves within shrub canopies to gain a better understanding of how light interception varies in response to the Arctic's complex radiation regime. This information was then coupled with pigment sampling (i.e., xanthophylls, and Chl a/b) to evaluate the optimization of foliage photosynthetic capacity within shrub canopies due to light availability. In addition, a lab experiment was performed to validate evidence of canopy level optimization via gradients of light intensity and leaf light environment. For this, hyperspectral reflectance (photochemical reflectance index (PRI)), and solar induced fluorescence (SIF)) was collected in conjunction with destructive pigment samples (xanthophylls) and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements in both sunlit and shaded canopy positions.

  17. Air-Parcel Residence Times Within Forest Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, Tobias; Chamecki, Marcelo; Fuentes, Jose D.

    2017-10-01

    We present a theoretical model, based on a simple model of turbulent diffusion and first-order chemical kinetics, to determine air-parcel residence times and the out-of-canopy export of reactive gases emitted within forest canopies under neutral conditions. Theoretical predictions of the air-parcel residence time are compared to values derived from large-eddy simulation for a range of canopy architectures and turbulence levels under neutral stratification. Median air-parcel residence times range from a few sec in the upper canopy to approximately 30 min near the ground and the distribution of residence times is skewed towards longer times in the lower canopy. While the predicted probability density functions from the theoretical model and large-eddy simulation are in good agreement with each other, the theoretical model requires only information on canopy height and eddy diffusivities inside the canopy. The eddy-diffusivity model developed additionally requires the friction velocity at canopy top and a parametrized profile of the standard deviation of vertical velocity. The theoretical model of air-parcel residence times is extended to include first-order chemical reactions over a range of of Damköhler numbers ( Da) characteristic of plant-emitted hydrocarbons. The resulting out-of-canopy export fractions range from near 1 for Da =10^{-3} to less than 0.3 at Da = 10. These results highlight the necessity for dense and tall forests to include the impacts of air-parcel residence times when calculating the out-of-canopy export fraction for reactive trace gases.

  18. Deploying Fourier Coefficients to Unravel Soybean Canopy Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubery, Talukder Z; Shook, Johnathon; Parmley, Kyle; Zhang, Jiaoping; Naik, Hsiang S; Higgins, Race; Sarkar, Soumik; Singh, Arti; Singh, Asheesh K; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2016-01-01

    Soybean canopy outline is an important trait used to understand light interception ability, canopy closure rates, row spacing response, which in turn affects crop growth and yield, and directly impacts weed species germination and emergence. In this manuscript, we utilize a methodology that constructs geometric measures of the soybean canopy outline from digital images of canopies, allowing visualization of the genetic diversity as well as a rigorous quantification of shape parameters. Our choice of data analysis approach is partially dictated by the need to efficiently store and analyze large datasets, especially in the context of planned high-throughput phenotyping experiments to capture time evolution of canopy outline which will produce very large datasets. Using the Elliptical Fourier Transformation (EFT) and Fourier Descriptors (EFD), canopy outlines of 446 soybean plant introduction (PI) lines from 25 different countries exhibiting a wide variety of maturity, seed weight, and stem termination were investigated in a field experiment planted as a randomized complete block design with up to four replications. Canopy outlines were extracted from digital images, and subsequently chain coded, and expanded into a shape spectrum by obtaining the Fourier coefficients/descriptors. These coefficients successfully reconstruct the canopy outline, and were used to measure traditional morphometric traits. Highest phenotypic diversity was observed for roundness, while solidity showed the lowest diversity across all countries. Some PI lines had extraordinary shape diversity in solidity. For interpretation and visualization of the complexity in shape, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on the EFD. PI lines were grouped in terms of origins, maturity index, seed weight, and stem termination index. No significant pattern or similarity was observed among the groups; although interestingly when genetic marker data was used for the PCA, patterns similar to canopy

  19. Canopy disturbance intervals, early growth rates, and canopy accession trends of oak-dominated old-growth forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    James S. Rentch; Ray R., Jr. Hicks

    2003-01-01

    Using a radial growth averaging technique, changes in growth rates of overstory oaks were used to quantify canopy disturbance events at five old-growth sites. On average, at least one canopy disturbance occurred on these sites every 3 years; larger multiple-tree disturbances occurred every 17 years. Although there was some variation by site and by historical period,...

  20. Impacts of differing aerodynamic resistance formulae on modeled energy exchange at the above-canopy/within-canopy/soil interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Application of the Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) Model using land surface temperature (LST) requires aerodynamic resistance parameterizations for the flux exchange above the canopy layer, within the canopy air space and at the soil/substrate surface. There are a number of aerodynamic resistance f...

  1. Characterizing stand-level forest canopy cover and height using Landsat time series, samples of airborne LiDAR, and the Random Forest algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Oumer S.; Franklin, Steven E.; Wulder, Michael A.; White, Joanne C.

    2015-03-01

    Many forest management activities, including the development of forest inventories, require spatially detailed forest canopy cover and height data. Among the various remote sensing technologies, LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) offers the most accurate and consistent means for obtaining reliable canopy structure measurements. A potential solution to reduce the cost of LiDAR data, is to integrate transects (samples) of LiDAR data with frequently acquired and spatially comprehensive optical remotely sensed data. Although multiple regression is commonly used for such modeling, often it does not fully capture the complex relationships between forest structure variables. This study investigates the potential of Random Forest (RF), a machine learning technique, to estimate LiDAR measured canopy structure using a time series of Landsat imagery. The study is implemented over a 2600 ha area of industrially managed coastal temperate forests on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. We implemented a trajectory-based approach to time series analysis that generates time since disturbance (TSD) and disturbance intensity information for each pixel and we used this information to stratify the forest land base into two strata: mature forests and young forests. Canopy cover and height for three forest classes (i.e. mature, young and mature and young (combined)) were modeled separately using multiple regression and Random Forest (RF) techniques. For all forest classes, the RF models provided improved estimates relative to the multiple regression models. The lowest validation error was obtained for the mature forest strata in a RF model (R2 = 0.88, RMSE = 2.39 m and bias = -0.16 for canopy height; R2 = 0.72, RMSE = 0.068% and bias = -0.0049 for canopy cover). This study demonstrates the value of using disturbance and successional history to inform estimates of canopy structure and obtain improved estimates of forest canopy cover and height using the RF algorithm.

  2. Modelling canopy radiation budget through multiple scattering approximation: a case study of coniferous forest in Mexico City Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silván-Cárdenas, Jose L.; Corona-Romero, Nirani

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we describe some results from a study on hyperspectral analysis of coniferous canopy scattering for the purpose of estimating forest biophysical and structural parameters. Georeferenced airborne hyperspectral measurements were taken from a flying helicopter over a coniferous forest dominated by Pinus hartweguii and Abies religiosa within the Federal District Conservation Land in Mexico City. Hyperspectral data was recorded in the optical range from 350 to 2500 nm at 1nm spectral resolution using the FieldSpec 4 (ASD Inc.). Spectral measurements were also carried out in the ground for vegetation and understory components, including leaf, bark, soil and grass. Measurements were then analyzed through a previously developed multiple scattering approximation (MSA) model, which represents above-canopy spectral reflectance through a non-linear combination of pure spectral components (endmembers), as well as through a set of photon recollision probabilities and interceptance fractions. In this paper we provide an expression for the canopy absorptance as the basis for estimating the components of canopy radiation budget using the MSA model. Furthermore, since MSA does not prescribe a priori the endmembers to incorporate in the model, a multiple endmember selection method (MESMSA) was developed and tested. Photon recollision probabilities and interceptance fractions were estimated by fitting the model to airborne spectral reflectance and selected endmembers where then used to estimate the canopy radiation budget at each measured location.

  3. Application of Semi-Automated Filter to Improve Waveform Lidar Sub-Canopy Elevation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwei Sheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Modeling sub-canopy elevation is an important step in the processing of waveform lidar data to measure three dimensional forest structure. Here, we present a methodology based on high resolution discrete-return lidar (DRL to correct the ground elevation derived from large-footprint Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS and to improve measurement of forest structure. We use data acquired over Barro Colorado Island, Panama by LVIS large-footprint lidar (LFL in 1998 and DRL in 2009. The study found an average vertical difference of 28.7 cm between 98,040 LVIS last-return points and the discrete-return lidar ground surface across the island. The majority (82.3% of all LVIS points matched discrete return elevations to 2 m or less. Using a multi-step process, the LVIS last-return data is filtered using an iterative approach, expanding window filter to identify outlier points which are not part of the ground surface, as well as applying vertical corrections based on terrain slope within the individual LVIS footprints. The results of the experiment demonstrate that LFL ground surfaces can be effectively filtered using methods adapted from discrete-return lidar point filtering, reducing the average vertical error by 15 cm and reducing the variance in LVIS last-return data by 70 cm. The filters also reduced the largest vertical estimations caused by sensor saturation in the upper reaches of the forest canopy by 14.35 m, which improve forest canopy structure measurement by increasing accuracy in the sub-canopy digital elevation model.

  4. A NEW EFFECTIVE WAY ON VEGETATION MORNITORING USING MULTI-SPECTRAL CANOPY LIDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Bo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS has been a well-established tool for the measurement of surface topography as well as for the estimation of biophysical canopy variables, such as tree height and vegetation density. By combining GPS and INS together, ALS could acquire surface information effectively in getting the mass production of DEM and DOM. However, up to now most approaches are built upon single-wavelength Lidar system, which could only provide structure information of the vegetation canopy, the intensity information was rarely used to monitor vegetation growing state as its limitation on spectral characteristics. On the other hand, positive multi/hyper-spectral imaging instruments highly rely on the effects of weather, shadow and the background noise etc. The attempts to fuse single-wavelength Lidar data with multi/hyper-spectral data also been effected this way. Thus, a concept for a multi-wavelength, active canopy Lidar has been tested in this paper. The proposed instrument takes measurement at two vegetation-sensitive bands separately at 556 nm and 780 nm, which, according to the correlation analysis between the wavelengths and biochemical content with plenty of ground ASD reflectance dataset, showed a high correlation coefficient on the chlorophyll concentration as well as nitrogen content. The instrumentation of the multi-wavelength canopy Lidar employs low power, solid and semiconductor laser diodes as its laser source and the receiver consists of two channels, one for 556 nm back-scatter signal and the other for 780 nm. The system calibration has also been done by using a standard white board. Multi-wavelength back-scatter signals were collected from a scene consists of stones, healthy broad-leaf trees and unhealthy trees that suffer from disease(part of its leaves were yellow. It is shown that the multi-wavelength canopy Lidar could not only capture the structure information, but also could pick up the spectral characteristics. A

  5. a New Effective way on Vegetation Mornitoring Using Multi-Spectral Canopy LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Z.; Wei, G.; Shuo, S.; Shalei, S.; Yingying, M.

    2012-07-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) has been a well-established tool for the measurement of surface topography as well as for the estimation of biophysical canopy variables, such as tree height and vegetation density. By combining GPS and INS together, ALS could acquire surface information effectively in getting the mass production of DEM and DOM. However, up to now most approaches are built upon single-wavelength Lidar system, which could only provide structure information of the vegetation canopy, the intensity information was rarely used to monitor vegetation growing state as its limitation on spectral characteristics. On the other hand, positive multi/hyper-spectral imaging instruments highly rely on the effects of weather, shadow and the background noise etc. The attempts to fuse single-wavelength Lidar data with multi/hyper-spectral data also been effected this way. Thus, a concept for a multi-wavelength, active canopy Lidar has been tested in this paper. The proposed instrument takes measurement at two vegetation-sensitive bands separately at 556 nm and 780 nm, which, according to the correlation analysis between the wavelengths and biochemical content with plenty of ground ASD reflectance dataset, showed a high correlation coefficient on the chlorophyll concentration as well as nitrogen content. The instrumentation of the multi-wavelength canopy Lidar employs low power, solid and semiconductor laser diodes as its laser source and the receiver consists of two channels, one for 556 nm back-scatter signal and the other for 780 nm. The system calibration has also been done by using a standard white board. Multi-wavelength back-scatter signals were collected from a scene consists of stones, healthy broad-leaf trees and unhealthy trees that suffer from disease(part of its leaves were yellow). It is shown that the multi-wavelength canopy Lidar could not only capture the structure information, but also could pick up the spectral characteristics. A further test of three

  6. Aboveground biomass mapping of African forest mosaics using canopy texture analysis: toward a regional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Jean-François; Barbier, Nicolas; Couteron, Pierre; Adams, Benoît; Shapiro, Aurélie; Bogaert, Jan; De Cannière, Charles

    In the context of the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions caused by deforestation and forest degradation (the REDD+ program), optical very high resolution (VHR) satellite images provide an opportunity to characterize forest canopy structure and to quantify aboveground biomass (AGB) at less expense than methods based on airborne remote sensing data. Among the methods for processing these VHR images, Fourier textural ordination (FOTO) presents a good method to detect forest canopy structural heterogeneity and therefore to predict AGB variations. Notably, the method does not saturate at intermediate AGB values as do pixelwise processing of available space borne optical and radar signals. However, a regional-scale application requires overcoming two difficulties: (1) instrumental effects due to variations in sun–scene–sensor geometry or sensor-specific responses that preclude the use of wide arrays of images acquired under heterogeneous conditions and (2) forest structural diversity including monodominant or open canopy forests, which are of particular importance in Central Africa. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of a rigorous regional study of canopy texture by harmonizing FOTO indices of images acquired from two different sensors (Geoeye-1 and QuickBird-2) and different sun–scene–sensor geometries and by calibrating a piecewise biomass inversion model using 26 inventory plots (1 ha) sampled across very heterogeneous forest types. A good agreement was found between observed and predicted AGB (residual standard error [RSE] = 15%; R2 = 0.85; P map (100-m pixels) was produced for a 400-km2 area, and predictions obtained from both imagery sources were consistent with each other (r = 0.86; slope = 1.03; intercept = 12.01 Mg/ha). These results highlight the horizontal structure of forest canopy as a powerful descriptor of the entire forest stand structure and heterogeneity. In particular, we show that quantitative metrics resulting from such textural

  7. Estimating the influence of different urban canopy cover types on atmospheric particulate matter (PM10) pollution abatement in London UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallis, Matthew; Freer-Smith, Peter; Sinnett, Danielle; Aylott, Matthew; Taylor, Gail

    2010-05-01

    In the urban environment atmospheric pollution by PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter less than 10 x 10-6 m) is a problem that can have adverse effects on human health, particularly increasing rates of respiratory disease. The main contributors to atmospheric PM10 in the urban environment are road traffic, industry and power production. The urban tree canopy is a receptor for removing PM10s from the atmosphere due to the large surface areas generated by leaves and air turbulence created by the structure of the urban forest. In this context urban greening has long been known as a mechanism to contribute towards PM10 removal from the air, furthermore, tree canopy cover has a role in contributing towards a more sustainable urban environment. The work reported here has been carried out within the BRIDGE project (SustainaBle uRban plannIng Decision support accountinG for urban mEtabolism). The aim of this project is to assess the fluxes of energy, water, carbon dioxide and particulates within the urban environment and develope a DSS (Decision Support System) to aid urban planners in sustainable development. A combination of published urban canopy cover data from ground, airborne and satellite based surveys was used. For each of the 33 London boroughs the urban canopy was classified to three groups, urban woodland, street trees and garden trees and each group quantified in terms of ground cover. The total [PM10] for each borough was taken from the LAEI (London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory 2006) and the contribution to reducing [PM10] was assessed for each canopy type. Deposition to the urban canopy was assessed using the UFORE (Urban Forest Effects Model) approach. Deposition to the canopy, boundary layer height and percentage reduction of the [PM10] in the atmosphere was assessed using both hourly meterological data and [PM10] and seasonal data derived from annual models. Results from hourly and annual data were compared with measured values. The model was then

  8. Variation in foliar respiration and wood CO2 efflux rates among species and canopy layers in a wet tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Shinichi; Bedoya-Arrieta, Ricardo; Ryan, Michael G

    2015-02-01

    As tropical forests respond to environmental change, autotrophic respiration may consume a greater proportion of carbon fixed in photosynthesis at the expense of growth, potentially turning the forests into a carbon source. Predicting such a response requires that we measure and place autotrophic respiration in a complete carbon budget, but extrapolating measurements of autotrophic respiration from chambers to ecosystem remains a challenge. High plant species diversity and complex canopy structure may cause respiration rates to vary and measurements that do not account for this complexity may introduce bias in extrapolation more detrimental than uncertainty. Using experimental plantations of four native tree species with two canopy layers, we examined whether species and canopy layers vary in foliar respiration and wood CO2 efflux and whether the variation relates to commonly used scalars of mass, nitrogen (N), photosynthetic capacity and wood size. Foliar respiration rate varied threefold between canopy layers, ∼0.74 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in the overstory and ∼0.25 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in the understory, but little among species. Leaf mass per area, N and photosynthetic capacity explained some of the variation, but height explained more. Chamber measurements of foliar respiration thus can be extrapolated to the canopy with rates and leaf area specific to each canopy layer or height class. If area-based rates are sampled across canopy layers, the area-based rate may be regressed against leaf mass per area to derive the slope (per mass rate) to extrapolate to the canopy using the total leaf mass. Wood CO2 efflux varied 1.0-1.6 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for overstory trees and 0.6-0.9 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for understory species. The variation in wood CO2 efflux rate was mostly related to wood size, and little to species, canopy layer or height. Mean wood CO2 efflux rate per surface area, derived by regressing CO2 efflux per mass against the ratio of surface

  9. A method for describing the canopy architecture of coppice poplar with allometric relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Eric; Sinoquet, Hervé

    2003-12-01

    A multi-scale biometric methodology for describing the architecture of fast-growing short-rotation woody crops is used to describe 2-year-old poplar clones during the second rotation. To allow for expressions of genetic variability observed within this species (i.e., growth potential, leaf morphology, coppice and canopy structure), the method has been applied to two clones: Ghoy (Gho) (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. x Populus nigra L.) and Trichobel (Tri) (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & A. Gray x Populus trichocarpa). The method operates at the stool level and describes the plant as a collection of components (shoots and branches) described as a collection of metameric elements, themselves defined as a collection of elementary units (internode, petiole, leaf blade). Branching and connection between the plant units (i.e., plant topology) and their spatial location, orientation, size and shape (i.e., plant geometry) describe the plant architecture. The methodology has been used to describe the plant architecture of 15 selected stools per clone over a 5-month period. On individual stools, shoots have been selected from three classes (small, medium and large) spanning the diameter distribution range. Using a multi-scale approach, empirical allometric relationships were used to parameterize elementary units of the plant, topological relationships and geometry (e.g., distribution of shoot diameters on stool, shoot attributes from shoot diameter). The empirical functions form the basis of the 3-D Coppice Poplar Canopy Architecture model (3-D CPCA), which recreates the architecture and canopy structure of fast-growing coppice crops at the plot scale. Model outputs are assessed through visual and quantitative comparisons between actual photographs of the coppice canopy and simulated images. Overall, results indicate a good predictive ability of the 3-D CPCA model.

  10. Estimating canopy cover from standard forest inventory measurements in western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne McIntosh; Andrew Gray; Steven. Garman

    2012-01-01

    Reliable measures of canopy cover are important in the management of public and private forests. However, direct sampling of canopy cover is both labor- and time-intensive. More efficient methods for estimating percent canopy cover could be empirically derived relationships between more readily measured stand attributes and canopy cover or, alternatively, the use of...

  11. Bias in lidar-based canopy gap fraction estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaccari, S.; Leeuwen, van M.; Calders, K.; Coops, N.C.; Herold, M.

    2013-01-01

    Leaf area index and canopy gap fraction (GF) provide important information to forest managers regarding the ecological functioning and productivity of forest resources. Traditional measurements such as those obtained from hemispherical photography (HP) measure solar irradiation, penetrating the

  12. [Turbulent characteristics in forest canopy under atmospheric neutral condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yi-Wei; Guan, De-Xin; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wang, An-Zhi; Pei, Tie-Fan

    2010-02-01

    Based on the micrometeorological data of broad-leaved Korean pine forest in Changbai Mountain in 2003, a second-order closure model was employed to calculate and analyze the turbulent characteristics within and above the canopy of the forest. The calculated mean wind profile was coincident with the measured one. The Reynolds stress within the forest was significantly attenuated. The turbulent strength, velocity flux, and skew were the largest at forest-atmosphere interface, as well the wind shear. With the increase of velocity skew, the turbulent intermittence became more significant, and the downward turbulent eddy within the canopy was limited. Most of the turbulent deeply within the forest canopy was produced by the non-local contributions above the canopy.

  13. An energy balance model for forest canopies: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. M. Goltz; James A. Smith

    1996-01-01

    The use of thermal scanning devices to map underlying terrain surface temperatures has been recognized as a potential tool for estimating evapotranspiration and latent heat flux densities in forest canopies.

  14. Development of a multispectral sensor for crop canopy temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantifying spatial and temporal variability in plant stress has precision agriculture applications in controlling variable rate irrigation and variable rate nutrient application. One approach to plant stress detection is crop canopy temperature measurement by the use of thermographic or radiometric...

  15. Estimating Mangrove Canopy Height and Above-Ground Biomass in Everglades National Park with Airbone LiDAR and TanDEM-X Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, E. A.; Wdowinski, S.; Potts, M. D.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Lee, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal mangroves forests of Everglades National Park (ENP) are well protected from development. Nevertheless, climate change, hurricanes and other anthropogenic disturbances have affected these intertidal ecosystems. Understanding and monitoring forest structural parameters such as canopy height and above-ground biomass (AGB) are important for the establishment of an historical database for past, present and future ecosystem comparison. Forest canopy height has a well understood and directly proportional correlation with AGB. It is possible to derive it using (1) airborne LiDAR/Laser Scanning (ALS) or (2) space-borne radar systems such as Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and TanDEM-X (TDX). A previous study of the mangrove canopy height and AGB in the ENP was conducted a decade ago based on ALS data acquired in 2004 in conjunction with SRTM data, which were acquired in 2000 (Simard et al. 2006). In this study we estimated canopy height and AGB using an ALS dataset acquired in 2012 and TDX data acquired during the years 2012-2014. The ALS dataset was acquired along a 16.5 x 1.5 km swath of mangrove forest with variable canopy height. The sampled areas were representative of mangrove stature and structure in the whole ENP. Analysis of the ALS dataset showed that mangrove canopy height can reach up to ~25 meters close to the coastal ENP waters. Additionally, by comparing our ALS results with those of a previous study by Simard et al. (2006) we identified areas where mangrove height changes greater than ± 3 meters occurred. To expand the study area to the full ENP mangrove ecosystem we processed single-polarization TDX data to obtain a Digital Canopy Model (DCM) that represents the mangrove canopy height. In order to obtain the true canopy height we calibrated the TDX phase center height with ALS true canopy height. Preliminary results of a corrected single-polarized (HH) TDX scene show that mangrove canopy height can reach up to ~25 meters in the western

  16. Utilizing In Situ Directional Hyperspectral Measurements to Validate Bio-Indicator Simulations for a Corn Crop Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yen-Ben; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Huemmrich, Karl F.; Zhang, Qingyuan; Campbell, Petya K. E.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Russ, Andrew L.; Kustas, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Two radiative transfer canopy models, SAIL and the two-layer Markov-Chain Canopy Reflectance Model (MCRM), were coupled with in situ leaf optical properties to simulate canopy-level spectral band ratio vegetation indices with the focus on the photochemical reflectance index in a cornfield. In situ hyperspectral measurements were made at both leaf and canopy levels. Leaf optical properties were obtained from both sunlit and shaded leaves. Canopy reflectance was acquired for eight different relative azimuth angles (psi) at three different view zenith angles (Theta (sub v)), and later used to validate model outputs. Field observations of photochemical reflectance index (PRI) for sunlit leaves exhibited lower values than shaded leaves, indicating higher light stress. Canopy PRI expressed obvious sensitivity to viewing geometry, as a function of both Theta (sub v) and psi . Overall, simulations from MCRM exhibited better agreements with in situ values than SAIL. When using only sunlit leaves as input, the MCRM-simulated PRI values showed satisfactory correlation and RMSE, as compared to in situ values. However, the performance of the MCRM model was significantly improved after defining a lower canopy layer comprised of shaded leaves beneath the upper sunlit leaf layer. Four other widely used band ratio vegetation indices were also studied and compared with the PRI results. MCRM simulations were able to generate satisfactory simulations for these other four indices when using only sunlit leaves as input; but unlike PRI, adding shaded leaves did not improve the performance of MCRM. These results support the hypothesis that the PRI is sensitive to physiological dynamics while the others detect static factors related to canopy structure. Sensitivity analysis was performed on MCRM in order to better understand the effects of structure related parameters on the PRI simulations. Leaf area index (LAI) showed the most significant impact on MCRM-simulated PRI among the parameters

  17. Effects of species selection and management on forest canopy albedo

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Juliane; Berveiller, Daniel; Bréon, François-Marie; Delpierre, Nicolas; Geppert , Gernot; Granier, André; Gunia, Katja; Jans, Wilma; Knohl, Alexander; Kuusk, Andres; Longdoz, Bernard; Moors, Eddy; Mund, Martina; Pinty, Bernard; Rautiainen, Miina

    2013-01-01

    Forest management is considered to be one of the key instruments available to mitigate climate change as it can lead to increased sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, the changes in canopy albedo may neutralise or offset the climate benefits of carbon sequestration. Although there is an emerging body of literature linking canopy albedo to management, understanding is still fragmented. We make use of a generally applicable approach: we combine a stand-level forest gap model wi...

  18. Convection regime between canopy and air in a greenhouse

    OpenAIRE

    Atarassi,Roberto Terumi; Folegatti,Marcos Vinicius; Brasil,René Porfírio Camponez do

    2006-01-01

    The use of covering materials in protected environments modifies the air movement close to the crop canopy compared to external environment, which changes the heat and mass transfer between canopy and air. Several researches have been made in greenhouses to estimate mass and heat flux using dimensionless numbers to characterize the type of convection (forced, free or mixed). The knowledge of which one is dominant allows simplifications and specific approaches. The dominant convection regime b...

  19. Estimating canopy fuel parameters for Atlantic Coastal Plain forest types.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2007-01-15

    Abstract It is necessary to quantify forest canopy characteristics to assess crown fire hazard, prioritize treatment areas, and design treatments to reduce crown fire potential. A number of fire behavior models such as FARSITE, FIRETEC, and NEXUS require as input four particular canopy fuel parameters: 1) canopy cover, 2) stand height, 3) crown base height, and 4) canopy bulk density. These canopy characteristics must be mapped across the landscape at high spatial resolution to accurately simulate crown fire. Currently no models exist to forecast these four canopy parameters for forests of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, a region that supports millions of acres of loblolly, longleaf, and slash pine forests as well as pine-broadleaf forests and mixed species broadleaf forests. Many forest cover types are recognized, too many to efficiently model. For expediency, forests of the Savannah River Site are categorized as belonging to 1 of 7 broad forest type groups, based on composition: 1) loblolly pine, 2) longleaf pine, 3) slash pine, 4) pine-hardwood, 5) hardwood-pine, 6) hardwoods, and 7) cypress-tupelo. These 7 broad forest types typify forests of the Atlantic Coastal Plain region, from Maryland to Florida.

  20. Ecohydrological responses of dense canopies to environmental variability: 2. Role of acclimation under elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewry, D. T.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to accurately predict land-atmosphere exchange of mass, energy, and momentum over the coming century requires the consideration of plant biochemical, ecophysiological, and structural acclimation to modifications of the ambient environment. Amongst the most important environmental changes experienced by terrestrial vegetation over the last century has been the increase in ambient carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, with a projected doubling in CO2 from preindustrial levels by the middle of this century. This change in atmospheric composition has been demonstrated to significantly alter a variety of leaf and plant properties across a range of species, with the potential to modify land-atmosphere interactions and their associated feedbacks. Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) technology has provided significant insight into the functioning of vegetation in natural conditions under elevated CO2, but remains limited in its ability to quantify the exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy at the canopy scale. This paper addresses the roles of ecophysiological, biochemical, and structural plant acclimation on canopy-scale exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy through the application of a multilayer canopy-root-soil model (MLCan) capable of resolving changes induced by elevated CO2 through the canopy and soil systems. Previous validation of MLCan flux estimates were made for soybean and maize in the companion paper using a record of six growing seasons of eddy covariance data from the Bondville Ameriflux site. Observations of leaf-level photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and surface temperature collected at the SoyFACE experimental facility in central Illinois provide a basis for examining the ability of MLCan to capture vegetation responses to an enriched CO2 environment. Simulations of control (370 [ppm]) and elevated (550 [ppm]) CO2 environments allow for an examination of the vertical variation and canopy-scale responses of vegetation states and fluxes

  1. Spatial and phylogenetic variation in plant defense in a tropical moist forest canopy community

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, K. M.; Asner, G. P.; Martin, R.

    2013-12-01

    Plants employ physical and chemical defenses to mitigate damage caused by herbivory. Spatial patterns of plant defense may provide insight into the role of plant-herbivore interactions in the assembly of plant communities. Within plant communities, the spatial overdispersion of anti-herbivore defenses by individuals may reflect a strategy to avoid host shifts from herbivore assemblages of neighboring plants. However, variation in plant defense may also result from trade-offs between foliar investment into defense and growth, mediated by variations in abiotic nutrient availability, or constrained by phylogeny. We measured four defensive traits (leaf toughness, total phenols, condensed tannins, and hydrolysable tannins) and three growth traits (LMA, C:N, total protein) of outer canopy foliage for 345 canopy trees representing 78 species, 65 genera, and 34 families in a moist tropical rainforest on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. The outer canopy provides an important, but rarely evaluated, cross-sectional image of the tropical forest ecosystem, and observations at this scale may provide an important link between field and remote sensing based studies. We used existing data on edaphic and geological properties to investigate the relationships of abiotic nutrient variation on variation in defense. Using regression and nested random-effects variance modeling, we found strong phylogenetic association with defensive traits at the family and species level, and little evidence for a trade-off between defensive traits. Greater understanding of phylogenetic structure in trait variation may yield improved characterizations of tropical biodiversity, from functional traits to risk assessments.

  2. Relative abundance of amphibians in forest canopy gaps of natural origin vs. timber harvest origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strojny, C. A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale canopy gaps created by logging may retain adequate habitat structure to maintain amphibian abundance. We used pitfalls with drift fences to measure relative abundance of amphibians in 44 harvested gaps, 19 natural treefall gaps, and 36 closed-canopy forest plots. Metamorphs had relatively lower capture rates in large harvest gaps for Ambystoma maculatum, Lithobates catesbeianus, L. clamitans, and L. sylvaticus but we did not detect statistically significant (p < 0.1 differences among gap types for Lithobates palustris metamorphs. L. clamitans juveniles and L. sylvaticus juveniles and adults had relatively lower capture rates in large harvest gaps. For juvenile-adult A. maculatum, we caught relatively fewer individuals in all gap types than in closed-canopy areas. Some groups with overall lower capture rates (immature Plethodon cinereus, juvenile L. palustris had mixed differences among gap types, and Notophthalmus viridescens (efts and adult P. cinereus showed no differences among gap types. One species, L. clamitans, was captured more often at gap edges than gap centers. These results suggest that harvest gaps, especially small gaps, provided habitat similar to natural gaps for some, but not all, amphibian species or life-stages.

  3. Panicle blast and canopy moisture in rice cultivar mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, You-Yong; Fang, Hui; Wang, Yun-Yue; Fan, Jin Xiang; Yang, Shi-Sheng; Mew, Twng Wah; Mundt, Christopher C

    2005-04-01

    ABSTRACT Glutinous rice cultivars were sown after every fourth row of a nonglutinous, hybrid cultivar in an additive design. The glutinous cultivars were 35 to 40 cm taller and substantially more susceptible to blast than was the nonglutinous cultivar. Interplanting of glutinous and nonglutinous rice reduced the incidence and severity of panicle blast on the glutinous cultivars by >90%, and on the nonglutinous cultivar by 30 to 40%. Mixing increased the per unit area yield of glutinous rice by 80 to 90% relative to pure stand, whereas yield of the nonglutinous cultivar was essentially unaffected by mixing. To determine whether the different plant heights and canopy structures may contribute to a microclimate that is less favorable to blast infection, we monitored the moisture status of the glutinous cultivars in pure stand and mixture at 0800 h by measuring relative humidity at the height of the glutinous panicles using a swing psychrometer and by visually estimating the percentage of leaf area covered by dew. Averaged over the two seasons, the number of days of 100% humidity at 0800 h was 20.0 and 2.2 for pure stands and mixtures, respectively. The mean percentage of glutinous leaf area covered by dewwas 84 and 36% for the pure stands and mixtures, respectively. Although other mechanisms also were operative, reduced leaf wetness was likely a substantial contributor to panicle blast control in the mixtures.

  4. Remote sensing detection of droughts in Amazonian forest canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Liana O; Malhi, Yadvinder; Aragão, Luiz E O C; Ladle, Richard; Arai, Egidio; Barbier, Nicolas; Phillips, Oliver

    2010-08-01

    *Remote sensing data are a key tool to assess large forested areas, where limitations such as accessibility and lack of field measurements are prevalent. Here, we have analysed datasets from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite measurements and field data to assess the impacts of the 2005 drought in Amazonia. *We combined vegetation indices (VI) and climatological variables to evaluate the spatiotemporal patterns associated with the 2005 drought, and explore the relationships between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. *There were differences in results based on c4 and c5 MODIS products. C5 VI showed no spatial relationship with rainfall or aerosol optical depth; however, distinct regions responded significantly to the increased radiation in 2005. The increase in the Enhanced VI (EVI) during 2005 showed a significant positive relationship (P drought was associated with a positive response of forest photosynthesis to changes in the radiation income. We discuss the evidence that this increase could be related to structural changes in the canopy.

  5. [Study on canopy spectral characteristics of paddy polluted by heavy metals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hong-Yan; Zhuang, Da-Fang; Pan, Jian-Jun; Shi, Xue-Zheng; Shi, Run-He; Wang, Hong-Jie

    2010-02-01

    Because of frequent mining, heavy metals are brought into environment like soils, water and atmosphere, resulting heavy metal contamination in the agricultural region beside mines. Heavy metals contamination causes vegetation stress like destruction of chloroplast structure, chlorophyll content decrease, blunt photosynthesis, etc. Spectral responses to changes in chlorophyll content and photosynthesis make it possible that remote sensing is applied in monitoring heavy metals stress on paddy plants. Field spectroradiometer was used to acquire canopy reflectance spectra of paddy plants contaminated by heavy metals released from local mining. The present study was conducted to (1) investigate discrimination of canopy reflectance spectra of heavy metal polluted and normal paddy plants; (2) extract spectral characteristics of contaminated paddy plants and compare them. By means of correlation analysis, sensitive bands (SB) were firstly picked out from canopy spectra. Secondly, on the basis of these sensitive bands, normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVI) were established, and then red edge position (REP) was extracted from canopy spectra via curve fitting of inverted Gaussian model. As a result of correlation analysis, 460, 560, 660 and 1 100 nm were considered respectively as sensitive band for Pb, Zn, Cu and As concentration in paddy leaves. Furthermore, heavy metal concentrations (Pb, Zn, Cu and As) were significantly correlated with NDVIs (Pb, NDV(510, 810); Zn, NDVI(510, 870; Cu, NDVI(660, 870); As, NDVI(510, 810)). Heavy metals were also significantly correlated with REP, however, the inflexion termed as spectral critical value (SCV) between low and high heavy metals concentrations should be considered during applying REP in remote sensing monitoring. Moreover, NDVI and REP are much better than SB in terms of capability of expressing spectral information. Therefore, heavy metals contamination in paddy plants can be remotely monitored via ground

  6. Canopy Height Estimation by Characterizing Waveform LiDAR Geometry Based on Shape-Distance Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Ariel L. Salas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There have been few approaches developed for the estimation of height using waveform LiDAR data. Unlike any existing methods, we illustrate how the new Moment Distance (MD framework can characterize the canopy height based on the geometry and return power of the LiDAR waveform without having to go through curve modeling processes. Our approach offers the possibilities of using the raw waveform data to capture vital information from the variety of complex waveform shapes in LiDAR. We assess the relationship of the MD metrics to the key waveform landmarks—such as locations of peaks, power of returns, canopy heights, and height metrics—using synthetic data and real Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS data. In order to verify the utility of the new approach, we use field measurements obtained through the DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice campaign. Our results reveal that the MDI can capture temporal dynamics of canopy and segregate generations of stands based on curve shapes. The method satisfactorily estimates the canopy height using the synthetic (r2 = 0.40 and the LVIS dataset (r2 = 0.74. The MDI is also comparable with existing RH75 (relative height at 75% and RH50 (relative height at 50% height metrics. Furthermore, the MDI shows better correlations with ground-based measurements than relative height metrics. The MDI performs well at any type of waveform shape. This opens the possibility of looking more closely at single-peaked waveforms that usually carries complex extremes.

  7. Dinâmica do acúmulo de matéria seca em pastagens de Tifton 85 sob pastejo Dry matter accumulation dynamics in grazed Tifton 85 bermudagrass swards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Felipe de Moura Pinto

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available O acúmulo de forragem é o resultado líquido de dois processos concomitantes e antagônicos: o crescimento e a senescência e morte de tecidos. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o processo de produção de forragem através do estudo de seus componentes; crescimento e senescência. Os tratamentos corresponderam a quatro condições de pasto caracterizadas pelas alturas de 5, 10, 15 e 20 cm, mantidas constante através do pastejo por ovinos em regime de lotação contínua e taxa de lotação variável. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos completos casualizados, com quatro repetições. Foram avaliadas as seguintes respostas: alongamento de hastes, alongamento de folhas, senescência, filocrono e o número de folhas por perfilho. Os resultados revelaram um padrão estacional de produção de forragem, com as maiores taxas de crescimento e senescência sendo observadas nas alturas de pasto mais altas (15 e 20 cm. O filocrono variou com a época do ano e com a altura de pasto, revelando uma alta associação com variações em temperatura do ar, disponibilidade de água no solo e índice de área foliar do pasto. As alturas de 15 e 20 cm resultaram na maior produção de matéria seca. Os mesmos princípios e relações originalmente descritos para plantas forrageiras de clima temperado são válidos para plantas tropicais dentro do contexto das limitações fisiológicas e de ambiente inerentes para cada condição.Herbage dry matter accumulation from forage plants results from the balance between growth and senescence. Agronomic practices may influence both processes in different ways and, therefore, alter the quantitative and qualitative patterns of dry matter production. This study aimed at evaluating the process of dry matter accumulation through measurements of growth and senescence. Experimental treatments corresponded to four sward state conditions (5, 10, 15 and 20 cm of sward surface height - SSH generated

  8. Canopy position has a profound effect on soybean seed composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C. Huber

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although soybean seeds appear homogeneous, their composition (protein, oil and mineral concentrations can vary significantly with the canopy position where they were produced. In studies with 10 cultivars grown over a 3-yr period, we found that seeds produced at the top of the canopy have higher concentrations of protein but less oil and lower concentrations of minerals such as Mg, Fe, and Cu compared to seeds produced at the bottom of the canopy. Among cultivars, mean protein concentration (average of different positions correlated positively with mean concentrations of S, Zn and Fe, but not other minerals. Therefore, on a whole plant basis, the uptake and allocation of S, Zn and Fe to seeds correlated with the production and allocation of reduced N to seed protein; however, the reduced N and correlated minerals (S, Zn and Fe showed different patterns of allocation among node positions. For example, while mean concentrations of protein and Fe correlated positively, the two parameters correlated negatively in terms of variation with canopy position. Altering the microenvironment within the soybean canopy by removing neighboring plants at flowering increased protein concentration in particular at lower node positions and thus altered the node-position gradient in protein (and oil without altering the distribution of Mg, Fe and Cu, suggesting different underlying control mechanisms. Metabolomic analysis of developing seeds at different positions in the canopy suggests that availability of free asparagine may be a positive determinant of storage protein accumulation in seeds and may explain the increased protein accumulation in seeds produced at the top of the canopy. Our results establish node-position variation in seed constituents and provide a new experimental system to identify genes controlling key aspects of seed composition. In addition, our results provide an unexpected and simple approach to link agronomic practices to improve human

  9. Boreal forest BVOC exchange: emissions versus in-canopy sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Putian; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Taipale, Ditte; Rannik, Üllar; Rantala, Pekka; Petteri Rissanen, Matti; Chen, Dean; Boy, Michael

    2017-12-01

    A multilayer gas dry deposition model has been developed and implemented into a one-dimensional chemical transport model SOSAA (model to Simulate the concentrations of Organic vapours, Sulphuric Acid and Aerosols) to calculate the dry deposition velocities for all the gas species included in the chemistry scheme. The new model was used to analyse in-canopy sources and sinks, including gas emissions, chemical production and loss, dry deposition, and turbulent transport of 12 featured biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) or groups of BVOCs (e.g. monoterpenes, isoprene+2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), sesquiterpenes, and oxidation products of mono- and sesquiterpenes) in July 2010 at the boreal forest site SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations). According to the significance of modelled monthly-averaged individual source and sink terms inside the canopy, the selected BVOCs were classified into five categories: 1. Most of emitted gases are transported out of the canopy (monoterpenes, isoprene + MBO). 2. Chemical reactions remove a significant portion of emitted gases (sesquiterpenes). 3. Bidirectional fluxes occur since both emission and dry deposition are crucial for the in-canopy concentration tendency (acetaldehyde, methanol, acetone, formaldehyde). 4. Gases removed by deposition inside the canopy are compensated for by the gases transported from above the canopy (acetol, pinic acid, β-caryophyllene's oxidation product BCSOZOH). 5. The chemical production is comparable to the sink by deposition (isoprene's oxidation products ISOP34OOH and ISOP34NO3). Most of the simulated sources and sinks were located above about 0.2 hc (canopy height) for oxidation products and above about 0.4 hc for emitted species except formaldehyde. In addition, soil deposition (including deposition onto understorey vegetation) contributed 11-61 % to the overall in-canopy deposition. The emission sources peaked at about 0.8-0.9 hc, which was higher than 0.6 hc

  10. Integrating canopy and large-scale effects in the convective boundary-layer dynamics during the CHATS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapkalijevski, Metodija M.; Ouwersloot, Huug G.; Moene, Arnold F.; Vilà-Guerau de Arrellano, Jordi

    2017-02-01

    By characterizing the dynamics of a convective boundary layer above a relatively sparse and uniform orchard canopy, we investigated the impact of the roughness-sublayer (RSL) representation on the predicted diurnal variability of surface fluxes and state variables. Our approach combined numerical experiments, using an atmospheric mixed-layer model including a land-surface-vegetation representation, and measurements from the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) field experiment near Dixon, California. The RSL is parameterized using an additional factor in the standard Monin-Obukhov similarity theory flux-profile relationships that takes into account the canopy influence on the atmospheric flow. We selected a representative case characterized by southerly wind conditions to ensure well-developed RSL over the orchard canopy. We then investigated the sensitivity of the diurnal variability of the boundary-layer dynamics to the changes in the RSL key scales, the canopy adjustment length scale, Lc, and the β = u*/|U| ratio at the top of the canopy due to their stability and dependence on canopy structure. We found that the inclusion of the RSL parameterization resulted in improved prediction of the diurnal evolution of the near-surface mean quantities (e.g. up to 50 % for the wind velocity) and transfer (drag) coefficients. We found relatively insignificant effects on the modelled surface fluxes (e.g. up to 5 % for the friction velocity, while 3 % for the sensible and latent heat), which is due to the compensating effect between the mean gradients and the drag coefficients, both of which are largely affected by the RSL parameterization. When varying Lc (from 10 to 20 m) and β (from 0.25 to 0.4 m), based on observational evidence, the predicted friction velocity is found to vary by up to 25 % and the modelled surface-energy fluxes (sensible heat, SH, and latent heat of evaporation, LE) vary up to 2 and 9 %. Consequently, the boundary-layer height varies up to

  11. Vertical stratification of forest canopy for segmentation of understory trees within small-footprint airborne LiDAR point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamraz, Hamid; Contreras, Marco A.; Zhang, Jun

    2017-08-01

    Airborne LiDAR point cloud representing a forest contains 3D data, from which vertical stand structure even of understory layers can be derived. This paper presents a tree segmentation approach for multi-story stands that stratifies the point cloud to canopy layers and segments individual tree crowns within each layer using a digital surface model based tree segmentation method. The novelty of the approach is the stratification procedure that separates the point cloud to an overstory and multiple understory tree canopy layers by analyzing vertical distributions of LiDAR points within overlapping locales. The procedure does not make a priori assumptions about the shape and size of the tree crowns and can, independent of the tree segmentation method, be utilized to vertically stratify tree crowns of forest canopies. We applied the proposed approach to the University of Kentucky Robinson Forest - a natural deciduous forest with complex and highly variable terrain and vegetation structure. The segmentation results showed that using the stratification procedure strongly improved detecting understory trees (from 46% to 68%) at the cost of introducing a fair number of over-segmented understory trees (increased from 1% to 16%), while barely affecting the overall segmentation quality of overstory trees. Results of vertical stratification of the canopy showed that the point density of understory canopy layers were suboptimal for performing a reasonable tree segmentation, suggesting that acquiring denser LiDAR point clouds would allow more improvements in segmenting understory trees. As shown by inspecting correlations of the results with forest structure, the segmentation approach is applicable to a variety of forest types.

  12. Temporal variation in the spider assemblage (Arachnida, Araneae) in canopies of Callisthene fasciculata (Vochysiaceae) in the Brazilian Pantanal biome

    OpenAIRE

    Lúcia Yamazaki; Vindica,Vanessa F.; Antonio D. Brescovit; Marques, Marinez I.; Battirola,Leandro D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spiders are generalist predators and present a high diversity of capturing and foraging, as well as considerable species richness in tropical habitats. Although, generally, not presenting specific relations to the host plant, they can be influenced by its phenology, structure and resource availability. So, this study analyzed temporal variation on the structure and composition of Araneae assemblage in Callisthene fasciculata (Spr.) Mart. (Vochysiaceae) canopies, in an area of monodom...

  13. The influence of the forest canopy on nutrient cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Cindy E

    2002-11-01

    Rates of key soil processes involved in recycling of nutrients in forests are governed by temperature and moisture conditions and by the chemical and physical nature of the litter. The forest canopy influences all of these factors and thus has a large influence on nutrient cycling. The increased availability of nutrients in soil in clearcuts illustrates how the canopy retains nutrients (especially N) on site, both by storing nutrients in foliage and through the steady input of available C in litter. The idea that faster decomposition is responsible for the flush of nitrate in clearcuts has not been supported by experimental evidence. Soil N availability increases in canopy gaps as small as 0.1 ha, so natural disturbances or partial harvesting practices that increase the complexity of the canopy by creating gaps will similarly increase the spatial variability in soil N cycling and availability within the forest. Canopy characteristics affect the amount and composition of leaf litter produced, which largely determines the amount of nutrients to be recycled and the resulting nutrient availability. Although effects of tree species on soil nutrient availability were thought to be brought about largely through differences in the decomposition rate of their foliar litter, recent studies indicate that the effect of tree species can be better predicted from the mass and nutrient content of litter produced, hence total nutrient return, than from litter decay rate. The greater canopy complexity in mixed species forests creates similar heterogeneity in nutritional characteristics of the forest floor. Site differences in slope position, parent material and soil texture lead to variation in species composition and productivity of forests, and thus in the nature and amount of litter produced. Through this positive feedback, the canopy accentuates inherent differences in site fertility.

  14. Removing forest canopy cover restores a reptile assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, David A; Webb, Jonathan K; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Humans are rapidly altering natural systems, leading to changes in the distribution and abundance of species. However, so many changes are occurring simultaneously (e.g., climate change, habitat fragmentation) that it is difficult to determine the cause of population fluctuations from correlational studies. We used a manipulative field experiment to determine whether forest canopy cover directly influences reptile assemblages on rock outcrops in southeastern Australia. Our experimental design consisted of three types of rock outcrops: (1) shady sites in which overgrown vegetation was manually removed (n = 25); (2) overgrown controls (n = 30); and (3) sun-exposed controls (n = 20). Following canopy removal, we monitored reptile responses over 30 months. Canopy removal increased reptile species richness, the proportion of shelter sites used by reptiles, and relative abundances of five species that prefer sun-exposed habitats. Our manipulation also decreased the abundances of two shade-tolerant species. Canopy cover thus directly influences this reptile assemblage, with the effects of canopy removal being dependent on each species' habitat preferences (i.e., selection or avoidance of sun-exposed habitat). Our study suggests that increases in canopy cover can cause declines of open-habitat specialists, as previously suggested by correlative studies from a wide range of taxa. Given that reptile colonization of manipulated outcrops occurred rapidly, artificially opening the canopy in ecologically informed ways could help to conserve imperiled species with patchy distributions and low vagility that are threatened by vegetation overgrowth. One such species is Australia's most endangered snake, the broadheaded snake (Hoplocephalus bungaroides).

  15. Características estruturais do dossel de pastagens de capim-tanzânia mantidas sob três períodos de descanso com ovinos Canopy structural traits of tanzaniagrass pastures under three resting periods and grazed by sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Gregório da Silva

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a estrutura do dossel em pastagem de Panicum maximum Jacq. cv. Tanzânia sob lotação rotativa com três períodos de descanso (PD, definidos de acordo com o tempo para a expansão de 1,5; 2,5 e 3,5 novas folhas por perfilhos ao longo dos ciclos de pastejo. Estimaram-se as produções de massa seca de lâmina verde (MSLV, colmo verde (MSCV, de forragem morta (MSFM e de altura; as relações folha-colmo (F/C, material vivo-morto (MV/MM, no pré e pós-pastejo; as taxas de crescimento da cultura (TCC e acúmulo de forragem (TAC, a densidade populacional de perfilhos (DPP no pré-pastejo e o índice de área foliar residual (IAFr. Com o avançar dos ciclos de pastejo, as diferenças entre os três períodos de descanso para as variáveis altura, produção de MSLV e MSCV foram acentuadas, especialmente no final do período experimental. A quantidade de MSFM se manteve semelhante dentro de cada período de descanso ao longo dos ciclos de pastejo, porém, na média dos ciclos de pastejo, o período de descanso para expansão de 3,5 folhas foi superior. As relações F/C e MV/MM foram maiores nos piquetes mantidos sob os períodos de descanso para expansão de 1,5 e 2,5 folhas em relação ao de 3,5 folhas. Os maiores valores para TCC e TAC foram obtidos nos piquetes mantidos sob períodos de descanso para expansão de 2,5 e 3,5 folhas. A densidade de perfilhos foi maior nos piquetes mantidos sob período de descanso para expansão de 2,5 folhas em relação ao de 3,5 folhas. O período de descanso para expansão de folhas é o mais indicado para o manejo de pastagens de Panicum maximum cv. Tanzânia com ovinos, pois permite a obtenção de boas produções de folhas em relação aos colmos sem comprometer a densidade populacional de perfilhos. Entretanto, com esse período de descanso, verifica-se aumento da altura pós-pastejo, a qual deve ser controlada por meio de roçada mecânica ou manual.The canopy structural traits of

  16. A comparison between wet canopy evaporation estimated by stable isotope ratios of water and canopy interception measured by water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shigeki; Hattori, Shohei; Uemura, Ryu

    2017-04-01

    Some papers proved that canopy interception is proportional to rainfall not only on a rain event basis but also on an hourly basis (e.g. Murakami, 2006, J. Hydrol.; Saito et al., 2013, J. Hydrol.). However, theoretically, evaporation does not depend on rainfall amount. These results are enigmatic and we need to reevaluate wet canopy evaporation. We measured gross rainfall and net rainfall in a plastic Christmas tree stand with a height of 165 cm placed on a 180-cm square tray as described in Murakami and Toba (2013, Hydrol. Res. Lett.). The measurement was conducted outside under natural rainfall. We also estimated wet canopy evaporation using stable isotope ratios of water. During a rain event, we manually sampled gross and net rainwater on an hourly basis. Evaporation was calculated using the difference between the δ18O (or δ2H) values in gross and net rainfall using isotope fractionation factor. Total gross rainfall in a target rain event in October, 2014, was 28.0 mm and net rainfall (discharge from the tray) was 22.7 mm, i.e. canopy interception was 5.3 mm (18.9% of gross rainfall). The δ18O (or δ2H) value in net rainfall was higher than that in gross rainfall because of fractionation by evaporation on wet canopy surface. Hourly evaporation calculated by the values of δ18O varied from 2% to 24% of gross rainfall, and the weighted average by hourly gross rainfall was 5.2% of gross rainfall. Further, we estimated rainfall interception using a tank model (Yoshida et al., 1993) assuming constant evaporation rate, i.e. 20% of gross rainfall. Total net rainfall calculated by the model was 23.1 mm, i.e. calculated canopy interception was 4.9 mm (17.5% of gross rainfall). Then, keeping the parameters of the model, we simulated net rainfall using hourly surface evaporation obtained by the δ18O values. Calculated net rainfall was 25.6 mm, i.e. wet canopy evaporation was only 2.4 mm (8.6% of gross rainfall). So far, possible explanation of the discrepancy between

  17. Modeling marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) habitat using LiDAR-derived canopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagar, Joan C.; Eskelson, Bianca N.I.; Haggerty, Patricia K.; Nelson, S. Kim; Vesely, David G.

    2014-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) is an emerging remote-sensing tool that can provide fine-scale data describing vertical complexity of vegetation relevant to species that are responsive to forest structure. We used LiDAR data to estimate occupancy probability for the federally threatened marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in the Oregon Coast Range of the United States. Our goal was to address the need identified in the Recovery Plan for a more accurate estimate of the availability of nesting habitat by developing occupancy maps based on refined measures of nest-strand structure. We used murrelet occupancy data collected by the Bureau of Land Management Coos Bay District, and canopy metrics calculated from discrete return airborne LiDAR data, to fit a logistic regression model predicting the probability of occupancy. Our final model for stand-level occupancy included distance to coast, and 5 LiDAR-derived variables describing canopy structure. With an area under the curve value (AUC) of 0.74, this model had acceptable discrimination and fair agreement (Cohen's κ = 0.24), especially considering that all sites in our sample were regarded by managers as potential habitat. The LiDAR model provided better discrimination between occupied and unoccupied sites than did a model using variables derived from Gradient Nearest Neighbor maps that were previously reported as important predictors of murrelet occupancy (AUC = 0.64, κ = 0.12). We also evaluated LiDAR metrics at 11 known murrelet nest sites. Two LiDAR-derived variables accurately discriminated nest sites from random sites (average AUC = 0.91). LiDAR provided a means of quantifying 3-dimensional canopy structure with variables that are ecologically relevant to murrelet nesting habitat, and have not been as accurately quantified by other mensuration methods.

  18. Throughfall deposition and canopy exchange processes along a vertical gradient within the canopy of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaenssens, Sandy; Hansen, Karin; Staelens, Jeroen; Wuyts, Karen; De Schrijver, An; Baeten, Lander; Boeckx, Pascal; Samson, Roeland; Verheyen, Kris

    2012-03-15

    To assess the impact of air pollution on forest ecosystems, the canopy is usually considered as a constant single layer in interaction with the atmosphere and incident rain, which could influence the measurement accuracy. In this study the variation of througfall deposition and derived dry deposition and canopy exchange were studied along a vertical gradient in the canopy of one European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) tree and two Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) trees. Throughfall and net throughfall deposition of all ions other than H(+) increased significantly with canopy depth in the middle and lower canopy of the beech tree and in the whole canopy of the spruce trees. Moreover, throughfall and net throughfall of all ions in the spruce canopy decreased with increasing distance to the trunk. Dry deposition occurred mainly in the upper canopy and was highest during the growing season for H(+), NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-) and highest during the dormant season for Na(+), Cl(-), SO(4)(2-) (beech and spruce) and K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (spruce only). Canopy leaching of K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) was observed at all canopy levels and was higher for the beech tree compared to the spruce trees. Canopy uptake of inorganic nitrogen and H(+) occurred mainly in the upper canopy, although significant canopy uptake was found in the middle canopy as well. Canopy exchange was always higher during the growing season compared to the dormant season. This spatial and temporal variation indicates that biogeochemical deposition models would benefit from a multilayer approach for shade-tolerant tree species such as beech and spruce. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparison of models to estimate in-canopy photosynthetically active radiation and their influence on canopy stomatal resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiming Zhang [Rumble Research, Ontario (Canada); Moran, M.D.; Brook, J. R. [Meteorological Service of Canada, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The models for photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) used in a multi-layer canopy stomatal resistance (CSR) model developed by Baldocchi et al. (Atmospheric Environment 21 (1987) 91-101) and in a two-big-leaf CSR model developed by Hicks et al. (Water, Air and Soil Pollution 36 (1987) 311) are investigated in this study. The PAR received by shaded leaves in Baldocchi et al. (1987) is found to be larger than that predicted by a canopy radiative-transfer model developed by Norman (in: Barfield, Gerber, (Eds.), Modification of the Aerial Environment of Crops. ASAE Monograph No. 2. American Society for Agricultural. Engineering, St. Joseph, MI, 1979, p. 249) by as much as 50% even though the Baldocchi et al. (1987) model is indirectly based on Norman's model. This larger value of PAR results in turn in a smaller CSR by as much as 30% for canopies with larger leaf area indexes. A new formula to predict vertical profiles for PAR received by shaded leaves inside a canopy is suggested in the present study based on Norman (1979) and agrees well with the original model of Norman (1979). The simple treatment used in Hicks et al. (1987) for canopy-average PAR received by shaded leaves is found to diverge for canopies with leaf area indexes not close to two A new empirical formula for canopy-average PAR is then suggested for use in a two-big-leaf model, and it is shown that under most conditions the modified two-big-leaf CSR model can predict reasonable values when compared with the more complex multi-layer CSR model. Both the modified multi-layer CSR model and the modified two-big-leaf CSR model are also shown to predict reasonable dry deposition velocities for 03 when compared to several sets of measurements. (author)

  20. Emergence time in forest bats: the influence of canopy closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Danilo; Cistrone, Luca; Jones, Gareth

    2007-01-01

    The role of the forest canopy in protecting bats roosting in forest from predators is poorly known. We analysed the effect of canopy closure on emergence time in Barbastella barbastellus in a mountainous area of central Italy. We used radio-tracking to locate roosts and filmed evening emergence. Comparisons were made between roosts in open areas and those in dense forest. Median emergence time and illuminance were correlated. Moreover, from pregnancy to late lactation bats emerged progressively earlier, probably because of the exceptionally high wing loading affecting pregnant bats and the high energy demand of lactation. A significant influence of canopy closure on median emergence time was revealed after adjusting for the effects of light and reproductive state. Bats in open habitat emerged later than those roosting beneath closed canopy. In cluttered habitats, predators relying on vision may find it more difficult to detect and catch bats at light levels which would offer more chances of success when attacking prey in open habitats. Bats in dense forest are less vulnerable to predators and may take advantage of an earlier emergence by prolonging foraging. Although more vulnerable, lactating females roosting at open sites may benefit from warmer roosting conditions. Roosts in dense forest may be preferred under intense predation pressure. Forest management should favour canopy heterogeneity to provide bats with a range of roosting conditions. Our work emphasises the role of a fine-grained spatial scale in the roosting ecology of forest bats.

  1. Simulations of tropical rainforest albedo: is canopy wetness important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Silvia N M; Costa, Marcos H

    2011-12-01

    Accurate information on surface albedo is essential for climate modelling, especially for regions such as Amazonia, where the response of the regional atmospheric circulation to the changes on surface albedo is strong. Previous studies have indicated that models are still unable to correctly reproduce details of the seasonal variation of surface albedo. Therefore, it was investigated the role of canopy wetness on the simulated albedo of a tropical rainforest by modifying the IBIS canopy radiation transfer code to incorporate the effects of canopy wetness on the vegetation reflectance. In this study, simulations were run using three versions of the land surface/ecosystem model IBIS: the standard version, the same version recalibrated to fit the data of albedo on tropical rainforests and a modified version that incorporates the effects of canopy wetness on surface albedo, for three sites in the Amazon forest at hourly and monthly scales. The results demonstrated that, at the hourly time scale, the incorporation of canopy wetness on the calculations of radiative transfer substantially improves the simulations results, whereas at the monthly scale these changes do not substantially modify the simulated albedo.

  2. Simulations of tropical rainforest albedo: is canopy wetness important?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia N.M. Yanagi

    Full Text Available Accurate information on surface albedo is essential for climate modelling, especially for regions such as Amazonia, where the response of the regional atmospheric circulation to the changes on surface albedo is strong. Previous studies have indicated that models are still unable to correctly reproduce details of the seasonal variation of surface albedo. Therefore, it was investigated the role of canopy wetness on the simulated albedo of a tropical rainforest by modifying the IBIS canopy radiation transfer code to incorporate the effects of canopy wetness on the vegetation reflectance. In this study, simulations were run using three versions of the land surface/ecosystem model IBIS: the standard version, the same version recalibrated to fit the data of albedo on tropical rainforests and a modified version that incorporates the effects of canopy wetness on surface albedo, for three sites in the Amazon forest at hourly and monthly scales. The results demonstrated that, at the hourly time scale, the incorporation of canopy wetness on the calculations of radiative transfer substantially improves the simulations results, whereas at the monthly scale these changes do not substantially modify the simulated albedo.

  3. Eo-1 Hyperion Measures Canopy Drought Stress In Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asner, Gregory P.; Nepstad, Daniel; Cardinot, Gina; Moutinho, Paulo; Harris, Thomas; Ray, David

    2004-01-01

    The central, south and southeast portions of the Amazon Basin experience a period of decreased cloud cover and precipitation from June through November. There are likely important effects of seasonal and interannual rainfall variation on forest leaf area index, canopy water stress, productivity and regional carbon cycling in the Amazon. While both ground and spaceborne studies of precipitation continue to improve, there has been almost no progress made in observing forest canopy responses to rainfall variability in the humid tropics. This shortfall stems from the large stature of the vegetation and great spatial extent of tropical forests, both of which strongly impede field studies of forest responses to water availability. Those few studies employing satellite measures of canopy responses to seasonal and interannual drought (e.g., Bohlman et al. 1998, Asner et al. 2000) have been limited by the spectral resolution and sampling available from Landsat and AVHRR sensors. We report on a study combining the first landscape-level, managed drought experiment in Amazon tropical forest with the first spaceborne imaging spectrometer observations of this experimental area. Using extensive field data on rainfall inputs, soil water content, and both leaf and canopy responses, we test the hypothesis that spectroscopic signatures unique to hyperspectral observations can be used to quantify relative differences in canopy stress resulting from water availability.

  4. Evaluating radiative transfer schemes treatment of vegetation canopy architecture in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braghiere, Renato; Quaife, Tristan; Black, Emily

    2016-04-01

    Incoming shortwave radiation is the primary source of energy driving the majority of the Earth's climate system. The partitioning of shortwave radiation by vegetation into absorbed, reflected, and transmitted terms is important for most of biogeophysical processes, including leaf temperature changes and photosynthesis, and it is currently calculated by most of land surface schemes (LSS) of climate and/or numerical weather prediction models. The most commonly used radiative transfer scheme in LSS is the two-stream approximation, however it does not explicitly account for vegetation architectural effects on shortwave radiation partitioning. Detailed three-dimensional (3D) canopy radiative transfer schemes have been developed, but they are too computationally expensive to address large-scale related studies over long time periods. Using a straightforward one-dimensional (1D) parameterisation proposed by Pinty et al. (2006), we modified a two-stream radiative transfer scheme by including a simple function of Sun zenith angle, so-called "structure factor", which does not require an explicit description and understanding of the complex phenomena arising from the presence of vegetation heterogeneous architecture, and it guarantees accurate simulations of the radiative balance consistently with 3D representations. In order to evaluate the ability of the proposed parameterisation in accurately represent the radiative balance of more complex 3D schemes, a comparison between the modified two-stream approximation with the "structure factor" parameterisation and state-of-art 3D radiative transfer schemes was conducted, following a set of virtual scenarios described in the RAMI4PILPS experiment. These experiments have been evaluating the radiative balance of several models under perfectly controlled conditions in order to eliminate uncertainties arising from an incomplete or erroneous knowledge of the structural, spectral and illumination related canopy characteristics typical

  5. Distribuição horizontal e taxas de crescimento, senescência e desfolhação de azevém perene e festuca, puros e em associação Horizontal distribution and growth, senescence and defoliation fluxes of perennial ryegrass and tall fescue pure and mixed swards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Machado Groff

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi realizado no INRA (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique em Theix, França. Duas gramíneas (azevém perene e festucaforam semeadas em caixas (0,13 m² usando-se três distribuições horizontais do pasto (pura, linhas alternadas e faixas alternadas e três intervalos de desfolhações (3,5, 7 e 14 dias, com quatro repetições por tratamento. Quatro meses após a semeadura, a cada data de desfolhação, as caixas foram oferecidas, individualmente, a quatro ovelhas secas e retiradas após a realização de 340 bocados.m-2. Para cada gramínea estudaram-se a densidade populacional e a massa de perfilhos, a altura e a produção de matéria seca, a profundidade e a massa do bocado e as taxas de crescimento, senescência e desfolhação. A maior altura do pasto, gerada por desfolhações menos freqüentes, promoveu a realização de bocados mais profundos e de maior massa. Por outro lado, em desfolhações mais freqüentes a altura do pasto foi mantida mais baixa, e a profundidade e massa do bocado foram menores. A distribuição horizontal das plantas promoveu respostas diferenciadas em relação as taxas de crescimento, senescência e desfolhação. Quando em linhas alternadas a festuca teve a taxa de crescimento limitada, provavelmente desfavorecida pela competição.The experiment was carried in INRA (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique at Theix, France. Two grasses (perennial ryegrass and tall fescue were grown in sward boxes (0,13 m², using three different sward horizontal distribution (pure, alternate rows and alternate strips and three defoliation intervals (3,5, 7 and 14 days between two successive defoliation with four replications. Four months after sowing, at defoliation date, sward boxes were offered to four individual dry ewes and removed after 340 bites.m-2 had been taken. For each grass species, the population density and the tiller mass, sward height, herbage production, bite depth and bite mass

  6. Stressed but stable: canopy loss decreased species synchrony and metabolic variability in an intertidal hard-bottom community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Valdivia

    Full Text Available The temporal stability of aggregate community properties depends on the dynamics of the component species. Since species growth can compensate for the decline of other species, synchronous species dynamics can maintain stability (i.e. invariability in aggregate properties such as community abundance and metabolism. In field experiments we tested the separate and interactive effects of two stressors associated with storminess--loss of a canopy-forming species and mechanical disturbances--on species synchrony and community respiration of intertidal hard-bottom communities on Helgoland Island, NE Atlantic. Treatments consisted of regular removal of the canopy-forming seaweed Fucus serratus and a mechanical disturbance applied once at the onset of the experiment in March 2006. The level of synchrony in species abundances was assessed from estimates of species percentage cover every three months until September 2007. Experiments at two sites consistently showed that canopy loss significantly reduced species synchrony. Mechanical disturbance had neither separate nor interactive effects on species synchrony. Accordingly, in situ measurements of CO(2-fluxes showed that canopy loss, but not mechanical disturbances, significantly reduced net primary productivity and temporal variation in community respiration during emersion periods. Our results support the idea that compensatory dynamics may stabilise aggregate properties. They further suggest that the ecological consequences of the loss of a single structurally important species may be stronger than those derived from smaller-scale mechanical disturbances in natural ecosystems.

  7. Stressed but Stable: Canopy Loss Decreased Species Synchrony and Metabolic Variability in an Intertidal Hard-Bottom Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Nelson; Golléty, Claire; Migné, Aline; Davoult, Dominique; Molis, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The temporal stability of aggregate community properties depends on the dynamics of the component species. Since species growth can compensate for the decline of other species, synchronous species dynamics can maintain stability (i.e. invariability) in aggregate properties such as community abundance and metabolism. In field experiments we tested the separate and interactive effects of two stressors associated with storminess–loss of a canopy-forming species and mechanical disturbances–on species synchrony and community respiration of intertidal hard-bottom communities on Helgoland Island, NE Atlantic. Treatments consisted of regular removal of the canopy-forming seaweed Fucus serratus and a mechanical disturbance applied once at the onset of the experiment in March 2006. The level of synchrony in species abundances was assessed from estimates of species percentage cover every three months until September 2007. Experiments at two sites consistently showed that canopy loss significantly reduced species synchrony. Mechanical disturbance had neither separate nor interactive effects on species synchrony. Accordingly, in situ measurements of CO2-fluxes showed that canopy loss, but not mechanical disturbances, significantly reduced net primary productivity and temporal variation in community respiration during emersion periods. Our results support the idea that compensatory dynamics may stabilise aggregate properties. They further suggest that the ecological consequences of the loss of a single structurally important species may be stronger than those derived from smaller-scale mechanical disturbances in natural ecosystems. PMID:22574181

  8. The MODIS Vegetation Canopy Water Content product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustin, S. L.; Riano, D.; Trombetti, M.

    2008-12-01

    Vegetation water stress drives wildfire behavior and risk, having important implications for biogeochemical cycling in natural ecosystems, agriculture, and forestry. Water stress limits plant transpiration and carbon gain. The regulation of photosynthesis creates close linkages between the carbon, water, and energy cycles and through metabolism to the nitrogen cycle. We generated systematic weekly CWC estimated for the USA from 2000-2006. MODIS measures the sunlit reflectance of the vegetation in the visible, near-infrared, and shortwave infrared. Radiative transfer models, such as PROSPECT-SAILH, determine how sunlight interacts with plant and soil materials. These models can be applied over a range of scales and ecosystem types. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) were used to optimize the inversion of these models to determine vegetation water content. We carried out multi-scale validation of the product using field data, airborne and satellite cross-calibration. An Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD) of the product is under evaluation by NASA. The CWC product inputs are 1) The MODIS Terra/Aqua surface reflectance product (MOD09A1/MYD09A1) 2) The MODIS land cover map product (MOD12Q1) reclassified to grassland, shrub-land and forest canopies; 3) An ANN trained with PROSPECT-SAILH; 4) A calibration file for each land cover type. The output is an ENVI file with the CWC values. The code is written in Matlab environment and is being adapted to read not only the 8 day MODIS composites, but also daily surface reflectance data. We plan to incorporate the cloud and snow mask and generate as output a geotiff file. Vegetation water content estimates will help predicting linkages between biogeochemical cycles, which will enable further understanding of feedbacks to atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. It will also serve to estimate primary productivity of the biosphere; monitor/assess natural vegetation health related to drought, pollution or diseases

  9. Representing Sub-Plot Canopy Heterogeneity Improves Model Prediction of Net Ecosystem Exchange in a Mixed-Deciduous Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, R. P. M.; Bohrer, G.; Medvigy, D.; Vogel, C. S.; Gough, C. M.; Curtis, P.

    2014-12-01

    Canopy density and composition may vary within an eddy covariance tower's footprint in response to small-scale topographic features, biotic interactions such as herbivory, local disturbances, etc. We are investigating how different representations of canopy heterogeneity influence predictions of net ecosystem CO2 exchange in a mixed-deciduous forest by an age/plant functional type structured ecosystem model. Our study area is located at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) where two eddy covariance towers and periodic tree censuses provide a rich long-term record of ecosystem structure, weather, and carbon uptake. Meteorological measurements collected at the US-UMB AmeriFlux tower served to force, optimize, and evaluate the Ecosystem Demography model version 2 (ED2), while tree census information was used to initialize ED2. To test the influence that representing canopy heterogeneity has on model-tower agreement, we ran a set of ED2 site-level simulations with an increasing number of sub-grid patches. The first simulation, which we call 'aggregated', had one large patch explicitly containing all trees. The aggregated canopy represents a case where different size cohorts of each plant functional type are distributed homogeneously throughout the plot with uniform stem density. Six other simulations represented patch-level canopies with varying degrees of heterogeneity, ranging from 5 to 64 sub-plot patches; each patch represented from one to several of the 0.1 ha tree census plots. A preliminary comparison of the aggregated and the 20-plot heterogeneous simulations showed that including patch-level heterogeneity in the canopy description improved model prediction quality. For example, compared to the single-patch, aggregated simulation, including 20 sub-plot patches improved model bias in the estimated accumulated 5-year net ecosystem exchange from 17% to 5%, which is smaller than our tower observation uncertainty. As a result of this study, we will

  10. Estimation of canopy height using lidar and radar interferometry: an assessment of combination methods and sensitivity to instrument, terrain and canopy height profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, M.; Neumann, M.; Pinto, N.; Brolly, M.; Brigot, G.

    2014-12-01

    The combined use of Lidar and radar interferometry to estimate canopy height can be classified into 3 categories: cross-validation, simple combination and fusion methods. In this presentation, we investigate the potential of each category for local and regional scale applications, and assess their sensitivity to instrument configuration, terrain topography and variations in the vertical forest canopy profiles. In addition to field data, we use data from TanDEM-X, UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar), LVIS (Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor) and a commercial discrete lidar. TanDEM-X is a pair of X-band spaceborne radars flying in formation to provide a global digital surface model and can also be used to perform polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (polinSAR) inversion of canopy height. The UAVSAR is an airborne fully polarimetric radar enabling repeat-pass interferometry and has been used for polinsar. While LVIS records the full waveform within a 20m footprint, the discrete lidar collects a cloud of points. The lidar data can be used to validate the polinSAR results (validation), to obtain ground elevation (simple combination with radar surface models) or within the polinSAR inversion model through a common model framework. The data was collected over the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve, a managed territory covering 7861km2 which is located between Québec city and Saguenay. The variety of management practices offers the possibility for long term and comparative studies of natural forest dynamics as well as the impact of human, fires and insect disturbances. The large elevational gradient of the region (~1000m) allows study of variations in structure and type of forests. Depending on the method used, several factors may degrade the accuracy of canopy height estimates from the combined use of lidar and radar interferometry. Here we will consider misregistration of datasets, differences in spatial resolution and viewing geometry, geometric

  11. The Atmospheric Chemistry and Canopy Exchange Simulation System (ACCESS: model description and application to a temperate deciduous forest canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Saylor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest canopies are primary emission sources of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs and have the potential to significantly influence the formation and distribution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA mass. Biogenically-derived SOA formed as a result of emissions from the widespread forests across the globe may affect air quality in populated areas, degrade atmospheric visibility, and affect climate through direct and indirect forcings. In an effort to better understand the formation of SOA mass from forest emissions, a 1-D column model of the multiphase physical and chemical processes occurring within and just above a vegetative canopy is being developed. An initial, gas-phase-only version of this model, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Canopy Exchange Simulation System (ACCESS, includes processes accounting for the emission of BVOCs from the canopy, turbulent vertical transport within and above the canopy and throughout the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL, near-explicit representation of chemical transformations, mixing with the background atmosphere and bi-directional exchange between the atmosphere and canopy and the atmosphere and forest floor. The model formulation of ACCESS is described in detail and results are presented for an initial application of the modeling system to Walker Branch Watershed, an isoprene-emission-dominated forest canopy in the southeastern United States which has been the focal point for previous chemical and micrometeorological studies. Model results of isoprene profiles and fluxes are found to be consistent with previous measurements made at the simulated site and with other measurements made in and above mixed deciduous forests in the southeastern United States. Sensitivity experiments are presented which explore how canopy concentrations and fluxes of gas-phase precursors of SOA are affected by background anthropogenic nitrogen oxides (NOx. Results from these experiments suggest that the

  12. THE PRE-PENUMBRAL MAGNETIC CANOPY IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacTaggart, David [School of Mathematics and Statistics University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QW (United Kingdom); Guglielmino, Salvo L.; Zuccarello, Francesca [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia—Sezione Astrofisica, Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Penumbrae are the manifestation of magnetoconvection in highly inclined (to the vertical direction) magnetic field. The penumbra of a sunspot tends to form, initially, along the arc of the umbra antipodal to the main region of flux emergence. The question of how highly inclined magnetic field can concentrate along the antipodal curves of umbrae, at least initially, remains to be answered. Previous observational studies have suggested the existence of some form of overlying magnetic canopy that acts as the progenitor for penumbrae. We propose that such overlying magnetic canopies are a consequence of how the magnetic field emerges into the atmosphere and are, therefore, part of the emerging region. We show, through simulations of twisted flux tube emergence, that canopies of highly inclined magnetic field form preferentially at the required locations above the photosphere.

  13. Experimental canopy removal enhances diversity of vernal pond amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelly, David K; Bolden, Susan R; Freidenburg, L Kealoha

    2014-03-01

    Vernal ponds are often treated as protected environments receiving special regulation and management. Within the landscapes where they are found, forest vegetation frequently dominates surrounding uplands and can grow to overtop and shade pond basins. Two bodies of research offer differing views of the role of forest canopy for vernal pond systems. Studies of landscape conversion suggest that removing forest overstory within uplands can cause local extinctions of amphibians by altering terrestrial habitat or hindering movement. Studies of canopy above pond basins imply an opposite relationship; encroachment of overstory vegetation can be associated with local extinctions potentially via changes in light, thermal, and food resource environments. Unresolved uncertainties about the role of forest canopy reveal significant gaps in our understanding of wetland species distributions and dynamics. Any misunderstanding of canopy influences is simultaneously important to managers because current practices emphasize promoting or conserving vegetation growth particularly within buffers immediately adjacent to ponds. We evaluated this apparent contradiction by conducting a landscape-scale, long-term experiment using 14 natural vernal ponds. Tree felling at six manipulated ponds was limited in spatial scope but was nevertheless effective in increasing water temperature. Compared with eight control ponds, manipulated ponds maintained more amphibian species during five years post-manipulation. There was little evidence that any species was negatively influenced, and the reproductive effort of species for which we estimated egg inputs maintained pretreatment population densities in manipulated compared with control ponds. Overall, our experiment shows that a carefully circumscribed reduction of overhead forest canopy can enhance the capacity of vernal ponds to support wildlife diversity and suggests a scale dependence of canopy influences on amphibians. These findings have

  14. Equivalence of airborne and ground-acquired wheat canopy temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, J. P.; Hatfield, J. L.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between airborne and ground-based measurements of soil and crop canopy temperatures is investigated for a partial crop canopy. Daily ground-based measurements using a wide-field-of-view radiometer oriented towards the nadir at a height of 1.5 m and airborne thermal imagery at two-week intervals were obtained throughout the entire growing season of a stand of wheat. When corrected for atmospheric effects, the airborne measurements were found to be virtually identical to ground-based measurements, with a regression line slope of 0.985, a standard deviation of 1.8 C and a correlation coefficient of 0.97.

  15. Bromeliad catchments as habitats for methanogenesis in tropical rainforest canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana K. Goffredi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tropical epiphytic plants within the family Bromeliaceae are unusual in that they possess foliage capable of retaining water and impounded material. This creates an acidic (pH 3.5-6.5 and anaerobic (< 1 ppm O2 environment suspended in the canopy. Results from a Costa Rican rainforest show that most bromeliads (n = 75/86 greater than ~20 cm in plant height or ~4-5 cm tank depth, showed presence of methanogens within the lower anoxic horizon of the tank. Archaea were dominated by methanogens (77-90% of recovered ribotypes and community structure, although variable, was generally comprised of a single type, closely related to either hydrogenotrophic Methanoregula or Methanocella, a specific clade of aceticlastic Methanosaeta, or Methanosarcina. Juvenile bromeliads, or those species, such as Guzmania, with shallow tanks, generally did not possess methanogens, as assayed by PCR specific for methanogen 16S rRNA genes, nor did artificial catchments (~ 100 ml volume, in place 6-12 months prior to sample collection. Methanogens were not detected in soil (n = 20, except in one case, in which the dominant ribotype was different from nearby bromeliads. Recovery of methyl coenzyme M reductase genes supported the occurrence of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogens within bromeliad tanks, as well as the trend, via QPCR analysis of mcrA, of increased methanogenic capacity with increased plant height. Methane production rates of up to 300 nmol CH4 ml tank water -1 day-1 were measured in microcosm experiments. These results suggest that bromeliad-associated archaeal communities may play an important role in the cycling of carbon in neotropical forests.

  16. Disruption of ant-aphid mutualism in canopy enhances the abundance of beetles on the forest floor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zhang

    Full Text Available Ant-aphid mutualism is known to play a key role in the structure of the arthropod community in the tree canopy, but its possible ecological effects for the forest floor are unknown. We hypothesized that aphids in the canopy can increase the abundance of ants on the forest floor, thus intensifying the impacts of ants on other arthropods on the forest floor. We tested this hypothesis in a deciduous temperate forest in Beijing, China. We excluded the aphid-tending ants Lasius fuliginosus from the canopy using plots of varying sizes, and monitored the change in the abundance of ants and other arthropods on the forest floor in the treated and control plots. We also surveyed the abundance of ants and other arthropods on the forest floor to explore the relationships between ants and other arthropods in the field. Through a three-year experimental study, we found that the exclusion of ants from the canopy significantly decreased the abundance of ants on the forest floor, but increased the abundance of beetles, although the effect was only significant in the large ant-exclusion plot (80*60 m. The field survey showed that the abundance of both beetles and spiders was negatively related to the abundance of ants. These results suggest that aphids located in the tree canopy have indirect negative effects on beetles by enhancing the ant abundance on the forest floor. Considering that most of the beetles in our study are important predators, the ant-aphid mutualism can have further trophic cascading effects on the forest floor food web.

  17. AREA-BASED SNOW DAMAGE CLASSIFICATION OF FOREST CANOPIES USING BI- TEMPORAL LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vastaranta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Multitemporal LiDAR data provide means for mapping structural changes in forest canopies. We demonstrate the use of area-based estimation method for snow damage assessment. Change features of bi-temporal LiDAR point height distributions were used as predictors in combination with in situ training data. In the winter 2009–2010, snow damages occurred in Hyytiälä (62°N, 24°E, southern Finland. Snow load resulted in broken, bent and fallen trees changing the canopy structure. The damages were documented at the tree level at permanent field plots and dense LiDAR data from 2007 and 2010 were used in the analyses. A 5 × 5-m grid was established in one pine%ndash;spruce stand and change metrics from the LiDAR point height distribution were extracted for the cells. Cells were classified as damaged (n = 43 or undamaged (n = 42 based on the field data. Stepwise logistic regression detected the damaged cells with an overall accuracy of 78.6% (Kappa = 0.57. The best predictors were differences in h-distribution percentage points 5, 35, 40, 50 and 70 of first-or-single return data. The tentative results from the single stand suggest that dense bi-temporal LiDAR data and an area-based approach could be feasible in mapping canopy changes. The accuracy of the point h-distribution is dependent on the pulse density per grid cell. Depending on the time span between LiDAR acquisitions, the natural changes of the h- distributions due to tree growth need to be accounted for as well as differences in the scanning geometry, which can substantially affect the LiDAR h-metrics.

  18. LBA-ECO LC-15 Aerodynamic Roughness Maps of Vegetation Canopies, Amazon Basin: 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, LBA-ECO LC-15 Aerodynamic Roughness Maps of Vegetation Canopies, Amazon Basin: 2000, provides physical roughness maps of vegetation canopies in the...

  19. Tree Canopy Cover for the Circumpolar Taiga-Tundra Ecotone: 2000-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides a map of selected areas with defined tree canopy cover over the circumpolar taiga-tundra ecotone (TTE). Canopy cover was derived...

  20. Will Canopy-Embedded Mild Detonating Cord Affect Aircrew Visual Performance?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gannon, Aaron

    1997-01-01

    .... These sections open upward and outward as the ejection seat penetrates the canopy. MDC thus eliminates the need to jettison the canopy prior to ejection, preserving the critical escape time requisite for aircrew survival...

  1. Canopy processes, fluxes and microclimate in a pine forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Launiainen, S.

    2011-07-01

    Interaction between forests and the atmosphere occurs by radiative and turbulent transport. The fluxes of energy and mass between surface and the atmosphere directly influence the properties of the lower atmosphere and in longer time scales the global climate. Boreal forest ecosystems are central in the global climate system, and its responses to human activities, because they are significant sources and sinks of greenhouse gases and of aerosol particles. The aim of the present work was to improve our understanding on the existing interplay between biologically active canopy, microenvironment and turbulent flow and quantify. In specific, the aim was to quantify the contribution of different canopy layers to whole forest fluxes. For this purpose, long-term micrometeorological and ecological measurements made in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest at SMEAR II research station in Southern Finland were used. The properties of turbulent flow are strongly modified by the interaction between the canopy elements: momentum is efficiently absorbed in the upper layers of the canopy, mean wind speed and turbulence intensities decrease rapidly towards the forest floor and power spectra is modulated by spectral short-cut . In the relative open forest, diabatic stability above the canopy explained much of the changes in velocity statistics within the canopy except in strongly stable stratification. Large eddies, ranging from tens to hundred meters in size, were responsible for the major fraction of turbulent transport between a forest and the atmosphere. Because of this, the eddy-covariance (EC) method proved to be successful for measuring energy and mass exchange inside a forest canopy with exception of strongly stable conditions. Vertical variations of within canopy microclimate, light attenuation in particular, affect strongly the assimilation and transpiration rates. According to model simulations, assimilation rate decreases with height more rapidly than stomatal

  2. Exploring Relationships between Canopy Architecture, Light Distribution, and Photosynthesis in Contrasting Rice Genotypes Using 3D Canopy Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Alexandra J; Retkute, Renata; Herman, Tiara; Murchie, Erik H

    2017-01-01

    The arrangement of leaf material is critical in determining the light environment, and subsequently the photosynthetic productivity of complex crop canopies. However, links between specific canopy architectural traits and photosynthetic productivity across a wide genetic background are poorly understood for field grown crops. The architecture of five genetically diverse rice varieties-four parental founders of a multi-parent advanced generation intercross (MAGIC) population plus a high yielding Philippine variety (IR64)-was captured at two different growth stages using a method for digital plant reconstruction based on stereocameras. Ray tracing was employed to explore the effects of canopy architecture on the resulting light environment in high-resolution, whilst gas exchange measurements were combined with an empirical model of photosynthesis to calculate an estimated carbon gain and total light interception. To further test the impact of different dynamic light patterns on photosynthetic properties, an empirical model of photosynthetic acclimation was employed to predict the optimal light-saturated photosynthesis rate (Pmax ) throughout canopy depth, hypothesizing that light is the sole determinant of productivity in these conditions. First, we show that a plant type with steeper leaf angles allows more efficient penetration of light into lower canopy layers and this, in turn, leads to a greater photosynthetic potential. Second the predicted optimal Pmax responds in a manner that is consistent with fractional interception and leaf area index across this germplasm. However, measured Pmax , especially in lower layers, was consistently higher than the optimal Pmax indicating factors other than light determine photosynthesis profiles. Lastly, varieties with more upright architecture exhibit higher maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis indicating a canopy-level impact on photosynthetic efficiency.

  3. Exploring Relationships between Canopy Architecture, Light Distribution, and Photosynthesis in Contrasting Rice Genotypes Using 3D Canopy Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J. Burgess

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The arrangement of leaf material is critical in determining the light environment, and subsequently the photosynthetic productivity of complex crop canopies. However, links between specific canopy architectural traits and photosynthetic productivity across a wide genetic background are poorly understood for field grown crops. The architecture of five genetically diverse rice varieties—four parental founders of a multi-parent advanced generation intercross (MAGIC population plus a high yielding Philippine variety (IR64—was captured at two different growth stages using a method for digital plant reconstruction based on stereocameras. Ray tracing was employed to explore the effects of canopy architecture on the resulting light environment in high-resolution, whilst gas exchange measurements were combined with an empirical model of photosynthesis to calculate an estimated carbon gain and total light interception. To further test the impact of different dynamic light patterns on photosynthetic properties, an empirical model of photosynthetic acclimation was employed to predict the optimal light-saturated photosynthesis rate (Pmax throughout canopy depth, hypothesizing that light is the sole determinant of productivity in these conditions. First, we show that a plant type with steeper leaf angles allows more efficient penetration of light into lower canopy layers and this, in turn, leads to a greater photosynthetic potential. Second the predicted optimal Pmax responds in a manner that is consistent with fractional interception and leaf area index across this germplasm. However, measured Pmax, especially in lower layers, was consistently higher than the optimal Pmax indicating factors other than light determine photosynthesis profiles. Lastly, varieties with more upright architecture exhibit higher maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis indicating a canopy-level impact on photosynthetic efficiency.

  4. Responses of canopy transpiration and canopy conductance of peach (Prunus persica) trees to alternate partial root zone drip irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Daozhi; Kang, Shaozhong; Zhang, Jianhua

    2005-08-01

    We investigated canopy transpiration and canopy conductance of peach trees under three irrigation patterns: fixed 1/2 partial root zone drip irrigation (FPRDI), alternate 1/2 partial root zone drip irrigation (APRDI) and full root zone drip irrigation (FDI). Canopy transpiration was measured using heat pulse sensors, and canopy conductance was calculated using the Jarvis model and the inversion of the Penman-Monteith equation. Results showed that the transpiration rate and canopy conductance in FPRDI and APRDI were smaller than those in FDI. More significantly, the total irrigation amount was greatly reduced, by 34.7% and 39.6%, respectively for APRDI and FPRDI in the PRDI (partial root zone drip irrigation) treatment period. The daily transpiration was linearly related to the reference evapotranspiration in the three treatments, but daily transpiration of FDI is more than that of APRDI and FPRDI under the same evaporation demand, suggesting a restriction of transpiration water loss in the APRDI and FPRDI trees. FDI needed a higher soil water content to carry the same amount of transpiration as the APRDI and FPRDI trees, suggesting the hydraulic conductance of roots of APRDI and FPRDI trees was enhanced, and the roots had a greater water uptake than in FDI when the average soil water content in the root zone was the same. By a comparison between the transpiration rates predicted by the Penman-Monteith equation and the measured canopy transpiration rates for 60 days during the experimental period, an excellent correlation along the 1:1 line was found for all the treatments (R2 > 0.80), proving the reliability of the methodology.

  5. Comparison of LiDAR- and photointerpretation-based estimates of canopy cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrios Gatziolis

    2012-01-01

    An evaluation of the agreement between photointerpretation- and LiDARbased estimates of canopy cover was performed using 397 90 x 90 m reference areas in Oregon. It was determined that at low canopy cover levels LiDAR estimates tend to exceed those from photointerpretation and that this tendency reverses at high canopy cover levels. Characteristics of the airborne...

  6. The influence of multi-season imagery on models of canopy cover: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Coulston; Dennis M. Jacobs; Chris R. King; Ivey C. Elmore

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying tree canopy cover in a spatially explicit fashion is important for broad-scale monitoring of ecosystems and for management of natural resources. Researchers have developed empirical models of tree canopy cover to produce geospatial products. For subpixel models, percent tree canopy cover estimates (derived from fine-scale imagery) serve as the response...

  7. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Horn; James L. Hanula; Michael D. Ulyshen; John C. Kilgo

    2005-01-01

    We found more green tree frogs (Hyla cinera) in canopy gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 gree ntree frogs observed, 88% were in canopy gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat. Flies were the most commonly collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data...

  8. Estimation of in-canopy ammonia sources and sinks in a fertilized Zea mays field

    Science.gov (United States)

    An analytical model was developed that describes the in-canopy vertical distribution of NH3 source and sinks and vertical fluxes in a fertilized agricultural setting using measured in-canopy concentration and wind speed profiles. This model was applied to quantify in-canopy air-s...

  9. A meta-analysis of leaf nitrogen distribution within plant canopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikosaka, Kouki; Anten, Niels P.R.; Borjigidai, Almaz; Kamiyama, Chiho; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hasegawa, Toshihiro; Oikawa, Shimpei; Iio, Atsuhiro; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Nishina, Kazuya; Ito, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Leaf nitrogen distribution in the plant canopy is an important determinant for canopy photosynthesis. Although the gradient of leaf nitrogen is formed along light gradients in the canopy, its quantitative variations among species and environmental responses remain unknown.

  10. Computing energy budget within a crop canopy from Penmann's ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    layer model, is rede-fined as a function of micrometeorological and physiological profiles of crop canopy. The sources and sinks of sensible and latent heat uxes are assumed to lie on a fictitious plane called zero-displacement plane. Algorithms ...

  11. Estimating foliar biochemistry from hyperspectral data in mixed forest canopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huber, S.; Kneubühler, M.; Psomas, A.; Itten, K.I.; Zimmerman, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    Estimating canopy biochemical composition in mixed forests at the level of tree species represents a critical tool for a better understanding and modeling of ecosystem functioning since many species exhibit differences in functional attributes or decomposition rates. We used airborne hyperspectral

  12. Simulating canopy temperature for modelling heat stress in cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop models must be improved to account for the large effects of heat stress effects on crop yields. To date, most approaches in crop models use air temperature despite evidence that crop canopy temperature better explains yield reductions associated with high temperature events. This study presents...

  13. Computing energy budget within a crop canopy from Penmann's ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan, Krishtel eMaging Solutions

    Computing energy budget within a crop canopy from. Penmann's formulae. Mahendra Mohan∗ and K K Srivastava∗∗. ∗Radio and Atmospheric Science Division, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012, India. ∗∗Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi.

  14. Estimating forest canopy bulk density using six indirect methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Elizabeth D. Reinhardt; Joe Scott; Kathy Gray; James Reardon

    2005-01-01

    Canopy bulk density (CBD) is an important crown characteristic needed to predict crown fire spread, yet it is difficult to measure in the field. Presented here is a comprehensive research effort to evaluate six indirect sampling techniques for estimating CBD. As reference data, detailed crown fuel biomass measurements were taken on each tree within fixed-area plots...

  15. Effect of forest canopy on GPS-based movement data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas J. DeCesare; John R. Squires; Jay A. Kolbe

    2005-01-01

    The advancing role of Global Positioning System (GPS) technology in ecology has made studies of animal movement possible for larger and more vagile species. A simple field test revealed that lengths of GPS-based movement data were strongly biased (P<0.001) by effects of forest canopy. Global Positioning System error added an average of 27.5% additional...

  16. Effect of Balanites glabra canopy cover on grass production, organic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was undertaken in Kenya's southern savanna rangelands to determine the seasonal effect of Balanites glabra canopy cover on aboveground grass biomass, grass species composition, soil organic matter and soil moisture content. The study was conducted during the period June to December 1999 in order to

  17. Mapping forest canopy disturbance in the Upper Great Lakes, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Garner; Mark D. Nelson; Brian G. Tavernia; Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Ian W. Housman

    2015-01-01

    A map of forest canopy disturbance was generated for Michigan, Wisconsin, and most of Minnesota using 42 Landsat time series stacks (LTSS) and a vegetation change tracker (VCTw) algorithm. Corresponding winter imagery was used to reduce commission errors of forest disturbance by identifying areas of persistent snow cover. The resulting disturbance age map was classed...

  18. Sources of sulphur in rain collected below a wheat canopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raybould, C.C.; Unsworth, M.H.; Gregory, P.J.

    1977-05-12

    The quantity of sulfur in rain collected below a maturing wheat canopy was measured. The measurement and calculations show that leaching of plant sulfur by rain was the main source of additional sulfur in throughfall and that most sulfur dry-deposited on leaf surfaces remained fixed there.

  19. Winter cereal canopy effect on cereal and interseeded legume productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interseeding red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) or alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) into winter cereals in the North Central USA can provide forage and a green manure crop. We hypothesize that winter cereal canopy traits such as leaf area index (LAI) and whole plant dry matter (DM) influence interseeded...

  20. Shading performance of a vertical deciduous climbing plant canopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ip, Kenneth; Lam, Marta; Miller, Andrew [Centre for Sustainability of the Built Environment, School of Environment and Technology, University of Brighton, Cockcroft Building, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ, East Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Deciduous climbing plant canopies strategically integrated to building facades can act as dynamic solar shading devices responsive to the seasonal climatic changes. Maximum shading occurs in the summer when the plant is at its peak growth. The shedding of leaves in autumn and winter reduces the shading and allows beneficial solar radiation to be absorbed by the opaque surface of the building facade or penetrated through the windows to the building interior. Although climbing plants have long been used for moderating the microclimate of buildings, there are very few scientific investigations to quantify such effects. This paper reports the findings of a study with specific focus on the shading performance of a vertical deciduous climbing plant canopy. It justifies the selection of Virginia Creeper as an appropriate plant for growth in the UK climate and describes the planting, monitoring and analysis procedures adopted to determine a proposed dynamic Bioshading Coefficient Function - which is used to represent the shading performance of the climbing plant canopy over its annual growing and wilting cycle. A thermal model was developed which identified the key parameters required for establishing the Bioshading Coefficients. Two climbing plant canopies (referred to as Bioshaders) were set up in an existing building in Southeast UK and monitored for 2 years. Measured data were used to calculate a series of daily Bioshading Coefficients which were subsequently applied to establish the Bioshading Coefficient Function. The research also identified issues affecting the indoor environment as a result of the application of Bioshaders. (author)

  1. Estimates of forest canopy height and aboveground biomass using ICESat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Lefsky; David J. Harding; Michael Keller; Warren B. Cohen; Claudia C. Carabajal; Fernando Del Bom; Maria O. Hunter; Raimundo Jr. de Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    Exchange of carbon between forests and the atmosphere is a vital component of the global carbon cycle. Satellite laser altimetry has a unique capability for estimating forest canopy height, which has a direct and increasingly well understood relationship to aboveground carbon storage. While the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) onboard the Ice, Cloud and land...

  2. Estimating foliar biochemistry from hyperspectral data in mixed forest canopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber Gharib, Silvia; Kneubühler, Mathias; Psomas, Achilleas

    2008-01-01

    data to estimate the foliar concentration of nitrogen, carbon and water in three mixed forest canopies in Switzerland. With multiple linear regression models, continuum-removed and normalized HyMap spectra were related to foliar biochemistry on an individual tree level. The six spectral wavebands used...

  3. Whole-tree canopy enclosures: why cage a tree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome F. Grant; Abdul Hakeem; Paris L. Lambdin; Gregory J. Wiggins; Rusty J. Rhea

    2011-01-01

    The use of whole-tree canopy enclosures (i.e., cages) is not a typical approach to assessing biological parameters and interactions in a forest setting. However, the successful application of this technology may enable researchers to better understand certain types of tree/organismal interactions.

  4. Estimating canopy water content using hyperspectral remote sensing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Kooistra, L.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing has demonstrated great potential for accurate retrieval of canopy water content (CWC). This CWC is defined by the product of the leaf equivalent water thickness (EWT) and the leaf area index (LAI). In this paper, in particular the spectral information provided by the

  5. The relation between canopy spread cover and the aboveground ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The canopy spread cover of Karoo bushes and grasses in the Nama Karoo was measured and related to the aboveground phytomass available to the grazing animal. A correlation coefficient of r = 0.7456, calculated for Karoo bushes, indicates that this method can be used to non-destructively estimate available phytomass.

  6. Base Cation Leaching From the Canopy of a Rubber ( Hevea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Base cations are essential to the sustainability of forest ecosystems. They are important for neutralizing the acidifying effects of atmospheric deposition. There is the need for in-depth understanding of base cation depletion and leaching from forest canopy. This is important particularly due to the increasing acidification and ...

  7. Modeling canopy CO2 exchange in the European Russian Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiepe, Isabell; Friborg, Thomas; Herbst, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we use the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal conductance model of Collatz et al. (1991) to simulate the current canopy carbon dioxide exchange of a heterogeneous tundra ecosystem in European Russia. For the parameterization, we used data obtained from in situ leaf level measurements...

  8. Predicting tropical plant physiology from leaf and canopy spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, C.; Asner, G. P.; Martin, R.

    2009-12-01

    A broad understanding of tropical forest leaf photosynthesis has long been a goal for tropical forest ecologists, but elusive, due to difficult canopy access and great species diversity. In this paper, we develop an empirical model to predict light saturated sunlit tropical leaf photosynthesis based on leaf and canopy spectra with the goal of developing a high resolution remote sensing technique to measure canopy photosynthesis. To develop this model, we used the partial least squares (PLS) regression technique on three tropical forest datasets (~168 species), two in Hawaii and one in the tropical rainforest module of Biosphere 2 (B2L). For each species, we measured light saturated photosynthesis (A), light and CO2 saturated photosynthesis (Amax), day respiration (R), leaf spectra (400-2500 nm with 1 nm sampling), leaf nitrogen (N), chlorophyll A and B, carotenoids, and specific leaf area (SLA). On a subset of species we measured Jmax and Vcmax based on light and Aci curves. The model best predicted A (r2 = 0.74, root mean square error (RMSE) = 2.85 µmol m-2 s-1), R (r2 of 0.48, RMSE of -0.52 µmol m-2 s-1) followed by Amax (r2 of 0.47, RMSE of 5.1 µmol m-2 s-1), Jmax, (R2 = 0.52, RMSE = 39) and VCmax (R2 = 0.39, RMSE = 36). The PLS weightings, which indicate which wavelengths most contribute to the model, indicated that physiology weightings were most similar to nitrogen weightings, followed by chlorophyll and SLA. We combined leaf-level reflectance and transmittance with a canopy radiative transfer model to simulate top-of-canopy reflectance, and found that canopy spectra are a better predictor of light saturated photosynthesis more strongly (RMSE = 2.4 µmol m-2 s-1) than are leaf spectra (RMSE = 2.85 µmol m-2 s-1). The results suggest that there is potential for this technique to be used with high fidelity imaging spectrometers to remotely sense tropical forest canopy photosynthesis.

  9. Estimating Mangrove Canopy Height and Above-Ground Biomass in the Everglades National Park with Airborne LiDAR and TanDEM-X Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuelle A. Feliciano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove forests are important natural ecosystems due to their ability to capture and store large amounts of carbon. Forest structural parameters, such as canopy height and above-ground biomass (AGB, provide a good measure for monitoring temporal changes in carbon content. The protected coastal mangrove forest of the Everglades National Park (ENP provides an ideal location for studying these processes, as harmful human activities are minimal. We estimated mangrove canopy height and AGB in the ENP using Airborne LiDAR/Laser (ALS and TanDEM-X (TDX datasets acquired between 2011 and 2013. Analysis of both datasets revealed that mangrove canopy height can reach up to ~25 m and AGB can reach up to ~250 Mg•ha−1. In general, mangroves ranging from 9 m to 12 m in stature dominate the forest canopy. The comparison of ALS and TDX canopy height observations yielded an R2 = 0.85 and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE = 1.96 m. Compared to a previous study based on data acquired during 2000–2004, our analysis shows an increase in mangrove stature and AGB, suggesting that ENP mangrove forests are continuing to accumulate biomass. Our results suggest that ENP mangrove forests have managed to recover from natural disturbances, such as Hurricane Wilma.

  10. A leaf gas exchange model that accounts for intra-canopy variability by considering leaf nitrogen content and local acclimation to radiation in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Jorge A; Louarn, Gaëtan; Perez Peña, Jorge; Ojeda, Hernán; Simonneau, Thierry; Lebon, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the distribution of gas exchange within a plant is a prerequisite for scaling up from leaves to canopies. We evaluated whether leaf traits were reliable predictors of the effects of leaf ageing and leaf irradiance on leaf photosynthetic capacity (V(cmax) , J(max) ) in field-grown vines (Vitis vinifera L). Simultaneously, we measured gas exchange, leaf mass per area (LMA) and nitrogen content (N(m) ) of leaves at different positions within the canopy and at different phenological stages. Daily mean leaf irradiance cumulated over 10 d (PPFD(10) ) was obtained by 3D modelling of the canopy structure. N(m) decreased over the season in parallel to leaf ageing while LMA was mainly affected by leaf position. PPFD(10) explained 66, 28 and 73% of the variation of LMA, N(m) and nitrogen content per area (N(a) ), respectively. Nitrogen content per unit area (N(a) = LMA × N(m) ) was the best predictor of the intra-canopy variability of leaf photosynthetic capacity. Finally, we developed a classical photosynthesis-stomatal conductance submodel and by introducing N(a) as an input, the model accurately simulated the daily pattern of gas exchange for leaves at different positions in the canopy and at different phenological stages during the season. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Estimating Canopy Height of a Temperate Forest from TanDEM-X and LVIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, W.; Dubayah, R.; Kugler, F.

    2014-12-01

    The recently launched TanDEM-X mission is the first single-pass polarimetric interferometer in space allowing global estimation of forest parameters without any temporal decorrelation. This study investigates the potential of single-polarized TanDEM-X data for forest height inversion and structure characterization. For this purpose, a temperate forest - Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in New Hampshire is chosen for experiment. Stripmap-mode HH-polarized TanDEM-X bistatic data (with resolution at 3 m) acquired at different baselines was used. LVIS data was applied to remove the ground phase component of the TanDEM-X interferogram and to validate the derived results. Forest parameters, e.g. canopy height and extinction coefficient were estimated based on Random Volume over Ground (RVoG) model. Scattering phase height (SPH) was also calculated and validated against LVIS rh100. A clear correlation was observed between TanDEM-X SPH and the reference height with an r2 of around 0.6 at 150m resolution. The inverted tree height had an RMSE of less than 3.4 m and an r2 of around 0.7 at the same resolution. It is shown that TanDEM-X data has great potential for improving the understanding and quantification of global forest canopy height and structure.

  12. Grazing management strategies for massaigrass-forage peanut pastures: 1. dynamics of sward condition and botanical composition Estratégias de manejo do pastejo para pastos consorciados de capim-massai e amendoim forrageiro: 1. dinâmica da condição do pasto e da composição botânica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mauricio Soares de Andrade

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out from October 2002 to December 2003 to evaluate the dynamics of sward condition and botanical composition of a mixed massaigrass (Panicum maximum x P. infestum, cv. Massai and forage peanut (Arachis pintoi Ac 01 pasture, intermittently stocked at three daily herbage allowance levels (9.0, 14.5 and 18.4% live weight. Sward condition was characterized in each grazing cycle in terms of the pre and post-grazing sward height, forage mass and percentage of bare ground. Botanical composition (grass, legume and weeds was evaluated before each grazing period. Sward height and forage mass increased linearly with increasing herbage allowance (HA levels, and higher values were observed during the rainy season. Percentage of bare ground increased primarily at the lowest HA level. Percentage of forage peanut increased throughout the experimental period, primarily in the barest and shortest swards, under the lowest HA level. In the last quarter of 2003 the legume constituted 23.5, 10.6 and 6.4% of the pasture forage mass, respectively, from the lowest to the highest HA level. These results suggest that forage peanut can be successfully associated with massaigrass, as long as the pre-grazing sward height is maintained shorter than 65-70 cm, which will prevent excessive shading to the legume.Este estudo foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar a dinâmica e a composição botânica de uma pastagem consorciada de capim-massai (Panicum maximum x P. infestum, cv. Massai e amendoim forrageiro (Arachis pintoi Ac 01, manejada sob lotação rotacionada em três níveis de oferta diária de forragem (9,0; 14,5 e 18,4% do peso vivo. A condição da pastagem foi caracterizada em cada ciclo de pastejo, em termos de altura, massa de forragem e porcentagem de solo descoberto (pré e pós-pastejo. A composição botânica da pastagem (gramínea, leguminosa e invasoras foi monitorada antes de cada período de ocupação. Houve aumento linear da altura

  13. Quantitative detection of settled dust over green canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna

    2016-04-01

    subsequently develop dedicated tools and measures to control and monitor pollutants in the free environment. The earliest effect of settled polluted dust particles is not always reflected through poor conditions of vegetation or soils, or any visible damages. In most of the cases, it has a quite long accumulation process that graduates from a polluted condition to long-term environmental hazard. Although conducted experiments with pollutant analog powders under controlled conditions have tended to confirm the findings from field studies (Brook, 2014), a major criticism of all these experiments is their short duration. The resulting conclusion is that it is difficult, if not impossible, to determine the implications of long-term exposure to realistic concentrations of pollutants from such short-term studies. Hyperspectral remote sensing (HRS) has become a common tool for environmental and geoscience applications. HRS has promoted new opportunities for exploring a wide range of materials and evaluating a variety of natural processes due to its detailed, specific, and extensive information on spectral and spatial disseminations. Hyperspectral unmixing (HU) is the technique of presuming the category type, which constitutes the mix-pixel, and its mixing ratio (Keshava and Mustard, 2002). In general, the task of unmixing is to decompose the reflectance spectrum of each pixel into a set of endmembers or principal combined spectra and their corresponding abundances (Bioucas-Dias et al., 2012). This study suggests that the sensitivity of sparse unmixing techniques provides an ideal approach to extract and identify dust settled over/upon green vegetation canopy using hyperspectral airborne data. Among the available techniques, this study present results of seven linear and non-linear unmixing algorithms: 1) Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF), 2) L1 sparsity-constrained NMF (L1-NMF), 3) L1/2 sparsity-constrained NMF (L1/2-NMF), 4) Graph regularized NMF (G-NMF), 5) Structured Sparse

  14. Edge effects and beta diversity in ground and canopy beetle communities of fragmented subtropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Marisa J; Catterall, Carla P; Stork, Nigel E

    2018-01-01

    Clearing of dry forests globally creates edges between remnant forest and open anthropogenic habitats. We used flight intercept traps to evaluate how forest beetle communities are influenced by distance from such edges, together with vertical height, spatial location, and local vegetation structure, in an urbanising region (Brisbane, Australia). Species composition (but not total abundance or richness) differed greatly between ground and canopy. Species composition also varied strongly among sites at both ground and canopy levels, but almost all other significant effects occurred only at ground level, where: species richness declined from edge to interior; composition differed between positions near edges ( 50 m); high local canopy cover was associated with greater total abundance and richness and differing composition; and greater distances to the city centre were associated with increased total abundances and altered composition. Analyses of individual indicator species associated with this variation enabled further biological interpretations. A global literature synthesis showed that most spatially well-replicated studies of edge effects on ground-level beetles within forest fragments have likewise found that positions within tens of metres from edges with open anthropogenic habitats had increased species richness and different compositions from forest interior sites, with fewer effects on abundance. Accordingly, negative edge effects will not prevent relatively small compact fragments (if >10-20 ha) from supporting forest-like beetle communities, although indirect consequences of habitat degradation remain a threat. Retention of multiple spatially scattered forest areas will also be important in conserving forest-dependent beetles, given high levels of between-site diversity.

  15. Radon 222 tracing of soil and forest canopy trace gas exchange in an open canopy boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussler, William, III; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Kelley, Cheryl A.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    A set of continuous, high-resolution atmospheric radon (Rn-222) concentration time series and radon soil flux measurements were acquired during the summer of 1990 at a micrometeorological tower site 13 km northwest of Schefferville, Quebec, Canada. The tower was located in a dry upland, open-canopy lichen-spruce woodland. For the period July 23 to August 1, 1990, the mean radon soil flux was 41.1 +/- 4.8 Bq m(exp -2)/h. Radon surface flux from the two end-member forest floor cover types (lichen mat and bare soil) were 38.8 +/- 5.1 and 61.8 +/- 15.6 Bq m(exp -2)/h, respectively. Average total forest canopy resistances computed using a simple 'flux box' model for radon exchange between the forest canopy and the overlying atmosphere range from 0.47 +/- 0.24 s cm(exp -1) to 2.65 +/- 1.61 cm(exp -1) for daytime hours (0900-1700 LT) and from 3.44 +/- 0.91 s cm(exp -1) to 10.55 +/- 7.16 s cm(exp -1) for nighttime hours (2000-0600) for the period July 23 to August 6, 1990. Continuous radon profiling of canopy atmospheres is a suitable approach for determining rates of biosphere/atmosphere trace gas exchange for remote field sites where daily equipment maintenance is not possible. where daily equipment maintenance is not possible.

  16. Description of Microbacterium foliorum sp. nov. and Microbacterium phyllosphaerae sp. nov., isolated from the phyllosphere of grasses and the surface litter after mulching the sward, and reclassification of Aureobacterium resistens (Funke et al. 1998) as Microbacterium resistens comb. nov..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, U; Ulrich, A; Schumann, P

    2001-07-01

    The taxonomic position of a group of coryneform bacteria isolated from the phyllosphere of grasses and the surface litter after sward mulching was investigated. On the basis of restriction analyses of 16S rDNA, the isolates were divided into two genotypes. According to the 16S rDNA sequence analysis, representatives of both genotypes were related at a level of 99.2% similarity and clustered within the genus Microbacterium. Chemotaxonomic features (major menaquinones MK-12, MK-11 and MK-10; predominating iso- and anteiso-branched cellular fatty acids; G+C content 64-67 mol%; peptidoglycan-type B2beta with glycolyl residues) corresponded to this genus as well. DNA-DNA hybridization studies showed a reassociation value of less than 70% between representative strains of both subgroups, suggesting that two different species are represented. Although the extensive morphological and physiological analyses did not reveal any differentiating feature for the genotypes, differences in the presence of the cell-wall sugar mannose enabled the subgroups to be distinguished from one another. DNA-DNA hybridization with type strains of closely related Microbacterium spp. indicated that the isolates represent two individual species, which can also be differentiated from previously described species of Microbacterium on the basis of biochemical features. As a result of phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses, the species Microbacterium foliorum sp. nov., type strain P 333/02T (= DSM 12966T = LMG 19580T), and Microbacterium phyllosphaerae sp. nov., type strain P 369/06T (= DSM 13468T = LMG 19581T), are proposed. Furthermore, the reclassification of Aureobacterium resistens (Funke et al. 1998) as Microbacterium resistens (Funke et al. 1998) comb. nov. is proposed.

  17. Estrutura do capim-braquiária em relação à planta daninha = Structure of signalgrass in relation to weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Eduardo Rozalino Santos

    2011-07-01

    prevailed. The presence of weeds caused an increase in sward height and light interception by the canopy. The masses and volumetric densities of living leaf, stem, living and dead material were lower in the site near the weeds in relation to the remote site. The occurrence of S. sisymbrifolium causes spatial variability of vegetation in B. decumbens pasture.

  18. Seasonal variations of leaf and canopy properties tracked by ground-based NDVI imagery in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hualei; Yang, Xi; Heskel, Mary; Sun, Shucun; Tang, Jianwu

    2017-04-28

    Changes in plant phenology affect the carbon flux of terrestrial forest ecosystems due to the link between the growing season length and vegetation productivity. Digital camera imagery, which can be acquired frequently, has been used to monitor seasonal and annual changes in forest canopy phenology and track critical phenological events. However, quantitative assessment of the structural and biochemical controls of the phenological patterns in camera images has rarely been done. In this study, we used an NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) camera to monitor daily variations of vegetation reflectance at visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands with high spatial and temporal resolutions, and found that the infrared camera based NDVI (camera-NDVI) agreed well with the leaf expansion process that was measured by independent manual observations at Harvard Forest, Massachusetts, USA. We also measured the seasonality of canopy structural (leaf area index, LAI) and biochemical properties (leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen content). We found significant linear relationships between camera-NDVI and leaf chlorophyll concentration, and between camera-NDVI and leaf nitrogen content, though weaker relationships between camera-NDVI and LAI. Therefore, we recommend ground-based camera-NDVI as a powerful tool for long-term, near surface observations to monitor canopy development and to estimate leaf chlorophyll, nitrogen status, and LAI.

  19. Structural traits of elephant grass ( Pennisetum purpureum Schum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the forage potential of elephant grass, controlling canopy structure during grazing has limited its use in pasture. This study was conducted to determine the effect of grazing frequency and post-grazing height on canopy structural characteristics of elephant grass genotypes. The treatments consisted of the factorial ...

  20. A Thermal-based Two-Source Energy Balance Model for Estimating Evapotranspiration over Complex Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustas, William; Anderson, Martha; Nieto, Hector; Andreu, Ana; Yang, Yun; Cammalleri, Carmelo; Alfieri, Joseph; Gao, Feng; Hain, Christopher; Torres-Rua, Alfonso

    2017-04-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) provides valuable information for quantifying root-zone water availability, evapotranspiration (ET) and crop condition as well as providing useful information for constraining prognostic land surface models. This presentation describes a robust but relatively simple LST-based land surface model called the Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model. The TSEB algorithms solve for the soil/substrate and canopy temperatures that achieves a balance in the radiation and turbulent heat flux exchange for the soil/substrate and vegetation elements coupled to the lower atmosphere. As a result, the TSEB modeling framework is applicable to a wide range of environmental and canopy cover conditions, which has been a limitation in many other LST-based energy balance approaches. This is particularly relevant in applying surface energy balance models using LST over heterogeneous landscapes with complex vegetation distribution and architecture/structure. An overview of applications of the TSEB modeling framework to a variety of landscapes will be presented. In addition, a modeling system will be described called the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) that couples the TSEB scheme with an atmospheric boundary layer model in time-differencing mode to routinely map continental-scale daily ET at 5 to 10-km resolution using geostationary satellites. A related algorithm (DisALEXI) spatially disaggregates ALEXI output down to finer spatial resolutions using polar orbiting satellites such as Landsat, which provides pixel resolutions at the scale of human management activities affecting land use⪉nd cover.

  1. Automatic measurement of crops canopy height based on monocular vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenghong; Cao, Zhiguo; Bai, Xiaodong

    2011-12-01

    Computer vision technology has been increasingly used for automatically observing crop growth state, but as one of the key parameters in the field of agro-meteorological observation, crop canopy height is still measured manually in the actual observation process up to now. In order to automatically measure the height based on the forward-and-downward-looking image in the existing monocular vision observation system, a novel method is proposed, that is, to measure the canopy height indirectly by the solving algorithm for the actual height of the vertical objects (SAAH) with the help of the intelligent sensor device. The experiment results verified the feasibility and validity of our method, and that the method could meet the actual observation demand.

  2. Effects of changing canopy directional reflectance on feature selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Oliver, R. E.; Kilpela, O. E.

    1973-01-01

    The use of a Monte Carlo model for generating sample directional reflectance data for two simplified target canopies at two different solar positions is reported. Successive iterations through the model permit the calculation of a mean vector and covariance matrix for canopy reflectance for varied sensor view angles. These data may then be used to calculate the divergence between the target distributions for various wavelength combinations and for these view angles. Results of a feature selection analysis indicate that different sets of wavelengths are optimum for target discrimination depending on sensor view angle and that the targets may be more easily discriminated for some scan angles than others. The time-varying behavior of these results is also pointed out.

  3. [Active crop canopy sensor-based nitrogen diagnosis for potato].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Li, Fei; Qin, Yong-Lin; Fan, Ming-Shou

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, two potato experiments involving different N rates in 2011 were conducted in Wuchuan County and Linxi County, Inner Mongolia. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was collected by an active GreenSeeker crop canopy sensor to estimate N status of potato. The results show that the NDVI readings were poorly correlated with N nutrient indicators of potato at vegetative Growth stage due to the influence of soil background. With the advance of growth stages, NDVI values were exponentially related to plant N uptake (R2 = 0.665) before tuber bulking stage and were linearly related to plant N concentration (R2 = 0.699) when plant fully covered soil. In conclusion, GreenSeeker active crop sensor is a promising tool to estimate N status for potato plants. The findings from this study may be useful for developing N recommendation method based on active crop canopy sensor.

  4. Strengthening the Ubuntu social canopy after the Afrophobic attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorodzai Dube

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In view of the aftermath of the Afrophobic attacks in South Africa, this study regards Paul�s emphasis concerning common humanity and morality as a possible lacuna towards strengthening Ubuntu. Paul taught that both the Jews and the Gentiles have their common ancestor � Adam, and that good morality is a better identity marker than ethnicity. In view of the aftermath of the Afrophobic attacks in South Africa, this study suggests that similar arguments can be used to amend the Ubuntu social canopy.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: This study is interdisciplinary in nature in that it uses perspectives from social sciences to seek solutions towards a more inclusive communityKeywords: Afrophobia; Xenophobia; Ubuntu; Social Canopy; Christ-like Anthropology

  5. Canopy Measurements with a Small Unmanned Aerial System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschel, J.

    2015-12-01

    This work discusses the use of a small unmanned aerial system (UAS) for the remote placement of wireless environmental sensors in tree canopies. Remote presence applications occur when one or more humans use a robot to project themselves into an environment in order to complete an inaccessible or time-critical mission. The more difficult problem of physical object manipulation goes one step further by incorporating physical-based interaction, in additional to visualization. Forested environments present especially unique challenges for small UAS versus similar domains (e.g., disaster response, inspection of critical infrastructure) due to the navigation and interaction required with dense tree canopies. This work describes two field investigations that inform: i) the type of physical object manipulation and visualization necessary for sensor placement (ventral, frontal, dorsal), ii) the necessary display form (hybrid) for piloting and sensor placement, and iii) visual feedback mechanisms useful for handling human-robot team role conflicts.

  6. [Review of Crop Canopy Spectral Information Detection Technology and Methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiao-rong; Gao, Jun-feng; Xie, Chuan-qi; Zhu, Feng-le; Huang, Ling-xia; He, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Compared with the traditional chemical methods and the subjective visual ways for measuring plant physiology information indicators, the assessments of crop canopy information through spectral radiometer are more simple, rapid and accurate. The applications of different types of spectral radiometer, especially for international general used Cropscan multispectral radiometer, for predicting crop canopy leaf area index under different growth stage, biomass, nitrogen, chlorophyll and yield, and monitoring plant diseases and insect pests were summarized based on crop group information acquisition methods in recent years. The varity of vegetation indices (VIs) were concluded after comparing regression coefficients of related models among different crops. In general, the correlation coefficients of mathematical models were high and it can realize the crop detection of various kinds of physiological information. Besides, the combination of multispectral radiometer and other sensors can provide useful information to evaluate the status of crops growth, which is very important in practice.

  7. Tree diversity and canopy cover in cocoa systems in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asare, Richard; Ræbild, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) growing systems in Ghana and West Africa consist of diverse tree species and densities.This study was conducted to determine factors that influence tree species configurations and how tree characteristics affect canopy cover in cocoa farms. Eighty-six farmers...... and corresponding farms were selected in a systematic approach in four districts across two agro-ecological zones in Ghana. Results show that men tend to have larger farm sizes, higher tree density and diversity than women. Tree density and canopy cover of shade trees were low on large farms, but diversity...... increased with increasing farm sizes. Even though there was a significant correlation between diameter at breast height and crown area for all species investigated, tree species differed considerably in their crown area and thus the amount of ground cover provided. Current recommendations for shade...

  8. LBA-ECO ND-04 Secondary Forest Recovery, Structure, and LAI, Central Amazonia, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports measurements of the canopy and structure of secondary forests regenerating from abandoned pastures. These secondary forests are...

  9. Forest canopy gap fraction from terrestrial laser scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Danson, F. M.; Hetherington, D; Morsdorf, F; Koetz, B; Allgöwer, B

    2007-01-01

    A terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) was used to measure canopy directional gap fraction distribution in forest stands in the Swiss National Park, eastern Switzerland. A scanner model was derived to determine the expected number of laser shots in all directions, and these data were compared with the measured number of laser hits to determine directional gap fraction at eight sampling points. Directional gap fraction distributions were determined from digital hemispherical photographs recor...

  10. Thermal constraints on foraging of tropical canopy ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Michelle Elise; Stark, Alyssa Y; Adams, Benjamin J; Kneale, Riley; Kaspari, Michael; Yanoviak, Stephen P

    2017-04-01

    Small cursorial ectotherms risk overheating when foraging in the tropical forest canopy, where the surfaces of unshaded tree branches commonly exceed 50 °C. We quantified the heating and subsequent cooling rates of 11 common canopy ant species from Panama and tested the hypothesis that ant workers stop foraging at temperatures consistent with the prevention of overheating. We created hot experimental "sunflecks" on existing foraging trails of four ant species from different clades and spanning a broad range of body size, heating rate, and critical thermal maxima (CTmax). Different ant species exhibited very different heating rates in the lab, and these differences did not follow trends predicted by body size alone. Experiments with ant models showed that heating rates are strongly affected by color in addition to body size. Foraging workers of all species showed strong responses to heating and consistently abandoned focal sites between 36 and 44 °C. Atta colombica and Azteca trigona workers resumed foraging shortly after heat was removed, but Cephalotes atratus and Dolichoderus bispinosus workers continued to avoid the heated patch even after >5 min of cooling. Large foraging ants (C. atratus) responded slowly to developing thermal extremes, whereas small ants (A. trigona) evacuated sunflecks relatively quickly, and at lower estimated body temperatures than when revisiting previously heated patches. The results of this study provide the first field-based insight into how foraging ants respond behaviorally to the heterogeneous thermal landscape of the tropical forest canopy.

  11. Geometry of the hemispherical radiometric footprint over plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolla, B.; Cescatti, A.

    2017-11-01

    Radiometric measurements of hemispherical surface reflectance and long-wave irradiance are required to quantify the broadband albedo and the outgoing thermal radiation. These observations are typically integrated with eddy covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes to characterize the surface energy budget. While the aerodynamic footprint has been widely investigated, the geometry of the hemispherical radiometric footprint over plant canopies has been rarely tackled. In the present work, the size and shape of the hemispherical radiometric footprint are formalized for a bare surface and in presence of a vegetation cover. For this purpose, four idealized canopies are analyzed and the dependency of the radiometric footprint on leaf area index and canopy height is explored. Besides, the radiometric footprint is compared with the aerodynamic footprint in conditions of neutral stability. It was observed that almost 100% of the hemispherical radiometric signal originates within a distance of a few radiometer heights, while only about 50-80% of the cumulative aerodynamic signal is generated within a distance of about 20 sensor heights. In order to achieve comparable extensions of the footprint areas, hemispherical radiometric measurements should therefore be taken about 6-15 times higher than turbulent flux ones, depending on the vegetation type. The analysis also highlights that the size of the radiative footprint decreases at increasing leaf area index, whereas the aerodynamic footprint shows an opposite behavior. For the abovementioned reasons, this work may support the interpretation of energy flux measurements and the optimal design of eddy covariance stations located in heterogeneous sites.

  12. A canopy trimming experiment in Puerto Rico: the response of litter invertebrate communities to canopy loss and debris deposition in a tropical forest subject to hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara A. Richardson; Michael J. Richardson; Grizelle Gonzalez; Aaron B. Shiels; Diane S. Srivastava

    2010-01-01

    Hurricanes cause canopy removal and deposition of pulses of litter to the forest floor. A Canopy Trimming Experiment (CTE) was designed to decouple these two factors, and to investigate the separate abiotic and biotic consequences of hurricane-type damage and monitor recovery processes. As part of this experiment, effects on forest floor invertebrate communities were...

  13. Microscale Canopy Interactions in Aquatic Phototrophs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtenberg, Mads

    community composition affects energy budgets in photosynthetic sediments, ii) the role of incident light field angularity (diffuse/collimated) on radiative energy conservation, and iii) how light-induced migration of cyanobacteria change community-structure and -photosynthetic efficiencies in a natural....... This was investigated in a range of aquatic phototrophs such as macroalgae, reef-building corals, and photosynthetic biofilms. As a first step, we demonstrate that a microscale stratification of the internal light- and chemical environment exists across the investigated systems, with concomitant internal gradients...... of photosynthesis and respiration. We further investigate this by compiling a closed radiative energy budget of a coral and find that corals are highly efficient light collectors that can display photosynthetic quantum efficiencies close to the theoretical limit. Using a similar approach, we then investigate i) how...

  14. Explaining the variability of Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI): deconvolution of variability related to Light Use Efficiency and Canopy attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlier, Elodie; Hmimina, Gabriel; Dufrêne, Eric; Soudani, Kamel

    2014-05-01

    The Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) was designed as a proxy of the state of xanthophyll cycle which is used as a response of plants to excess of light (Gamon et al., 1990; 1992). Strong relationships between PRI and LUE were shown at leaf and canopy scales and over a wide range of species (Garbulsky et al., 2011). However, its use at canopy scale was shown to be significantly hampered by effects of confounding factors such as the PRI sensitivity to leaf pigment content (Gamon et al. 2001; Nakaji et al. 2006) and to canopy structure (Hilker et al. 2008). Several approaches aimed at correcting such effects and recent works focused on the deconvolution of LUE related and LUE unrelated PRI variability (Rahimzadeh-Bajgiran et al. 2012).In this study, the PRI variability at canopy scale is investigated over two years on three species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus robur and Pinus sylvestris) growing under two water regimes. At daily scale, PRI variability is mainly explained by radiation conditions. As already reported at leaf scale in Hmimina et al. (2014), analysis of PRI responses to incoming photosynthetically active radiation over seasonal scale allowed to separate two sources of variability : a constitutive variability mainly related to canopy structure and leaf chlorophyll content and a facultative variability mainly related to LUE and soil moisture content. These results highlight the composite nature of PRI signal measured at canopy scale and the importance of disentangling its sources of variability in order to accurately assess ecosystem light use efficiency. Gamon JA, Field CB, Bilger W, Björkman O, Fredeen AL, Peñuelas J. 1990. Remote sensing of the xanthophyll cycle and chlorophyll fluorescence in sunflower leaves and canopies. Oecologia 85, 1-7. Gamon JA, Field CB, Fredeen A AL, Thayer S. 2001. Assessing photosynthetic downregulation in sunflower stands with an optically-based model. Photosynthesis Research 67, 113-125. Gamon JA, Peñuelas J, Field CB

  15. Variation in canopy duration in the perennial biofuel crop Miscanthus reveals complex associations with yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Paul R.H.; Farrar, Kerrie; Gay, Alan P.; Jensen, Elaine F.; Clifton-Brown, John C.; Donnison, Iain S.

    2013-01-01

    Energy crops can provide a sustainable source of power and fuels, and mitigate the negative effects of CO2 emissions associated with fossil fuel use. Miscanthus is a perennial C4 energy crop capable of producing large biomass yields whilst requiring low levels of input. Miscanthus is largely unimproved and therefore there could be significant opportunities to increase yield. Further increases in yield will improve the economics, energy balance, and carbon mitigation of the crop, as well as reducing land-take. One strategy to increase yield in Miscanthus is to maximize the light captured through an extension of canopy duration. In this study, canopy duration was compared among a diverse collection of 244 Miscanthus genotypes. Canopy duration was determined by calculating the number of days between canopy establishment and senescence. Yield was positively correlated with canopy duration. Earlier establishment and later senescence were also both separately correlated with higher yield. However, although genotypes with short canopy durations were low yielding, not all genotypes with long canopy durations were high yielding. Differences of yield between genotypes with long canopy durations were associated with variation in stem and leaf traits. Different methodologies to assess canopy duration traits were investigated, including visual assessment, image analysis, light interception, and different trait thresholds. The highest correlation coefficients were associated with later assessments of traits and the use of quantum sensors for canopy establishment. A model for trait optimization to enable yield improvement in Miscanthus and other bioenergy crops is discussed. PMID:23599277

  16. Throughfall-mediated alterations to soil microbial community structure in a forest plot of homogenous soil texture, litter, and plant species composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stan, John; Rosier, Carl; Moore, Leslie; Gay, Trent; Reichard, James; Wu, Tiehang; Kan, Jinjun

    2015-04-01

    Identifying spatiotemporal influences on soil microbial community (SMC) structure is critical to our understanding of patterns in biogeochemical cycling and related ecological services (e.g., plant community structure, water quality, response to environmental change). Since forest canopy structure alters the spatiotemporal patterning of precipitation water and solute supplies to soils (via "throughfall"), is it possible that changes in SMC structure could arise from modifications in canopy elements? Our study investigates this question by monitoring throughfall water and dissolved ion supply to soils beneath a continuum of canopy structure: from large gaps (0% cover), to bare Quercus virginiana Mill. (southern live oak) canopy (~50-70%), to heavy Tillandsia usneoides L. (Spanish moss) canopy (>90% cover). Throughfall water supply diminished with increasing canopy cover, yet increased washoff/leaching of Na+, Cl-, PO43-, and SO42- from the canopy to the soils. Presence of T. usneoides diminished throughfall NO3-, but enhanced NH4+, concentrations supplied to subcanopy soils. The mineral soil horizon (0-10 cm) sampled in triplicate from locations receiving throughfall water and solutes from canopy gaps, bare canopy, and T. usneoides-laden canopy significantly differed in soil chemistry parameters (pH, Ca2+, Mg2+, CEC). Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) banding patterns beneath similar canopy covers (experiencing similar throughfall dynamics) also produced high similarities per ANalyses Of SIMilarity (ANO-SIM), and clustered together when analyzed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS). These results suggest that modifications of forest canopy structures are capable of affecting mineral-soil horizon SMC structure via throughfall when canopies' biomass distribution is highly heterogeneous. As SMC structure, in many instances, relates to functional diversity, we suggest that future research seek to identify functional

  17. The invasion of the intertidal canopy-forming alga Fucus serratus L. to southwestern Iceland: Possible community effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingólfsson, Agnar

    2008-04-01

    The intertidal serrated wrack, Fucus serratus L. (Fucales: Phaeophyceae), has become an abundant canopy-forming alga along a ca. 100 km stretch of shore in southwestern Iceland in the last century. Its distribution has not changed noticeably since a survey in 1975/1976. Many experimental studies have shown that canopy-forming algae can have profound effects on the community structure. Although such experiments involving F. serratus are few it was decided to test predictions from these experiments on a geographical scale by comparing community compositions within the area where F. serratus is a dominant algae (since at least 1975/1976) with an adjacent area of similar size where F. serratus is absent (with a single exception without consequences). The work is based on measurements on some 372 stations in the F. serratus area, termed region A, and 227 stations from the F. serratus-free area, termed region B. Percentage cover of algae and sessile invertebrates was estimated on 2 m 2 on each station and animals collected from 800 cm 2 from each station. The vertical distribution of F. serratus was most similar to that of Fucus distichus and the two species often grew intermingled on the lower part of the shore. F. serratus appeared to have reduced the cover of F. distichus in the lowermost part of the shore, while having little or no effect on other canopy-forming species. The low abundance of Semibalanus balanoides in the F. serratus area (region A) is in line with experiments showing detrimental effect on this barnacle by whiplash of F. serratus. In general algal grazers were more abundant in region A, consistent with the greater attractiveness of F. serratus than other canopy-forming species to grazers, although this may be partly explained by the abundance of understorey algae in region A.

  18. Comparing RIEGL RiCOPTER UAV LiDAR Derived Canopy Height and DBH with Terrestrial LiDAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, Benjamin; Lau, Alvaro; Bartholomeus, Harm M; Kooistra, Lammert

    2017-10-17

    In recent years, LIght Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) and especially Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) systems have shown the potential to revolutionise forest structural characterisation by providing unprecedented 3D data. However, manned Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) requires costly campaigns and produces relatively low point density, while TLS is labour intense and time demanding. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-borne laser scanning can be the way in between. In this study, we present first results and experiences with the RIEGL RiCOPTER with VUX ® -1UAV ALS system and compare it with the well tested RIEGL VZ-400 TLS system. We scanned the same forest plots with both systems over the course of two days. We derived Digital Terrain Model (DTMs), Digital Surface Model (DSMs) and finally Canopy Height Model (CHMs) from the resulting point clouds. ALS CHMs were on average 11.5 c m higher in five plots with different canopy conditions. This showed that TLS could not always detect the top of canopy. Moreover, we extracted trunk segments of 58 trees for ALS and TLS simultaneously, of which 39 could be used to model Diameter at Breast Height (DBH). ALS DBH showed a high agreement with TLS DBH with a correlation coefficient of 0.98 and root mean square error of 4.24 c m . We conclude that RiCOPTER has the potential to perform comparable to TLS for estimating forest canopy height and DBH under the studied forest conditions. Further research should be directed to testing UAV-borne LiDAR for explicit 3D modelling of whole trees to estimate tree volume and subsequently Above-Ground Biomass (AGB).

  19. Comparing RIEGL RiCOPTER UAV LiDAR Derived Canopy Height and DBH with Terrestrial LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Brede

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, LIght Detection And Ranging (LiDAR and especially Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS systems have shown the potential to revolutionise forest structural characterisation by providing unprecedented 3D data. However, manned Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS requires costly campaigns and produces relatively low point density, while TLS is labour intense and time demanding. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV-borne laser scanning can be the way in between. In this study, we present first results and experiences with the RIEGL RiCOPTER with VUX ® -1UAV ALS system and compare it with the well tested RIEGL VZ-400 TLS system. We scanned the same forest plots with both systems over the course of two days. We derived Digital Terrain Model (DTMs, Digital Surface Model (DSMs and finally Canopy Height Model (CHMs from the resulting point clouds. ALS CHMs were on average 11.5 c m higher in five plots with different canopy conditions. This showed that TLS could not always detect the top of canopy. Moreover, we extracted trunk segments of 58 trees for ALS and TLS simultaneously, of which 39 could be used to model Diameter at Breast Height (DBH. ALS DBH showed a high agreement with TLS DBH with a correlation coefficient of 0.98 and root mean square error of 4.24 c m . We conclude that RiCOPTER has the potential to perform comparable to TLS for estimating forest canopy height and DBH under the studied forest conditions. Further research should be directed to testing UAV-borne LiDAR for explicit 3D modelling of whole trees to estimate tree volume and subsequently Above-Ground Biomass (AGB.

  20. The influence of canopy-layer composition on understory plant diversity in southern temperate forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mestre

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Understory plants represents the largest component of biodiversity in most forest ecosystems and plays a key role in forest functioning. Despite their importance, the influence of overstory-layer composition on understory plant diversity is relatively poorly understood within deciduous-evergreen broadleaved mixed forests. The aim of this work was to evaluate how tree overstory-layer composition influences on understory-layer diversity in three forest types (monospecific deciduous Nothofagus pumilio (Np, monospecific evergreen Nothofagus betuloides (Nb, and mixed N. pumilio-N. betuloides (M forests, comparing also between two geographical locations (coast and mountain to estimate differences at landscape level. Results We recorded 46 plant species: 4 ferns, 12 monocots, and 30 dicots. Canopy-layer composition influences the herb-layer structure and diversity in two different ways: while mixed forests have greater similarity to evergreen forests in the understory structural features, deciduous and mixed were similar in terms of the specific composition of plant assemblage. Deciduous pure stands were the most diverse, meanwhile evergreen stands were least diverse. Lack of exclusive species of mixed forest could represent a transition where evergreen and deciduous communities meet and integrate. Moreover, landscape has a major influence on the structure, diversity and richness of understory vegetation of pure and mixed forests likely associated to the magnitude and frequency of natural disturbances, where mountain forest not only had highest herb-layer diversity but also more exclusive species. Conclusions Our study suggests that mixed Nothofagus forest supports coexistence of both pure deciduous and pure evergreen understory plant species and different assemblages in coastal and mountain sites. Maintaining the mixture of canopy patch types within mixed stands will be important for conserving the natural patterns of understory plant

  1. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James L.; Ulyshen, Michael D.; Kilgo, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Horn, Scott, James L. Hanula, Michael D. Ulyshen, and John C. Kilgo. 2005. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest. Am. Midl. Nat. 153:321-326. Abstract: We found more green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea) in canopy gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopy gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat. Flies were the most commonly collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.

  2. Development of models for thermal infrared radiation above and within plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paw u, Kyaw T.

    1992-01-01

    Any significant angular dependence of the emitted longwave radiation could result in errors in remotely estimated energy budgets or evapotranspiration. Empirical data and thermal infrared radiation models are reviewed in reference to anisotropic emissions from the plant canopy. The biometeorological aspects of linking longwave models with plant canopy energy budgets and micrometeorology are discussed. A new soil plant atmosphere model applied to anisotropic longwave emissions from a canopy is presented. Time variation of thermal infrared emission measurements is discussed.

  3. Identification of Robust Models for co2 xcEhange at Canopy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, J.; Schulz, K.

    2008-12-01

    Nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic time series analysis tools are applied to numerous sites and years of eddy covariance and meteorological measurements provided by the worldwide network FLUXNET with the intention to identify robust models for the CO2 exchange at canopy scale. The analysis tools based on Kalman filtering and smoothing techniques help to extract the dominant behaviour of daily gross photosynthesis and respiration in relation to their principally modulating drivers. Based on these findings semi-parametric models are formulated and optimized against over one hundred FLUXNET site-years. The only input variables are soil temperature, insolation and precipitation or evaporative fraction as moisture availability measure. The resulting well-defined parameters are analyzed for patterns that relate the parameters to site characteristics as vegetation and climate class. Despite their simplicity the retrieved model structures fit the measured data well and provide reliable annual CO2 budgets for forests and grasslands.

  4. BOREAS TE-23 Canopy Architecture and Spectral Data from Hemispherical Photos

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Hemispherical photographs collected in support of the effort to characterize and interpret information on estimates of canopy architecture and radiative...

  5. Examining vertical patterns in Arctic tundra shrub canopies: Implications for carbon cycling in a changing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskel, M.; Atkin, O.; Turnbull, M.; Rastetter, E.; Griffin, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is facilitating the northward encroachment and expansion of woody shrub species into the Arctic tundra, which in turn is altering a number of physical and biogeochemical processes that are likely to affect how carbon is cycled in this region. Greater shrub presence also increases leaf area index and canopy complexity in the tundra, introducing the potential for vertical variation in nitrogen, photosynthesis, and respiration through the canopy. For these reasons, Arctic tundra shrub communities represent an ecologically relevant case study for investigating carbon cycling-nitrogen relationships and testing optimization models. Here, we measured photosynthesis, respiration in the dark and light, the light inhibition of respiration, stomatal conductance, leaf nitrogen, and related leaf traits at different heights representing variation in light availability in multiple Arctic Alaskan shrub communities dominated by Salix pulchra and Betula nana to examine if the relatively low-stature canopies exhibit vertical patterns. Highest rates of photosynthesis and respiration (P top of the canopy, suggesting substrate-limitation of respiration at lower, more shaded canopy levels. Leaves at the top of the canopy also exhibited the lowest inhibition of respiration by light (NS), and the highest nitrogen concentrations. (P photosynthesis, nitrogen, and a relaxation of light-inhibition to optimize metabolic efficiency. Data from this study was also used to test leaf-level and canopy nitrogen optimization models. These data emphasize the need to include canopy complexity in tundra carbon models, as neglecting physiological differences through a canopy may lead to an underestimation of stored carbon.

  6. Vertical stratification of beetles (Coleoptera) and flies (Diptera) in temperate forest canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Dorothy Y; Robert, Katleen; Brochu, Kristen; Larrivée, Maxim; Buddle, Christopher M; Wheeler, Terry A

    2014-02-01

    Forest canopies support high arthropod biodiversity, but in temperate canopies, little is known about the spatial distribution of these arthropods. This is an important first step toward understanding ecological roles of insects in temperate canopies. The objective of this study was to assess differences in the species composition of two dominant and diverse taxa (Diptera and Coleoptera) along a vertical gradient in temperate deciduous forest canopies. Five sugar maple trees from each of three deciduous forest sites in southern Quebec were sampled using a combination of window and trunk traps placed in three vertical strata (understory, mid-canopy, and upper-canopy) for three sampling periods throughout the summer. Coleoptera species richness and abundance did not differ between canopy heights, but more specimens and species of Diptera were collected in the upper-canopy. Community composition of Coleoptera and Diptera varied significantly by trap height. Window traps collected more specimens and species of Coleoptera than trunk traps, although both trap types should be used to maximize representation of the entire Coleoptera community. There were no differences in abundance, diversity, or composition of Diptera collected between trap types. Our data confirm the relevance of sampling all strata in a forest when studying canopy arthropod biodiversity.

  7. BOREAS TE-23 Canopy Architecture and Spectral Data from Hemispherical Photos

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hemispherical photographs collected in support of the effort to characterize and interpret information on estimates of canopy architecture and radiative transfer...

  8. Travelling waves above the canopy of aquatic vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimov, D.; Lyubimova, T.; Baidina, D.

    2012-04-01

    When fluid moves over a saturated porous medium with high permeability and porosity, the flow partially involves the fluid in porous medium, however, because of the great resistance force there arises sharp drop of tangential velocity. This leads to the development of instability similar to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on discontinuity surface of the tangential velocities of homogeneous fluids. Analogy becomes even more complete if we take into account the deformability of porous medium under the influence of pressure changes. Intensive vortices above the canopy of aquatic vegetation can lead to the coherent oscillations of vegetation, such traveling waves are called monami [1]. In the present paper we investigate stability of steady flow over a saturated porous medium. The importance of this problem is related to the applications to the dynamics of pollutants in the bottom layer of vegetation: the accumulation at low flow and salvo emissions with increasing velocity. We consider a two-layer system consisting of a layer of a viscous incompressible fluid and porous layer saturated with the same fluid located underneath. The lower boundary of the system is assumed to be rigid, the upper boundary - free and non-deformable. Weak slope of the river is taken into account. The problem is solved within the framework of single approach in which a two-layer system is described by a single system of equations for saturated porous medium and the presence of two layers is modeled by introducing variable permeability and porosity, depending on vertical coordinate. The flow in a saturated porous medium is described by the Brinkman model. Solution of the problem for steady flow shows that the velocity profile has two inflection points, which leads to the instability. The neutral curves are obtained for different values of the ratio d of porous layer thickness to full thickness. It is found that the dependence of critical Reynolds number on d is non-monotonic and the wave

  9. A Versatile, Production-Oriented Approach to High-Resolution Tree-Canopy Mapping in Urban and Suburban Landscapes Using GEOBIA and Data Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarlath O'Neil-Dunne

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of tree canopy in urban and suburban landscapes are increasingly well known: stormwater runoff control, air-pollution mitigation, temperature regulation, carbon storage, wildlife habitat, neighborhood cohesion, and other social indicators of quality of life. However, many urban areas lack high-resolution tree canopy maps that document baseline conditions or inform tree-planting programs, limiting effective study and management. This paper describes a GEOBIA approach to tree-canopy mapping that relies on existing public investments in LiDAR, multispectral imagery, and thematic GIS layers, thus eliminating or reducing data acquisition costs. This versatile approach accommodates datasets of varying content and quality, first using LiDAR derivatives to identify aboveground features and then a combination of LiDAR and imagery to differentiate trees from buildings and other anthropogenic structures. Initial tree canopy objects are then refined through contextual analysis, morphological smoothing, and small-gap filling. Case studies from locations in the United States and Canada show how a GEOBIA approach incorporating data fusion and enterprise processing can be used for producing high-accuracy, high-resolution maps for large geographic extents. These maps are designed specifically for practical application by planning and regulatory end users who expect not only high accuracy but also high realism and visual coherence.

  10. Mapping growing stock at 1-km spatial resolution for Spanish forest areas from ground forest inventory data and GLAS canopy height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ruiz, S.; Chiesi, M.; Maselli, F.; Gilabert, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    National forest inventories provide measurements of forest variables (e.g. growing stock) that can be used for the estimation of above ground biomass (AGB). Mapping growing stock brings knowledge about spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of ABG, which is necessary for carbon cycle analysis. Several studies have been conducted on the integration of ground and optical remote sensing data to map forest biomass over Europe. Nevertheless, more direct information on forest biomass could be obtained by LiDAR techniques, which directly assess vertical forest structure by measuring the distance between the sensor and the scattering elements located inside the canopy volume. Thus, global 1-km maps of forest canopy height have been recently obtained from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). The current study aims to produce a forest growing stock map in Spain. Five different forest type areas were identified in three provinces along a North - South gradient accounting for different ecosystems and climatic conditions. Growing stock ground data from the Third Spanish National Forest Inventory were assigned to each forest type and aggregated to 1-km spatial resolution. GLAS-derived canopy height was extracted for the locations of selected ground data. A relationship between inventory growing stock and satellite canopy height was found for each class. The obtained relationships were then extended all over Spain. The accuracy of the resulting growing stock map was assessed at province level against the Third Spanish National Forest Inventory growing stock estimations (R = 0.85, RMSE = 21 m3 ha-1).

  11. Object-Based Canopy Gap Segmentation and Classification: Quantifying the Pros and Cons of Integrating Optical and LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Delineating canopy gaps and quantifying gap characteristics (e.g., size, shape, and dynamics are essential for understanding regeneration dynamics and understory species diversity in structurally complex forests. Both high spatial resolution optical and light detection and ranging (LiDAR remote sensing data have been used to identify canopy gaps through object-based image analysis, but few studies have quantified the pros and cons of integrating optical and LiDAR for image segmentation and classification. In this study, we investigate whether the synergistic use of optical and LiDAR data improves segmentation quality and classification accuracy. The segmentation results indicate that the LiDAR-based segmentation best delineates canopy gaps, compared to segmentation with optical data alone, and even the integration of optical and LiDAR data. In contrast, the synergistic use of two datasets provides higher classification accuracy than the independent use of optical or LiDAR (overall accuracy of 80.28% ± 6.16% vs. 68.54% ± 9.03% and 64.51% ± 11.32%, separately. High correlations between segmentation quality and object-based classification accuracy indicate that classification accuracy is largely dependent on segmentation quality in the selected experimental area. The outcome of this study provides valuable insights of the usefulness of data integration into segmentation and classification not only for canopy gap identification but also for many other object-based applications.

  12. [Evaluation of the tree form quality of middle-aged Pinus tabuliformis plantation under different canopy densities in Huanglong Mountains, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jian-jian; Zhang, Wen-hui; Deng, Lei

    2015-07-01

    To clarify the effects of different canopy densities on tree form quality of Pinus tabuliformis, a hierarchical indicator system was structured, which brought about a set of grading criteria to evaluate tree form quality of the middle-aged P. tabuliformis plantation under four canopy densities in Huanglong Mountains by using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). Plots were divided into four classes according to the stand canopy density (CD) : CDstraightness, forking ratio, height under living branch, number of branches, max-branch base diameter and average base diameter of branches, the tree form quality could be evaluated. Among these factors, stem straightness, forking ratio and DBH were the most important ones influencing the tree form quality with a total weight of 0.7382. So, these three indicators were the major determinants of tree form quality. The comprehensive scores of the tree form quality evaluations fluctuated as the canopy density decreased and topped at 90.28 when CD was valued at 0.75 (type 2). The indicators and evaluation system developed in this study were easy to operate, and quite fit for solving the quantity problem of the tree form quality evaluation. Our system would be capable for applications in evaluating the tree form quality of other tree species on the Loess Plateau.

  13. Avaliação do desempenho animal e do pasto na mistura aveia IAPAR 61 (Avena strigosa Schreb e ervilha forrageira (Pisum arvense L. manejada em diferentes alturas Evaluation of animal performance and of the pasture in a mixture of oat (Avena strigosa Schreb Cv. IAPAR 61 and field pea (Pisum arvense L. managed in different sward heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Maria Grise

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de diferentes alturas (8,9; 10,0; 11,3; 11,9; 13,4; 13,6; 14,7; e 18,3 cm na mistura de aveia cv IAPAR 61 (Avena strigosa Schreb + ervilha forrageira (Pisum arvense L. sobre o ganho médio diário (GMD, o ganho de peso vivo (GPV/ha, número de animais.dia, composição botânica, resíduo de MS e porcentagem de solo descoberto. Utilizaram-se novilhos nelore, em pastejo, com lotações variáveis. As alturas do pasto foram mantidas usando-se o disco medidor, com ajustes de carga animal, semanalmente. O GMD variou de 0,497 a 1,017 kg/animal/dia, nas alturas de 8,9 e 18,3 cm, respectivamente, apresentando efeito linear em função do aumento da altura do pasto. Não houve efeito das alturas do pasto no GPV/ha e número de animais.dia/ha. O GPV/ha oscilou entre 127 e 356 kg/ha a 8,92 e 18,3 cm do pasto, a lotação variou de 184 à 424 animais.dia/ha nas alturas de 14,7 e 10,0 cm, respectivamente. O nível de resíduo de matéria seca/ha aumentou linearmente com o incremento da altura do pasto, na pastagem avaliada pelo método de DISCO. A aveia permaneceu dominante na composição botânica do pasto representando 99,69%, enquanto que a ervilha contribuiu com 0,31% da mesma. A percentagem de solo descoberto foi decrescente à medida que se aumentou a altura do pasto. Esses resultados evidenciam que resíduos de MS superior a 18 cm são importantes para o desempenho animal e para a produção da pastagem.The objective of the work was evaluate the effect of different sward heights (8.9, 10.0, 11.3, 11.9, 13.4, 13.6, 14.7, and 18.3 cm of a mixture of black oat cv IAPAR 61 (Avena strigosa Schreb + field pea (Pisum arvense L. on the average daily liveweight gain (DLG, weight gain/ha (WGP/ha, stocking rate (animals.day/ha, botanical composition, residue of dry matter and percentage of uncovered soil of the pasture. Steer nelore was used in grazing with variable stocking rate. Maintenance of the sward heights was

  14. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Canopy Configurations in Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials of Various Grafting Densities during CO 2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Petit, Camille

    2012-01-12

    Novel liquid-like nanoparticle organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) made of polyetheramine chains tethered onto functionalized silica nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized before and after exposure to CO 2 using NMR, Raman, and ATR FT-IR spectroscopies in order to investigate the effect of the grafting densities on the NOHM canopy structure. Considering the promising tunable properties for CO 2 capture of NOHMs, this study was conducted to provide important structural information to better design NOHMs for CO 2 capture. In order to minimize the CO 2 absorption via enthalpic effect and provide a more accurate assessment of the structural effects, the NOHMs were synthesized without task-specific groups. A greater chain ordering and decreased intermolecular interactions were observed in NOHMs compared to the unbound polymer. This was attributed to the specific structural arrangement of the frustrated canopy. The distinct configuration of grafted polymer chains caused different CO 2 packing and CO 2-induced swelling behaviors between the NOHMs and the unbound polymer. The grafting density influenced the ordering and coupling of the polymer chains and CO 2-induced swelling. Its effect on the CO 2 packing behavior was less pronounced. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  15. Linking canopy leaf area and light environments with tree size distributions to explain Amazon forest demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Scott C; Enquist, Brian J; Saleska, Scott R; Leitold, Veronika; Schietti, Juliana; Longo, Marcos; Alves, Luciana F; Camargo, Plinio B; Oliveira, Raimundo C

    2015-07-01

    Forest biophysical structure - the arrangement and frequency of leaves and stems - emerges from growth, mortality and space filling dynamics, and may also influence those dynamics by structuring light environments. To investigate this interaction, we developed models that could use LiDAR remote sensing to link leaf area profiles with tree size distributions, comparing models which did not (metabolic scaling theory) and did allow light to influence this link. We found that a light environment-to-structure link was necessary to accurately simulate tree size distributions and canopy structure in two contrasting Amazon forests. Partitioning leaf area profiles into size-class components, we found that demographic rates were related to variation in light absorption, with mortality increasing relative to growth in higher light, consistent with a light environment feedback to size distributions. Combining LiDAR with models linking forest structure and demography offers a high-throughput approach to advance theory and investigate climate-relevant tropical forest change. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  16. Correction of Erroneous LiDAR Measurements in Artificial Forest Canopy Experimental Setups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Cifuentes

    2014-07-01

    occurrence. Results indicated that optimized distance-based filters relative to the scanning distance have improved the outcomes in ghost points detection, in comparison to standard filtering criteria. These results suggest that more accurate characterization of forest canopy 3D structures can be achieved by removing ghost points using the new developed method.

  17. [Study on spectral reflectance characteristics of hemp canopies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yi-Chen; Jia, Kun; Wu, Bing-Fang; Li, Qiang-Zi

    2010-12-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is a special economic crop and widely used in many field. It is significative for the government to master the information about planting acreage and spatial distribution of hemp for hemp industrial policy decision in China. Remote sensing offers a potential way of monitoring large area for the cultivation of hemp. However, very little study on the spectral properties of hemp is available in the scientific literature. In the present study, the spectral reflectance characteristics of hemp canopy were systematically analyzed based on the spectral data acquired with ASD FieldSpec portable spectrometer. The wavebands and its spectral resolution for discriminating hemp from other plants were identified using difference analysis. The major differences in canopy reflectance of hemp and other plants were observed near 530, 552, 734, 992, 1 213, 1 580 and 2 199 nm, and the maximal difference is near 734 nm. The spectral resolution should be 30 nm or less in visible and near infrared regions, and 50 nm or less in middle infrared regions.

  18. A coupled energy transport and hydrological model for urban canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Smith, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Urban land-atmosphere interaction has been attracting more research efforts in order to understand the complex physics of flow and mass and heat transport in urban surfaces and the lower urban atmosphere. In this work, we developed and implemented a new physically-based single-layer urban canopy model, coupling the surface exchange of energy and the subsurface transport of water/soil moisture. The new model incorporates sub-facet heterogeneity for each urban surface (roof, wall or ground). This better simulates the energy transport in urban canopy layers, especially over low-intensity built (suburban type) terrains that include a significant fraction of vegetated surfaces. We implemented detailed urban hydrological models for both natural terrains (bare soil and vegetation) and porous engineered materials with water-holding capacity (concrete, gravel, etc). The skill of the new scheme was tested against experimental data collected through a wireless sensor network deployed over the campus of Princeton University. The model performance was found to be robust and insensitive to changes in weather conditions or seasonal variability. Predictions of the volumetric soil water content were also in good agreement with field measurements, highlighting the model capability of capturing subsurface water transport for urban lawns. The new model was also applied to a case study assessing different strategies, i.e. white versus green roofs, in the mitigation of urban heat island effect.

  19. Vegetation canopy discrimination and biomass assessment using multipolarized airborne SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dobson, M. C.; Held, D. N.

    1985-01-01

    Multipolarized airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data were acquired over a largely agricultural test site near Macomb, Illinois, in conjunction with the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B) experiment in October 1984. The NASA/JPL L-band SAR operating at 1.225 GHz made a series of daily overflights with azimuth view angles both parallel and orthogonal to those of SIR-B. The SAR data was digitally recorded in the quadpolarization configuration. An extensive set of ground measurements were obtained throughout the test site and include biophysical and soil measurements of approximately 400 agricultural fields. Preliminary evaluation of some of the airborne SAR imagery indicates a great potential for crop discrimination and assessment of canopy condition. False color composites constructed from the combination of three linear polarizations (HH, VV, and HV) were found to be clearly superior to any single polarization for purposes of crop classification. In addition, an image constructed using the HH return to modulate intensity and the phase difference between HH and VV returns to modulate chroma indicates a clear capability for assessment of canopy height and/or biomass. In particular, corn fields heavily damaged by infestations of corn borer are readily distinguished from noninfested fields.

  20. The impact of urban canopy meteorological forcing on summer photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huszár, Peter; Karlický, Jan; Belda, Michal; Halenka, Tomáš; Pišoft, Petr

    2018-03-01

    The regional climate model RegCM4.4, including the surface model CLM4.5, was offline coupled to the chemistry transport model CAMx version 6.30 in order to investigate the impact of the urban canopy induced meteorological changes on the longterm summer photochemistry over central Europe for the 2001-2005 period. First, the urban canopy impact on the meteorological conditions was calculated performing a reference experiment without urban landsurface considered and an experiment with urban surfaces modeled with the urban parameterization within the CLM4.5 model. In accordance with expectations, strong increases of urban surface temperatures (up to 2-3 K), decreases of wind speed (up to -1 ms-1) and increases of vertical turbulent diffusion coefficient (up to 60-70 m2s-1) were found. For the impact on chemistry, these three components were considered. Additionally, we accounted for the effect of temperature enhanced biogenic emission increase. Several experiments were performed by adding these effects one-by-one to the total impact: i.e., first, only the urban temperature impact was considered driving the chemistry model; secondly, the wind impact was added and so on. We found that the impact on biogenic emission account for minor changes in the concentrations of ozone (O3), oxides of nitrogen NOx = NO + NO2 and nitric acid (HNO3). On the other hand, the dominating component acting is the increased vertical mixing, resulting in up to 5 ppbv increase of urban ozone concentrations while causing -2 to -3 ppbv decreases and around 1 ppbv increases of NOx and HNO3 surface concentrations, respectively. The temperature impact alone results in reduction of ozone, increase in NO, decrease in NO2 and increases of HNO3. The wind impact leads, over urban areas, to ozone decreases, increases of NOx and a slight increase in HNO3. The overall impact is similar to the impact of increased vertical mixing alone. The Process Analysis (PA) technique implemented in CAMx was adopted to

  1. Simulations of tropical rainforest albedo: is canopy wetness important?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia N.M. Yanagi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate information on surface albedo is essential for climate modelling, especially for regions such as Amazonia, where the response of the regional atmospheric circulation to the changes on surface albedo is strong. Previous studies have indicated that models are still unable to correctly reproduce details of the seasonal variation of surface albedo. Therefore, it was investigated the role of canopy wetness on the simulated albedo of a tropical rainforest by modifying the IBIS canopy radiation transfer code to incorporate the effects of canopy wetness on the vegetation reflectance. In this study, simulations were run using three versions of the land surface/ecosystem model IBIS: the standard version, the same version recalibrated to fit the data of albedo on tropical rainforests and a modified version that incorporates the effects of canopy wetness on surface albedo, for three sites in the Amazon forest at hourly and monthly scales. The results demonstrated that, at the hourly time scale, the incorporation of canopy wetness on the calculations of radiative transfer substantially improves the simulations results, whereas at the monthly scale these changes do not substantially modify the simulated albedo.A informação precisa do albedo superficial é essencial para a modelagem climática, especialmente para regiões, tais como a Amazônia, onde a resposta da circulação atmos