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Sample records for swainsonine locoweed oxytropis

  1. De novo transcriptome assembly of a Chinese locoweed (Oxytropis ochrocephala species provides insights into genes associated with drought, salinity and cold tolerance

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    Wei eHe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Locoweeds (toxic Oxytropis and Astraglus species, containing the toxic agent swainsonine, pose serious threats to animal husbandry on grasslands in both China and the US. Some locoweeds have evolved adaptations in order to resist various stress conditions such as drought, salt and cold. As a result they replace other plants in their communities and become an ecological problem. Currently very limited genetic information of locoweeds is available and this hinders our understanding in the molecular basis of their environmental plasticity, and the interaction between locoweeds and their symbiotic swainsonine producing endophytes. Next-generation sequencing provides a means of obtaining transcriptomic sequences in a timely manner, which is particularly useful for non-model plants. In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of Oxytropis ochrocephala plants followed by a de nove assembly. Our primary aim was to provide an enriched pool of genetic sequences of an Oxytropis sp. for further locoweed research. Results: Transcriptomes of four different O. ochrocephala samples, from control (CK plants, and those that had experienced either drought (20% PEG, salt (150 mM NaCl or cold (4 °C stress were sequenced using an Illumina Hiseq 2000 platform. From 232,209,506 clean reads 23,220,950,600 (~23 G nucleotides, 182,430 transcripts and 88,942 unigenes were retrieved, with an N50 value of 1,237. Differential expression analysis revealed putative genes encoding heat shock proteins (HSPs and late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins, enzymes in secondary metabolite and plant hormone biosyntheses, and transcription factors which are involved in stress tolerance in O. ochrocephala. In order to validate our sequencing results, we further analyzed the expression profiles of nine genes by quantitative real-time PCR. Finally, we discuss the possible mechanism of O. ochrocephala’s adaptations to stress environment. Conclusion: Our

  2. Fetotoxicity of Astragalus lentiginosus (locoweed) in Spanish goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locoweeds (plant species of Astragalus and Oxytropis containing swainsonine) cause large economic losses to the livestock industry in the western United States and in other regions of the world. Embryo and fetal loss is commonly reported when pregnant animals grazed locoweeds. Pregnant Spanish goa...

  3. Swainsonine biosynthesis genes in diverse symbiotic and pathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainsonine, a cytotoxic fungal alkaloid and a potential cancer therapy drug, is produced by the insect pathogen and plant symbiont, Metarhizium robertsii, the clover pathogen Slafractonia leguminicola, locoweed symbionts belonging to Alternaria sect. Undifilum, and a recently discovered morning glo...

  4. Effects of Elevated CO2 on the Swainsonine Chemotypes of Astragalus lentiginosus and Astragalus mollissimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel; Gardner, Dale R; Pfister, James A; Stonecipher, Clinton A; Robins, Joseph G; Morgan, Jack A

    2017-03-01

    Rapid changes in the Earth's atmosphere and climate associated with human activity can have significant impacts on agriculture including livestock production. CO 2 concentration has risen from the industrial revolution to the current time, and is expected to continue to rise. Climatic changes alter physiological processes, growth, and development in numerous plant species, potentially changing concentrations of plant secondary compounds. These physiological changes may influence plant population density, growth, fitness, and toxin concentrations and thus influence the risk of toxic plants to grazing livestock. Locoweeds, swainsonine-containing Astragalus species, are one group of plants that may be influenced by climate change. We evaluated how two different swainsonine-containing Astragalus species responded to elevated CO 2 concentrations. Measurements of biomass, crude protein, water soluble carbohydrates and swainsonine concentrations were measured in two chemotypes (positive and negative for swainsonine) of each species after growth at CO 2 levels near present day and at projected future concentrations. Biomass and water soluble carbohydrate concentrations responded positively while crude protein concentrations responded negatively to elevated CO 2 in the two species. Swainsonine concentrations were not strongly affected by elevated CO 2 in the two species. In the different chemotypes, biomass responded negatively and crude protein concentrations responded positively in the swainsonine-positive plants compared to the swainsonine-negative plants. Ultimately, changes in CO 2 and endophyte status will likely alter multiple physiological responses in toxic plants such as locoweed, but it is difficult to predict how these changes will impact plant herbivore interactions.

  5. Swainsonine Biosynthesis Genes in Diverse Symbiotic and Pathogenic Fungi

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    Daniel Cook

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Swainsonine—a cytotoxic fungal alkaloid and a potential cancer therapy drug—is produced by the insect pathogen and plant symbiont Metarhizium robertsii, the clover pathogen Slafractonia leguminicola, locoweed symbionts belonging to Alternaria sect. Undifilum, and a recently discovered morning glory symbiont belonging to order Chaetothyriales. Genome sequence analyses revealed that these fungi share orthologous gene clusters, designated “SWN,” which included a multifunctional swnK gene comprising predicted adenylylation and acyltransferase domains with their associated thiolation domains, a β-ketoacyl synthase domain, and two reductase domains. The role of swnK was demonstrated by inactivating it in M. robertsii through homologous gene replacement to give a ∆swnK mutant that produced no detectable swainsonine, then complementing the mutant with the wild-type gene to restore swainsonine biosynthesis. Other SWN cluster genes were predicted to encode two putative hydroxylases and two reductases, as expected to complete biosynthesis of swainsonine from the predicted SwnK product. SWN gene clusters were identified in six out of seven sequenced genomes of Metarhzium species, and in all 15 sequenced genomes of Arthrodermataceae, a family of fungi that cause athlete’s foot and ringworm diseases in humans and other mammals. Representative isolates of all of these species were cultured, and all Metarhizium spp. with SWN clusters, as well as all but one of the Arthrodermataceae, produced swainsonine. These results suggest a new biosynthetic hypothesis for this alkaloid, extending the known taxonomic breadth of swainsonine producers to at least four orders of Ascomycota, and suggest that swainsonine has roles in mutualistic symbioses and diseases of plants and animals.

  6. Swainsonine promotes apoptosis in human oesophageal squamous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-24

    Oct 24, 2012 ... oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells and investigated relative molecular mechanisms. Swainsonine ..... sical death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway while ..... hormone-resistant prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Cancer ...

  7. Exposure to swainsonine impairs adult neurogenesis and spatial learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiutao; Song, Lingzhen; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Wei; An, Lei; Zhang, Yamei; Tong, Dewen; Zhao, Baoyu; Chen, Shulin; Zhao, Shanting

    2015-01-05

    Swainsonine (SW) is an indolizidine triol plant alkaloid isolated from the species Astragalus, colloquially termed locoweed. Ingestion induces severe neurological symptoms of livestock and wildlife, including ataxia, trembling, exaggerated fright reactions. Toxicity to the central and peripheral nervous system is caused by inhibition of lysosomal a-mannosidase (AMA) and accumulation of intracellular oligosaccharide. However, the effects of SW on adult neurogenesis and cognition have remained unclear. Therefore, the present study was conducted to examine the effects of SW on adult neurogenesis and learning as well as memory performance in adult mice. SW (10μg/mL in drinking water) was administered orally to mice for 4 weeks. Our results showed that SW reduced proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in culture, and in the hippocampus of adult mice. In addition, exposure to SW led to down-regulation of doublecortin (DCX) and synaptophysin (SYP) in the hippocampus. However, caspase 3 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels were significantly increased in SW-treated mice. Finally, SW-treated mice exhibited deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory. Our findings suggest that SW affects adult neurogenesis and cognitive function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Potential Degradation of Swainsonine by Intracellular Enzymes of Arthrobacter sp. HW08

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    Haili Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Swainsonine (SW is a toxin produced by locoweeds and harmful to the livestock industry. Degrading SW by Arthrobacter sp. HW08 was demonstrated as a promising way to deal with SW poisoning. However, it is unknown which part of the subcellular enzymes in Arthrobacter sp. HW08 is responsible for biodegrading SW and whether the metabolites are atoxic. In this study, intracellular and extracellular enzymes of Arthrobacter sp. HW08 were isolated and their enzyme activity was evaluated. The metabolites were fed to mice, and physiological and histological properties of the treated mice were investigated. The results showed that only intracellular enzyme of Arthrobacter sp. HW08 (IEHW08 could degrade SW efficiently. Compared with mice in SW treatment group, mice in SW + IEHW08 treatment group (1 increased their body weights; (2 showed higher number of platelets and lower number of white blood cells; (3 decreased the levels of creatinine, urea nitrogen, alanine transaminase and aspartate aminotransferase in serum; (4 reduced the number of vacuolated cells in cerebellum, liver and kidney. All these data demonstrate that IEHW08 was potentially safe for mice, while keeping the capacity of degrading SW. This study indicates a possible application of IEHW08 as an additive in the livestock industry to protect animals from SW poisoning.

  9. Liver biopsy as diagnostic method for poisoning by swainsonine-containing plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the aim to investigate the use of hepatic biopsies for the diagnosis of poisoning by swainsonine-containing plants, dry leaves of Ipomoea marcellia containing 0.02% of swainsonine were administered to goats. Group I, with six goats, ingested 4g/kg of dry plant (0.8mg of swainsonina/kg) until th...

  10. [Phylogenetic relationships of the species of Oxytropis DC. subg. Oxytropis and Phacoxytropis (Fabaceae) from Asian Russia inferred from the nucleotide sequence analysis of the intergenic spacers of the chloroplast genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholina, A B; Kozyrenko, M M; Artyukova, E V; Sandanov, D V; Andrianova, E A

    2016-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence analysis of trnH–psbA, trnL–trnF, and trnS–trnG intergenic spacer regions of chloroplast DNA performed in the representatives of the genus Oxytropis from Asian Russia provided clarification of the phylogenetic relationships of some species and sections in the subgenera Oxytropis and Phacoxytropis and in the genus Oxytropis as a whole. Only the section Mesogaea corresponds to the subgenus Phacoxytropis, while the section Janthina of the same subgenus groups together with the sections of the subgenus Oxytropis. The sections Chrysantha and Ortholoma of the subgenus Oxytropis are not only closely related to each other, but together with the section Mesogaea, they are grouped into the subgenus Phacoxytropis. It seems likely that the sections Chrysantha and Ortholoma should be assigned to the subgenus Phacoxytropis, and the section Janthina should be assigned to the subgenus Oxytropis. The molecular differences were identified between O. coerulea and O. mandshurica from the section Janthina that were indicative of considerable divergence of their chloroplast genomes and the species independence of the taxa. The species independence of O. czukotica belonging to the section Arctobia was also confirmed.

  11. Diverse Mesorhizobium bacteria nodulate native Astragalus and Oxytropis in arctic and subarctic areas in Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampomah, Osei Yaw; Mousavi, Seyed Abdollah; Lindström, Kristina; Huss-Danell, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Rhizobia nodulating native Astragalus and Oxytropis spp. in Northern Europe are not well-studied. In this study, we isolated bacteria from nodules of four Astragalus spp. and two Oxytropis spp. from the arctic and subarctic regions of Sweden and Russia. The phylogenetic analyses were performed by using sequences of three housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, rpoB and recA) and two accessory genes (nodC and nifH). The results of our multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of the three housekeeping genes tree showed that all the 13 isolates belonged to the genus Mesorhizobium and were positioned in six clades. Our concatenated housekeeping gene tree also suggested that the isolates nodulating Astragalus inopinatus, Astragalus frigidus, Astragalus alpinus ssp. alpinus and Oxytropis revoluta might be designated as four new Mesorhizobium species. The 13 isolates were grouped in three clades in the nodC and nifH trees. 15 N analysis suggested that the legumes in association with these isolates were actively fixing nitrogen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Swainsonine, a novel fungal metabolite: optimization of fermentative production and bioreactor operations using evolutionary programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Digar; Kaur, Gurvinder

    2014-08-01

    The optimization of bioreactor operations towards swainsonine production was performed using an artificial neural network coupled evolutionary program (EP)-based optimization algorithm fitted with experimental one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) results. The effects of varying agitation (300-500 rpm) and aeration (0.5-2.0 vvm) rates for different incubation hours (72-108 h) were evaluated in bench top bioreactor. Prominent scale-up parameters, gassed power per unit volume (P g/V L, W/m(3)) and volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient (K L a, s(-1)) were correlated with optimized conditions. A maximum of 6.59 ± 0.10 μg/mL of swainsonine production was observed at 400 rpm-1.5 vvm at 84 h in OFAT experiments with corresponding P g/VL and K L a values of 91.66 W/m(3) and 341.48 × 10(-4) s(-1), respectively. The EP optimization algorithm predicted a maximum of 10.08 μg/mL of swainsonine at 325.47 rpm, 1.99 vvm and 80.75 h against the experimental production of 7.93 ± 0.52 μg/mL at constant K L a (349.25 × 10(-4) s(-1)) and significantly reduced P g/V L (33.33 W/m(3)) drawn by the impellers.

  13. Ultrasound studies of the effects of certain poisonous plants on uterine function and fetal development in livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, T D; Panter, K E; James, L F

    1992-05-01

    Ingestion of locoweed (Astragalus spp. and Oxytropis spp.) by pregnant livestock may result in fetal malformations, delayed placentation, reduced placental and uterine vascular development, hydrops amnii, hydrops allantois, abnormal cotyledonary development, interruption of fetal fluid balance, and abortion. Ultrasonography of pregnant sheep fed locoweed demonstrated that abortion was first preceded by changes in fetal heart rate and strength of contraction and structural changes of the cotyledons, followed by increased accumulation of fetal fluid within the placental membranes and death of the fetus. During pregnancy the toxic agent in locoweed (swainsonine) apparently passes through the placental barrier to the fetus and during lactation through the milk to the neonate. Poison-hemlock (Conium maculatum), wild tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca), and lunara lupine (Lupinus formosus) all contain piperidine alkaloids and induce fetal malformations, including multiple congenital contractures and cleft palate in livestock. Ultrasonography studies of pregnant sheep and goats gavaged with these plants during 30 to 60 d of gestation suggests that the primary cause of multiple congenital contractures and cleft palate is the degree and the duration of the alkaloid-induced fetal immobilization.

  14. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. The effect of swainsonine on post-translational processing of aminopeptidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Cowell, G M; Norén, Ove

    1983-01-01

    -beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. Swainsonine caused only a moderate inhibition of transport of the enzyme through the Golgi complex and the subsequent expression in the microvillar membrane. This may imply that the trimming of the high-mannose core and complex glycosylation of N-linked oligosaccharides is not essential...

  15. Approaches to gene pool conservation of medicinal plant Oxytropis lanata (Pall. DC. (Fabaceae

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    A. B. Kholina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to preserve the gene pool of medicinal plant Oxytropis lanata (Pall. DC. we analyzed allozyme polymorphism and identified reliable and informative marker enzyme systems of this species; also we studied the response of seeds to deep freezing in liquid nitrogen (–196 ºС. Population has an average level of polymorphism (P95 = 41,2 %, P99 = 52,9 %, A = 1,58, Ho = 0,158, He = 0,171 in general typical for herbaceous legumes, and can serve as a source of material for gene pool conservation of the species. Deep freezing has not led to the death of the seeds; it was marked stimulatory effect of ultralow temperatures, expressed as an acceleration of germination and sharp increase of germinability (98,6 ± 2,3 % compared to the control (12,0 ± 3,5 % that is associated with overcoming physical dormancy. There were no abnormalities in the development of seedlings from seeds passed cryopreservation.

  16. POISONING BY THE SWAINSONINE-CONTAINING PLANT SIDA CARPINIFOLIA IN CAPTIVE SAMBAR DEER (CERVUS UNICOLOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Bruno L; Peixoto, Paulo V; Caldas, Saulo A; Bhaltazar, Daniel; França, Ticiana N; Armién, Aníbal G

    2016-09-01

    Plant intoxications in wildlife are difficult to diagnose, are overlooked, or are sometimes even neglected. Hence, factors that induce wild animals to ingest poisonous plants have not been sufficiently documented. An outbreak of glycoprotein storage disease in sambar deer ( Cervus unicolor ), induced by ingestion of the swainsonine-containing plant, common wireweed (Sida carpinifolia), is reported. Nine out of 55 deer held by a zoo in Brazil were affected. The poisoning was characterized by emaciation and neurologic signs followed by unexpected death in some of the animals. Animals presented abnormal consciousness, posterior paresis, and musculoskeletal weakness; less evident were vestibulo-cerebellar signs. Histologically, there was vacuolation of neurons and epithelial cells of the pancreatic acines, thyroid follicules, and renal tubules. Furthermore, in the central nervous system were axonal degeneration, necrosis, and loss of neurons. Three factors may lead to the ingestion of S. carpinifolia by sambar deer: 1) A grazing field with only S. carpinifolia as a source of forage; 2) a large number of animals kept in this field; and 3) a hierarchy within a cervid group in which dominant males isolated and displaced juvenile and weaker adult males, leaving them with access to only S. carpinifolia.

  17. Rare species of the genus Oxytropis DC. (Fabaceae) from the flora of the Republic of Bashkortostan under cultivation within the city of Ufa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, N. V.; Elizaryeva, O. A.; Galikeeva, G. M.; Tyutyunova, N. M.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations introducing eight rare species of the genus Oxytropis DC. from the flora of the Republic of Bashkortostan into the city of Ufa. Seven species are characterized as promising ornamental plants. According to the integrated evaluation scale of introduction effectiveness based on seven indices, two species were considered as very promising (O. spicata (Pall.) O. et B. Fedtsch., O. knjazevii Vasjukov), five species as promising (O. approximata Less., O. baschkirensis Knjasev, O. hippolyti Boriss., O. gmelinii Boriss., O. kungurensis Knjasev) and one species as non-promising (O. sordida (Willd.) Pers.). The ornamental quality assessment of rare species of the genus Oxytropis based on ten indices showed that these species can be used to create ornamental compositions in the landscape design style.

  18. Experimental swainsonine poisoning in goats ingesting Ipomoea sericophylla and Ipomoea riedelii (Convolvulaceae Intoxicação experimental por swainsonina em caprinos ingerindo Ipomoea sericophylla e Ipomoea riedelii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossemberg C. Barbosa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Ipomoea sericophylla and Ipomoea riedelii cause a glycoprotein storage disease in goats. This paper reports the experimental poisoning in goats by dried I. sericophylla and I. riedelii containing 0.05% and 0.01% swainsonine, respectively. Three groups with four animals each were used. Group 1 received daily doses of 2g/kg body weight (bw of dried I. sericophylla (150mg of swainsonine/kg. Goats from this group had clinical signs 36-38 days after the start of ingestion. Group 2 received dried I. riedelii daily doses of 2g/kg of I. riedelii (30mg of swainsonine/kg for 70 days. No clinical signs were observed, therefore the swainsonine dose was increased to 60mg/kg for another 70 days. Goats from Group 2 had clinical signs 26-65 days after increase in swainsonine dose to 60mg/kg. Group 3 was used as control. In these experiments the minimum toxic dose was 60mg/kg which represents 0.0004% of the dry matter in goats ingesting 1.5% bw of the dry matter. For goats ingesting 2%-2.5% bw of dry matter this dose would be 0.00024%-0.0003% of the dry matter. After the end of the experiment two goats were euthanized and another six were observed for recovery of clinical signs. Four goats that continued to consume swainsonine containing plant for 39-89 days after the first clinical signs had non reversible signs, while two goats that ingested the plant for only 15 and 20 days after the first clinical signs recovered completely. These and previous results indicate that irreversible lesions due to neuronal loss occur in goats that continue to ingest the plants for about 30 days after the first clinical signs. Clinical signs and histological lesions were similar to those reported previously for goats poisoned by swainsonine containing plants. No significant alterations were found in packed cell volume, red and white blood cell counts, hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations, mean corpuscular volume, and serum levels of glucose, total protein, and

  19. Taxonomically Different Co-Microsymbionts of a Relict Legume, Oxytropis popoviana, Have Complementary Sets of Symbiotic Genes and Together Increase the Efficiency of Plant Nodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, Vera I; Belimov, Andrey A; Sazanova, Anna L; Chirak, Elizaveta R; Verkhozina, Alla V; Kuznetsova, Irina G; Andronov, Evgeny E; Puhalsky, Jan V; Tikhonovich, Igor A

    2018-06-20

    Ten rhizobial strains were isolated from root nodules of a relict legume Oxytropis popoviana Peschkova. For identification of the isolates, sequencing of rrs, the internal transcribed spacer region, and housekeeping genes recA, glnII, and rpoB was used. Nine fast-growing isolates were Mesorhizobium-related; eight strains were identified as M. japonicum and one isolate belonged to M. kowhaii. The only slow-growing isolate was identified as a Bradyrhizobium sp. Two strains, M. japonicum Opo-242 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain Opo-243, were isolated from the same nodule. Symbiotic genes of these isolates were searched throughout the whole-genome sequences. The common nodABC genes and other symbiotic genes required for plant nodulation and nitrogen fixation were present in the isolate Opo-242. Strain Opo-243 did not contain the principal nod, nif, and fix genes; however, five genes (nodP, nodQ, nifL, nolK, and noeL) affecting the specificity of plant-rhizobia interactions but absent in isolate Opo-242 were detected. Strain Opo-243 could not induce nodules but significantly accelerated the root nodule formation after coinoculation with isolate Opo-242. Thus, we demonstrated that taxonomically different strains of the archaic symbiotic system can be co-microsymbionts infecting the same nodule and promoting the nodulation process due to complementary sets of symbiotic genes.

  20. Rapid Identification of unstable acyl glucoside flavonoids of Oxytropis racemosa Turcz by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionisation/multi-stage mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shuang; Zheng, Xiu-Ping; Liu, Wei-Dong; Du, Rui-Fang; Feng, Zi-Ming; Zhang, Pei-Cheng; Bi, Li-Fu

    2013-02-01

    Oxytropis racemosa Turcz is an important minority medicine that is used mainly to improve children's indigestion, especially in inner Mongolia and Tibet. Previous studies indicated that the characteristic constituents of this plant are acylated flavonoids. Rapidly identify the characteristic chemical constituents of O. racemosa by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionisation/multi-stage mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n) ) and suggest a useful method to control the quality of this medicinal plant. In the HPLC fingerprint, 32 flavonoids were tentatively identified by a detailed analysis of their mass spectra, UV spectra and retention times. Furthermore, 13 flavonoids were confirmed by comparison with previously isolated compounds obtained from O. racemosa. In total, 32 flavonoids, including 13 flavonoids with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric acid (HMG) moieties and four flavonoids with 3-malonyl moieties, were identified in the extract of O. racemosa. Among the compounds identified, 10 were characterised as new compounds for their particular acylated sugar moieties. The method described is effective for obtaining a comprehensive phytochemical profile of plants containing unstable acylated flavonoids. The method is also useful for constructing the chromatographic fingerprint of the minority medicine -O. racemosa Turcz for quality control. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. [Neurological syndromes linked with the intake of plants and fungi containing a toxic component (I). Neurotoxic syndromes caused by the ingestion of plants, seeds and fruits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod-Artal, F J

    A wide range of plants, seeds and fruits used for nutritional and medicinal purposes can give rise to neurotoxic symptoms. We review the neurological pathology associated with the acute or chronic consumption of plants, seeds and fruits in human beings and in animals. Of the plants that can trigger acute neurotoxic syndromes in humans, some of the most notable include Mandragora officinalis, Datura stramonium, Conium maculatum (hemlock), Coriaria myrtifolia (redoul), Ricinus communis, Gloriosa superba, Catharanthus roseus, Karwinskia humboldtiana and Podophyllum pelatum. We also survey different neurological syndromes linked with the ingestion of vegetable foodstuffs that are rich in cyanogenic glycosides, Jamaican vomiting sickness caused by Blighia sapida, Parkinson dementia ALS of Guam island and exposition to Cycas circinalis, Guadeloupean parkinsonism and exposition to Annonaceae, konzo caused by ingestion of wild manioc and neurolathyrism from ingestion of Lathyrus sativus, the last two being models of motor neurone disease. Locoism is a chronic disease that develops in livestock feeding on plants belonging to Astragalus and Oxytropis sp., Sida carpinifolia and Ipomea carnea, which are rich in swainsonine, a toxin that inhibits the enzyme alpha mannosidase and induces a cerebellar syndrome. The ingestion of neurotoxic seeds, fruits and plants included in the diet and acute poisoning by certain plants can give rise to different neurological syndromes, some of which are irreversible.

  2. Swainsonine-induced lysosomal storage disease in goats caused by the ingestion of Sida rodrigoi Monteiro in North-western Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheloud, Juan Francisco; Marin, Raúl; Colque-Caro, Luis Adrián; Martínez, Olga Gladys; Gardner, Dale; Gimeno, Eduardo Juan

    2017-03-15

    There are numerous poisonous plants that can induce intralysosomal accumulation of glycoproteins and neurologic syndromes. Here we describe for the first time, a disease caused by ingesting Sida rodrigoi Monteiro in goats in North-western Argentina. The animals showed weight loss, indifference to the environment, unsteady gait and ataxia. Histopathologic studies showed vacuolization in cells of various organs, mainly in the CNS. The material deposited in the cells was positive for LCA (Lens culinaris agglutinin), WGA (Triticum vulgaris agglutinin), sWGA (succinyl-Triticum vulgaris agglutinin) and Con-A (Concanavalia ensiformis agglutinin) lectins. Finally, toxic levels of swansonine were identified in the plant. The present investigation allowed to recognize S. rodrigoi Monteiro poisoning as a plant induced α-mannosidosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swainsonine, a natural indolizidine alkaloid, has been reported to have antitumour effects, and can induce apoptosis in human gastric and lung cancer cells. In the present study, we evaluated the antitumour effects of swainsonine on several oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells and investigated relative molecular ...

  4. Efficient routing of glucocerebrosidase to lysosomes requires complex oligosaccharide chain formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, J. M.; Brul, S.; Donker-Koopman, W. E.; van Weely, S.; Murray, G. J.; Barranger, J. A.; Tager, J. M.; Schram, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The biosynthesis and intracellular transport of the membrane-associated lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase was studied in the monoblast cell line U937. Addition to the cultures of the oligosaccharide trimming inhibitors swainsonine or deoxymannojirimycin led to an increased intracellular activity

  5. Glucosidase trimming inhibitors preferentially perturb T cell activation induced by CD2 mAb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kemenade, F. J.; Rotteveel, F. T.; van den Broek, L. A.; Baars, P. A.; van Lier, R. A.; Miedema, F.

    1994-01-01

    Glycosidase trimming inhibitors may be used to study contribution of N-linked glycan moieties in T cell function. We have studied the effects of castanospermine (Cas), swainsonine (Swain), 1-deoxynojirimycin (dNM), and 1-deoxymannojirimycin (dMM) on T cell activation and differentiation. Our

  6. Toxic plants affecting the nervous system of ruminants and horses in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review updates information about neurotoxic plants affecting ruminants and equidae in Brazil. Currently in the country, there are at least 131 toxic plants belonging to 79 genera. Thirty one of these poisonous plants affect the nervous system. Swainsonine-containing plants (Ipomoea spp., Turbin...

  7. The use of ultrasonography to study teratogenicity in ruminants: Evaluation of Ipomoea carnea in goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipomoea carnea (I. carnea) is a poisonous plant found in Brazil and other tropical countries that often poison livestock. The plant contains calystegines and swainsonine, which inhibit cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perinatal effects...

  8. Maternal ingestion of Ipomoea carnea: Effects on goat-kid bonding and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant found in Brazil and other tropical and subtropical countries and often causes poisoning of livestock. The plant contains the alkaloids swainsonine and calystegines, which inhibit key cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. This study evaluated the behavioral...

  9. An Overview of Ipomoea carnea subspecies fistulosa toxicosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It contains two toxic principles, swainsonine and calystegines causing neurological condition called acquired lysosomal storage disease. Its toxicological status is not determined in the region despite risk of poisoning. Therefore it is being reviewed for its toxic effects, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentations, ...

  10. Links between CD147 Function, Glycosylation, and Caveolin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Wei; Chang, Sharon B.; Hemler, Martin E.

    2004-01-01

    Cell surface CD147 shows remarkable variations in size (31-65 kDa) because of heterogeneous N-glycosylation, with the most highly glycosylated forms functioning to induce matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production. Here we show that all three CD147 N-glycosylation sites make similar contributions to both high and low glycoforms (HG- and LG-CD147). l-Phytohemagglutinin lectin binding and swainsonine inhibition experiments indicated that HG-CD147 contains N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V-cataly...

  11. Revision of the genus-group Hystricella R. T. Lowe, 1855 from Porto Santo (Madeira Archipelago), with descriptions of new recent and fossil taxa (Gastropoda, Helicoidea, Geomitridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia, Willy De; Neiber, Marco T; Groh, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    The genus-group Hystricella R. T. Lowe, 1855 is revised on the basis of conchological, anatomical and genetic characteristics. A new genus Wollastonia gen. n. , two recent species, W. jessicae sp. n. and W. klausgrohi sp. n ., and one recent subspecies, W. jessicae monticola ssp. n. are described as new to science, as well as five fossil taxa, H. microcarinata sp. n. , W. beckmanni sp. n. , W. falknerorum sp. n. , W. ripkeni sp. n. , and W. inexpectata sp. n. For Helix vermetiformis R. T. Lowe, 1855, H. leacockiana Wollaston, 1878, H. oxytropis R. T. Lowe, 1831, H. duplicata R. T. Lowe, 1831 and H. oxytropis var. ß subcarinulata Wollaston, 1878 lectotypes are designated. For the taxa Helix bicarinata G. B. Sowerby I, 1824, Helix bicarinata var. ß aucta Wollaston, 1878 and Discula bulverii W. Wood, 1828 neotypes are selected. The taxa aucta and subcarinulata are elevated to specific rank. For the hitherto monospecific (sub-) genus Callina R. T. Lowe, 1855 it is shown that it is not closely related to the genus Discula but to the Hystricella -group and its generic rank is confirmed. The taxon D. bulverii W. Wood, 1828 is transferred from the genus Discula s. str. to the genus Callina . A further fossil taxon C. waldeni sp. n. is described as new to science.

  12. Evidence that maturation of the N-linked glycans of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) glycoproteins is required for virus-mediated cell fusion: The effect of α-mannosidase inhibitors on RSV infectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Terence P.; Jeffree, Chris E.; Li, Ping; Rixon, Helen W. McL.; Brown, Gaie; Aitken, James D.; MacLellan, Kirsty; Sugrue, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Glycan heterogeneity of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) protein was demonstrated by proteomics. The effect of maturation of the virus glycoproteins-associated glycans on virus infectivity was therefore examined using the α-mannosidase inhibitors deoxymannojirimycin (DMJ) and swainsonine (SW). In the presence of SW the N-linked glycans on the F protein appeared in a partially mature form, whereas in the presence of DMJ no maturation of the glycans was observed. Neither inhibitor had a significant effect on G protein processing or on the formation of progeny virus. Although the level of infectious virus and syncytia formation was not significantly affected by SW-treatment, DMJ-treatment correlated with a one hundred-fold reduction in virus infectivity. Our data suggest that glycan maturation of the RSV glycoproteins, in particular those on the F protein, is an important step in virus maturation and is required for virus infectivity

  13. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo J. Diaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia.

  14. Australine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that inhibits amyloglucosidase and glycoprotein processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tropea, J.E.; Molyneux, R.J.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pan, Y.T.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    Australine is a polyhydroxylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid that was isolated from the seeds of the Australian tree Castanospermum australe and characterized by NMR and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since swainsonine and catanospermine are polyhydroxylated indolizidine alkaloids that inhibit specific glycosidases, the authors tested australine against a variety of exoglycosidases to determine whether it would inhibit any of these enzymes. This alkaloid proved to be a good inhibitor of the α-glucosidase amyloglucosidase (50% inhibition at 5.8 μM), but it did not inhibit β-glucosidase, α- or β-mannosidase, or α- or β-galactosidase. The inhibition of amyloglucosidase was of a competitive nature. Australine also inhibited the glycoprotein processing enzyme glucosidase I, but had only slight activity toward glucosidase II. When incubated with cultured cells, this alkaloid inhibited glycoprotein processing at the glucosidase I step and caused the accumulation of glycoproteins with Glc 3 Man 7-9 (GlcNAc) 2 -oligosaccharides

  15. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Gonzalo J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia. PMID:26690479

  16. ЧИСЛА ХРОМОСОМ НЕКОТОРЫХ ВИДОВ ДВУДОЛЬНЫХ РАСТЕНИЙ ЮЖНОЙ СИБИРИ И КАЗАХСТАНА

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. An’kova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Приведены числа хромосом (2n для девяти видов семейств Asteraceae, Caryophyllaceae, Fabaceae, Rosaceae и Scrophulariaceae. Впервые определены числа хромосом Silene cretacea (2n=20 и Oxytropis stenofoliola (2n=48. Впервые для Казахстана и Южной Сибири (Западный Саян, Новосибирская область определены числа хромосом у Jurinea arachnoidea, Tragopogon ruber, Astragalus brachylobus, A. cicer, A. danicus, Verbascum phoeniceum.

  17. Native legume transplant survivorship and subsequent seedling recruitment on unamended coal mine soils in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, C.R.

    1997-05-01

    Transplant survivorship, growth, and reproductive performance of several indigenous high-elevation legume species grown in unamended spoil were studied at three coal mines in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Survivorship varied with species but was highest for Astragalus aboriginum (62%), Astragalus alpinus (73-57%), Astragalus vexilliflexus var. nubilus (73-63%), and Oxytropis sericea (77-62%). Mortality was greatest during the first two years for most species. The causes of transplant mortality are considered to be drought stress, deep-seated `frost-popping`/root exposure, and damage, for example, root exposure and destruction of meristematic tissues by foraging mammals such as bighorn sheep, mountain goats, grizzly bears, and marmots. Survivorship, growth, and reproductive activity were greatest at the two subalpine disturbances. Growth varied with species, but the greatest growth increments (height and diameter) were recorded during the first and second years. Reproductive activity for the Astragalus species began during the first year at one location but, in general, flowering and seed set did not begin until the second or third years. Recruitment from seed was small ({lt} 10/year). Several of these species appear to be suitable for revegetation of subalpine and alpine surface mine disturbances.

  18. Maternal Ingestion of Ipomoea carnea: Effects on Goat-Kid Bonding and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotardo, André T; Pfister, James A; Raspantini, Paulo C F; Górniak, Silvana L

    2016-03-16

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant found in Brazil and other tropical and subtropical countries and often causes poisoning of livestock. The plant contains the alkaloids swainsonine and calystegines, which inhibit key cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. This study evaluated the behavioral effects of prenatal ingestion of this plant on dams and their kids. Twenty-four pregnant goats were randomly allocated into four treatment groups and received the following doses (g/kg BW) of fresh I. carnea: 0 (control group), 1.0 (IC1), 3.0 (IC3), and 5.0 (IC5) from day 27 of gestation until parturition. Dam and kid bonding and behavior were evaluated by several tests, immediately after birth until six weeks of age. Dams from IC3 and IC5 groups spent less time paying attention to the newborn. There was a lack of maternal-infant bonding due to I. carnea intoxication. Kids from treated dams had difficulty in standing, suckling, and in recognizing their mother hours after birth. I. carnea can also compromise the kids' ability to learn and to retain spatial memory. We suggest that kids from pregnant goats given I. carnea during gestation have significant behavioral alterations and developmental delays that may compromise their survival.

  19. European medicinal and edible plants associated with subacute and chronic toxicity part II: Plants with hepato-, neuro-, nephro- and immunotoxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanc, Luka; Kreft, Samo

    2016-06-01

    A tremendous surge of public interest in natural therapies has been reported in the past several decades in both developing and developed countries. Furthermore, edible wild-growing plants whose use had long been associated with poverty and famine have also gained in popularity among people in developed countries. An important fraction of herbal products evade all control measures and are generally perceived as safe. However, this may not always be true. It is important to recognize that some plants are not associated with acute toxicity but rather produce more insidious problems, which develop only with long-term exposure. In this review, we continue a systematic analysis of the subacute and chronic toxicity associated with the use of herbal preparations. The hepato-, neuro-, nephro- and immunotoxicity of plant species that either grow natively or are cultivated in Europe are discussed in some detail. The basic concepts regarding the molecular mechanisms implicated in their nonacute toxicity and their pathophysiological, clinical and epidemiological characteristics are included. Among others, we discuss the hepatotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, the nephrotoxicity of aristolochic acid, the lathyrism associated with neurotoxin swainsonine, thiamine depletion and thyroid dysfunction of herbal cause, and finally address also the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The relative contribution of mannose salvage pathways to glycosylation in PMI-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Naonobu; Tamura, Ayako; Higashidani, Aya; Tonozuka, Takashi; Freeze, Hudson H; Nishikawa, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    Mannose for mammalian glycan biosynthesis can be imported directly from the medium, derived from glucose or salvaged from endogenous or external glycans. All pathways must generate mannose 6-phosphate, the activated form of mannose. Imported or salvaged mannose is directly phosphorylated by hexokinase, whereas fructose 6-phosphate from glucose is converted to mannose 6-phosphate by phosphomannose isomerase (PMI). Normally, PMI provides the majority of mannose for glycan synthesis. To assess the contribution of PMI-independent pathways, we used PMI-null fibroblasts to study N-glycosylation of DNase I, a highly sensitive indicator protein. In PMI-null cells, imported mannose and salvaged mannose make a significant contribution to N-glycosylation. When these cells were grown in mannose-free medium along with the mannosidase inhibitor, swainsonine, to block the salvage pathways, N-glycosylation of DNase I was almost completely eliminated. Adding approximately 13 microm mannose to the medium completely restored normal glycosylation. Treatment with bafilomycin A(1), an inhibitor of lysosomal acidification, also markedly reduced N-glycosylation of DNase I, but in this case only 8 microm mannose was required to restore full glycosylation, indicating that a nonlysosomal source of mannose made a significant contribution. Glycosylation levels were greatly also reduced in glycoconjugate-free medium, when endosomal membrane trafficking was blocked by expression of a mutant SKD1. From these data, we conclude that PMI-null cells can salvage mannose from both endogenous and external glycoconjugates via lysosomal and nonlysosomal degradation pathways.

  1. The CD3-zeta chimeric antigen receptor overcomes TCR Hypo-responsiveness of human terminal late-stage T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunter Rappl

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells showed remarkable efficacy in recent trials. Repetitive T cell receptor (TCR engagement of target antigen, however, inevitably ends up in hypo-responsive cells with terminally differentiated KLRG-1(+ CD57(+ CD7(- phenotype limiting their therapeutic efficacy. We here revealed that hypo-responsiveness of CMV-specific late-stage CD8(+ T cells is due to reduced TCR synapse formation compared to younger cells. Membrane anchoring of TCR components contributes to T cell hypo-responsiveness since dislocation of galectin-3 from the synapse by swainsonine restored both TCR synapse formation and T cell response. Transgenic expression of a CD3-zeta signaling chimeric antigen receptor (CAR recovered hypo-responsive T cells to full effector functions indicating that the defect is restricted to TCR membrane components while synapse formation of the transgenic CAR was not blocked. CAR engineered late-stage T cells released cytokines and mediated redirected cytotoxicity as efficiently as younger effector T cells. Our data provide a rationale for TCR independent, CAR mediated activation in the adoptive cell therapy to avoid hypo-responsiveness of late-stage T cells upon repetitive antigen encounter.

  2. Toxic plants affecting the nervous system of ruminants and horses in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Riet-Correa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This review updates information about neurotoxic plants affecting ruminants and equidae in Brazil. Currently in the country, there are at least 131 toxic plants belonging to 79 genera. Thirty one of these poisonous plants affect the nervous system. Swainsonine-containing plants (Ipomoea spp., Turbina cordata and Sida carpinifolia cause numerous outbreaks of poisoning, mainly in goats, but cattle and horses are occasionally affected. The poisoning by Ipomoea asarifolia, a tremorgenic plant, is very common in sheep, goats and cattle in the Northeastern region and in the Marajo island. Poisoning by the pods of Prosopis juliflora are frequent in cattle in Northeastern Brazil; occasionally this poisoning affects goats and more rarely sheep. Some poisonings by plants, such as Hybanthus calceolaria, Ipomoea marcellia and Talisia esculenta in ruminants and Indigofera lespedezioides in horses were recently described and needs to be accurately investigated about its occurrence and importance. Other plants poisonings causing nervous signs in ruminants and equidae are less important, but should be considered for the differential diagnosis of neurologic diseases.

  3. Australine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that inhibits amyloglucosidase and glycoprotein processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tropea, J.E.; Molyneux, R.J.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pan, Y.T.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (USA))

    1989-03-07

    Australine is a polyhydroxylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid that was isolated from the seeds of the Australian tree Castanospermum australe and characterized by NMR and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since swainsonine and catanospermine are polyhydroxylated indolizidine alkaloids that inhibit specific glycosidases, the authors tested australine against a variety of exoglycosidases to determine whether it would inhibit any of these enzymes. This alkaloid proved to be a good inhibitor of the {alpha}-glucosidase amyloglucosidase (50% inhibition at 5.8 {mu}M), but it did not inhibit {beta}-glucosidase, {alpha}- or {beta}-mannosidase, or {alpha}- or {beta}-galactosidase. The inhibition of amyloglucosidase was of a competitive nature. Australine also inhibited the glycoprotein processing enzyme glucosidase I, but had only slight activity toward glucosidase II. When incubated with cultured cells, this alkaloid inhibited glycoprotein processing at the glucosidase I step and caused the accumulation of glycoproteins with Glc{sub 3}Man{sub 7-9}(GlcNAc){sub 2}-oligosaccharides.

  4. Maternal Ingestion of Ipomoea carnea: Effects on Goat-Kid Bonding and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotardo, André T.; Pfister, James A.; Raspantini, Paulo C. F.; Górniak, Silvana L.

    2016-01-01

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant found in Brazil and other tropical and subtropical countries and often causes poisoning of livestock. The plant contains the alkaloids swainsonine and calystegines, which inhibit key cellular enzymes and cause systematic cell death. This study evaluated the behavioral effects of prenatal ingestion of this plant on dams and their kids. Twenty-four pregnant goats were randomly allocated into four treatment groups and received the following doses (g/kg BW) of fresh I. carnea: 0 (control group), 1.0 (IC1), 3.0 (IC3), and 5.0 (IC5) from day 27 of gestation until parturition. Dam and kid bonding and behavior were evaluated by several tests, immediately after birth until six weeks of age. Dams from IC3 and IC5 groups spent less time paying attention to the newborn. There was a lack of maternal-infant bonding due to I. carnea intoxication. Kids from treated dams had difficulty in standing, suckling, and in recognizing their mother hours after birth. I. carnea can also compromise the kids’ ability to learn and to retain spatial memory. We suggest that kids from pregnant goats given I. carnea during gestation have significant behavioral alterations and developmental delays that may compromise their survival. PMID:26999204

  5. Находки редких видов сосудистых растений в Амурской области

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Stupnikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Для территории Амурской обл. приводятся данные о новых местонахождениях семи редких видов сосудистых растений. Для Нижне-Зейского флористического района впервые указан Oxytropis muricata. Подтверждены произрастание Androsace incana в Амурской обл. и местонахождение Saxifraga korshinskii в устье р. Домикан, описанное В.Л. Комаровым в 1895 г.

  6. Oxyfadichalcone C inhibits melanoma A375 cell proliferation and metastasis via suppressing PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaolin; Wang, Zhengming; Liu, Yang; Peng, Xin; Liu, Yao; Zhu, Shan; Zhang, Zhe; Qiu, Yuling; Jin, Meihua; Wang, Ran; Zhang, Qingying; Kong, Dexin

    2018-08-01

    Melanoma remains to be one of the most incurable cancers. Discovery of novel antitumor agent for melanoma therapy is expected. We recently isolated Oxyfadichalcone C from Oxytropis falcate and investigated the anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic activity on human melanoma A375 cells in vitro. Cell viability was determined using MTT assay and soft agar cloning formation assay. The effect of Oxyfadichalcone C on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell metastasis was determined by wound healing assay, Transwell assay and Gelatin zymography assay. The effect of Oxyfadichalcone C on signal proteins of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathways was examined by western blot analysis. Synergism assay was employed to determine whether combination of Oxyfadichalcone C with Vemurafenib would enhance the anti-proliferative effect. Oxyfadichalcone C potently inhibited proliferation, induced G1 phase arrest and weak apoptosis in A375 cells. Anti-migration and anti-invasion activities were also indicated. Such effects were associated with upregulation of p27, reduction of cyclin D1, p-pRb, p-Integrin β1, as well as the proteolytic activity of metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9. Meanwhile, key molecules of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathways were downregulated, which might be involved in the inhibition against proliferation and metastasis of A375 cells by Oxyfadichalcone C. In addition, combination of Oxyfadichalcone C with Vemurafenib at a ratio of IC50 Oxyfadichalcone C : 5 × IC 50 Vemurafenib exhibited synergistic anti-proliferative effect on A375 cells. Our findings suggest that Oxyfadichalcone C has the potential to be developed as a promising drug candidate for the treatment of melanoma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ethnopharmacological survey on medicinal plants used in herbal drinks among the traditional communities of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mushtaq; Khan, Muhammad Pukhtoon Zada; Mukhtar, Anam; Zafar, Muhammad; Sultana, Shazia; Jahan, Sarwat

    2016-05-26

    There is very limited information regarding medicinal plants used by traditional healers in Pakistan, for treating wide-ranging diseases. Current study provides significant ethnopharmacological information, both qualitative and quantitative on medical plants in Pakistan and the pharmacological importance of herbal drinks, especially in the discovery of new drugs. The current ethnomedicinal field study was conducted from various traditional communities of Pakistan to document usage of medicinal plants as herbal drinks. Data was collected through field interviews from local people and using semi-structured questionnaires. Data was analyzed using quantitative indices such as UV (use value), RFC (Relative frequency of citation), and FL (Fidelity level). The present study recorded 217 plant species belonging to 174 genera and 69 families used in herbal drinks preparations. Major herbal preparations include decoctions, infusions and juice. According to use reports, significant species were Aloe vera, Artemisia fragrans, Allium cepa, Senegalia catechu, Alternanthera sessilis, Malva ludwigii, Arnebia benthamii, Cichorium intybus, Coccinia grandis, Dalbergia sissoo. Major ailment treated with herbal drinks include heartburn, fever, diarrhea, hypertension, and others. Use value (UV) varies from 0.23 to 0.02, with Mentha arvensis (0.23) having the highest value of UV followed by Mentha longifolia (0.22), Plantago lanceolate (0.19), Achillea millefolium (0.18), Coriandrum sativum (0.18), Justicia adhatoda and Malva sylvestris (0.17). Values of RFC varies from 0.28 to 0.09 while Fidelity level (FL) among plants varies from 37.5 to 100. Alternanthera sessilis, Oxytropis lapponica, Millettia pinnata and Salvia bucharica had the highest FL value (100). The use of medicinal plants is prevalent in traditional communities of Pakistan. Different herbal preparations are in common practice including various herbal drinks a common tradition and much favoured herbal preparation in terms

  8. Alpha-mannosidase activity in goats fed with Sida carpinifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedin, Marisete; Moleta Colodel, Edson; Viapiana, Marli; Matte, Ursula; Driemeier, David; Giugliani, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Human alpha-mannosidosis results from alpha-mannosidase deficiency and progressive accumulation of mannose-rich oligosaccharides in lysosomes. Two days before Saanen goats were fed with Sida carpinifolia, alpha-mannosidase activity in leukocytes was 128+/-28 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein (first trial) and 104+/-6 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein (second trial). At day 5, after the introduction of S. carpinifolia diet, the alpha-mannosidase activity in leukocytes was significantly increased, both in the first (288+/-13 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein) and in the second trial (303+/-45 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein), and it returned to normal levels 2 days after the withdrawal of the plant from the diet (114+/-7 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein in first trial, and 108+/-25 nmoles4-MU/h/mgprotein in the second one). Plasma alpha-mannosidase activity decreased significantly 4 days after animal exposure to the S. carpinifolia diet (769+/-167 nmoles4-MU/h/ml) and returned to normal values 10 days after the withdrawal of the plant from the diet (1289+/-163 nmoles4-MU/h/ml). Thin-layer chromatography showed an abnormal excretion of oligosaccharides in urine as of day 2 after diet exposure, which persisted until one day after the withdrawal of the plant. Animals presented neurological clinical signs beginning at day 37 (in the first trial) and at day 25 (in the second trial) after being fed with the plant. The results obtained herein suggest that oligosaccharides observed in urine are a result of a decrease in alpha-mannosidase activity in plasma. S. carpinifolia seems to have other compounds that act on alpha-mannosidase enzyme in leukocytes in a competitive manner with swainsonine. The increase in alpha-mannosidase enzyme in leukocytes could be attributed to one of these compounds present in S. carpinifolia. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental intoxication of guinea pigs with Ipomoea carnea: behavioural and neuropathological alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholich, Luciana A; Márquez, Mercedes; Pumarola i Batlle, Martí; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Teibler, Gladys P; Rios, Elvio E; Acosta, Ofelia C

    2013-12-15

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant that affects goats, with symptoms being characterised by nervous disorders and death. Swainsonine and calystegines are the principal toxic components isolated from I. carnea, which also yields lysergic acid derivatives. The aim of this study was to improve the clinical characterisation of experimental intoxication by I. carnea in guinea pigs through the evaluation of behavioural changes and to perform a thorough histopathological analysis of the affected CNS. Leaves of I. carnea were administered to guinea pigs. Open-field gait analysis and monoamine levels were measured. The poisoned animals exhibited increased vocalisation, lethargy, and a reduction in the locomotion frequency after the fourth week of intoxication, as demonstrated in the open-field test. Significant differences were observed in hind-limb gait width by the last week of intoxication. After 65 days, the guinea pigs were euthanised, necropsied, and examined using light and electron microscopy. At the end of the experiment, plasma serotonin decreased. In contrast, dopamine decreased, and noradrenaline increased in urine. Brain sections were evaluated with conventional histological methods and immunohistochemistry (IHC), as well as by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Vacuoles were observed throughout the brain, but they were particularly prominent in the brainstem. In addition, there were PAS-negative regions, and the Nissl substance was dispersed or absent, which was confirmed with the Kluver-Barreda stain. Moderate microgliosis was observed by immunohistochemistry. In the medulla oblongata, numerous ubiquitin-positive spheroids together with neuronal degeneration were observed in the nucleus gracilis/cuneatus. Furthermore, vacuoles were observed in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and endothelial cells by TEM. Our results showed that the behavioural effects may have been caused by alterations in the brain in conjunction with changes in monoamine levels. This

  10. Floristic changes at Khersan Glacier Territory, Alamkuh Mountain, Central Alborz, North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOUROSH KAVOUSI

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Kavousi K, Nejadsattari T, Asri Y, Ejtehadi H, Khavari-Nejad RA. 2016. Floristic changes at Khersan Glacier Territory, Alamkuh Mountain, Central Alborz, North of Iran. Biodiversitas 17: 11-15. Extensive investigation in subnival-nival area around Khersan glacier moraine introduced 71 vascular plant species. From this list 43 species have been listed in Noroozi (2001 in “ subnival-nival vascular plant species of Iran : a unique high mountain flora and its threat from climate warming ” and the others are new for subnival- nival area of Iran. Among this plant list 31 species had introduced with Kotschy (1861a,b, Bornmuller (1904, Melchior (1937, Klein (1982, european researchers and the other is named for the first time from Khersan glacier territory. Many species such as Astragalus macrosemius, Pseudocamelina kleinii, Crepis multicaulis subsp. congesta, Didymophysa fedtschenkoana and Draba melanopus due to glacier condition have very sensitive habitat, vulnerable and only gathered from restrict area with conservation value. Vegetation change happened in many nival and subnival area with upward movement in the same habitat and movement from lower altitude at alpine towards summit in subnival and nival. Carex oreophila, Campanula stevenii, Bromus barchystachyus, Oxytropis immersa, Erigeron uniflorus,Trachydium pauciradiatum, Scorzonera radicosa and some other species are surprisingly movement to subnival area and many nival and subnival species such as Didymophysa aucheri, Didymophysa fedtschenkoana, Dracocephalum aucheri and Arabis caucasica have come significantly upward in nival. The movement is different in all side of Khersan glacier moraine in north, south and the east (beside moraine tongue slops and limited with presence of soil natural generation and other ecological remarks. Limitation for soil generation starts at different altitude in northern, southern and eastern slopes of Khersan glacier valley. This study examined

  11. Changes in vegetation and biological soil crust communities on sand dunes stabilizing after a century of grazing on San Miguel Island, Channel Island National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellman, Kristine L.

    2014-01-01

    San Miguel Island is the westernmost of the California Channel Islands and one of the windiest areas on the west coast of North America. The majority of the island is covered by coastal sand dunes, which were stripped of vegetation and subsequently mobilized due to droughts and sheep ranching during the late 19th century and early 20th century. Since the removal of grazing animals, vegetation and biological soil crusts have once again stabilized many of the island's dunes. In this study, historical aerial photographs and field surveys were used to develop a chronosequence of the pattern of change in vegetation communities and biological soil crust levels of development (LOD) along a gradient of dune stabilization. Historical aerial photographs from 1929, 1954, 1977, and 2009 were georeferenced and used to delineate changes in vegetation canopy cover and active (unvegetated) dune extent among 5 historical periods (pre-1929, 1929–1954, 1954–1977, 1977–2009, and 2009–2011). During fieldwork, vegetation and biological soil crust communities were mapped along transects distributed throughout San Miguel Island's central dune field on land forms that had stabilized during the 5 time periods of interest. Analyses in a geographic information system (GIS) quantified the pattern of changes that vegetation and biological soil crust communities have exhibited on the San Miguel Island dunes over the past 80 years. Results revealed that a continuing increase in total vegetation cover and a complex pattern of change in vegetation communities have taken place on the San Miguel Island dunes since the removal of grazing animals. The highly specialized native vascular vegetation (sea rocket, dunedelion, beach-bur, and locoweed) are the pioneer stabilizers of the dunes. This pioneer community is replaced in later stages by communities that are dominated by native shrubs (coastal goldenbush, silver lupine, coyote-brush, and giant coreopsis), with apparently overlapping or

  12. Insect midgut α-mannosidases from family 38 and 47 with emphasis on those of Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Nathalia R; Cardoso, Christiane; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Ferreira, Clelia; Terra, Walter R

    2015-12-01

    α-Mannosidases are enzymes which remove non-reducing terminal residues from glycoconjugates. Data on both GH47 and GH38 (Golgi and lysosomal) enzymes are available. Data on insect midgut α-mannosidases acting in digestion are preliminary and do not include enzyme sequences. Tenebrio molitor midgut α-mannosidases were separated by chromatography into two activity peaks: a major (Man1) and a minor (Man2). An antibody generated against a synthetic peptide corresponding to a sequence of α-mannosidase fragment recognizes Man2 but not Man1. That fragment was later found to correspond to TmMan2 (GenBank access KP892646), showing that the cDNA coding for Man2 is actually TmMan2. TmMan2 codes for a mature α-mannosidase with 107.5 kDa. Purified Man2 originates after SDS-PAGE one band of about 72 kDa and another of 51 kDa, which sums 123 kDa, in agreement with gel filtration (123 kDa) data. These results suggest that Man2 is processed into peptides that remain noncovalently linked within the functional enzyme. The physical and kinetical properties of purified Man1 and Man2 are similar. They have a molecular mass of 123 kDa (gel filtration), pH optimum (5.6) and response to inhibitors like swainsonine (Man1 Ki, 68 nM; Man2 Ki, 63 nM) and deoxymannojirimycin (Man1 Ki, 0.12 mM; Man2 Ki, 0.15 mM). Their substrate specificities are a little different as Man2 hydrolyzes α-1,3 and α-1,6 bonds better than α-1,2, whereas the contrary is true for Man1. Thus, they pertain to Class II (GH38 α-mannosidases), that are catabolic α-mannosidases similar to lysosomal α-mannosidase. However, Man2, in contrast to true lysosomal α-mannosidase, is secreted (immunocytolocalization data) into the midgut contents. There, Man2 may participate in digestion of fungal cell walls, known to have α-mannosides in their outermost layer. The amount of family 38 α-mannosidase sequences found in the transcriptome (454 pyrosequencing) of the midgut of 9 insects pertaining to 5 orders is

  13. Primary cilia utilize glycoprotein-dependent adhesion mechanisms to stabilize long-lasting cilia-cilia contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ott Carolyn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central tenet of cilia function is sensing and transmitting information. The capacity to directly contact extracellular surfaces would empower primary cilia to probe the environment for information about the nature and location of nearby surfaces. It has been well established that flagella and other motile cilia perform diverse cellular functions through adhesion. We hypothesized that mammalian primary cilia also interact with the extracellular environment through direct physical contact. Methods We identified cilia in rod photoreceptors and cholangiocytes in fixed mouse tissues and examined the structures that these cilia contact in vivo. We then utilized an MDCK cell culture model to characterize the nature of the contacts we observed. Results In retina and liver tissue, we observed that cilia from nearby cells touch one another. Using MDCK cells, we found compelling evidence that these contacts are stable adhesions that form bridges between two cells, or networks between many cells. We examined the nature and duration of the cilia-cilia contacts and discovered primary cilia movements that facilitate cilia-cilia encounters. Stable adhesions form as the area of contact expands from a single point to a stretch of tightly bound, adjacent cilia membranes. The cilia-cilia contacts persisted for hours and were resistant to several harsh treatments such as proteases and DTT. Unlike many other cell adhesion mechanisms, calcium was not required for the formation or maintenance of cilia adhesion. However, swainsonine, which blocks maturation of N-linked glycoproteins, reduced contact formation. We propose that cellular control of adhesion maintenance is active because cilia adhesion did not prevent cell division; rather, contacts dissolved during mitosis as cilia were resorbed. Conclusions The demonstration that mammalian primary cilia formed prolonged, direct, physical contacts supports a novel paradigm: that mammalian primary

  14. Structure and kinetic investigation of Streptococcus pyogenes family GH38 alpha-mannosidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D L Suits

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic hydrolysis of alpha-mannosides is catalyzed by glycoside hydrolases (GH, termed alpha-mannosidases. These enzymes are found in different GH sequence-based families. Considerable research has probed the role of higher eukaryotic "GH38" alpha-mannosides that play a key role in the modification and diversification of hybrid N-glycans; processes with strong cellular links to cancer and autoimmune disease. The most extensively studied of these enzymes is the Drosophila GH38 alpha-mannosidase II, which has been shown to be a retaining alpha-mannosidase that targets both alpha-1,3 and alpha-1,6 mannosyl linkages, an activity that enables the enzyme to process GlcNAc(Man(5(GlcNAc(2 hybrid N-glycans to GlcNAc(Man(3(GlcNAc(2. Far less well understood is the observation that many bacterial species, predominantly but not exclusively pathogens and symbionts, also possess putative GH38 alpha-mannosidases whose activity and specificity is unknown.Here we show that the Streptococcus pyogenes (M1 GAS SF370 GH38 enzyme (Spy1604; hereafter SpGH38 is an alpha-mannosidase with specificity for alpha-1,3 mannosidic linkages. The 3D X-ray structure of SpGH38, obtained in native form at 1.9 A resolution and in complex with the inhibitor swainsonine (K(i 18 microM at 2.6 A, reveals a canonical GH38 five-domain structure in which the catalytic "-1" subsite shows high similarity with the Drosophila enzyme, including the catalytic Zn(2+ ion. In contrast, the "leaving group" subsites of SpGH38 display considerable differences to the higher eukaryotic GH38s; features that contribute to their apparent specificity.Although the in vivo function of this streptococcal GH38 alpha-mannosidase remains unknown, it is shown to be an alpha-mannosidase active on N-glycans. SpGH38 lies on an operon that also contains the GH84 hexosaminidase (Spy1600 and an additional putative glycosidase. The activity of SpGH38, together with its genomic context, strongly hints at a function