WorldWideScience

Sample records for swab yielded growth

  1. [Correlation between microbial growth in conjunctival swabs of corneal donors and contamination of organ culture media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Bischoff, M; Schirra, F; Langenbucher, A; Ong, M; Halfmann, A; Herrmann, M; Seitz, B

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the rate of contamination in conjunctival swabs from corneal donors by microbiological investigations and to correlate this with microbial contamination of the culture medium. Contamination of conjunctival swabs and culture media was analyzed retrospectively for the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 at the LIONS corneal bank of Saar-Lor-Lux Trier/Westpfalz at the Saarland University Medical Center. The total annual number of conjunctival swabs was 316 in 2009, 341 in 2010 and 381 in 2011. Conjunctival swabs were taken prior to 1.25% povidone-iodine application. After disinfection donor corneas were harvested by in situ corneoscleral disc excision in all cases. The correlation between positive conjunctival swabs and microbial contamination of the culture medium was analyzed. In every year examined the contamination rate of the culture medium was significantly higher in cases of contaminated conjunctival swabs (p culture medium was contaminated in 16.5%, 11.5% and 7.6% of the donated corneas with positive conjunctival swabs and in 7.2%, 1.9% and 0.6% in donated corneas with negative conjunctival swabs, respectively. A positive correlation was found between contamination of the culture medium and microbial colonization of the conjunctival swabs, Nevertheless, microbial colonization of the conjunctiva was high and contamination of the culture medium was relatively low. For the microbial contamination rate of the donated corneas in the medium, conjunctival disinfection time with iodine solution before explantation of the corneoscleral disc and the addition of antibiotics to the culture medium seem to play a protective role.

  2. Correlation Analysis of some Growth, Yield, Yield Components and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria ... The study was aimed at investigating the correlation between some growth, yield, yield components and ... Simple correlation coefficient ® of different crop parameters and grain yield indicated that most of the agro-.

  3. Growth and yield of shortleaf pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul A. Murphy

    1986-01-01

    A survey of available growth and yield information for shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) is given. The kinds of studies and data sources that produce this information are also evaluated, and an example of how a growth and yield model can be used to answer management questions is illustrated. Guidelines are given for using growth and yield models, and needs for...

  4. GDP growth and the yield curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Stig Vinther

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the forecastability of GDP growth using information from the term structure of yields. In contrast to previous studies, the paper shows that the curvature of the yield curve contributes with much more forecasting power than the slope of yield curve. The yield curvature also...

  5. FEM growth and yield data monocultures - Poplar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohren, G.M.J.; Goudzwaard, L.; Jansen, J.J.; Oosterbaan, A.; Oldenburger, J.F.; Ouden, den J.

    2016-01-01

    The current database is part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collection of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species, with only a few plots,

  6. Growth regulator on oat yield indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionatan K. Krysczun

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Growth regulator in oat can reduce lodging with effects on yield indicators. The objective of the study is to define the optimum dose of growth regulator to reduce lodging in oats under different conditions of nitrogen (N fertilization (reduced, high and very high and the effects on yield indicators in the succession systems. In each succession system (soybean/oats and corn/oats, two experiments were conducted, one to quantify biomass yield and the other to estimate grain yield and lodging. In the four experiments, the design was randomized blocks with four replicates in 3 x 4 factorial scheme, for N-fertilizer doses (30, 90 and 150 kg ha-1 and growth regulator doses (0, 200, 400 and 600 mL ha-1, respectively. Growth regulator reduces lodging in oat plants, with the ideal doses of 500 mL ha-1 in the soybean/oat system and 400 mL ha-1 in the corn/oat system, regardless of the reduced, high and very high N doses. There is a linear reduction of biological and straw yields, and a quadratic trend in the expression of grain yield and harvest index as a function of the growth regulator doses, regardless of succession systems (soybean/oats and corn/oats.

  7. Soybean growth and yield under cover crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila de Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cover crops in no-tillage systems can provide better conditions for the development of soybean plants with positive effects on grain yield and growth analysis techniques allow researchers to characterize and understand the behavior of soybean plants under different straw covers. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize, using growth analysis, yield components and agronomic performance of soybean under common bean, Brachiaria brizantha and pearl millet straws. The experiment was performed on a soil under cerrado in the municipality of Santo Antônio de Goiás, GO. The experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design with three treatments (cover crops and five replications. Soybean grain yield was lower in the B. brizantha straw treatment (3,708 kg ha-1 than both in the pearl millet (4.772 kg ha-1 and common bean straw treatments (5,200 kg ha-1. The soybean growth analysis in B. brizantha, pearl millet and common bean allowed characterizing the variation in the production of dry matter of leaves, stems, pods and total and leaf area index that provided different grain yields. The cover crop directly affects the soybean grain yield.

  8. Simulation of oil palm growth and yield.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraalingen, van D.W.G.; Breure, C.J.; Spitters, C.J.T.

    1989-01-01

    A dynamic model is presented to simulate growth and yield formation of oil palm (Elaeis quineensis Jacq.) in dependence of weather data and plant characteristics. From incoming amounts of light, light interception of the foliage and photosynthetic characteristics of individual leaflets, daily rates

  9. Stocking, growth, and yield of oak stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel F. Gingrich

    1971-01-01

    An appraisal of stocking in even-aged upland oak stands is a prerequisite for determining the cultural needs of a given stand. Most oak stands have sufficient stocking to utilize the site, but are deficient in high-quality trees. Thinning such stands offers a good opportunity to upgrade the relative quality of the growing stock and enhance the growth and yield...

  10. SEED GROWTH RATE, GROWTH DURATION, AND YIELD IN SOYBEAN

    OpenAIRE

    Guffy, R. D.; Hesketh, J. D.; Nelson, R. L.; Bernard, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Seed growth rate and duration of growth were studied for different soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars and isolines differing in maturity and stem termination behavior under field conditions. Various methods for estimating rate and duration were compared, and such estimates were compared with yield, along with mature seed weight, seed number, and days from planting to maturity. Three estimates of seed filling period were all highly correlated with each other, but the final seed weight,...

  11. FEM growth and yield data Monocultures - Poplar (revised version)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohren, G.M.J.; Goudzwaard, L.; Jansen, J.J.; Schmidt, P.; Oosterbaan, A.; Oldenburger, J.; Ouden, den J.

    2017-01-01

    The current database is part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collection of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species with only a few plots,

  12. FEM growth and yield data monocultures - Silver birch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburger, J.F.; Jansen, J.J.; Oosterbaan, A.; Lu, Huicui; Mohren, G.M.J.; Ouden, den J.

    2016-01-01

    The current database is part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collection of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species, with only a few plots,

  13. Improving growth and yield of cowpea by foliar application of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water stress impaired cowpea plant growth and decreased ion percentage and chlorophyll and carbohydrate concentration in the shoot as well as yield and its quality. Foliar-applied chitosan, in particular 250 mg/l, increased plant growth, yield and its quality as well as physiological constituents in plant shoot under stressed ...

  14. Impact of organic and inorganic fertilizers on growth, fruit yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akanbi W B

    2015-08-05

    Aug 5, 2015 ... Impact of organic and inorganic fertilizers on growth, fruit yield, nutritional and lycopene contents of three ... It could be concluded that the use of organic fertilizer has potential in improving the growth, fruit yield and ... an antioxidant, is the pigment that imparts red color to some fruits, most notably tomato and ...

  15. FEM growth and yield data selection forest - Kolkbos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, de J.P.G.; Jansen, J.J.; Mohren, G.M.J.; Ouden, den J.

    2016-01-01

    The current database is part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collection of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species, with only a few plots,

  16. FEM growth and yield data - selection forest - Het Oude Trekerbos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.J.; Klein, de J.P.G.; Mohren, G.M.J.; Ouden, den J.

    2016-01-01

    The current database is part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collection of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species, with only a few plots,

  17. FEM growth and yield data monocultures - other species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudzwaard, L.; Jansen, J.J.; Oosterbaan, A.; Oldenburger, J.F.; Mohren, G.M.J.; Ouden, den J.

    2016-01-01

    The current database is part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collection of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species, with only a few plots,

  18. Growth, yield and NPK uptake by maize with complementary organic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High and sustainable crop yields in the tropics have been reported to be only possible with judicious combination of mineral fertilizers and organic amendments. Fertilizing croppings to achieve this has usually been a difficult task to achieve. The growth and yield of maize cultivated with a complementary application of ...

  19. Growth and yield components of tomato as influenced by nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the yield is constrained by poor soil fertility management and lack of appropriate/adequate fertilizers rates recommendation. Experiments were conducted at Melkassa on station with the objectives of evaluating effect of N and P fertilizer applications on growth and yield, and determining optimal requirements for ...

  20. acid on growth and yield components of common beans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pods perplant, 100-seed mass and harvest index. The highest seed yields were equi valient to 1854 kg ha1 in 1997 ... In pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.) (Singh et ah, 1978), and broad beans (Diethelm et al, 1986) ...... growth, chemical composition, flowering, pod yield and chemical composition of green seeds of pea plant ...

  1. Growth indices and grain yield attributes in six maize cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth indices and grain yield attributes in six maize cultivars representing two era of maize breeding in Nigeria. ... Overall, varieties developed in era 2 were superior to those developed in era 1 for E% and also had six percent (6%) higher values for LAR at vegetative growth phase than those developed in era 1 but ...

  2. EFFECT OF SALINITY ON GROWTH AND LEAF YIELD OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results show that salinity significantly decreased general plant growth, leaf chlorophyll content, leaf growth and yield, and retarded flower development. This indicates that spiderplant has a poor capacity for regulating the entry, translocation and compartmentalization of salt. This allows large amounts of salt to be absorbed ...

  3. Comparison of growth and yield adaptability indicators of two maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD), with the two cultivars, each replicated four times. Yield, leaf length and plant height were measured and averaged. Results showed that PHB3253 had growth of 75.2 cm after measuring at 2 weeks interval for 10 weeks. Its growth was significantly ...

  4. Modeling the effects of ozone on soybean growth and yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K; Miller, J E; Flagler, R B; Heck, W W

    1990-01-01

    A simple mechanistic model was developed based on an existing growth model in order to address the mechanisms of the effects of ozone on growth and yield of soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr. 'Davis'] and interacting effects of other environmental stresses. The model simulates daily growth of soybean plants using environmental data including shortwave radiation, temperature, precipitation, irrigation and ozone concentration. Leaf growth, dry matter accumulation, water budget, nitrogen input and seed growth linked to senescence and abscission of leaves are described in the model. The effects of ozone are modeled as reduced photosynthate production and accelerated senescence. The model was applied to the open-top chamber experiments in which soybean plants were exposed to ozone under two levels of soil moisture regimes. After calibrating the model to the growth data and seed yield, goodness-of-fit of the model was tested. The model fitted well for top dry weight in the vegetative growth phase and also at maturity. The effect of ozone on seen yield was also described satisfactorily by the model. The simulation showed apparent interaction between the effect of ozone and soil moisture stress on the seed yield. The model revealed that further work is needed concerning the effect of ozone on the senescence process and the consequences of alteration of canopy microclimate by the open-top chambers.

  5. Material and methods to increase plant growth and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Matias

    2015-09-15

    The present invention relates to materials and methods for modulating growth rates, yield, and/or resistance to drought conditions in plants. In one embodiment, a method of the invention comprises increasing expression of an hc1 gene (or a homolog thereof that provides for substantially the same activity), or increasing expression or activity of the protein encoded by an hc1 gene thereof, in a plant, wherein expression of the hc1 gene or expression or activity of the protein encoded by an hc1 gene results in increased growth rate, yield, and/or drought resistance in the plant.

  6. Materials and methods to increase plant growth and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirst, Matias

    2017-05-16

    The present invention relates to materials and methods for modulating growth rates, yield, and/or resistance to drought conditions in plants. In one embodiment, a method of the invention comprises increasing expression of an hc1 gene (or a homolog thereof that provides for substantially the same activity), or increasing expression or activity of the protein encoded by an hc1 gene thereof, in a plant, wherein expression of the hc1 gene or expression or activity of the protein encoded by an hc1 gene results in increased growth rate, yield, and/or drought resistance in the plant.

  7. Effects of Ethephon on the Growth, Yield and Yield Components of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two experiments to determine the effects of timing and levels of application of ethephon on the growth and yield of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L). were conducted. Bean cultivar \\'Mwezi moja\\' was used. Four levels of ethephon (0, 100, 200 and 300 mg/l) were sprayed to the plants at 7, 14 or at 28 days after ...

  8. Biomass and grain yield of oats by growth regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Marolli, Anderson; Silva, José A. G. da; Romitti, Marcos V.; Mantai, Rubia D.; Hawerroth, Maraisa C.; Scremin, Osmar B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of growth regulator in oats can reduce plant lodging with reflections in biomass and grain yield. The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility and efficiency of using Trinexapac-Ethyl regulator in the growth of white oat under different conditions of N-fertilizer and years favorable and unfavorable for cultivation. In this study, two experiments were conducted in the years 2011, 2012 and 2013, one for quantifying biomass production rate and the other for the de...

  9. Growth, assimilate partitioning and grain yield response of soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This investigation tested variation in the growth components, assimilate partitioning and grain yield of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrrill) varieties established in CO2 enriched atmosphere when inoculated with mixtures of Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) species in the humid rainforest of Nigeria. A pot and a field ...

  10. Growth, yield and fiber morphology of kenaf ( Hibiscus cannabinus L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pot-culture experiment was conducted in shade house to determine the effects of carbon levels on plant growth, yield and fiber morphology of different kenaf varieties. The plants of five kenaf varieties were grown in pots containing sandy beach ridges interspersed with swales (BRIS) soil. Organic carbons at the levels of 0, ...

  11. Effect of Inorganic Fertilizer Application on Growth and Yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth and yield parameters of Thevetia peruviana (Pers) Schum. were evaluated under in-organic fertilizer in 2009, 2010 and 2011 rainy seasons at the Research farms of the Biofuel and Alternate Renewable Energy Ltd, Edidi, Kwara State in the southern Guinea savannah of Nigeria. The objective of the study was to ...

  12. Effect of physiologically active compounds on growth and yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of physiologically active compounds on growth and yield of spring wheat. MA Wailare. Abstract. No Abstract. Bowen Journal of Agriculture Vol. 3 (1) 2006: pp. 16-20. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics Loading ... Metrics powered ...

  13. Oil palm growth, yield and financial returns from interplanted food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maize, soyabean and pigeon pea were inter-planted with a juvenile oil palm plantation in 1999-2002 at the Teaching and Research Farm of the University of Agriculture, Abeokuta (7°15'N, 3°25', altitude 144m above sea level) to evaluate the growth of the interplanted oil palm as well as yield and overall economic returns ...

  14. Growth and yield responses of cowpea genotypes to soluble and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth and yield responses of cowpea genotypes to soluble and rock P fertilizers on acid, highly weathered soil from humid tropical West Africa. Grace ADUSEI 1*, Thomas GAISER 1, Ousmane BOUKAR 2 and Christian FATOKUN 3. 1University of Bonn, Inst. Crop Sci. and Res. Conserv. (INRES), Katzenburgweg 5.

  15. Poultry Manure Effect on Growth and Yield of Maize

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    The effect of poultry manure application on maize (Zea mays) growth and yields was studied on a Ferric Acrisol in the semi-deciduous ... Poultry manure application registered over 53% increases of N levels ..... control, however, indicated the relative advantage of applying poultry manure and that an application rate of 2.

  16. Impact of nitrogen nutrition and moisture deficits on growth, yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crop production in arid and semi arid areas is restricted by soil deficiencies in moisture and plant nutrients, especially nitrogen. In order to evaluate the impact of nitrogen nutrition and moisture deficits on growth, yield and radiation use efficiency of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), a field experiment was conducted at Agronomic ...

  17. Growth and yield response of wheat to EM (effective microorganisms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-07

    Jun 7, 2010 ... on fresh weight bases) and EM (effective microorganisms), a biofertilizer, on the growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). EM application was carried out by applying 1 L of 0.2% dilution of the commercial stock EM solution per pot at fortnight intervals throughout the experimental period. Plants.

  18. Growth and Yield Responses of Vegetable Cowpea ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted in the teaching and research farm of Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike during 2006 and 2007 cropping seasons to determine the growth and yield responses of three vegetable cowpea varieties, IT93K-915 (white seeded and climbing vines), IT86D-880 (brown seeded ...

  19. Growth Performance, Yields and Economic Benefits of Nile Tilapia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fish culture integration in the growth, yields and economic benefits of fish and vegetables. Two 200 m2 earthen fishponds were stocked with Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus at 20,000 fish fingerlings per hectare. Pond A was fertilized with ...

  20. Tomato growth and yield : quantitative analysis and synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelink, E.

    1996-01-01


    In this thesis, the responses of tomato crop growth and yield to greenhouse climate (light, temperature and C0 2 concentration) and crop management (plant density and fruit pruning) were analysed and quantified. A simulation model,

  1. Cowpea growth and yield performance as influenced by phosphorus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the optimum level of phosphorus for better growth and yield of cowpea. The experiment was conducted at the Teaching and Research farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ilorin. Five levels of phosphorus fertilizers (0kgP/ha, 30kgP/ha, 60kgP/ha, 90kgP/ha, ...

  2. Variational formulation based analysis on growth of yield front in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study investigates the growth of elastic-plastic front in rotating solid disks of non-uniform thickness having exponential and parabolic geometry variation. The problem is solved through an extension of a variational method in elastoplastic regime. The formulation is based on von-Mises yield criterion and linear ...

  3. Growth, physiology and yield responses of Amaranthus cruentus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amaranthus cruentus, Corchorus olitorius and Vigna unguiculata are traditional leafy vegetables with potential to improve nutritional security of vulnerable people. The promotion of these crops is partly hindered by the lack of agronomic information. The effect of plant spacing on growth, physiology and yield of these three ...

  4. Growth and Yield Parameters of Sorghum Genotypes as Affected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field trial was conducted at Bayero University, Kano research farm with the aim of determining the effect of stem injection artificial inoculation technique on the growth and yield parameters of one hundred and four sorghum genotypes against head smut. The trial was laid on a randomized complete block design with two ...

  5. Analysis of growth, yield potential and horticultural performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PTC Lab

    2013-04-03

    Apr 3, 2013 ... Complete randomized block design was applied to evaluate and compare the growth, yield and field performance of in vitro derived turmeric plants with conventional rhizome under field condition. In vitro propagated plants manifest consistently superior horticultural performance over the conventional.

  6. Growth and yield of red pine in the Lake States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Buckman; Badege Bishaw; T.J. Hanson; Frank A. Benford

    2006-01-01

    This review examines the entire portfolio of active and inactive red pine growth and yield studies maintained by the USDA Forest Service, North Central Research Station and several of its cooperators. The oldest studies date back to the mid-1920s. Available for analysis are 31 experiments and sets of monitoring plots in both planted and natural forests. These contain 3...

  7. Growth and yield potential of Echinochloa pyramidalis (Lam.) Hitchc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    results revealed that salinity and flooding combined with salinity stresses had similar effect on plant survival, height and density, leading to ... Key words: Constructed wetlands, Echinochloa pyramidalis, faecal sludge, flooding, growth, salinity, yield potential. ...... for their financial and logistic support (IFS, Sweden grant No.

  8. Growth and yield models for Eucalyptus grandis grown in Swaziland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to develop a stand-level growth and yield model for short-rotationEucalyptus grandis grown for pulp wood production at Piggs Peak in Swaziland. The data were derived from a Nelder 1a spacing trial established with E. grandis clonal cuttings in 1998 and terminated in 2005. Planting density ...

  9. Simultaneous growth and yield models for Eucalyptus grandis (Hill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simultaneous stand-level growth and yield models for Eucalyptus grandis in Zimbabwe were developed from Correlated Curve Trend (CCT) and Nelder wheel experiments replicated on five different sites. Nonlinear three-stage least squares method was used to simultaneously fit prediction and projection equations for ...

  10. Effect Of Cowpea Planting Density On Growth, Yield And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field trials were conducted at the research farm of the National Root Crops Research Institute (NRCRI), Umudike (07° 33΄ E, 05° 29΄ N) in 2004/2005 and 2005/2006 cropping seasons to determine the effect of cowpea planting density on growth, yield and productivity of component crops in cowpea/cassava intercropping ...

  11. Analysis of growth, yield potential and horticultural performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complete randomized block design was applied to evaluate and compare the growth, yield and field performance of in vitro derived turmeric plants with conventional rhizome under field condition. In vitro propagated plants manifest consistently superior horticultural performance over the conventional rhizome. Among the ...

  12. Location Effects On The Growth, Yield And Flavour Expression Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two-locational trial comprising four varieties of the Nsukka aromatic yellow pepper was carried out in Umudike and Nsukka in 1999. The main objective was to investigate the influence of the environmental differences on growth, yield, aroma and susceptibility of the crop to the pepper leaf curl geminivirus. Except for aroma ...

  13. Effect of Intercropping Jatropha Curcas on Growth and Yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research study was carried out to investigate the effect of Jatropha curcas plant on the growth and yield of Arable crops (maize and vegetable) at Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria (FRIN) Arboretum, Jericho, Ibadan. This research study involves six (6) experimental plots of Jatropha curcas interplanted with ...

  14. Growth and yield response of Telfairia occidentalis (Hook f.) as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to investigate the effect of different rates of poultry manure on the growth and yield of fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis Hook F.) the treatment rates were; 0t/ha, 5t/ha, 10t/ha and 15t/ha poultry manure. The experimental design was a randomized complete block design replicated four times.

  15. Effect of Colchicine Induced Mutagenesis on Growth and Yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical mutagenesis through the use of colchicine on the seeds of two varieties of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. Var. Ex-Sudan and E-8) with the aim of inducing variability that could be exploited in the genetic improvement of its growth and yield was carried out. The sesame seeds were treated with colchicines at four ...

  16. Effects of different irrigation regimes on vegetative growth, fruit yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted during five growing seasons from 2004 to 2008 to investigate effects of different irrigation regimes on vegetative growth, fruit yield and quality of Salak apricot trees in semiarid climatic conditions. There were six irrigation treatments, five of which (S1, S2, S3, S4 and S5) were based on adjustment ...

  17. Oat yield through panicle components and growth regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Marolli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The growth regulator modifies the expression of lodging and panicle components in oat plants, with reflexes in yield. The objective of this study was to define the optimal dose of growth regulator in oat for a maximum lodging of 5%. In addition, this study aimed to identify potential variables of the panicle to compose the multiple linear regression model and the simulation of grain yield in conditions of use of the regulator under low, high and very high fertilization with nitrogen. The study was conducted in 2011, 2012 and 2013 in a randomized block design with four replicates in a 4 x 3 factorial scheme, for growth regulator doses (0, 200, 400 and 600 mL ha-1 and N-fertilizer doses (30, 90 and 150 kg ha-1, respectively. The growth regulator doses of 395, 450 and 560 mL ha-1 are efficient, with maximum oat lodging of 5%, under low, high and very high nitrogen fertilization, respectively. The grain weight per panicle and panicle harvest index are potential variables to compose the multiple linear regression model. Multiple linear regression equations are efficient in the simulation of oat grain yield under the conditions of use of growth regulator, regardless of the N-fertilizer dose.

  18. Biomass and grain yield of oats by growth regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Marolli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of growth regulator in oats can reduce plant lodging with reflections in biomass and grain yield. The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility and efficiency of using Trinexapac-Ethyl regulator in the growth of white oat under different conditions of N-fertilizer and years favorable and unfavorable for cultivation. In this study, two experiments were conducted in the years 2011, 2012 and 2013, one for quantifying biomass production rate and the other for the determination of grain yield and lodging. The experimental design was randomized blocks with four replicates, in a 4 x 3 factorial scheme, for growth regulator doses (0, 200, 400 and 600 mL ha-1 and nitrogen doses (30, 90 and 150 kg ha-1, respectively. There is a linear reduction of biomass rate with the increase in the growth regulator dose in oat, regardless of the condition of year and use of N-fertilizer. The growth regulator dose of 495 mL ha-1 efficiently reduces lodging with reduced, high and very high use of N-fertilizer, without reducing the yield of oat grains, in favorable, intermediate or unfavorable year for cultivation.

  19. Growth and yield of anthurium in response to sawdust mulching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Domingues Lima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objectives of the study were to analyze the effect of sawdust mulch on the: (1 soil characteristics; (2 growth and flower yield of the anthurium cv. 'Apalai'. Assay was conducted in a totally randomized design in subdivided plots, with five treatments and eight replications. The treatment consisted of five volumes of sawdust 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80L m-2, distributed over the bed, every three months. Soil, plants and flower stalks were evaluated during two years. Soil temperature, moisture, organic matter, bulk density and water retention conditions were improved, while the leaf area of plants and the yield of flower stalks were increased when the soil were mulched with sawdust. In addition to increasing soil organic matter, however, no change occurred in the level of nutrients in plants. Sawdust also improved the dimension of flower stalks. Application of 40L m-2 of sawdust every three months is recommended.

  20. Effect of growth regulators on growth, flowering and rhizome yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted in 2001 and 2002, to study the effect of foliar application of growth regulators on growth; flowering and rhizome yield of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.). Treatments consisted of gibberellic acid (GA3) at 0,150 and 300 ppm; ethrel at 0,100 and 200 ppm and cycocel (CCC) at 0,250 ppm ...

  1. Growth and yield of anthurium in response to gibberellic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Domingues Lima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gibberellic acid (GA3 induces flowering of plants of various genera of the Araceae family. Therefore, it was evaluated the effect of GA3 on the growth and yield of Anthurium andraeanum cv. 'Apalai'. For this purpose, micropropagated seedlings were planted in nursery beds under 70% shade. The experimental design was completely randomized in subdivided plots with eight replications. The growth regulation effect was assessed in each plot and the time to flowering after the start of the treatments was assessed in each subplot. The GA3 concentrations were 0, 150, 300, 450 and 600mg L-1, applied every 60 days by spraying on the leaves. The applications and evaluations started after the production of marketable floral stems. Every month the number of leaves was counted and their dimensions were measured, while every week the presence of inflorescences and the point of their commercial harvest were assessed and the respective dimensions were measured. Application of GA3 at 150, 300 and 450 mg L-1 promoted an increase in the leaf area. However, there was no increase in the number of inflorescences produced or their quality, making it impossible to recommend the use of this growth regulator for commercial production of this flower.

  2. Evaluation of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds inoculation with Rhizobium phaseoli and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria on yield and yield components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadegari, M; Rahmani, H A; Noormohammadi, G; Ayneband, A

    2008-08-01

    To study the effect of co-inoculation with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and Rhizobium, on yield and yield components of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars was investigated in 2 consecutive years under field condition of plant growing evidence indicates that soil beneficial bacteria can positively affect symbiotic performance of rhizobia. PGPR strains Pseudomonas fluorescens P-93 and Azospirillum lipoferum S-21 as well as two highly effective Rhizobium strains were used in this study. Common bean seeds of three cultivars were inoculated with Rhizobium singly or in a combination with PGPR to evaluate their effect on growth characters. A significant variation of plant growth in response to inoculation with Rhizobium strains was observed. Treatment with PGPR significantly increased pod per plant, number of seeds per pod, weight of 100 seed, weight of seeds per plant, weight of pods per plant, total dry matter in R6 as well as seed yield and protein content. Co-inoculation with Rhizobium and PGPR demonstrated a significant increase in the yield and yield components. The results showed that all treatments of bacteria increased yield; however, strains Rb-133 with Pseudomonas fluorescens P-93 gave the highest seed yield, number of pods per plant, weight of 100 seed, seed protein yield, number seed per pod, seed protein yield.

  3. Growth, development and yield parameters of five banana hybrid cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Pérez Armas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research had the objective of determining the parameters o f growth, development and yield of five banana hybrid cultivars under dryland conditions. The research was done at the Agroindustrial Farm Marta Abreu in Cienfuegos on a carbonated Brown soil. The field experiment was run in a randomized block design with four replications, and two factors: five banana cultivars (‘FHIA-18’, ‘FHIA 02’, ‘FHIA-01’, ‘SH-3436 L-9’ and ‘FHIA 23’ and at two moments (mother plants and first offspring. The plots had an area of 56 m2 with 16 plants each. Eight Plants from each clone were evaluated for a total of 32 plants. The soil characteristics and the climatic conditions in the local area were studied. Growth and development parameters of mother plant and first offspring were measured and the time of occurrence of each phonological phase, and the photosynthetic potential in mother plant and in first offspring were determined. In the cultivars ‘SH 3436 L9’ and ‘F HIA-23’, the pseudostem height and perimeter were larger, there were more number of hands and fingers, the weight of the clusters was higher and the vegetative and reproductive phases were longer. The highest values of foliar area and foliar area index were observed in the cultivars ‘FHIA-18’ and ‘FHIA-01’. At the same time, these cultivars had the highest number of functional leaf at flowering.

  4. growth and yield response of carrot (daucus carota l.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Keywords: Soil amendments, spacing, nematode populations, carrot yield .... with a meter rule. Root diameter was measured at about 1cm from the shoulder of the root with veneer calipers. Total yield, marketable yield and cost-benefit analysis were determined us- ing all the ... plants and did not hold excess soil moisture.

  5. [Influence of plant growth regulater on yield and quality of Salvia miltiorrhiza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian-En; Zhang, Xiao-Yang

    2014-06-01

    The study is aimed to investigate the effect of plant growth regulators on yield and quality of the Salvia miltiorrhiza. The plant growth regulators was spraying on Salvia plants in July or August in field experiment, then the yield, ingredient content and the antioxidant activity were determined. The results showed that plant growth regulator 'Zhuanggenling' could increase the yield of Salvia with root-planting by 38.45%. Plant growth regulator 'Duoxiaozuo' could increase the yield of Salvia with seedling planting by 14.19%. Both plant growth regulator significantly reduced the antioxidant activity of Salvia in vitro, but they had no significant effect on active ingredient contents.

  6. Physiology of seed yield in soybean: Growth and dry matter production

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physiology of seed yield in soybean: Growth and dry matter production. MA Malek, MMA Mondal, MR Ismail, MY Rafii, Z Berahim. Abstract. A field study was conducted to assess the growth parameters controlling the dry matter and seed yield of soybean. The result shows that growth rate was slow during vegetative phase in ...

  7. Analysis and simulation of growth and yield of cut chrysanthemum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Key words : chrysanthemum, crop growth, development, explanatory model, expolinear growth, dry mass, dry matter partitioning, fresh mass, leaf area index, light interception, light use efficiency, plant density, season,

  8. Comparative growth and grain yield responses of soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... replications. The main plots were twelve soybean genotypes, while two P fertilizer levels constituted the sub-plots. Plant height, leaf area and number of branches per plant, crop growth rate, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and leaf area ratio were measured at full flowering, while number of pods ...

  9. Detecting and quantifying influenza virus with self- versus investigator-collected mid-turbinate nasal swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Andrea; Quach, Susan; McGeer, Allison; Gubbay, Jonathan B; Kwong, Jeffrey C

    2017-07-01

    We compared pairs of self- and investigator-collected mid-turbinate nasal swabs to detect and quantify influenza viral loads. We used RNase P, which reflects presence of human cells to determine adequate sample collection. Sixteen pairs of influenza-positive swabs and 25 pairs of influenza-negative swabs were included in this study. The median influenza A viral loads for self- and investigator-collected swabs were 1.68 and 1.67 log10 copies/mL, respectively (P = 0.96). RNase P loads were also similar between self- and investigator-collected swabs (P = 0.51). Self-collected mid-turbinate nasal swabs yield comparable viral loads to investigator-collected swabs, and therefore might be considered for research and clinical management. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. FEM growth and yield data uneven-aged - Beech-oak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouden, den J.; Jansen, J.J.; Goudzwaard, L.; Oldenburger, J.F.; Mohren, G.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The current database is part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collection of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species, with only a few plots,

  11. Growth and yield responses of rainy season field tomatoes to timing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth and yield responses of rainy season field tomatoes to timing and splitting of fertilizer application. G O Oko-Ibom, J E Asiegbu. Abstract. Growth and yield responses of eight (8) tomato cultivars (UN-83, Nsukka Local NHle-7-7-1, Roma VFN, Ronita, Ife 1, Rossol, and Ace VF) to different times and modes of NPK ...

  12. Ozone's suffocating effect on soybean physiology, growth and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is damaging air pollutant that is currently costing U.S. farmers hundreds of millions of dollars in yield losses each year. The detrimental effect of O3 on soybean production has been recognized over the past 30 to 40 years, yet there has been little effort to improve soybean...

  13. Examining growth, yield and bean quality of Ethiopian coffee trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bote, Adugna

    2016-01-01

    Coffee (Coffeaarabica L.)bean production and quality are determined by a diversity of interacting factors (e.g. shade, nitrogen, crop traits). Bean yield increases with increase in radiation, but adequate fertilizer suppliesare needed to sustain the productivity. This thesis analysed coffee tree

  14. growth and yield parameters of sorghum genotypes as affected

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    feasible. Sorghum is very versatile as a food and feed grain and exhibits wide adaptation and yield stability in marginal areas where it is used as a subsistence staple food. As a consequence, sorghum is important in traditional, low input, cereal based, semi-arid production farming systems in Africa (Norman, et al.,. 1984).

  15. Growth and Yield of Thinned Yellow-Poplar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald E. Beck; Lino Della-Bianca

    1972-01-01

    Diameter distributions and yields for various combinations of site index, age, and density for unthinned and largely undisturbed stands of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L. ) have been presented by McGee and Della-Bianca (1967) and Beck and Della-Bianca (1970). Their results were based on the initial measurements of a network of permanent sample plots...

  16. Analysis and simulation of growth and yield of cut chrysanthemum

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J H

    2002-01-01

    Key words : chrysanthemum, crop growth, development, explanatory model, expolinear growth, dry mass, dry matter partitioning, fresh mass, leaf area index, light interception, light use efficiency, plant density, season, simulation, validation, year-round.

    Seasonal variation in daily light integral naturally leads to seasonal variation in production and plant quality in year-ro...

  17. Improving the optimum yield and growth of Chlamydomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both strains had a quicker growth rate in just 35 mM of acetate and 10 mM glycerol although feed of algal cells on 35 mM acetate produced more and quicker biomass. In use of 10 mM acetate in micro plate and tissue culture flasks, CW15 had a maximum growth rate of 5.3×104 and 1.3×104 cells/hour; while on use of 35 ...

  18. Growth models for ponderosa pine: I. Yield of unthinned plantations in northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William W. Oliver; Robert F. Powers

    1978-01-01

    Yields for high-survival, unthinned ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) plantations in northern California are estimated. Stems of 367 trees in 12 plantations were analyzed to produce a growth model simulating stand yields. Diameter, basal area, and net cubic volume yields by Site Indices50 40 through 120 are tabulated for...

  19. Does high yield spread dampen economic growth? : the case of US-Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Kurihara

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the relationship between the United States' and Japan's yield spread of interest rates and economic growth in Japan. The yield spread is defined in this article as the difference between the Japanese government bond yield minus the US government bond yield. Some studies have tackled this issue and found a negative relationship between the yield spread and economic growth; however, recent studies have shown no or a weak relationship. This problem has not yet consensus in spite of its importance. As the Japanese interest rate has been quite low since the adoption of the zero interest rate policy at the end of 1990s, the situation may change the results. The empirical results show that reliability of yield spread as a leading indicator of output growth exists in Japan; however, term structure of interest rate is not related to economic growth.

  20. Screening plant growth promoting rhizobacteria for improving seed germination, seedling growth and yield of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezarat, S; Gholami, A

    2009-01-01

    The effect of Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) on seed germination, seedling growth and yield of field grown maize were evaluated in three experiments. In these experiments six bacterial strains include P. putida strain R-168, P. fluorescens strain R-93, P. fluorescens DSM 50090, P. putida DSM291, A. lipoferum DSM 1691 and A. brasilense DSM 1690 were used. Results of first study showed seed inoculation significantly enhanced seed germination and seedling vigour of maize. In second experiment, leaf and shoot dry weight and also leaf surface area significantly were increased by bacterial inoculation in both sterile and non-sterile soil. The results showed that inoculation with bacterial treatments had a more stimulating effect on growth and development of plants in nonsterile than sterile soil. In the third experiment, Inoculation of maize seeds with all bacterial strains significantly increased plant height, 100 seed weight, number of seed per ear and leaf area. The results also showed significant increase in ear and shoot dry weight of maize.

  1. Sugarcane straw removal effects on plant growth and stalk yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is growing interest in sugarcane straw removal from the field to use as raw material for bioenergy production. In contrast, sugarcane straw removal may have negative implications for many soil ecosystem services and subsequent plant growth. A two-year experiment was conducted at Bom Retiro and...

  2. effect of deficit irrigation on growth and yield of okro

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Cotton shows complex responses to deficit irrigation because of its deep root system, its ability to maintain low leaf water potential and to osmotically regulate leaf-turgor pressure (Grimes and Ya- mada, 1982). This study is aimed at determining the effect of different irrigation regimes on the growth and development of okro.

  3. Climate change effects on plant growth, crop yield and livestock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rötter, R.P.; Geijn, van de S.C.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given of the state of knowledge in the field of assessing climate change impacts on agricultural crops and livestock. Starting from the basic processes controlling plant growth and development, the possible impacts and interactions of climatic and other biophysical variables in different

  4. Growth and Yield Components of Tomato as Influenced by Nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3Ethiopian Water Resources Institute, alamirew2004@yahoo.com. Abstract. Tomato is an important ... However, incidences of pests and diseases, moisture stress, improper rates of fertilizer application and too high ... development, thus nitrogen has a dramatic effect on tomato growth and development in soils with limited N ...

  5. Influence of moisture stress on growth, dry matter yield and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moisture stress significantly reduced (p < 0.05) the total leaf area of I. amorphoides at moderate levels and that of I. vicioides at the most severe moisture stress level. The relative growth rate was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in I. amorphoides but not in I. arrecta, I. coerulea or I. vicioides plants subjected to moisturedeficit ...

  6. Impact of organic and inorganic fertilizers on growth, fruit yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was a split plot fitted into a randomized complete block design replicated three times. Data were collected on growth and reproductive parameters, fruit and seed attributes, and fruit proximate and nutritional contents. Data collected were subjected to analysis of variance to determine significant means.

  7. Investigation of Tolerance, Yield and Yield Components of Wheat Cultivars to Salinity of Irrigation Water at Sensitive Stages of Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Saadatian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This research in order to study of tolerance ability of wheat cultivates yield and yield components to salinity of irrigation water at sensitive stages of growth, was carried out as a factorial based on a randomized complete block design with 3 replications at greenhouse of Agricultural Faculty of Bu-Ali Sina University, in 2009. Treatments were included wheat cultivars of Alvand, Tous, Sayson and Navid and salinity of irrigation water induced by sodium chloride at five levels of 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 dS m-1. The results showed that percentage and rate of emergence, plant height, 1000-grain weight, number of seed per spike, number of spike per pot, biological and grain yield reduced by increasing salinity level. At all stress levels Navid cv. had highest emergence percentage. In non-stress and 4 dS m-1, Alvand cv. and at higher levels of stress, Tous cv. had high height in reproductive phase. At control and 4 dS m-1, Sayson cv. and at 8, 12 and 16 dS m-1, Tous cv. in majority of yield and yield components traits had significant superior than other cultivars. Tolerance index of Sayson cv. at 4 and 8 dS m-1 was more than other cultivars but at 12 and 16 dS m-1, maximum value of this index was belonged to Tous cv. At all salinity levels, Alvand cv. had least tolerance index to stress. Number of spike per pot had maximum direct effect on grain yield of wheat cultivars in stress condition. Also indirect effect of biological yield via number of spike per pot than other its indirect effects, had maximum share in wheat seed yield.

  8. Using the Yield Curve in Forecasting Output Growth and In‡flation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillebrand, Eric Tobias; Huang, Huiyu; Lee, Tae-Hwy

    Following Diebold and Li (2006), we use the Nelson-Siegel (NS, 1987) yield curve factors. However the NS yield curve factors are not supervised for a specifi…c forecast target in the sense that the same factors are used for forecasting different variables, e.g., output growth or infl‡ation. We...... propose a modifed NS factor model, where the new NS yield curve factors are supervised for a specifi…c variable to forecast. We show it outperforms the conventional (non-supervised) NS factor model in out-of-sample forecasting of monthly US output growth and infl‡ation. The original NS yield factor model...... is to combine information (CI) of predictors and uses factors of predictors (yield curve). The new supervised NS factor model is to combine forecasts (CF) and uses factors of forecasts of output growth or infl‡ation conditional on the yield curve. We formalize the concept of supervision, and demonstrate...

  9. The Effect of Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria on Transplants Growth and Lettuce Yield in Organic Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczech Magdalena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of beneficial bacterial strain B125 (Enterobacter sp. and strain PZ9 (Bacillus sp. in lettuce transplants production significantly enhanced seed germination and plant biomass. The best effect was obtained when the mixture of B125 and PZ9 was used. Combined application of these bacteria significantly increased transplants biomass, which was about 45% higher than that in the control. However, after planting these transplants in organic field, generally, there were no differences in yield and nutrient content in plants treated and not treated with the bacteria, except for nitrogen and vitamin C. The lettuce grown from transplants treated with bacterial mixture B125 + PZ9 contained significantly higher nitrogen than plants from other treatments. Opposite to nitrogen, bacterial applications decreased the amount of vitamin C. The growth and organic lettuce composition was affected by planting time. The yield was higher in spring, but the concentration of nutrients in these plants was lower than that in plants harvested in autumn. Climatic and light conditions in the late season were the reasons for increased dry matter content, minerals, phenolic compounds, and vitamin C, as well as high concentration of nitrates.

  10. Effect of Zeolite and Foliar Application of Selenium on Growth, Yield and Yield Component of Three Canola Cultivar under Conditions of Late Season Drought Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hossein ZAHEDI; Ghorban NOORMOHAMMADI; Amir Hossein SHIRANI RAD; Davood HABIBI; Masoud Mashhadi AKBAR BOOJAR

    2009-01-01

      In order to study effect of zeolite soil application and selenium foliar application on growth, yield and yield components of three canola cultivar under conditions of late season drought stress...

  11. [Effect of different plant growth regulators on yield and quality of Angelica dahurica var. formosana development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Kai; Chen, Jun-Wen; Zhai, Juan-Yuan; Shen, Hao; Chen, Li; Wu, Wei

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effect of plant growth regulators on the growth and quality of Angelica dahurica var. formosana. Five plant growth regulators: chlormequat chloride (CCC), Mepiquat chloride (PIX), Gibberellic acid (GA3), Paclobutrazol (PP333) and Maleic Hydrazide (MH) were sprayed in rosette stage, the effects of these plant growth regulators (PGRs) on the growth, yield and quality of A. dahurica var. formosanaw were observed. The biological traits were first measured and then imperatorin and isoimperatorin contents in roots were determined by HPLC. Low concentration GA3 increased the yield while not influenced the premature bolting rate and the coumarin content. Spraying of GA3 (30 mg x L(-1)) could guarantee the growth and development of A. dahurica var. formosana to have a higher yield and maintain the active ingredients content in the root as well.

  12. Effect of NPK and Poultry Manure on Growth, Yield, and Proximate Composition of Three Amaranths

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oyedeji, Stephen; Animasaun, David Adedayo; Bello, Abdullahi Ajibola; Agboola, Oludare Oladipo

    2014-01-01

      The study compares the growth, yield, and proximate composition of Amaranthus hybridus, Amaranthus cruentus, and Amaranthus deflexus, grown with poultry manure and NPK in relation to the unfertilized...

  13. A simplified field protocol for genetic sampling of birds using buccal swabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilstrup, Julia T.; Mullins, Thomas D.; Miller, Mark P.; McDearman, Will; Walters, Jeffrey R.; Haig, Susan M.

    2018-01-01

    DNA sampling is an essential prerequisite for conducting population genetic studies. For many years, blood sampling has been the preferred method for obtaining DNA in birds because of their nucleated red blood cells. Nonetheless, use of buccal swabs has been gaining favor because they are less invasive yet still yield adequate amounts of DNA for amplifying mitochondrial and nuclear markers; however, buccal swab protocols often include steps (e.g., extended air-drying and storage under frozen conditions) not easily adapted to field settings. Furthermore, commercial extraction kits and swabs for buccal sampling can be expensive for large population studies. We therefore developed an efficient, cost-effective, and field-friendly protocol for sampling wild birds after comparing DNA yield among 3 inexpensive buccal swab types (2 with foam tips and 1 with a cotton tip). Extraction and amplification success was high (100% and 97.2% respectively) using inexpensive generic swabs. We found foam-tipped swabs provided higher DNA yields than cotton-tipped swabs. We further determined that omitting a drying step and storing swabs in Longmire buffer increased efficiency in the field while still yielding sufficient amounts of DNA for detailed population genetic studies using mitochondrial and nuclear markers. This new field protocol allows time- and cost-effective DNA sampling of juveniles or small-bodied birds for which drawing blood may cause excessive stress to birds and technicians alike.

  14. Effect of rice-husk ash on exchange acidity, growth and yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of rice-husk ash on exchange acidity, growth and yield of groundnut ( Arachis hypogaea l.) in an acid ultisol. ... in an acid ultisol. D.O Nottidge, R.B Balogun, N.R Njoku ... Significant increases (P < 0.01) in soil P, K and Ca status relate significantly (P = 0.05) to patterns of growth and kernel yield of the crop. The 3 t ha-1 ...

  15. Growth and yield of onion as influenced by organic and inorganic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application rates of 80 kg/ha NPK 15:15:15 in combination with 15t/ha poultry manure enhanced the growth and yield of onion in terms of crop growth rate, chlorophyll content, harvest index and individual bulb weight of onion and significantly produced the highest yield of (29.55 t/ ha) in 2011/2012 and (28.17 t /ha) in ...

  16. Variation in growth, physiology, and yield of six sugarcane cultivars from across the globe in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of sugarcane cultivars with diverse genetic background under similar location can help in better understanding cultivar response to environment and in identifying various physiological traits that could lead to improved yields. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth, yield...

  17. Effects of sheep kraal manure on growth, dry matter yield and leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low manure rates (.2.5 t/ha) resulted in plant heights and fresh matter yields which ... There was no effect of manure rate or fertiliser on residual soil N and Ca, ... that .2.5 t/ha sheep kraal manure could result in growth, nutrient uptake and yield ...

  18. Growth, yield and quality responses to gibberellic acid (GA3)of Wax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-26

    Sep 26, 2011 ... anthocyanin content, total phenol and antioxidant activity was higher in GA3 treated fruits. From this study, it can be concluded that spraying with 50 mg/L GA3 once a week results in better yield and quality of jambu madu fruits under field conditions. Key words: Gibberellin, growth, quality, wax apple, yield.

  19. Effect of season on growth, fruit yield and nutrient profile of two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    growth, fruit yield and nutrient profile of two landraces (Variant I and II) of snake tomato (Trichosanthes cucumerina L.). ... ANOVA table for affects of variant and season on fruit production characteristics, fruit yield, and quality factors for Snake tomato. Number of .... evidence of serious water stress in cucurbits was said to.

  20. Growth, Yield and Fruit Quality of Grapevines under Organic and Biodynamic Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Johanna; Frisch, Matthias; Tittmann, Susanne; Stoll, Manfred; Kauer, Randolf

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine growth, yield and fruit quality of grapevines under organic and biodynamic management in relation to integrated viticultural practices. Furthermore, the mechanisms for the observed changes in growth, yield and fruit quality were investigated by determining nutrient status, physiological performance of the plants and disease incidence on bunches in three consecutive growing seasons. A field trial (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Riesling) was set up at Hochschule Geisenheim University, Germany. The integrated treatment was managed according to the code of good practice. Organic and biodynamic plots were managed according to Regulation (EC) No 834/2007 and Regulation (EC) No 889/2008 and according to ECOVIN- and Demeter-Standards, respectively. The growth and yield of the grapevines differed strongly among the different management systems, whereas fruit quality was not affected by the management system. The organic and the biodynamic treatments showed significantly lower growth and yield in comparison to the integrated treatment. The physiological performance was significantly lower in the organic and the biodynamic systems, which may account for differences in growth and cluster weight and might therefore induce lower yields of the respective treatments. Soil management and fertilization strategy could be responsible factors for these changes. Yields of the organic and the biodynamic treatments partially decreased due to higher disease incidence of downy mildew. The organic and the biodynamic plant protection strategies that exclude the use of synthetic fungicides are likely to induce higher disease incidence and might partially account for differences in the nutrient status of vines under organic and biodynamic management. Use of the biodynamic preparations had little influence on vine growth and yield. Due to the investigation of important parameters that induce changes especially in growth and yield of grapevines under

  1. Growth, Yield and Fruit Quality of Grapevines under Organic and Biodynamic Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Döring

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to determine growth, yield and fruit quality of grapevines under organic and biodynamic management in relation to integrated viticultural practices. Furthermore, the mechanisms for the observed changes in growth, yield and fruit quality were investigated by determining nutrient status, physiological performance of the plants and disease incidence on bunches in three consecutive growing seasons. A field trial (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Riesling was set up at Hochschule Geisenheim University, Germany. The integrated treatment was managed according to the code of good practice. Organic and biodynamic plots were managed according to Regulation (EC No 834/2007 and Regulation (EC No 889/2008 and according to ECOVIN- and Demeter-Standards, respectively. The growth and yield of the grapevines differed strongly among the different management systems, whereas fruit quality was not affected by the management system. The organic and the biodynamic treatments showed significantly lower growth and yield in comparison to the integrated treatment. The physiological performance was significantly lower in the organic and the biodynamic systems, which may account for differences in growth and cluster weight and might therefore induce lower yields of the respective treatments. Soil management and fertilization strategy could be responsible factors for these changes. Yields of the organic and the biodynamic treatments partially decreased due to higher disease incidence of downy mildew. The organic and the biodynamic plant protection strategies that exclude the use of synthetic fungicides are likely to induce higher disease incidence and might partially account for differences in the nutrient status of vines under organic and biodynamic management. Use of the biodynamic preparations had little influence on vine growth and yield. Due to the investigation of important parameters that induce changes especially in growth and yield of

  2. Effect of Spatial Arrangement on Growth and Yield of Cowpea in a Cowpea-maize Intercrop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocaya, CP.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea growth and yield performance when intercropped with maize was studied for 3 consecutive seasons under three spatial arrangements, i. e., maize planted at 90 x 30, 100 x 27, and 120 x 22.5 cm, with 2 rows of cowpea between the maize rows. Growth and yield of cowpea was improved significantly by widening maize intra-row distances as compared to the 90 x 30 cm spacing. Hence, intercropped cowpea needs to be sown where maize rows are wide apart, but the maize rows should not be too wide as this would lower the grain yield of maize.

  3. Light on Cut Chrysanthemum : Measurements and Simulation of Crop Growth and Yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelink, E.; Lee, J.H.; Buiskool, R.P.M.; Ortega, L.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of plant density and light intensity on crop growth and yield of cut chrysanthemum were investigated experimentally and simulated with a generic explanatory crop growth model (HORTISIM). In winter, supplementary light (HPS; 48 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR) increased total incident PAR with

  4. A standardized data structure for describing and exchanging data from remeasured growth and yield plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Sweet; John C. Byrne

    1990-01-01

    Proposes standard data definitions and format to facilitate the sharing of growth and yield permanent plot data for the development, testing, and improvement of tree or stand growth models. The data structure presented provides standards for documenting sampling design, plot location and summary descriptors, measurement dates, treatments, site attributes, and...

  5. A hidden square-root boundary between growth rate and biomass yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wilson W; Tran, Linh M; Liao, James C

    2009-01-01

    Although the theoretical value of biomass yield can be calculated from metabolic network stoichiometry, the growth rate is difficult to predict. Since the rate and yield can vary independently, no simple relationship has been discovered between these two variables. In this work, we analyzed the well-accepted enzyme kinetics and uncovered a hidden boundary for growth rate, which is determined by the square-root of three physiological parameters: biomass yield, the substrate turnover number, and the maximum synthesis rate of the turnover enzyme. Cells cannot grow faster than the square-root of the product of these parameters. This analysis is supported by experimental data and involves essentially no assumptions except (i) the cell is not undergoing a downshift transition, (ii) substrate uptake enzyme activity is proportional to its copy number. This simple boundary (not correlation) has escaped notice for many decades and suggests that the yield calculation does not predict the growth rate, but gives an upper limit for the growth rate. The relationship also explains how growth rate is affected by the yield and sheds lights on strain design for product formation.

  6. Effect of Supplemental Irrigation on Lentil Yield and Growth in Semi-Arid Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kahraman, Abdullah; Khan, Mohd Kamran; Pandey, Anamika; Ergun DOGAN

    2016-01-01

    Lentil is one of the most promising legume crops providing nutritional and food assurance to human beings. Due to extensive production of lentil crop in rain-fed agriculture system, its growth and yield are mainly determined by the levels of precipitation. Consequently, it usually faces drought stress during the generative stage resulting in low yield. In such scenario, controlled supplemental irrigation (SI) can improve and stabilize the productivity. Therefore, the present study was conduct...

  7. INFLUENCE OF ENRICHED BIO-DIGESTER LIQUID MANURE ON GROWTH AND YIELD OF FINGER MILLET

    OpenAIRE

    SUDHEENDRA SAUNCHI; V C REDDY; MALLIKARJUN; RAJESH RAWAL

    2014-01-01

    Application of enriched bio-digester liquid manure (BDLM) with poultry manure & rock phosphate equivalent to 60 kg N ha-1 had led lead to the significant grain yield (3893 kg ha-1) and straw yield (7228 kg ha -1) of finger millet compared to recommended practice which was in turn due to growth parameters viz., plant height, leaf area index, dry matter production and tillers

  8. High-yielding Wheat Varieties Harbour Superior Plant Growth Promoting-Bacterial Endophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehwish Yousaf

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the endophytic microbial flora of different wheat varieties to check whether a better yielding variety also harbours superior plant growth promoting bacteria. Such bacteria are helpful in food biotechnology as their application can enhance the yield of the crop.Material and Methods: Three wheat varieties (Seher, Faisalabad and Lasani were selected, Seher being the most superior variety. endophytic bacteria were isolated from the histosphere of the leaves and roots at different growth phases of the plants. The isolates were analyzed for plant growth promoting activities. Isolates giving best results were identified through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Statistical analysis was done using Microsoft Excel 2013. All the experiments were conducted in triplicates.Results and Conclusion: The endophytes of Seher variety showed maximum plant growth promoting abilities. Among the shoot endophytes, the highest auxin production was shown by Seher isolate SHHP1-3 up to 51.9μg ml-1, whereas in the case of root endophytes, the highest auxin was produced by SHHR1-5 up to 36 μg ml-1. The bacteria showing significant plant growth promoting abilities were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Bacillus, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria species were the dominant bacteria showing all the traits of plant growth promotion. It can be concluded that Seher variety harbours superior plant growth promoting endophytes that must be one of the reasons for its better growth and yield as compared to the other two varieties. The investigated results support possible utilization of the selected isolates in wheat growth promotion with respect to increase in agro-productivity. The application of such bacteria could be useful to enhance wheat yield and can help in food biotechnology.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  9. Effects of growth regulator and nitrogen on yield and lodging of irrigated wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Marques Paula Nunes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available High rates of nitrogen (N increase plant growth, which can result in lodging. To avoid excessive growth of plants, plant growth regulators (PGRs, which cause internode length reduction, can be used. In this study, our objective was to evaluate the N nutritional status, growth, and yield of irrigated wheat as parameters using variable rates of nitrogen and growth regulator. Two experiments were conducted in Rio Paranaíba – MG in 2011 and 2012 using the BRS 264 cultivar. The treatments consisted of two concentrations of N (50 and 110 kg ha-1 as urea and five concentrations of the growth regulator trinexapac-ethyl (0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 L ha-1 of Moddus® containing 25% w/v of trinexapac-ethyl. Each plot consisted of 20 rows of wheat spaced 0.17 m, six meters in length. We evaluated plant height, shoot dry matter accumulation, thousand-grain weight, number of grains per spike, yield, leaf N content in the index leaf and grain, amount of N uptake and export, and lodging index. The PGR resulted in a linear decrease in plant height and shoot dry matter production. However, the rates of the growth regulator did not affect productivity. The rates of N influenced the yield only in 2011.

  10. Phenotypic recurrent selection on herb growth yield of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus grown in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMED M. IBRAHIM

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim MM,Khalid KA. 2013. Phenotypic recurrent selection on herb growth yield of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus grown in Egypt. Nusantara Bioscience 5: 68-72. This investigation was conducted in four generations: base population (G0, G1, G2 and G3 (clone selection generation to evaluate the genetic variability of citronella clones. Thirteen clones were selected from base population to study the herb growth yield characters and oil production as well as genetic parameters, correlation and regression. Results were recorded for herb growth characters (i.e. plant high (PH, no. of tillers (NOT, dry yield (DY, viability percentage (VP and oil production. Significant variation was observed among citronella clones in base population for most studied traits. Wide range of mean values was observed among the characters for generations and cuts in most of traits. High heritability values (0.95, 0.93, 0.89 and 0.72 were estimated in NOT, LG, HY and VP., respectively. Clone code no. 39/3, 17/4 and 8/1 gave highest values of dry weight, oil yield and viability percentage. Selected clones showed significant positive regression and correlation between dry weight and each of number of tillers and linear growth. On contrary, viability percentage had significant negative correlation and regression with other characters. These results raveled high yielding selected citronella clones will be utilized in medicinal plant breeding program.

  11. Effect of treated tannery effluent with domestic wastewater and amendments on growth and yield of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagathjothi, N; Amanullah, M Mohamed; Muthukrishnan, P

    2013-11-15

    Pot culture and field experiments were carried out at the Common Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP), Dindigul during kharif 2011-12 to investigate the influence of irrigation of treated tannery effluent along with domestic wastewater on growth, yield attributes and yield of cotton. The pot culture was in a factorial completely randomized design and field experiment laid out in factorial randomized block design with four replications. The results revealed that the mixing proportion of 25% Treated Tannery Effluent (TTE)+75% domestic wastewater (DWW) application recorded taller plants, higher dry matter production, number of sympodial branches plant(-1), number of fruiting points plant(-1), number of bolls plant(-1) and seed cotton yield with yield reduction of 15.28 and 16.11% compared to normal water irrigation under pot culture and field experiment, respectively. Regarding amendments, gypsum application registered higher seed cotton yield followed by VAM.

  12. A Dynamic System of Growth and Yield Equations for Pinus patula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenceslao Santiago-García

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable forest management needs tools that can predict how silvicultural treatments will affect cutting stands. Growth and yield systems are an example of these tools because they can represent periods of growth and yield of a stand in numerical terms. The aim of this research was to develop a dynamic growth and yield timber system with the stand-level models approach for Pinus patula in even-aged forests of Ixtlán de Juárez, Oaxaca, Mexico. The data was obtained from two consecutive remeasurements of 66 permanent 400 m2 plots. With this information, prediction and projection equations in the algebraic difference approach for mean diameter at breast height (DBH, basal area and total volume per hectare were fitted through the seemingly unrelated regression technique. Mortality was fitted by the non-linear least squares method. A model of dominant height and site index (Levakovic II with polymorphism was related to basal area, DBH, total volume ha−1 and mortality equations. The growth system generated an average optimal age rotation of 32 years when the current annual increment (CAI was the same as the mean annual increment (MAI for the mean site index and a density of 1500 trees ha−1 at five years. The growth and yield system developed is an important tool for planning forest management of even-aged P. patula forests.

  13. Yield components in wheat affected by sowing density and growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Luiz Fioreze

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Improvement on yield potential of plants by crop management is the main research challenge due to the growing of food demand worldwide. The objective of this work was to study physiological and morphological traits and its relationship with yield components and yield of wheat as affected by sowing densities and plant growth regulators. The experimental design was a split-plot design with four replications. The plots were consisted by four sowing densities (30, 50 70 and 90 plants m-1 and the subplots were consisted by plant growth regulators [control, (IBA+GA+KT, Trinexapac-Ethyl e (IBA+GA+KT + Trinexapac-Ethyl]. Dry matter accumulation, plant height, source-sink distance, gas exchange and yield were determined. Trinexapac-Ethyl application resulted in decreasing of plant height, source-sink distance and flag leaf length; however, the grain yield was not affected. The number of plants per unit area affected dry matter accumulation. Higher dry matter accumulation showed direct relationship with yield and yield components in lower plant densities.

  14. Nitrogen fertilization and conservation tillage: a review on growth, yield, and greenhouse gas emissions in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adnan Noor; Iqbal, Javaid; Tanveer, Mohsin; Yang, Guozheng; Hassan, Waseem; Fahad, Shah; Yousaf, Muhammad; Wu, Yingying

    2017-01-01

    Cotton is planted worldwide as a "cash crop" providing us fiber, edible oil, and animal feed as well. In this review, we presented a contemporary synthesis of the existing data regarding the importance of nitrogen application and tillage system on cotton growth and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. Cotton growth and development are greatly influenced by nitrogen (N); therefore, proper N application is important in this context. Tillage system also influences cottonseed yield. Conservation tillage shows more promising results as compared to the conventional tillage in the context of cotton growth and GHG emission. Moreover, the research and knowledge gap relating to nitrogen application, tillage and cotton growth and yield, and GHG emission was also highlighted in order to guide the further studies in the future. Although limited data were available regarding N application, tillage and their interactive effects on cotton performance, and GHG emission, we also tried to highlight some key factors which influence them significantly.

  15. Importance of growth characteristics for yield of barley in different growing systems: will growth characteristics describe yield diffently in different growing systems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kristian; Ericson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The interest in organic grown cereals has increased the need for variety tests under organic growing systems and/or the knowledge on whether growth characteristics describe yield differently under conventional and organic conditions. This paper is a contribution to that question by examining...... system. The analyses showed that diseases seemed to have a less negative effect on yield in the organic growing system than in the conventional growing system if pesticides were not applied. For other characteristics the effect depended on the country. This was the case for grain characteristics where...... in the organic growing system than in the conventional growing system, but there was only a small and non-significant difference in the Swedish trials. In both countries there was a significant interaction between the two grain characteristics...

  16. Growth and yield of strawberry plants fertilized with nitrogen and phosphorus

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros,Reinaldo F.; Pereira,Walter E.; Rodrigues,Rummenigge de M.; Nascimento,Ronaldo do; Suassuna,Janivan F.; Dantas,Tony A. G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTStrawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) is a crop that has rapid growth and is highly influenced by fertilization. Due to its development speed, the plant needs to absorb sufficient macronutrients in order to meet its demand. The objective of this research was to evaluate growth and yield of strawberry under different doses of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) fertilization. The treatments, using Box's central composite design, were distributed in randomized blocks with four rep...

  17. Impact of Thiamethoxam Seed Treatment on Growth and Yield of Rice, Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanka, S K; Senthil-Nathan, S; Blouin, D J; Stout, M J

    2017-04-01

    Neonicotinoid seed treatments are widely used in agriculture. In rice, Oryza sativa L., in the southern United States, neonicotinoid seed treatments are used to manage early-season populations of the rice water weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel. In addition to their effects on pests, neonicotinoid seed treatments may benefit crop plants directly by increasing plant growth or altering plant responses to stresses. As part of an effort to assess the overall benefits of thiamethoxam seed treatment in rice, rice emergence, growth, and yield were evaluated. In a growth chamber, rice emergence from the soil was 1-2 d more rapid from treated than untreated seeds. These laboratory results were supported by field experiments that revealed higher stand counts from thiamethoxam-treated plots than from untreated plots. Yields from thiamethoxam treatments were no higher than those from untreated plots under conditions in which weevil larvae were absent, a result inconsistent with the hypothesis that thiamethoxam imparts direct yield benefits. In a series of field experiments conducted to compare the relationship between weevil larval densities and rice yields in plots treated with several rates of thiamethoxam or chlorantraniliprole (another widely used seed treatment insecticide), the relationship between weevil density and yield did not differ markedly among both seed treatments. Overall yields from both seed treatments did not differ significantly, despite more effective control in chlorantraniliprole-treated plots. These results provide strong support for effect of thiamethoxam on early-season growth of rice, but only weak support for its direct effect on rice yields. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Evaluation of sources of organic manure on the growth and yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were conducted at the Teaching and Research Farms of the University of Agriculture, Makurdi and the Cross River University of Technology, Obubra campus during the 2009 cropping season to study the effect of sources of organic manures on the growth and yield of two cultivars of Garden egg in the ...

  19. Time interval between cover crop termination and planting influences corn seedling disease, plant growth, and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were established in controlled and field environment to evaluate the effect of time intervals between cereal rye cover crop termination and corn planting on corn seedling disease, corn growth, and grain yield in 2014 and 2015. Rye termination dates ranged from 25 days before planting (DB...

  20. Maize growth, yield and soil nutrient changes with N-enriched ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Nigeria, in the degraded tropical rain forest zone to assess the growth and yield of maize with Nitrogen-enriched organic fertilizer made from municipal waste and cow dung (2.5t ha-1 Pacesetter fertilizer + 100kg ha-1 urea)and also with ...

  1. Effect of Mulching and Nitrogen Fertilizer on Growth and Yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was carried out in 2008 cropping season at the experimental farm of the faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources Management to evaluate effect of different rates of nitrogen (0, 70, 140, 210 kg N/ ha) and mulching (grass mulch) on the vegetative growth and green pod yield of okra. The experiment ...

  2. Response of leaf nutrient content, growth and corm yield of cocoyam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to provide information on soil management requirement of cocoyam, three field experiments were carried out at two locations in 2007, 2008 and 2009 on an Alfisol at Owo southwest Nigeria to evaluate the effects of different tillage methods and poultry manure levels on leaf nutrient content, growth and corm yield of ...

  3. Effect of tillage on soil physical properties, growth and yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of tillage, namely, no-tillage (NT), slashing (SH), ploughing (PHO), ploughing plus harrowing (PHA), ploughing plus harrowing plus bedding (PHB), on soil physical properties, growth and shoot yield of large-green leafy amaranth (Amaranth sp.). Soil moisture retention and ...

  4. Effects of spacing on the growth and yield of Okra ( Abelmochus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of plant population on growth and yield of Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench) was investigated for two planting seasons (2008 and 2009) in the teaching and research farm, Department of Agronomy, Cross River University of Technology, Obubra . Treatments were five Okra plant populations : 111,111, ...

  5. Growth and yield of cassava as influenced by maize and cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two field trials were conducted at the research farm of the National Root Crops Research Institute (NRCRI) Umudike, Igbariam sub-station (060151N, 060521E) in 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 cropping seasons to determine the growth and yield of cassava as influenced by maize and cowpea population densities. Cassava at ...

  6. Effect of pre- and post-heading waterlogging on growth and grain yield of four millets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asana Matsuura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Seeds of Panicum miliaceum, Panicum sumatrense, Setaria glauca, and Setaria italica were raised in polyvinylchloride tubes filled with soil to determine interspecific differences in waterlogging tolerance and the effect of pre- and post-heading waterlogging on growth and grain yield. Four treatments were conducted including control (no-waterlogging stress during growth. Pre-heading waterlogging treatment was initiated 17 days after sowing to heading (TC. Post-heading waterlogging treatment was initiated heading till harvest (CT. Waterlogging treatment was initiated 17 days after sowing to harvesting (TT. The grain yield of P. miliaceum, S. glauca, and S. italica decreased 16, 18, and 4%, while that of P. sumatrense increased 210% under TT treatment and this showed P. sumatrense had most waterlogging tolerance. The grain yield was more affected under TC treatment in S. italica and P. miliaceum. However, there was not significant differences the grain yield between TC and CT treatment in P. sumatrense and S. glauca. Total dry weight, total root dry weight, number of crown root, and the proportion of lysigenous aerenchyma of P. sumatrense were significantly higher than those of other millets at harvesting. Plant growth rate, total root dry weight, number of crown root, and the proportion of lysigenous aerenchyma of P. sumatrense were significantly higher than those of other millets at heading. These results suggest that P. sumatrense exhibits waterlogging tolerance by enhancing root growth characterized by a high proportion of lysigenous aerenchyma in the crown root.

  7. Effect of different vine lengths on the growth and yield of orange ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiment was conducted in 2014 cropping season at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Agricultural Education Department, Nwafor Orizu College of Education, Nsugbe to investigate the effect of different vine lengths on the growth and yield of orange-fleshed sweet potato (Ipomea batatas(L) Lam) in ultisols of ...

  8. Assessment of growth and yield of some high-and low- cyanide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ENGR C.J

    2014-01-29

    Jan 29, 2014 ... 2Department of Crop Production Technology, Federal College of Agriculture, P. M. B. 7008, Ishiagu, Ebonyi State, .... Growth and yield characters of twenty five high-cyanide cassava genotypes in 2004 and 2005 cropping seasons. ..... International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Cali Colombia,.

  9. Influence of Intra row spacing on growth and fodder yield of Lablab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: A Field experiment was conducted in 2010 and repeated in 2011 cropping seasons at the Usmanu. Danfodiyo University Teaching and Research Farm, Dabagi to determine the effect of intra row spacing on growth and yield of Lablab purpureus. Treatments consisted three intra row spacings (20, 30 and 40cm) ...

  10. Effects of nitrogen levels on growth, yield and nitrogen uptake of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    1970-08-15

    Aug 15, 1970 ... To investigate the effect of nitrogen (N) application level on fiber-rich cultivar, Goami 2, an experiment was carried out on a paddy soil at the rice experimental farm of the National Institute of Crop Science. (NICS), Rural Development Administration (RDA) in Suwon, Korea. Rice growth, yield and its.

  11. Effect of time of fertilizer application on growth and yield of maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was carried out during the 2006 growing season, between June and November, to investigate the growth and yield responses of four varieties of maize (SUWAN-1-Y, TZSR-Y, DMESR-W and ACROSS-97 TZL) to time of fertilizer application (2,4 and 6 weeks after planting). The experiment was laid out in a 3 x ...

  12. Effect of NPK and organo-mineral fertilizer on the growth and yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of NPK and organo-mineral fertilizer on the growth and yield of jute mallow (Corchorus Olitorius) in Ilorin north central Nigeria. E.K. Eifediyi, H.E. Ahamefule, I. Kareem, T.O. Olukayode, M.O. Musa, S.U. Remison ...

  13. Complementary Use of NPK Fertilizer and Zinc on Growth and Yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out at the research farm, National Root Crops Research Institute, Sub-station Igbariam to determine the effect of NPK fertilizer and zinc on growth and yield of cocoyam. The study was a factorial type fitted into a randomized complete block design (RCBD) replicated three times. Five levels of NPK fertilizer ...

  14. Effect of water stress on the growth and some yield parameters of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of water stress on the growth and some yield parameters of Solanum lycopersicum L. ... Plants in the first group (W1) were supplied with 200 ml of water everyday; plants in the second group (W2) were supplied with 200 ml of water once every 3 days; plants in the third group (W3) were supplied with 200 ml of water ...

  15. The content of parthenolide and its yield per plant during the growth of Tanacetum parthenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, H; Anderson-Wildeboer, Y.; Bos, R.; Woerdenbag, H.J.

    During the growth of Tanaceum parthenium (L.) Schultz-Bip. Feverfew, Asteraceae) the percentage of parthenolide was the highest at an early stage (just before the formation of stems), The yield of parthenolide per individual plant gradually increased from about 10 mg at the beginning of the study to

  16. Growth and yield of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) as affected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    Growth and yield of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) as affected by nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization and water regimes in Tigray, Ethiopia. Dejene Kassahun Mengistu. * and Fetien Abay Abera. Department of Dryland crop and Horticultural Science, College of Dryland Agriculture,. P.O.Box, 231, Mekelle University, Mekelle, ...

  17. Influence of sub-optimal temperature on tomato growth and yield : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der A.; Heuvelink, E.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of temperature on growth, development and yield of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) are reviewed with special emphasis on cultivar differences. The focus is on sub-optimal temperatures, above the level where chilling injury occurs. Temperature has a large effect on all aspects of

  18. Effect of seed yam weight on growth and tuber yield of white yam ( D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of different weights of seed yam (250, 300 and 350 g) on growth and tuber yield of white yam were evaluated. The results showed significant differences (P<0.05) among the three seed yam weights in vine length, number and basal diameter, and leaf number measured at 8, 10, and 12 weeks after planting, ...

  19. Growth and yield response of carrot ( Daucus carota l .) to different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 5 x 2 factorial field experiment in a randomised complete block design with four replications was conducted at the College of Agriculture Education, University of Education, Winneba, Mampong Campus to investigate the growth and yield responses of carrot to different rates of soil amendments and spacing. The five rates ...

  20. Effects of magnetic treatment of water on the growth, yield and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of magnetic treatment of water on the growth, yield and quality of maize. Three magnetic flux densities of 443, 319 and 124 gauss (G) produced by the electromagnet were used to treat the water and they were lablelled as T1, T2 and T3, respectively. The water was called ...

  1. Growth and yield performance of Jerusalem artichoke clones in a semiarid region of China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Z.X.; Spiertz, J.H.J.; Sha, J.; Xue, S.; Xie, G.H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated biomass yield and growth characteristics of 26 Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) clones and assessed it as a bioenergy crop for a semiarid region of the Loess Plateau in China. Genotype, year, and genotype ´ year interaction contributed to differences in crop

  2. Effect of pod maturation on vegetative growth, fruit yield and seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of pod maturation on vegetative growth, fruit yield and seed germination of Okra ( Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench) Effet de la maturation des gousses sur la croissance vegetative, la production des fruits et la germination des graines du gombo ( Abelmoschus esculentus (L) Moench)

  3. Effects Of Organic Fertilizer And Spacing On Growth And Yield Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIHORT), Ibadan to investigate the effects of maize-stover compost fertilizer and plant spacing on the growth and shoot yield of Celosia argentea L. var. TLV8. Plants were spaced 15x 15cm; 20 x 20cm and 25 x 25cm and the compost fertilizer was ...

  4. Quantifying the effects of uniconazole on growth and yield of pyrethrum in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficacy of the plant growth regulator uniconazole (Sumagic®) was evaluated in replicated and field-scale demonstrations trials in each of three years (2009 to 2011) for manipulating pyrethrum canopy architecture and enhancing yield, in commercial fields across northern Tasmania, Australia. Tri...

  5. Nitrogen and Plant Growth Regulator Rates on Cotton Yield and Fiber Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of two plant growth regulator (PGR) strategies with and without a high application PGR rate, prior to harvest, on cotton yield and fiber quality across two N rates for a cotton conservation tillage system. Nitrogen rates and PGR strategie...

  6. Development of growth and yield models for southern hardwoods: site index determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Paul McTague; Daniel J. Robison; David O' Loughlin; Joseph Roise; Robert Kellison

    2006-01-01

    Growth and yield data from across 13 southern States, collected from 1967 to 2004 from fully-stocked even-aged southern hardwood forests on a variety of site types, was used to calculate site index curves. These derived curves provide an efficient means to evaluate the productivity-age relation which varies across many sites. These curves were derived for mixed-species...

  7. A parametric study on the growth of yield front in rotating annular disks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    A parametric study on the growth of yield front in rotating annular disks. Shubhankar Bhowmick. 1. , Dipten Misra. 2 and Kashi Nath Saha. 3. 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Raipur 492010, India. 2, 3 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032, ...

  8. A parametric study on the growth of yield front in rotating annular disks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth of elastic-plastic front under post-elastic conditions in high speed rotating annular disks having exponential and parabolic geometry variation is investigated in the present study. The problem is addressed in post-elastic regime through an extension of variational method based on von-Mises yield criterion and ...

  9. Effects of different fertilizer inputs on the growth and yield of soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of different fertilizer inputs on the growth and yield of soybean planted on an Alfisols in the Teaching and Research Farm of the Federal University of Technology, Minna during the 2011 cropping season. Minna lies within the southern Guinea savanna zone of Nigeria on longitude of 06027'E and latitude of 09032'N.

  10. Maintaining a permanent plot data base for growth and yield research: Solutions to some recurring problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Byrne

    1993-01-01

    Methods for solving some recurring problems of maintaining a permanent plot data base for growth and yield reseuch are described. These methods include documenting data from diverse sampling designs, changing sampling designs, changing field procedures, and coordinating activities in the plots with the land management agency. Managing a permanent plot data base (...

  11. Effects of calcium paste as a seed coat on growth, yield and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to study the effect of coating the seeds with calcium paste before sowing, on plant growth, yield, the contents of some antioxidants and the activities of carbonic anhydrase and nitrate reductase in the Pisum sativum L. leaves under the influence of NaCl stress. NaCl stress reduced plant ...

  12. Effect of Sources of Organic Manure on Growth and Yields of Okra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cow, Sheep and Poultry Manure) on growth and yield of okra was carried out at the Teaching and Research Fadama Farm of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Sokoto, Nigeria during 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 dry seasons. Treatments were laid ...

  13. Efficacy of nitrogen on the growth and yield of maize (Zea Mays L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two field experiments were conducted to determine the efficacy of Nitrogen fertilizer on the growth and yield of improved maize variety in the teaching and research farm department of Agronomy Obubra, Cross River University of Technology during the 2003 / 2004 cropping seasons. The experiment comprised seven rates ...

  14. Effect of Pre-Crop Type on Growth and Yield of Maize on Two Soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Their effects on growth, grain yield and arbuscular mycorrhiza formation of the following maize in a rotational system were assessed. A non-fertilized weedy fallow treatment was also included as control. Each of the legume pre-crops received 40 kg P ha-1 and 30 kg K ha-1 whereas the cereals received 60-40-30 kg N-P-K ...

  15. Effects of salinity on germination, growth and yield of five groundnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of salinity on germination, growth and yield parameters as well as phenotypic variance and heritability of five groundnut genotypes (Ex-Dakar, RRB 12, RMP 12, RMP 91 and Esan Local) were investigated. Saline treatments were imposed by irrigating the seeds and plants with varying concentrations of brackish ...

  16. Growth and yield response to plant density of water leaf ( Talinum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of different planting spaces (15cm x 15cm, 20cm x 20cm, 25cm x 25cm and 30cm x 30cm) on the growth and yield of Talinum triangulare (Water leaf) were investigated in two cropping seasons from 2012 to 2013 (rainy and dry seasons) at University of Port Harcourt Teaching and Research farm, Port Harcourt, ...

  17. Growth and yield of barley ( Hordeum vulgare L .) as affected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth and yield of barley ( Hordeum vulgare L .) as affected by nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization and water regimes in Tigray, Ethiopia. ... The understanding of the interactive effects of abiotic stresses is a crucial issue for improving cereal production in arid environment. For this reason, study was conducted in northern ...

  18. Effect of weeding frequency on the growth and yield of cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Department of Agricultural Technology, Federal Polytechnic, Mubi, Adamawa State between July and September, 2012, to assess the effect of weeding frequency on the growth and yield of cowpea. The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design with four treatments (zero weeding, weeding once, ...

  19. Growth and yield responses of broccoli cultivars to different rates of nitrogen at western Chitwan, Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giri, Raj Kumar; Sharma, Moha Datta; Shakya, Santa Man

    2013-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted with the objective to determine the optimum rate of nitrogen (N) fertilizer for effective growth and yield of two varieties of broccoli in southern plain of Nepal. The experiment was laid out with two-factorial completely random block design (RCBD) comprising two...

  20. Effect of Staking and Pruning on the Growth and Yield of Cucumber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of pruning and staking on the vegetative growth and yield of cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.). The experiment was a 3 x 2 factorial laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with five replications. The results showed that vine length, number of flowers, total ...

  1. Effects of nitrogen levels on growth, yield and nitrogen uptake of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate the effect of nitrogen (N) application level on fiber-rich cultivar, Goami 2, an experiment was carried out on a paddy soil at the rice experimental farm of the National Institute of Crop Science (NICS), Rural Development Administration (RDA) in Suwon, Korea. Rice growth, yield and its components for Goami 2 ...

  2. Efficiency of NEB-33 fortified fertilizers on growth and yield of pepper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two year field study was conducted in Institute of Agriculture Reasearch and Training experimental field at Ibadan, Nigeria to evaluate the effects of NEB-33 fertilizer additive on the growth and yield of chilli pepper (Capsium fruitscen). Treatments consisted of control, NPK, poultry manure (PM), organomineral fertilizer (OM) ...

  3. evaluation of growth of young coconut and nut yield of old coconut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    EVALUATION OF GROWTH OF YOUNG COCONUT AND. NUT YIELD OF OLD COCONUT AND THEIR NUTRIENT. STATUS UNDER COCONUT-CASSAVA INTERCROPPING. SYSTEMS. E. Andoh-Mensah,1 R. Nuhu Issaka2 and A. S. Ennin3. 1CSIR - Oil Palm Research Institute, Coconut Programme, Box 245, Sekondi, ...

  4. Effect Of Different Rates Of Pig Manure On The Growth And Yield Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out to assess the response of Phaseolus vulgaris to various rates of pig manure application with respect to growth and yield. The study was carried out in a completely randomized design replicated four times. The rate of pig manure application did not affect plant height throughout the period of plant ...

  5. Parthenocarpic Fruit Growth Reduces Yield Fluctuations and Blossom-end Rot in Sweet Pepper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelink, E.; Körner, O.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether parthenocarpic fruit growth could avoid flushing, i.e. an irregular yield pattern, in sweet pepper. Plants were grown in a greenhouse compartment from April until August. Half of the plants were grown without a fruit set treatment (control), whereas

  6. Effect of phospho-compost on growth and yield of cowpea ( Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of phospho-compost on the growth and yield of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) was studied at Juaboso in the Western Region of Ghana. It was a factorial experiment arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Phospho-compost, prepared from phosphate rock, cocoa pod husk, sawdust ...

  7. Effect of planting date on growth and grain yield of fonio millet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seven planting times (from early July to mid August with 7-day interval) were laid out in a randomized complete block design. In general, plant growth and grain yield were significantly better for the early July sowing dates compared to other sowing dates. However, tillering capacity and grain size were not influenced by the ...

  8. Growth and yield of sweet potato ( Ipomoea batates (L.) Lam.) as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth and yield of sweet potato (Ipomoea batates (L.) Lam.) as influenced by type of planting material. O A Namo, O E Michael. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Pure and Applied Physics Vol. 14 (1) 2008 pp. 37-42. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  9. A comparison of DNA collection and retrieval from two swab types (cotton and nylon flocked swab) when processed using three QIAGEN extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlow, Robert J; Dagnall, Kathryn E; Ames, Carole E

    2012-05-01

    The Metropolitan Police Service currently uses cotton swabs to retrieve DNA for forensic profiling. Recently, a new nylon flocked swab type has become available from Copan (MicroRheologics, Brescia, Italy) that it is claimed, offers increased sample recovery and release yields. If true, the flocked swab may have important applications in DNA evidence retrieval. This study examines the DNA retrieval capability of cotton and nylon flocked swabs when extracted using three common extraction platforms (QIAcube, BioRobot EZ1 and manually processed QIAamp DNA investigator kit). Results indicate that both swab types are capable of recovering high percentages of DNA (>50%); however, the extraction platform selected was shown to have a significant effect upon DNA retrieval. Across all experiments, the cotton swab combined with the spin-column extractions was shown to be most effective, with the nylon swab and BioRobot EZ1 combination being the least effective. These findings illustrate the importance of extraction method selection. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. EFFECT OF SPACING ON THE GROWTH AND YIELD OF SWEET PEPPER (Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monirul ISLAM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was carried out at the Horticultural farm of the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI, Joydebpur, Gazipur, during September 2006 to April 2007 to investigate growth and yield of sweet pepper as influenced by spacing. There were three levels of spacing viz. 50×50 cm, 50×40 cm, 50×30 cm. The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD with three replications. Data were recorded on various parameters and subjected to statistical analysis. The plant spacing had significant variation in almost all the growth and yield components except pericarp thickness. Number of branches per plant, number of leaves per plant, stem girth, number of fruits per plant, days to first harvest, fruit length, individual fruit weight, yield per plant were found to be significantly increased with the increasing of plant spacing but plant height at different stages, number of fruits per plot, days to 50% flowering, fruit breadth, yield per plot and yield per hectare were found to be significantly increased with the decreasing plant spacing. Considering the yield of fruits per hectare, cost of production and net return, 50×30cm spacing appeared to be recommendable for the cultivation of sweet pepper.

  11. OAKSIM: An individual-tree growth and yield simulator for managed, even-aged, upland oak stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald E. Hilt; Donald E. Hilt

    1985-01-01

    OAKSIM is an individual-tree growth and yield simulator for managed, even-aged, upland oak stands. Growth and yield projections for various thinning alternatives can be made with OAKSIM for a period of up to 50 years. Simulator components include an individual-tree diameter growth model, a mortality model, height prediction equations, bark ratio equations, a taper-...

  12. Influence of Plant Growth Regulators (PGRs and Planting Method on Growth and Yield in Oil Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo var. styriaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirzad SURE

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plant growth regulators IBA (indole butyric acid, GA3 (gibberellin and ethylene (as ethephon in two methods of planting was investigated (each method was considered as a separate experiment on morphological characters and yield of medicinal pumpkin. The experiments were carried out in a factorial trial based on completely randomized block design, with four replicates. The treatments were combined with priming and spraying with the above PGRs. The first seed priming with control (water, IBA 100 ppm, GA3 25 ppm and ethephon 200 ppm, and when seedling developed to 4 leaf stage sprayed there with control (water, IBA 100 ppm, GA3 25 ppm and ethephon 200 ppm for three times. In both planting methods, there were all of these treatments. The result showed that PGRs and planting method had significant effects on vegetative, flowering and yield characteristics including: leaf area %DM plant, number of male and female flowers per plant, number of fruit/plant, fruits fresh weight, seeds length and width, number of seed per fruit, seed yield, % seeds oil and oil yield. Hence spraying with GA3 25 ppm in four leaf stage at trellis method could be a suitable treatment for enhancing growth and yield of medicinal pumpkin.

  13. Effect of seaweed extracts on growth and yield of rice plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALUH NIKMATULLAH

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Sunarpi, Jupri A, Kurnianingsih R, Julisaniah NI, Nikmatullah A 2010. Effect of seaweed extracts on growth and yield of rice plants. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 73-77. Application of liquid seaweed fertilizers on some plant specieshas been reported to decrease application doses of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium on some crop plants, as well as stimulating growth and production of many plants. It has been reported that there are at least 59 species of seaweeds found in coastal zone of West Nusa Tenggara Province, 15 of those species weres able to stimulate germination, growth and production of some horticultural and legume plants. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of seaweed extracts obtained from ten species on growth and production of rice plants. To achive the goal, seaweed (100 g per species wasextracted with 100 mL of water, to obtain the concentration of 100%. Seaweed extract (15% was sprayed into the rice plants during vegetative and generative stages. Subsequently, the growth and yield parameters of rice plants were measured. The results shown that extracts of Sargassum sp.1, Sargassum sp.2, Sargassum polycistum, Hydroclathrus sp., Turbinaria ornata, and Turbinaria murayana, were able to induce growth of rice plants. However, only the Hydroclathrus sp. extract could enhance both growth and production of rice plants.

  14. Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Si; Zhenjiang, Zhou; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2015-01-01

    of the regression model showed that the maximum yield, 1166 g per plant, was obtained by the combination of θ1 (c. 28% ASW), θ2 (c. 82% ASW), θ3 (c. 92% ASW), θ4 (c. 92% ASW), and θ5 (c. 92% ASW). This result may guide irrigation scheduling to achieve higher tomato yield and WUE based on specific soil water...... effects of ASW in two growth stages were between θ2 and θ5, θ3. In both cases a moderate θ2 was a precondition for maximum yield response to increasing θ5 and θ3. Sensitivity analysis revealed that yield was most sensitive to soil water content at fruit maturity (θ5). Numerical inspection...

  15. Growth, efficiency, and yield of commercial broilers from 1957, 1978, and 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidhof, M J; Schneider, B L; Carney, V L; Korver, D R; Robinson, F E

    2014-12-01

    The effect of commercial selection on the growth, efficiency, and yield of broilers was studied using 2 University of Alberta Meat Control strains unselected since 1957 and 1978, and a commercial Ross 308 strain (2005). Mixed-sex chicks (n = 180 per strain) were placed into 4 replicate pens per strain, and grown on a current nutritional program to 56 d of age. Weekly front and side profile photographs of 8 birds per strain were collected. Growth rate, feed intake, and measures of feed efficiency including feed conversion ratio, residual feed intake, and residual maintenance energy requirements were characterized. A nonlinear mixed Gompertz growth model was used to predict BW and BW variation, useful for subsequent stochastic growth simulation. Dissections were conducted on 8 birds per strain semiweekly from 21 to 56 d of age to characterize allometric growth of pectoralis muscles, leg meat, abdominal fat pad, liver, gut, and heart. A novel nonlinear analysis of covariance was used to test the hypothesis that allometric growth patterns have changed as a result of commercial selection pressure. From 1957 to 2005, broiler growth increased by over 400%, with a concurrent 50% reduction in feed conversion ratio, corresponding to a compound annual rate of increase in 42 d live BW of 3.30%. Forty-two-day FCR decreased by 2.55% each year over the same 48-yr period. Pectoralis major growth potential increased, whereas abdominal fat decreased due to genetic selection pressure over the same time period. From 1957 to 2005, pectoralis minor yield at 42 d of age was 30% higher in males and 37% higher in females; pectoralis major yield increased by 79% in males and 85% in females. Over almost 50 yr of commercial quantitative genetic selection pressure, intended beneficial changes have been achieved. Unintended changes such as enhanced sexual dimorphism are likely inconsequential, though musculoskeletal, immune function, and parent stock management challenges may require additional

  16. Boron Application Improves Growth, Yield and Net Economic Return of Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubshar HUSSAIN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A field trial was conducted to evaluate the role of boron (B application at different growth stages in improving the growth, yield and net economic return of rice at farmer's fields during summer season, 2009. Boron was soil applied (1.5 kg/hm2 at the transplanting, tillering, flowering and grain formation stages of rice; foliar applied (1.5% B solution at the tillering, flowering and grain formation stages of rice, and dipped seedling roots in 1.5% B solution before transplanting; while control plots did not apply any B. Boron application (except dipping of seedling roots in B solution, which caused toxicity and reduced the number of tillers and straw yield than control substantially improved the rice growth and yield. However, soil application was better in improving the number of grains per panicle, 1000-grain weight, grain yield, harvest index, net economic income and ratio of benefit to cost compared with the rest of treatments. Overall, for improving rice performance and maximizing the net economic returns, B might be applied as soil application at flowering.

  17. Effect of NPK fertilization and elemental sulphur on growth and yield of lowbush blueberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. STARAST

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the effect of fertilizers on the pH of former arable soils and on the growth and the yield of the lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.. Lowbush blueberry fertilization experiments were established in 1999 at two locations – at Kärla, Saaremaa, West Estonia and at Vasula, Tartu County, South Estonia. Experimental sites were situated on different soils: soil pHKCl at Kärla was 5.5 and at Vasula 6.2. Elemental sulphur and acidifying fertilizers (ammonium sulfate, potassium sulfate and superphosphate were used in both plantations. Fertilizers were applied based on nutrient in the soil and sulphur was applied at 100 g m–2. Plant growth was recorded in 2001, 2002 and 2003. A positive influence of NPK fertilization on yield was found in both Kärla and Vasula, and yield were 336 g and 41 g higher compared to the control, respectively. The vegetative growth and yield of blueberry depended significantly on soil pH. Elemental sulphur increased soil acidity and on loamy sand soil did not increase plant productivity. The sulphur effect on soil pH began to decrease three years after application. Sulphur can be recommended to increase soil acidity in nutrient-rich soil but, not nutrient poor soil with light texture, where only NPK fertilizers were effective.;

  18. Foliar copper uptake by maize plants: effects on growth and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Hidalgo Barbosa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A slight increase in the levels of a certain nutrient can cause a significant increase in crop yield or can cause phytotoxicity symptoms. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of foliar application of copper (Cu on the growth and yield of DG-501 maize. The experiment was carried out between December 2009 and April 2010 in conventional tillage. When plants were with six to eight leaves, Cu (0, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600g ha-1 was applied to the leaves. Treatments were arranged in randomized complete block with five replications. When 50% of the plants were in flowering, it was evaluated the plant height, culm diameter, height of the first ear insertion, leaf area, and chlorophyll content. At harvest, it was evaluated diameter and length of the ear, yield and thousand grain weight. There was a linear reduction in the plant height and in the height of the first ear insertion with increasing Cu doses. On the other hand, chlorophyll content, leaf area, diameter and length of ear, thousand grain weight and yield increased at doses up to 100g ha-1 Cu, however, decreased at higher doses. Therefore, foliar Cu application at doses higher than 100g ha-1 has toxic effect in maize plants with losses in growth and yield.

  19. Influence of growth regulators on plant growth, yield, and skin color of specialty potatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2,4-D has been used since the 1950’s to enhance color in red-skinned potatoes, but there is little research on the potential use of other plant growth regulators to improve tuber skin color in the wide range of specialty potatoes now available on the market. Field trials conducted at Parma, ID in 20...

  20. Exogenously Applied Plant Growth Regulators Enhance the Morpho-Physiological Growth and Yield of Rice under High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Ihsan, Zahid; Shah, Adnan N; Wu, Chao; Yousaf, Muhammad; Nasim, Wajid; Alharby, Hesham; Alghabari, Fahad; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR) on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT) and high night temperature (HNT). Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan) were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc), alpha-tocopherol (Ve), brassinosteroids (Br), methyl jasmonates (MeJA), and triazoles (Tr) were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above-, and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future.

  1. Stability Studies on Dry Swabs and Wet Mailed Swabs for Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Aptima Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Jeanne; Clark, Carey B; Holden, Jeffrey; Hook, Edward W; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Schachter, Julius

    2017-03-01

    The Aptima Combo 2 (AC2) and Aptima CT (ACT) (Hologic Inc., San Diego, CA) are nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) that detect Chlamydia trachomatis AC2 also detects Neisseria gonorrhoeae Storage and temperature conditions may impact the utility of NAATs in some settings and screening programs. We evaluated specimen stability for use beyond the Aptima package insert specifications for temperature and duration of storage (between 2°C and 30°C and 60 days, respectively) in two studies: (i) dry C. trachomatis-seeded swabs were used with ACT after storage at 4°C, 23°C, or 36°C for up to 84 days and (ii) swabs seeded with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae and then placed in transport medium were tested with AC2, after being mailed via the U.S. Postal Service to three different sites. Prolonged storage of samples had no effect, and samples stored at 4°C, 23°C, and 36°C for up to 84 days yielded comparable ACT positivities, although there was a drop in signal intensity for virtually all specimens under all storage/shipping conditions after day 21. In the mailing study, 80%, 52% and 29% of seeded swabs were exposed to temperatures of >30°C during three rounds in transit, and 2% reached temperatures of >40°C. No evidence of signal degradation in the AC2 assay for detection of C. trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae was observed, although some mailed swabs took more than 5 weeks to reach the laboratory site. These two studies support the potential use of swabs at temperatures above 36°C and storage beyond 60 days and provide confidence regarding this commercially available NAAT for testing of specimens after mailing. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Comparative effectiveness of different Rhizobium sp. for improving growth and yield of maize (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijaz Mehboob, Zahir Ahmad Zahir, Muhammad Arshad, Muhammad Khalid

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last couple of decades, it has been demonstrated that rhizobia can associate with roots of non-legumes also without forming true nodules, and can promote their growth by using one or more of the direct or indirect mechanisms of actions. This work examines the growth and yield responses of maize to inoculation with different species of rhizobia, isolated from the root nodules of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L., lentil (Lens culinaris M. and mung bean (Vigna radiata L. in pots and fields. Twenty isolates of rhizobia were isolated from root nodules each of mung bean, lentil and chickpea and were screened under axenic conditions. On the basis of their promising performance under axenic conditions, nine most efficient isolates (three from each legume host were selected, characterized and further evaluated for their growth promoting activities by conducting pot and field experiments. Results of pot experiment revealed that maximum increase in grain yield, 1000 grain weight, N, P and K uptake (up to 47.89, 54.52, 73.46, 84.66 and 59.19% by CRI28, respectively, over un-inoculated control was produced by the isolate of Mesorhizobium ciceri. Whereas, maximum improvement in rest of the parameters was caused by the isolates of Rhizobium phaseoli (i.e. fresh biomass, straw yield and root length up to 36.30% by A18, 25.46% by S6 and 81.89% by A18, respectively over un-inoculated control. Rhizobium leguminosarum isolates came out to be the least effective among the species tested. Similarly, all the selected isolates improved the growth and yield attributing parameters in fields as well but with varying capacity compared with un-inoculated control. The selected isolates of Mesorhizobium ciceri and Rhizobium phaseoli again remained superior compared to the isolates of Rhizobium leguminosarum under field conditions. The results of this study imply that rhizobium species had potential to promote growth and yield of maize but this technology should be

  3. Tree growth and management in Ugandan agroforestry systems: effects of root pruning on tree growth and crop yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajja-Musukwe, Tellie-Nelson; Wilson, Julia; Sprent, Janet I; Ong, Chin K; Deans, J Douglas; Okorio, John

    2008-02-01

    Tree root pruning is a potential tool for managing belowground competition when trees and crops are grown together in agroforestry systems. We investigated the effects of tree root pruning on shoot growth and root distribution of Alnus acuminata (H.B. & K.), Casuarina equisetifolia L., Grevillea robusta A. Cunn. ex R. Br., Maesopsis eminii Engl. and Markhamia lutea (Benth.) K. Schum. and on yield of adjacent crops in sub-humid Uganda. The trees were 3 years old at the commencement of the study, and most species were competing strongly with crops. Tree roots were pruned 41 months after planting by cutting and back-filling a trench to a depth of 0.3 m, at a distance of 0.3 m from the trees, on one side of the tree row. The trench was reopened and roots recut at 50 and 62 months after planting. We assessed the effects on tree growth and root distribution over a 3 year period, and crop yield after the third root pruning at 62 months. Overall, root pruning had only a slight effect on aboveground tree growth: height growth was unaffected and diameter growth was reduced by only 4%. A substantial amount of root regrowth was observed by 11 months after pruning. Tree species varied in the number and distribution of roots, and C. equisetifolia and M. lutea had considerably more roots per unit of trunk volume than the other species, especially in the surface soil layers. Casuarina equisetifolia and M. eminii were the tree species most competitive with crops and G. robusta and M. lutea the least competitive. Crop yield data provided strong evidence of the redistribution of root activity following root pruning, with competition increasing on the unpruned side of tree rows. Thus, one-sided root pruning will be useful in only a few circumstances.

  4. A Novel Modelling Approach for Predicting Forest Growth and Yield under Climate Change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Irfan Ashraf

    Full Text Available Global climate is changing due to increasing anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Forest managers need growth and yield models that can be used to predict future forest dynamics during the transition period of present-day forests under a changing climatic regime. In this study, we developed a forest growth and yield model that can be used to predict individual-tree growth under current and projected future climatic conditions. The model was constructed by integrating historical tree growth records with predictions from an ecological process-based model using neural networks. The new model predicts basal area (BA and volume growth for individual trees in pure or mixed species forests. For model development, tree-growth data under current climatic conditions were obtained using over 3000 permanent sample plots from the Province of Nova Scotia, Canada. Data to reflect tree growth under a changing climatic regime were projected with JABOWA-3 (an ecological process-based model. Model validation with designated data produced model efficiencies of 0.82 and 0.89 in predicting individual-tree BA and volume growth. Model efficiency is a relative index of model performance, where 1 indicates an ideal fit, while values lower than zero means the predictions are no better than the average of the observations. Overall mean prediction error (BIAS of basal area and volume growth predictions was nominal (i.e., for BA: -0.0177 cm(2 5-year(-1 and volume: 0.0008 m(3 5-year(-1. Model variability described by root mean squared error (RMSE in basal area prediction was 40.53 cm(2 5-year(-1 and 0.0393 m(3 5-year(-1 in volume prediction. The new modelling approach has potential to reduce uncertainties in growth and yield predictions under different climate change scenarios. This novel approach provides an avenue for forest managers to generate required information for the management of forests in transitional periods of climate change. Artificial intelligence

  5. Swabbing for respiratory viral infections in older patients: a comparison of rayon and nylon flocked swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernes, S S; Quarsten, H; Hagen, E; Lyngroth, A L; Pripp, A H; Bjorvatn, B; Bakke, P S

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sampling efficacy of rayon swabs and nylon flocked swabs, and of oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal specimens for the detection of respiratory viruses in elderly patients. Samples were obtained from patients 60 years of age or above who were newly admitted to Sorlandet Hospital Arendal, Norway. The patients were interviewed for current symptoms of a respiratory tract infection. Using rayon swabs and nylon flocked swabs, comparable sets of mucosal samples were harvested from the nasopharynx and the oropharynx. The samples were analysed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. A total of 223 patients (mean age 74.9 years, standard deviation [SD] 9.0 years) were swabbed and a virus was recovered from 11% of the symptomatic patients. Regardless of the sampling site, a calculated 4.8 times higher viral load (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-17, p = 0.017) was obtained using the nylon flocked swabs as compared to the rayon swabs. Also, regardless of the type of swab, a calculated 19 times higher viral load was found in the samples from the nasopharynx as compared to the oropharynx (95% CI 5.4-67.4, p Nylon flocked swabs appear to be more efficient than rayon swabs.

  6. High-yield growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on a continuously moving substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman de Villoria, R; Hart, A J; Steiner, S A III; Wardle, B L [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Figueredo, S L; Slocum, A H, E-mail: rguzman@mit.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are grown on a moving substrate, demonstrating continuous growth of nanoscale materials with long-range order. A cold-wall chamber with an oscillating moving platform is used to locally heat a silicon growth substrate coated with an Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst film for CNT growth via chemical vapor deposition. The reactant gases are introduced over the substrate through a directed nozzle to attain high-yield CNT growth. Aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays (or 'forests') with heights of {approx}1 mm are achieved at substrate speeds up to 2.4 mm s{sup -1}. Arrays grown on moving substrates at different velocities are studied in order to identify potential physical limitations of repeatable and fast growth on a continuous basis. No significant differences are noted between static and moving growth as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, although overall growth height is marginally reduced at the highest substrate velocity. CNT arrays produced on moving substrates are also found to be comparable to those produced through well-characterized batch processes consistent with a base-growth mechanism. Growth parameters required for the moving furnace are found to differ only slightly from those used in a comparable batch process; thermal uniformity appears to be the critical parameter for achieving large-area uniform array growth. If the continuous-growth technology is combined with a reaction zone isolation scheme common in other types of processing (e.g., in the manufacture of carbon fibers), large-scale dense and aligned CNT arrays may be efficiently grown and harvested for numerous applications including providing interlayers for advanced composite reinforcement and improved electrical and thermal transport.

  7. Environmental effects on growth and development of cassava (Manihot esculenta crantz). II. Crop growth rate and biomass yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, B.A.; Evenson, J.P.; Fukai, S.

    1982-12-01

    Frequent harvests of serial plantings of cassava (cv. M Aus 10) in S.E. Queensland, Australia (latitude 27 degrees 37'S) were used to examine the effect of environment on dry matter growth and biomass yield. Maximum crop growth rates (CGR) calculated from fitted logistic curves ranged from 23.8 to 2.4 g m-2 day-1 for the various planting dates and occurred in late summer to autumn, becoming progressively smaller and later for plantings made later in the growth season. Crop growth rate declined to zero or near zero for all planting dates in late winter. Maximum CGR's were higher than those reported for cassava at lower latitudes but, because of the restricted growing season, annual biomass yields from early planting times were similar and of the order of 30 tons per hectare-1 year-1. Multiple regression models were developed which could account for 89% of the variation in CGR in terms of mean air temperature or solar radiation and leaf area index (LAI). Temperature and solar radiation were highly correlated at this experimental site and it was not possible to distinguish their separate effects on CGR. (Refs. 18).

  8. [Effects of calcium fertilizer application on peanut growth, physiological characteristics, yield and quality under drought stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xue-hua; Sun, Lian-qiang; Gao, Bo; Sun, Qi-ze; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Jia-lei; Li, Xiang-dong

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was carried out to study the effects of different rates of calcium application on peanut growth, physiological characteristics, yield and quality under drought stress at pegging stage and pod setting stage in pool cultivation with rainproof, using variety 606 as experimental material. The results showed that applying Ca fertilizer under drought stress could promote peanut growth, increase the chlorophyll content, leaf photosynthetic rate and the root vitality, increase the recovery ability of peanut during rewatering after drought stress, alleviate the impact of drought stress on peanut. Applying Ca fertilizer under drought stress increased pod and kernel yields because of the increase of kernel rate and pod number per plant. It also increased the fat and protein contents of peanut kernel, and improved peanut kernel quality under drought stress. It was suggested that 300 kg · hm(-2) Ca application is the best choice to alleviate the impact of drought stress on peanut.

  9. [Effects of day and night temperature difference on growth, development, yield and fruit quality of tomatoes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Li, Jia; Gao, Qing; Chen, Jin-xing

    2015-09-01

    Abstract: The effects of day and night temperature difference (DIF) on tomato's growth were studied in three precisely controlled units in phytotron. Set DIF as 6 °C (25/19 C), 8 °C (26/18 °C), 10 °C (27/17 °C) respectively, with the same diurnal mean temperature as 22 °C. The results showed that, different tomato varieties needed different suitable DIF at different growth stages. Before flouring, compared with DIF 6 °C , DIF 8 °C could significantly improve the growth and development of the wild currant tomato LA1781, increasing the plant height by 23.1%, fastening leaf development by 1-2 leaves, advancing flowers by 7 d. DIF 10 °C had similar effects with DIF 8 °C on LA1781. As to the cultured ordinary tomatoes LA2397 and LA0490, DIF 6 °C made the seedlings grow well, DIF 8 °C had no significant improved effects on seedlings, DIF 10 °C depressed the seedling's growth and flouring, decreasing the plant height by 12.0%-18.3%, lowering the leaf development by 2-3 leaves, delaying flouring by 2-4 d. But DIF 10 °C increased the dry aboveground mass of these three varieties by 25.2%-44.2%. After flouring, compared with DIF 6 °C, DIF 10 °C could significantly improve the yield and fruit quality of LA1781, increasing fruit number by 34.7%, yield per plant by 92.1%, single fruit mass by 40.0%, soluble sugar content by 16.3%, lycopene content by 95.6%. Compared with DIF 6 °C, LA2397 and LA0490 had higher yields and better fruit quality under DIF 8 °C, and lycopene content increased more than twice as that under DIF 6 °C. Under DIF 10 °C, yields of LA2397 and LA0490 slightly decreased (5.0%), soluble sugar contents of fruit decreased, but fruit size and lycopene content increased. The results showed that, DIF should not be very great in the seedling period of tomatoes, and a moderate DIF in flower and fruit periods could improve the yield and fruit quality, but a too high DIF would result in poor growth and yield reduction.

  10. Effect of Transplanting on Yield and Growth of Grain Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbaje, GO.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out to study the effects of transplanting on growth and grain yield of three varieties of Sorghum bicolor, 'Ilorin local', SK 5912, and SSV10. Seedlings from each variety transplanted at 2, 4 and 6 weeks after planting (WAP were compared with directly seeded plants used as control. Results show that at 8 WAP with seedlings transplanted at 2 WAP were taller than the other transplants, but shorter than directly seeded plants. Transplanting caused delay in flowering, but at this stage, height of transplants was comparable to directly seeded plants in SK 5912 and SSV10, while in 'Ilorin local' the transplants were significantly shorter at P< 0.05. Dry matter accumulation and grain yield was comparable among transplants but lower than those of directly seeded plants. However, grain yield of seedlings that were transplanted at 2 WAP was statistically comparable with directly seeded plants at P< 0.05.

  11. Growth, yield and fruit quality of pepper plants amended with two sanitized sewage sludges

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual Elizalde, Inmaculada; Azcona, Iñaki; Aguirreolea, Jone; Morales Iribas, Fermín; Corpas, Francisco Javier; Palma, José Manuel; Rellán-Álvarez, Rubén; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Organic wastes such as sewage sludge have been successfully used to increase crop productivity of horticultural soils. Nevertheless, considerations of the impact of sludges on vegetable and fruit quality have received little attention. Therefore, the objective of the present work was to investigate the impact of two sanitized sewage sludges, autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) and compost sludge, on the growth, yield, and fruit quality of pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Pi...

  12. Influence of irrigation during the growth stage on yield and quality in mango (Mangifera indica L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junya; Liu, Guoyin; Liu, Debing; Chen, Yeyuan

    2017-01-01

    Although being one of the few drought-tolerant plants, mango trees are irrigated to ensure optimum and consistent productivity in China. In order to better understand the effects of soil water content on mango yield and fruit quality at fruit growth stage, irrigation experiments were investigated and the object was to determine the soil water content criteria at which growth and quality of mango would be optimal based on soil water measured by RHD-JS water-saving irrigation system through micro-sprinkling irrigation. Five soil water content treatments (relative to the percentage of field water capacity) for irrigation (T1:79%-82%, T2:75%-78%, T3:71%-74%, T4: 65%-70%, T5:63%-66%) were compared in 2013. Amount of applied irrigation water for different treatments varied from 2.93m3 to 1.08 m3. The results showed that mango fruit production and quality at fruit growth stage were significantly affected under different irrigation water amounts. Variation in soil water content not only had effects on fruit size, but also on fruit yield. The highest fruit yield and irrigation water use efficiency were obtained from the T4 treatment. Irrigation water amount also affected fruit quality parameters like fruit total soluble solids, soluble sugar, starch, titratable acid and vitamin C content. Comprehensive evaluation of the effect of indexs of correlation on irrigation treatment by subordinate function showed that when the soil moisture content were controlled at about 65-70% of the field water moisture capacity, water demand in the growth and development of mango could be ensured, and maximum production efficiency of irrigation and the best quality of fruit could be achieved. In conclusion, treatment T4 was the optimum irrigation schedule for growing mango, thus achieving efficient production of mango in consideration of the compromise among mango yield, fruit quality and water use efficiency.

  13. Growth and yield responses of potato to mixtures of carbon dioxide and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heagle, A S; Miller, J E; Pursley, W A

    2003-01-01

    Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere can stimulate plant growth and yield, whereas ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations cause the opposite effect in many areas of the world. Recent experiments show that elevated CO2 can protect some plants from O3 stress, but this has not been tested for most crop species. Our objective was to determine if elevated CO2 protects Irish potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) from foliar injury and suppression of growth and yield caused by O3. An O3-resistant cultivar (Superior) and an O3-sensitive cultivar (Dark Red Norland) were exposed from within 10 d after emergence to maturity to mixtures of three CO2 and three O3 treatments in open-top field chambers. The three CO2 treatments were ambient (370 microL L(-1)) and two treatments with CO2 added to ambient CO2 for 24 h d(-1) (540 and 715 microL L(-1)). The O3 treatments were charcoal-filtered air (15 nL L(-1)), nonfiltered air (45 nL L(-1)), and nonfiltered air with O3 added for 12 h d(-1) (80 nL L(-1)). Elevated O3 and CO2 caused extensive foliar injury of Dark Red Norland, but caused only slight injury of Superior. Elevated CO2 increased growth and tuber yield of both cultivars, whereas elevated O3 generally suppressed growth and yield, mainly of Dark Red Norland. Elevated CO2 appeared to protect Dark Red Norland from O3-induced suppression of shoot, root, and tuber weight as measured at midseason but did not protect either cultivar from O3 stress at the final harvest. The results further illustrate the difficulty in predicting effects of O3 + CO2 mixtures based on the effects of the individual gases.

  14. GROWTH, GAS EXCHANGE AND YIELD OF CORN WHEN FERTIGATED WITH BOVINE BIOFERTILIZER

    OpenAIRE

    THALES VINÍCIUS DE ARAÚJO VIANA; JOÃO GUILHERME ARAÚJO LIMA; GEOCLEBER GOMES DE SOUSA; LUIS GONZAGA PINHEIRO NETO; BENITO MOREIRA DE AZEVEDO

    2014-01-01

    The bovine biofertilizer applied through irrigation water in the soil (bio fertigation), can be a viable organic source to maintain fertility levels in agricultural production systems. So, this work was aimed at evaluating the effects of different concentrations of bovine biofertilizer applied by fertigation on corn growth, gas exchange and yield. The experiment was conducted under full sun exposure, in Fortaleza, Ceara, in 100 liter (100 L) vessels. The experimental design was that of random...

  15. Post-pruning shoot growth increases fruit abscission and reduces stem carbohydrates and yield in macadamia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadyen, Lisa M; Robertson, David; Sedgley, Margaret; Kristiansen, Paul; Olesen, Trevor

    2011-05-01

    There is good evidence for deciduous trees that competition for carbohydrates from shoot growth accentuates early fruit abscission and reduces yield but the effect for evergreen trees is not well defined. Here, whole-tree tip-pruning at anthesis is used to examine the effect of post-pruning shoot development on fruit abscission in the evergreen subtropical tree macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia, M. integrifolia × tetraphylla). Partial-tree tip-pruning is also used to test the localization of the effect. In the first experiment (2005/2006), all branches on trees were tip-pruned at anthesis, some trees were allowed to re-shoot (R treatment) and shoots were removed from others (NR treatment). Fruit set and stem total non-structural carbohydrates (TNSC) over time, and yield were measured. In the second experiment (2006/2007), upper branches of trees were tip-pruned at anthesis, some trees were allowed to re-shoot (R) and shoots were removed from others (NR). Fruit set and yield were measured separately for upper (pruned) and lower (unpruned) branches. In the first experiment, R trees set far fewer fruit and had lower yield than NR trees. TNSC fell and rose in all treatments but the decline in R trees occurred earlier than in NR trees and coincided with early shoot growth and the increase in fruit abscission relative to the other treatments. In the second experiment, fruit abscission on upper branches of R trees increased relative to the other treatments but there was little difference in fruit abscission between treatments on lower branches. This study is the first to demonstrate an increase in fruit abscission in an evergreen tree in response to pruning. The effect appeared to be related to competition for carbohydrates between post-pruning shoot growth and fruit development and was local, with shoot growth on pruned branches having no effect on fruit abscission on unpruned branches.

  16. Effect of textile wastewater on growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najam-us-Sahar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Textile wastewater can be a good source of nutrients in addition to meet the crop water requirements in areas facing water shortage problem. The use of untreated industrial wastewater can be hazardous for end users and soil environment due to high concentration of pollutants. The toxic effects of wastewater could be reduced by dilution of these pollutants. A pot trial was conducted to evaluate the suitability of untreated textile wastewater at different dilution levels (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100% for improving growth, physiology and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. Tap water (0 % dilution level was applied as control treatment. Results showed that textile effluents negatively affected growth and yield of wheat. Maximum reduction in growth, yield, chemical and physiological parameters of wheat was recorded on application of textile wastewater (100% wastewater dilution level. However, on dilution, inhibitory effects of textile wastewater on all measured parameters of wheat were significantly reduced. In addition, effects of 10% and 20% diluted textile effluent on growth and yield of wheat was statistically at par with control. So, it can be concluded that although textile wastewater imparts negative effects on wheat but on dilution it can be used for irrigation of wheat in areas facing water scarcity. However, dyes or their intermediates even in the diluted textile wastewater after entering into food chain may cause harm to human. Such wastewater could be used for biomass production of bioenergy crops and further studies are required to test toxicity impacts of textile wastewater on human through food chain.

  17. pod portion and type effects on sex, growth and yield in fluted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    pod type of fluted pumpkin on sex ratio, growth and yield in the crop. ... trois parties (supérieure, terminale et centale) de trois types de gousses (1, 2 et 3) avaient été plantées en 3 x 3 factoriel dans un ... relatifs de plants mâles et femelles par parcelles de graines de la partie superieur, du milieu et les parties terminales.

  18. Effects of Dual/Threefold Rootstock Grafting on the Plant Growth, Yield and Quality of Watermelon

    OpenAIRE

    Yaoguo QIN; Cuiqin YANG; Jialong XIA; He, Jing; Ma, Xiaoli; Chuanyang YANG; Yangxia ZHENG; Lin, Xia; Zhongqun HE; Huang, Zhi; Zesheng YAN

    2014-01-01

    To test the feasibility of multi-rootstock grafting, bottle gourd and pumpkin were used as rootstocks in a comparative analysis of the effects of single, dual, and threefold rootstock grafting on the plant growth, fruit yield, and quality of watermelon. Results showed that different grafts have significant effects on the abovementioned properties. The appropriate dual/threefold rootstock grafting allowed for higher survival rates. The combined rootstock of bottle gourd and pumpkin can enhance...

  19. Evaluation of methods to improve the extraction and recovery of DNA from cotton swabs for forensic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, Michael S; Stasulli, Dominique M; Sobestanovich, Emily M; Bille, Todd W

    2014-01-01

    Samples for forensic DNA analysis are often collected from a wide variety of objects using cotton or nylon tipped swabs. Testing has shown that significant quantities of DNA are retained on the swab, however, and subsequently lost. When processing evidentiary samples, the recovery of the maximum amount of available DNA is critical, potentially dictating whether a usable profile can be derived from a piece of evidence or not. The QIAamp DNA Investigator extraction kit was used with its recommended protocol for swabs (one hour incubation at 56°C) as a baseline. Results indicate that over 50% of the recoverable DNA may be retained on the cotton swab tip, or otherwise lost, for both blood and buccal cell samples when using this protocol. The protocol's incubation time and temperature were altered, as was incubating while shaking or stationary to test for increases in recovery efficiency. An additional step was then tested that included periodic re-suspension of the swab tip in the extraction buffer during incubation. Aliquots of liquid blood or a buccal cell suspension were deposited and dried on cotton swabs and compared with swab-less controls. The concentration of DNA in each extract was quantified and STR analysis was performed to assess the quality of the extracted DNA. Stationary incubations and those performed at 65°C did not result in significant gains in DNA yield. Samples incubated for 24 hours yielded less DNA. Increased yields were observed with three and 18 hour incubation periods. Increases in DNA yields were also observed using a swab re-suspension method for both cell types. The swab re-suspension method yielded an average two-fold increase in recovered DNA yield with buccal cells and an average three-fold increase with blood cells. These findings demonstrate that more of the DNA collected on swabs can be recovered with specific protocol alterations.

  20. Evaluation of Methods to Improve the Extraction and Recovery of DNA from Cotton Swabs for Forensic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, Michael S.; Stasulli, Dominique M.; Sobestanovich, Emily M.; Bille, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Samples for forensic DNA analysis are often collected from a wide variety of objects using cotton or nylon tipped swabs. Testing has shown that significant quantities of DNA are retained on the swab, however, and subsequently lost. When processing evidentiary samples, the recovery of the maximum amount of available DNA is critical, potentially dictating whether a usable profile can be derived from a piece of evidence or not. The QIAamp DNA Investigator extraction kit was used with its recommended protocol for swabs (one hour incubation at 56°C) as a baseline. Results indicate that over 50% of the recoverable DNA may be retained on the cotton swab tip, or otherwise lost, for both blood and buccal cell samples when using this protocol. The protocol’s incubation time and temperature were altered, as was incubating while shaking or stationary to test for increases in recovery efficiency. An additional step was then tested that included periodic re-suspension of the swab tip in the extraction buffer during incubation. Aliquots of liquid blood or a buccal cell suspension were deposited and dried on cotton swabs and compared with swab-less controls. The concentration of DNA in each extract was quantified and STR analysis was performed to assess the quality of the extracted DNA. Stationary incubations and those performed at 65°C did not result in significant gains in DNA yield. Samples incubated for 24 hours yielded less DNA. Increased yields were observed with three and 18 hour incubation periods. Increases in DNA yields were also observed using a swab re-suspension method for both cell types. The swab re-suspension method yielded an average two-fold increase in recovered DNA yield with buccal cells and an average three-fold increase with blood cells. These findings demonstrate that more of the DNA collected on swabs can be recovered with specific protocol alterations. PMID:25549111

  1. Effects of ground cover from branches of arboreal species on weed growth and maize yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Lima e Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTCultivating maize under systems of alley cropping results in improvements to the soil, a reduction in weeds and an increase in yield. Studies using ground cover from tree shoots produce similar results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on weed growth and maize yield of ground cover made up of 30 t ha-1 (fresh matter of branches from the tree species: neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss, gliricidia [Gliricidia sepium(Jacq. Kunth ex Walp.], leucaena [Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit.] and sabiá (Mimosa caesalpiniifolia Benth.. Two treatment groups (cultivars and weed control were evaluated. The cultivars AG 1041 and AL Bandeirantes were subjected to the following treatments: no hoeing, double hoeing, and ground a cover of branches of the above species when sowing the maize. A randomised block design was used with split lots (cultivars in the lots and ten replications. The cultivars did not differ for green ear or grain yield. Double hoeing was more effective than ground cover at reducing the growth of weeds. However, both weeding and ground cover resulted in similar yields for green ears and grain, which were greater than those obtained with the unweeded maize.

  2. Estimating the effect of urease inhibitor on rice yield based on NDVI at key growth stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailou LIU,Yazhen LI,Huiwen HU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the urease inhibitor, N-(n-butyl thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT at a range of application rates on rice production was examined in a field experiment at Jinxian County, Jiangxi Province, China. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI was measured at key growth stages in both early and late rice. The results showed that the grain yield increased significantly when urea was applied with NBPT, with the highest yield observed at 1.00% NBPT (wt/wt. NDVI differed with the growth stage of rice; it remained steady from the heading to the filling stage. Rice yield could be predicted from the NDVI taken at key rice growing stages, with R2 ranging from 0.34 to 0.69 in early rice and 0.49 to 0.70 in late rice. The validation test showed that RMSE (t·hm-2 values were 0.77 and 0.87 in early and late rice, respectively. Therefore, it was feasible to estimate rice yield for different amounts of urease inhibitor using NDVI.

  3. Application of perennial legume green manures to improve growth and yield of organic lowland rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Winarni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment in green house was done to study the effect of the dosage and speciesof perennial legume green manures to the physiological traits, growth and yield of organic lowland rice (Oryza sativaL., and to obtain the optimal dosage as well.  The research was arranged in a factorial randomized block design consistedof two factors with three replications.The first factor was the species of perennial legume thatconsisted of threespecies: Turi (Sesbaniagrandiflora, Glirisidia (Gliricidiasepium, and Lamtoro (Leucaenaleucocephala and cow manure as control treatment. The second factor was the dosage of green manure thatconsisted of four levels: 5, 10, 20 and 40 t/ha.  The results showed that application ofperennial legumesinto the soil significantly improved the growth and yield of rice.  The application of  20 t Glirisidia leaves/haproduced the highest grain yield, followed by 20 t Lamtoro leaves/ha and 20 t Turi leaves/ha.  The optimal dosages of S. grandiflora, G. sepium and L. leucochepala leaves that could yield 58.03 g/hill (equivalent to14.51 t/ha, 53.67 g/hill (equivalent to 13.42 t/ha, and 49.67 g/hill (equivalent to 12.42 t/ha were 28.05, 25.46 and 26.41 t/ha, respectively.

  4. Vermicompost as a soil supplement to improve growth, yield and fruit quality of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Miceli, Federico A; Santiago-Borraz, Jorge; Montes Molina, Joaquín Adolfo; Nafate, Camerino Carlos; Abud-Archila, Miguel; Oliva Llaven, María Angela; Rincón-Rosales, Reiner; Dendooven, Luc

    2007-11-01

    The effects of earthworm-processed sheep-manure (vermicompost) on the growth, productivity and chemical characteristics of tomatoes (Lycopersicum esculentum) (c.v. Rio Grande) were investigated in a greenhouse experiment. Five treatments were applied combining vermicompost and soil in proportions of 0:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 and 1:5 (v/v). Growth and yield parameters were measured 85 days and 100 days after transplanting. Addition of vermicompost increased plant heights significantly, but had no significant effect on the numbers of leaves or yields 85 days after transplanting. Yields of tomatoes were significantly greater when the relationship vermicompost:soil was 1:1, 1:2 or 1:3, 100 days after transplanting. Addition of sheep-manure vermicompost decreased soil pH, titratable acidity and increased soluble and insoluble solids, in tomato fruits compared to those harvested from plants cultivated in unamended soil. Sheep-manure vermicompost as a soil supplement increased tomato yields and soluble, insoluble solids and carbohydrate concentrations.

  5. Effects of isolation of calves on growth, behavior, and first lactation milk yield of Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arave, C W; Albright, J L; Armstrong, D V; Foster, W W; Larson, L L

    1992-12-01

    Holstein (n = 323) calves in the herds of four experiment stations were reared individually (control) or in isolation to 70 d of age to determine whether isolation affected growth, behavior, and first lactation yield. Treatment differences were not observed for average daily gain for BW at d 28, 56 or 70. Postweaning approach distance was measured in two herds (n = 122; n = 28). Detailed pre and post-weaning behaviors were reported in one herd (n = 26). Isolation did not affect subsequent milk yield or culling percentages. In a second experiment, seven pairs of monozygous twins and a set of identical triplet calves were obtained by transferring split embryos into recipients, one member of each pair was reared in a group, and the twin was reared in isolation. Early rearing previously had been found to affect growth, feed intake, dominance rank, and learning ability of calves, and, in our study, the subsequent milk yield of calves reared in isolation tended to average more than for calves in groups. Intraclass correlations between monozygous twin pairs for milk, fat, relative value milk, and relative value fat were lower than anticipated. These data indicate that preweaning isolation did not affect first lactation milk yield traits.

  6. Lime and phosphate application as mycorrhizae stimulation to enhance growth and yield of Marandu grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Eduardo Melo Santiago

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pastures are important food sources for Brazilian cattle herds. However, inadequate management of soil fertility has emerged as a major cause of low yield rates and of progressive degradation of these areas. The objective of the present study was to evaluate growth, by means of morphogenetic and structural characteristics, and yield of Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. cv. Marandu as functions of the application of the mycorrhizae stimulant formononetin, associated with lime and phosphate application. The experimental design was completely randomised with four replications, and the treatments were arranged in a 2 x 2 x 5 factorial scheme, consisting of two liming treatments (with and without limestone, two formononetin treatments (with and without application and five P2O5 doses (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg dm-3. Three shoot cuttings were carried out after a first standardisation cutting to evaluate the morphogenetic and structural characteristics as well as the dry matter yield of different morphological fractions. Liming and phosphate application at the dose of 141 mg dm-3 P2O5 increased growth and yield of Marandu grass, and these practices are essential for the cultivation of this pasture grass in Yellow Latosol of the Cerrado region of Piauí, Brazil. The application of formononetin increased stem elongation rate, total number of tillers and green stem dry matter, and decreased dead dry matter of Marandu grass, which are effects that contribute to the improvement of pasture quality.

  7. Effect of catalyst preparation on the yield of carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Mariano, E-mail: mescobar@df.uba.a [Dep. Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica, FCEyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Bs As (Argentina); LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Rubiolo, Gerardo [Unidad de Actividad Materiales, CNEA, Av Gral Paz 1499, San Martin (1650), Bs As (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Candal, Roberto [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Fisico-quimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia (INQUIMAE), CONICET - UBA (Argentina); Goyanes, Silvia [LP and MC, Dep. Fisica, FCEyN, UBA (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2009-10-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic iron nanoparticles dispersed in a silica matrix, prepared by sol gel method. In this contribution, variation of gelation condition on catalyst structure and its influence on the yield of carbon nanotubes growth was studied. The precursor utilized were tetraethyl-orthosilicate and iron nitrate. The sols were dried at two different temperatures in air (25 or 80 deg. C) and then treated at 450 deg. C for 10 h. The xerogels were introduced into the chamber and reduced in a hydrogen/nitrogen (10%v/v) atmosphere at 600 deg. C. MWCNTs were formed by deposition of carbon atoms from decomposition of acetylene at 700 deg. C. The system gelled at RT shows a yield of 100% respect to initial catalyst mass whereas the yield of that gelled at 80 deg. C was lower than 10%. Different crystalline phases are observed for both catalysts in each step of the process. Moreover, TPR analysis shows that iron oxide can be efficiently reduced to metallic iron only in the system gelled at room temperature. Carbon nanotubes display a diameter of about 25-40 nm and several micron lengths. The growth mechanism of MWCNTs is base growth mode for both catalysts.

  8. Effect of NPK and Poultry Manure on Growth, Yield, and Proximate Composition of Three Amaranths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Oyedeji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study compares the growth, yield, and proximate composition of Amaranthus hybridus, Amaranthus cruentus, and Amaranthus deflexus, grown with poultry manure and NPK in relation to the unfertilized soil of Ilorin, Nigeria. Viable seeds of the Amaranths raised in nursery for two weeks were transplanted (one plant per pot into unfertilized soil (control and soils fertilized with either NPK or poultry manure (PM at 30 Kg ha−1 rate arranged in randomized complete block design with four replicates. Data were collected on plant height, stem girth, number of leaves, leaf area, and number of branches from 1 week after transplanting (1 WAT. Fresh weight, dry weight, and proximate composition were determined at 6 WAT. Except for the length, breadth, and number of leaves, the order of growth parameters and yield in the three Amaranthus species was NPK > PM > control. NPK grown Amaranthus species had the highest protein while PM-grown vegetables had the highest ash content. Crude fibre in A. cruentus grown with PM was significantly higher than NPK and the control. The NPK treatment of A. hybridus and A. deflexus had the highest crude fibre content. NPK and PM favoured growth and yield of the Amaranthus species but influenced proximate composition differently.

  9. Effect of vermicompost on growth, yield and nutrition status of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarmi, Rasool; Ziveh, Parviz Sharifi; Satari, Mohammad Reza

    2008-07-15

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of vermicompost on growth, yield and fruit quality of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum var. Super Beta) in a field condition. The experiment was a randomized complete block design with four replications. The different rates of vermicompost (0, 5, 10 and 15 t ha(-1)) was incorporated into the top 15 cm of soil. During experiment period, fruits were harvested twice in a week and total yield were recorded for two months. At the end of experiment, growth characteristics such as leaf number, leaf area and shoot dry weights were determined. The results revealed that addition of vermicompost at rate of 15 t ha(-1) significantly (at p Vermicompost with rate of 15 t ha(-1) increased EC of fruit juice and percentage of fruit dry matter up to 30 and 24%, respectively. The content of K, P, Fe and Zn in the plant tissue increased 55, 73, 32 and 36% compared to untreated plots respectively. The result of our experiment showed addition of vermicompost had significant (p < 0.05) positive effects on growth, yield and elemental content of plant as compared to control.

  10. Seed priming for better growth and yield of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius under saline condition

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    Elouaer Mohamed Aymen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is considered as a major abiotic stress affecting crop production in arid and semi-arid region. In field condition, poor germination and decrease of seedling growth results in poor establishment and occasionally crop failure. Many research studies have shown that seed priming is an efficient method for increasing plant growth and improvement of yield in saline condition. That’s why; this experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of KCl priming on the growth traits and yield of Tunisian safflower under salinity conditions. Seeds were primed with KCl (5 g/l for 24 h at 20°C. Primed (P and un-primed (NP seeds were directly sown in the field and followed during eight months of plant cycle. Experiments were conducted using various water irrigations concentrations induced by NaCl (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 g/l. Results showed that plant height of primed seeds was greater than that of un-primed seeds. Numbers of branches per plant, fresh and dry weight, heads number per plant, petals and grains yield of plants derived from primed seeds were higher compared with un-primed seeds.

  11. Nitrate concentration effects on NO3-N uptake and reduction, growth, and fruit yield in strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, R. L.; Stutte, G. W.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Strawberries (Fragaria xananassa Duch. 'Osogrande') were grown hydroponically with three NO3-N concentrations (3.75, 7.5, or 15.0 mM) to determine effects of varying concentration on NO3-N uptake and reduction rates, and to relate these processes to growth and fruit yield. Plants were grown for 32 weeks, and NO3-N uptake and nitrate reductase (NR) activities in roots and shoots were measured during vegetative and reproductive growth. In general, NO3-N uptake rates increased as NO3-N concentration in the hydroponics system increased. Tissue NO3- concentration also increased as external NO3-N concentration increased, reflecting the differences in uptake rates. There was no effect of external NO3-N concentration on NR activities in leaves or roots during either stage of development. Leaf NR activity averaged approximately 360 nmol NO2 formed/g fresh weight (FW)/h over both developmental stages, while NR activity in roots was much lower, averaging approximately 115 nmol NO2 formed/g FW/h. Vegetative organ FW, dry weight (DW), and total fruit yield were unaffected by NO3-N concentration. These data suggest that the inability of strawberry to increase growth and fruit yield in response to increasing NO3-N concentrations is not due to limitations in NO3-N uptake rates, but rather to limitations in NO3- reduction and/or assimilation in both roots and leaves.

  12. Comparison of feces versus rectal swabs for the molecular detection of Lawsonia intracellularis in foals with equine proliferative enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha; Johnson, Cara; Slovis, Nathan; Page, Allen; Gebhart, Connie

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the current study was to compare the molecular detection rate of Lawsonia intracellularis between feces and rectal swabs collected from 42 foals with suspected equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Fecal samples and rectal swabs were processed for DNA purification by using an automated extraction system. The purified DNA was then analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of the aspartate ammonia lyase (aspA) gene of L. intracellularis. Absolute quantitation was calculated by using a standard curve for L. intracellularis and expressed as copy numbers of the aspA gene of L. intracellularis per microliter of purified DNA. The combined PCR detection rate for L. intracellularis was 90%, with 38 foals testing PCR positive in feces (33 samples), rectal swabs (32), or both (27). Six foals tested PCR positive only in feces, whereas 5 tested positive only in rectal swabs. Feces yielded a significantly higher aspA gene copy number of L. intracellularis than rectal swabs. Feces and rectal swabs tested PCR negative from 4 foals. In conclusion, the results showed that feces yielded similar numbers of PCR-positive results, with a higher L. intracellularis aspA gene load than rectal swabs. By analyzing dual samples, the PCR detection rate for L. intracellularis increased from 76% and 79% for rectal swabs and feces, respectively, to 90%. Rectal swabs should be considered as an alternative sample type for EPE-suspected patients with decreased or no fecal output.

  13. Effectiveness of Commercial Biofertilizer on Fertilization Efficiency in Ultisols for the Growth and Yield of Caisim

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    Ea Kosman Anwar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of Commercial Biofertilizer 1 (CBF1 on the growth and yield of caisim (Brassica sp. was examined in the greenhouse of Indonesian Soil Research Institute in Bogor. The completely randomized design (CRD was performed to examine the effects of Commercial Biofertilizer 1 (CBF1 on Fertilization Efficiency in Ultisols. The treatments were consists of 10 combinations between NPK-recommendation (NPK-rec and CBF1, with six replications. The experiment was conducted from August to October 2009. The result showed that CBF I increased the yields of caisim when combining by fertilizer NPK-rec, while giving CBF1 alone did not significantly increases yields compare to control (without fertilizer. Giving ¾ dosage NPK-rec. + CBF1 had RAE value 163%, indicating the effectiveness of CBF1 was optimum, that it reduce the need of NPK fertilizer by 25% by providing the increasing of yield 63% compared to NPK rec. The higher the level of NPK-rec. the lower the efficiency of fertilization. CBF1 had given effectives on yields when it was combined by inorganic fertilizer. However, when it was not combined with inorganic fertilizers, it would harm plants and decreased the soil nutrients. The influence of biofertilizer in plants were predictable unpredictable, while the influent of inorganic fertilizers were predictable.

  14. Yield Response of Maize Hybrids to Drought Stress at Different Growth Stages

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    J. Rabbani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress is the most important limiting factor in crop plants including maize (Zea mays L., which is the third important world crop after wheat and rice. Water deficiency at different growth stages affects maize yield differently. To examine the response of four maize hybrids to drought stress at different growth stages, a field experiment was carried out as a split plot based on completely randomized block design at Research Farm of College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, during 2009 and 2010 growing seasons. The main plots composed of four drought stress levels including optimum irrigation, withholding irrigation at vegetative growth stage (8-leaf to flowering, flowering and kernel filling. Four maize hybrids including Zola, BC666, Maxima and SC704 were allocated into sub-plots. Data analysis showed that the effect of year was not significant on measured characters thus, the data of both years were combined. Drought stress affected all measured characters except number of kernels per ear. The most significant effect of drought stress at vegetative growth phase was on reduction of plant height (10.2%. Drought stress at flowering reduced ear length (12.6%, kernel per ear (17.8%, yield (29.1% and harvest index (20.4%. The 1000-kernel weight was significantly reduced (10.3% when drought stress occurred at kernel filling stage. SC704 hybrid had the highest height (281.07 cm, kernel per ear (710.62, ear length (19.45 cm, 1000-kernel weight (316.49 gr, biological yield (25368 kg/ha and kernel weight (11291 kg/ha. The highest harvest index (46.99% was achieved in Maxima hybrid. It appears that flowering stage was the most sensitive stage to drought. Although drought stress at all growth stages reduced maize yield, but in dry areas, it might be possible to accept a small reduction in maize yield and save an irrigation in favor of other crops, simultaneously grown with maize. According to the results of this 2-year experiment, Maxima hybrid

  15. Effect of Micronutrients on Growth and Yield of Pinto Bean under Irrigation– cutback Treatments

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    M. Roshdi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of micronutrients and irrigation cutback at different development stages on vegetative characteristics and yield of pinto bean (Talash cultivar, an experiment was carried out at Agricultural Research Station of Khoy in 2009. This experiment was performed as strip split plots based on randomized complete blocks design with 3 replications. Treatments included irrigation as the main factor at 3 levels (conventional irrigation (control, irrigation cutback at podding stage, irrigation cutback at seed-filling stage, and application of micronutrients (boron, zinc and manganese as sub factor at 4 levels (soil treatment, one foliar application, two foliar applications, and control (no micronutrients application. According to the results, irrigation levels had significant effects on height of the first branch above the ground, stem diameter, seed yield, biological yield and protein content of the seeds. By irrigation cutback at podding and seed-filling stages, the seed yield decreased from 2647 kg/ha to 1269 and 1920 kg/ha, respectively. Micronutrients treatments had also significant effects on number of branches per plant, height of the first branch above the ground, stem diameter, seed yield, biological yield and protein percent. The highest seed yield (2379 kg/ha was in two foliar applications, which was 893 kg/ha more than control (no micronutrients application. The highest protien content (26.8% belonged to irrigation at control level and two foliar applications of micronutrients. The general result of this research shows that due to high sensitivity of pinto bean to water deficiency, irrigation at conventional level with two foliar applications of micronutrients is recommendable to improve its growth.

  16. Dynamic of Saline Soil Cations after NaCl Application on Rice Growth and Yields

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    Wanti Mindari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Saline soil cation dynamic is determined by the proportion of salt cations dissolved either acidic or alkaline. Common base cations in saline soil are in the proportion of Na > Ca > Mg > K. They affects the availability of water, nutrients, and plant growth. The six level of NaCl were 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 mM and two types of soil (saline and non saline from Gununganyar and Mojokerto were evaluated to soil sample cations taken from depth of 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, and 15-20 cm. Rice growth and yields were measured. The experiment indicated that increasing doses of NaCl increased the soil Na after rice harvest and decreased K, Ca and Mg contents, both of non-saline and saline soil, decreased of rice growth and yield (straw, grain, number of tiller. NaCl up to 30 mM caused highest Ca:Mg ratio, about 8, suppressed nutrient available, inhibited root growth and reduced nutrient uptake.

  17. Metabolic efficiency in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to temperature dependent growth and biomass yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhartsev, Maksim; Yang, Xuelian; Reuss, Matthias; Pörtner, Hans Otto

    2015-08-01

    Canonized view on temperature effects on growth rate of microorganisms is based on assumption of protein denaturation, which is not confirmed experimentally so far. We develop an alternative concept, which is based on view that limits of thermal tolerance are based on imbalance of cellular energy allocation. Therefore, we investigated growth suppression of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the supraoptimal temperature range (30-40°C), i.e. above optimal temperature (Topt). The maximal specific growth rate (μmax) of biomass, its concentration and yield on glucose (Yx/glc) were measured across the whole thermal window (5-40°C) of the yeast in batch anaerobic growth on glucose. Specific rate of glucose consumption, specific rate of glucose consumption for maintenance (mglc), true biomass yield on glucose (Yx/glc(true)), fractional conservation of substrate carbon in product and ATP yield on glucose (Yatp/glc) were estimated from the experimental data. There was a negative linear relationship between ATP, ADP and AMP concentrations and specific growth rate at any growth conditions, whilst the energy charge was always high (~0.83). There were two temperature regions where mglc differed 12-fold, which points to the existence of a 'low' (within 5-31°C) and a 'high' (within 33-40°C) metabolic mode regarding maintenance requirements. The rise from the low to high mode occurred at 31-32°C in step-wise manner and it was accompanied with onset of suppression of μmax. High mglc at supraoptimal temperatures indicates a significant reduction of scope for growth, due to high maintenance cost. Analysis of temperature dependencies of product formation efficiency and Yatp/glc revealed that the efficiency of energy metabolism approaches its lower limit at 26-31°C. This limit is reflected in the predetermined combination of Yx/glc(true), elemental biomass composition and degree of reduction of the growth substrate. Approaching the limit implies a reduction of the safety margin

  18. Use of swabs for sampling epithelial cells for molecular genetics analyses in Enteroctopus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenback, Nathan; Scheel, David; Gravley, Meg C.; Sage, George K.; Toussaint, Rebecca K.; Talbot, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of using swabs to collect cells from the epidermis of octopus as a non-invasive DNA source for classical genetic studies, and demonstrated value of the technique by incorporating it into an effort to determine, within a day, the lineage of captured, live Enteroctopus (E. dofleini or a cryptic lineage). The cryptic lineage was targeted for captive behavioral and morphological studies, while once genetically identified, the non-target lineage could be more rapidly released back to the wild. We used commercially available sterile foamtipped swabs and a high-salt preservation buffer to collect and store paired swab and muscle (arm tip) tissue sampled from live Enteroctopus collected from Prince William Sound, Alaska. We performed a one-day extraction of DNA from epithelial swab samples and amplification of two diagnostic microsatellite loci to determine the lineage of each of the 21 individuals. Following this rapid lineage assessment, which allowed us to release non-target individuals within a day of laboratory work, we compared paired swab and muscle tissue samples from each individual to assess quantity of DNA yields and consistency of genotyping results, followed by assessment of locus-by-locus reliability of DNA extracts from swabs. Epithelial swabs yielded, on average, lower quantities of DNA (170.32 ± 74.72 (SD) ng/μL) relative to DNA obtained from tissues collected using invasive or destructive techniques (310.95 ± 147.37 (SD) ng/μL. We observed some decrease in yields of DNA from extractions of swab samples conducted 19 and 31 months after initial extractions when samples were stored at room temperature in lysis buffer. All extractions yielded quantities of DNA sufficient to amplify and score all loci, which included fragment data from 10 microsatellite loci (nine polymorphic loci and monomorphic locus EdoμA106), and nucleotide sequence data from a 528 base pair portion of the nuclear octopine dehydrogenase gene. All results

  19. The effect of covering and mulching on the soil temperature, growth and yield of tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosterna Edyta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available By improving the thermal and moisture conditions in the immediate vicinity of plants, plastic covers influenced the growth and development and increased the yield of vegetables. Soil mulching with organic material is one method of soil water protection and also helps maintain a constant soil temperature within the root system of crops. This study investigated the effect of plant covering and the type of straw applied to soil mulching (rye, corn, rape or buckwheat on the soil temperature, development of the plant and the yield of ‘Polfast’ F1 tomato. The effect of the straw was compared to a control plot without mulch. Soil temperature at a depth of 10 cm was higher in covered plots than in the plot without covers. The increase in soil temperature as a result of covering amounted to 1.3°C at 8:00 a.m. and 1.7°C at 2:00 p.m. Both in the morning and in the afternoon, the soil temperature in the plots without straw and without covers and under polypropylene fibre was higher than in the plots with straw. The application of covers resulted in higher aboveground parts of plants and higher leaf area compared to cultivation without covers. Irrespective of whether a covering was used, all of the types of straw investigated in the experiment caused the acceleration of growth and development of tomato plants. Simultaneous plant covering and soil mulching increased the total yield of fruits but did not have an influence on the share of marketable yield of the total yield.

  20. Effects of suckling intensity on milk yield and piglet growth from lactation-enhanced gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, K M; Hurley, W L; Shanks, R D; Wheeler, M B

    2006-09-01

    The effects of suckling intensity on milk yield and piglet growth were determined when lactation capacity of the sow was enhanced through overexpression of a mammary-specific transgene, bovine alpha-lactalbumin. Lactational response to increased suckling stimulation was determined by fostering litters of the same age (d 1) or 7 d older (d 7) than the day of lactation to sows nontransgenic (control) or transgenic (TG) for bovine alpha-lactalbumin. Twenty first-parity gilts were allocated to 4 treatments dependent on gilt genotype and age of litter fostered (control d 1, control d 7, TG d 1, and TG d 7). Litters were standardized to 10 piglets within 24 h postpartum, and nonbirth piglets were fostered to gilts with an equal litter BW within age groups at 36 h postpartum. Milk yield was determined by the weigh-suckle-weigh method on d 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 of lactation. Mean daily milk yield was greater (P = 0.031) for TG gilts compared with control gilts and tended to be greater (P = 0.056) for all gilts with d-7 piglets compared with those with d-1 piglets. Daily milk yield of TG d 7 gilts increased rapidly to peak at d 9 and was greater than milk yield of all control gilts at d 9 (P Piglet BW gain between d 3 and 6 was greater (P piglets between the day of age at foster (d 1 vs. 7; P = 0.606) or between the control d 1 and control d 7 groups (P = 0.759). Accumulated BW gain of piglets suckling TG d 7 gilts from d 3 through 9 was greater (P piglets suckling TG d 1 gilts was no longer different (P = 0.40) from that of the TG d 7 group and was greater (P piglet growth.

  1. Whole genome QTL mapping for growth, meat quality and breast meat yield traits in turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad L; Bastiaansen, John W M; Crooijmans, Richard P M A; Vereijken, Addie; Groenen, Martien A M

    2011-07-11

    The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is an important agricultural species and is the second largest contributor to the world's poultry meat production. Demand of turkey meat is increasing very rapidly. Genetic markers linked to genes affecting quantitative traits can increase the selection response of animal breeding programs. The use of these molecular markers for the identification of quantitative trait loci, and subsequently fine-mapping of quantitative trait loci regions, allows for pinpointing of genes that underlie such economically important traits. The quantitative trait loci analyses of the growth curve, body weight, breast yield and the meat quality traits showed putative quantitative trait loci on 21 of the 27 turkey chromosomes covered by the linkage map. Forty-five quantitative trait loci were detected across all traits and these were found in 29 different regions on 21 chromosomes. Out of the 45 quantitative trait loci, twelve showed significant (p<0.01) evidence of linkage while the remaining 33 showed suggestive evidence (p<0.05) of linkage with different growth, growth curve, meat quality and breast yield traits. A large number of quantitative trait loci were detected across the turkey genome, which affected growth, breast yield and meat quality traits. Pleiotropic effects or close linkages between quantitative trait loci were suggested for several of the chromosomal regions. The comparative analysis regarding the location of quantitative trait loci on different turkey, and on the syntenic chicken chromosomes, along with their phenotypic associations, revealed signs of functional conservation between these species. © 2011 Aslam et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  2. Growth and Yield Stimulation of Winter Oilseed Rape (Brasssica Napus L. by Mg-Titanit Fertiliser

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    Kováčik Peter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effort to achieve higher yields at the required qualitative level has led to the intensive studying the problems of the rational usage of the titanium containing fertilisers by the agricultural research in the course the previous thirty years. Therefore, the objective of the experiment was to evaluate the impact of two doses of Mg-Titanit (0.2 l/ha and 0.4 l/ha on the formation of the aboveground and underground phytomass, also on the total chlorophyll in leaves, on the titanium and nitrogen content in the seeds and straw, on the quantity and quality of winter rape yield. The doses were applied two or three times on the leaves of winter rape (BBCH 50-52, BBCH 59, BBCH 66-67. The experiment was realized on the Haplic Chernozem (48°42´ N, 17°70´ E - Western Slovakia during two farming years (2009/2010 and 2010/2011. The results showed that all three applications of Mg-Titanit in both doses stimulated the formation of aboveground and underground phytomass of winter rape. The highest growth of phytomass was detected after the second application. The application of Mg-Titanit in the growth phases BBCH 50-52 and BBCH 59 increased the contents of both chlorophylls (a and b, where the growth of chlorophyll b content was more considerable than the growth of chlorophyll a content. The third spraying by Mg-Titanit decreased the content of the total chlorophyll. The application of Mg-Titanit had the positive impact on the yield of seeds, straw and fat content in the winter oilseed rape seeds.

  3. GROWTH, YIELD AND POSTHARVEST QUALITY OF WAX APPLE AS AFFECTED BY NAPHTHALENE ACETIC ACID APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD MONERUZZAMAN KHANDAKER

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of this study represent the first report of the effect of Naphthalene Acetic Acid (NAA on the pre and post harvest quality of wax apple fruit. The wax apple trees were spray treated with 0, 5, 10 and 20 mg L-1 NAA under field conditions during 2008 to 2011. The experiments were carried out in Completely Randomized Design (CRD with six replications. Leaf chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic yield, net photosynthetic rate, drymatter content of leaves and total soluble solids and K+content of wax apple fruits were significantly increased after treatments with 10 mg L-1. Polygalacturonase activity significantly decreased with NAA treatments. The application of 5 mg L-1 NAA increased 27% more bud and reduced 42% less fruit drop compared to the control. In addition, higher protein and phosphate synthase activity of leaves, fruit set, fruit growth, larger fruit size and yield were recorded in NAA treated plants. In storage, treated fruits exhibited higher TSS and firmness and less weight loss, browning, titratable acidity, respiration and ethylene production than the control. It is concluded that spraying with 5 and 10 mg L-1 NAA once a week under field conditions produced better fruit growth and yield of the wax apple and maintained better fruit quality in postharvest storage.

  4. [Relationship between seedling grade and plant growth, yield and quality of medicinal Chrysanthemum morifolium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Pengfei; Wang, Tao; Guo, Qiaosheng

    2012-07-01

    To provide the basis for standardization cultivation of medicinal Chrysanthemum morifolium, the relationship between the seedling grading and plant growth, yield and quality were studied. The morphological index of the seedlings was measured and the method of principal component and correlation analysis were used to determine the grading index, and step-wise cluster analysis was applied for clustering analysis. Pot experiments were used to measure the indicators of plant growth and development, yield and quality. The height and ground diameter were determined for the quality indicators of the seedlings grading, and the standard quality grading of seedlings of Ch. morifolium was initially set up. The ground diameter of the class I and II were larger than that of the class III, and the number of branches of class I and II was more than that of the class III, on the contrary, the plant height of the class III was higher than that of the class I and II. The shape and appearance of the plant had no effect on the intrinsic quality. Flower center diameter and tubular floret number of the class I and II were significantly larger than those of the class III, so as the yield. The seedling grading had no obvious effect on the internal quality of medicinal material. Seedlings of the class I and class II were suitable for transplanting.

  5. The effect of the weight of cloves on the growth and the yield of fall-planted garlic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Nurzyńska-Wierdak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In three years trials (1990-1993 the effect of diameter of bulbilson growth and yield of local garlic ecotype R was studied. Nine size classes of bulbils were investigated. Significant effect of diameter of bulbils on biometric propeities and yield of local garlic was found out. The plants grown from big bulbils gave higher and better quality yield then those grown from smaller bulbils. There was no difference in yield of plants grown from big and medium bulbils.

  6. Effect of plastic mulch on growth and yield of chilli (Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ashrafuzzaman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work a field study was conducted to evaluate the effect of coloured plastic mulch on growth and yield of chilli from October 2005 to April 2006. The plastic mulches were transparent, blue, and black and bare soil was the control. Different mulches generated higher soil temperature and soil moisture under mulch over the control. Transparent and blue plastic mulches encouraged weed population which were suppressed under black plastic. Plant height, number of primary branches, stem base diameter, number of leaves and yield were better for the plants on plastic. At the mature green stage, fruits had the highest vitamin-C content on the black plastic. Mulching produced the fruits with the highest chlorophyll-a, chlorophyll-b and total chlorophyll contents and also increased the number of fruits per plant and yield. However, mulching did not affect the length and diameter of the fruits and number of seeds per fruit. Plants on black plastic mulch had the maximum number of fruits and highest yield. Thus, mulching appears to be a viable tool to increase the chilli production under tropical conditions.

  7. Fish growth, yield and economics of conventional feed and weed based polyculture in ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Asadujjaman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fish growth, yield and economics of polyculture were evaluated for six months from April to September, 2011 in ponds of Kushtia district, Bangladesh under 4 treatments of feeds and weeds as T0: rice bran, wheat bran and mustard oilcake; T1: Azolla; T2: Grass and T3: Banana leaf. Each treatment had 3 replications. Mean initial stocking weight of fishes like Hypophthalmichthyes molitrix, Catla catla, Labeo rohita, Cirrhinus mrigala, Cyprinus carpio, Ctenopharyngodon idella and Barbonymus gonionotus was 62, 64, 57, 54, 63, 65 and 25 g, respectively. Stocking density (11,115 fishes/ha, liming (250 kg/ha, basal fertilization (Cowdung, 1,500 kg/ha; urea, 60 kg/ha; and Triple Super Phosphate, TSP 60 kg/ha and periodic fertilization (Urea, 2.5 kg/ha/day; and TSP, 2.5 kg/ha/day were same for all the treatments. Water quality parameters (water temperature, transparency, dissolved oxygen, pH, alkalinity and free carbon dioxide were monitored fortnightly and fish growth parameters (weight gain and Specific Growth Rate, SGR were monitored monthly. Treatments did not vary significantly for the mean water quality parameters. Treatment T0 varied more significantly (P<0.05 for the mean final weight, weight gain, SGR, survival rate and yield for almost all the species except C. idella and B. gonionotus. Significantly highest CBR was recorded with treatment T1.

  8. Influence of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field on Plant Growth, Nutrient Absorption and Yield of Durum Wheat

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    Nikolaos KATSENIOS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have adopted the use of magnetic field as a new pre-sowing, environmental friendly technique. Enhancements on plant characteristics with economic impact on producer’s income could be the future of a modern, organic and sustainable agriculture. A field experiment was established at Soil Science Institute of Athens, Lycovrissi, Greece, in the winter of 2014. Two durum wheat cultivars were used. It was a pot experiment with 6 treatments (2 cultivars with 3 magnetic field time exposure. The seeds were treated using a PAPIMI electromagnetic field generator for 0, 30 and 45 minutes one day before planting. The experiment followed a completely randomized design with six treatments and 30 replications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the positive effect of magnetic field pre-sowing treatment in a wide range of plant measurements, including yield. The influence of pulsed electromagnetic field on two varieties of durum wheat seeds showed some statistically significant differences at the 0.05 level in growth measurements, physiological measurements and root growth measurements. Plant tissue analysis showed that magnetic field treatments had higher values than control in total nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, copper (only MF-45, zinc (only MF-30 and boron content, although values showed statistically significant differences only in total nitrogen. The results indicate that this innovative technique can increase the yield of durum wheat, through enhanced absorption of nutrients. Pre-sowing treatment of the seeds leads to vigorous plant growth that are more productive.

  9. Growth of multicrystalline silicon ingot with both enhanced quality and yield through quartz seeded method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huali; You, Da; Huang, Chunlai; Wu, Yihua; Xu, Yan; Wu, Peng

    2016-02-01

    An effective method for ingot quality control in directional solidification by using artificially designed quartz coating as seed is demonstrated in this paper. Quartz powders sprayed at the bottom of the crucible provided numerous nucleation points for the silicon grain growth. The quartz seeded growth ingot showed a large number of small and uniform silicon grains at the bottom, although the grain size increased with crystal growth. Comparatively less dislocation agglomerates and multiplication rate through bottom to top were observed through photoluminescence (PL) analysis. Crystals produced by quartz seeded method showed a higher and more uniform minority carrier lifetime distribution compared to that produced from normal method without seed, and shorter low lifetime area length at the bottom compared to that produced from mc-Si seed-assisted growth method, indicating larger production yield under the same feedstock charging weight. An enhanced average solar cell conversion efficiency of as high as 0.52% in absolute value was obtained compared to that made from seedless method under the same cell manufacture process line, very close to that made from mc-Si seed-assisted growth method.

  10. Aggressiveness of Fusarium species and impact of root infection on growth and yield of soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, María M Díaz; Leandro, Leonor F; Munkvold, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    Fusarium spp. are commonly isolated from soybean roots but the pathogenic activity of most species is poorly documented. Aggressiveness and yield impact of nine species of Fusarium were determined on soybean in greenhouse (50 isolates) and field microplot (19 isolates) experiments. Root rot severity and shoot and root dry weights were compared at growth stages V3 or R1. Root systems were scanned and digital image analysis was conducted; yield was measured in microplots. Disease severity and root morphology impacts varied among and within species. Fusarium graminearum was highly aggressive (root rot severity >90%), followed by F. proliferatum and F. virguliforme. Significant variation in damping-off (20 to 75%) and root rot severity (60%) was observed among F. oxysporum isolates. In artificially-infested microplots, root rot severity was low (soybean at different plant stages and introduces root image analysis to assess the impact of root pathogens on soybean.

  11. Growth, yield, plant quality and nutrition of basil (Ocimum basilicum L. under soilless agricultural systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrajit Saha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional agricultural systems are challenged by globally declining resources resulting from climate change and growing population. Alternative agricultural practices such as aquaponics (includes crop plant and aquatic species and hydroponics (includes crop plant only have the potential to generate high yield per unit area using limited land, water, and no soil. A soilless agricultural study was conducted at the Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA, USA from August to November, 2015. The growth, yield, quality, and nutrition of basil (Ocimum basilicum L. cultivar Aroma 2, were compared between aquaponic and hydroponic systems using crayfish (Procambarus spp. as the aquatic species. Non-circulating floating raft systems were designed using 95 L polyethylene tanks. Equal amounts of start-up fertilizer dose were applied to both systems. The objective was to understand how the additional nutritional dynamics associated with crayfish influence the basil crop. Both fresh and dry basil plant weights were collected after harvest, followed by leaf nutrient analysis. Leaf chlorophyll content, water pH, nitrogen and temperature were measured periodically. Aquaponic basil (AqB showed 14%, 56%, and 65% more height, fresh weight, and dry weight, respectively, compared to hydroponic basil (HyB. It is logical to assume that crayfish waste (excreta and unconsumed feed has supplied the additional nutrients to AqB, resulting in greater growth and yield. The chlorophyll content (plant quality or leaf nutrients, however, did not differ between AqB and HyB. Further research is needed to investigate aquaponic crayfish yield, overall nutritional dynamics, cost-benefit ratio, and other plant characteristics under soilless systems.

  12. Assessment of reclaimed water irrigation on growth, yield, and water-use efficiency of forage crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamisi, S. A.; Abdelrahman, H. A.; Ahmed, M.; Goosen, M. F. A.

    2011-09-01

    Field experiments were conducted to determine the effect of water quality (reclaimed and fresh water), water quantity, and their interactions on the growth, yield, and water use efficiency of forage maize during two winter seasons in the Arabian Gulf. The plants irrigated with the reclaimed water had higher plant height than those irrigated with the fresh water. The leaf length and leaf area (cm2) did not show any significant differences among the interaction. Reclaimed water had shorter time for 50% male and female flowering of forage maize plants, indicating earlier maturity. Plants irrigated with reclaimed water had higher chlorophyll content for all levels of water applications. A significant difference in green forage yield was found among the interactions. Reclaimed water gave the highest green forage yield of 72.12 and 59.40 t/ha at 1.4ETo and 1.0ETo, respectively. Plants irrigated with the reclaimed water used water more efficiently [3.65 kg/m3 of DM (dry matter)] than those irrigated with the fresh water [2.91 kg/m3 of DM (dry matter)] for all water quantities. The enhanced growth in wastewater-irrigated crops, compared with fresh water-irrigated crops, was attributed primarily to higher nutrient content (e.g., nitrogen) and lower salinity of the reclaimed water. The study concluded that treated wastewater irrigation increased yields of forage crops and their water use efficiency. Cost-benefit analysis, studies on the use these forage crops as animal feed, and more in depth evaluation of possible crop and soil contamination were recommended.

  13. The Effects of Polyethylene Mulch and Sowing Date on Early Maturity, Growth and Yield of Okra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tavoosi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effects of plastic bed mulch and sowing date on early maturity, growth and yield of Ahvazi-Okra and obtaining the highest production during the peak price period, an experiment was executed in Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Center of Khuzestan. The experiment was laid out as split plot design in RCBD with four replications. Four sowing dates including Feb. 14, Feb. 24, Mar. 6, and Mar. 16 were considered as main plots and three different kinds of mulch including black plastic, clear plastic and control (without mulch were considered as sub plots. The results showed that the effects of sowing date, kind of mulch, and their interactions on early maturity, early production, total production, germination period, and the number of days to harvest time were significant. The mulch application led to the acceleration of growth stages, and 2.64, 1.53, and 0.9 °C increases respectively in soil temperature at 10cm depth, soil surface temperature and crop canopy temperature, compared to the control treatment. Sowing date did not have significant effect on weeds population. Black plastic mulch could control weeds population effectively. The results demonstrated that the Feb. 14 sowing date together with using clear bed plastic mulch had the highest early production yield (1.9 t/ha, total yield (6.4 t/ha, and the longest crop growth cycle (135 days, the longest fruit production period (70 days and the most number of harvestings (22 times among the other ones.

  14. Salinity and phosphorus interactions on growth, yield and nutrient uptake by berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahmood gholer ata

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of different levels of salinity and phosphorus on the growth and yield of berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum, an experiment using a factorial experiment conducted carried out based on completely randomized block design with four levels of salinity (S1=0, 12, S2=2, S3=6 and S4=10 dS/m and two levels of phosphorus (P1=10 and P2=30 ppm with four replicates under green house conditions. Different levels of salinity have been provided from NaCl, MgCl2, Na2SO4 and MgSO4 with weight proportional respectively 2:1:1:1. The treatments of phosphorus provided from KH2PO4 sources. The traits such as growth indexes (leaf area, plant height and shoot diameter at three different stages, shoot and root dry matters, root to shoot ratio, total length of root, nutrient elements (N, P, K and Na in shoot and potassium to sodium ratio in shoot were measured. The salinity was applied using saline water with the above-mentioned electrical conductivities. Generally, by increasing salinity and phosphorus levels, all the measured traits were reduced and increased, respectively. Furthermore, at the high level of salinity, increased available phosphorus improves clover yield. So it seems that in saline soils, where there is no possibility for soil leaching and amending, application of phosphorus fertilizers can lead to a good growth and production in clover yield.

  15. EFFECT OF GROWTH REGULATOR MICEFIT ON YIELD OF GARDEN RADISH (RAPHANUS SATIVUS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Seredin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micefit is a product developed based on mycorrhizal fungi extracted from roots of swamp ledum. For ecological purposes the Micefit is used for final stage of cleaning of contaminated and polluted land at seed sowing and seedling plating. The effect of growth regulator Micefit on seeds of garden radish depending on different concentrations and exposures. The dependence of garden radish yield on time of treatment and concentration is shown.

  16. Vegetative growth and yield of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) in response to the systemic insecticide phorate

    OpenAIRE

    Raul N. C. Guedes; Guedes,Nelsa M. P.; Picanço,Marcelo

    1998-01-01

    The effect of the systemic insecticide phorate on vegetative growth and yield of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) was studied in the greenhouse. Three dosages of phorate (1.5, 7.5, and 13.5 mg a.i./ 1.5 L pot) were applied along with a control (without insecticide application). The plants were harvested at 17, 32, 51, 69, and 90 days after tilling. Regression analysis did not show any significant effect of insecticide dosages in plant and root length. However, an overall negative effect...

  17. EFFECT OF CHITOSAN ON PLANT GROWTH, FLOWERING AND CORMS YIELD OF POTTED

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Salachna; Agnieszka Zawadzińska

    2014-01-01

    The research was aimed at determining the influence of chitosan with different molecular weights on the growth and yield of flowers and corms of ‘Gompey’ freesia cultivated in pots. Freesia corms were soaked for 20 minutes in 0.5% chitosan solutions with low molecular weight (2 kDa), medium molecular weight (50 kDa) and high molecular weight (970 kDa). The average deacetylation level of the chitosans used was 85%. The plants were cultivated under controlled conditions (18/16 °C day/night, rel...

  18. Effect of Zeolite and Foliar Application of Selenium on Growth, Yield and Yield Component of Three Canola Cultivar under Conditions of Late Season Drought Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein ZAHEDI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study effect of zeolite soil application and selenium foliar application on growth, yield and yield components of three canola cultivar under conditions of late season drought stress an experiment was conducted in two growing season in 2006 and 2007. Site study was field of Seed and Plant Improvement Institute, Karaj, Iran. The experimental design was a Randomized Complete Block arrangement in factorial split plot with three replications. Irrigation factors were chosen at two levels, included complete irrigation and irrigation holding at stem elongation stage. Zeolite was used at two levels, non application and 10 ton per hectare. Also selenium was sprayed at three concentrations, 0, 15 and 30 gr per liter from sodium selenate. These treatments were randomized in main plots while three canola cultivars (�Zarfam�, �Okapi� and �Sarigol� were randomized in sub plots. The results showed that, main effects of different irrigation levels have significant effect on all traits and drought stress decreased significantly all traits. Foliar application of selenium had significant and additive effect on plant height, number of pods in plant, number of seeds in pod, seed yield, biological yield, harvest index and oil yield. There was significant difference between zeolite application and non application on all traits except oil percent and harvest index. It was shown that canola cultivars were different in all of studied traits. Comparison of means showed that, four critical traits that is seed yield, biological yield, harvest index and oil yield were affected by experimental treatments. Different cultivars have different responses under unlike conditions inside upon traits. Under different treatment conditions especially drought stress, zeolite and selenium application have positive and significant effect on traits related to yield. In finally, zeolite and selenium application in dry lands that are exposure to late season drought

  19. Effect of Zeolite and Foliar Application of Selenium on Growth, Yield and Yield Component of Three Canola Cultivar under Conditions of Late Season Drought Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein ZAHEDI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study effect of zeolite soil application and selenium foliar application on growth, yield and yield components of three canola cultivar under conditions of late season drought stress an experiment was conducted in two growing season in 2006 and 2007. Site study was field of Seed and Plant Improvement Institute, Karaj, Iran. The experimental design was a Randomized Complete Block arrangement in factorial split plot with three replications. Irrigation factors were chosen at two levels, included complete irrigation and irrigation holding at stem elongation stage. Zeolite was used at two levels, non application and 10 ton per hectare. Also selenium was sprayed at three concentrations, 0, 15 and 30 gr per liter from sodium selenate. These treatments were randomized in main plots while three canola cultivars (Zarfam, Okapi and Sarigol were randomized in sub plots. The results showed that, main effects of different irrigation levels have significant effect on all traits and drought stress decreased significantly all traits. Foliar application of selenium had significant and additive effect on plant height, number of pods in plant, number of seeds in pod, seed yield, biological yield, harvest index and oil yield. There was significant difference between zeolite application and non application on all traits except oil percent and harvest index. It was shown that canola cultivars were different in all of studied traits. Comparison of means showed that, four critical traits that is seed yield, biological yield, harvest index and oil yield were affected by experimental treatments. Different cultivars have different responses under unlike conditions inside upon traits. Under different treatment conditions especially drought stress, zeolite and selenium application have positive and significant effect on traits related to yield. In finally, zeolite and selenium application in dry lands that are exposure to late season drought stress can be helpful

  20. Microcalorimetric investigation on the growth model and the protein yield of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyan, Lin; Yi, Liu; Peng, Liu; Songsheng, Qu; Ziniu, Yu

    2004-06-30

    A novel microcalorimetric technique based on the bacterial heat output was applied to evaluate the special growth model, the protein expression and the generation time of Bacillus thuringiensis for the first time. The thermogenic curves of the aerobic metabolism of B. thuringiensis strains YBT-833, YBT-1520 and YBT-833-2-1 were determined by using an LKB-2277 BioActivity Monitor. The analysis of the thermogenic curves indicated both the mutant strain and the wild-type strains followed the same linear growth model during sporulation. The metabolism heat output revealed heat output was correlated to the yield of the insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) very well, the more protein product, and the less heat output. Based on the data acquired, we proposed that this method could be a useful tool in monitoring the fermentation of B. thuringiensis.

  1. Growth and yield responses of snap bean to mixtures of carbon dioxide and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heagle, A S; Miller, J E; Burkey, K O; Eason, G; Pursley, W A

    2002-01-01

    Elevated CO2 concentrations expected in the 21st century can stimulate plant growth and yield, whereas tropospheric O3 suppresses plant growth and yield in many areas of the world. Recent experiments showed that elevated CO2 often protects plants from O3 stress, but this has not been tested for many important crop species including snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The objective of this study was to determine if elevated CO2 protects snap bean from O3 stress. An O3-tolerant cultivar (Tenderette) and an O3-sensitive selection (S156) were exposed from shortly after emergence to maturity to mixtures of CO2 and O3 in open-top field chambers. The two CO2 treatments were ambient and ambient with CO2 added for 24 h d(-1) resulting in seasonal 12 h d(-1) (0800-2000 h EST) mean concentrations of 366 and 697 microL L(-1), respectively. The two O3 treatments were charcoal-filtered air and nonfiltered air with O3 added for 12 h d(-1) to achieve seasonal 12 h d(-1) (0800-2000 h EST) mean concentrations of 23 and 72 nL L(-1), respectively. Elevated CO2 significantly stimulated growth and pod weight of Tenderette and S156, whereas elevated O3 significantly suppressed growth and pod weight of S156 but not of Tenderette. The suppressive effect of elevated O3 on pod dry weight of S156 was approximately 75% at ambient CO2 and approximately 60% at elevated CO2 (harvests combined). This amount of protection from O3 stress afforded by elevated CO2 was much less than reported for other crop species. Extreme sensitivity to O3 may be the reason elevated CO2 failed to significantly protect S156 from O3 stress.

  2. Nodulation, biochemical aspects, growth and yield of common bean according biostimulant application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Queiroz de Almeida

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of biostimulants can alter plant growth and development, but the action of they may be varied according to the stage of development of the plant. The aim was to evaluate the effects of forms and times of a biostimulant (cytokinin, indolebutyric acid, and gibberellic acid application on nodulation, some biochemical aspects, growth and yield of common bean cultivar Pérola. The treatments were: Control (without application; TS – 250 mL ha-1 seed treatment; V4 – 250 mL ha-1 foliar spray in V4 stage; R5 – 250 mL ha-1 foliar spray in R5 stage; TS+V4 – 250 mL ha-1 in TS + 250 mL ha-1 in V4; TS+R5 – 250 mL ha-1 in TS + 250 mL ha-1 in R5; V4+R5 – 250 mL ha-1 in V4 + 250 mL ha-1 in R5, and TS+V4+R5 – 250 mL ha-1 in TS + 250 mL ha-1 in V4 + 250 mL ha-1 in R5.The foliar biostimulant application in the vegetative (V4 or early reproductive phase (R5 increases nodulation, root growth, content of soluble sugars, content of total amino acid and nitrate reductase activity, however, does not interfere with shoot growth and grain yield of common bean.

  3. Comparison of an empirical forest growth and yield simulator and a forest gap simulator using actual 30-year growth from two even-aged forests in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel A. Yaussy

    2000-01-01

    Two individual-tree growth simulators are used to predict the growth and mortality on a 30-year-old forest site and an 80-year-old forest site in eastern Kentucky. The empirical growth and yield model (NE-TWIGS) was developed to simulate short-term (

  4. Recycling of sugarcane industries byproducts for preparation of enriched pressmud compost and its influence on growth and yield of rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalaivanan, D; Omar Hattab, K

    2016-01-01

    Field experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of enriched pressmud compost prepared from sugarcane industries byproducts on soil nutrient availability, growth, yield parameters and yield...

  5. Effect of spent mushroom compost tea on mycelial growth and yield of button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, Francisco J; Santos, Mila; Diánez, Fernando; Tello, Julio C; Navarro, María J

    2012-08-01

    Preliminary studies suggested that the use of compost tea made from spent mushroom substrate (SMS) may be regarded as a potential method for biologically controlling dry bubble disease in button mushroom. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of SMS compost tea on the host, the button mushroom, to ascertain whether the addition of these water extracts has a toxic effect on Agaricus bisporus mycelium growth and on mushroom yield. In vitro experiments showed that the addition of SMS compost tea to the culture medium inoculated with a mushroom spawn grain did not have an inhibitory effect on A. bisporus mycelial growth. The effect of compost teas on the quantitative production parameters of A. bisporus (yield, unitary weight, biological efficiency and earliness) was tested in a cropping trial, applying the compost teas to the casing in three different drench applications. Quantitative production parameters were not significantly affected by the compost tea treatments although there was a slight delay of 0.8-1.4 days in the harvest time of the first flush. These results suggest that compost teas have no fungitoxic effect on A. bisporus so that they can be considered a suitable biocontrol substance for the control of dry bubble disease.

  6. Growth and yield of strawberry plants fertilized with nitrogen and phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo F. Medeiros

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTStrawberry (Fragaria x ananassa is a crop that has rapid growth and is highly influenced by fertilization. Due to its development speed, the plant needs to absorb sufficient macronutrients in order to meet its demand. The objective of this research was to evaluate growth and yield of strawberry under different doses of nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and potassium (K fertilization. The treatments, using Box's central composite design, were distributed in randomized blocks with four replicates and consisted of five N doses (0.16, 0.37, 0.88, 1.4 and 1.6 g plant-1 and five P doses (0.3, 0.58, 1.2, 1.8 and 2.1 g plant-1, in the presence (1.67 g plant-1 and absence of K. Seedlings of the cultivar 'Oso Grande' were cultivated in 10-L pots. The analysed variables were: plant height, fresh fruit mass, number of leaves, number of fruits, total soluble solids and titratable acidity. The fertilization with N and P increased the values for most of the studied variables. At the highest doses of N and P, K stimulated plant yield.

  7. Effects of ozone on growth, net photosynthesis and yield of two African varieties of Vigna unguiculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Rashied; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Wada, Yoshiharu; Funada, Ryo; Izuta, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effects of O(3)on growth, net photosynthesis and yield of two African varieties of cowpea(Vigna unguiculata L.), Blackeye and Asontem were exposed as potted plants to air that was either filtered to remove O(3) (FA), non-filtered air (NF), non-filtered with added O3 of approximately 50 nL L(-1) (ppb) from 11:00 to 16:00 (NF + O(3)) for 88 days in open-top chambers. The mean O(3) concentration (11:00-16:00) during the exposure period had a range from 16 ppb in the FA treatment to 118 ppb in the NF + O(3) treatment. Net photosynthetic rate and leaf area per plant were significantly reduced by exposure to O(3), reducing the growth of both varieties. Exposure to O(3) significantly reduced the 100-seed weight and number of seeds per pod. As a result, cowpea yield was significantly reduced by long-term exposure to O(3), with no difference in sensitivity between the varieties.

  8. Whole genome QTL mapping for growth, meat quality and breast meat yield traits in turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vereijken Addie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo is an important agricultural species and is the second largest contributor to the world's poultry meat production. Demand of turkey meat is increasing very rapidly. Genetic markers linked to genes affecting quantitative traits can increase the selection response of animal breeding programs. The use of these molecular markers for the identification of quantitative trait loci, and subsequently fine-mapping of quantitative trait loci regions, allows for pinpointing of genes that underlie such economically important traits. Results The quantitative trait loci analyses of the growth curve, body weight, breast yield and the meat quality traits showed putative quantitative trait loci on 21 of the 27 turkey chromosomes covered by the linkage map. Forty-five quantitative trait loci were detected across all traits and these were found in 29 different regions on 21 chromosomes. Out of the 45 quantitative trait loci, twelve showed significant (p Conclusion A large number of quantitative trait loci were detected across the turkey genome, which affected growth, breast yield and meat quality traits. Pleiotropic effects or close linkages between quantitative trait loci were suggested for several of the chromosomal regions. The comparative analysis regarding the location of quantitative trait loci on different turkey, and on the syntenic chicken chromosomes, along with their phenotypic associations, revealed signs of functional conservation between these species.

  9. Effect of Different Organic Wastes on Soil Propertie s and Plant Growth and Yield: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain M. Z.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of organic wastes in agriculture plays a great role in recycling essential plant nutrients, sustaining soil security as well as protecting the environment from unwanted hazards. This review article deals with the effect of different kinds of organic wastes on soil properties and plant growth and yield. Municipal solid waste is mainly used as a source of nitrogen and organic matter, improving soil properties and microbial activity that are closely related to soil fertility. Biowaste and food waste increase pH, nitrogen content, cation exchange capacity, water holding capacity, and microbial biomass in soil. Sewage sludge contains various amounts of organic matter and huge amounts of plant nutrients. Manure is a common waste which improves soil properties by adding nutrients and increases microbial and enzyme activity in soil. It also reduces toxicity of some heavy metals. These organic wastes have a great positive impact on soil physical, chemical, and biological properties as well as stimulate plant growth and thus increase the yield of crops.

  10. Vegetative growth and yield of strawberry under irrigation and soil mulches for different cultivation environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pires Regina Célia de Matos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The vegetative growth and yield of strawberry in relation to irrigation levels and soil mulches are still not well known, mainly for different environmental conditions. Two experiments were carried out in Atibaia, SP, Brazil, during 1995, one in a protected environment and the other in an open field, to evaluate the cultivar Campinas IAC-2712, under different irrigation levels and soil mulches (black and clear polyethylene. Three water potential levels in the soil were used in order to define irrigation time, corresponding to -0.010 (N1, -0.035 (N2, and -0.070 (N3 MPa, measured through tensiometers installed at the 10 cm depth. A 2 x 3 factorial arrangement was adopted, as randomized complete block, with 5 replicates. In the protected cultivation, the irrigation levels of -0.010 and -0.035 MPa and the clear plastic mulch favored the vegetative growth, evaluated through plant height, maximum horizontal dimension of the plant, leaf area index, as well as by total marketable fruit yield and its components (mean number and weight of fruits per plant. In the open field cultivation, no effect of treatments due to rainfall were observed.

  11. Effect of salinity on growth and yield of Desi and Kabuli chickpea cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Yousef; Heidari, Gholamreza; Esmailpoor, Behrooz

    2008-02-15

    To evaluate the effects of different level of Na salinity (0, 3, 6 and 9 dS m(-1)) on growth, yield and yield component of Kabuli (Hashem and Jam) and Desi (Kaka and Pirooz) chickpea cultivars a factorial experiment based on randomized complete block design with four replications was carried out in Research Greenhouse of Mokrian Agricultural Extension Center near Mahabad, Iran at 2006. Seeds of four chickpea cultivars were grown under 0, 3, 6 and 9 dS m(-1) levels of salinity until maturity. Salinity reduced the plant growth, flower, pod and seed number and seed weight. As increase in salinity, the undesirable effect of Na+ was more pronounced and reached the highest value at 9 dS m(-1) in all cultivars. Four chickpea cultivar have different responses to salinity and the Kabuli cultivars seemed to have a greater capacity for salt tolerance compared to Desi cultivars. Hahshem cultivar has the highest salinity tolerance among all cultivars.

  12. Growth and yield of broccoli fertilized with doses of velvet bean in greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Rúbia Diniz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The dose effects of green manure in vegetable crops production are still poorly understood. There are few scientific studies indicate that increasing the dose may influence plants characteristics. The objectives were to evaluate the effect of doses of velvet bean green manure on growth and yield, the partitioning of dry matter and nitrogen (N in plants of broccoli, as well as determine the apparent recovery and physiological efficiency of use N. We established four treatments plus a control. The treatments consisted of four levels of green manure: 0, 3, 6, 9 t ha-1 on a dry matter basis, with the addition of 12 t ha-1 of compost. Doses of green manure applied influenced the growth and yield of broccoli. The distribution of dry matter between plant parts of broccoli is not influenced by the doses of green manure. Doses of green manure influenced the amount of N accumulated in the inflorescence and whole plant of broccoli. The apparent recovery of N from green manure and efficiency of N use by plants of broccoli are positively associated with the applied doses.

  13. TOMATOES GROWTH AND YIELD APPLIED ORGANIC AND IN-ORGANIC IN WAIHATU, WEST SERAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Sirappa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomato fertilization studies conducted in farmers' fields rice fields fallow for three years. Area of approximately 50 ha cultivated horticulture. Objective: to see growth and yield tomato lowland organic and inorganic fertilizers. RAK Factorial design of two factors , namely organic fertilizers, Manure, Organic Fertilizer granulesha, second factor is inorganic fertilizers:(1 PA-1: urea 150 kg/ha, SP-36 200 kg/ha and 100 kg KCl/h (2 PA-2: Rainbow NPK 500 kg/ha+urea 100 kg/ha, (3 PA-3: Half dose of PA-1, and (4 the PA-4: Half dose of PA-2. Each treatment was repeated three times, 36 treatment. Varieties: Tombatu F1 with a distance of 50 cmx60 cm. Results: highest results in a single treatment of inorganic fertilizer, organic liquid fertilizer, and combinations thereof. In addition to liquid organic fertilizer, manure and their combinations give higher yields than organic fertilizer granules or a combination thereof. Plants harvested one time due to disease, drought, and no production. Natural Liquid Organic Fertilizer Plus prospected good because gives higher yields than manure or organic fertilizer granules, especially combined with a single inorganic fertilizer. Horticultural land in village of Waihatu necessary crop rotation or sterilized rested during one growing season to recover land planted continuously.

  14. Vermicompost substitution influences growth, physiological disorders, fruit yield and quality of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajbir; Sharma, R R; Kumar, Satyendra; Gupta, R K; Patil, R T

    2008-11-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effect of vermicompost on growth, physiological disorders, fruit yield and quality of 'Chandler' strawberry. For this, 4 levels of vermicompost (2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0tha(-1)) were supplemented with inorganic fertilizers to balance fertilizer requirement of strawberry under semi-arid region of northern India. The vermicompost was incorporated into top 10cm layer of soil, which was supplemented on the basis of chemical analysis, with amount of inorganic N, P, K fertilizer calculated to equalize the recommended dose of nutrients. Vermicompost application increased plant spread (10.7%), leaf area (23.1%) and dry matter (20.7%), and increased total fruit yield (32.7%). Substitution of vermicompost drastically reduced the incidence of physiological disorders like albinism (16.1-4.5%); fruit malformation (11.5-4.0%) and occurrence of grey mould (10.4-2.1%) in strawberry indicating that vermicompost had significant role in reducing nutrient-related disorders and disease like Botrytis rot, and thereby increasing the marketable fruit yield up to 58.6% with better quality parameters. Fruit harvested from plant receiving vermicompost were firmer, have higher TSS, ascorbic acid content and lower acidity, and have attractive colour. All these parameters appeared to be dose dependent and best results were achieved @ 7.5tha(-1), however, beyond this dose of vermicompost, there was not significant influence on these parameters.

  15. Effect of Fungicide Applications on Grain Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Growth and Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan D. Fromme

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Field studies were conducted in the upper Texas Gulf Coast and in central Louisiana during the 2013 through 2015 growing seasons to evaluate the effects of fungicides on grain sorghum growth and development when disease pressure was low or nonexistent. Azoxystrobin and flutriafol at 1.0 L/ha and pyraclostrobin at 0.78 L/ha were applied to the plants of two grain sorghum hybrids (DKS 54-00, DKS 53-67 at 25% bloom and compared with the nontreated check for leaf chlorophyll content, leaf temperature, and plant lodging during the growing season as well as grain mold, test weight, yield, and nitrogen and protein content of the harvested grain. The application of a fungicide had no effect on any of the variables tested with grain sorghum hybrid responses noted. DKS 53-67 produced higher yield, greater test weight, higher percent protein, and N than DKS 54-00. Results of this study indicate that the application of a fungicide when little or no disease is present does not promote overall plant health or increase yield.

  16. Effect of different chelated zinc sources on the growth and yield of maize (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tahir

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A field study was conducted at Agronomic Research Area, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad during spring, 2007 to evaluate the effect of different chelated zinc sources on growth and yield of maize (Zea mays L.. Crop was sown on well prepared soil in 1st week of March, 2007. The experiment was laid out according to randomized complete block design. The treatments comprised of different chelated zinc sources: ZnSO4-DTPA, ZnSO4-Fulvate, ZnSO4-Lignosulphonate, ZnSO4-EDTA and ZnSO4-H2O along with control (no zinc, repeated three times. Results showed that number of cobs plant-1, grain rows cob-1 and oil contents did not differ significantly. However, differences among treatments for plant height at harvest (cm, leaf area plant-1 (cm2, stem diameter (cm, cob length (cm, cob diameter (cm, 100-grains weight (g, number of grains cob-1, grains weight cob-1(g, biological yield (tons ha-1, grain yield (tons ha-1 and protein contents (% were significantly higher. Moreover, results also revealed that ZnSO4-DPTA was found the most effective Zn chelated source among all the treatments. Rest of the chelating agents were not too impressive as they showed varied response for different variables. The result of this experiment suggest further experimentation to explore behaviour of Zn-DTPA with other macro and micro nutrients and to calculate cost benefit ratio for use ofZn chelated compounds.

  17. Growth and Yield Performance of Five Guar Cultivars in a Mediterranean Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazio Sortino

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate growth and yield performance of guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L. in Mediterranean area, main morphological parameters (plant height, dry weight of single plant parts, branch and leaf number, dry biomass accumulation and seed yield response of five varieties of guar (Esser, Malosan, Kinman, Lewis and Santa Cruz were studied. Seed crude protein and fibre content were also determined. Irrigation was applied to ensure that water availability did not limit production. The growing season of guar lasted for 120 days for all the varieties. Average plant height at harvest was about 63 cm (ranging from 56.0 to 70.6 cm. The highest dry weight increment was recorded during 55-70 days after sowing. Malosan, Santa Cruz and Kinman showed the highest individual seed weight (> 30 mg. Above average leaf and branch number were observed in Kinman, Esser and Santa Cruz. The greatest seed protein content was observed in Lewis and Esser (35.6% and 34.7%. High yield and seed quality were obtained in these environments with limited water supply, indicating that guar may represent a valid alternative multipurpose crop for semiarid regions.

  18. Milk yield and mammary growth effects due to increased milking frequency during early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, S A; Capuco, A V; Erdman, R A

    2003-06-01

    Increased milking frequency (IMF) at the beginning of lactation has been shown to increase milk yield not only during IMF but also after its cessation. The objectives of this experiment evaluated the effects of increased milking frequency initiated during early lactation on mammary growth and effects on milk yield (MY). Thirty-one cows were divided into treatment groups: 1) 2X: cows milked twice daily (2X) beginning at parturition (d 1), 2) IMF1: cows milked four times daily (4X) from d 1 to 21 postpartum (PP) and 3) IMF4: cows milked 2X d 1 to 3 and 4X d 4 to 21 PP. The 4X cows were milked immediately before 2X cows and again approximately 3 h later, at the end of the normal milking routine. All cows were milked 2X from d 21 to 305 postpartum. Milk yields were 34.5, 37.8 and 37.6 kg/d during wk 1 to 44 for 2X, IMF1 and IMF4, respectively. Mammary biopsies from four cows per treatment were obtained on d 7 and 14 PP to evaluate mammary cell proliferation. Tritiated-thymidine incorporation tended to increase on d 7 in IMF1 cows, and arithmetic means of the percentage of cells expressing Ki-67 proliferation antigen were consistent with a proliferative response to IMF though not significant. Blood was sampled three times per wk during the first 2 wk and then once per wk during wk 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 10. Plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) averaged 20.1 ng/ml in IMF cows vs. 24.2 in 2X but was not accompanied by a change in bST. Prolactin was also not affected by treatment. Neither milk yield nor potential effects on mammary cell proliferation were correlated with systemic IGF-1. Implementing an IMF routine increases MY during treatment and elicits a carryover effect on the remainder of lactation. Milk yield responses after an IMF routine may be the result of increased mammary cell proliferation.

  19. Microbial contamination assessment of cryostored autogenous cranial bone flaps: should bone biopsies or swabs be performed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Ivan P; Inglis, Timothy J J; Bowman, Jacintha; Lee, Gabriel Y F

    2013-02-01

    Autogenous cranioplasty infection requiring bone flap removal is under-recognised as a major complication causing significant morbidity. Microbial contamination of stored bone flaps may be a significant contributing factor. Current infection control practices and storage procedures vary. It is not known whether 'superficial' swabs or bone cultures provide a more accurate assessment. Twenty-five skull flaps that were cryo-stored for more than 6 months were studied. Two swab samples (superficial and deep) and a bone biopsy sample were taken from each skull flap sample and cultured. Half blood agar and half chocolate agar plates were inoculated with the swabs for anaerobic and aerobic cultures respectively. The bone biopsy samples were cultured in brain-heart broth and subcultured similar to the swabs for 5 days. Incidence of microbial contamination was 20 % in the bone flaps studied. One swab culture and five bone biopsy cultures were positive for bacterial growth, all of which contained Propionibacterium acnes (p = 0.014). Positive cultures were from bone flaps stored less than 18 months, whereas no growth was obtained from bone flaps that were stored longer (p = 0.014). Bone biopsy culture is a more sensitive technique of assessing microbial contamination of cryo-stored autogenous bone flaps than swab cultures. The clinical implications of in vitro demonstration of microbial contamination require further study.

  20. Growth and Yield Performance of Banana (Musa acuminate L. as Affected by Different Farm Manures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda C. Panelo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted at the Integrated Sustainable Agri-Techno Demo Farm (ISATDF of the Pangasinan State University, Sta. Maria Campus, Sta. Maria, Pangasinan from October 15, 2013 to August 18, 2014 with a duration of 308 days. This study aimed to determine the growth and yield performance of banana (Musa acuminata L. as affected by different farm manures. Specifically, it attempted to: (1 determine the effect of different farm manures on the growth and yield performance of banana; and to (2 determine the cost and return of the different farm manures. The experiment was laid out using the Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA was used to evaluate the differences between treatments using F-test at 5 and 1 percent levels of significance and the Duncan’s Multiple Range Test (DMRT was used to evaluate the differences among treatment means. The treatments used were the following: T1 - chicken manure, T2 - cow manure, T3 - goat manure, and T4 - hog manure. The results revealed that the application of chicken manure recorded the tallest plants (5.27 cm, most number of suckers (340. The application of chicken manure and goat manure significantly increased the mid-trunk diameter (25.63cm and (25.62 cm; finger length (14.33 cm and (13.13 cm; finger diameter (3.60 cm each; and weight of fruits (450kgs each. Net income and return on investment (ROI were also influenced by chicken manure and goat manure. Application of chicken manure and goat manure significantly enhanced the yield quality attributes and income of banana compared to the other sources of organic manure

  1. Impact of phosphate solubilizing bacteria on growth and yield of maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Iqbal Hussain, Hafiz Naeem Asghar*, Muhammad Javed Akhtar and Muhammad Arshad

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil microorganisms are supportive in the transformation of soil phosphorus (P and are thus an important component of the soil P cycle. These are effective in releasing P both from inorganic and organic pools of total soil P through their respective solubilizing and mineralizing abilities. To evaluate this, five promising strains of PGPR [PS-01 (Burkholderai sp., PS-12 (Bacillus sp., PS-32 (Pseudomonas sp., PS-41 (Flavobacterium sp. and PS-51 (Pseudomonas sp.] capable of solubilization of both organic and inorganic phosphorus as investigated under in vitro conditions were evaluated in a pot trial for their rhizosphere phosphatase activity and mineralization potential of organic P in soil, plant growth and yield at different farmyard manure (FYM levels i.e. 0, 8 and 16 Mg ha-1. These bacterial strains were also monitored for other attributes like chitinase activities and root colonization ability in addition to phosphatase activity, auxin production and ACC-deaminase activity. In response to inoculation with these selected rhizobacteria, significant increases in plant height, root length, shoot dry weight, root dry weight and grain yield were observed which were up to 16, 11, 42, 29 and 33%, respectively, over uninoculated control in the presence of FYM at 16 Mg ha-1. Similarly, there were significant increases in the rhizosphere phosphatase activity, mineralization of organic P and soil available P which were 189, 185 and 62% higher than uninoculated control in the presence of FYM, respectively. The study demonstrated that the use of PGPR having multifaceted beneficial traits would be highly effective for improving growth and yield of crops.

  2. Growth Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Meat Yield of Boer Goats Fed Diets Containing Leaves or Whole Parts of Andrographis paniculata

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yusuf, A L; Goh, Y M; Samsudin, A A; Alimon, A R; Sazili, A Q

    2014-01-01

    ...), on growth performance, carcass characteristics and meat yield of 24 intact Boer bucks. The results obtained indicated that inclusion of Andrographis paniculata significantly improved feed intake, weight gain, feed efficiency and live weight...

  3. Use of different organic fertilizers on soil fertility improvement, growth and head yield parameters of cabbage (Brassica oleraceae L)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ibukunoluwa Moyin-Jesu, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Field experiment was carried out in Akure in the rainforest zone of Nigeria to determine the effect of poultry manure, wood ash and rice bran on the soil fertility improvement, growth and head yield of cabbage...

  4. Effects of Different Biochar Application Patterns on Rice Growth and Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yue-man

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Biochar has positive effect on carbon sequestration and soil improvement, consequently biochar application has been attracted more and more attention in recent years. However, so far, few investigations about the effects of biochar application patterns on crop growth, which may have a direct impact on biochar's application and comprehensive environmental effects have been reported. Herein, soil column study was conducted using four biochars, i.e., wheat straw(WBC and wood sawdust(SBC that pyrolyzed at 500℃ and 700℃, respectively, to study the effects of two different biochar application patterns on rice growth. These two typical biochar application patterns were:generally mixed application(mixed treatment and surface application(surface treatment. The results showed that:(1In comparison with CK, all biochar application treatments promoted the growth of rice in terms of plant height and SPAD(Soil Plant Analysis Development value. Plant height of surface treatment was higher than that of mixed treatments at the heading, filling and maturation stages. SPAD and NDVI(Normalized Different Vegetation Index value of surface treatments were slightly lower than mixed treatment.(2Biochar significantly increased rice seeding setting rate by 4.88%~8.39%, moreover, surface treatments were observed higher rice seeding setting rate than mixed treatments. However, no significant difference was observed in the number of effective panicles, grains per spike and 1 000-grain weight between surface and mixed treatment. (3Application of biochar promoted rice yield, and surface treatments were more likely to increase rice yield compared with the conventional mixed treatments. (4All biochar treatments increased rice harvest index by 2.58%~10.56%, and no significant difference was found between surface and mixed treatment.(5All applications of biochar promoted nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium partial productivity, which was 9.81%~36.25% higher than that of CK.

  5. Exploring plant growth-promotion actinomycetes from vermicompost and rhizosphere soil for yield enhancement in chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sreevidya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The main objective of the present study was to isolate and characterize actinomycetes for their plant growth-promotion in chickpea. A total of 89 actinomycetes were screened for their antagonism against fungal pathogens of chickpea by dual culture and metabolite production assays. Four most promising actinomycetes were evaluated for their physiological and plant growth-promotion properties under in vitro and in vivo conditions. All the isolates exhibited good growth at temperatures from 20 °C to 40 °C, pH range of 7–11 and NaCl concentrations up to 8%. These were also found highly tolerant to Bavistin, slightly tolerant to Thiram and Captan (except VAI-7 and VAI-40 but susceptible to Benlate and Ridomil at field application levels and were found to produce siderophore, cellulase, lipase, protease, chitinase (except VAI-40, hydrocyanic acid (except VAI-7 and VAI-40, indole acetic acid and β-1,3-glucanase. When the four actinomycetes were evaluated for their plant growth-promotion properties under field conditions on chickpea, all exhibited increase in nodule number, shoot weight and yield. The actinomycetes treated plots enhanced total N, available P and organic C over the un-inoculated control. The scanning electron microscope studies exhibited extensive colonization by actinomycetes on the root surface of chickpea. The expression profiles for indole acetic acid, siderophore and β-1,3-glucanase genes exhibited up-regulation for all three traits and in all four isolates. The actinomycetes were identified as Streptomyces but different species in the 16S rDNA analysis. It was concluded that the selected actinomycetes have good plant growth-promotion and biocontrol potentials on chickpea.

  6. Exploring plant growth-promotion actinomycetes from vermicompost and rhizosphere soil for yield enhancement in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreevidya, M; Gopalakrishnan, S; Kudapa, H; Varshney, R K

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to isolate and characterize actinomycetes for their plant growth-promotion in chickpea. A total of 89 actinomycetes were screened for their antagonism against fungal pathogens of chickpea by dual culture and metabolite production assays. Four most promising actinomycetes were evaluated for their physiological and plant growth-promotion properties under in vitro and in vivo conditions. All the isolates exhibited good growth at temperatures from 20°C to 40°C, pH range of 7-11 and NaCl concentrations up to 8%. These were also found highly tolerant to Bavistin, slightly tolerant to Thiram and Captan (except VAI-7 and VAI-40) but susceptible to Benlate and Ridomil at field application levels and were found to produce siderophore, cellulase, lipase, protease, chitinase (except VAI-40), hydrocyanic acid (except VAI-7 and VAI-40), indole acetic acid and β-1,3-glucanase. When the four actinomycetes were evaluated for their plant growth-promotion properties under field conditions on chickpea, all exhibited increase in nodule number, shoot weight and yield. The actinomycetes treated plots enhanced total N, available P and organic C over the un-inoculated control. The scanning electron microscope studies exhibited extensive colonization by actinomycetes on the root surface of chickpea. The expression profiles for indole acetic acid, siderophore and β-1,3-glucanase genes exhibited up-regulation for all three traits and in all four isolates. The actinomycetes were identified as Streptomyces but different species in the 16S rDNA analysis. It was concluded that the selected actinomycetes have good plant growth-promotion and biocontrol potentials on chickpea. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Biomethanated Distillery Spentwash and Pressmud Biocompost on Growth, Yield and Quality of SugarcaneSolution

    OpenAIRE

    , M. Selvamurugan; , P Doraisamy; , M Maheswari

    2013-01-01

    A Şeld experlment was conducted to study the effect of blomethanated distillery spentwash and pressmud biocompost in various proportions with inorganic fertilizers on growth, yield and quality of sugarcane at Research and Development Farm of M/s. Bhavani Distilleries and Chemicals Ltd., T.Pudur, Thimiri, Tamil Nadu. Crop growth, yield and quality of sugarcane were improved by the application of biomethanated distillery spentwash and pressmud biocompost compared to recommended NPK as chemical ...

  8. Enhancing Growth and Yield of Grey Oyster Mushroom (Plearotussajorcaju Using Different Acoustic Sound Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Roshita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mushroom, as believed by many people, grows on specific time and condition as in the wild it grows after a heavy rain falls. The effects of lightning and thunderstorm may suppress the mychorrizal structure to grow and eventually forming fruiting body. This study was conducted to determine the effect of different acoustic sound treatments on the growth and yield of grey oyster mushroom (Pleurotussajor-caju. Five different acoustic sound treatments had been applied during spawning period which were thunder storm, hardcore music, soothing instrumental, Quranic recital and without any sound treatment applied which served as control. The parameters studied were mycelium growth rate, days of mycelium filled up the bags, days of pinhead emergence, days of fruiting body formation, total weight, percentage biological efficiency, pileus color and texture. There were significant differences (P0.05 observed in other parameters, such as pinhead emergence, fruiting bodies formation, pileus color and texture. In summary, treatments using different acoustic sound at 75 dB could be considered as better treatment to enhance the mycelium growth thus accelerate the mushroom cultivation process as well as increasing the mushroom productivity. This research could help farmers to grow and harvest their mushroom at specific time frame and fulfill customer’s demand.

  9. Effect of drought and heat stresses on plant growth and yield: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiec, J.; Doussan, C.; Nosalewicz, A.; Kondracka, K.

    2013-12-01

    Drought and heat stresses are important threat limitations to plant growth and sustainable agriculture worldwide. Our objective is to provide a review of plant responses and adaptations to drought and elevated temperature including roots, shoots, and final yield and management approaches for alleviating adverse effects of the stresses based mostly on recent literature. The sections of the paper deal with plant responses including root growth, transpiration, photosynthesis, water use efficiency, phenotypic flexibility, accumulation of compounds of low molecular mass (eg proline and gibberellins), and expression of some genes and proteins for increasing the tolerance to the abiotic stresses. Soil and crop management practices to alleviate negative effects of drought and heat stresses are also discussed. Investigations involving determination of plant assimilate partitioning, phenotypic plasticity, and identification of most stress-tolerant plant genotypes are essential for understanding the complexity of the responses and for future plant breeding. The adverse effects of drought and heat stress can be mitigated by soil management practices, crop establishment, and foliar application of growth regulators by maintaining an appropriate level of water in the leaves due to osmotic adjustment and stomatal performance.

  10. Variations of Growth and Toxin Yield in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii under Different Phosphorus Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The bloom-forming cyanobacteria, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, is a producer of the cytotoxic cylindrospermopsin (CYN. In this study, the growth, toxin yield, and expression of CYN biosynthesis genes of C. raciborskii were examined under varying phosphorus (P concentrations. The results show the cell number at 0.00 and 0.01 mg·L−1 P was significantly lower than that at higher P concentrations (≥0.5 mg·L−1. The chlorophyll a content, filament length, heterocyst, and akinete numbers at P ≤ 0.05 mg·L−1 were also significantly reduced. The intracellular and extracellular CYN concentrations and the extracellular proportions increased during the culture period, and larger values were observed at higher P concentrations. Total CYN content reached 45.34–63.83 fg·cell−1 and extracellular CYN proportion reached 11.49%–20.44% at the stationary growth phase. A significantly positive correlation was observed between CYN production and cell growth rate. Three cyr genes were expressed constantly even at P-deficient conditions. The transcription of cyr genes at P-replete conditions or after P supplementation increased from 1.18-fold to 8.33-fold. In conclusion, C. raciborskii may rapidly reorganize metabolic processes as an adaptive response to environmental P fluctuations. CYN production and cyr gene expression were constitutive metabolic processes in toxic C. raciborskii.

  11. A photorespiratory bypass increases plant growth and seed yield in biofuel crop Camelina sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Jyoti; Lopez, Harry; Vasani, Naresh B; Hu, Zhaohui; Swift, Jennifer E; Yalamanchili, Roopa; Dvora, Mia; Lin, Xiuli; Xie, Deyu; Qu, Rongda; Sederoff, Heike W

    2015-01-01

    Camelina sativa is an oilseed crop with great potential for biofuel production on marginal land. The seed oil from camelina has been converted to jet fuel and improved fuel efficiency in commercial and military test flights. Hydrogenation-derived renewable diesel from camelina is environmentally superior to that from canola due to lower agricultural inputs, and the seed meal is FDA approved for animal consumption. However, relatively low yield makes its farming less profitable. Our study is aimed at increasing camelina seed yield by reducing carbon loss from photorespiration via a photorespiratory bypass. Genes encoding three enzymes of the Escherichia coli glycolate catabolic pathway were introduced: glycolate dehydrogenase (GDH), glyoxylate carboxyligase (GCL) and tartronic semialdehyde reductase (TSR). These enzymes compete for the photorespiratory substrate, glycolate, convert it to glycerate within the chloroplasts, and reduce photorespiration. As a by-product of the reaction, CO2 is released in the chloroplast, which increases photosynthesis. Camelina plants were transformed with either partial bypass (GDH), or full bypass (GDH, GCL and TSR) genes. Transgenic plants were evaluated for physiological and metabolic traits. Expressing the photorespiratory bypass genes in camelina reduced photorespiration and increased photosynthesis in both partial and full bypass expressing lines. Expression of partial bypass increased seed yield by 50-57 %, while expression of full bypass increased seed yield by 57-73 %, with no loss in seed quality. The transgenic plants also showed increased vegetative biomass and faster development; they flowered, set seed and reached seed maturity about 1 week earlier than WT. At the transcriptional level, transgenic plants showed differential expression in categories such as respiration, amino acid biosynthesis and fatty acid metabolism. The increased growth of the bypass transgenics compared to WT was only observed in ambient or low CO

  12. Increased Temperatures Have Dramatic Effects on Growth and Grain Yield of Three Maize Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry L. Hatfield

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rising temperatures under climate change are projected to have negative impacts on crop growth and production. These conclusions are not based on direct observations but on projected model results. A study conducted comparing normal seasonal temperatures (1980–2010 for Ames, IA, to a normal + 4°C environment with the same water vapor deficit evaluated the impacts of temperature on maize ( L. development and production. The rate of phenological development increased at higher temperatures; however, the relationship of leaf collar and leaf tip appearance to growing degree days was the same between temperature regimes. There was no effect on total leaf area or vegetative dry matter production, but grain yields decreased from 84 to 100% because of exposure to high nighttime temperatures and disruption of the pollination process as evidenced by the large reduction in kernels per ear. Projected increases in temperature will negatively affect grain production and threaten food security.

  13. Effects of saliva collection using cotton swabs on melatonin enzyme immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Tomoaki; Lee, Soomin; Nishimura, Takayuki; Katsuura, Tetsuo; Yasukouchi, Akira

    2011-01-10

    Although various acceptable and easy-to-use devices have been used for saliva collection, cotton swabs are among the most common ones. Previous studies reported that cotton swabs yield a lower level of melatonin detection. However, this statistical method is not adequate for detecting an agreement between cotton saliva collection and passive saliva collection, and a test for bias is needed. Furthermore, the effects of cotton swabs have not been examined at lower melatonin level, a level at which melatonin is used for assessment of circadian rhythms, namely dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). In the present study, we estimated the effect of cotton swabs on the results of salivary melatonin assay using the Bland-Altman plot at lower level. Nine healthy males were recruited and each provided four saliva samples on a single day to yield a total of 36 samples. Saliva samples were directly collected in plastic tubes using plastic straws, and subsequently pipetted onto cotton swabs (cotton saliva collection) and into clear sterile tubes (passive saliva collection). The melatonin levels were analyzed in duplicate using commercially available ELISA kits. The mean melatonin concentration in cotton saliva collection samples was significantly lower than that in passive saliva collection samples at higher melatonin level (>6 pg/mL). The Bland-Altman plot indicated that cotton swabs causes relative and proportional biases in the assay results. For lower melatonin level (<6 pg/mL), although the BA plots didn't show proportional and relative biases, there was no significant correlation between passive and cotton saliva collection samples. Our findings indicate an interference effect of cotton swabs on the assay result of salivary melatonin at lower melatonin level. Cotton-based collection devices might, thus, not be suitable for assessment of DLMO.

  14. Effects of saliva collection using cotton swabs on melatonin enzyme immunoassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuura Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although various acceptable and easy-to-use devices have been used for saliva collection, cotton swabs are among the most common ones. Previous studies reported that cotton swabs yield a lower level of melatonin detection. However, this statistical method is not adequate for detecting an agreement between cotton saliva collection and passive saliva collection, and a test for bias is needed. Furthermore, the effects of cotton swabs have not been examined at lower melatonin level, a level at which melatonin is used for assessment of circadian rhythms, namely dim light melatonin onset (DLMO. In the present study, we estimated the effect of cotton swabs on the results of salivary melatonin assay using the Bland-Altman plot at lower level. Methods Nine healthy males were recruited and each provided four saliva samples on a single day to yield a total of 36 samples. Saliva samples were directly collected in plastic tubes using plastic straws, and subsequently pipetted onto cotton swabs (cotton saliva collection and into clear sterile tubes (passive saliva collection. The melatonin levels were analyzed in duplicate using commercially available ELISA kits. Results The mean melatonin concentration in cotton saliva collection samples was significantly lower than that in passive saliva collection samples at higher melatonin level (>6 pg/mL. The Bland-Altman plot indicated that cotton swabs causes relative and proportional biases in the assay results. For lower melatonin level ( Conclusion Our findings indicate an interference effect of cotton swabs on the assay result of salivary melatonin at lower melatonin level. Cotton-based collection devices might, thus, not be suitable for assessment of DLMO.

  15. Seed Coating with Biological Agent to Increace Plant Growth and Yield of Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tantri Palupi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Seed quality is an important factor in rice production. Bacterial leaf blight (BLB caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo is a seedborne disease of rice that cause serious yield losses in Indonesia. Experiments were conducted at the Laboratory of Rice Research Babakan, IPB, Bogor; Laboratory of Seed Science and Technology at IPB, Bogor; and the Laboratory of Seed PT. EWSI, Purwakarta, from April to August 2011. The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of coating Xoo contaminated rice seeds with biological agents on plant growth and crop yield. The experiments were arranged in a randomized complete block design with one factor (seed coating treatment,i.e. T0 = negative control, healthy seed; T1 = positive control, the seeds contaminated with Xoo; T2 = P. diminuta A6 and B. subtilis 5/B; T3 = alginate 3% + 1% peat + P. diminuta A6 and B. subtilis % 5/B; T4 = arabic gum 3% + 1% gypsum + P. diminuta A6 and B. subtilis 5/B; T5 = CMC 1.5% + 1% talc + P. diminuta A6 and B. subtilis 5/B, and T6 = bactericide streptomycin sulfat 4%. The results showed that seed coating treatment with with 3% alginate + 1% peat + P. diminuta A6 + B. subtilis 5/B was the best treatment based on the percentage of full and empty grain weight per panicle, and the percentage of number of full and empty grains per panicle.

  16. Growth and yield of corn hybrids in response to association with Azospirillum brasilense and nitrogen fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniele Marini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in optimizing the positive effects of the association between Azospirillum bacteria and corn crop in order to reduce the use of nitrogen fertilizers. This study aimed to evaluate the inoculation efficiency of an A. brasilense-based commercial product in association with different rates of nitrogen fertilization in two corn genotypes. The experiment was arranged in a 2 x 2 x 5 factorial randomized block design, with four replications. The treatments consisted of two corn hybrids (30F53 and CD386; with and without inoculation with a commercial product based on A. brasilense and five nitrogen rates (0, 40, 80, 120 and 160 kg ha-1. The variables plant height, basal stem diameter, leaf area, shoot dry matter, leaf nitrogen content, length and diameter of the cob, weight of 100 grains and grain yield were evaluated. Inoculation with A. brasilense provided increases of 11 and 12% in leaf area and shoot dry matter, respectively. There were differences in the response of the corn hybrids for most variables and the increase in nitrogen supply provided increments in the growth and yield of corn.

  17. Piriformospora indica promotes growth, seed yield and quality of Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhen-Zhu; Wang, Ting; Shrivastava, Neeraj; Chen, You-Yuan; Liu, Xiaoxi; Sun, Chao; Yin, Yufeng; Gao, Qi-Kang; Lou, Bing-Gan

    2017-06-01

    In current scenario, crop productivity is being challenged by decreasing soil fertility. To cope up with this problem, different beneficial microbes are explored to increase the crop productivity with value additions. In this study, Brassica napus L., an important agricultural economic oilseed crop with rich source of nutritive qualities, was interacted with Piriformospora indica, a unique root colonizing fungus with wide host range and multifunctional aspects. The fungus-treated plants showed a significant increase in agronomic parameters with plant biomass, lodging-resistance, early bolting and flowering, oil yield and quality. Nutritional analysis revealed that plants treated by P. indica had reduced erucic acid and glucosinolates contents, and increased the accumulation of N, Ca, Mg, P, K, S, B, Fe and Zn elements. Low erucic acid and glucosinolates contents are important parameters for high quality oil, because oils high in erucic acid and glucosinolates are considered undesirable for human nutrition. Furthermore, the expression profiles of two encoding enzyme genes, Bn-FAE1 and BnECR, which are responsible for regulating erucic acid biosynthesis, were down-regulated at mid- and late- life stages during seeds development in colonized plants. These results demonstrated that P. indica played an important role in enhancing plant growth, rapeseed yield and quality improvement of B. napus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessing the ability of swab data to determine the true burden of infection for the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Frances; Daniel, Olivia; Garner, Trent; Fisher, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is a pathogenic fungus which causes the disease chytridiomycosis in amphibians by infecting the animals' epidermis. The most commonly applied method for the detection of Bd is the use of a sterile swab, rubbed over the keratinized areas of an amphibian and then processed to yield DNA for detection by qPCR. This method has been used to infer a threshold of lethal infection in some species; however, how reliable and reproducible the swabbing method is at detecting the true burden of infection suffered by individuals is not known. European midwife toads, Alytes obstetricans, are susceptible to chytridiomycosis and are highly parasitised by Bd across Europe. By quantifying Bd-load throughout the entire skin and comparing this to swab results taken from the same individual, we determined whether epidermal swabs provide a quantifiable and accurate indication of the true fungal burden suffered. Further, we examined whether we could infer a threshold for lethal infection based on comparison of swab data taken from infected A. obstetricans exhibiting different clinical states. From swab data, we detected significantly higher fungal burdens from moribund metamorphs compared to visually healthy individuals; however, the ability of these swab data to provide an accurate indication of the true fungal burden was not reliable. These data suggest that fungal load dynamics play an important role in disease-induced mortality in A. obstetricans at these sites, but that using swab data to infer an exact threshold for Bd-associated mortality might be inappropriate and misleading.

  19. EVA-Compatible Microbial Swab Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    When we send humans to search for life on Mars, we'll need to know what we brought with us versus what may already be there. To ensure our crewed spacecraft meet planetary protection requirements—and to protect our science from human contamination—we'll need to know whether micro-organisms are leaking/venting from our ships and spacesuits. This is easily done by swabbing external vents and suit surfaces for analysis, but requires a specialized tool for the job. Engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently developed an Extravehicular Activity (EVA)-compatible swab tool that can be used to sample current space suits and life support systems. Data collected now will influence Mars life support and EVA hardware early in the planning process, before design changes become difficult and expensive.NASA’s EVA swab tool pairs a Space Shuttle-era tool handle with a commercially available swab tip mounted into a custom-designed end effector. A glove-compatible release mechanism allows the handle to quickly switch between swab tips, much like a shaving razor handle can snap onto a disposable blade cartridge. Swab tips are stowed inside individual sterile containers, each fitted with a microbial filter that allows the container to equalize atmospheric pressure, but prevents cabin contaminants from rushing into the container when passing from the EVA environment into a pressurized cabin. A bank of containers arrayed inside a tool caddy allows up to six individual samples to be collected during a given spacewalk.NASA plans to use the tool in 2016 to collect samples from various spacesuits during ground testing to determine what (if any) human-borne microbial contamination leaks from the suit under simulated thermal vacuum conditions. Next, the tool will be used on board the International Space Station to assess the types of microbial contaminants found on external environmental control and life support system vents. Data will support

  20. The Effects of Application Vinasseand additive nitrogen and phosphorus on Growth and Yield of Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Golchin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Vinasse is a byproduct of the sugar industry. Sugarcane or Sugarbeet is processed to produce crystallinesugar, pulp and molasses. The latter isfurther processed by fermentation to ethanol, ascorbicacid or other products. After the removal of the desired product (alcohol, ascorbicacid, etc. the remaining material is called vinasse. Vinasse is sold after a partial dehydration and usually has a viscositycomparable to molasses. Commercially offered vinasse comes either from sugarcaneand is called cane-vinasse or from sugarbeet and is called beet-vinasse. On average, for each liter of vinasse, 12 liters alcohol produced. Vinasse is a material with dark brown color and the smell of burned sugar, which is rich in potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and nitrogen. Materials and Methods:To determine the effect of vinasse and additive nitrogen and phosphorus on growth and yield of tomato, a factorial pot experiment was conducted at ZanjanUniversity in 2008. Two different plant nutrient including N and P and their combination (N+P were added to vinasse with three different concentrations to form experimental treatments. In addition to these treatments, three control treatments with vinasse of different concentrations, but with no additive were also included in the experiment. Each treatment used with two different application methods (soil application and soil + foliar application.The experiment had 24 treatments, a complete randomized design and three replications. The vinasse used in this experiment was diluted with water 10, 20 and 40 times to make a nutrient solution of three different concentrations of tomato plant. The amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus that were added to vinasse were 224 and 62 mg/l, respectively. Phosphorus and nitrogen were applied to as super-phosphate triple and calcium nitrate and ammonium nitrate respectively. After being deployed to ensure complete installation of tomatoes in pots containing perlite (about 2

  1. Swab sample transfer for point-of-care diagnostics: characterization of swab types and manual agitation methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttada Panpradist

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The global need for disease detection and control has increased effort to engineer point-of-care (POC tests that are simple, robust, affordable, and non-instrumented. In many POC tests, sample collection involves swabbing the site (e.g., nose, skin, agitating the swab in a fluid to release the sample, and transferring the fluid to a device for analysis. Poor performance in sample transfer can reduce sensitivity and reproducibility. METHODS: In this study, we compared bacterial release efficiency of seven swab types using manual-agitation methods typical of POC devices. Transfer efficiency was measured using quantitative PCR (qPCR for Staphylococcus aureus under conditions representing a range of sampling scenarios: 1 spiking low-volume samples onto the swab, 2 submerging the swab in excess-volume samples, and 3 swabbing dried sample from a surface. RESULTS: Excess-volume samples gave the expected recovery for most swabs (based on tip fluid capacity; a polyurethane swab showed enhanced recovery, suggesting an ability to accumulate organisms during sampling. Dry samples led to recovery of ∼20-30% for all swabs tested, suggesting that swab structure and volume is less important when organisms are applied to the outer swab surface. Low-volume samples led to the widest range of transfer efficiencies between swab types. Rayon swabs (63 µL capacity performed well for excess-volume samples, but showed poor recovery for low-volume samples. Nylon (100 µL and polyester swabs (27 µL showed intermediate recovery for low-volume and excess-volume samples. Polyurethane swabs (16 µL showed excellent recovery for all sample types. This work demonstrates that swab transfer efficiency can be affected by swab material, structure, and fluid capacity and details of the sample. Results and quantitative analysis methods from this study will assist POC assay developers in selecting appropriate swab types and transfer methods.

  2. Growth and yield performance of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. Fr.) Kumm (oyster mushroom) on different substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girmay, Zenebe; Gorems, Weldesemayat; Birhanu, Getachew; Zewdie, Solomon

    2016-12-01

    Mushroom cultivation is reported as an economically viable bio-technology process for conversion of various lignocellulosic wastes. Given the lack of technology know-how on the cultivation of mushroom, this study was conducted in Wondo Genet College of Forestry and Natural Resource, with the aim to assess the suitability of selected substrates (agricultural and/or forest wastes) for oyster mushroom cultivation. Accordingly, four substrates (cotton seed, paper waste, wheat straw, and sawdust) were tested for their efficacy in oyster mushroom production. Pure culture of oyster mushroom was obtained from Mycology laboratory, Department of Plant Biology and Biodiversity Management, Addis Ababa University. The pure culture was inoculated on potato dextrose agar for spawn preparation. Then, the spawn containing sorghum was inoculated with the fungal culture for the formation of fruiting bodies on the agricultural wastes. The oyster mushroom cultivation was undertaken under aseptic conditions, and the growth and development of mushroom were monitored daily. Results of the study revealed that oyster mushroom can grow on cotton seed, paper waste, sawdust and wheat straw, with varying growth performances. The highest biological and economic yield, as well as the highest percentage of biological efficiency of oyster mushroom was obtained from cotton seed, while the least was from sawdust. The study recommends cotton seed, followed by paper waste as suitable substrates for the cultivation of oyster mushroom. It also suggests that there is a need for further investigation on various aspects of oyster mushroom cultivation in Ethiopia to promote the industry.

  3. The plant growth-promoting bacterium Kosakonia radicincitans improves fruit yield and quality of Solanum lycopersicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Beatrice; Baldermann, Susanne; Ruppel, Silke

    2017-11-01

    Production and the quality of tomato fruits have a strong economic relevance. Microorganisms such as the plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Kosakonia radicincitans (DSM 16656) have been demonstrated to improve shoot and root growth of young tomato plants, but data on yield increase and fruit quality by K. radicincitans are lacking. This study investigated how K. radicincitans affects tomato fruits. After inoculation of tomato seeds with K. radicincitans or a sodium chloride buffer control solution, stalk length, first flowering and the amount of ripened fruits produced by inoculated and non-inoculated plants were monitored over a period of 21 weeks. Inoculation of tomato seeds with K. radicincitans accelerated flowering and ripening of tomato fruits. Sugars, acidity, amino acids, volatile organic compounds and carotenoids in the fruits were also analyzed. It was found that the PGPB K. radicincitans affected the amino acid, sugar and volatile composition of ripened fruits, contributing to a more pleasant-tasting fruit without forfeiting selected quality indicators. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Linking individual-tree and whole-stand models for forest growth and yield prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quang V Cao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Different types of growth and yield models provide essential information for making informed decisions on how to manage forests. Whole-stand models often provide well-behaved outputs at the stand level, but lack information on stand structures. Detailed information from individual-tree models and size-class models typically suffers from accumulation of errors. The disaggregation method, in assuming that predictions from a whole-stand model are reliable, partitions these outputs to individual trees. On the other hand, the combination method seeks to improve stand-level predictions from both whole-stand and individual-tree models by combining them. Methods Data from 100 plots randomly selected from the Southwide Seed Source Study of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. were used to evaluate the unadjusted individual-tree model against the disaggregation and combination methods. Results Compared to the whole-stand model, the combination method did not show improvements in predicting stand attributes in this study. The combination method also did not perform as well as the disaggregation method in tree-level predictions. The disaggregation method provided the best predictions of tree- and stand-level survival and growth. Conclusions The disaggregation approach provides a link between individual-tree models and whole-stand models, and should be considered as a better alternative to the unadjusted tree model.

  5. Molecular signature of high yield (growth influenza a virus reassortants prepared as candidate vaccine seeds.

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    Manojkumar Ramanunninair

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human influenza virus isolates generally grow poorly in embryonated chicken eggs. Hence, gene reassortment of influenza A wild type (wt viruses is performed with a highly egg adapted donor virus, A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8, to provide the high yield reassortant (HYR viral 'seeds' for vaccine production. HYR must contain the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of wt virus and one to six 'internal' genes from PR8. Most studies of influenza wt and HYRs have focused on the HA gene. The main objective of this study is the identification of the molecular signature in all eight gene segments of influenza A HYR candidate vaccine seeds associated with high growth in ovo. METHODOLOGY: The genomes of 14 wt parental viruses, 23 HYRs (5 H1N1; 2, 1976 H1N1-SOIV; 2, 2009 H1N1pdm; 2 H2N2 and 12 H3N2 and PR8 were sequenced using the high-throughput sequencing pipeline with big dye terminator chemistry. RESULTS: Silent and coding mutations were found in all internal genes derived from PR8 with the exception of the M gene. The M gene derived from PR8 was invariant in all 23 HYRs underlining the critical role of PR8 M in high yield phenotype. None of the wt virus derived internal genes had any silent change(s except the PB1 gene in X-157. The highest number of recurrent silent and coding mutations was found in NS. With respect to the surface antigens, the majority of HYRs had coding mutations in HA; only 2 HYRs had coding mutations in NA. SIGNIFICANCE: In the era of application of reverse genetics to alter influenza A virus genomes, the mutations identified in the HYR gene segments associated with high growth in ovo may be of great practical benefit to modify PR8 and/or wt virus gene sequences for improved growth of vaccine 'seed' viruses.

  6. [Impacts of climate warming on growth period and yield of rice in Northeast China during recent two decades].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-jia; Geng, Ting; Chen, Qun; Chen, Chang-qing

    2015-01-01

    By using rice growth period, yield and climate observation data during the recent two decades, the impact of climate warming on rice in Northeast China was investigated by mathematical statistics methods. The results indicated that in the three provinces of Northeast China, the average, maximum and minimum temperatures in rice growing season were on the. rise, and the rainfall presented a downward trend during 1989-2009. Compared to 1990s, the rice whole growth periods of Heilongjiang, Jilin and Liaoning provinces in 2000s were prolonged 14 d, 4.5 d and 5.1 d, respectively. The increase of temperature in May, June and September could extend the rice growth period, while that in July would shorten the growth duration. The rice growth duration of registered varieties and experiment sites had a similar increasing trend in Northeast China except for the Heilongjiang Province, and the extension of registered varieties growth period was the main factor causing the prolonged growth period of rice at experiment sites. The change in daily average, minimum and maximum temperatures all could affect the rice yield in Northeast China. The increasing temperature significantly increased the rice yield in Heilongjiang Province, especially in the west region of Sanjiang Plain. Except for the south of Liaoning Province, rice yields in other regions of Northeast China were promoted by increasing temperature. Proper measures for breeding, cultivation and farming, could be adopted to fully improve the adaptation of rice to climate warming in Northeast China.

  7. Effects of exposure to artificial long days on milk yield, maternal insulin-like growth factor 1 levels and kid growth rate in subtropical goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Horacio; Flores, José Alfredo; Delgadillo, José Alberto; Fernández, Ilda G; Flores, Manuel de Jesús; Mejía, Ángel; Elizundia, José Manuel; Bedos, Marie; Ponce, José Luis; Ramírez, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to determine whether any relationship exists between exposure to artificial long days, milk yield, maternal plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels, and kid growth rate in goats. One group of lactating goats was maintained under naturally decreasing day length (control group; n = 19), while in another one, they were kept under artificial long days (LD group; n = 19). Milk yield was higher in goats from the LD group than that in the control group (P goats from the LD group than the levels in the control group and were positively correlated with the total milk yields per goat at days 43 and 57 of lactation (r = 0.77 and r = 0.84, respectively; P goats to artificial long days increases milk yield, plasma IGF-1 maternal levels and the growth rate of the kids. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  8. Effects of Nano-Zinc oxide and Seed Inoculation by Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR on Yield, Yield Components and Grain Filling Period of Soybean (Glycine max L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Seyed Sharifi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Utilizing biological fertilizer is a proper and cheap method for crop production. Potentially, soybean can be used as biological fertilizers and seed inoculation. Zinc is an essential element that have positive effects on plant growth and its development. Canola, sunflower, soybean and safflower are the main cultivated oilseeds in Iran. Soybean production in Iran is very low as compared to other countries. One of the most effective factor in increasing the soybean yield is seed inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR and application of Zinc fertilizer. Some of the benefits provided by PGPR are the ability to produce gibberellic acid, cytokinins and ethylene, N2 fixation, solubilization of mineral phosphates and other nutrients (56. Numerous studies have shown a substantial increase in dry matter accumulation and seed yield following inoculation with PGPR. Seyed Sharifi (45 reported that seed inoculation with Azotobacter chroococcum strain 5 increased all of the growth indices such as total dry matter, crop growth rate and relative growth rate. Increasing and extending the role of biofertilizers such as Rhizobium can reduce the need for chemical fertilizers and decrease adverse environmental effects. Therefore, in the development and implementation of sustainable agricultural techniques, biofertilization has great importance in alleviating environmental pollution and deterioration of the nature. As a legume, soybean can obtain a significant portion (4-85% of its nitrogen requirement through symbiotic N2 fixation when grown in association with effective and compatible Rhizobium strains. Since there is little available information on nano-zinc oxide and seed inoculation by plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR on yield in the agro-ecological growing zones of Ardabil province of Iran. Therefore, this research was conducted to investigate the effects of nano-zinc oxide and seed inoculation with plant growth

  9. Effect of Component Population on the Growth and Yield of Maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of egusi melon reduced the grain yield of maize and the seed yield of egusi melon. The grain yield of maize, however, increased as the population of maize in the intercrop increased, while the seed yield of egusi melon continued to decrease with increase in maize population in the intercrop. The LER ranged ...

  10. Physiology of seed yield in soybean: Growth and dry matter production

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-12

    Apr 12, 2012 ... availability of high yielding varieties. In spite of the best efforts to improve the soybean varieties, the yield of this crop remains low. Several studies have been made to understand their perfor- mances which mainly include the contribution of various yield components towards yield (Das et al., 1992; Mehta.

  11. Enhancing crop yield with the use of N-based fertilizers co-applied with plant hormones or growth regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Mohammad; Kurepin, Leonid V; Catto, Warwick; Pharis, Richard P

    2015-07-01

    Crop yield, vegetative or reproductive, depends on access to an adequate supply of essential mineral nutrients. At the same time, a crop plant's growth and development, and thus yield, also depend on in situ production of plant hormones. Thus optimizing mineral nutrition and providing supplemental hormones are two mechanisms for gaining appreciable yield increases. Optimizing the mineral nutrient supply is a common and accepted agricultural practice, but the co-application of nitrogen-based fertilizers with plant hormones or plant growth regulators is relatively uncommon. Our review discusses possible uses of plant hormones (gibberellins, auxins, cytokinins, abscisic acid and ethylene) and specific growth regulators (glycine betaine and polyamines) to enhance and optimize crop yield when co-applied with nitrogen-based fertilizers. We conclude that use of growth-active gibberellins, together with a nitrogen-based fertilizer, can result in appreciable and significant additive increases in shoot dry biomass of crops, including forage crops growing under low-temperature conditions. There may also be a potential for use of an auxin or cytokinin, together with a nitrogen-based fertilizer, for obtaining additive increases in dry shoot biomass and/or reproductive yield. Further research, though, is needed to determine the potential of co-application of nitrogen-based fertilizers with abscisic acid, ethylene and other growth regulators. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Effects of Nitrogen Application on Growth and Ethanol Yield of Sweet Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench] Varieties

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    Oluwatoyin Olugbemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out in two locations, Ilorin (8° 29′ N; 4° 35′ E; about 310 m asl and Ejiba (8° 17′ N; 5° 39′ E; about 246 m asl, at the Southern Guinea Savannah agroecological zone of Nigeria to assess the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on the growth and ethanol yield of four sweet sorghum varieties (NTJ-2, 64 DTN, SW Makarfi 2006, and SW Dansadau 2007. Five N fertilizer levels (0, 40, 80, 120, and 160 kg ha−1 were used in a 4 × 5 factorial experiment, laid out in split-plots arrangement. The application of nitrogen fertilizer was shown to enhance the growth of sweet sorghum as observed in the plant height, LAI, CGR, and other growth indices. Nitrogen fertilizer application also enhanced the ethanol yield of the crop, as variations in growth parameters and ethanol yield were observed among the four varieties studied. The variety SW Dansadau 2007 was observed as the most promising in terms of growth and ethanol yield, and the application of 120 kg N ha−1 resulted in the best ethanol yield at the study area.

  13. [Effects of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) on the plant growth, fruit yield, and fruit quality of cucumber under salt stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Guo, Shi-Rong; He, Chao-Xing; Yan, Yan; Yu, Xian-Chang

    2012-01-01

    By adopting organic substrate culture, and salt-sensitive cucumber variety 'Jinchun No. 2' was used as test material, this paper studied the effects of inoculating arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) on the plant growth, fruit yield, and fruit quality of cucumber under salt stress. AMF-inoculation could effectively promote the plant growth and nutrient uptake, and improve the fruit yield and fruit nutrient quality, compared with ordinary cultivation. Under salt stress, the plant growth was inhibited, and the plant N, P, K, Cu, and Zn contents and K+/Na+ ratio, fruit yield, and fruit soluble protein, total sugar, vitamin C, and nitrate contents decreased, while inoculation with AMF could mitigate the inhibitory effect of salt stress on the plant growth, made the plant N, P, K, Cu, and Zn contents increased by 7.3%, 11.7%, 28.2%, 13.5%, and 9.9%, respectively, and made the plant K+/Na+ ratio, fruit yield, and fruit soluble protein, total sugar, and vitamin C contents have an obvious increase and the fruit nitrate content have a significant decrease. It was suggested that AMF could promote the plant growth and nutrient uptake of cucumber under salt stress, increase the plant salt-tolerance, and improve the fruit yield and its nutrient quality.

  14. Effect of fertilizer and dolomite applications on growth and yield of tapping rubber trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issariyaporn Damrongrak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tropical acid soil used for rubber planting has usually low fertility due to continuous loss of plant nutrient elements by crop removal and leaching. Thus, proper soil improvement in tapping rubber is very essential. This study aimed to measure the growth and yield of 17-year-old rubber trees, chemical properties of soil, and plant nutrient status in the leaf and latex after two years of soil improvement. A randomized complete block of seven treatments: No fertilizer (Control treatment, Chemical fertilizer based on soil analysis according to the recommendation of the Rubber Research Institute (Ch.F, Ch.F+ Dolomite to raise pH up to 6.0 (D, 3 kg per plant of compost (C, Ch.F+C, ½ Ch.F+C and ½ Ch.F+C+D, with three replicates was designed. After two years of giving treatments, it was found that adding full rate of chemical fertilizer based on soil test together with compost or dolomite increased the tree girth increment from the first year to the second year. Rubber yield after soil improvements tended to increase from the beginning to the end of the year, especially with compost application. Increasing of soil fertility was found after soil improvement treatments. However, total N, available P and available K were still lower than optimum levels as well as leaf N and K. Nitrogen in rubber latex after soil improvement treatments was higher than those in the control treatment, which contrasted to those of Ca and Mg. However, fertilizer and dolomite effect on micronutrient elements in rubber leaf and latex were not clear. Thus, fertilizer should be continuously applied at least with the full rate of chemical fertilizer based on soil analysis, and organic fertilizer should be applied to gain some trace elements. Dolomite could also be applied in a very strong acid soil.

  15. Difference in C3-C4 metabolism underlies tradeoff between growth rate and biomass yield in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanfen; Beck, David A C; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2016-07-19

    Two variants of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 demonstrated a trade-off between growth rate and biomass yield. In addition, growth rate and biomass yield were also affected by supplementation of growth medium with different amounts of cobalt. The metabolism changes relating to these growth phenomena as well as the trade-off were investigated in this study. (13)C metabolic flux analysis was used to generate a detailed central carbon metabolic flux map with both absolute and normalized flux values. The major differences between the two variants occurred at the formate node as well as within C3-C4 inter-conversion pathways. Higher relative fluxes through formyltetrahydrofolate ligase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, and malic enzyme led to higher biomass yield, while higher relative fluxes through pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase led to higher growth rate. These results were then tested by phenotypic studies on three mutants (null pyk, null pck mutant and null dme mutant) in both variants, which agreed with the model prediction. In this study, (13)C metabolic flux analysis for two strain variants of M. extorquens AM1 successfully identified metabolic pathways contributing to the trade-off between cell growth and biomass yield. Phenotypic analysis of mutants deficient in corresponding genes supported the conclusion that C3-C4 inter-conversion strategies were the major response to the trade-off.

  16. Growth, yield, and fruit quality of pepper plants amended with two sanitized sewage sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Immaculada; Azcona, Iñaki; Aguirreolea, Jone; Morales, Fermín; Corpas, Francisco Javier; Palma, José Manuel; Rellán-Alvarez, Rubén; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel

    2010-06-09

    Organic wastes such as sewage sludge have been successfully used to increase crop productivity of horticultural soils. Nevertheless, considerations of the impact of sludges on vegetable and fruit quality have received little attention. Therefore, the objective of the present work was to investigate the impact of two sanitized sewage sludges, autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) and compost sludge, on the growth, yield, and fruit quality of pepper plants ( Capsicum annuum L. cv. Piquillo) grown in the greenhouse. Two doses of ATAD (15 and 30% v/v) and three of composted sludge (15, 30, and 45%) were applied to a peat-based potting mix. Unamended substrate was included as control. ATAD and composted sludge increased leaf, shoot, and root dry matter, as well as fruit yield, mainly due to a higher number of fruits per plant. There was no effect of sludge on fruit size (dry matter per fruit and diameter). The concentrations of Zn and Cu in fruit increased with the addition of sewage sludges. Nevertheless, the levels of these elements remained below toxic thresholds. Pepper fruits from sludge-amended plants maintained low concentrations of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, thus indicating low pungency level, in accordance with the regulations prescribed by the Control Board of "Lodosa Piquillo peppers" Origin Denomination. The application of sludges did not modify the concentration of vitamin C (ASC) in fruit, whereas the highest doses of composted sludge tended to increase the content of reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, without change in the GSH/GSSG ratio. There were no effects of sludge on the transcript levels of enzymes involved in the synthesis of vitamin C, l-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH) or in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), and glutathione reductase (GR). Results suggest that the synthesis and degradation of ASC and GSH were compensated for in most of the

  17. Increasing Growth and Yield of Upland Rice by Application of Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhizae and Potassium Fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Natawijaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Field experiment with a split plot design has been carried out in order to assess the growth characteristics andyields, and effectiveness of MVA upland rice which were given potassium fertilizer in two growing seasons. MVAinoculation consisted of three treatments (without MVA, Glomus sp. and Gigaspora sp. while potassium fertilizerconsisted of five levels (0, 12.5, 25, 37.5, and 50 kg ha-1 K. The results showed that plant growth variable which wasinoculated by MVA at any levels of K fertilizer was higher in the dry season than that in the wet season, whereas theopposite occurred for net assimilation rate. Potassium content of leaf tissue, shoot/root ratio, and grain weight perhill was determined and mutually dependent on genus MVA, dosages of K fertilizer, and growing season. Harvestindex and grain dry weight per hill were influenced by the growing season and the genus MVA but the effect did notdepend on each other. At all dosages of K fertilizer and any MVA genera, Gigaspora sp. inoculation was better thanthat of Glomus sp. Dry weight of grains per hill was affected by the contribution of grain content per hill, weight of1000 grains and number of productive seedlings per hill. The optimum dosage of K fertilizer in the dry season was32.4 kg ha-1 K with grain yield 3.12 Mg ha-1 for inoculation of Gigaspora sp., whereas the optimum dosage in the wetseason was 34.2 kg ha-1 K for the treatment Glomus sp. inoculation with Gigaspora sp. in the wet season did notreach dosages of optimum K fertilizer.

  18. Post-coital vaginal sampling with nylon flocked swabs improves DNA typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benschop, Corina C G; Wiebosch, Danielle C; Kloosterman, Ate D; Sijen, Titia

    2010-02-01

    In the examination of sexual assault cases, DNA typing of vaginal samples mostly occurs after differential DNA extraction. Notwithstanding the differential extraction method, the DNA profiles from the seminal fraction often show the male alleles at low-level in combination with female alleles. This unfavorable ratio male to female DNA is due to a limited amount of sperm cells and an overwhelming quantity of female cells. In this study, we compared standard cotton and nylon flocked swabs for post-coital vaginal sampling. Twelve couples donated 88 vaginal swabs - 44 cotton, 44 nylon flocked - which were taken with a time since intercourse (TSI) up to 84 h. These vaginal swabs were sorted into categories on the basis of the TSI and submitted to (1) microscopic examination for the presence of male cells, (2) presumptive tests for the detection of seminal fluid and (3) DNA typing. Cellular elution was found to be 6-fold more efficient from the nylon flocked swabs. This makes microscopic analysis less time consuming as the higher cell yield and better cell morphology simplify detection of male cells. Both swab types reveal similar results regarding presumptive tests and male DNA typing. Positive presumptive tests (RSID-semen and PSA) were obtained up to 60 h TSI and male autosomal profiles up to 72 h TSI. Interestingly, over 50% of the samples negative for both presumptive tests resulted in informative male STR profiles. After differential extraction, less DNA was left on the nylon flocked swabs and more male DNA was isolated. Our results imply that the use of nylon flocked swabs for vaginal sampling will improve microscopic analysis and DNA typing in the medical forensic investigation of sexual assault cases.

  19. Impact of foliar application of seaweed extract on growth, yield and quality of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasim Haider, Chaudhary Muhammad Ayyub, Muhammad Aslam Pervez, Habat Ullah Asad, Abdul Manan, Syed Ali Raza and Irfan Ashraf

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A field trial was carried out in 2010 to investigate the effect of foliar application of seaweed extract “Primo” as an organic biostimulant on potato cv. ‘Sante’. Foliar application of seaweed extract was carried out at different growth stages of the crop (i.e. 30 days; 45 days; 60 days; 30 and 45 days; 30 and 60 days; 45 and 60 days; 30, 45 and 60 days after sowing. Control plants were sprayed with water without seaweed extract. A significant improvement in growth, yield and tuber quality of potato was observed where treatment was applied. The highest tuber yield was recorded with applications of seaweed extract at 30 + 60 days interval after planting. The treatment also improved nitrogen, total soluble solids and protein contents of the potato tubers. The results of the study concluded a positive response of potato plant growth and yield to the foliar application of seaweed extract.

  20. The Relationship between the thermal time accumulated during the long period of growth in agricultural yields of sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Ferrer Reyes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The work was carried out at the station for irrigation and drainage of sugarcane, Havana province. The time heat in the great period of growth was determined in eight stools grow Ja 60-5, under irrigation and rain fed conditions. The thermal time accumulated during the great period of growth, plants and sprouts was superior to that obtained under rain fed conditions and tended to decrease as the great period started later to the month of may, similarly behaved the agricultural yield. Greater heat time was obtained by the plant "noviembre.81" and their respective offspring under irrigation conditions, with 1314,3 and 117,35 0C day, respectively. The yields of these plantations were: 166 and to117.5 tha-1 the tendency found between the thermal time and agricultural yields, with the date of commencement of the great period of growth was adjusted to a logarithmic type model.

  1. EFFECT OF CHITOSAN ON PLANT GROWTH, FLOWERING AND CORMS YIELD OF POTTED

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    Piotr Salachna

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed at determining the influence of chitosan with different molecular weights on the growth and yield of flowers and corms of ‘Gompey’ freesia cultivated in pots. Freesia corms were soaked for 20 minutes in 0.5% chitosan solutions with low molecular weight (2 kDa, medium molecular weight (50 kDa and high molecular weight (970 kDa. The average deacetylation level of the chitosans used was 85%. The plants were cultivated under controlled conditions (18/16 °C day/night, relative air humidity of 60%, quantum irradiance of 90 μmol∙m-2∙s-1 with a light/dark cycle of 14/8 hours. The research results obtained have shown that chitosan is used as a biostimulator in the cultivation of potted freesia. Regardless of the molecular weight of the compound, the chitosan-treated plants had more leaves and shoots, flowered earlier, formed more flowers and corms. The application of medium- and high-molecular-weight chitosan resulted in higher plants with a higher relative chlorophyll content (SPAD. The highest increase in the corm weight was observed as a result of treating plants with high-molecular-weight chitosan. No chitosan influence on the length of the main inflorescence shoot or the inflorescence length was observed.

  2. Effect of fertilization methods on growth of pear trees, yielding and fruit quality

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    Tomasz Lipa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried out in the commercial orchard near Lublin on five-year old pear trees of two cultivars: ‘Conference’and ‘Lukasowka’, planted on Quince MA. The objective of the study was evaluated the reaction of pear on the method of application of fertilizers. In the early spring the surface broadcasting of fertilizers was used (N – 71,5 kg, P 2O5 – 33,0 kg, K 2 O – 114,0 kg and from the May to the middle of August the fertigation was applied (N – 76,4 kg, P 2O5 – 49,5 kg, K 2 O – 84,2 kg. Method of fertilizer’s applications had no significant effect on the growth of evaluated trees. There were no differences in quantity of yield in dependence on the method of fertilization. In the case of cv. ‘Lukasowka’the beneficial influence of the way of fertilization on morphology of fruits (their diameter, height and mass was stated. Such an effect was not observed in the case of the ‘Conference’.

  3. Primary health clinic toilet/bathroom surface swab sampling can indicate community profile of sexually transmitted infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiunn-Yih; Andersson, Patiyan; Holt, Deborah C.

    2017-01-01

    Background The microbiome of built environment surfaces is impacted by the presence of humans. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that analysis of surface swabs from clinic toilet/bathroom yields results correlated with sexually transmitted infection (STI) notifications from corresponding human populations. We extended a previously reported study in which surfaces in toilet/bathroom facilities in primary health clinics in the Australian Northern Territory (NT) were swabbed then tested for nucleic acid from the STI agents Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis. This was in the context of assessing the potential for such nucleic acid to contaminate specimens collected in such facilities. STIs are notifiable in the NT, thus allowing comparison of swab and notification data. Methods An assumption in the design was that while absolute built environment loads of STI nucleic acids will be a function of patient traffic density and facility cleaning protocols, the relative loads of STI nucleic acids from different species will be largely unaffected by these processes. Another assumption was that the proportion of swabs testing positive for STIs provides a measure of surface contamination. Accordingly, “STI profiles” were calculated. These were the proportions that each of the three STIs of interest contributed to the summed STI positive swabs or notifications. Three comparisons were performed, using swab data from clinics in remote Indigenous communities, clinics in small-medium towns, and a single urban sexual health clinic. These data were compared with time and place-matched STI notifications. Results There were significant correlations between swab and notifications data for the both the remote Indigenous and regional data. For the remote Indigenous clinics the p values ranged from 0.041 to 0.0089, depending on data transformation and p value inference method. Further, the swab data appeared to strongly indicate known higher

  4. Primary health clinic toilet/bathroom surface swab sampling can indicate community profile of sexually transmitted infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffard, Philip M; Su, Jiunn-Yih; Andersson, Patiyan; Holt, Deborah C

    2017-01-01

    The microbiome of built environment surfaces is impacted by the presence of humans. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that analysis of surface swabs from clinic toilet/bathroom yields results correlated with sexually transmitted infection (STI) notifications from corresponding human populations. We extended a previously reported study in which surfaces in toilet/bathroom facilities in primary health clinics in the Australian Northern Territory (NT) were swabbed then tested for nucleic acid from the STI agents Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis. This was in the context of assessing the potential for such nucleic acid to contaminate specimens collected in such facilities. STIs are notifiable in the NT, thus allowing comparison of swab and notification data. An assumption in the design was that while absolute built environment loads of STI nucleic acids will be a function of patient traffic density and facility cleaning protocols, the relative loads of STI nucleic acids from different species will be largely unaffected by these processes. Another assumption was that the proportion of swabs testing positive for STIs provides a measure of surface contamination. Accordingly, "STI profiles" were calculated. These were the proportions that each of the three STIs of interest contributed to the summed STI positive swabs or notifications. Three comparisons were performed, using swab data from clinics in remote Indigenous communities, clinics in small-medium towns, and a single urban sexual health clinic. These data were compared with time and place-matched STI notifications. There were significant correlations between swab and notifications data for the both the remote Indigenous and regional data. For the remote Indigenous clinics the p values ranged from 0.041 to 0.0089, depending on data transformation and p value inference method. Further, the swab data appeared to strongly indicate known higher relative prevalence of gonorrhoeae

  5. Response of Physiological Growth Indices and Bulb Dry Yield of Onion (Allium cepa L. Genotypes to Priming and Seed Size

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    M. Izadkhah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Priming is one of the most common methods of improving seed quality, which significantly affects their storability. Seed priming is a seed treatment that allows imbibition and activation of the initial metabolic events associated with seed germination, but prevents radicle emergence and growth. In other words, phase one and two of seed water imbibition curve are passed, but seeds do not enter the third phase of water uptake. Then seeds are dried back to their original water content. Seed priming is a pre-sowing strategy for influencing seed germination and seedling development by modulating pre-germination metabolic activity prior to emergence of the radicle and generally enhances germination rate and plant performance. Naturally, when speed and percentage emergence of germinating seeds are being high, growing sources like light, water and nutrient will be more used. Another factor that can affect the seed germination and seedling establishment is the seed size. As generally known, among producing factors, seed as the first consumer store, plays an important role in the transfer of genetic characters and improvement of qualitative and quantitative traits of production. One of the most important factors in maximizing crop yield is planting high quality seed. Seed size is an important physical indicator of seed quality that affects vegetative growth and is frequently related to yield, market grade factors and harvest efficiency. In the present paper, effects of different pre-sowing treatments and seed size on physiological growth indices and bulb dry yield of onion cultivars were investigated. Materials and Methods In order to determine the response of physiological growth indices and bulb dry yield of onion to priming and seed size, a field experiment was conducted in 2012-2013 cropping season at Agriculture and Natural Resources Research Center of East, Azarbayjan, Iran. This experiment was a factorial experiment based on a

  6. Maximal sum of metabolic exchange fluxes outperforms biomass yield as a predictor of growth rate of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarecki, Raphy; Oberhardt, Matthew A; Yizhak, Keren; Wagner, Allon; Shtifman Segal, Ella; Freilich, Shiri; Henry, Christopher S; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2014-01-01

    Growth rate has long been considered one of the most valuable phenotypes that can be measured in cells. Aside from being highly accessible and informative in laboratory cultures, maximal growth rate is often a prime determinant of cellular fitness, and predicting phenotypes that underlie fitness is key to both understanding and manipulating life. Despite this, current methods for predicting microbial fitness typically focus on yields [e.g., predictions of biomass yield using GEnome-scale metabolic Models (GEMs)] or notably require many empirical kinetic constants or substrate uptake rates, which render these methods ineffective in cases where fitness derives most directly from growth rate. Here we present a new method for predicting cellular growth rate, termed SUMEX, which does not require any empirical variables apart from a metabolic network (i.e., a GEM) and the growth medium. SUMEX is calculated by maximizing the SUM of molar EXchange fluxes (hence SUMEX) in a genome-scale metabolic model. SUMEX successfully predicts relative microbial growth rates across species, environments, and genetic conditions, outperforming traditional cellular objectives (most notably, the convention assuming biomass maximization). The success of SUMEX suggests that the ability of a cell to catabolize substrates and produce a strong proton gradient enables fast cell growth. Easily applicable heuristics for predicting growth rate, such as what we demonstrate with SUMEX, may contribute to numerous medical and biotechnological goals, ranging from the engineering of faster-growing industrial strains, modeling of mixed ecological communities, and the inhibition of cancer growth.

  7. Effects of saliva collection using cotton swab on cortisol enzyme immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Tomoaki; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Kaji, Yumi; Yasukouchi, Akira; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2009-12-01

    Cotton swabs are among the most commonly used devices for collecting saliva, but various studies have reported that their use impacts the results of salivary cortisol assays. These studies, however, estimated this impact by comparing the average of the concentration and/or scatter plots. In the present study, we estimated the impact of cotton swabs on the results of salivary cortisol enzyme immunoassay (EIA) by Bland-Altman plot. Eight healthy males (aged 20-23 years) provided four saliva samples on different days to yield a total of 32 samples. Saliva samples were collected directly in plastic tubes using plastic straws and then pipetted onto cotton swabs (cotton saliva collection) and into clear sterile tubes (passive saliva collection). There was a lower correlation between cotton and passive saliva collection. Individually, four subjects showed a negative correlation between passive and cotton saliva collection. A Bland-Altman plot indicated that cotton swabs causes a proportional bias on the EIA assay result. Our findings indicate a considerable effect of using cotton swabs for saliva collection, and subject-specific variability in the impact. A Bland-Altman plot further suggests possible reasons for this effect.

  8. The Effect of Soil Fertilizers on Yield and Growth Traits of Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor

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    R Kamaei

    2016-07-01

    , but they had significant effects on characteristics of root length colonization, specific root length, leaf area index, crop yield, number of seeds per panicle and thousand grains weight .The results demonstrated that the highest percent of root length colonization (82, specific root length (51.82 m root in 25 cm3 soil, leaf area index (5.47, seed yield (425.62 g.m-2, number of seeds in panicle (635 were obtained in mycorhhiza with Nitroxine® treatment. The highest weight of thousands seeds (29.26 g was gained in simultaneous use of mycrhhoriza and vermicampost. On the basis of our results, the integration of mycrhhoriza with Nitroxine® is suggested as the best fertilizer treatment for sorghum. Conclusions The results showed that the application of mycorrhiza with nitroxin had the greatest effect on growth characteristics and yield of sorghum. It seems that whenever there was a source of nitrogen beside the mycorrhiza, the performance of sorghum was higher. Undoubtedly, application of bio and organic fertilizers specially in poor soils, have positive effects on soil physical and nutritional characteristics. On the other hand according to economical, environmental and social aspects, they are benefits and could be appropriate alternative for chemical fertilizers in future.

  9. Effect of Organic Manure Mixture on growth and yield of Radish (RaphanusSativus L

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    M. Etesami

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today, production of organic farming and gardening is rising. The use of organic fertilizers such as animal manure has a long history. In recent years, the use of fertilizers and manure for providing the nutritional needs of plants, improve soil physical and chemical structure and reduce the environmental issues have been observed. Animal manures can increase soil organic matter and nutrients, improve soil structure and water-holding capacity which in turn increase the quality and quantity of the product to follow. Manure is a valuable source of biological, ecological and environmental benefits is positive and its main use is for agricultural use. Radish is an important root vegetable that belongs to the cruciferous (Brassicaceae. Value radish on high levels of dietary is related to soluble fiber and antioxidants. Radish is a native plant to Asia, China and Europe. The oral part of the botanical garden radish is important and that kind of traditional varieties have long hypocotyls include root and hypocotyls made.The purpose of this test is to evaluate the different mixture amount of animal fertilizers on the growth and yield of radish plants and compare them to each other. Materials and Methods: In order to study of different manure effect on radish growth and yield, an experiment carried out in 2012-2013 in the greenhouse of Gonbad- Kavos University with geographical characteristics 37.16 degrees north, 55.12 ° east and with a height of 45 meters above sea level in a completely randomized design with four replications. Soil and fertilizers used to this experiment were made of the soil and livestock of Gonbad- Kavos University. Soil texture was Clay loam and pH was 7.7 obtained from soil analysis. To obtain the required levels of fertilizer treatments (25, 50, 75, 100, a measure was considered as the basis of each treatment on the basis of the ratio were calculated. The treatments included control (soil, 25 percent cow manure+ 75

  10. Effect of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR on Yield and Yield Components of Sesame (Sesamum indicum l. with Emphasize on Environmental Friendly Operations

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    P Rezvani Moghaddam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effects of different plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR on yield and yield components of sesame, an experiment was conducted in the form of Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications at Research Station, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in year 2009. Treatments were: 1 Nitragin (containing of Azotobacter sp., Azospirillum sp. and Pseudomonas sp., 2 Nitroxin (containing of Azotobacter sp. and Azospirillum sp., 3 Super nitro plus (containing of Azospirillum sp., Bacillus sp. and Pseudomonas sp., 4 Phosphate suloblizing bacteria (containing of Bacillus sp. and Pseudomonas sp., 5 Bio Phosphate (containing of Bacillus sp. and Pseudomonas sp., 6 Nitroxin + Phosphate suloblizing bacteria, 7 Nitroxin + Bio Phosphate and control. The results showed that seed yield affected by PGPR and Nitroxin + Phosphate suloblizing bacteria treatment had superior effect on seed yield compared to other treatments. Superior effect of Nitroxin + Phosphate suloblizing bacteria treatment also was shown on plant seed weight and harvest index. Nitragin, Nitroxin + Bio Phosphate, Nitroxin + Phosphate suloblizing bacteria, Bio Phosphate, Phosphate suloblizing bacteria, Nitroxin treatments increased dry weight of capsules per plant of 62, 53, 51, 36 and 30 percent compared to control, respectively. Although, the effect of PGPR was not significant on sesame seed oil content but Bio Phosphate and Nitragin treatments increased seed oil content by 1 and 1.5 percent, respectively. In general, results showed utilization of PGPR can improve seed yield and seed oil content, which can decrease dependence of sesame seed production to chemical fertilizer, decrease negative environmental impacts and as an ecofriendly inputs can help to produce crops and sustainable agriculture guidlines.

  11. Interactive Role of Fungicides and Plant Growth Regulator (Trinexapac on Seed Yield and Oil Quality of Winter Rapeseed

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    Muhammad Ijaz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the role of growth regulator trinexapac and fungicides on growth, yield, and quality of winter rapeseed (Brassica napus L.. The experiment was conducted simultaneously at different locations in Germany using two cultivars of rapeseed. Five different fungicides belonging to the triazole and strobilurin groups, as well as a growth regulator trinexapac, were tested in this study. A total of seven combinations of these fungicides and growth regulator trinexapac were applied at two growth stages of rapeseed. These two stages include green floral bud stage (BBCH 53 and the course of pod development stage (BBCH 65. The results showed that plant height and leaf area index were affected significantly by the application of fungicides. Treatments exhibited induced photosynthetic ability and delayed senescence, which improved the morphological characters and yield components of rape plants at both locations. Triazole, in combination with strobilurin, led to the highest seed yield over other treatments at both experimental locations. Significant effects of fungicides on unsaturated fatty acids of rapeseed oil were observed. Fungicides did not cause any apparent variation in the values of free fatty acids and peroxide of rapeseed oil. Results of our study demonstrate that judicious use of fungicides in rapeseed may help to achieve sustainable farming to obtain higher yield and better quality of rapeseed.

  12. Effect of plant growth regulators on the yield of such red beetroot varieties as Bordeaux Kharkivskyi and Aktion

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    І. М. Бобось

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Revealing of adaptive properties of plant varieties of red beet Bordeaux Kharkivskyi and Aktion based on the study of plant growth regulators for marketable production in the Steppe zone of Ukraine. Methods. Field, laboratory ones, variance analysis. Results. The influence of plant growth regulators (Lignogumat, Betastimulin on earliness and productivity of such red beet varieties as Bordeaux Kharkivskyi and Aktion was established. Conclusions. Plant growth regulators (Betastimulin, Lignogumat stimulated seed sprouting of red beet Bordeaux Kharkivskyi and Aktion varieties, activated vegetative plant growth increa­sing marketable yield. Application of Betastimulin (0.2% for red beet Kharkivskyi Bordeaux and Aktion varieties provides the highest number of marketable beetroots, thus forming marketable yield of 44.7 and 54.9 t/ha respectively with the average beetroot weight of 328–519 g.

  13. The Effect of Nitrogen and Plant Density on Some Growth Characteristics, Yield and Essential Oil in Peppermint (Mentha piperita L.

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    z Izadi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to study the effect of different amounts of nitrogen and plant density on growth, yield, the percentage of essential oil in leaf and essential oil yield of peppermint (Mentha piperita L., an experiment was conducted in 2008 at the Experimental Field of the Agricultural Faculty of Bu-Ali Sina University. The experiment was split plot based on randomized complete block design with three replications over two cuts. The main plots included the amounts of 100, 150 and 200 kg nitrogen/ha in which half of fertilizer were used for the first cut and another half for the second. The sub-plots were consisted of plant densities as 8, 12 and 16 plants/m2. Morphophysiological characteristics including plant height, node and leaf number per plant, leaf area index, fresh and dry yield, essential oil percentage in leaf and essential oil yield over two cuts, and also the growth of dry matter, leaf area index and crop growth rate in the first cut were measured. The results showed that, nitrogen treatment significantly affected the properties measured, so that, their highest rates were obtained with the application of 100 and 200 kg nitrogen/ha from the first and the second cut, respectively. In addition, total dry matter, leaf area index and crop growth rate increased with increasing the amounts of nitrogen. Plant density also affected the plant height; node number, leaf number and leaf area index, essential oil percentage in leaf and essential oil yield in the first cut significantly, and in the second cut, plant density effect on leaf number and leaf area index was significant as well. Keywords: Peppermint, Nitrogen, Plant density, Yield, Growth indices, Essential oil

  14. Stand-level growth and yield component models for red oak-sweetgum forests on Mid-South minor stream bottoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily B. Schultz; J. Clint Iles; Thomas G. Matney; Andrew W. Ezell; James S. Meadows; Theodor D. Leininger; al. et.

    2010-01-01

    Greater emphasis is being placed on Southern bottomland hardwood management, but relatively few growth and yield prediction systems exist that are based on sufficient measurements. We present the aggregate stand-level expected yield and structural component equations for a red oak (Quercus section Lobatae)-sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) growth and yield model....

  15. Growth and yield models, assortment type and analysis of deadwood in chestnut coppice

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    Marziliano PA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chestnut (Castanea sativa MILL. is one of the most important forest tree species in Europe, and it is considered a symbol of the natural vegetation in southern Europe. In Calabria (southern Italy chestnut forest covers an area of approximately 87000 hectares, most of which (about 80% managed as coppice. In this study a growth and yield table has been elaborated. Thurthermore, assortment type and quantity of deadwood have been evaluated according to age of coppice and forest fire prevention, respectively. The study site is located in the “Presila of Catanzaro” and the research was carried out in 15 plots; the age of the examined stands ranged from 2 to 50 years old. More than 30000 shoots per hectare were recorded in the first two years after coppicing. As opposed, about 2300 and 1000 shoots per hectare were observed 15 and 50 years after coppicing, respectively. The culmination of the mean annual increment of the forest standing volume (16 m3 ha-1 year-1 was highlighted 25 years after coppicing, while the current annual increment culmination (21 m3 ha-1 year-1 was observed at 15 years. Fifteen years after coppicing, most of the wood production was constituted by small dimension assortments. Twenty five years after coppicing small and large poles were the prevailing assortments while telegraph poles and timber beams increased after 50 years. The amount of deadwood in forest ranged between 11.9 and 68.7 m3 ha-1. The largest component was represented by standing dead shoots. The results show that coppice management can be adopted even if the main purpose of the chestnut stand is the production of large size assortments. In chestnut coppice, highly vulnerable to fire, the reduction of stand density with silvicultural practices (thinning and displacement is the main way to promote the efficiency of forest and a higher strength and resiliency against forest fire.

  16. Patterns of Cereal Yield Growth across China from 1980 to 2010 and Their Implications for Food Production and Food Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyun; Liu, Nianjie; You, Liangzhi; Ke, Xinli; Liu, Haijun; Huang, Malan; Waddington, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    After a remarkable 86% increase in cereal production from 1980 to 2005, recent crop yield growth in China has been slow. County level crop production data between 1980 and 2010 from eastern and middle China were used to analyze spatial and temporal patterns of rice, wheat and maize yield in five major farming systems that include around 90% of China's cereal production. Site-specific yield trends were assessed in areas where those crops have experienced increasing yield or where yields have stagnated or declined. We find that rice yields have continued to increase on over 12.3 million hectares (m. ha) or 41.8% of the rice area in China between 1980 and 2010. However, yields stagnated on 50% of the rice area (around 14.7 m. ha) over this time period. Wheat yields increased on 13.8 m. ha (58.2% of the total harvest area), but stagnated on around 3.8 m. ha (15.8% of the harvest area). Yields increased on a smaller proportion of the maize area (17.7% of harvest area, 5.3 m. ha), while yields have stagnated on over 54% (16.3 m. ha). Many parts of the lowland rice and upland intensive sub-tropical farming systems were more prone to stagnation with rice, the upland intensive sub-tropical system with wheat, and maize in the temperate mixed system. Large areas where wheat yield continues to rise were found in the lowland rice and temperate mixed systems. Land and water constraints, climate variability, and other environmental limitations undermine increased crop yield and agricultural productivity in these systems and threaten future food security. Technology and policy innovations must be implemented to promote crop yields and the sustainable use of agricultural resources to maintain food security in China. In many production regions it is possible to better match the crop with input resources to raise crop yields and benefits. Investments may be especially useful to intensify production in areas where yields continue to improve. For example, increased support to maize

  17. Patterns of Cereal Yield Growth across China from 1980 to 2010 and Their Implications for Food Production and Food Security.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Li

    Full Text Available After a remarkable 86% increase in cereal production from 1980 to 2005, recent crop yield growth in China has been slow. County level crop production data between 1980 and 2010 from eastern and middle China were used to analyze spatial and temporal patterns of rice, wheat and maize yield in five major farming systems that include around 90% of China's cereal production. Site-specific yield trends were assessed in areas where those crops have experienced increasing yield or where yields have stagnated or declined. We find that rice yields have continued to increase on over 12.3 million hectares (m. ha or 41.8% of the rice area in China between 1980 and 2010. However, yields stagnated on 50% of the rice area (around 14.7 m. ha over this time period. Wheat yields increased on 13.8 m. ha (58.2% of the total harvest area, but stagnated on around 3.8 m. ha (15.8% of the harvest area. Yields increased on a smaller proportion of the maize area (17.7% of harvest area, 5.3 m. ha, while yields have stagnated on over 54% (16.3 m. ha. Many parts of the lowland rice and upland intensive sub-tropical farming systems were more prone to stagnation with rice, the upland intensive sub-tropical system with wheat, and maize in the temperate mixed system. Large areas where wheat yield continues to rise were found in the lowland rice and temperate mixed systems. Land and water constraints, climate variability, and other environmental limitations undermine increased crop yield and agricultural productivity in these systems and threaten future food security. Technology and policy innovations must be implemented to promote crop yields and the sustainable use of agricultural resources to maintain food security in China. In many production regions it is possible to better match the crop with input resources to raise crop yields and benefits. Investments may be especially useful to intensify production in areas where yields continue to improve. For example, increased

  18. An evaluation of three growth and yield simulators for even-aged hardwood forests of the mid-Appalachian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Brooks; Gary W. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Data from even-aged hardwood stands in four ecoregions across the mid-Appalachian region were used to test projection accuracy for three available growth and yield software systems: SILVAH, the Forest Vegetation Simulator, and the Stand Damage Model. Average root mean squared error (RMSE) ranged from 20 to 140 percent of actual trees per acre while RMSE ranged from 2...

  19. Growth, radiation use efficiency and yield potential of enset (Ensete ventricosum) at different sites in southern Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsegaye, A.; Struik, P.C.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge on the physiological parameters that determine the growth of enset (Ensete ventricosum) and on how these parameters develop over time and affect yield under field conditions is scarce. Field experiments were carried out at three sites in southern Ethiopia using suckers of several clones to

  20. Maize yield and quality in response to plant density and application of a novel plant growth regulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Zhang, L.; Evers, J.B.; Werf, van der W.; Zhang, W.; Duan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Farmers in China have gradually increased plant density in maize to achieve higher yields, but this has increased risk of lodging due to taller and weaker stems at higher plant densities. Plant growth regulators can be used to reduce lodging risk. In this study, for the first time, the performance

  1. Silviculture affects composition, growth, and yield in mixed northern conifers: 40-year results from the Penobscot Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul E. Sendak; John C. Brissette; Robert M. Frank

    2003-01-01

    This long-term experiment in Maine, U.S.A., was designed to provide information on the best silvicultural practices for managing stands of mixed northern conifers in northeastern U.S.A. We evaluated growth and yield and changes in species composition, quality, and structure during the first 40 years of the experiment. Replicated treatments include the selection system...

  2. Volume recovery, grade yield, and properties of lumber from young-growth sitka spruce and western hemlock in southeast Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn A. Christensen; Kent R. Julin; Robert J. Ross; Susan. Willits

    2002-01-01

    Wood volume recovery, lumber grade yield, and mechanical properties of young-growth Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophyla (Raf.) Sarg.)were examined. The sample included trees from commercially thinned and unthinned stands and fluted western hemlock logs obtained from a sort yard....

  3. Effect of application time of integratedchemical fertilizer with cattle manure on the growth, yield and yield components of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.

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    aliye salehi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the important aspects of the medicinal plants production is using less chemical inputs. It could be effective for increasing of production and environmental purposes. In order to investigate the effects of application time of integrated chemical fertilizer with cattle manure on growth, yield and yield components of black cumin (Nigella sativa L., an experiment was conducted based on a randomized complete block design with nine treatments and three replications in Research Farm of Shahrekord University during growing season 2011-2012. The treatments consisted of control (no amended nitrogen, cattle manure, urea, three levels of split integrated fertilizers such as cattle manure + urea, cattle manure + cattle manure + urea, and three levels of full integrated fertilizers including cattle manure + urea, cattle manure + cattle manure + urea. The results indicated that integrated application of cattle manure with chemical fertilizer caused significant increase in number of main branch per plant (%11.5, number of capsules per plant (%9.5, 1000-seed weight (%7.4, capsule weight (%5.9, biological yield (%36.7 of black cumin. Full dose application of urea fertilizer with cattle manure (50:50 due to improve of capsules per plant and 1000-seed weight increased significantly grain yield (2397 kg.ha-1. In general, use of integrated cattle manure with chemical fertilizer, full dose application of urea specially, with increasing of fertilizer efficiency led to improve of quantitative characteristic in black cumin. This method caused to cost eliminate of top dressing fertilizer and it can be effective for environment and medicinal plant health.

  4. Effects of planting pattern and density on growth indices, yield and yield component of corn (Zea mays in competition with redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retrofelexus(

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    alireza barkhi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted in 2002-2003 using split-split plot arrangement based on Rondomised Compelete Block Design with three replications at Feiz Abad Agricultural Research Station of Qazvin, in order to study of planting patterns and corn densitis effect in competition with redroot pigweed. Main plots inclouded two planting pattern of corn (P1: single row and P2: double row, sub plots inclouded two corn densities (D1:7 and D2:10 plant/m2 and sub sub plots inclouded 4 weed densities (C1:0, C2:2, C3:6, C4:12 plant/m2. Sampling conducted in 2-weekly intervals and growth indices evaluated. Results indicated that with increasing of weed density CGR, TDW, LAI, number of seeds in row, grain and ear yield decreased but plant height increased. Also LAI, CGR, TDW, number of weed seed and seed,s weight of weed increased. By increasing in corn density LAI, CGR, TDW, ear and grain yield increased, but length and diameter of ear and number of seeds in row decreased. Also LAI and CGR of weed increased, but TDW was decreased. In double row planting pattern just CGR, LAI, TDW of corn were higher significantly than single row planting pattern. But single row planting of weed caused higher LAI, NAR, RGR, CGR and TDW of weed in comparison with double row planting pattern. In 2-way interaction, double row planting pattern and zero densities and 2 weeds/m2 had highest grain yield respectively. There were no significant differences for 3-way interactions but double row planting pattern 10 plant density of corn/m2 zero weed/ m2 had highest grain yield.

  5. Effect of water regime on the growth, flower yield, essential oil and proline contents of Calendula officinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAMI ALI METWALLY

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Metwally SA,Khalid KA, Abou-Leila BH. 2013. Effect of water regime on the growth, flower yield, essential oil and proline contents of Calendula officinalis. Nusantara Bioscience 5: 63-67. The effects of water regime on the growth, content of essential oil and proline of Calendula officinalis L. plants were investigated. Water regimes of 75% of field water capacity increased certain growth characters [i.e. plant height (cm, leaf area (cm2, flower diameter (cm and spike stem diameter] and vase life (day. Water regime promoted the accumulation of essential oil content and its main components as well as proline contents.

  6. Effects of sheep kraal manure on growth, dry matter yield and leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous vegetables that supply abundant amounts of protein, vitamins, ... Keywords: Amaranthus accession, sheep manure, dry matter yield, nutrient ..... manure and fertiliser applications, though no specific trend was .... formulation.

  7. Effect of Irrigation Timing on Root Zone Soil Temperature, Root Growth and Grain Yield and Chemical Composition in Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun Dong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High air temperatures during the crop growing season can reduce harvestable yields in major agronomic crops worldwide. Repeated and prolonged high night air temperature stress may compromise plant growth and yield. Crop varieties with improved heat tolerance traits as well as crop management strategies at the farm scale are thus needed for climate change mitigation. Crop yield is especially sensitive to night-time warming trends. Current studies are mostly directed to the elevated night-time air temperature and its impact on crop growth and yield, but less attention is given to the understanding of night-time soil temperature management. Delivering irrigation water through drip early evening may reduce soil temperature and thus improve plant growth. In addition, corn growers typically use high-stature varieties that inevitably incur excessive respiratory carbon loss from roots and transpiration water loss under high night temperature conditions. The main objective of this study was to see if root-zone soil temperature can be reduced through drip irrigation applied at night-time, vs. daytime, using three corn hybrids of different above-ground architecture in Uvalde, TX where day and night temperatures during corn growing season are above U.S. averages. The experiment was conducted in 2014. Our results suggested that delivering well-water at night-time through drip irrigation reduced root-zone soil temperature by 0.6 °C, increase root length five folds, plant height 2%, and marginally increased grain yield by 10%. However, irrigation timing did not significantly affect leaf chlorophyll level and kernel crude protein, phosphorous, fat and starch concentrations. Different from our hypothesis, the shorter, more compact corn hybrid did not exhibit a higher yield and growth as compared with taller hybrids. As adjusting irrigation timing would not incur an extra cost for farmers, the finding reported here had immediate practical implications for farm

  8. Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, V. A.; Ott, C. M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of risk from infectious disease during spaceflight missions is composed of several factors including both the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms to which the crew are exposed. Thus, having a good understanding of the microbial ecology aboard spacecraft provides the necessary information to mitigate health risks to the crew. While preventive measures are taken to minimize the presence of pathogens on spacecraft, medically significant organisms have been isolated from both the Mir and International Space Station (ISS). Historically, the method for isolation and identification of microorganisms from spacecraft environmental samples depended upon their growth on culture media. Unfortunately, only a fraction of the organisms may grow on a specific culture medium, potentially omitting those microorganisms whose nutritional and physical requirements for growth are not met. To address this bias in our understanding of the ISS environment, the Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment was designed to investigate and develop monitoring technology to provide better microbial characterization. For the SWAB flight experiment, we hypothesized that environmental analysis using non-culture-based technologies would reveal microorganisms, allergens, and microbial toxins not previously reported in spacecraft, allowing for a more complete health assessment. Key findings during this experiment included: a) Generally, advanced molecular techniques were able to reveal a few organisms not recovered using culture-based methods; however, there is no indication that current monitoring is "missing" any medically significant bacteria or fungi. b) Molecular techniques have tremendous potential for microbial monitoring, however, sample preparation and data analysis present challenges for spaceflight hardware. c) Analytical results indicate that some molecular techniques, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), can

  9. Soybean root growth and crop yield in reponse to liming at the beginning of a no-tillage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Campanhola Bortoluzzi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing the soil near crop roots may reveal limitations to growth and yield even in a no-tillage system. The purpose of the present study was to relate the chemical and physical properties of soil under a no-tillage system to soybean root growth and plant yield after five years of use of different types of limestone and forms of application. A clayey Oxisol received application of dolomitic and calcitic limestones and their 1:1 combination in two forms: surface application, maintained on the soil surface; and incorporated, applied on the surface and incorporated mechanically. Soil physical properties (resistance to mechanical penetration, soil bulk density and soil aggregation, soil chemical properties (pH, exchangeable cations, H+Al, and cation exchange capacity and plant parameters (root growth system, soybean grain yield, and oat dry matter production were evaluated five years after setting up the experiment. Incorporation of lime neutralized exchangeable Al up to a depth of 20 cm without affecting the soil physical properties. The soybean root system reached depths of 40 cm or more with incorporated limestone, increasing grain yield an average of 31 % in relation to surface application, which limited the effect of lime up to a depth of 5 cm and root growth up to 20 cm. It was concluded that incorporation of limestone at the beginning of a no-tillage system ensures a favorable environment for root growth and soybean yield, while this intervention does not show long-term effects on soil physical properties under no-tillage. This suggests that there is resilience in the physical properties evaluated.

  10. DNA from buccal swabs suitable for high-throughput SNP multiplex analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Gai L; Gibson, Catherine S; O'Callaghan, Michael E; Goldwater, Paul N; Dekker, Gustaaf A; Haan, Eric A; MacLennan, Alastair H

    2009-12-01

    We sought a convenient and reliable method for collection of genetic material that is inexpensive and noninvasive and suitable for self-collection and mailing and a compatible, commercial DNA extraction protocol to meet quantitative and qualitative requirements for high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) multiplex analysis on an automated platform. Buccal swabs were collected from 34 individuals as part of a pilot study to test commercially available buccal swabs and DNA extraction kits. DNA was quantified on a spectrofluorometer with Picogreen dsDNA prior to testing the DNA integrity with predesigned SNP multiplex assays. Based on the pilot study results, the Catch-All swabs and Isohelix buccal DNA isolation kit were selected for our high-throughput application and extended to a further 1140 samples as part of a large cohort study. The average DNA yield in the pilot study (n=34) was 1.94 microg +/- 0.54 with a 94% genotyping pass rate. For the high-throughput application (n=1140), the average DNA yield was 2.44 microg +/- 1.74 with a >or=93% genotyping pass rate. The Catch-All buccal swabs are a convenient and cost-effective alternative to blood sampling. Combined with the Isohelix buccal DNA isolation kit, they provided DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for high-throughput SNP multiplex analysis.

  11. Interaction effects of water salinity and hydroponic growth medium on eggplant yield, water-use efficiency, and evapotranspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnoosh Mahjoor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eggplant (Solanum melongena L. is a plant native to tropical regions of Southeast Asia. The water crisis and drought on the one hand and eggplant greenhouse crop development as one of the most popular fruit vegetables for people on the other hand, led to the need for more research on the use of saline water and water stress to optimize salinity level and their impact on eggplant evapotranspiration and encounter better yield and crop quality. The objective of the present study was to investigate the interactions of water salinity and hydroponic growth medium on qualitative and quantitative properties of eggplant and its water-use efficiency. The study used the factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replications of four levels of water salinity (electrical conductivity of 0.8 (control, 2.5, 5, and 7 dS m−1 and three growth media (cocopeat, perlite, and a 50–50 mixture of the two by volume. Total yield, yield components, evapotranspiration, and water-use efficiency were determined during two growing periods, one each in 2012 and 2013. All of these indices decreased significantly as water salinity increased. Water with of 0.8 dS m−1 produced an average eggplant yield of 2510 g per plant in 2012 and 2600 g in 2013. The highest yield was observed in cocopeat. Water with 7 dS m−1 reduced yield to 906 g per plant in 2012 and to 960 g in 2013. Lowest yield was observed in perlite. The highest evapotranspiration values occurred in cocopeat at the lowest salinity in both years. Cocopeat and the cocopeat–perlite mixture were equally good substrates. The mixture significantly improved the quantitative and qualitative properties of eggplant yield.

  12. Effects of sowing date on the growth and yield of maize cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    Effects of harvest and sowing time on the performance of the rotation of winter wheat–summer maize in the North China Plain. Ind. Crop. Prod. 25:239-247. Killi F, Altunbay SG (2005). Seed yield, oil content and yield components of confection and oil seed sunflower cultivars. (Helianthus annuus L) planted on different dates.

  13. Biotoxic effects of the herbicides on growth, seed yield, and grain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pre-emergence application of the four herbicides at 400 µg kg-1 of soil adversely affected the measured parameters. The average maximum increase of 10 % in seed yield occurred at 200 µg kg-1 of sulfosulfuron, while atrazine at 200 and 400 µg kg-1 of soil decreased the seed yield by 25 % and 40%, respectively.

  14. Effect of organic and inorganic fertilizers on growth and yield of tef ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatments included eleven selected combinations of organic and inorganic nutrient sources (Farm yard manure, vermicompost, Compost, Nitrogen and Phosphorus). The design was randomized complete block with three replications. Results showed that tef yield, some yield components and soil chemical properties ...

  15. Phosphate fertilizer and weed control effects on growth and yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of phosphate fertilizer and weed control on yield and yield components of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) were studied on acidic Nitisols of farmers' fields of Welmera Woreda, West Shoa. Factorial combinations of four levels of phosphate fertilizer (0, 10, 20 and 30 kg P ha-1) as triple super-phosphate (TSP) and two ...

  16. Gastrointestinal Spatiotemporal mRNA Expression of Ghrelin vs Growth Hormone Receptor and New Growth Yield Machine Learning Model Based on Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Tao; Liu, Yong; Li, Hengzhi; Tang, Shaoxun; He, Zhixiong; Munteanu, Cristian R; González-Díaz, Humberto; Tan, Zhiliang; Zhou, Chuanshe

    2016-07-27

    The management of ruminant growth yield has economic importance. The current work presents a study of the spatiotemporal dynamic expression of Ghrelin and GHR at mRNA levels throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of kid goats under housing and grazing systems. The experiments show that the feeding system and age affected the expression of either Ghrelin or GHR with different mechanisms. Furthermore, the experimental data are used to build new Machine Learning models based on the Perturbation Theory, which can predict the effects of perturbations of Ghrelin and GHR mRNA expression on the growth yield. The models consider eight longitudinal GIT segments (rumen, abomasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum), seven time points (0, 7, 14, 28, 42, 56 and 70 d) and two feeding systems (Supplemental and Grazing feeding) as perturbations from the expected values of the growth yield. The best regression model was obtained using Random Forest, with the coefficient of determination R(2) of 0.781 for the test subset. The current results indicate that the non-linear regression model can accurately predict the growth yield and the key nodes during gastrointestinal development, which is helpful to optimize the feeding management strategies in ruminant production system.

  17. Effect of planting date and spacing on growth and yield of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) under irrigated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dalain, Saddam Aref; Abdel-Ghani, Adel H; Al-Dala'een, Jawad A; Thalaen, Haditha A

    2012-12-01

    Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) plant is a medicinal aromatic herb and belongs to Apiaceae family. It has a rich nutritional value and has many medicinal usages. Very limited information is available in the literature about fennel cultivation and production practices. Therefore, this study was carried out to evaluate the effect of planting date and plant spacing and their interactive effects on yield, yield components and growth of Fennel under irrigation. Three planting dates (Oct. 1st, Nov. 1st and Dec. 1st) and four plant spacings (10, 20, 30 and 40 cm with constant row width, 60 cm) were used. Fruit yield was significantly (p<0.05) influenced by plant spacing and planting date and their interaction. Early planting significantly increased the fruit yield combined with higher number of branches per plant, number of umbrella per plant, number of fruit per plant and plant height. The percentage of increases in Oct. 1st were 34.4 and 32.2% in fruit and biological yield respectively compared with Dec. 1st. Harvest index and thousand fruit weight was not significantly affected by planting date. Increase plant spacing to 30 cm led to more than 15% increase in fruit and biological yield. The early planting date with 30 cm plant spacing resulted in higher fruit (4136 kg ha(-1)) and biological yield (10,114 kg ha(-1)).

  18. Yield and Physiological Response of Red Bean Genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L. to Cutting Irrigation off at Different Growth Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Sadat Mohajerani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit and graduall reduction of available water resources are the limiting factors of crop production. To investigate the effect of water deficit stress on yield and components of some red bean genotypes a split plot experiment in the form of randomized complete block design with three replications was carried out at the Agricultural Research Station of Islamic Azad University, Arak Branch. The treatments consisted of full irrigation (control, cutting irrigation off during flowering stage, cutting irrigation off of pod filling stage and three genotypes of red bean (derakhshan, goli, and D81083. The results showed that the effect of cutting off irrigation during the growth stages on biological yield, grain yield, harvest index, number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod was significant. The results also showed that the highest seed yield belonged to the full irrigation (control treatment, where D81083 and goli produced higher yields than derakhshan. Highest grain yield was belonged to goli at full irrigation (control treatment. Among the genotypes under study, D81083 had the lowest amount of reduction equal to 60 percent during cutting off irrigation at flowering stage. Number of seeds per pod decreased when irrigation was cutted off during the flowering stage. Derakhshan produced higher yield than the other genotypes and its seed per pod decreased by 38 percent. The results also revealed that red bean genotypes were very sensitive to deficite water stress. As a whole D81083 and goli genotypes were higher yielders than Derakhshan under limited water conditions.

  19. Initial growth and yield structure of selected cultivars of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. cultivated on mineral soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szwonek Eugeniusz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the possibility of cranberry cultivation on mineral soils and to assess the influence of vegetative biomass development, generative growth and yield components on the yielding of three cranberry cultivars originating in the USA (Stevens, Pilgrim and Ben Lear at two locations in Poland. The key biometrical traits involved in yield formation were taken into account, and the soil and plant chemical conditions were evaluated. All of the measured biometrical characteristics were strongly influenced by the location and the year of cultivation, and varietal differences were also noted. The most important determinants that explained yield variation were: the number of uprights per square meter, floral induction and berry set. However, the participation of each component in yield variation was strongly affected by the location, age of plantation and to a minor extent by the cultivar. The study confirmed the possibility of cranberry cultivation on mineral soils with a low pH. The biggest average yield of the three years was collected from cv. Stevens as cultivated on sandy soil in contrast to the same cultivar grown on sandy loam soil. In the case of sandy loam soil after acidification, cv. Pilgrim appeared to be a relatively better yielding cultivar.

  20. Corn and Soybeans in a Strip Intercropping System: Crop Growth Rates, Radiation Interception, and Grain Yield Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Verdelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crop growth rates (CGR, radiation interception (IPAR, yields, and their components were determined in two crops monocultures (using one corn and two soybean genotypes and in intercropped “strips,” during three growing seasons. Corn yield in the strips significantly increased in the three seasons (13–16% as compared to that in the monocultures. This response was due to increased yield in corn plants of the border rows of the strips, which was highly correlated to an increased IPAR, allowing high CGR at critical crop stages. As a result, more dry matter was partitioned to grain and also an increased number of ears per plant were generated. Conversely, yields of soybeans in the strips were 2 to 11% lower than that in the monocultures, with variable significance depending on soybean cultivar and/or year. Grain number per unit area was the yield component most closely associated to yield variation in both crops. We believe that if yield components of this system are more closely identified, more appropriate genotypes will fit into strip intercropping, thus contributing to the spread of this technique and thus to the sustainability of actual massive monocultured agricultural systems.

  1. Growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum adapted to lowland Lombok Island as an alternative food crop for dryland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zubaidi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wheat is not currently grown as a commercial crop in Indonesia, however since the consumption of wheat in Indonesia is steadily increasing and alternative of dry season crops are required for farming system diversification, wheat becomes an important crop to be adapted in dry land areas of Indonesia, one of them is dry land area of Lombok Island. The aims of this experiment is to adapt and screen wheat varieties including national and introduced Australian varieties in lowland Lombok Island. In future, wheat is expected to be an alternative crop for degraded lands. The experimental method used to evaluate growth and yield of 10 wheat varieties to look at the adaptability on the lowland of 200 m asl (Pringgarata and on higher land of 400 m asl (Aik Bukak. The results showed that at a lower altitude (Pringgarata, wheat growth is slower than in Aik Bukak, which can be caused by the temperature at 200 m asl has exceeded the tolerance limit for grain growth (supra optimal temperature. Wheat can give good yields on 400 m asl, but the yield is decreased at 200 m asl (average 1.68 t/ha vs 0.82 t/ha. This low yield is mainly due to sterility indicated by the low number of grain/spikelet ( 2 t/ha , higher than other varieties

  2. Flower synchrony, growth and yield enhancement of small type bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) through plant growth regulators and NPK fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mia, Baset M A; Islam, Md Serajul; Miah, Md Yunus; Das, M R; Khan, H I

    2014-02-01

    Assessment of growth regulator and NPK fertilization effects are important tools for flower stimulation and yield improvement in cucurbits. This investigation demonstrates the comparative male-female flower induction and fruit yield of small sized bitter gourd treated with NPK fertilizers and plant growth regulators. Namely, two experiments having three replicates were conducted in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with NPK fertilization and plant growth regulators-GA3, NAA and Ethophon application on small sized bitter gourd-genotype BG5 at the research field of the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU). In experiment 1, different doses of NPK fertilizers comprised of 10 treatments and in that of experiment 2, different levels of plant growth regulators indicated 10 treatments. The results indicated that application of different doses of NPK fertilizer and plant growth regulators significantly (< or = 0.05) influenced over the flower initiation and fruit setting. The application of N90-P45-K60 fertilizer along with Ethophon spraying resulted in the better yield of small sized bitter gourd.

  3. Inoculation of Schizolobium parahyba with mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria increases wood yield under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Viviana Torres Cely

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Schizolobium parahyba var. amazonicum (Huber ex Ducke occurs naturally in the Brazilian Amazon. Currently, it is being planted extensively because of its fast growth and excellent use in forestry. Consequently, there is great interest in new strategies to increase wood production. The interaction between soil microorganisms and plants, specifically in the roots, provides essential nutrients for plant growth. These interactions can have growth-promoting effects. In this way, this study assessed the effect of the inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR on growth of S. parahyba var. amazonicum under field conditions. We used two native species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Claroideoglomus etunicatum (Ce and Acaulospora sp. (Ac; two native strains of Rhizobium sp. (Rh1 and Rh2; and a non-native strain of Burkholderia sp. Different combinations of microorganisms were supplemented with chemical fertilizers (doses D1 and D2 in two planting methods, seed sowing and seedling planting. In seed sowing, the results showed that treatments with Ce/Rh1/Fertilizer D2 and Ac/No PGPR/Fertilizer D2 increased wood yield. In seedling planting, two combinations (Ac/Rh2/Fertilizer D1 and Ac/Rh1/Fertilizer D1 were more effective in increasing seedling growth. In these experiments, inoculation with AMF and PGPR increased wood yield by about 20% compared to the application of fertilizer alone.

  4. Enhancing growth and yield of grey oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sajor-caju) using sound treatment at different intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshita, I.; Mukhlis, A. Amir; Ain, M. S. Nur; Fern, C. Shi; Zarina, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Mushrooms are famous for their use as source of nutrient and medicinal purposes. Wild mushrooms grew in a large number in the nature after a heavy down pour. Some believes that the thunderstorm and lightning can have effects on the growth of mushrooms. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the impact of different acoustic sound treatment intervals towards the growth of grey oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sajor-caju). Five different sound treatment intervals involved which were; no treatment (control), 5-day, 10-day, 15-day and 20 day. The variables investigated were mycelium growth rate, growth stage performance (durations for mycelium filling up the bags, pinhead emergence and fruiting bodies formation), yield (number of fruiting bodies, total weight of fruiting bodies and percentage of biological efficiency) and physical analyses (pileus size, colour and texture). There were significant differences (P<0.05) observed in the mycelium growth rate, mycelium filling up the bags and number of fruiting bodies formation among different treatment intervals. As conclusion, the sound treated at different intervals have significant impact on the growth and yield of mushroom production where treatment at 5-day intervals was found to be the best treatment interval.

  5. Growth, nutrient accumulation in leaves and grain yield of super early genotypes of common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Stephan Nascente

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of researches that evaluate the development and nutrient accumulation in super early genotypes of common bean for the elaboration of fertilization programs. This study aimed at characterizing the development; N, P, K, Ca and Mg accumulation by leaves; grain yield; and yield components of super early genotypes of common bean. Field experiments were conducted in a randomized blocks design, with four replications. The treatments consisted of the IPR Colibri (control, CNFC 15873, CNFC 15874 and CNFC 15875 genotypes. Plants were sampled throughout the common bean development, being divided into leaves, stems and pods. After determining the dry matter, the contents of N, P, K, Ca and Mg accumulated in leaves were estimated. At harvesting, the grain yield and yield components were evaluated. The biomass accumulation in stems and leaves occurred until the flowering stage, and then it started in the pods until harvesting. The genotypes that absorbed more nitrogen and phosphorus had a higher grain yield. The average growing season of super early genotypes was 70 days (winter and 63 days (summer. CNFC 15874 was the most productive genotype in the winter, with grain yield similar to the IPR Colibri cultivar (control. In the summer, CNFC 15873 and CNFC 15875 achieved grain yield similar to the IPR Colibri cultivar.

  6. Impact of Poultry Manure and NPK Fertilizer On Soil Physical Properties and Growth and Yield of Carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbede Taiwo Michael

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted in the forest-savanna transition zone of Nigeria from May to July 2014 and September to November 2015 to determine the impacts of poultry manure (PM and NPK fertilizer on soil physical properties, and growth and yield of carrot (Daucus carota L.. The five treatments included no manure or fertilizer (control; 10, 20, and 30 megagrams (Mg·ha-1 of PM; and 300 kg·ha-1 of 15 N-15 P-15 K fertilizer. All levels of PM reduced soil bulk density and temperature, and improved total porosity and moisture content compared to the NPK fertilizer and the control. Plant height, number of leaves, root diameter, root length, and fresh root yield in the PM and NPK fertilizer treatments were improved compared to the control. Growth and yield parameters of carrot plants treated with 20 and 30 Mg·ha-1 PM were higher than the other treatments. The 10 Mg·ha-1 PM and NPK fertilizer treatments produced similar growth and yield responses. There was an interaction for year (Y × fertilizer (F on plant height, number of leaves, and fresh root yield. Relative to the control 10, 20, or 30 Mg·ha-1 PM and NPK fertilizer increased fresh root yield of carrot by 39.9%, 62.0%, 64.9%, and 37.3%, respectively. The 20 Mg·ha-1 PM treatment best improved soil properties and carrot productivity as indicated by the benefit-to-cost ratio.

  7. Measurement of sputtered beryllium yield and angular distribution during nanostructure growth in a helium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Alegre, D.; Baldwin, M. J.; Chrobak, C. P.; Doerner, R. P.; Miyamoto, M.; Nishijima, D.

    2017-09-01

    The angular distribution and sputtering yield of beryllium exposed to helium plasma are estimated from analysis of line-integrated 2D imaging of Be-I line emission in a steady-state linear plasma device. As the surface nanostructure forms during plasma exposure on a ˜100 s timescale (corresponding to a fluence of order 1020/cm2) from nearly mono-energetic ion bombardment, a narrowing of the beryllium sputtering angle and a significant (˜5×) drop in sputtering yield are observed. These trends are found to be qualitatively consistent with modeling taking into account the effect of the surface morphology on sputtering yield and angular distribution.

  8. Swabs to genomes: a comprehensive workflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison I. Dunitz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The sequencing, assembly, and basic analysis of microbial genomes, once a painstaking and expensive undertaking, has become much easier for research labs with access to standard molecular biology and computational tools. However, there are a confusing variety of options available for DNA library preparation and sequencing, and inexperience with bioinformatics can pose a significant barrier to entry for many who may be interested in microbial genomics. The objective of the present study was to design, test, troubleshoot, and publish a simple, comprehensive workflow from the collection of an environmental sample (a swab to a published microbial genome; empowering even a lab or classroom with limited resources and bioinformatics experience to perform it.

  9. Over-expression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa leads to faster plant growth and higher seed yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youjun; Yu, Laura; Yung, Ka-Fu; Leung, Dennis Yc; Sun, Feng; Lim, Boon L

    2012-04-02

    Lipids extracted from seeds of Camelina sativa have been successfully used as a reliable source of aviation biofuels. This biofuel is environmentally friendly because the drought resistance, frost tolerance and low fertilizer requirement of Camelina sativa allow it to grow on marginal lands. Improving the species growth and seed yield by genetic engineering is therefore a target for the biofuels industry. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of purple acid phosphatase 2 encoded by Arabidopsis (AtPAP2) promotes plant growth by modulating carbon metabolism. Overexpression lines bolt earlier and produce 50% more seeds per plant than wild type. In this study, we explored the effects of overexpressing AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa. Under controlled environmental conditions, overexpression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa resulted in longer hypocotyls, earlier flowering, faster growth rate, higher photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, increased seed yield and seed size in comparison with the wild-type line and null-lines. Similar to transgenic Arabidopsis, activity of sucrose phosphate synthase in leaves of transgenic Camelina was also significantly up-regulated. Sucrose produced in photosynthetic tissues supplies the building blocks for cellulose, starch and lipids for growth and fuel for anabolic metabolism. Changes in carbon flow and sink/source activities in transgenic lines may affect floral, architectural, and reproductive traits of plants. Lipids extracted from the seeds of Camelina sativa have been used as a major constituent of aviation biofuels. The improved growth rate and seed yield of transgenic Camelina under controlled environmental conditions have the potential to boost oil yield on an area basis in field conditions and thus make Camelina-based biofuels more environmentally friendly and economically attractive.

  10. Over-expression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa leads to faster plant growth and higher seed yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Youjun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipids extracted from seeds of Camelina sativa have been successfully used as a reliable source of aviation biofuels. This biofuel is environmentally friendly because the drought resistance, frost tolerance and low fertilizer requirement of Camelina sativa allow it to grow on marginal lands. Improving the species growth and seed yield by genetic engineering is therefore a target for the biofuels industry. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of purple acid phosphatase 2 encoded by Arabidopsis (AtPAP2 promotes plant growth by modulating carbon metabolism. Overexpression lines bolt earlier and produce 50% more seeds per plant than wild type. In this study, we explored the effects of overexpressing AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa. Results Under controlled environmental conditions, overexpression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa resulted in longer hypocotyls, earlier flowering, faster growth rate, higher photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, increased seed yield and seed size in comparison with the wild-type line and null-lines. Similar to transgenic Arabidopsis, activity of sucrose phosphate synthase in leaves of transgenic Camelina was also significantly up-regulated. Sucrose produced in photosynthetic tissues supplies the building blocks for cellulose, starch and lipids for growth and fuel for anabolic metabolism. Changes in carbon flow and sink/source activities in transgenic lines may affect floral, architectural, and reproductive traits of plants. Conclusions Lipids extracted from the seeds of Camelina sativa have been used as a major constituent of aviation biofuels. The improved growth rate and seed yield of transgenic Camelina under controlled environmental conditions have the potential to boost oil yield on an area basis in field conditions and thus make Camelina-based biofuels more environmentally friendly and economically attractive.

  11. Vermicompost and vermiwash as supplement to improve seedling, plant growth and yield in Linum usitassimum L. for organic agriculture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Makkar, Cinny; Singh, Jaswinder; Parkash, Chander

    2017-01-01

    ...% vermicompost v/v with soil and commercial potting media (Perlite, Peat and Coconut coir). To study the germination, vegetative growth, reproductive growth and yield in two varieties of Linum usitassimum L...

  12. Effects Of Spring Herbicide Treatments On Winter Wheat Growth And Grain Yield*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamouz P.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Herbicides provide a low-cost solution for protecting crops from significant yield losses. If weed infestations are below damage thresholds, however, then herbicide application is unnecessary and can even lead to yield loss. A small-plot field trial was conducted to examine the effect of herbicides on winter wheat yields. Weeds were removed manually from the trial area before herbicide application. Twenty-four treatments were tested in four replications. Treatment 1 consisted of an untreated weed-free control, whereas the other treatments comprised applications of the following herbicides and their combinations: metsulfuron-methyl + tribenuron-methyl (4.95 + 9.99 g ha−1, pinoxaden (30 g ha−1, fluroxypyr (175 g ha−1, and clopyralid (120 g ha−1. Water (250 l ha−1 or a urea-ammonium nitrate fertilizer solution (UAN, 120.5 l ha−1 was used as the herbicide carrier. Crop injury 30 days after treatment and yield loss were recorded. Results showed minor crop injury by herbicides and their combinations when applied without UAN and moderate injury caused by UAN in combination with herbicides. Yield losses reached 5.3% and 4.3% in those treatments where all of the tested herbicides were applied with and without UAN, respectively. The effect of all treatments on crop yield was, however, statistically insignificant (P = 0.934.

  13. Comparing non-woven, filmateci and woven gauze swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S; Loveless, P; Hay, N P; Toyick, N

    1993-01-02

    The physical characteristics and performance of seven non-woven swabs intended for topical use were compared with those of filmated swabs and woven cotton gauze in a series of laboratory tests. The results of this study suggest that the non-woven swabs have significant advantages over the other type examined. Based upon current pricing structures they represent a highly cost-effective alternative to the more traditional products for routine wound management procedures. As the various non-wovens have very different handling characteristics, it should be possible to select a swab to suit most requirements from the range of products available.

  14. Yield and resource use efficiency of Plukenetia volubilis plants at two distinct growth stages as affected by irrigation and fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, He-De; Geng, Yan-Jing; Yang, Chun; Jiao, Dong-Ying; Chen, Liang; Cai, Zhi-Quan

    2018-01-08

    This study is to test how seedlings (vegetative) and large plants (reproductive) of an oilseed crop (Plukenetia volubilis) responded to regulated deficit irrigation techniques (conventional deficit irrigation, DI; alternative partial root-zone irrigation, APRI) in a tropical humid monsoon area. Seedlings were more sensitive to water deficit than large plants. Although APRI did better than DI in saving water for both seedlings and large plants at the same amount of irrigation, full irrigation (FI) is optimal for faster seedling growth at the expense of water-use efficiency (WUE). The seed number per unit area was responsible for the total seed oil yield, largely depending on the active process of carbon and nitrogen storages at the whole-plant level. The magnitude of the increase in total seed and seed oil yield by fertilization was similar under different irrigation regimes. Compared with FI, DI can save water, but reduced the total seed yield and had lower agronomic nutrient-use efficiency (NUE agr ); whereas APRI had similar total seed yield and NUE agr , but reduced water use greatly. Although the dual goal of increasing the yield and saving water was not compatible, maintaining a high yield and NUEagr at the cost of WUE is recommended for P. volubilis plantation in t he water-rich areas.

  15. Study the effects of bio and organic fertilizers on growth characteristics and yield of Fennel (Foeniculum vulgar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gholami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the strategies for improving the quality of agricultural products is using bio-fertilizers. So in order to study the effects of mycorrhizal fungi, vermicompost and humic acid on growth characteristics and yield of Fennel, an experiment was studied on research farm of agricultural college of Shahrood University. This study was conducted as factorial experiment based on completely randomized block design with three replications. Factors include: mycorrhizal fugi( inoculated with Glomus intraradices and without inoculated, vermicompost(0,4,8 ton.ha-1 and humic acid( foliar and non-foliar application. Results of this study showed, the main effects of mycorrhizal fungi, vermicompost and humic acid on height, no. of umbels, seed weight per plant, biological and grain yield were significant. Mycorrhizal inoculation increased biological and grain yield compared with control plots about 8.5 and 20%, respectively. In this study 1000 seed weight significantly was affected by vermicompost and humic acid application. Interaction effects of mycorrhizal fungi, vermicompost on no. of seed per umbel, 1000 seed weight and grain yield was significant. So , the highest 1000 seed weight and grain yield were obtained from combination of mycorrhizal inoculation and 8 ton vermicompost( about 21 and 45 % increase in compare with control. Also the effects of combination of mycorrhizal fungi, vermicompost and humic acid on plant height and biological yield of fennel were significant.

  16. A Stand-Class Growth and Yield Model for Mexico’s Northern Temperate, Mixed and Multiaged Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Návar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to develop a stand-class growth and yield model based on the diameter growth dynamics of Pinus spp. and Quercus spp. of Mexico’s mixed temperate forests. Using a total of 2663 temporary, circular-sampling plots of 1000 m2 each, nine Weibull distribution techniques of parameter estimation were fitted to the diameter structures of pines and oaks. Statistical equations using stand attributes and the first three moments of the diameter distribution predicted and recovered the Weibull parameters. Using nearly 1200 and 100 harvested trees for pines and oaks, respectively, I developed the total height versus diameter at breast height relationship by fitting three non-linear functions. The Newnham model predicted stem taper and numerical integration was done to estimate merchantable timber volume for all trees in the stand for each diameter class. The independence of the diameter structures of pines and oaks was tested by regressing the Weibull parameters and projecting diameter structures. The model predicts diameter distributions transition from exponential (J inverse, logarithmic to well-balanced distributions with increasing mean stand diameter at breast height. Pine diameter distributions transition faster and the model predicts independent growth rates between pines and oaks. The stand-class growth and yield model must be completed with the diameter-age relationship for oaks in order to carry a full optimization procedure to find stand density and genera composition to maximize forest growth.

  17. The relationship between Norwegian Red heifer growth and their first-lactation test-day milk yield: A field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storli, K S; Klemetsdal, G; Volden, H; Salte, R

    2017-09-01

    Today's Norwegian Red (NR) is markedly different from the one that existed 25 yr ago due to the continuous genetic improvement of economically important traits. Still, current national recommendations on replacement heifer rearing largely are based on results from Danish studies from the late 1980s to the mid 1990s. The objectives of the present study were to gain information on (1) growth and growth profiles of modern NR replacement heifers in commercial dairy herds and (2) how growth during the rearing period affects the heifers' milk yield during their first lactation. To this end, we conducted a field study on 5 high-producing and 5 low-producing commercial dairy farms from each of 3 geographical regions in Norway. On these 30 farms, we combined repeated onsite registrations of growth on all available females from newborn to calving with registrations deriving from the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System. Each herd was visited 6 to 8 times over a period of 2 yr. At each visit, heart girth circumference on all available young females was measured. Registrations were made on a total of 3,110 heifers. After imposing restrictions on the data, growth parameters were estimated based on information from 536 animals, whereas 350 of these animals had the required information needed to estimate the relationship between growth and test-day milk yield. Our findings pointed toward an optimal ADG of 830 g/d from 10 to 15 mo of age that would optimize first-lactation yield of heifers in an average Norwegian dairy herd. The optimum will likely increase from selection over time. Utilizing simple proportionality, the ADG between 5 and 10 mo of age ideally should be 879 g/d, taking into account the fact that animal growth rate is higher at low ages and that a high prepubertal growth rate had no negative effect on first-lactation yield. When such a rearing practice is used to meet the requirements of today's genetically improved NR heifer, heifers can both optimize production in

  18. Effect of gamma-irradiated sludge on the growth and yield of rice (Oryza sativa L. var. GR-3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, G.A.; Prakash, L.; Devasia, Preston; Modi, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of gamma-irradiated sludge on the growth and yield of rice (Oryza sativa L. var. GR-3) in pot cultures have been studied. Compared to plants grown only in soil, shoot length, root length, fresh weight, dry weight, total proteins, total soluble sugars, starch and chlorophyll content of plants grown in soil supplemented with unirradiated or gamma-irradiated sludge were found to be significantly increased. Irradiation of sludge significantly stimulated the linear growth of shoot and root systems as well as fresh and dry weights of plants, compared to those grown in soil containing unirradiated sludge. There was also an improvement in the grain yield (weight of seed) when plants were grown in soil supplemented with irradiated sludge. The results obtained suggest that the gamma-irradiated sewage sludge can be beneficially recycled for agricultural uses.

  19. Effect of Phosphate Solubilizating Bacteria and Different Levels of Mineral Phosphorous on the Growth and Seed Yield of Soybean Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Yasari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of strains of Pseudomonas bacteria and levels of mineral phosphorous on the growth and seed yield of the soybean cultivars a study was conducted as split split plot format using the randomized complete block design with four replications. Two soybean cultivars such as Sari and Telar, three levels of phosphorous and four levels of inoculation with phosphate solubilizing bacteria were considered as sun and sub sub plots, respectively. Results showed that seed yield of the Telar cultivar (177.14 g m-2 was significantly higher than Sari cultivar (143.87 g m-2. The highest seed yield under the main influences of phosphorous (186.2 g m-2 belonged to the treatment of applying 50 kg h-1 of phosphorous and seed yield declined at 100 kg h-1 of phosphorous. It was also found that when seeds were inoculated with P. putida and P. fluorescens seed yield increased, compared to the control (123.5 g m-2, seed yield raised significantly (160 and 168.2 g m-2, respectively. By simultaneously inoculated with both the bacterial species maximum seed yield (190.3 g m-2 obtained which was accompanied by the maximum number of pods on the main stem (40.87, the highest number of pods per plant (99.67, and the largest 100–seed weight (20.61 g. Under the triple interaction effects of cultivar, phosphorous application, and bacterial inoculation, the maximum seed yield (236.6 g m-2 was obtained when seeds of the cultivar Telar were inoculated with P. putida and 50 kg h-1 of phosphorous were applied to the soil.

  20. Responses of Pea (Pisum sativum Growth and Yield to Residual Effects of Organic and Urea Fertilizers from Previous Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fallah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Application of organic manure in organic farming and long-term mineralization may lead to residual effects on the succeeding crop. So, residual effects of combined cattle manure and urea fertilizer of previous crop (black cumin on growth and yield of pea were examined in a randomized complete block design. Treatments included of  cattle manure (CM, urea (U, three ratios of CM+U full dose application (2:1; 1:1; 1:2 and three ratios of CM+U split application (2:1; 1:1; 1:2, and unfertilized control to previous crop (black cumin in 2012. Pea planted without any fertilizer in 2013. There was no significant difference between control and residual of urea treatment for some parameters including dry matter in flowering stage, plant nitrogen and phosphorus concentration, plant height, yield components, grain yield and biological yield of pea. Biological and grain yields were greater under both residual of cattle manure treatment and integrated treatments compared to residual of urea treatment. The highest grain yield (4000 kg ha-1 was observed in residual of CM:U full dosed application treatment, to the extent that grain yield in this treatment indicated a 1.5-fold increase in comparison with residual of urea treatment. The highest biological yield (8325 kg ha-1 was obtained in residual of CM treatment, though it was not significant different from that of residual of CM:U (1:2 treatments. In general, although residual of urea fertilizer did not leave a notable effect on pea production, but production of this crop relying on residual of cattle manure deems effective to lowering of fertilization cost and ameliorating environmental contaminations.

  1. Growth, yield and quality responses to gibberellic acid (GA 3 ) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out to investigate the effects of gibberellic acid (GA3) on the growth and development of the red jambu air madu fruits (Syzygium samarangense). Various horticultural parameters were monitored during two seasons of fruit growth between December, 2008 to December, 2009 with the application of three ...

  2. Climate change and agroecosystems: the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2 of the Earths atmosphere is increasing, which has the potential of increasing greenhouse effect and air temperature in the future. Plants respond to environment CO2 and temperature. Therefore, climate change may affect agriculture. The purpose of this paper was to review the literature about the impact of a possible increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield. Increasing CO2 concentration increases crop yield once the substrate for photosynthesis and the gradient of CO2 concentration between atmosphere and leaf increase. C3 plants will benefit more than C4 plants at elevated CO2. However, if global warming will take place, an increase in temperature may offset the benefits of increasing CO2 on crop yield.

  3. Enhancing growth rate and lipid yield of Chlorella with nuclear irradiation under high salt and CO2 stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Lu, Hongxiang; Huang, Yun; Li, Ke; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-03-01

    In order to produce biodiesel from microalgae cultured with abundant seawater, Chlorella sp. was mutated with (137)Se-γ ray irradiation and domesticated with f/2 seawater culture medium (salinity=3 wt.%) under 15 vol.% CO2 stress. Biomass yield of the mutant increased by 25% compared with wild species and lipid content increased to 54.9%. When nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in the initial substrate increased, the increased propagation speed of the mutant resulted in decreased cell diameter by 26.6% and decreased cell wall thickness by 69.7%. The dramatically increased biomass yield of the mutant with sufficient initial substrate and relative nitrogen starvation in the later growth period with continuous 15 vol.% CO2 led to an increased lipid yield of 1.0 g/L. The long-chain unsaturated fatty acids increased, whereas short-chain saturated fatty acids decreased. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Catalytic CVD Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes: Towards High Yield and Low Temperature Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrez, Arnaud; Seo, Jin Won; Smajda, Rita; Mionić, Marijana; Forró, László

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) is currently the most flexible and economically attractive method for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Although its principle is simple, the precisely controlled growth of carbon nanotubes remains very complex because many different parameters influence the growth process. In this article, we review our recent results obtained on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes via CCVD. We discuss the role of the catalyst and the catalyst support. Our recent results obtained from the water assisted growth and the equimolar C2H2-CO2 reaction are also discussed. Both procedures lead to significantly enhanced carbon nanotube growth. In particular, the latter allows growing carbon nanotubes on diverse substrate materials at low temperatures. PMID:28883358

  5. Morphological plasticity of root growth under mild water stress increases water use efficiency without reducing yield in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Cai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A large yield gap exists in rain-fed maize (Zea mays L. production in semi-arid regions, mainly caused by frequent droughts halfway through the crop-growing period due to uneven distribution of rainfall. It is questionable whether irrigation systems are economically required in such a region since the total amount of rainfall does generally meet crop requirements. This study aimed to quantitatively determine the effects of water stress from jointing to grain filling on root and shoot growth and the consequences for maize grain yield, above- and below-ground dry matter, water uptake (WU and water use efficiency (WUE. Pot experiments were conducted in 2014 and 2015 with a mobile rain shelter to achieve conditions of no, mild or severe water stress. Maize yield was not affected by mild water stress over 2 years, while severe stress reduced yield by 56 %. Both water stress levels decreased root biomass slightly but shoot biomass substantially. Mild water stress decreased root length but increased root diameter, resulting in no effect on root surface area. Due to the morphological plasticity in root growth and the increase in root ∕ shoot ratio, WU under water stress was decreased, and overall WUE for both above-ground dry matter and grain yield increased. Our results demonstrate that an irrigation system might be not economically and ecologically necessary because the frequently occurring mild water stress did not reduce crop yield much. The study helps us to understand crop responses to water stress during a critical water-sensitive period (middle of the crop-growing season and to mitigate drought risk in dry-land agriculture.

  6. Morphological plasticity of root growth under mild water stress increases water use efficiency without reducing yield in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qian; Zhang, Yulong; Sun, Zhanxiang; Zheng, Jiaming; Bai, Wei; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Yang; Feng, Liangshan; Feng, Chen; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Ning; Evers, Jochem B.; Zhang, Lizhen

    2017-08-01

    A large yield gap exists in rain-fed maize (Zea mays L.) production in semi-arid regions, mainly caused by frequent droughts halfway through the crop-growing period due to uneven distribution of rainfall. It is questionable whether irrigation systems are economically required in such a region since the total amount of rainfall does generally meet crop requirements. This study aimed to quantitatively determine the effects of water stress from jointing to grain filling on root and shoot growth and the consequences for maize grain yield, above- and below-ground dry matter, water uptake (WU) and water use efficiency (WUE). Pot experiments were conducted in 2014 and 2015 with a mobile rain shelter to achieve conditions of no, mild or severe water stress. Maize yield was not affected by mild water stress over 2 years, while severe stress reduced yield by 56 %. Both water stress levels decreased root biomass slightly but shoot biomass substantially. Mild water stress decreased root length but increased root diameter, resulting in no effect on root surface area. Due to the morphological plasticity in root growth and the increase in root / shoot ratio, WU under water stress was decreased, and overall WUE for both above-ground dry matter and grain yield increased. Our results demonstrate that an irrigation system might be not economically and ecologically necessary because the frequently occurring mild water stress did not reduce crop yield much. The study helps us to understand crop responses to water stress during a critical water-sensitive period (middle of the crop-growing season) and to mitigate drought risk in dry-land agriculture.

  7. [Effects of different patterns surface mulching on soil properties and fruit trees growth and yield in an apple orchard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Xie, Yong-Sheng; Hao, Ming-De; She, Xiao-Yan

    2010-02-01

    Taking a nine-year-old Fuji apple orchard in Loess Plateau as test object, this paper studied the effects of different patterns surface mulching (clean tillage, grass cover, plastic film mulch, straw mulch, and gravel mulch) on the soil properties and fruit trees growth and yield in this orchard. Grass cover induced the lowest differentiation of soil moisture profile, while gravel mulch induced the highest one. In treatment gravel mulch, the soil moisture content in apple trees root zone was the highest, which meant that there was more water available to apple trees. Surface mulching had significant effects on soil temperature, and generally resulted in a decrease in the maximum soil temperature. The exception was treatment plastic film mulch, in which, the soil temperature in summer exceeded the maximum allowable temperature for continuous root growth and physiological function. With the exception of treatment plastic film mulch, surface mulching increased the soil CO2 flux, which was the highest in treatment grass cover. Surface mulching also affected the proportion of various branch types and fruit yield. The proportion of medium-sized branches and fruit yield were the highest in treatment gravel mulch, while the fruit yield was the lowest in treatment grass cover. Factor analysis indicated that among the test surface mulching patterns, gravel mulch was most suitable for the apple orchards in gully region of Loess Plateau.

  8. Effects of humic acid application and mother corm weight on yield and growth of saffron (Crocus sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Koocheki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Saffron as a food, spicy and medicinal plant has more than 62000 ha under cultivation with about 250 tons annual dry stigma production in Iran, which includes about 90% of its world production. Therefore, this plant has a specific value in agricultural export products of Iran (Fallahi et al., 2014. Due to the important role of saffron in Iran’s agroecosystems, the improvement of its agronomic practices is essential. Nutritional management and mother corms size are two of the main factors affecting growth and yield of saffron. Humic acid is an eco-friendly fertilizer that improves the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil. This nutritional source has hormonal compounds and exerts a positive effect on elements absorption, quality and yield of plants. In addition, in saffron cultivation, it is possible to produce considerable amounts of stigma by using of standard mother corms with a minimum weight of 8 g. Because, large corms have a positive effect on stigma yield especially in the first growth cycle and the weight of replacement corms and consequently saffron flowering in the other growth cycles (Nassiri Mahallati et al., 2008. Therefore, the aim of this research was to investigate the interaction effects of mother corm size and different rates of humic acid on growth and yield of saffron. Materials and methods This experiment was carried out as factorial based on randomized completely block design with three replications in research farm of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, during two growing season (2009-2011. Experimental factors were consisted of mother corm weight (4-5, 6-8 and 9-10 g and application of humic acid (0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 kg.ha-1. Mother corm planting was in early October, 2009 with 10×20 cm corms distances and planting depth of 10cm. Humic acid (dissolved in water was used along with the first autumnal irrigation in two season growth. Flower and stigma yield of saffron were measured

  9. Heterologous expression of chloroplast-localized geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase confers fast plant growth, early flowering and increased seed yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Sandeep Kumar; Jung, Jihye; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Choi, Jun Young; Jung, Ji-Yul; Lee, In-Jung; Shin, Jeong Sheop; Ryu, Stephen Beungtae

    2016-01-01

    Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase (GGPS) is a key enzyme for a structurally diverse class of isoprenoid biosynthetic metabolites including gibberellins, carotenoids, chlorophylls and rubber. We expressed a chloroplast-targeted GGPS isolated from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The resulting transgenic tobacco plants expressing heterologous GGPS showed remarkably enhanced growth (an increase in shoot and root biomass and height), early flowering, increased number of seed pods and greater seed yield compared with that of GUS-transgenic lines (control) or wild-type plants. The gibberellin levels in HaGGPS-transgenic plants were higher than those in control plants, indicating that the observed phenotype may result from increased gibberellin content. However, in HaGGPS-transformant tobacco plants, we did not observe the phenotypic defects such as reduced chlorophyll content and greater petiole and stalk length, which were previously reported for transgenic plants expressing gibberellin biosynthetic genes. Fast plant growth was also observed in HaGGPS-expressing Arabidopsis and dandelion plants. The results of this study suggest that GGPS expression in crop plants may yield desirable agronomic traits, including enhanced growth of shoots and roots, early flowering, greater numbers of seed pods and/or higher seed yield. This research has potential applications for fast production of plant biomass that provides commercially valuable biomaterials or bioenergy. © 2015 Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists.

  10. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhiza inoculation on growth and yield of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill. under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R.R. Damaiyanti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the research was to study the effect mycorrhiza on growth and yield of tomato. The experiment was conducted in screen house 14 m x 10.5 m, in Pasuruan on November 2013 until March 2014, The experiment was conducted as a factorial randomized complete design. The first factor was dose of mycorrhiza (without mycorrhiza, 5 g mycorrhiza, 10 g mycorrhiza, and 20 g mycorrhiza. The second factor was the salinity stress level (without NaCl, 2500 ppm NaCl, 5000 ppm NaCl, and 7500 ppm NaCl. The results showed that salinity stress at the level 7500 ppm decreased the amount of fruit by 30.84% and fresh weight per hectare decreased by 51.72%. Mycorrhizal application was not able to increase the growth and yield in saline stress conditions; it was shown by the level of infection and the number of spores on the roots of tomato plants lower the salinity level 5000 ppm and 7500 ppm. But separately, application of 20 g mycorrhiza enhanced plant growth, such as plant height, leaf area, leaf number and proline. Application of 20 g mycorrhiza increased the yield by 35.99%.

  11. Screening femoral heads from living donors: a prospective study comparing swab-agar versus bone fragment-broth culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegeman, Veroniek; Verhaegen, Jan; Simon, Jean-Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Femoral heads are an important source of allograft bone used in reconstructive orthopaedic surgery. The sterility of donor material is of major importance for the recipient. Femoral heads intraoperatively retrieved during hip arthroplasty from medically screened living donors are routinely checked with a surface swab to exclude microbiological contamination. There is, however, evidence that swab cultures have limited sensitivity. We therefore prospectively compared two ways of screening femoral heads. Bacterial recovery from swabs in Amies transport medium taken intraoperatively, subsequently transported to the microbiology laboratory and inoculated on agar and in broth was compared with the recovery from a bone fragment also taken intraoperatively but immediately inoculated into Wilkins Chalgren broth. Forty femoral heads were tested with both methods. Bacteria were cultured neither from the femoral surface swabs nor from the femoral fragments. Consequently no distinct conclusions regarding the sensitivity of both techniques could be drawn. In addition the bacterial yield of two swabs in Amies transport medium streaked on a variety of culture media other than the conventional agar plates was also studied. Culturing of these swabs resulted in the detection of bacteria that are predominantly considered contaminants.

  12. Swabbing often fails to detect amphibian Chytridiomycosis under conditions of low infection load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehyub Shin

    Full Text Available The pathogenic chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (denoted Bd, causes large-scale epizootics in naïve amphibian populations. Intervention strategies to rapidly respond to Bd incursions require sensitive and accurate diagnostic methods. Chytridiomycosis usually is assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR amplification of amphibian skin swabs. Results based on this method, however, sometimes yield inconsistent results on infection status and inaccurate scores of infection intensity. In Asia and other regions where amphibians typically bear low Bd loads, swab results are least reliable. We developed a Bd-sampling method that collects zoospores released by infected subjects into an aquatic medium. Bd DNA is extracted by filters and amplified by nested PCR. Using laboratory colonies and field populations of Bombina orientalis, we compare results with those obtained on the same subjects by qPCR of DNA extracted from swabs. Many subjects, despite being diagnosed as Bd-negative by conventional methods, released Bd zoospores into collection containers and thus must be considered infected. Infection loads determined from filtered water were at least 1000 times higher than those estimated from swabs. Subjects significantly varied in infection load, as they intermittently released zoospores, over a 5-day period. Thus, the method might be used to compare the infectivity of individuals and study the periodicity of zoospore release. Sampling methods based on water filtration can dramatically increase the capacity to accurately diagnose chytridiomycosis and contribute to a better understanding of the interactions between Bd and its hosts.

  13. Volume 10 No. 3 March 2010 2203 GROWTH, YIELD AND NPK ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-03

    Mar 3, 2010 ... yield of maize cultivated with a complementary application of organic and inorganic fertilizers ... The potential of cow dung, poultry droppings, refuse compost ... round each plot. The organic fertilizer was an equal mixture of composted domestic waste and stale cow dung, applied at 10 tonnes ha. -1. [19].

  14. Yield assessment of integument-led seed growth following targeted repair of auxin response factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rhiannon; Spielman, Melissa; Schruff, Marie C; Larson, Tony R; Graham, Ian A; Scott, Rod J

    2008-10-01

    It is becoming increasingly vital to improve the yield of seed crops to feed an expanding population and, more recently, for biofuel production. One strategy to increase the yield is to increase the seed size, provided that there is not a concomitant decrease in seed number. In a previous study, we described a mutant in the auxin response factor 2 (ARF2) gene which produced extra cells in the seed coat and, subsequently, enlarged seeds. However, arf2 mutant plants also show severely reduced self-fertility caused, in part, by over-elongated sepals that prevent flower opening. As a low seed set increases individual seed size, a meaningful comparison of the yield in arf2 and wild-type plants could not be conducted. In this study, we show that targeted expression of wild-type ARF2 in the sepals and petals of arf2-9 mutant flowers restores flower opening and dramatically increases seed set. The restored plants retain both enlarged integuments and increased seed size, reinforcing previous evidence that arf2 mutations increase seed weight through their effect on integuments and not only via reduced fertility. We also show that the measurement of the harvest index in Arabidopsis is useful in assessing the impact of introduced traits on the yield.

  15. Effect of mineral and organic fertilizers on the growth and calyx yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yield study was carried out during the 2006 summer season in the field of Research Institute, University of Zabol at Sistan (latitude 30°54' N and longitude 61°41'E). The goal of the study was to evaluate the reaction of roselle cultivar to different chemical fertilizers alone or in combination with organic manure.

  16. Growth, nodulation and yield of black gram [Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... EM (effective microorganisms) is a commercial biofertilizer mainly consists of photosynthetic and lactic acid bacteria, yeast and ... application significantly enhanced grain yield by 48% in NPK amendment without B. japonicum inoculation. ... Black gram is a grain legume widely cultivated in. Pakistan, India ...

  17. Camelina growth and yield response to sowing depth and rate in the northern Corn Belt USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelina (Camelina sativa L.) is gaining interest as a productive alternative oilseed crop for biofuels and healthy food-use applications. Developing sound agronomic practices for its production is key to optimizing its seed oil yield potential. Plant stand establishment of camelina has been problem...

  18. Effect of plant population density on the growth and yield of sorghum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement of resource use efficiency and yields is probably possible through the use of appropriate plant densities. Field trials were therefore conducted to study the effects of four plant densities, varying from 2.0 to 12.5 plants m-2 on water and radiation use and performance of two Masakwa sorghum varieties grown on ...

  19. Effects of Striga gesnerioides on the Growth and Yield of Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uniform broadcasting of 0.05g of Striga gesnerioides were imposed in the treatment. Data were collected on plant height, number of leaves, plant vigor score, phenology, and grain yield. The results showed that there is a significant difference in the number of leaves between the treatments with DANILA having the highest ...

  20. Effect of zinc fertilization on growth and yield of cocoyam ( Colocasia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence, the lack of significance observed on plant height, number of corms, number of cormels and tuber yield of cocoyam in the study area may be attributed to the inherent characteristics of zinc oxide applied which is very slow in releasing nutrient to the test crop because its specific gravity surface decreased when it is ...

  1. Influence of urea application on growth, yield and mineral uptake in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pot experiment was conducted in a wire netting green house in order to assess the beneficial effect of urea on corn cultivars (C-20 and C-79) differing in yield production. Corn plants were grown in loam soil with alkaline in reaction. Application of varying urea levels did not change the physico-chemical properties of soil.

  2. Influence of growing conditions at different latitudes of Europe on strawberry growth performance, yield and quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, E.; Josuttis, M.; Nestby, R.

    2012-01-01

    The site effect of five locations from north (Stjørdal, Norway, 63°36'N) to south (Ancona, Italy, 43°31'N) was evaluated in strawberry regarding yield performance, fruit quality, length of fruit developing time from anthesis to harvest start and length of the harvest season. Cv. Elsanta was grown...

  3. The effect of aspen harvest and growth on water yield in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elon S. Verry

    1987-01-01

    Annual water yield increased following the clearcutting of a mature aspen forest in years 1-9 and year 14 of subsequent aspen regrowth. Maximum increases of 85, 117, and 88 mm year-l occurred during the first 3 years of regrowth. Increases in streamflow volumes from snowmelt and early spring rains were minimal and more variable after harvest and...

  4. Deficit irrigation and organic compost improve growth and yield of quinoa and pea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirich, A.; Choukr-Allah, R.; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    2012. Three organic matter levels (0, 5 and 10 t ha-1) were supplied as compost amendment combined with 2 irrigation levels (50 and 100% of full irrigation). The results indicate that stomatal conductance and dry matter have been affected significantly (P ... harvested yield was affected significantly (P compost. Results indicated that organic amendment of 10 t ha-1 and 5 t ha-1...

  5. Effect of Spacing on Growth and Yield of Five Bambara Groundnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted under field conditions to study the effect of spacing on yield of five bambara groundnut landraces in 2008 cropping season. The experimental design was a split plot with bambara groundnut landraces; Nav 4, Nav Red, Black eye, Mottled cream and Burkina as the main plot factor and the three ...

  6. Effect of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers on Growth and Yield of Tef ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    toshiba

    The design was randomized complete block with three replications. Results showed that tef yield, ... composting process is assisted by the presence of the earthworms in the compost heap, it is named vermicomposting. ... are converted by earthworms and micro-organisms into rich soil amendments with greatly increased ...

  7. Developing robust crop plants for sustaining growth and yield under adverse climatic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural production and quality are expected to suffer from adverse changes in climatic conditions, including global warming, and this will affect worldwide human and animal food security. Global warming has been shown to negatively impact crop yield and therefore will affect sustainability of a...

  8. Efficiency of NEB-33 fortified fertilizers on growth and yield of pepper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-03

    Apr 3, 2008 ... of branches, number of fruits, and fruit yield ranged from 129 - 170, 30.4 – 44.2 cm, 20.7 – 35 cm2, 2.0 -. 2.7 cm2, 12 – 17, 392 .... fertilizer unit of the institute. ... year cultural operations were subsequently carried out. Chemical ...

  9. Effects of NPK Fertilizer Application on the Growth and Seed Yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design, replicated twice. Data were collected on plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, number of branches, number of pods per plant, number of seeds per pod, weight of 100seeds and grain yield per treatment. All data were subjected to Analysis of Variance ...

  10. Effect of atrazine applications on weed growth and yield at different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corn (Zea mays L.), for silage, is very important in animal feeding because winter seasonal conditions last longer in Eastern Turkey. Corn yield components were investigated in plots, in which herbicide had been applied and also not applied at different irrigation levels in this study. The study lasted for two years and ...

  11. Growth and yield of the cowpea cultivar BRS Guariba inoculated with rhizobia strains in southwest Piauí

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Martins da Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of cowpea with efficient strains of rhizobia in biological nitrogen fixation can allow increased yield, which can completely replace nitrogen fertilization and can reduce production costs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of cowpea cultivar BRS Guariba to inoculation with six strains of rhizobia (UFLA 03-164, UFLA 03-154, INPA 03-11B, UFLA 03-84, BR 3267 and BR 3262 in a field experiment conducted in the Southwest of Piauí. The experimental design was randomized blocks with eight treatments and four replicates, including the six cited strains and two uninoculated controls, one with mineral nitrogen (70 kg ha-1 and the other without mineral nitrogen. Nodulation, growth, yield, nitrogen accumulation in shoots and in grains and crude protein content in grains were evaluated. Strains under selection (UFLA 03-154 and UFLA 03-164 promoted yields that were higher compared to those obtained by strains authorized as inoculants (INPA 03-11B, BR 3267 and BR 3262. Inoculation with strains UFLA 03-84, UFLA 03-154 and UFLA 03-164 promoted yields equivalent to the control with mineral nitrogen (796.51 kg ha-1 and similar to the yield obtained with the control without mineral nitrogen and without inoculation, indicating efficient symbiosis of the indigenous rhizobia. UFLA 03-154 was better than the other treatments in terms of increased crude protein.

  12. Photosynthesis and Transpiration Rates of Rice Cultivated Under the System of Rice Intensification and the Effects on Growth and Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Hidayati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The system of rice intensification (SRI crop management method has been reported by many authors to significantly increase rice yield with lower inputs, but physiological bases of yielding improvement has not been studied. In this research we assessed some physiological parameters and the mechanism of rice yield improvement of rice plants under SRI cultivation method during both vegetative and generative phases compared to conventional rice cultivation methods. We measured photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, leaf temperature, chlorophyll content, N and P uptake, plant growth parameters and yield for those comparison. SRI methods significantly increased both vegetative and reproductive (generative parameters of rice plants compared to conventional cultivation methods. Photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll content, N and P uptake under SRI cultivation were significantly higher compared to those of the conventional rice cultivation, but no differences were found in transpiration rate and leaf temperature. With SRI method, plants in their generative phase (especially in the grain-filling phase had the highest photosynthetic and the lowest transpiration rates. Grain yield under SRI method was significantly higher (ca. 24% than that of conventional method.

  13. GROWTH AND YIELD OF THREE VARIETIES OF MAIZE IN DRY LAND AT WAIHATU VILLAGE, WEST PART CERAM REGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Sirappa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity was conducted in July until October 2009. Research prepared on randomized block design, three replications. Purpose: to know respons of three maize varieties which cultivated on dry land. Size of plots area is 15 m × 16 m, plant spacing 75 cm × 40 cm, two plants per hole. Varieties assess is Bima-3 Bantimurung, Srikandi Kuning, and Bisi-2. Dosage of fertilizer used is NPK Phonska 300 kg, urea 300 kg, chicken manure two t ha-1 . Study shows: varieties Bima-3 Bantimurung, Srikandi Kuning give highest growth and yield than Bisi-2. Phonska NPK fertilizer application combined with manure give average yield of maize is higher than average of national and Moluccas yields, each 3.45 t ha-1 and 2.30 t ha-1 , respectively. Bima-3 Bantimurung hybrid variety gives average highest yield and not significantly different from composite Srikandi Kuning, but significantly different from hybrid Bisi-2. Bima-3 Bantimurung and Srikandi Kuning potentially developed on dry land in Moluccas because in addition to high yield, Bima 3 Bantimurung a maize hybrid that has a high biomass and stay green until harvest so that waste can be utilized for animal feed, while Srikandi Kuning is a composite maize rich of protein that can be used as an alternative food sources.

  14. Effects of Pyraclostrobin on Growth and Yield of Curly Red Chili (Capsicum Annum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Hardiansyah, Arizal Nur; Sulistyaningsih, Endang; Putra, Eka Tarwaca Susila

    2017-01-01

    Curly red chili was one of vegetable commodities in Indonesia used for seasoning of home cuisine, food industry, and pharmaceutical industry. Curly red chili cultivation needed fungicide to prevent fungal disease. Pyraclostrobin was a fungicide which could overcome fungal attack and improve plant growth. This research was conducted to study the effectiveness of pyraclostrobin application on vegetative growth of curly red chili plant. Research had been done in farmer’s land in Kemiriombo Villa...

  15. Crop growth, light utilization and yield of relay intercropped cotton as affected by plant density and a plant growth regulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mao, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, X.; Liu, S.; Werf, van der W.; Zhang, S.; Spiertz, J.H.J.; Li, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Modern cotton cultivation requires high plant densities and compact plants. Here we study planting density and growth regulator effects on plant structure and production of cotton when the cotton is grown in a relay intercrop with wheat, a cultivation system that is widespread in China. Field

  16. Comparison of urine with urethral swabs for the detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although cell culture has been regarded as the 'gold standard' for C. ... immunofluorescence as a 'gold standard', because of loss of chlamydial ... Specimens for EIA were collected with. Dacron swabs on aluminium shafts with prescored plastic handles. Swabs were immersed and broken off in 1 ml EIA transport media ...

  17. Effects of Silicon-Based Fertilizer on Growth, Yield and Nutrient Uptake of Rice in Tropical Zone of Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Xuan Cuong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Application of silicon (Si could greatly boost rice yield and mitigate abiotic stress, especially drought. A field experiment was conducted during 2015 at the research farm of Hong Duc University, Thanh Hoa City, Vietnam, to evaluate the effects of five different combined doses of standard fertilizer practice and Si fertilizer on growth, yield and yield components, as well as nutrient uptake of rice. The treatments consisted of the recommended dose of fertilizer (RDF, 110 kg/hm2 N + 90 kg/hm2 P2O5 + 80 kg/hm2 K2O as the control, RDF + 100 kg/hm2 SiO2, RDF + 200 kg/hm2 SiO2, RDF + 300 kg/hm2 SiO2 and RDF + 400 kg/hm2 SiO2. The results showed that the growth, grain and straw yields as well as yield components (number of grains per panicle, seed-setting rate and 1000-grain weight were significantly affected by Si application. The highest grain yield of 3 705 kg/hm2 was obtained with the highest level of Si fertilizer in combination with RDF (RDF + 400 kg/hm2 SiO2, however, it was statistically at par with the yields obtained with RDF + 300 kg/hm2 SiO2 (3 664 kg/hm2 and RDF + 200 kg/hm2 SiO2 (3 621 kg/hm2. The optimum dose of Si fertilizer with maximized grain yield (3 716 kg/hm2 was 329 kg/hm2 SiO2. The nutrient (Si, N, P and K uptakes of rice were also significantly enhanced by Si application. Si application at the level of 329 kg/hm2 along with RDF would help in the sustainable production of rice in the tropical zone of Vietnam.

  18. In situ earthworm breeding in orchards significantly improves the growth, quality and yield of papaya (Carica papaya L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Huimin; Zhang, Jia-En; Guo, Lei; Zhao, Benliang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four fertilizer applications-control (C), chemical fertilizer (F), compost (O), and in situ earthworm breeding (E)-on the growth, quality and yield of papaya (Carica papaya L.). In this study, 5 g plant(-1) urea (CH4N2O, %N = 46.3%) and 100 g plant(-1) microelement fertilizer was applied to each treatment. The fertilizer applications of these four treatments are different from each other. The results showed that the E treatment had the highest growth parameters over the whole growth period. At 127 days after transplantation, the order of plant heights from greatest to smallest was E > F > O > C, and the stem diameters were E > F > O > C, with significant differences between all treatments. Soluble-solid, sugar, vitamin C, and protein content significantly increased in the E treatment. In addition, the total acid and the electrical conductivity of the fruit significantly decreased in the E treatment. Fruit firmness clearly increased in the O treatment, and decreased in the F treatment. The fresh individual fruit weights, fruit numbers, and total yields were greatly improved in the F and E treatments, and the total yield of the E treatment was higher than that in the F treatment. In conclusion, the in situ earthworm breeding treatment performed better than conventional compost and chemical fertilizer treatments. Furthermore, in situ earthworm breeding may be a potential organic fertilizer application in orchards because it not only improves the fruit quality and yield but also reduces the amount of organic wastes from agriculture as a result of the activities of earthworms.

  19. Extraction of Sensitive Bands for Monitoring the Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum Growth Status and Yields Based on the Spectral Reflectance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    Full Text Available To extract the sensitive bands for estimating the winter wheat growth status and yields, field experiments were conducted. The crop variables including aboveground biomass (AGB, soil and plant analyzer development (SPAD value, yield, and canopy spectra were determined. Statistical methods of correlation analysis, partial least squares (PLS, and stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR were used to extract sensitive bands and estimate the crop variables with calibration set. The predictive model based on the selected bands was tested with validation set. The results showed that the crop variables were significantly correlated with spectral reflectance. The major spectral regions were selected with the B-coefficient and variable importance on projection (VIP parameter derived from the PLS analysis. The calibrated SMLR model based on the selected wavelengths demonstrated an excellent performance as the R2, TC, and RMSE were 0.634, 0.055, and 843.392 for yield; 0.671, 0.017, and 1.798 for SPAD; and 0.760, 0.081, and 1.164 for AGB. These models also performed accurately and robustly by using the field validation data set. It indicated that these wavelengths retained in models were important. The determined wavelengths for yield, SPAD, and AGB were 350, 410, 730, 1015, 1185 and 1245 nm; 355, 400, 515, 705, 935, 1090, and 1365 nm; and 470, 570, 895, 1170, 1285, and 1355 nm, respectively. This study illustrated that it was feasible to predict the crop variables by using the multivariate method. The step-by-step procedure to select the significant bands and optimize the prediction model of crop variables may serve as a valuable approach. The findings of this study may provide a theoretical and practical reference for rapidly and accurately monitoring the crop growth status and predicting the yield of winter wheat.

  20. Simulating Phenology, Growth and Yield of Transplanted Rice at Different Seedling Ages in Northern Iran Using ORYZA2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Amiri LARIJANI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice crop growth and yield in the north Iran are affected by crop duration and phenology. The purpose of this study was to calibrate and validate the ORYZA2000 model under potential production based on experimental data for simulating and quantifying the phenological development, crop duration and yield prediction of rice crop influenced by different seedling ages. In order to calibrate and validate the crop parameters of ORYZA2000 model, a two-year field experiment was conducted under potential growth condition for transplanted lowland rice during the 2008–2009 rice growing seasons, using three rice varieties with three seedling ages (17, 24 and 33 days old. The results showed that the seedling age changed crop duration from 7 to 10 d. The ORYZA2000 model could predict well, but consistently underestimated the length of growing period. The range in normalized root mean square error (RMSEn values for each phenological stage was between 4% and 6%. From our evaluation, we concluded that ORYZA2000 was sufficiently accurate in simulation of yield, leaf area index (LAI and biomass of crop organs over time. On average, RMSEn values were 13%–15% for total biomass, 18%–21% for green leaf biomass, 17%–20% for stem biomass, 16%–23% for panicle biomass and 24%–26% for LAI. The RMSEn values for final yield and biomass were 12%–16% and 6%–9%, respectively. Generally, the model simulated LAI, an exceeded measured value for younger seedlings, and best-fit was observed for older seedlings of short-duration varieties. The results revealed that the ORYZA2000 model can be applied as a supportive research tool for selecting the most appropriate strategies for rice yield improvement across the north Iran.

  1. Nitrogen on growth and yield of lettuce plants grown under root confinement

    OpenAIRE

    Francieli L Cardoso; Andriolo,Jerônimo L.; Picio, Miriane Dal; Piccin, Marcieli; Souza,Jéssica M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The objective of this research was to test the hypothesis that when lettuce plants grow under root confinement, development and yield is reduced and that such negative effects may be compensated by increasing nitrogen availability in the rooting media. The experiment was conducted between August 11st and September 23rd 2011. Lettuce transplants, cultivar Stella, bearing five leaves, were planted in pots using sand as substrate. Treatments were three root confinement levels and five ...

  2. Growth and yield of five varieties of cucumber ( Cucumis sativus l.) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The other varieties, Centriolo marketer, Pionsett, Beit alpha and Local variety produced 858 g, 722 g, 652 g, and 388 g per plant respectively. It was also superior in yield per unit area with a value of 35 t/ha and this more than doubled the value of the local variety which had 12.9 t/ha. ThE study revealed that Marketmoore ...

  3. Growth, yield, plant quality and nutrition of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) under soilless agricultural systems

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Subhrajit; Monroe, Amber; Martin R. Day

    2016-01-01

    Traditional agricultural systems are challenged by globally declining resources resulting from climate change and growing population. Alternative agricultural practices such as aquaponics (includes crop plant and aquatic species) and hydroponics (includes crop plant only) have the potential to generate high yield per unit area using limited land, water, and no soil. A soilless agricultural study was conducted at the Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA, USA from August to November, 201...

  4. Soybean growth and yield after single tillage and species mixture of cover plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislaine Piccolo de Lima

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of cover crops is important for the agricultural crop and soil management in order to improve the system and, consequently, to increase yield. Therefore, the present study analyzed the effect of crop residues of black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb. (BO and a cocktail (CO of BO, forage turnip (Raphanus sativus L. (FT and common vetch (Vicia sativa L. (V on the emergence speed index (ESI, seedling emergence speed (SES plant height and soybean yield in different intervals between cover crop desiccation with glyphosate 480 (3 L ha-1 and BRS 232 cultivar sowing. Plots of 5 x 2.5 m with 1 m of border received four treatments with BO cover crops and four with CO as well as a control for each cover crop, at random, with five replications. The plots were desiccated in intervals of 1, 10, 20 and 30 days before soybean seeding. The harvest was manual while yield was adjusted to 13% of moisture content. The experimental design was completely randomized with splitplots and means compared by the Scott and Knott test at 5% of significance. The results showed that CO of cover crops can be recommended for soybean to obtain a more vigorous seedling emergence, from 10 days after cover crop desiccation.

  5. Current surface ozone concentrations significantly decrease wheat growth, yield and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleijel, Håkan; Broberg, Malin C; Uddling, Johan; Mills, Gina

    2018-02-01

    Tropospheric ozone is known to adversely affect crops and other vegetation. Most studies have focussed on the effects of elevated ozone levels vs. present ambient. We investigated the effect of present ambient surface ozone (O3) concentrations vs. preindustrial on a range of agronomically important response variables in field-grown wheat, using results from 33 experiments (representing 9 countries, 3 continents, 17 cultivars plus one set of 4 cultivars) having both charcoal filtered (CF) and non-filtered (NF) air treatments. Average filtration efficiency was 62%, reducing the O3 concentration from 35.6±10.6SDppb in NF to 13.7±8.8SDppb in CF. Average CF concentrations were in the range of levels believed to represent pre-industrial conditions, while NF concentrations were 7% lower than in the ambient air at plant height on the experimental sites. NF had significant (pyield (-8.4%), grain mass (-3.7%), harvest index (-2.4%), total above-ground biomass (-5.4%), starch concentration (-3.0%), starch yield (-10.9%), and protein yield (-6.2%). No significant effect was found for grain number and protein concentration. There was a significant relationship between the effect of filtration on grain yield and the difference in O3 concentration between NF and CF treatments. The average yield loss per ppb O3 removed was 0.38% and did not systematically vary with year of experiment (ranging from 1982 to 2010) or with the average O3 level in the experiments. Although there are many differences among the field experiments included in this meta-analysis (e.g. genotype, degree of O3 pollution of the site and year, nutrient and soil condition, filtration efficiency), our study clearly shows that there is a consistent and significant effect of present ambient O3 exposure on a range of important response variables in wheat, the most strongly affected being starch yield. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of abscisic acid on growth, biomass and lipid yield of Scenedesmus quadricauda under nitrogen starved condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulochana, Sujitha Balakrishnan; Arumugam, Muthu

    2016-08-01

    Scenedesmus quadricauda, accumulated more lipid but with a drastic reduction in biomass yield during nitrogen starvation. Abscisic acid (ABA) being a stress responsible hormone, its effect on growth and biomass with sustainable lipid yield during nitrogen depletion was studied. The result revealed that the ABA level shoots up at 24h (27.21pmol/L) during the onset of nitrogen starvation followed by a sharp decline. The external supplemented ABA showed a positive effect on growth pattern (38×10(6)cells/ml) at a lower concentration. The dry biomass yield is also increasing up to 2.1 fold compared to nitrogen deficient S. quadricauda. The lipid content sustains in 1 and 2μM concentration of ABA under nitrogen-deficient condition. The fatty acid composition of ABA treated S. quadricauda cultures with respect to nitrogen-starved cells showed 11.17% increment in saturated fatty acid content, the desired lipid composition for biofuel application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Competitive Effects of Lambsquarters (Chenopodium album on Growth Parameters, Seed Yield and Essential Oil of Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Mirshekar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate competition between lambsquarters (Chenopodium album and fennel (Foeniculum vulgare on some traits effective on growth and yield a factorial experiment was conducted during 2010-2011 in Agricultural Research Station of Islamic Azad University, Tabriz Branch, Iran, based on randomized complete blocks design with 3 replications. Treatments were weed density (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 plants per meter row and its relative emergence times (simultaneously, 10, 20 and 30 days after crop emergence. Dormancy in lambsquarters seeds was broken using gibberlic acid. Essential oil of seeds was extracted by celevenger type apparatus. Results indicated that emergence of 4 weed plants per meter row had no significant effect on fennel growth period. When weed density increased more than 4 plants per meter row, leaf chlorophyle content index increased 26%. Effect of higher weed densities on the time of leaf senescence appearance and plant height was more than lower weed densities. Reduction of weed density and delaying its time of relative emergence decreased weed biomass. While, seed and essence yield increased, significantly. In those weed densities higher than 4 plants per meter row essence yield reduced 25 mL ha-1 per weed. It seems that the weed control in fennel field is necessary.

  8. A new method for high yield purification of type beta transforming growth factor from human platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnden-van Raaij, A.J.M. van den; Koornneef, I.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1988-01-01

    A new method was developed for the purification of type beta transforming growth factor from human platelets. This method is a three-step procedure including gel filtration, weak cation exchange HPLC and reverse phase HPLC. All steps are carried out at low pH using exclusively volatile acidic buffer

  9. Growth, Yield and Water Use Efficiency of Maize-Sorghum Intercrop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) with mean annual rainfall of 1100mm. Mean daily air temperatures. (minimum and maximum) range between 15oC and. 38oC. The wind speed ranges from 77.2 km/day in .... better at utilization of solar radiation for vegetative growth than the ...

  10. Growth, yield and grain protein content of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Plant and Soil ... Soil tillage affects both the profitability and sustainability of cropping systems. ... compared to a monoculture system can be ascribed to improved soil organic carbon and nitrogen (N) contents, which result in more plant-available mineral N and hence more vigorous crop growth.

  11. Yield and growth components of potato and wheat under organic nitrogen management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delden, van A.

    2001-01-01

    In order to optimize N management in organic farming systems, knowledge of crop growth processes in relation to N limitation is necessary. The present paper examines the response of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to N with respect to intercepted photosynthetically

  12. Growth, nodulation and yield of black gram [ Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EM (effective microorganisms) is a commercial biofertilizer mainly consists of photosynthetic and lactic acid bacteria, yeast and actinomycetes. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of EM application and two strains of nitrogen fixing Bradyrhizobium japonicum (TAL- 102 and MN-S) on plant growth, ...

  13. Yield and vegetative growth of cactus pear at different spacings and under chemical fertilizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João A. da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective was to evaluate the effect of different spacings and mineral fertilizations on cactus pear growth and production in a randomized block design, with three replicates, in a 3 x 4 factorial scheme: three spacings, 1.00 x 0.50 m, 2.00 x 0.25 m and 3.00 x 1.00 x 0.25 m, and four fertilizations, 000-000-000, 000-150-000, 200-150-000 and 200-150-100 kg ha-1 of N, P2O5 and K2O, respectively. Plant growth was evaluated between 90 and 390 days and production and growth were evaluated at 620 days after planting. There were significant interactions between spacing and fertilization for plant height, number of cladodes and cladode area index from 90 to 390 days and for production of fresh and dry matter at 620 days after planting. Spacing influenced cladode area index, while fertilization influenced plant height, number of cladodes and cladode area index at 620 days after planting. Plant height showed cubic effect for the days after planting. Number of cladodes and cladode area index were dependent on spacing, fertilization and plant age, and fitted to cubic models. The best results of growth and production of fresh and dry matter are associated with NPK and NP fertilizations and the spacing of 1.00 x 0.50 m.

  14. Effect of organic and inorganic fertilizer on growth and yield of fluted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PAT

    Organic fertilizers apart from releasing nutrient to the soil also improve its physical properties, which enhance plant growth and development. However, release of nutrient is slow in organic fertilizers, but more lasting compared to the faster release of nutrients by inorganic fertilizers, which are often lost rapidly by leaching in ...

  15. Remote Sensing Protocols for Parameterizing an Individual, Tree-Based, Forest Growth and Yield Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    input parameter for modeling forest growth, but it cannot be measured directly with LIDAR. Therefore, once individual stems are located, allometric ... equations relating LIDAR-derived estimates of stem height, crown size, and relative stem density are typical- ly used to estimate dbh for individual

  16. Effects of calcium paste as a seed coat on growth, yield and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MK

    2012-09-25

    Sep 25, 2012 ... NaCl stress reduced plant growth, photosynthetic pigment levels, ascorbic acid and calcium contents, and the activities of ... effects of calcium paste as a seed coat in mitigating the phytotoxicity of NaCl stress in pea plants. Key words: Calcium paste, ..... of saline water on tomato plants. Fayoum J. Agric. Res.

  17. Irrigation of grapevines with saline water. II. Mathematical simulation of vine growth and yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben-Asher, J.; Dam, van J.C.; Feddes, R.A.; Jhorar, R.K.

    2006-01-01

    Soil, water, atmosphere and plant (SWAP) model simulates deterministic transport of water and solutes, incorporating a semi-analytical sink function. It enables one to simulate detailed (SAWPd) or simple (SWAPs) crop growth patterns in response to flow patterns in the root zone. The objectives of

  18. Manipulating transplant morphology to advance post-transplant growth and yield in strawberry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reekie, J.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Two methods were developed to enhance transplant success and minimize water use of strawberry transplants harvested in Canadian nurseries for use in the annual strawberry production system in the Southern United States: mechanical leaf removal by mowing, and chemical control of growth and

  19. Growth, yield and quality of wheat and cotton in relay strip intercropping systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.; Werf, van der W.; Zhang, S.; Li, B.; Spiertz, J.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Intercropping of wheat and cotton is practiced at a large scale in northern China, but the productivity of intercrops, compared to monoculture, and the productivity and growth patterns of different alternative intercropping patterns have not been quantitatively documented. In this study, four

  20. Influence of growth regulator on plant growth, development and yield formation of sunflower hybrids (F1 under the conditions of Southern Steppe zone of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. А. Єременко

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study the effect of AKM plant growth regulator on growth, development and yield formation of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. hybrids in hybridization plots under the conditions of the Southern Steppe zone of Ukraine. Methods. Laboratory tests, field study, statistical evaluation. Results. The results of studies devoted to determining the optimal AKM concentration for the treatment of seeds of the maternal and paternal lines, the effect of AKM on field germination, biometric parameters of sunflower plants, seed quality (F1 and yield are presented. Three hybrids of the Ukrainian selection, such as ‘Alpha’, ‘Logos’ and ‘Persei’ were studied during 2014–2016. Optimal concentration of AKM (0.0015 g/l was defined. The vigor of seeds processed by AKM was higher than in check variety by 0.8–12.8 р.р. (♂; 0.4–10.7 p.p. (♀, laboratory germination – by 2.3–6.1 p.p. (♂; 3.5–6.2 p.p. (♀. In 2016, the sunflower plant height for all variants exceeded this parameter to be obtained for other years of the study. This could be explained by the fact that HTC in 2016 for the BBCH 00–39 period was 1.4 times higher than in 2015. In general, hybrids as the studied factor considerably influenced sunflower yield, and the share of the hybrid (factor A influence is 33%. This should be considered when selecting hybrids for sunflower cultivation technologies in the Steppe zone of Ukraine. Conclusions. Hydrothermal conditions of the year had the maximum impact on the formation of seed quality and yield of sunflower plants of the hybrids under study, but when using AKM growth regulator for presowing seed treatment, this negative impact was reduced by an average of 23%.

  1. Effects of organic fertilizers on the growth and yield of bush bean, winged bean and yard long bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Aminul Islam

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT VC (20%, TC (20% and N:P:K fertilizer (farmer's practice were used to determine the growth and yield attributes of bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus and yard long bean (Vigna unguiculata. Plants grown with VC (20% produced the highest fresh biomass for bush bean (527.55 g m-2, winged bean (1168.61 g m-2 and yard long bean (409.84 g m-2. In all the tested legumes the highest pod weight, pod number, pod dry weight and pod length were found in the VC (20% treatment. Photosynthetic rates in the three legumes peaked at pod formation stage in all treatments, with the highest photosynthetic rate observed in winged bean (56.17 µmol m-2s-1 grown with VC (20%. The highest yield for bush bean (2.98 ton ha-1, winged bean (7.28 ton ha-1 and yard long bean (2.22 ton ha-1 were also found in VC (20% treatment. Furthermore, protein content was highest in bush bean (26.50 g/100g, followed by yard long bean (24.74 g/100g and winged bean (22.04 g/100g, under VC (20% treatment. It can be concluded that legumes grown with VC (20% produced the highest yield and yield attributes.

  2. Forage growth, yield and quality responses of Napier hybrid grass cultivars to three cutting intervals in the Himalayan foothills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesang Wangchuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3 x 3 factorial study was conducted in the southern foothills of Bhutan to compare 3 cultivars of Napier hybrid grass (Pennisetum purpureum x P. glaucum: Pakchong-1, CO-3 and Giant Napier, at 3 cutting intervals (40, 60 and 80 days, in terms of forage growth, dry matter (DM yield and crude protein (CP concentration. The effects of cultivar x cutting interval were significant only on tiller number per plant and leaf:stem ratio (LSR. CO-3 consistently produced the highest tiller number per plant, leaves per plant and LSR, while Pakchong-1 produced the lowest. Pakchong-1 plants were taller, had bigger tillers and basal circumference and higher stem DM production than CO-3 and Giant. Leaf CP for all cultivars was about 17%, while stem CP concentration was lower for Pakchong-1 than for the other cultivars (3.6 vs. 5.3%, P<0.05. While 40-day cutting intervals produced high quality forage, yields suffered marked-ly and the best compromise between yield and quality of forage seemed to occur with 60-day cutting intervals. Pakchong-1 seems to have no marked advantages over CO-3 and Giant for livestock feed, and feeding studies would verify this. Its higher stem DM yields may be advantageous for biogas production and this aspect should be investigated.Keywords: Bhutan, CO-3, crude protein , dry matter, Giant Napier, Pakchong-1.DOI: 10.17138/TGFT(3142-150

  3. Effect of chemical paclobutrazol on growth, yield and quality of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) Har lium cultivar in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjawan, Chutichudet; Chutichudet, P; Chanaboon, T

    2007-02-01

    This investigation was carried out at Mahasarakham University Experimental Farm, Mahasarakham University, Northeast Thailand in the late rainy season of the 2003 to 2004 with the use of Roi-Et soil series (Oxic Paleustults). The experiment aims to search for more information on the effect of different rates of chemical Paclobutrazol (PBZ) application on growth, yield and quality of edible okra pods. A Randomised Complete Block Design (RCDB) with four replications was used for the experiment. The experiments consisted of five treatments, i.e., 0 (T1), 4000 (T2), 8000 (T3), 12,000 (T4) and 16,000 ppm ha(-1) (T5) of chemical PBZ. The results showed that an increase in PBZ application rate highly decreased plant height, harvesting age and significantly decreased leaf area of the fifth leaf but highly increased pod length, fresh weight/pod and fresh pod yield ha(-1) of the okra plants. PBZ had no significant effect on stem diameter and diameter of pods of the okra plants. Total soluble solid, fibre content, titratable acid, vitamin C and pectin contents in pods were not affected by chemical PBZ application. Pod yield highly increased with an increase in rate of PBZ application. The highest edible pod yield reached a value of 4501 kg ha(-1) for the highest rate of PBZ application (T5).

  4. [Effects of increasng field temperature on growth, development and yield of spring wheat in semi-arid area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Run-yuan; Wang, He-ling; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Fu-nian; Yang, Fu-lin; Lei, Jun

    2015-09-01

    A field infrared temperature-increasing simulation experiment was conducted to investi- gate the effects of air temperature increases (0, 1 and 2 °C ) on growth, development and yield of spring wheat at the Dingxi Arid Meteorology and Ecological Environment Experimental Station of the Institute of Arid Meteorology of China Meteorological Administration. The results showed that the growth period of spring wheat was shortened by 7-11 d when the temperature increased by 1-2 °C. The plant height and leaf area index increased at early growth stage, decreased after entering the jointing stage, and warming 2 °C had a higher effect than warming 1 °C. Warming treatment induced an obvious decrease in chlorophyll content, especially from late grain filling stage to milk ripe stage. Compared with the control, increasing temperature by 1-2 °C decreased the spring wheat yield by 25.4%-45.5%, mainly due to obvious decreases in number of grains and grain mass per panicle. Water consumption of 0-100 cm soil horizons increased with the increase of temperature, while the variation tendency of water consumption of 100-160 cm soil horizons was not obvious.

  5. The Application of Rice Hull Mulch and Potassium Nitrate on Growth and Yield of Kailan (Brassica oleraceae var. Long Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Ramadiana

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Potassium (K is absorbed by plants in larger amounts than any other mineral element except N to optimalize plant growth. Mulches may be influenced an available K at vegetative growth phase of plant. The research was conducted in Simpang Kanan Village, Gisting, Tanggamus Lampung Province. The objectives of this research were to study the application of KNO3 and rice hull mulch on growth and yield of kailan. Fields experiments were arranged by a factorial in a completely randomized block design with 10 treatments and 3 replications. A first factor was (1 dosages of KNO3 (150, 175, 200, 225, and 250 kg ha-1 and the second factor was mulch of the rice hull (with and without the rice hull. The results showed that the application of the rice hull did not significantly affected the yield of kailan, however the application of KNO3 till 250 kg ha-1 increased the level of greenness up to 6.10% and the wide of leaf up to 18,57%. In addition, the present of potassium fertilizer suspended with the rice hull significantly affected the width of kalian leaf.

  6. Effect of foliar application of plant growth regulators on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and grain yield in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Nirmali; Baruah, Kushal Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural soils are the major source of global nitrous oxide (N2O) emission, and more than two thirds of N2O emission originate from soil. Recent studies have identified that green plants contribute to transport of N2O to the atmosphere. We investigated the effects of foliar application of plant growth regulators (PGRs) and growth stimulating chemicals on N2O emission and wheat grain yield for 2 years. The PGRs' abscisic acid (ABA) and cytozyme (20 mg L(-1)), kinetin (10 and 20 mg L(-1)) and wet tea extract (1:20 w/w) along with distilled water as control were sprayed on wheat canopy at the tillering and panicle initiation stages. Our results showed that cytozyme and tea extract enhanced the plant dry biomass over control. Kinetin (10 and 20 mg L(-1)) and cytozyme increased the plant photosynthetic rate and photosynthate partitioning towards the developing grain. ABA (20 mg L(-1)) and kinetin (10 and 20 mg L(-1)) reduced the N2O emission over control primarily through regulation of leaf growth, stomatal density and xylem vessel size. Leaf area, stomatal density and xylem vessel size were found to be associated with N2O transport and emission. We concluded that use of ABA and kinetin can reduce N2O emissions without any impact on wheat grain yield.

  7. Effects of supplemental ultraviolet-B and cadmium on growth, antioxidants and yield of Pisum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, S B; Mishra, Shweta

    2009-02-01

    The impact of supplemental UV-B irradiation (sUV-B) and cadmium (Cd, 68 micromol kg(-1) soil) singly and in combination was studied on growth, pigments, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, lipid peroxidation (LPO), uptake and translocation of Cd and yield of pea plants under field condition. Compared to the control, both the stresses individually and in combination led to in reductions in growth, photosynthetic pigments, ascorbic acid, catalase (CAT) activity and yield, whereas a reverse trend was observed for flavonoids, thiols and proline contents, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities, and LPO. The uptake and translocation of Cd increased in different plant parts with duration of its treatment and also when applied with sUV-B. Combined treatment of sUV-B and Cd inhibited the growth and various metabolic processes antagonistically except the CAT activity which showed additive response. Further, CAT activity may be used as a bioindicator parameter to evaluate the individual and interactive effects of both the stresses.

  8. Effect of minta effluent on the phenology, growth and yield of Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp var. Ife brown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umebese, C E; Onasanya, O M

    2007-01-01

    The composition of minta effluent and its effect on the phenology, growth and yield of seeds of Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp var. Ife brown, were investigated. The effluent was highly acidic (pH 3.74) and the concentrations of Ca, Mg and SO4 were appreciable (107.07, 351.47 and 221.11 mg L(-1), respectively). Germination of seeds sown in effluent was delayed by a day, reduced by 2% and not synchronous. Phenological investigations showed that plants grown in soil watered with effluent had 4-5 days delay in staking, bud formation, flower initiation, fruiting, pod ripening and plant senescence. These plants showed significant reductions in plant height, leaf area, shoot biomass and pod biomass (p < 0.05). Furthermore, seed yield and 100 corn weight of treated plants were low. Minta effluent has low agropotential.

  9. Development of yield and nutritive value of timothy in primary growth and regrowth in northern growing conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. NISSINEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of the yield and nutritive value of timothy (Phleum pratense L. both in the primary growth and in the regrowth were studied at MTT Plant Production Research, a unit of MTT Agrifood Research Finland, in Rovaniemi (66°35´N in 1999–2001. The dry matter yield and leaf:stem ratio were measured from the crop samples, and the contents of crude protein and organic matter digestibility of both whole plant samples and leaf and stem fractions were analysed. In primary growth, the most rapid increase of dry matter, 220–240 kg ha-1 per day, was measured around the beginning of the heading stage. There was a very strong positive correlation between the proportion of stems and the amount of dry matter in the primary yield. The daily growth rate of the regrowth was less than half of that of the primary growth. The fastest decrease, 1 percentage unit per day, in crude protein content was measured at the pasture stage (4–5-leaf stage. During the entire sampling period, the average daily decline in crude protein content in the primary growth of timothy was 0.65 percentage units. The main cause for the rapid decline in crude protein content was the high proportion of stem matter and its low protein content. In the regrowth, during the last four weeks before the harvest, the average daily decline in crude protein content was 0.28 percentage units.The average decline in organic matter digestibility from early pasture stage to late silage stage was 0.9 percentage units per day. The most remarkable change was noticed at the growth stage of timothy when about the half of stems were heading and it was then that the digestibility decreased by more than one percentage unit per day. The rapid decline in organic matter digestibility was due to the low digestibility of stem matter. The daily change in forage digestibility in the regrowth was very small, on average 0.11%.;

  10. Roles of plant growth regulators on yield, grain qualities and antioxidant enzyme activities in super hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shenggang; Rasul, Fahd; Li, Wu; Tian, Hua; Mo, Zhaowen; Duan, Meiyang; Tang, Xiangru

    2013-04-16

    Plant growth regulators play important roles in plant growth and development, but little is known about roles of plant growth regulators in yield, grain qualities and antioxidant enzyme activities in super hybrid rice. In this study, gibberellic acid(GA3), paclobutrazol (PBZ), 6-Benzylaminopurine(6-BA) treatments and distilled water (control) were sprayed to two hybrid rice cultivars (Peizataifeng and Huayou 86) at the heading stage in the field experiments in both early and late season in 2007. Treatments were arranged in a split-plot design with four replications. Cultivars treatments with two newly developed super hybrid rice Peizataifeng and Huayou86 were the main plots and plant growth regulators treatments were the subplots. Subplot treatments included (1) plots sprayed with distilled water(CK), (2) plots sprayed with 20 mg L-1 GA3 prepared using 95% ethanol as surfactant(GA3), (3) plots sprayed with 50 mg L-1 PBZ(PBZ), (4) plots sprayed with 30 mg L-1 6-BA(6-BA). Spraying PBZ with 50 mg L-1 or 6-BA with 30 mg L-1 at the heading stage could increase the number of spikelets per panicle, seed setting rate and grain yields in Peizataifeng and Huayou86 in both seasons. PBZ treatment also significantly improved head rice rate and amylose content in Peizataifeng and Huayou86 in early season. Furthermore, it was observed that spraying PBZ or 6-BA could increase super oxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities, decrease accumulation of malendialdehyde (MDA) in flag leaves at the late growth stage. Application of PBZ or 6-BA partially alleviated the detrimental effects of rice senescence by modulating the activity of enzymatic antioxidants, and improving antioxidant system, which helped in sustaining plant growth. Therefore, spraying PBZ with 50 mg L-1 or 6-BA with 30 mg L-1 at the heading stage could increase grain yields and improve grain qualities in the two super hybrid rice.

  11. Growth and yield of cucumber under no-tillage cultivation using rye as a cover crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Jelonkiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the first two years of study, method of cultivation did not affect the emergence of cucumber seedlings. In the third year, a drought occurring during the spring was the cause of poor seedling emergence on no-tilled plots. Six weeks after seed sowing, the shoots of cucumbers grown on the no-tilled plots were much shorter, especially in the last study year. At the time of cucumber seed sowing, no-tilled soil contained less phosphorus and potassium and in the middle of the fructification period the content of these elements in cucumber leaves was higher under no-tillage cultivation. Additional spring fertilization of rye with ammonium nitrate resulted in a higher N-NO3 content in soil and later in a higher nitrogen content of cucumber leaves. The content of calcium and magnesium in soil and than in cucumber leaves was independent of the cultivation method. In the first two years, method of cultivation did not affect the yield of cucumber fruits and in the third year the yield was much lower under no-tillage because of poor seedling emergence. Moreover, in the third year the fruits were smaller and dry matter content of the fruit was significantly higer under no-tillage cultivation.

  12. Evaluation of the effects of soil texture on yield and growth of saffron (Crocus sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Aghhavani Shajari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to study the effect of soil texture on flower and corm yield of saffron. This experiment was carried out based on Randomized Complete Block Design with four treatments and four replications in box at Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, in 2011. Treatments included of: 1- 100% field soil + cow manure, 2- 70% field soil + 30% sand, 3- 70% field soil + 30% sand + cow manure and 4- 70% sand + 30% field soil + cow manure. Results showed that the effect of soil texture was significant on all flower and corm properties. The highest flower and stigma fresh weight per box (1.59 and 0.10 g, respectively and petal dry weight (0.12 g were observed in 70% sand + 30% field soil + cow manure. The highest corm number in 2-3 cm diameter per box was obtained in 70% field soil + 30% sand + cow manure (3.75 numbers. Treatment of 70% sand + 30% field soil + cow manure produced the highest corm number in 3-6 g (1.75 numbers and 6-9 g (1.25 numbers per box, but the lowest values of most studied indices were obtained in 100% field soil + cow manure. Generally, our results indicated that light soil texture has more advantages than heavy soil texture in saffron cultivation. Therefore, soil modification through lighter soil application can improve saffron flower and corm yield.

  13. Nitrogen and phosphorus management strategy for better growth and yield of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. hybrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjed Ali and Ijaz Rasool Noorka

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study conducted during autumn season, 2010 investigated the effect of nitrogen and phosphorus on sunflower hybrid Hysun-33. The experiment was planned in randomized complete block design (factorial arrangement, with three replication, having net plot size of 3 x 7 m. The experiment comprised of 9 treatments, three levels of nitrogen and phosphorus, viz., 85, 135, 185 kg N ha-1, and 50, 75, 85 kg P ha-1. Nitrogen affected all estimated characters significantly, except plant population, while, phosphorus did not show significant effect on plant population and plant height. All other parameters, as leaf area plant-1, head diameter, 1000- achene weight and achene yield were affected significantly by different nitrogen and phosphorus levels. Interactive effects of nitrogen and phosphorus were significant in all these cases. The highest achene’s yield (2584 kg ha-1 was obtained with the application of 135-75 kg NP ha-1as against the lowest (1491kg ha-1 at 85-50 kg NP ha-1.

  14. Phytotoxic Effect of Herbicides with and without Surfactant on Weed Growth and Yield of Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tanveer

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of surfactants is an effective mean of improving herbicide efficiency. The herbicides methabenzthiazuron [l ,3-Dimethyl-3-(2-benzothiazolylurea], chlortoluron[N-(3, Chloro-4-methyl phenyl-N-N-dimethyl urea] + MCPA(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy acetic acid] and lsoproturon [3-(4-isopropylphenyl-1, 1-dimethyl urea] were evaluated for weed control at recommended rates of 1.26, 1.50 and 0.97 a.i. kg ha-1, respectively, in comparison with a 12.5 and 25% less rate after the addition of 0.2 % surfactant. Application of herbicides with surfactant even at lower rates was as effective as recommended rates in controlling weeds and increasing grain yield. Grain yield ranged from 20.8 to 45.3 % and 26.3 to 38.1 % more than the weedy check in 1992-93 and 1993-94, respectively, for various herbicide concentrations. Thus for economical weed control, a lower rate of herbicide with the addition of surfactant should be recommended.

  15. A simulation model of forage yield, quality and intake and growth of growing cattle grazing cornstalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Rivera, S; Lewis, M; Klopfenstein, T J; Thompson, T L

    1989-02-01

    A simulation model was developed to predict corn crop residue yield and quality and intake and performance of growing cattle grazing cornstalks. The model is wholly deterministic and integrates the effects of weather, residue supply and animal components. Low temperatures increase animal energy requirements, whereas snow cover decreases residue available. Residual grain and leaf are calculated from grain yield. Residue quantity and quality are reduced daily by environmental losses and animal consumption. Daily performance is predicted based on the nutrients obtained from residue and supplemental feed. Under unlimited roughage supply, leaf, husk and grain are primary diet components. Grain consumption decreases as the supply diminishes and forage quality decreases with time. Intake is calculated based on digestibility and fecal output = .0365 W.75. Forage availability affects intake in a curvilinear fashion. Energy gain is predicted by NRC equations and protein gain from metabolizable protein supply. The model underestimated intake of calves measured with chromic oxide and in vitro DM disappearance. Simulated daily gain (y, kg) of calves grazing at several stocking rates was related to observed daily gain (x, kg) by the equation y = .012 + .853 x (R2 = .71, Sy.x = .077). The model overestimated response to protein supplementation. Severe cold weather was predicted to reduce gains or cause weight loss due to increased energy requirements for maintenance. The model can be used as an aid in both research planning and cattle management.

  16. Growth and Yield of 15-Year Plantations of Pine, Spruce and Birch in Agricultural Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daugaviete Mudrite

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The growth data and the potential returns from 15-year-old plantations of pine Pinus sylvestris L. (6 trial sites, spruce Picea abies Karst L. (9 trial sites and silver birch Betula pendula Roth (13 trial sites, established in abandoned agricultural lands in a variety of soil types (sod calcareous, anthrosols, podzolic, podzols, gley, podzolic gley, alluvial, using the planting density 2,500 and 3,300 and also 5,000 trees/ha are analysed.

  17. Effects of calcium paste as a seed coat on growth, yield and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MK

    2012-09-25

    Sep 25, 2012 ... Except for seeds of the control and 150 mM. NaCl treatments, the healthy seeds were well coated with calcium paste by manual stirring. Each 1 kg seed needed 500 g of CW or. CWH for well coating and to be available to seeds and roots in a longer time during vegetative growth stage. CW- or CWH-coated.

  18. The effects of nutrient solution sterilization on the growth and yield of hydroponically grown lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzkopf, S. H.; Dudzinski, D.; Minners, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    Two methods of removing bacteria from hydroponic nutrient solution [ultraviolet (UV) radiation and submicronic filter] were evaluated for efficiency and for their effects on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) production. Both methods were effective in removing bacteria; but, at high intensity, the ultraviolet sterilizer significantly inhibited the production of plants grown in the treated solution. Bacterial removal by lower intensity UV or a submicronic filter seemed to promote plant growth slightly, but showed no consistent, statistically significant effect.

  19. Effect of rice-husk incorporation rates on the growth and yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plots were treated with 3 rates (10, 20 and 30 kg equivalent to 25, 50 and 75 tons/ha) of rice-husk and a control (0 kg) that were replicated 4 times in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD). Data collected on the plant growth parameters was analyzed using the generalized linear model of Statistix 9.1 for the ...

  20. Effects of incandescent radiation on photosynthesis, growth rate and yield of 'Waldmann's Green' leaf lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, S. L.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of different ratios incandescent (ln) to fluorescent (Fl) radiation were tested on growth of 'Waldmann's Green' leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) in a controlled environment. After 4 days of treatment, dry weight, leaf area, relative growth rate (RGR), net assimilation rate (NAR), leaf area ratio (LAR) and photosynthetic rate (Pn) were greater for plants grown at 84 rather than 16% of total irradiance (82 W m-2) from ln lamps. Although leaf dry weight and area were 12-17% greater at 84% ln after the first 8 days of treatment, there were no differences in RGR or Pn between treatments during the last 4 days. If 84% ln was compared with 50% ln, all cumulative growth parameters, RGR, NAR and Pn were greater for 84% ln during the first 4 days of treatment. However, during the second 4 days, RGR was greater for the 50% ln treatment, resulting in no net difference in leaf dry weight or area between treatments. Shifting from 84 to 50% ln radiation between the first and second 4 days of treatment increased plant dry weight, leaf area, RGR and NAR relative to those under 84% ln for 8 days continuously.

  1. High Yield Chemical Vapor Deposition Growth of High Quality Large-Area AB Stacked Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixin; Zhou, Hailong; Cheng, Rui; Yu, Woo Jong; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Yu; Shaw, Jonathan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    Bernal stacked (AB stacked) bilayer graphene is of significant interest for functional electronic and photonic devices due to the feasibility to continuously tune its band gap with a vertical electrical field. Mechanical exfoliation can be used to produce AB stacked bilayer graphene flakes but typically with the sizes limited to a few micrometers. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been recently explored for the synthesis of bilayer graphene but usually with limited coverage and a mixture of AB and randomly stacked structures. Herein we report a rational approach to produce large-area high quality AB stacked bilayer graphene. We show that the self-limiting effect of graphene growth on Cu foil can be broken by using a high H2/CH4 ratio in a low pressure CVD process to enable the continued growth of bilayer graphene. A high temperature and low pressure nucleation step is found to be critical for the formation of bilayer graphene nuclei with high AB stacking ratio. A rational design of a two-step CVD process is developed for the growth of bilayer graphene with high AB stacking ratio (up to 90 %) and high coverage (up to 99 %). The electrical transport studies demonstrated that devices made of the as-grown bilayer graphene exhibit typical characteristics of AB stacked bilayer graphene with the highest carrier mobility exceeding 4,000 cm2/V·s at room temperature, comparable to that of the exfoliated bilayer graphene. PMID:22906199

  2. Effects of submicron ammonium sulfate particles on the growth and yield of komatsuna (Brassica rapa L. var. perviridis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motai, Akira; Nakaba, Satoshi; Lenggoro, I. Wuled; Watanabe, Makoto; Wada, Yoshiharu; Izuta, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of submicron ammonium sulfate (AS) particles on komatsuna (Brassica rapa L. cv. Hakkei) plants. First, we optimized a leaf-washing method to measure the amount of AS particles deposited on the leaf surface of the plants. Then, we used this method to determine the retention time of particles deposited on the leaf surface of the plants. We also investigated the effects of AS particles on the growth and yield of the plants. Almost all the AS particles deposited on the leaf surface were removed within 1 min washing time with ultrapure water, and ion leaching from the leaf was relatively slow but continuous during the leaf-washing procedure. On the basis of these results, we determined that 1 min was a suitable washing time to remove most of the AS particles while minimizing the influence of ion leaching from the leaf. The amount of particulate SO42- deposited on the leaf surface decreased over time, probably because AS particles deposited on the leaf surface deliquesced, allowing ions such as SO42- in the deliquescence solution to be absorbed into the leaf. The plants were grown and exposed to AS particles for 16 days in naturally lit phytotrons. The daily mean increase in the concentration of SO42- in PM2.5 by the exposure to AS particles was 22.5 μg m-3 in the phytotrons. The growth and yield of the plants were significantly reduced by the exposure to AS particles. The exposure to AS particles did not affect the leaf concentrations of nitrogen and chlorophyll, but significantly reduced stomatal conductance. Therefore, stomatal closure is one of the reasons for the AS particle-induced reductions in the growth and yield of komatsuna plants.

  3. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing Brassica juncea HMG-CoA synthase 1 shows increased plant growth, pod size and seed yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Mingfu; Hsiao, An-Shan; Bach, Thomas J; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Seeds are very important not only in the life cycle of the plant but they represent food sources for man and animals. We report herein a mutant of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS), the second enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway that can improve seed yield when overexpressed in a phylogenetically distant species. In Brassica juncea, the characterisation of four isogenes encoding HMGS has been previously reported. Enzyme kinetics on recombinant wild-type (wt) and mutant BjHMGS1 had revealed that S359A displayed a 10-fold higher enzyme activity. The overexpression of wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 in Arabidopsis had up-regulated several genes in sterol biosynthesis, increasing sterol content. To quickly assess the effects of BjHMGS1 overexpression in a phylogenetically more distant species beyond the Brassicaceae, wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 were expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) of the family Solanaceae. New observations on tobacco OEs not previously reported for Arabidopsis OEs included: (i) phenotypic changes in enhanced plant growth, pod size and seed yield (more significant in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1) in comparison to vector-transformed tobacco, (ii) higher NtSQS expression and sterol content in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1 corresponding to greater increase in growth and seed yield, and (iii) induction of NtIPPI2 and NtGGPPS2 and downregulation of NtIPPI1, NtGGPPS1, NtGGPPS3 and NtGGPPS4. Resembling Arabidopsis HMGS-OEs, tobacco HMGS-OEs displayed an enhanced expression of NtHMGR1, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Overall, increased growth, pod size and seed yield in tobacco HMGS-OEs were attributed to the up-regulation of native NtHMGR1, NtIPPI2, NtSQS, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Hence, S359A has potential in agriculture not only in improving phytosterol content but also seed yield, which may be desirable in food crops. This work further demonstrates HMGS function in plant reproduction

  4. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing Brassica juncea HMG-CoA synthase 1 shows increased plant growth, pod size and seed yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Liao

    Full Text Available Seeds are very important not only in the life cycle of the plant but they represent food sources for man and animals. We report herein a mutant of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS, the second enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA pathway that can improve seed yield when overexpressed in a phylogenetically distant species. In Brassica juncea, the characterisation of four isogenes encoding HMGS has been previously reported. Enzyme kinetics on recombinant wild-type (wt and mutant BjHMGS1 had revealed that S359A displayed a 10-fold higher enzyme activity. The overexpression of wt and mutant (S359A BjHMGS1 in Arabidopsis had up-regulated several genes in sterol biosynthesis, increasing sterol content. To quickly assess the effects of BjHMGS1 overexpression in a phylogenetically more distant species beyond the Brassicaceae, wt and mutant (S359A BjHMGS1 were expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi of the family Solanaceae. New observations on tobacco OEs not previously reported for Arabidopsis OEs included: (i phenotypic changes in enhanced plant growth, pod size and seed yield (more significant in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1 in comparison to vector-transformed tobacco, (ii higher NtSQS expression and sterol content in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1 corresponding to greater increase in growth and seed yield, and (iii induction of NtIPPI2 and NtGGPPS2 and downregulation of NtIPPI1, NtGGPPS1, NtGGPPS3 and NtGGPPS4. Resembling Arabidopsis HMGS-OEs, tobacco HMGS-OEs displayed an enhanced expression of NtHMGR1, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Overall, increased growth, pod size and seed yield in tobacco HMGS-OEs were attributed to the up-regulation of native NtHMGR1, NtIPPI2, NtSQS, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Hence, S359A has potential in agriculture not only in improving phytosterol content but also seed yield, which may be desirable in food crops. This work further demonstrates HMGS function in plant

  5. Influence of Salinity and Nitrogen Levels on Growth, Yield and Nutrients Uptake of Tomato in Hydroponics Culture

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zahedifar; A. M. Ronaghi; MOOSAVI, S.A.A.; S. Safarzadeh Shirazi

    2010-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effect of salinity and nitrogen on growth and yield of tomato and concentration and total uptake of some nutrients in different parts of plant in hydroponics culture. Nitrogen (N) was used at 0, 1.5 and 3% levels as NH4Cl and NH4H2PO4 and salinity consisted of 0, 30 and 60 mM as NaCl and CaCl2 (2:1 w/w). A completely randomized design experiment was carried out under greenhouse conditions. Results showed that fruit fresh weight increased with N a...

  6. A review of thinning effects on Scots pine stands: From growth and yield to new challenges under global change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miren del Río, M.P.; Bravo-Oviedo, Andrés; Pretzsch, Hans; Löf, Magnus; Ruiz-Peinado, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    Aim of the study: Thinning experiments in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands have been carried out since long in different regions of its distribution. The aim of this paper is to gather the knowledge about the thinning effects on Scots pine stands, from the effects on growth and yield to the provision of ecosystem services in the framework of climate change. Area of study: The review covered studies from different regions of the distribution area of Scots pine Aim of the study: Thinning experiments in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands have been carried out for many years in different regions of its distribution. The aim of this paper is to gather knowledge regarding the effects of thinning on Scots pine stands, from the effects on growth and yield to the provision of ecosystem services in the context of climate change. Area of study: The review covers studies from different regions of the distribution area of Scots pine Material and methods: We reviewed the effect of thinning on four aspects: growth and yield, stability against snow and wind, response to drought, and ecosystem services. Main results: Heavy thinning involves a loss in volume yield, although the magnitude depends on the region, site and stand age. Thinning generally does not affect dominant height while the positive effect on tree diameter depends on the thinning regime. The stability of the stand against snow and wind is lower after the first thinning and increases in the long term. The impact of extreme droughts on tree growth is lower in thinned stands, which is linked to a better capacity to recover after the drought. Thinning generally reduces the wood quality, litter mass, and stand structural diversity, while having neutral or positive effects on other ecosystem services, although these effects can vary depending on the thinning regime. However, scarce information is available for most of the ecosystem services. Research highlight: Existing thinning experiments in Scots pine stands

  7. Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Inoculation on Growth and Yield of Tomato (Lycopersicum Esculentum Mill.) Under Salinity Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Damaiyanti, D R R; Aini, N; Soelistyono, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective of the research was to study the effect mycorrhiza on growth and yield of tomato. The experiment was conducted in screen house 14 m x 10.5 m, in Pasuruan on November 2013 until March 2014, The experiment was conducted as a factorial randomized complete design. The first factor was dose of mycorrhiza (without mycorrhiza, 5 g mycorrhiza, 10 g mycorrhiza, and 20 g mycorrhiza). The second factor was the salinity stress level (without NaCl, 2500 ppm NaCl, 5000 ppm NaCl, and 7500 ppm NaCl...

  8. Screening for eri silkworm (Samia ricini Donovan ecoraces using morphological characters, growth, yields, and ISSR marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duanpen Wongsorn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The selection of eri silkworm ecoraces with high yield and distinct morphological characters is necessary for variety improvement. The five ecoraces SaKKU1, SaKKU2, SaKKU3, SaKKU4 and SaKKU5 were derived mostly by international academic cooperation. They were cultured using castor leaves of TCO 101 cultivar as food plant at 25±2°C, 80±5% R.H. Based on morphological characters, they are similar, except the body of the 5th instar larva of SaKKU1 is clearly covered with more creamy white powder and the mature larva has a shiny dominant yellow color. The duration of the life cycle among ecoraces was also similar; 46-53 days (SaKKU1, 42-53 days (SaKKU2, 42-52 days (SaKKU3, 40-56 days (SaKKU4 and 41-52 days (SaKKU5. SaKKU1 had the highest survival rate at larval stage (1st – 5th instar (100.00% and larva (1st – 5th instar - adult (88.89%, including the predominant heaviest average larva weight of all instars, 0.0317 g (2nd instar, 0.2206 g (3rd instar, 1.0788 g (4th instar, 4.0102 g (5th instar, and 8.9940 g (5 days of 5th instar, which was significantly different (P<0.05 to other ecoraces. Moreover, this ecorace gave the highest average yields: fresh cocoon weight (3.8016 g, pupa weight (3.2532 g, shell weight (0.5287 g, shell ratio (14.01%, fresh cocoon weight/10,000 larvae (38.01 kg, eggs/moth (531.13 eggs, total eggs (6,375.27 eggs and total hatching eggs (6,006.13 eggs, which was also significantly different (P<0.05 than other ecoraces. Of those properties, especially survival rates and yields, this ecorace (SaKKU1 is favored for further varietal improvement program. In parallel, genetic relationship analysis of eri silkworm ecoraces using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR technique was also carried out. The result revealed from dendrogram analysis that SaKKU1 was the farthest distance than other ecoraces, especially against SaKKU3. Based on all above results, the SaKKU1 ecorace was considered to be the most suitable for heat tolerant

  9. Moderate Drought Stress Affected Root Growth and Grain Yield in Old, Modern and Newly Released Cultivars of Winter Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yan; Du, Yanlei; Wang, Jun; Wu, Aijiao; Qiao, Sheng; Xu, Bingcheng; Zhang, Suiqi; Siddique, Kadambot H. M.; Chen, Yinglong

    2017-01-01

    To determine root growth and grain yield of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L) under moderate drought stress, a nursery experiment and a field trial were conducted with or without water stress using three representative cultivars released in different years: CW134 (old landrace), CH58 (modern cultivar) and CH1 (new release). In the nursery experiment, plants were grown in soil-filled rhizoboxes under moderate drought (MD, 55% of field capacity) or well-watered (WW, 85% of field capacity) conditions. In the field trial, plots were either rainfed (moderate drought stress) or irrigated with 30 mm of water at each of stem elongation, booting and anthesis stages (irrigated). Compared to drought stress, grain yields increased under sufficient water supply in all cultivars, particular the newly released cultivar CH1 with 70% increase in the nursery and 23% in the field. When well-watered (nursery) or irrigated (field), CH1 had the highest grain yields compared to the other two cultivars, but produced similar yield to the modern cultivar (CH58) under water-stressed (nursery) or rainfed (field) conditions. When exposed to drought stress, CW134 had the highest topsoil root dry mass in topsoil but lowest in subsoil among the cultivars at stem elongation, anthesis, and maturity, respectively; while CH1 had the lowest topsoil and highest subsoil root dry mass at respective sampling times. Topsoil root mass and root length density were negatively correlated with grain yield for the two water treatments in nursery experiment. When water was limited, subsoil root mass was positively correlated with thousand kernel weight (TKW). In the field trial, CH1 and CH58 used less water during vegetative growth than CW134, but after anthesis stage, CH1 used more water than the other two cultivars, especially in the soil profile below 100 cm, which was associated with the increased TKW. This study demonstrated that greater root mass and root length density in subsoil layers, with enhanced

  10. Nylon flocked swab severely reduces Hexagon Obti sensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frippiat, Christophe; De Roy, Gilbert; Fontaine, Louis-Marie; Dognaux, Sophie; Noel, Fabrice; Heudt, Laeticia; Lepot, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    Hexagon Obti immunological blood test and flocked swab are widely used in forensic laboratories. Nevertheless, up to now, no compatibility tests have been published between sampling with the ethylene oxide treated flocked swab and the Hexagon Obti blood detection strip. In this study, we investigated this compatibility. Our work shows that sampling with ethylene oxide treated flocked swab reduces by a factor of at least 100 the detection threshold of blood using the Hexagon Obti immunological test. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Changes in nutritive value and herbage yield during extended growth intervals in grass-legume mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elgersma, Anjo; Søegaard, Karen

    2018-01-01

    . Perennial ryegrass was sown with each of four legumes: red clover, white clover, lucerne and birdsfoot trefoil, and white clover was sown with hybrid ryegrass, meadow fescue and timothy. Effects of species composition on herbage yield, contents of N, neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre (ADF......) and lignin, ash and in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD) were studied in entire herbage and in component species during 2 years in a small-plot cutting trial in Denmark. In May and August, the dynamic development of components of feed value and their interrelationships were investigated by sampling...... at optimum harvest date (i.e., normal practice) ± 1 week (t = −1 to t = +1). Herbage digestibility and contents of N and ash decreased while those of fibre compounds increased during the 2 weeks from t = −1 to t = 1 in all species. In May, contents of ADF and lignin increased at a faster rate in legumes than...

  12. Influence of calcinated starfish powder on growth, yield, spawn run and primordial germination of king oyster mushroom (Pleurotus eryngii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ung-Kyu; Bajpai, Vivek K; Lee, Nan-Hee

    2009-11-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the calcium absorption efficacy of Pleurotus eryngii (king oyster mushroom) in sawdust medium supplemented with starfish powder and to determine the effect of starfish powder as calcium supplement on growth, yield, spawn run and primordial germination of P. eryngii. Optimum calcination of starfish powder was achieved at the temperature ranging from 560.1 to 649.5 degrees C. A 1% supplementation of starfish powder in sawdust medium did not suppress the growth of P. eryngii. Also the supplementation of 1% calcinated starfish powder to sawdust medium potentially increased the calcium content up to a level of 256.0+/-16.3 in the fruiting body of P. eryngii without extension of spawn run period and the retardation of the days to primordial germination.

  13. Dry matter yield, chemical composition and estimated extractable protein of legume and grass species during the spring growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solati, Zeinab; Jørgensen, Uffe; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Knowledge of the variation of extractable protein amount in legumes and grasses as affected by harvest time is important for identifying optimal combinations to enable a high protein production in a biorefinery. The extractability of protein was estimated using the Cornell Net...... Carbohydrate and Protein System across six harvests during the spring growth. RESULTS The estimated extractable protein [g kg−1 dry matter (DM)] defined as the easily available fractions B1+B2 was significantly higher in white clover and lucerne at all harvests while, if the more cell wall attached fraction B3...... can be extracted, white clover had the highest extractable protein amongst all species. Total yield of B1+B2 per ha was higher in white clover and red clover at the early growth while B1+B2+B3 was by far the highest for red clover through all harvests. CONCLUSION White clover could be a good candidate...

  14. Role of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria in modulating the efficiency of poultry litter composting with rock phosphate and its effect on growth and yield of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billah, Motsim; Bano, Asghari

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the role of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) in P solubilisation from rock phosphate through composting with poultry litter, and further to study the effects of prepared enriched composts on growth, yield, and phosphorus uptake of wheat crop. Various phosphorus-enriched composts were prepared from rock phosphate and poultry litter (1:10) with and without inoculation of plant growth promoting rhizobacterias (Pseudomonas sp. and Proteus sp.). Results showed that the rock-phosphate-added poultry litter had higher total phosphorus, available (Mehlic-3 extracted) phosphorus, microbial biomass (carbon and phosphorus), and lower total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and carbon/nitrogen ratio over poultry litter alone. Inoculation of Pseudomonas sp. with rock phosphate-added poultry litter showed maximum increase in available phosphorus (41% of total phosphorus) followed by Proteus sp. inoculation (30% of total phosphorus) over uninoculated treatment (23% of total phosphorus) on the 120th day of composting. Microbial biomass (carbon and phosphorus) increased up to Day 45 and tended to decrease till the 120th day of composting, irrespective of the treatments. However, in pot experiments, wheat seeds receiving inoculation with plant growth promoting rhizobacterias, subsequently treated with rock phosphate-enriched compost proved highly stimulatory to plant height, phosphorus uptake, grain yield, and seed phosphorus content over uninoculated untreated control. The plant growth promoting rhizobacterias inoculation can be a sustainable source releasing phosphorus from low grade rock phosphate through composting and application of rock phosphate-enriched compost can be an alternative to chemical fertilisers for better crop production. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Growth and yield of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) as influenced by weed management practices and Rhizobium inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhala, A; Rathod, P H; Patel, K C; Van Damme, P

    2005-01-01

    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) productivity in India is low, because of many problems beset in its cultivation. One of the serious problems are weeds. Groundnut yield losses due to weeds have been estimated as high as 24 to 70 percent. This has created a scope for using herbicides in groundnut crop. A field investigation was carried out during kharif (rainy) season of 2001-2002 on a sandy loam soil at College Agronomy Farm, B.A. College of Agriculture, Gujarat Agricultural University, Anand, India to study the effect of weed management practices and Rhizobium inoculation on growth and yield of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.). Ten weed control treatments, comprising four treatments of sole application of fluchloralin, pendimethalin, butachlor and metolachlor, respectively each applied at 1.0 kg ha(-1); four treatments comprising of an application of the same herbicides at the same levels coupled with one hand weeding at 30 DAS; one weed-free treatment (hand weedings at 15, 30, 45 DAS); and one unweeded control. All 10 treatmets were combined with and without Rhizobium inoculation (i.e. a total of 20 treatment combinations) under a factorial randomized complete block design (FRBD) with four replications. Minimum weed dry matter accumulation (70 kg/ha) with higher weed control efficiency (90.70%) was recorded under an integrated method i.e. pendimethalin at 1.0 kg ha(-1) + hand weeding at 30 DAS, which also resulted in maximum pod yield (1773.50 kg ha(-1)). This treatment was comparable to fluchloralin applied at 1.0 kg ha(-1) combined with hand- weeding at 30 DAS. Weedy conditions in the unweeded control treatment reduced pod yield by 29.90-35.95% as compared to integrated method. Significantly higher pod yield was obtained with Rhizobium inoculation than the mean value of all treatments without inoculation. For most agronomical parameters examined, Rhizobium inoculation and weed control treatments were independent in their effect.

  16. Sweet potato growth parameters, yield components and nutritive value for CELSS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loretan, P. A.; Bonsi, C. K.; Hill, W. A.; Ogbuehi, C. R.; Mortley, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Sweet potatoes have been grown hydroponically using the nutrient film technique (NFT) to provide a potential food source for long-term manned space missions. Experiments in both sand and NFT cultivars have produced up to 1790 g/plant of fresh storage root with an edible biomass index ranging from 60-89 percent and edible biomass linear growth rates of 39-66 g/sq m day in 105 to 130 days. Experiments with different cultivars, nutrient solution compositions, application rates, air and root temperatures, photoperiods, and light intensities indicate good potential for sweet potatoes in CELSS.

  17. The Effect of Planting Date on the Growth and Yield of Indigo (Indigofera tinctoria L. in Shahrood Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ansori

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A suitable planting date is an important management tool to determine the best match between phenological stages of plant growth with the environmental factors affecting them. Indigo is known for the natural blue colors obtained from the leaflets and branches of this herb. In addition to indigo dyes, it has been used medicinally to purify the liver, reduce inflammation and fever and to alleviate pain. Determining the proper sowing time for the sowing indigo plant is highly important that should be based on the climate of each region separately. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sowing date on growth and biological yield of indigo plant in Shahrood region. Materials and Methods This experiment was carried out on randomized complete block design with three replications in the experimental field of the University of Shahrood, Iran, in 2011. Treatments were three planting dates (18 June, 3 and 18 July. Plant density was 50 plants per square meter. The distance between the plants on and between the rows was 10 and 20 cm, respectively. Sampling was conducted in six-stages (every 15 days randomly in 0.25 m2. Equation 1 was used to calculate the growth rate. CGR = (Equation 1 Y = (Equation 2 In this equation, W1: dry weight in the first sampling, W2: dry weight in the second sampling, SA: sampling area (m-2, t1: first sampling time, t2: is the second sampling time. To do this, three parameters sigmoid function [Eq. 2], were fitted to dry matter accumulation variation during the season (Equation 2: In the equation 2: Y is the cumulative dry matter content at any time (x of growing season, b: is the slope of increasing and xo is the time (in degree days of reaching to 50% dry matter accumulation. Gaussian function parameter [Eq. 3] was fitted to the crop growth rate data variation: Y = (Equation 3 GDD (Equation 4 In equation 3: Y value is crop growth rate at any time (x of growing season, b: is the slope of

  18. Growth performance, carcass yield and intestinal microflora populations of broilers fed diets containing thepax and yogurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Boostani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of the probiotic thepax and yogurt (as probiotic on the growth response and intestinal microflora results of broiler chickens. Two hundred forty day-old Ross 308 broilers were equally distributed into 12 floor pens and reared for 42 day. The treatments consisted of yogurt (10, 5 and 2.5% during starter, grower and finisher periods in the drinking water, respectively and thepax (1000, 500, 250 g/ton-1 in the starter, grower and finisher diets, respectively, resulting three experimental diets and a control group. Each dietary treatment was fed ad-libitum to four replicate group of 20 birds at the beginning of rearing period. Birds and feed were weighed on days 21 and 42. The results of experiment indicate that diets containing feed additives improved broiler performance. The body weight gain and feed conversion ratio improved significantly more (p < 0.05 with the thepax treatment compared with the control broilers during the total rearing period. The highest (p < 0.05 carcass and thigh values were recorded for broilers fed the diet supplemented with thepax and yogurt, respectively. The lowest abdominal fat pad value was obtained in broilers fed the diet supplemented with thepax. On d 21, thepax and yogurt significantly reduced (p < 0.05 cecal Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens populations compared with the control group. In conclusion, thepax and yogurt improved broilers growth response and conferred intestinal health benefits to chickens by improving their microbial ecology.

  19. High yield recombinant penicillin G amidase production and export into the growth medium using Bacillus megaterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahn Dieter

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last years B. megaterium was continuously developed as production host for the secretion of proteins into the growth medium. Here, recombinant production and export of B. megaterium ATCC14945 penicillin G amidase (PGA which is used in the reverse synthesis of β-lactam antibiotics were systematically improved. Results For this purpose, the PGA leader peptide was replaced by the B. megaterium LipA counterpart. A production strain deficient in the extracellular protease NprM and in xylose utilization to prevent gene inducer deprivation was constructed and employed. A buffered mineral medium containing calcium ions and defined amino acid supplements for optimal PGA production was developed in microscale cultivations and scaled up to a 2 Liter bioreactor. Productivities of up to 40 mg PGA per L growth medium were reached. Conclusion The combination of genetic and medium optimization led to an overall 7-fold improvement of PGA production and export in B. megaterium. The exclusion of certain amino acids from the minimal medium led for the first time to higher volumetric PGA activities than obtained for complex medium cultivations.

  20. Bioassociative effect of rhizospheric microorganisms on growth, nutrient uptake and yield of mung bean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Kadian

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen applications have generated great interests in agriculture, with much of its success associated with increasing the uptake of nitrogen by crops while reducing pollution by this chemical fertilizer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the interactive effect of rhizospheric microorganisms on nutrient uptake, yield and growth of mung bean grown in pots under glasshouse conditions. The results revealed that the growth, in terms of morphology and physiology, of all the inoculated plants was better than that of the control plants. In terms of growth, plant height, fresh and dry weights and length of the roots plants inoculated with both Funneliformis mosseae + T. viride did best. Total chlorophyll content, alkaline and acidic phosphatase activities were greatest when inoculated with only F. mosseae and fresh and dry weights of shoots when inoculated only with T. viride. Significant increase in N and P uptake was recorded when inoculated with both F. mosseae + T. viride. Overall the significant increase in growth and development was due to positive interactions among rhizospheric microorganisms leading to healthy and vigorously growing plants. However, there is now a need for field trails of this technique.

  1. Responses of Seed Germination, Seedling Growth, and Seed Yield Traits to Seed Pretreatment in Maize (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of seed priming experiments were conducted to test the effects of different pretreatment methods to seed germination, seedling growth, and seed yield traits in maize (Zea mays L.. Results indicated that the seeds primed by gibberellins (GA, NaCl, and polyethylene glycol (PEG reagents showed a higher imbibitions rate compared to those primed with water. The final germination percentage and germination rate varied with different reagents significantly (P<0.05. The recommended prime reagents were GA at 10 mg/L, NaCl at 50 mM, and PEG at 15% on account of germination experiment. 15% PEG priming reagent increased shoot and root biomass of maize seedling. The shoot biomass of seedlings after presoaking the seeds with NaCl reagent was significantly higher than the seedlings without priming treatment. No significant differences of plant height, leaf number, and hundred-grain weight were observed between control group and priming treatments. Presoaking with water, NaCl (50 mM, or PEG (15% significantly increased the hundred-grain weight of maize. Therefore, seed pretreatment is proved to be an effective technique to improve the germination performance, seedling growth, and seed yield of maize. However, when compared with the two methods, if immediate sowing is possible, presoaking is recommended to harvest better benefits compared to priming method.

  2. Environmental effects on growth and development of cassava (Manihot esculenta crantz). III. Assimilate distribution and storage organ yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, B.A.; Evenson, J.P.; Fukai, S.

    1982-12-01

    Assimilate distribution and storage organ (storage roots plus swollen planting piece) yield of serial plantings of the cassava cultivar M Aus 10, made throughout a year, and grown for one year duration were studied with sequential harvests in S.E. Queensland (latitude 27 degrees 37'S), Australia. Seasonal differences in the proportion of total dry matter assimilation partioned to storage organs over a given time period (referred to as distribution ratio, DR) were observed with low DR over the mid-summer (January to March) period (0.1 to 0.3) when crop growth rate (CGR) was at a maximum compared with 0.4 to 0.5 in November to December and 0.5 to 1.0 in late autumn to winter (April to July). This period of low DR restricted storage organ yields which generally lower (6-9 t DW ha-1 year-1) than those reported for adapted germplasm at lower latitudes. Multiple regression models were developed which accounted for much of the variation in DR in terms of mean air temperature of photoperiod and leaf area index (R2 = 0.73). High temperatures, long photoperiods and high leaf area indices were associated with reduced DR. Mean air temperature and photoperiod are highly correlated in this environment and their separate effects on DR could not be distinguised. This model of distribution ratio was combined with earlier published models of CGR, and storage organ growth rate predicted. (Refs. 20).

  3. Growth Hormone Gene Polymorphism and Its Association with Partial Cumulative Milk Yields of Holstein Friesian Dairy Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Misrianti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone gene (GH gene plays an important role in regulating body growth and in developing mammary gland, similar with its interaction to specific receptors. The GH gene has been considered as one of candidate gene associated with selection on lactation trait and milk production. This study was aimed to determine genetic polymorphism of the GH-AluI gene and to associate its genotype variants on various 15-d partial cumulative milk yields in Holstein Friesian (HF dairy cows. A number of 370 blood samples were collected from six HF populations, respectively from small dairy farmer under the supervision of the North Bandung Milk Cooperation (NBMC in Cilumber (98 and Pasir Kemis village (96, Dairy Cattle Breeding and Improvement Station (Cikole DCBIS Cikole (88, Lembang Artificial Insemination Center (Lembang AIC (17, Singosari Artificial Insemination Center (Singosari AIC (32, and Cipelang Livestock Embryo Center (Cipelang LEC (40. A polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method was used to identify variant genotypes of the GH gene using AluI restriction enzyme. Genotyping results produced only two genotypes, i.e. LL and LV genotypes, without VV genotype. Frequency of the former was dominant, whilst that was low for the latter (89% vs. 11%; leading to the frequency of L allele was very high (94% compared to that of V allele (6%. No significant association between variant genotypes (LL and LV and various 15-d partial cumulative milk yields.

  4. Growth and yield of rice submergence stress conditions in two types of swampy lowland of South Sumatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribaldi, Nurlaili, Danial, E.; Rahim, S. E.

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to determine the best fertilizer treatment at vegetative stage for the growth and yield of rice submergence stress conditions on two types of swampy lowland. The experimental design used in this research was spilt-plot design with three replications. The main plot was fertilization treatment consisting of P1 = base fertilization, P2 = fertilizer before being submerged, P3 = fertilizer after being submerged + PPC Micro, P4 = fertilization before and after being submerged. The subplots are varieties of rice, V1 = Inpara 5, V2 = IR 64. The subplot was rice variety which consisted of V1 = Inpara 5, V2 = IR 64. The results showed fertilization treatment can increase rice production growth and submergence stress conditions, varieties of Inpara 5 added with fertilization before flooded can suppress a decrease in grain yield for 16 % in the shallow-backswamp and 6 % in middle-backswamps or with each production of 2.9 and 5.1 tons per hectare, varieties of Inpara 5 which is giving fertilization before flooded, tends to be a good treatment to be developed in rice submergence cultivation both in the the shallow-backswamp and middle-backswamps.

  5. Prepartum nutrition and solar radiation in beef cattle: II. Residual effects on postpartum milk yield, immunoglobulin, and calf growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, T M; Early, R J; Carpenter, J R; Buckley, B A

    1995-05-01

    Residual effects of nutrition and solar radiation during the last two-thirds of gestation on postpartum milk yield, immunoglobulin (Ig) G and M in both colostrum and calf serum, and calf growth were determined in beef cattle. Nineteen mature, multiparous crossbred cows (Bos taurus) at d 90 of pregnancy were assigned to either low (LO, 70% NRC total energy intake) or high (HI, 110% NRC total energy intake) nutritional level (sudangrass hay) and to either shade (S) or no shade (NS) treatments in a 2 x 2 factorial experiment. After parturition, all cows were moved into a large paddock and managed uniformly. Calf weights and calf serum were collected within 1 d postpartum, thereafter at 2-wk intervals for the next 12 wk, and then at 4-wk intervals until weaning. Colostrum samples were taken from the cow and milk yields were determined by the "weigh-suckle-weigh" technique. Neither prepartum nutrition nor environment influenced lactational performance of the dam. Concentrations of IgG were elevated in the colostrum of LO cows (15.3 vs 7.8 g/100 mL, LO vs HI, respectively; P calves from S cows than in those from NS cows. This difference in IgM profile did not seem to be due to any residual effect from prepartum treatments. Postnatal growth of calves from birth until weaning were similar across all prepartum treatments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Enhancing the growth and yield of Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L.) by ramie biomass waste in liquid form and gibberellic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suherman, C.; Nuraini, A.; Wulandari, A. P.; Kadapi, M.

    2017-05-01

    Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L.) is one of the most important sources of natural fibre, a sustainable biomass. The growth and yield of ramie are affected by mineral nutrients. In the present study, we usedfertilizers from waste of ramie biomass in liquid form (liquid organic fertilizer, LOF) and the other treatment is by gibberellic acid (GA3). This study was to obtain the effect of treatments on enhance the growth and yield of ramie. Hence, we measure the character that related to the important parameter for biomass product of ramie. Such plant height, stem diameter, dry plant weight, and ramie fresh stem weight of ramie clone Pujon 13. This research was conducted from January 2016 to March 2016 at Research Field Ciparanje, Faculty of Agriculture, Padjadjaran University, Jatinangor, Sumedang, West Java with an altitude of about ± 750 m above sea level. The type of Soil in this area is Inceptisolsoil order and thetype of rainfall according to Schmidt and Fergusson Classification is C type. The experiment used Randomized Block Design (RBD) which consisted of eight treatments (GA and LOF) and four replications. The concentration of GA from 0, 50, 100 and 150 ppm and for concentration of LOF is 40 mlL-1. We suggested the treatment of GA 150 ppm with 40 mlL-1 LOF was the best treatment on enhancing plant height and stem fresh weight of ramie clone Pujon 13.

  7. Effect of inoculation and time of application of microbes on growth and yield of soybean (Glycine max (L. Merrill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Muslikah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of inorganic fertilizers continuously can result in hardening of soil, narrowing of soil pores, thus the roots will have difficulty in penetrating soil. Biological properties of soil that decreases could lead to disruption of microorganism activity, so that the decomposition of organic matter of soil become obstructedand soil fertility decline. Therefore, it is advisable to use an alternative to application of microbes, i.e. Rhizobium and effective microorganisms 4 (EM4 that will enhance the availability of nutrients for plants. This study was aimed to determine the effect of inoculation and time of application of the microbes on the growth and yield of soybean. The experiment was conducted in the greenhouse located 500 m above sea level. The design used for the experiment was a completely randomized design with three replications. Observations of non-destructive and destructive data were analyzed by analysis of variance (F test at 5% level and continued with LSD at 5% level. The results showed significant effect treatments applied on the growth and yield components. Treatment i6 (EM4 applied at 1 week after planting was the best treatment, as shown by the increased number of pods by 95.94%,  dry weight of pods by 38.25%, total dry matter, seed by 24.61%, and 68.40% weight of 100 seeds.

  8. Assessment of Salinity Effect on Germination, Growth and Yield of Solanum lycopersicum (L.

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    Joshua D. BUAH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at unraveling the morphological effect of salinity on germination, growth and yield of S. lycopersicum, through inducement of salinity (0, 4, 6, 8, and 10 g NaCl. All the parameters considered: germination percentage, leaves number, stem girth, plant height and fruit quality, were significantly affected by NaCl treatments (salinity compared with the control (no salinity. 100% germination was recorded only in control and 4 g NaCl concentration, though the percentage of germination was faster in control than within the 4 g NaCl. ‘Tomato UC-83-B’ plants’ growth till maturity, shed leaves, chlorosis and leaf burns around edges occurred due to osmotic imbalance and water deficit caused by salinity, which invariably had effect on leaf area, although the reduction in leaf area varied among tested NaCl concentrations. Fruits yield and quality of ‘Tomato UC-83-B’ treated with NaCl was poor and relative to the degree of saline inducements, with 10 g NaCl treatment producing the least fruits. Chlorophyll contents were also significantly reduced by increasing saline concentrations. Ca and K were the predominant elements found in the digested fruit samples observed under Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS at different NaCl concentrations, while Mg, Na and P were significantly less. Salinity is a major abiotic factor that hampered the overall performance of tomato crop in salient ways and must therefore be curbed in order to meet its increasing global demand.

  9. Effects of Foliar Spraying with Salicylic acid and Putrescine on Growth Characteristics and Yield of Summer Savory (Satureja hortensis L.

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    A Faraji-mehmany

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Summer Savory (Satureja hortensis L. is an annual, herbaceous plant belonging to the Labiatae family. This plant is most often used as a culinary herb, but it also has marked medicinal benefits, especially upon the whole digestive system. The most important components of S. hortensis include volatile oils, phenolic compounds, flavonoids and phenolic acids, tannins, mucus, resins, carotenoids and mineral components. Plant growth regulators are used to improve the quality and quantity of medicinal plant production. Salicylic Acid is one of this PGRs that involved in seed germination, photosynthesis, Stomatal opening and closure, Membrane Permeability, Ions Absorption and transmission and other growth processes. Polyamines are ubiquitous low-molecular-weight aliphatic amines that are involved in regulating plant growth processes. The most commonly found polyamines in higher plants, putrescine (Put, spermidine (Spd and spermine (Spm may be present in free, soluble conjugated and insoluble bound forms. It has been demonstrated that PAs are important for the normal course of diverse plant ontogeny processes such as cell division and elongation, organogenesis and somatic and zygotic embryogenesis. Materials and Methods This experiment was conducted in factorial based on a randomized complete block design with three replications in Karaj, Iran. Foliar spraying with SA (1, 2 and 3 mM.l and Putrecine (50, 100, 150 and 200 mg l-1 was performed in thrice in Savory growth period. Spraying was performed at 21, 35 (Budding Phase and 56 (flowering initiation phase day after seed germination. In flowering stage, some morphological traits such as plant height, weight, yield, canopy diameter, stem diameter, leaf area, essential oil content and efficiency were measured. Results and Discussion Analysis of variance showed that the effects of salicylic acid and putrescine spraying on plant height, canopy diameter, stem diameter, number of axillary stems

  10. The effects of compost prepared from waste material of banana on the growth, yield and quality properties of banana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Ilhan; Sen, Bahtiyar; Kaya, Zülküf

    2005-01-01

    Three doses (15-30-45 kg plant(-1)) of the compost prepared from the clone of Dwarf cavendish banana were compared with farmyard manure (50 kg plant(-1)), mineral fertilizers (180 g N+ 150 g P +335 g K plant(-1)) and farmyard manure+ mineral fertilizers (25 kg FM+ 180 g N+ 150 g P +335 g K plant(-1)) which determined positive effects on the growth, yield and fruit quality characteristics of banana plants. The banana plants were grown under a heated glasshouse and in a soil with physical and chemical properties are suitable for banana growing. The contents of N, P, K and Mg in compost and in farmyard manure were found to be similar. Farmyard manure, farmyard manure + mineral fertilizers and 45 kg plant(-1) of compost increased growth, yield and fruit quality characteristics. According to obtained results, 45 kg plant(-1) of compost was determined more suitable in terms of economical production and organic farming than the other fertilizer types.

  11. Does overhead irrigation with salt affect growth, yield, and phenolic content of lentil plants?

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    Giannakoula Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Overhead irrigation of lentil plants with salt (100 mM NaCl did not have any significant impact on plant growth, while chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm were affected. Under such poor irrigation water quality, the malondialdehyde content in leaves was increased due to the lipid peroxidation of membranes. In seeds, the total phenolic content (TPC was correlated to their total antioxidant capacity (TAC. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS detection showed that flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, rutin, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, kaempferol, gallic acid and resveratrol appear to be the compounds with the greatest influence on the TAC values. Catechin is the most abundant phenolic compound in lentil seeds. Overhead irrigation with salt reduced the concentration of almost all phenolic compounds analyzed from lentil seed extracts.

  12. Gossypiboma – the retained surgical swab: An enduring clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that raise clinical suspicion, of a condition that may be elusive in presentation on ... A review of the English literature reporting retained abdominal swabs between 1992 and 2012 revealed 100 cases. .... help to explain the variety of associated.

  13. GROWTH, PHYSIOLOGY AND YIELD OF FORMOSA ‘PAPAYA’ CULTIVATED UNDER DIFFERENT DOSES OF COATED AND CONVENTIONAL UREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIEL BARBOSA DA SILVA JÚNIOR

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral fertilizer management is one of the most important agronomic techniques applied in papaya cultivation, which generally extracts large amounts of nutrients from soil, especially nitrogen. This study aimed to assess the phytotechnical and physiological attributes and yield of „Formosa‟ papaya hybrid Caliman 01 as a function of different doses of coated and conventional urea in the region of Bom Jesus - PI, Brazil. The treatments were arranged in a factorial scheme (2 × 4 and distributed in a randomized block design with four replications, corresponding to 2 nitrogen sources (coated urea, 43% of N; and conventional urea, 45% of N and 4 doses nitrogen (350, 440, 530 and 620 g per plant. The N doses used corresponded to 80, 100, 120 and 140% of the nitrogen fertilization. It was used six plants per plot with two row borders, totaling 192 plants cultivated in the field. It was assessed the intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (int.PAR, radiation interception efficiency (PAREff., leaf area index (LAI, plant height, stem diameter and yield. The coated urea promotes a higher growth and yield of „Formosa‟ papaya compared to the conventional urea. The application of 1.0 g of coated N promotes the production of 2.87 g of fruit per hectare while the application of 1.0 g of conventional N produces only 1.89 g of fruit per hectare, showing that the source of polymerized N increases the use efficiency of N applied to soil.

  14. Effects of ozone on growth, yield and leaf gas exchange rates of four Bangladeshi cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhtar, Nahid [United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Inada, Hidetoshi; Hoshino, Daiki; Kondo, Taisuke [Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Fukami, Motohiro [Faculty of Agriculture, Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8505 (Japan); Funada, Ryo [Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Izuta, Takeshi, E-mail: izuta@cc.tuat.ac.j [Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    To assess the effects of tropospheric O{sub 3} on rice cultivated in Bangladesh, four Bangladeshi cultivars (BR11, BR14, BR28 and BR29) of rice (Oryza sativa L.) were exposed daily to charcoal-filtered air or O{sub 3} at 60 and 100 nl l{sup -1} (10:00-17:00) from 1 July to 28 November 2008. The whole-plant dry mass and grain yield per plant of the four cultivars were significantly reduced by the exposure to O{sub 3}. The exposure to O{sub 3} significantly reduced net photosynthetic rate of the 12th and flag leaves of the four cultivars. The sensitivity to O{sub 3} of growth, yield and leaf gas exchange rates was not significantly different among the four cultivars. The present study suggests that the sensitivity to O{sub 3} of yield of the four Bangladeshi rice cultivars is greater than that of American rice cultivars and is similar to that of Japanese rice cultivars and that O{sub 3} may detrimentally affect rice production in Bangladesh. - Bangladeshi cultivars of rice are sensitive to O{sub 3} below 100 ppb.

  15. Combined effect of organic manure and potassium on growth and yield of onion cv. BARI piaz-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.K. Barman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to find out the combined effect of cowdung and potassium on the growth and yield of onion cv. BARI piaz-I at Horticulture Farm, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh during the period from December 2010 to March 2011. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The two factors experiment had four levels of cowdung, viz., 0, 5, 10 and 20 tons ha-1 and four levels of potassium, viz. 0, 50, 150 and 250 kg K ha-1. Doses of cowdung and potassium showed significant variation in respect of all the parameters studied. The combination of 10 tons cowdung and 250 kg K ha-1 gave the tallest plant (46.60 cm, the highest number of leaves plant-1 (6.40, the highest length of bulb (3.27 cm, the highest diameter of bulb (4.83 cm, individual weight of bulb (51.23 g, dry matter content (12.66% and yield of bulb ha-1 (12.83 tons; whereas the control treatment gave the shortest plant (38.15 cm, lowest number of leaves plant-1 (5.68, diameter of bulb (3.41, individual weight of bulb (35.65g and gave lowest bulb yield ha-1 (9.16 tons.

  16. Effect of multi-nutrient complex fertilizers on growth and tuber yield of very early potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Wadas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare the effect of multi-nutrient complex fertilizers (HydroComplex, Nitrophoska Blue Special and Viking 13 from the nitrophoska group, and Polimag S from the amophoska group and single-nutrient fertilizers on the growth and tuber yield of very early potato cultivars (‘Aster’, ‘Fresco’, ‘Gloria’. The field experiment was carried out on podzolic soil in mid-eastern Poland during 2005–2007. The study showed a greater beneficial effect of HydroComplex and Nitrophoska Blue Special on the growth of very early potato cultivars than that of Viking 13 and Polimag S. The application of HydroComplex and Nitrophoska Blue Special resulted in greater above-ground plant biomass and assimilation leaf area compared with single-nutrient fertilizers; the leaf area index (LAI was higher by 0.28 and 0.32, respectively. The differences were smaller and not statistically confirmed with the use of Polimag S and Viking 13. When the multi-nutrient complex fertilizers were applied, leaf weight ratio (LWR, leaf area ratio (LAR and specific leaf area (SLA were similar to the single-nutrient fertilizers. Of the multi-nutrient complex fertilizers, only Nitrophoska Blue Special resulted in higher tuber yield, on average by 2.40 t × ha-1, compared with the single-nutrient fertilizers. The studied cultivars showed a similar response to applied fertilizers. LAI for ‘Gloria’ was higher than for ‘Aster’ and ‘Fresco’, with smaller LAR found in ‘Gloria’. LWR for ‘Fresco’ was smaller than for ‘Aster’ and ‘Gloria’, with higher SLA found in ‘Fresco’. The tuber yield of ‘Aster” (24.04 t × ha-1 was higher on average by 3 t × ha-1 than for ‘Fresco’ and ‘Gloria’.

  17. Response of snap bean growth and seed yield to seed size, plant density and foliar application with algae extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehia I. Abu Seif

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Two field experiments were conducted during the two growing summer seasons of 2013 and 2014, at the experimental farm of vegetables at Kaha, Qalyubia Governorate, Agriculture Research Center (ARC, Egypt, in order to investigate the effect of seed size, plant density and foliar application with some algae extracts on growth and seed yield of snap bean cv. valentino. A split–split plot design was used with three replications, where three sizes i.e., large, small and control (without grading were randomly distributed in the main plots, two plant density rates (22 and 33 plants per m2 arranged in subplots and foliar spray with seaweed extract (algost, fresh water algae (spirulina, mixture of them and control (sprayed with distilled water allocated in sub–subplots. Results showed a clear positively enhancement of plant vegetative growth parameters, chlorophyll, N, P, and K contents of leaves and seed yield quantity and quality positively by sowing large seeds compared with other seed sizes. Meanwhile, higher plant density (33 plants per m2 gave the highest values of plant length and seed yield per feddan, while the lower plant density (22 plants per m2 gave the highest values in other studied parameters except weight of 100 seeds where there were no significant differences between the two plant densities. All foliar applications with algae extracts significantly increased all the studied parameters compared to the control treatment. The superior application was the mixture of seaweeds and fresh water algae extracts together followed by seaweed extract alone in the two seasons, respectively.

  18. Effect of Super Absorbent Polymer and Irrigation Deficit on Water Use Efficiency, Growth and Yield of Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid-Reza FALLAHI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable use of water resources in agriculture is a necessity for many arid countries. In order to investigate the effect of water deficit, irrigation after 120 (control, 155 (moderate water stress and 190 mm (sever water stress pan evaporation and super absorbent polymer rates (SAP (0, 30, 60 and 90 kg ha-1 on growth, yield and water use efficiency of cotton, an experiment was conducted as split plot based on a randomized complete block design with three replications. Moreover, the effect of water quality (distilled water and solutions of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1 and 1.25% NaCl was investigated on water holding capacity by SAP. Results revealed that moderate water stress (irrigation intervals of aprox. 15 days along with 60 kg ha-1 SAP application was the best treatment in terms of growth and yield indices of cotton. The results for plant height, plant dry weight, boll number per plant and fiber yield in this treatment were 16, 28, 42 and 10% higher than control treatment, respectively. Water deficit and SAP application improved the water use efficiency (WUE of cotton. The amount of WUE in moderate water stress treatment along with consumption of 60 or 90 kg ha-1 SAP was 26% higher than for control treatment. In addition, water holding capacity by SAP in distilled water treatment was 7 times higher than in the case of 1.25% NaCl solution. The overall results showed that irrigation deficit and SAP application are two appropriate strategies for crop production in areas affected by drought stress, especially if low saline water sources are used.

  19. Organic matrix based slow release fertilizer enhances plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinod K; Singh, Rana P

    2011-09-01

    Field experiments were conducted to study the effect of organic matrix based slow release fertilizers (SRFs) on plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield of Brassica juncea L. cv, pusa bold. The agro-waste materials like cow dung, clay soil, neem leaves and rice bran were mixed together in 2:2:1:1 ratio and used as organic matrix for the immobilization of chemical fertilizer nutrients with commercial grade saresh (Acacia gum, 15% solution) as binder. Different fertilizer treatments were organic matrix based slow release fertilizers, SRF-I (542.0 kg ha(-1)); SRF-II (736.5 kg ha(-1)) and chemical fertilizer combinations, boron (3 kg ha(-1))+sulphur (15 kg ha(-1))+nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1)) and boron (3 kg ha(-1)) + sulphur (15 kg ha(-1))+nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1))+phosphorus (15 kg ha(-1))+potassium (100 kg ha(-1)). Organic matrix based SRF-II released ammonium up to 50-d in wetsoil under laboratory conditions which showed maximum retention of the nutrients. Avery significant increase in plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield was recorded in organic matrix based SRF-II applied plants. The maximum percent increase in biomass production was observed with organic matrix based SRF-II (increase of 65.8% in root fresh weight, 38.0% in root dry weight, 45.9% in leaf fresh weight plant(-1) and 27.5 % in leaf dry weight plant(-1) in 60-d old plants). It also increased the acquisition and assimilation of nitrate from the plant's rhizosphere which was evident by 45.6% increase in nitrate, 27.5% in nitrite and 11.7% in nitrate reductase activity (NRA) in leaves of 45-d old plants over control. The organic matrix based SRF-II significantly increased the seed yield by 28% in Indian mustard. Cost analysis revealed thatthis formulation is cost effective as it is based on agro waste materials.

  20. Growth and Yield Responses of Green Pepper (Capsicum annum L. to Manure Rates under Field and High Tunnel Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima-obong I. DOMINIC

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine growth and yield responses of green pepper to varying manure rates under field and high tunnel conditions. Experiment 1 was a pot experiment to evaluate three rates (0.5 and 10 t/ha of poultry manure (PM on green pepper production under high tunnel and open field conditions. Experiment 2 was to determine the performance of green pepper as influenced by different manure rates (0, 5 and 10 t/ha of PM, 300 kg/ha of NPK, 5 t/ha of PM + 200 kg of NPK and 10 t/ha of PM + 100 kg of NPK on the field. High tunnel produced about 3.1 fruits/plant that weighted 102.8 g, which was significantly higher than open field experiment in which 1.7 fruits/plant, with a medium weight of 32.3 g were noted. High tunnel enhanced successful production of green pepper during rainy season, whereas the open field production during the same season was near failure. Application of 10 t/ha of PM produced significantly larger fruits in the pot experiment. Good fertilizer effects on growth and yield components were recorded for the field study. Plant height, number of leaves and branches, number and weight of harvested fruit followed similar trend in 5 and 10 t/ha of PM which gave statistically similar results, and provided the best performance during the experiment. Application of 5 t/ha of PM produced the highest total fruits yield.

  1. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization and root separation on the plant growth and grain yield of maize and its rhizosphere microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-Qian; Huang, Guo-Qin; Bian, Xin-Min; Zhao, Qi-Guo

    2012-12-01

    A field experiment with root separation was conducted to study the effects of root interaction in maize-soybean intercropping system on the plant growth and grain yield of maize and its rhizosphere microorganisms under different nitrogen fertilization levels (0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 g x kg(-1)). Root interaction and nitrogen fertilization had positive effects on the plant height, leaf length and width, and leaf chlorophyll content of maize. Less difference was observed in the root dry mass of maize at maturing stage between the treatments root separation and no root separation. However, as compared with root separation, no root separation under the nitrogen fertilization levels 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 g x kg(-1) increased the biomass per maize plant by 8.8%, 6.3%, 3.6%, and 0.7%, and the economic yield per maize plant by 17.7%, 10.0%, 8.2%, and 0.9%, respectively. No root separation increased the quantity of rhizosphere fungi and azotobacteria significantly, as compared with root separation. With increasing nitrogen fertilization level, the quantity of rhizosphere bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes presented an increasing trend, while that of rhizosphere azotobacteria decreased after an initial increase. The root-shoot ratio of maize at maturing stage was significantly negatively correlated with the quantity of rhizosphere bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes, but less correlated with the quantity of rhizosphere azotobacteria. It was suggested that the root interaction in maize-soybean intercropping system could improve the plant growth of maize and increase the maize yield and rhizosphere microbial quantity, but the effect would be decreased with increasing nitrogen fertilization level.

  2. Effect of Organic and Biological Fertilizers on Growth and Yield of Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. and Bacterial Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Makarian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent decades, excessive use of chemical fertilizers causes environmental problems such as water resource pollution and decrease in soil fertility. Organic matters are excellent sources of plant-available nutrients and their addition to soil could maintain high microbial populations and activities. In crop studies, Prabha et al. (2007 reported that there was excellent plant growth as well as yield in garlic plants that received vermicompost as nutrient in the field (28. Recent studies confirmed that, a number of bacterial species mostly associated with the plant rhizosphere, are found to be beneficial for plant growth, yield and crop quality. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the growth promoting effects of organic and bio-fertilizers on tomato growth and yield. Materials and Methods: A factorial experiment in randomized complete block design with three replications was conducted at the College of Agricultural, University of Shahrood in 2011. Geographically, the site is located in Bastam (36° 25’E, 54° 58’N, 1349 m a.s.l..The climate of this region is semi-arid. Treatments included three levels of organic fertilizers: vermicompost (1300 kgha-1, cow manure (3350 kgha-1, and control, biological fertilizer in four levels (Pseudomonas putyda, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Azotobacter chrococcum and control. The bacterial suspension for each species was applied at a rate of 3 liters per hectare. Metribuzin herbicide (wettable 80% powder was used at a rate of 1000 gr. ha-1. Petopride No. 2' variety of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. was used in the present experiment. At the time of harvesting, the plant characteristics namely lengths and diameter of stem, number and weight of fruit, weight of stem and leaf were also registered. Statistical analyses of data were performed with statistical software Mstatc. Significant differences between means refer to the probability level of 0.05 by LSD test. Results

  3. Effect of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPRs) on plant growth, yield, and quality of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) under simulated seawater irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Min; Jun Kang, Yi; Li Wang, Huan; Sheng Zhang, Xiang; Xin Zhao, Qing

    2012-01-01

    To determine the effects of three PGPRs on plant growth, yield, and quality of tomato under simulated seawater irrigation, a two consecutive seasons' field experiment was conducted in Yancheng Teachers University plot from April to June and August to October, 2011. The results showed that Erwinia persicinus RA2 containing ACC deaminase exhibited the best ability compared with Bacillus pumilus WP8 and Pseudomonas putida RBP1 which had no ACC deaminase activity to enhance marketable yields of fresh and dried fruits in tomato under simulated seawater irrigation especially under HS condition. B. pumilus WP8 had significant effects on improving tomato fruit quality under the conditions of irrigating with 1.0% NaCl solution (MS) and with 2.0% NaCl solution (HS). Na(+) contents were generally accumulated much more in tomato plant mid-shoot leaves than in fruits whatever the salt concentration. More sodium accumulation in leaves of E. persicinus RA2 and B. pumilus WP8 treatments under HS condition were found than in control. E. persicinus RA2 and B. pumilus WP8 can promote tomato growth, improve fruit quality more firmly than P. putida RBP1 during two consecutive seasons. Our study suggested that E. persicinus RA2 and B. pumilus WP8 are considered to be promising PGPR strains which are suited for application in salt marsh planting, ACC deaminase activity was not unique index on screening for PGPRs with the aim of salt stress tolerance, and plant growth promoting activities may be relevant to different growth indices and different stress conditions.

  4. Significance of lower respiratory tract cultures yielding Aspergillus spp. growth in a hospital without transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Paloma; Barberán, José; Eroles, Guillermo; Granizo, Juan-José; Giménez, María-José; Mir, Nuria; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Prieto, José; Cuétara, Maria Soledad

    2010-12-01

    Isolation of Aspergillus spp. in non-neutropenic, non-transplant patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) usually treated with corticosteroids is not easily interpretable. A retrospective review of clinical records corresponding to cultures (respiratory samples) yielding Aspergillus spp. in non- transplant patients was carried out. Patients were assigned to four categories: colonization, possible, probable or definitive aspergillosis. A logistic regression model (step-wise procedure) was performed using as dependent variable mortality, and as independent variables those showing differences (p≤0.1) in the bivariant analysis. Sixty-nine patients were identified. Most were elderly (68.1% ≥65 years), male (73.9%), presented comorbidities (84.1% Charlson index ≥3), COPD (76.8%), were receiving high corticosteroid doses (66.7%), and had previously received antibiotics (94.2%). Forty-five cases were colonizations, 4 possible, 15 probable and 5 definitive aspergillosis. A. fumigatus was isolated in 75.4% patients: 66.7% colonized, 75% possible, 93.3% probable and 100% definitive aspergillosis. Colonized patients were older (71.9 ± 11.9 vs. 65.1 ± 9.2 years; p= 0.018) and presented higher (p=0.034) comorbidity index than patients with aspergillosis. Mortality was 31.1% in colonized vs. 62.5% in aspergillosis (p=0.012). The isolation of A. fumigatus was associated with an increased probability of aspergillosis, with statistical association in the multivariate analysis between mortality and variables related to chemotherapy (no antifungal treatment), disease (diagnostic category) and immunity (leukocytosis).

  5. GROWTH AND HERBAGE YIELD OF Celosia argentea AS INFLUENCED BY PLANT DENSITY AND NPK FERTILIZATION IN DEGRADED ULTISOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolawole Edomwonyi Law-Ogbomo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of five plant densities (8,0000, 160,000, 250,000, 444,444 and 1,000,000 plants ha-1 and three levels of fertilizer (0, 200 and 400 kg NPK ha-1 on growth and yield of Celosia argentea was evaluated on degraded ultisol at Evboneka, Edo State, Nigeria in 2005 and 2006 cropping seasons. The trial was a 5 x 3 factorial arrangement fitted into a randomized complete block design in three replicates. Results revealed that plant density and fertilizer application affected significantly (P < 0.05 affected the plant height, stem girth, number of leaves, leaf area index and total dry weight leading to higher herbage yield. The plants grown under high plant density and fertilizer application level had higher degree of foliation and total dry weight than plants grown under lower plant density and fertilizer application levels. The greatest yield (13.67 tonnes hectare was produced from a population of 444,444 plants with 400kg fertilizer rate. The production cost increased from $ 79.570 – $ 790.18, revenue from $ 1,008.00 – $ 2,460.60, gross margin from $ 948.08 – $ 2151.00, net income from $ 928.43 – $ 2,072.92 and benefit-cost ratio from 1.34 – 14.55 for the various treatment combinations. The best herbage yield was a population of 80,000 plants with 400 kg fertilizer rate based on the fact that it had the greatest benefit-cost ratio (14.55.

  6. Growth, yield and photosynthesis of Panicum maximum and Stylosanthes hamata under elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R K; Baig, M J; Tiwari, H S; Roy, Sharmila

    2010-07-01

    Plant height, biomass production, assimilatory functions and chlorophyll accumulation of Panicum maximum and Stylosanthes hamata in intercropping systems was influenced significantly under elevated CO2 (600 +/- 50 ppm) in open top chambers (OTCs). The plant height increased by 32.0 and 49.0% over the control in P. maximum and S. hamata respectively in intercropping system under elevated CO2 over open field grown crops (Ca). P. maximum and S. hamata produced 67 and 85% higher fresh and dry biomass respectively under elevated CO2. Rates of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance increased in both the crop species in intercropping systems under elevated CO2. The canopy photosynthesis (photosynthesis x leaf area index) of these crop species increased significantly under elevated CO2 over the open grown crops. The chlorophyll a and b accumulation were also higher in the leaves of both the crop species as grown in OTC with elevated CO2. The increased chlorophyll content, leaf area index and canopy photosynthesis led to higher growth and biomass production in these crop species under elevated CO2. The total carbon sequestration in crop biomass and soils during the three years was 21.53 Mg C/ha under elevated CO2. The data revealed that P. maximum and S. hamata intercropping system is the potential as a sink for the increasing level of CO2 in the atmosphere in the semi-arid tropics.

  7. Effect of spent bleaching earth based bio organic fertilizer on growth, yield and quality of eggplants under field condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, K. Y.; Loh, S. K.; Salimon, J.

    2013-11-01

    Spent bleaching earth (SBE) is a solid waste generated from the bleaching process in palm oil industry. This solid waste is currently disposed directly in landfills without treatment, causing severe water and air pollution. Recently, dumping of SBE in landfills or public disposal sites has been prohibited in most countries. Meanwhile, high costs associated with the large area of land needed for storage of the residue has lead to the interest in regenerate SBE. Thus, a recent novel approach has been carried out on the utilization of SBE in agriculture as an alternative method for disposal. In this study, a field experiment was conducted at an experimental plot in Plant House National University Malaysia to evaluate the effect of SBE on the growth and quality of eggplant. Growth and quality parameters of eggplant including total fruit yield, total biomass, macronutrients concentration of leaf were studied through close monitoring and assessment. Field trials conducted showed that SBE is effective in promoting eggplant growth and nutrient uptake compared to the control treatment under field conditions. Therefore, with the proper and effective ways in handling SBE through conversion of SBE into beneficial bio organic fertilizer, this material which is a waste in the past will become an advantage in agriculture as a substitute for commercial fertilizers.

  8. Effect of Zinc Element on Growth, Yield Components and some Physiological Characteristics of Maize under NaCl Salinity Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Karmollachaab

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of zinc element application on growth and some Morphophysiological of maize (single cross 704 an experiment was conducted during 2010 at greenhouse. Experimented design was complete randomize factorial with four replications. Treatments of experiment were soil salinity (4, 8 dS.m-1 and 0 as a control and different zinc concentration including 0, 10 and 20 mg.kg-1. Results showed that salinity stress had significantly different effects on all measured parameters while effect on zinc concentration was not significant and resulted in significant reduction for all phonological and physiological traits of Maize while proline and sodium contents were increased. At non stress condition, application of zinc had no significant effect on ear length, number of grains in ear, 1000 grains weight, proline and sodiumconcentration comparing to control. Plant height, total dry weight, relative water content percent and zinc potassium concentration increasing at zinc treatments in non-salinity stress condition. Application of zinc at salinity stress treatment led to increasing zinc and potassium concentration of plants, improving growth and yield components of Maize and significant decrease in proline and sodium content of plants. Positive effect of zinc application on growth of Maize was clearer on stress condition than control.

  9. Prediction of grain yield using optical remote sensing and a growth model: application on Merguellil catchment (Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahbi, A.; Zribi, M.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.; Duchemin, B.; Shabou, M.; Mougenot, B.; Boulet, G.

    2012-04-01

    In semi-arid region and especially in irrigated areas, agriculture represents a major contribution to food security. These areas significantly contribute to the increase of global production. A challenging objective is thus to ensure food security. Therefore an operational forecasting system for the grain yields is required and could help decision-makers to make early decisions and plan annual imports. In this context, remote sensing is a very interesting tool for giving information on the development of vegetation. The main objective is to analyze and predict the average grain yield, based on different indices measured or modelled during the growing season. Thus, we used three lines of research: the first is based on analysing a relationship between normalized vegetation index (NDVI) which is determined from optical satellite imagery and the leaf area index (LAI) measured in situ. The second axis is based on the estimation of the relation between wheat yields and normalized vegetation index NDVI. The third axis is based on the application of a growth model SAFY « Simple Algorithm For Yield Estimate » developed to simulate LAI, dry aboveground phytomass (DAM) and the grain yield (GY). For the first axis, we used optical data at high resolution. A series of 7 SPOT / HRV during the 2010-2011 agricultural seasons was acquired in the Merguellil catchment (Tunisia). At the same time we realised experimental measurements made on 27 test plots of dry or irrigated cereals carried out in study area. These measurements are mainly: the water content of the vegetation, the vegetation height, wheat density and leaf area index LAI (estimated using a hemispherical camera). From satellite data, a profile of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was generated for each pixel. For both types of cereal, a relationship is established between NDVI and leaf area index LAI. This relationship is exponential and it allows connecting the satellite observations with a variable

  10. Investigating of growth characteristics, yield, yield components and potential weed control in intercropping of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and vegetative sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Alizadeh, Y.; A Koocheki; M. Nassiri Mahallati

    2016-01-01

    In order to study yield and yield components in intercropping bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and evaluating effect of intercropping on weed control, a field experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad during growing season of 2008. Treatments: included 1- sole crop of bean 2- sole crop of sweet basil 3- strip intercropping of bean and sweet basil (four rows of bean and two rows of sweet basil) 4- strip inter...

  11. Study of water stress effects in different growth stages on yield and yield components of different rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Zinolabedin Tahmasebi; Pirdashti, Hemmatollah; Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad Modarres; Balouchi, Hamidreza

    2008-05-15

    A field experiment was conducted during 2001-2003 to evaluate the effect of water stress on the yield and yield components of four rice cultivars commonly grown in Mazandaran province, Iran. In northern Iran irrigated lowland rice usually experiences water deficit during the growing season include of land preparation time, planting, tillering stage, flowering and grain filing period. Recently drought affected 20 of 28 provinces in Iran; with the southeastern, central and eastern parts of the country being most severely affected. The local and improved cultivars used were Tarom, Khazar, Fajr and Nemat. The different water stress conditions were water stress during vegetative, flowering and grain filling stages and well watered was the control. Water stress at vegetative stage significantly reduced plant height of all cultivars. Water stress at flowering stage had a greater grain yield reduction than water stress at other times. The reduction of grain yield largely resulted from the reduction in fertile panicle and filled grain percentage. Water deficit during vegetative, flowering and grain filling stages reduced mean grain yield by 21, 50 and 21% on average in comparison to control respectively. The yield advantage of two semidwarf varieties, Fajr and Nemat, were not maintained under drought stress. Total biomass, harvest index, plant height, filled grain, unfilled grain and 1000 grain weight were reduced under water stress in all cultivars. Water stress at vegetative stage effectively reduced total biomass due to decrease of photosynthesis rate and dry matter accumulation.

  12. Response of vegetation to carbon dioxide. Growth, yield and plant water relationships in sweet potatoes in response to carbon dioxide enrichment 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    In the summer of 1985, under the joint program of US Department of Energy, Carbon Dioxide Division, and Tuskegee University, experiments were conducted to study growth, yield, photosynthesis and plant water relationships in sweet potato plants growth in an enriched CO{sub 2} environment. The main experiment utilized open top chambers to study the effects of CO{sub 2} and soil moisture on growth, yield and photosynthesis of field-grown plants. In addition, potted plants in open top chambers were utilized in a study of the effects of different CO{sub 2} concentrations on growth pattern, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and biomass increment at different stages of development. The interaction effects of enriched CO{sub 2} and water stress on biomass production, yield, xylem potential, and stomatal conductance were also investigated. The overall results of the various studies are described.

  13. Primary health clinic toilet/bathroom surface swab sampling can indicate community profile of sexually transmitted infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Giffard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The microbiome of built environment surfaces is impacted by the presence of humans. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that analysis of surface swabs from clinic toilet/bathroom yields results correlated with sexually transmitted infection (STI notifications from corresponding human populations. We extended a previously reported study in which surfaces in toilet/bathroom facilities in primary health clinics in the Australian Northern Territory (NT were swabbed then tested for nucleic acid from the STI agents Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis. This was in the context of assessing the potential for such nucleic acid to contaminate specimens collected in such facilities. STIs are notifiable in the NT, thus allowing comparison of swab and notification data. Methods An assumption in the design was that while absolute built environment loads of STI nucleic acids will be a function of patient traffic density and facility cleaning protocols, the relative loads of STI nucleic acids from different species will be largely unaffected by these processes. Another assumption was that the proportion of swabs testing positive for STIs provides a measure of surface contamination. Accordingly, “STI profiles” were calculated. These were the proportions that each of the three STIs of interest contributed to the summed STI positive swabs or notifications. Three comparisons were performed, using swab data from clinics in remote Indigenous communities, clinics in small-medium towns, and a single urban sexual health clinic. These data were compared with time and place-matched STI notifications. Results There were significant correlations between swab and notifications data for the both the remote Indigenous and regional data. For the remote Indigenous clinics the p values ranged from 0.041 to 0.0089, depending on data transformation and p value inference method. Further, the swab data appeared to strongly indicate

  14. EVA Swab Tool to Support Planetary Protection and Astrobiology Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Hood, Drew; Walker, Mary; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2018-01-01

    When we send humans to search for life on other planets, we'll need to know what we brought with us versus what may already be there. To ensure our crewed systems meet planetary protection requirements-and to protect our science from human contamination-we'll need to assess whether microorganisms may be leaking or venting from our spacecraft. Microbial sample collection outside of a pressurized spacecraft is complicated by temperature extremes, low pressures that preclude the use of laboratory standard (wetted) swabs, and operation either in bulky spacesuits or with robotic assistance. Engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently developed a swab kit for use in collecting microbial samples from the external surfaces of crewed spacecraft, including spacesuits. The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Swab Kit consists of a single swab tool handle and an eight-canister sample caddy. The design team minimized development cost by re-purposing a heritage Space Shuttle tile repair handle that was designed to quickly snap into different tool attachments by engaging a mating device in each attachment. This allowed the tool handle to snap onto a fresh swab attachment much like popular shaving razor handles can snap onto a disposable blade cartridge. To disengage the handle from a swab, the user performs two independent functions, which can be done with a single hand. This dual operation mitigates the risk that a swab will be inadvertently released and lost in microgravity. Each swab attachment is fitted with commercially available foam swab tips, vendor-certified to be sterile for Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA). A microbial filter installed in the bottom of each sample container allows the container to outgas and repressurize without introducing microbial contaminants to internal void spaces. Extensive ground testing, post-test handling, and sample analysis confirmed the design is able to maintain sterile conditions as the canister moves between

  15. The Effect of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR and Phosphate Solubilizing Microorganism (PSM on Yield and Yield Components of Wheat (cv. N80 under Different Nitrogen and Phosphorous Fertilizers Levels in Greenhouse Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H Bahari saravi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effect of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR and phosphate solubilizing microorganism (PSM on yield and yield components of wheat a pot experiment was conducted at Sari Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources University during 2009. Experiment was arranged in factorial based on completely randomized design in three replicates. Treatments were included bio-fertilizer in four levels (non-inoculation control, Phosphate Barvare 2 (Pseudomonas fluorescens+Bacillus subtilis, Supernitroplus (Azotobacter brasilense+Azospirillum lipoferum and Nitroxine (Azospirillum + Pseudomona + Bacillus, three levels of chemical nitrogen fertilizer (0, 75 and 150 kg urea/ha and three levels of phosphorus fertilizer (0, 60 and 120 kg super phosphate triple/ha. Results showed that the studied treatments (biofertilizer, nitrogen and phosphate inorganic fertilizers had significant effect on grain number per spike, 1000 grain weight, grain yield, straw yield, biological yield and harvest index. Interaction effect between biofertilizer and chemical fertilizers was significant in terms of grain yield. The maximum grain yield was resulted from simultaneously applying of Nitroxine and 75 kg ha-1 nitrogen fertilizer. By contrast, the highest straw yield was obtained when 150 kg nitrogen fertilizer was used. Grain yield had the maximum correlation with biological yield (r=0.85**. Grain yield positively and significantly correlated with grain number per spike (r=0.73**, 1000 grain weight (r=0.68**, straw yield (r=0.56** and harvest index (r=0.69**. In conclusion biofertilizer inoculations could reduce application of nitrogen and phosphorus chemical fertilizers and increase plant performance.

  16. Growth and yield of tomato cultivated on composted duck excreta enriched wood shavings and source-separated municipal solid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Zoes

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the use of growth substrates, made with duck excreta enriched wood shaving compost (DMC and the organic fraction of source-separated municipal solid waste (MSW compost, on the growth and yield of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill. cv. Campbell 1327. Substrate A consisted of 3:2 (W/W proportion of DMC and MSW composts. Substrates B and C were the same as A but contained 15% (W/W ratio of brick dust and shredded plastic, respectively. Three control substrates consisted of the commercially available peat-based substrate (Pr, an in-house sphagnum peat-based substrate (Gs, and black earth mixed with sandy loam soil (BE/S in a 1:4 (W/W ratio. Substrates (A, B, C and controls received nitrogen (N, phosphate (P and potassium (K at equivalent rates of 780 mg/pot, 625 mg/pot, and 625 mg/pot, respectively, or were used without mineral fertilizers. Compared to the controls (Pr, Gs and BE/S, tomato plants grown on A, B, and C produced a greater total number and dry mass of fruits, with no significant differences between them. On average, total plant dry-matter biomass in substrate A, B, and C was 19% lower than that produced on Pr, but 28% greater than biomass obtained for plant grown, on Gs and BE/S. Plant height, stem diameter and chlorophyll concentrations indicate that substrates A, B, and C were particularly suitable for plant growth. Although the presence of excess N in composted substrates favoured vegetative rather than reproductive growth, the continuous supply of nutrients throughout the growing cycle, as well as the high water retention capacity that resulted in a reduced watering by 50%, suggest that substrates A, B, and C were suitable growing mixes, offering environmental and agronomic advantages.

  17. Biochar and flyash inoculated with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria act as potential biofertilizer for luxuriant growth and yield of tomato plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripti; Kumar, Adarsh; Usmani, Zeba; Kumar, Vipin; Anshumali

    2017-04-01

    Overuse of agrochemical fertilizers alarmingly causes deterioration in soil health and soil-flora. Persistence of these agrochemicals exerts detrimental effects on environment, potentially inducing toxic effects on human health, thus pronouncing an urgent need for a safer substitute. The present study investigates the potential use of agricultural and industrial wastes as carrier materials, viz. biochar and flyash, respectively, for preparation of bioformulations (or biofertilizers) using two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, Bacillus sp. strain A30 and Burkholderia sp. strain L2, and its effect on growth of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. (tomato). The viability of strains was determined based on colony forming units (cfu) count of each bioformulation at an interval of 60 days for a period of 240 days. Seeds were coated with different carrier based bioformulations and pot experiment(s) were carried out to access its effects on plant growth parameters. Biochar based bioformulations showed higher cfu count and maximum viability for strain L2 (10 7  cfu g -1 ) at 240 days of storage. Maximum percentage of seed germination was also observed in biochar inoculated with strain L2. Significant (p < 0.05) increase in plant growth parameters (dry and fresh biomass, length, number of flowers) were ascertained from the pot experiment and amongst all bioformulations, biochar inoculated with strain L2 performed consistently thriving results for tomato yield. Furthermore, post-harvest study of this bioformulation treated soil improved physico-chemical properties and dehydrogenase activity as compared to pre-plantation soil status. Overall, we show that prepared biochar based bioformulation using Burkholderia sp. L2 as inoculum can tremendously enhance the productivity of tomato, soil fertility, and can also act as a sustainable substitute for chemical fertilizers. In addition, mixture of biochar and flyash inoculated with strain L2 also showed noteworthy results for the

  18. Two tank-mix adjuvants effect on yield and quality attributes of wheat treated with growth retardants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Miziniak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of seeds and yield of winter wheat under different retardants application. The two years field trials on winter wheat were carried out in the Institute of Plant Protection - National Research Institute in Poznan (Poland. Treatments consisted of trinexapac-ethyl, chlormequat and prohexadione calcium applied in mixtures with paraffin oil adjuvant or organosilicone surfactant in BBCH 31 growth stage of winter wheat. No lodging occurred in any experimental year. The retardants had varying effect on the quality parameters of wheat grain. The highest fluctuations in the content of protein, gluten and the Zeleny value were observed after the application of chlormequat chloride. Starch content in wheat grain, regardless of the retardant application method, was negatively correlated with others grain quality parameters evaluated in the experiment. Depending on the year of study and weather conditions, increased or decreased wheat quality.

  19. Growth inhibition, turgor maintenance, and changes in yield threshold after cessation of solute import in pea epicotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalstig, J. G.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The dependence of stem elongation on solute import was investigated in etiolated pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L. var Alaska) by excising the cotyledons. Stem elongation was inhibited by 60% within 5 hours of excision. Dry weight accumulation into the growing region stopped and osmotic pressure of the cell sap declined by 0.14 megapascal over 5 hours. Attempts to assay phloem transport via ethylenediaminetetraacetate-enhanced exudation from cut stems revealed no effect of cotyledon excision, indicating that the technique measured artifactual leakage from cells. Despite the drop in cell osmotic pressure, turgor pressure (measured directly via a pressure probe) did not decline. Turgor maintenance is postulated to occur via uptake of solutes from the free space, thereby maintaining the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Cell wall properties were measured by the pressure-block stress relaxation technique. Results indicate that growth inhibition after cotyledon excision was mediated primarily via an increase in the wall yield threshold.

  20. The data harvest how sharing research data can yield knowledge, jobs and growth : an RDA Europe report

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, Nuala

    2014-01-01

    In October 2010, the High Level Group on Scientific Data presented the "Riding the Wave,” report to the European Commission outlining a series of policy recommendations on how Europe could gain from the rising tide of scientific data. Over 4 years later, a team of European experts have generated a new report "The Data Harvest: How sharing research data can yield knowledge, jobs and growth" with an update on the landscape described in the previous report aiming to sound a warning on how Europe must act now to secure its standing in future data markets. In this report, we outline the benefits and challenges, and offer recommendations to European policy makers. The seeds have been sown. Now is the time to plan the harvest.