WorldWideScience

Sample records for svs science story

  1. Pathological Images (SVS format) - Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available resolution whole slide digital images of liver and kidney pathological specimens stained with hematoxylin-eo...Pathological Images in SVS format File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates-pathological-images/LATEST/images.../ File size: 25 TB (Total amount of SVS files) Simple search URL - Data acquisition method Digital images...o's ScanScope AT). Data analysis method - Number of data entries 52,879 entries Digital images in SVS format... can be viewed with Aperio's ImageScope viewer. ImageScope can be downloaded for free from http://www.aperio.com/download-images

  2. Standard Verification System (SVS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — SVS is a mainframe program that accesses the NUMIDENT to perform SSN verifications. This program is called by SSA Internal applications to verify SSNs. There is also...

  3. Revisiting Science in Culture: Science as Story Telling and Story Revising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Grobstein

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Both science itself, and the human culture of which it is a part, would benefit from a story of science that encourages wider engagement with and participation in the processes of scientific exploration. Such a story, based on a close analysis of scientific method, is presented here. It is the story of science as story telling and story revising. The story of science as story suggests that science can and should serve three distinctive functions for humanity: providing stories that may increase (but never guarantee human well-being, serving as a supportive nexus for human exploration and story telling in general, and exemplifying a commitment to skepticism and a resulting open-ended and continuing exploration of what might yet be. Some practical considerations that would further the development and acceptance of such a story of science as a widely shared nexus of human activity are described.

  4. Science News Stories as Boundary Objects Affecting Engagement with Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polman, Joseph L.; Hope, Jennifer M. G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how participating in a program spanning an informal science institution and multiple school sites engaged youth with science in a different way. In particular, teens in the program selected and researched science topics of personal interest, and then authored, revised, and published science news stories about those topics in an…

  5. Quantum ten a story of passion, tragedy, ambition and science

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Sheilla

    2014-01-01

    Jones weaves together the personal and the scientific in a heartwarming -- and heartbreaking -- story of the men who struggled to create quantum physics ... a story of passion, tragedy, ambition and science.

  6. Standard Verification System Lite (SVS Lite)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — SVS Lite is a mainframe program used exclusively by the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) to perform batch SSN verifications. This process is exactly the...

  7. False Friends: What Makes a Story Inadequate for Science Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heering, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increasing emphasis in discussions on science education on the potential and advantages of stories and narratives in teaching situations. From this, one might conclude that simply starting to use stories in science classrooms is a good thing, "per se". Yet, as I will argue in my paper, things do not appear to be that…

  8. The Role of Interest in Learning Science through Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Stephen; Klassen, Cathrine Froese

    2015-01-01

    A major aspect of the power of a historically based science story derives from its ability to cultivate interest in the reader or listener. In this paper, we review the research on interest originating from diverse scholarly areas and apply it to the understanding, construction, and effective use of science stories in both formal and informal…

  9. Science fiction by scientists an anthology of short stories

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This anthology contains fourteen intriguing short stories by active research scientists and other writers trained in science. Science is at the heart of real science fiction, which is more than just westerns with ray guns or fantasy with spaceships. The people who do science and love science best are scientists. Scientists like Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, and Fred Hoyle wrote some of the legendary tales of golden age science fiction. Today there is a new generation of scientists writing science fiction informed with the expertise of their fields, from astrophysics to computer science, biochemistry to rocket science, quantum physics to genetics, speculating about what is possible in our universe. Here lies the sense of wonder only science can deliver. All the stories in this volume are supplemented by afterwords commenting on the science underlying each story.

  10. Writing Science Fiction Stories to Motivate Analysis of Journal Articles

    CERN Document Server

    Kontur, F J

    2014-01-01

    For many students, college physics courses have little or even negative impact on their beliefs about the connection between physics and the everyday world. One way to help students see this connection is to incorporate analysis of science articles into the course. For introductory courses, one might have students discuss newspaper articles related to science or articles from popular science magazines while articles from peer-reviewed journals might be more appropriate for honors-level or upper-division courses. In this work, I describe a project done in a two-semester upper-division electricity and magnetism course at the United States Air Force Academy in which students were required to use the science from a peer-reviewed journal article to write a science fiction story. Although others have utilized science fiction stories in physics courses, this is the first article to describe a project in which students write their own science fiction stories in a physics course.

  11. Story-Telling for Science: One Scientist's Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Science is the most successful way humans have developed to understand the world, and application of the knowledge gained has been essential in allowing a few million hunter-gatherers become a few billion grower-builders. Yet, at least anecdotally, there is a growing tendency for many people to reject science without knowing what they are rejecting, and the ranks of scientists are thinned by having so many students arrive at our universities neither prepared to study science nor open to the possibility of doing so. This growing gap represents a growing opportunity for scientists to use their expertise in the service of humanity. Based on my experience, the biggest requirement for scientists to do so is simply to engage, but engagement is more successful in teamwork with experienced communicators and unexpected voices, and using narrative and history.

  12. Science fiction/science fact: medical genetics in news stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alan; Anderson, Alison; Allan, Stuart

    2005-12-01

    News media coverage of biotechnology issues offers a rich source of fictional portrayals, with stories drawing strongly on popular imagery and metaphors in descriptions of the powers and dangers of biotechnology. This article examines how science fiction metaphors, imagery and motifs surface in British newspaper (broadsheet and tabloid) coverage of medical genetic issues, focusing on press reporting of two recent highly publicised news media events; namely, the Hashmi and Whitaker families' plights to use stem cells from a 'perfectly matched sibling' for the treatment of their diseased children. It is concerned in particular with the extent to which journalists' use of certain literary devices encourages preferred formulations of medical genetics, and thereby potentially shapes public deliberation about scientific developments and their consequences for society. Understanding how science fiction sustains science fact, and vice versa, and how the former is portrayed in news media, it is argued, would thus seem to be crucial in the effort to understand why people respond so strongly to biotechnologies, and what they imagine their consequences to be.

  13. Story-telling, Earth-Sciences and Geoethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohle, Martin; Sibilla, Anna; Graells, Robert Casals i.

    2015-04-01

    People are engineers, even the artist. People like stories, even the engineers. Engineering shapes the intersections of humans and their environments including with the geosphere. Geoethics considers values upon which to base practices how to intersect the geosphere. Story-telling is a skilful human practice to describe perception of values in different contexts to influence their application. Traditional earth-centric narrations of rural communities have been lost in the global urbanisation process. These former-time narrations related to the "sacrum" - matters not possible to be explained with reasoning. Science and technology, industrialisation and global urbanisation require an other kind of earth-centric story-telling. Now at the fringe of the Anthropocene, humans can base their earth-centricity on knowledge and scientific thinking. We argue that modern story-telling about the functioning of Earth's systems and the impact of humankind's activities on these systems is needed, also in particular because citizens rarely can notice how the geosphere intersects with their daily dealings; putting weather and disasters aside. Modern earth-centric story-telling would offer citizens opportunities to develop informed position towards humankind's place within earth-systems. We argue that such "earth-science story-lines" should be part of the public discourse to engage citizens who have more or less "expert-knowledge". Understanding the functioning of the Earth is needed for economy and values suitable for an anthropophil society. Multi-faceted discussion of anthropogenic global change and geoengineering took off recently; emerging from discussions about weather and hazard mitigation. Going beyond that example; we illustrate opportunities for rich story-telling on intersections of humans' activities and the geosphere. These 'modern narrations' can weave science, demographics, linguistics and cultural histories into earth-centric stories around daily dealings of citizens

  14. Learning from education to communicate science as a good story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete, Aquiles; Lartigue, Cecilia

    2004-09-01

    Science communicators must learn from science educators in their crusade to counteract the traditional boring and inefficient approaches to convey science. Educators encounter a need for methods of teaching that portray science as 'hard fun' and resources that encourage students' minds to burst into action. Narratives are considered by several authors as highly valuable resources for science education. However, little research has been undertaken to measure the efficiency of narratives in the context of science communication to the general public. Recent work however, suggests that narratives are indeed an alternative and an important means for science communication to convey information in an accurate, attractive, imaginative and memorable way. To present scientific information through stories, novels, comics and plays should be regarded as an important means to transmit information in the repertoire of both science teachers and science communicators.

  15. Weaving a Webb story: Communicating Science for JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Alexandra

    2018-01-01

    NASA’s next great observatory is an impressive and complex mission with many tales to tell. Science is a collection of stories and Webb will be a storytelling machine. How are we preparing to share the scientific news to come from this amazing telescope? From news releases to multimedia content to a vast online presence, the stories of the James Webb Space Telescope will require crafting in order to impact the widest audience. We discuss the art of storytelling based on messaging, goals, mediums, and audience, and how you can apply the same principles to communicating your own research.

  16. A Science Education Learning Community Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Sharon

    This paper examines the establishment of a collaborative science education learning community over a five-year period. By assuming a pluralistic theoretical perspective which has been influenced by post-critical theory, postmodernism/poststructuralism, and feminism, focus is placed on the challenges experienced in developing a learning community…

  17. Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of storytelling by teachers and librarians to promote reading. Topics include folktales; communication through story; oral traditions; learning through story; impact on reading, comprehension, and composition skills; telling/listening interaction; storytelling as a leadership skill; and story and inquiry or discovery learning.…

  18. Houston, we have a narrative why science needs story

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Ask a scientist about Hollywood, and you ll probably get eye rolls. But ask someone in Hollywood about science, and they ll see dollar signs: moviemakers know that science can be the source of great stories, with all the drama and action that blockbusters require. That s a huge mistake, says Randy Olson: Hollywood has a lot to teach scientists about how to tell a story and, ultimately, how to "do" science better. With "Houston, We Have a Narrative," he lays out a stunningly simple method for turning the dull into the dramatic. Drawing on his unique background, which saw him leave his job as a working scientist to launch a career as a filmmaker, Olson first diagnoses the problem: When scientists tell us about their work, they pile one moment and one detail atop another moment and another detail a stultifying procession of and, and, and. What we need instead is an understanding of the basic elements of story, the narrative structures that our brains are all but hardwired to look for which Olson boils down, bril...

  19. NEW PROSPECTS FOR TEACHING SCIENCE IN KINDERGARTEN. THE SCIENCE STORY CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Hugerat

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The story is a good way to teach children different subjects and explain phenomena in kindergarten. The science story teaches the pupil scientific phenomena in an indirect way. Phenomenology is another way to learn about similarities among various materials without using the senses of taste or smell. The focus concentrates on the scientific method. Here, the scientific idea is that not all materials with similar external characteristics are the same. Therefore, the child must be careful. The role of the science story today introduces a new and pioneering method in teaching some aspects of scientific knowledge, such as facts and concepts, using stories to attract children and lead them to reason logically.

  20. Differentiating Science Instruction: Success Stories of High School Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Jennifer Lynn Cunningham

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics and practices of high school science teachers who differentiate instruction. Specifically teachers' beliefs about science teaching and student learning and how they planned for and implemented differentiated instruction in their classrooms were explored. Understanding how high school science teachers…

  1. Historical short stories as nature of science instruction in secondary science classrooms: Science teachers' implementation and students' reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Smith, Jennifer Ann

    This study explores the use of historical short stories as nature of science (NOS) instruction in thirteen secondary science classes. The stories focus on the development of science ideas and include statements and questions to draw students' and teachers' attention to key NOS ideas and misconceptions. This study used mixed methods to examine how teachers implement the stories, factors influencing teachers' implementation, the impact on students' NOS understanding, students' interest in the stories and factors correlated with their interest. Teachers' implementation decisions were influenced by their NOS understanding, curricula, time constraints, perceptions of student ability and resistance, and student goals. Teachers implementing stories at a high-level of effectiveness were more likely to make instructional decisions to mitigate constraints from the school environment and students. High-level implementers frequently referred to their learning goals for students as a rationale for implementing the stories even when facing constraints. Teachers implementing at a low-level of effectiveness were more likely to express that constraints inhibited effective implementation. Teachers at all levels of implementation expressed concern regarding the length of the stories and time required to fully implement the stories. Additionally, teachers at all levels of implementation expressed a desire for additional resources regarding effective story implementation and reading strategies. Evidence exists that the stories can be used to improve students' NOS understanding. However, under what conditions the stories are effective is still unclear. Students reported finding the stories more interesting than textbook readings and many students enjoyed learning about scientists and the development of science idea. Students' interest in the stories is correlated with their attitudes towards reading, views of effective science learning, attributions of academic success, and interest in

  2. Methods and Strategies: Oral Science Stories. Using Culturally Responsive Storytelling to Teach Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Renard; Hall, Cynthia; Hawkins, Tristan; Hartley, Megan; McCray, Willie; Sirleaf, Hammed

    2016-01-01

    T.A.L.E.S., Teaching And Learning with Engaging Stories, is an alternative teaching method that focuses on enhancing learning by teaching science, math, ELA, and social studies through story. A six-week research study investigating socioeconomically disadvantaged students' responses to oral stories was conducted during an afterschool tutoring…

  3. Science Fiction Stories with Good Astronomy and Physics: A Topical Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2010-08-01

    This is a selective list of some short stories and novels that use more or less accurate science and can be used for teaching or reinforcing astronomy or physics concepts. I include both traditional science-fiction and (occasionally) more serious fiction that derives meaning or plot from astronomy or physics ideas. The titles of short stories are given in quotation marks; only short stories that have been published in book form or are available free on the Web are included. While one book source is given for each short story, note that some of the stories can be found in other collections as well. (See the Internet Speculative Fiction Database, cited at the end, for an easy way to find all the places a particular story has been published.) The author welcomes suggestions for additions to this list, especially if your favorite story with good science is left out.

  4. Analyzing stories told by an elementary science teacher in a fifth-grade classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, Alicia M.

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to analyze and interpret the stories told by one teacher, Ms. M, in a fifth grade science classroom. In this study, stories are defined as teacher utterances that are used in first person or third person narrative view, and are related to an experience that occurred outside the classroom. This research answers questions concerning: (a) what types of stories Ms. M tells during science instruction; (b) when these stories occur in the classroom; and (c) what pedagogical functions do these stories serve in the classroom. Utilizing theories on the social construction of knowledge and narrative cognition, stories told may be formed through multiple paths that follow no logical expression to make sense of the context and to connect to its audience. Therefore, this study provides insight into how Ms. M made sense of science with her stories and the ways in which they worked with her students. The results illlustrated that the types of stories found with Ms. M were autobiographical, biographical, fictional, or based on current events. These stories occurred when the teacher initiated the discussion by bringing forth a definition, a question or reinforcing a concept. However, the stories were triggered by students to a greater degree with their questions, concerns, observations or their own stories or explanations. Finally, all pedagogical functions of stories were identified with Ms. M's stories: promotion of engagement or attention of students, building community, clarifying concepts or vocabulary, activation and building of background knowledge and disclosure of teacher role and voice. Ms. M stories exemplified her sense-making of science and connections to her own life that her students were eventually able to make for themselves.

  5. The Culture of Translational Science Research: Participants' Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarba, Joseph A; Wooten, Kevin; Freeman, Jean; Brasier, Allan R

    2013-01-01

    We apply a symbolic interactionist framework and a qualitative methodology to the examination of the everyday reality of translational science research (TSR). This is a growing scientific movement that aims to facilitate the efficient application of basic research to clinical service design and delivery. We describe the emerging culture of translational research at a mid-size medical center that received a Clinical and Translational Science Award from the National Institutes of Health. The stories related by scientists, clinicians, and students in interviews indicate that they make sense of the emerging inter- and cross-disciplinary, team-oriented culture of TSR through the refinement and redefinition of the significant symbols that inform their work while they attempt to master translational research by addressing the dilemmas it produces for them and their work. We see the strength, currency, adaptability, and energy of the core self-definition of "scientist" to be significant in shaping the emerging culture of translational research. We conclude by celebrating the value of interpretive ethnography for evaluation research.

  6. Encouraging a "Romantic Understanding" of Science: The Effect of the Nikola Tesla Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Klassen, Stephen; Klassen, Cathrine Froese

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and apply the notion of romantic understanding by outlining its features and its potential role in science education, to identify its features in the story of Nikola Tesla, and to describe an empirical study conducted to determine the effect of telling such a story to Grade 9 students. Elaborated features of…

  7. Developing Nontraditional Partnerships to Disseminate the Space Science Story (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, C.; Allen, J. S.; Garcia, J.; Martinez, D.

    2010-12-01

    NASA Space Science Days (NSSD) was established in 2004 to bring the story of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) to a community far removed from areas NASA traditionally served. The original NSSD invited 400 5th and 8th graders from the Texas Rio Grande Valley area to the University of Texas Brownsville (UTB) campus to participate in a one day Saturday event filled with information about MER with related hands on activities. Currently the yearly NSSD at UTB has grown to over 700 5th and 8th grade participants who are mentored by NASA trained university students. The NSSD program has expanded to other universities and community colleges and will soon include universities from throughout the U.S. A collaboration between three major institutions: 1) NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate (ARES); 2) The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers/Advancing Hispanic Excellence in Technology Engineering, Math, and Science, (SHPE/AHETEMS); and 3) The University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) has been established to enable the dissemination of NASA Space Science related education materials throughout the U.S. Already in its 8th year, UTB developed and tested a NSSD model that has successfully engaged students throughout South Texas Rio Grande Valley in space science activities. With this newly formed collaboration of NASA JSC, SHPE/AHETEMS, and UTB the expansion of the NSSD model will allow trained SHPE students and professionals to conduct events throughout SHPE’s established nation-wide delivery systems. Each year a new NSSD site will be established through an application process solicited from SHPE student and professional chapters. Once a chapter is awarded to conduct a NSSD, upper-level high school and university students will travel to NASA-JSC for a two day workshop where students learn about the current year’s science theme and are trained to present hands-on activities related to the theme. In each NSSD

  8. Developing Nontraditional Partnerships to Disseminate the Space Science Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Charles; Allen, Jaclyn; Garcia, Javier; Martinez, Debra

    2010-01-01

    NASA Space Science Days (NSSD) was established in 2004 to bring the story of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) to a community far removed from areas NASA traditionally serves. The original NSSD invited 400 5th and 8th graders from the Texas Rio Grande Valley area to the University of Texas Brownsville campus to participate in a one day Saturday event filled with information about MER with related hands on activities. Currently the program has grown to over 700 5th and 8th grade participants who are mentored by trained university students from several Texas universities and community colleges and growing to include universities from throughout the U.S. A collaboration between three major institutions: The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate (ARES), the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers/Advancing Hispanic Excellence in Technology Engineering, Math, and Science, (SHPE/AHETEMS), and the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) has been established to enable the dissemination of Solar System related educational materials throughout the U.S. Already in its 8th year, UTB has developed and tested a NSSD model that has successfully disseminated space science materials to students throughout South Texas Rio Grande Valley. With this newly formed collaboration this model s expansion will allow trained SHPE students and professionals to conduct events throughout its established nation-wide delivery systems. Each year a new NSSD site will be established through an application process solicited from SHPE student and professional chapters. Once a chapter is awarded, upper-level high school and university students will travel to NASA- JSC for a two day workshop where students learn about the current year s theme and are trained to present hands-on activities related to the theme. Additional training by ARES and UTB occurs one month before the new event in their own communities. Both local middle school teachers and

  9. Reflecting on Scientists' Activity Based on Science Fiction Stories Written by Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Pedro; Galvao, Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    In this article the authors resort to a qualitative analysis of the plot of science fiction stories about a group of scientists, written by two 11th-grade Earth and Life Science students (aged 17), and to semi-structured interviews, with the double purpose of diagnosing their conceptions of the nature of science (namely, as regards scientists'…

  10. The Launch Region of the SVS13 Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodapp, Klaus

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of Keck Telescope laser adaptive optics integral field spectroscopy with OSIRIS of the innermost regions of the NGC1333 SVS13 jet that drives the system of Herbig-Haro objects 7-11. We find a 0.4" long micro-jet traced by the emission of shock-excited [FeII]. Beyond the extent of this jet, we find a series of near-spherical bubbles traced in the lower excitation H 2 1-0 S(1) line. While this most recent outflow activity is directed almost precisely (PA 170°) to the south of SVS13, the older bubbles show a different direction of motion and orientation more towards the south-east, connecting the recent outflow activity to the well-known, poorly collimated HH 7-11 system of Herbig-Haro objects. We postulate that the creation of a series of bubbles and the changes in outflow direction are indicative of a precessing disk. Our velocity-resolved observations of the microjet in the [FeII] emission line at 1.644μm, as well as the HI12-4 and 13-4 (Brackett series) emission lines originating from the accretion disk or jet launch region clearly show the kinematic signature of disk and jet rotation.

  11. Spherical versus flat displays for communicating climate science concepts through stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schollaert Uz, S.; Storksdieck, M.; Duncan, B. N.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most compelling ways to display global Earth science data is through spherical displays. Museums around the world use Science On a Sphere for informal education of the general public, commonly for Earth science. An increasing number of universities and K-12 school systems are acquiring spheres to support formal education curriculum, but the use of spheres in education is relatively new and understanding of their advantages and best practices is still evolving. Many museums do not have the resources to staff their sphere with a facilitator or they have high turn-over of volunteer facilitators without a science background. Many K-12 teachers lack resources or training needed to utilize sphere technology to address global phenomena or Earth system science. One solution to this "facilitator-problem" has been the creation of "canned shows" for spheres, like ClimateBits. These are short videos that help people visualize Earth science concepts through global data sets and simple story-telling. To understand whether and when data driven story-telling works best on a sphere, we surveyed groups that saw identical Earth system science stories presented on a spherical display versus a flat screen. We also surveyed identical groups using live Earth science data story-telling compared to the ClimateBits videos. Some of the advantages of each format were most apparent in the qualitative comments at the end of the surveys

  12. Preservice Science Teachers' Perceptions of Their TPACK Development after Creating Digital Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancar-Tokmak, Hatice; Surmeli, Hikmet; Ozgelen, Sinan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this case study was to examine pre-service science teachers' (PSTs) perceptions of their Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) development after creating digital stories based on science topics drawn from the national curriculum. A total of 21 PSTs enrolled in Introduction to Computers II participated in the study. Data…

  13. Encouraging a "Romantic Understanding" of Science: The Effect of the Nikola Tesla Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis; Klassen, Stephen; Klassen, Cathrine Froese

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and apply the notion of romantic understanding by outlining its features and its potential role in science education, to identify its features in the story of Nikola Tesla, and to describe an empirical study conducted to determine the effect of telling such a story to Grade 9 students. Elaborated features of the story are the humanization of meaning, an association with heroes and heroic qualities, the limits of reality and extremes of experience, a sense of wonder, and a contesting of conventions and conventional ideas. The study demonstrates the learning benefits of encouraging a romantic understanding through a story that is structured explicitly around the identified features, in this instance in the context of the production and transmission of alternating current electricity. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of journal entries showed that the group of students who were encouraged to understand the concept of alternating current romantically (the experimental group) became more involved with both the content and the context of the story than a comparison group of students who were taught the concept explicitly, without a context (the control group). The students in the experimental group also performed statistically better on a science-content test taken 1 week and again 8 weeks after the indicated teaching intervention. This finding, along with the content analyses of students' journals, provided evidence of romantic understanding of the science content for those students who listened to the Tesla story.

  14. Anatomy of the story: Narratives of mortuary science learners and graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jose Luis

    Using the anatomy of the story as a framework (Guajardo & Guajardo, 2010), this qualitative study reports the narratives of nine Mortuary Science learners and graduates from an accredited two-year Mortuary Science program in Texas. The research questions are: (1) What can we learn from the narratives of Mortuary Science learners and graduates? (2) What are the learning journeys of nine individuals currently enrolled or graduated from an accredited two-year Mortuary Science program? (3) What challenges and successes have they experienced during their residence in the program, their internship, and the process of obtaining a license? Data collected for the study include platicas (conversational interviews), artifacts, documents, and the researcher's analytic journal. Data analysis was multilayered and included several phases. First, MAXQDA software served to code the data using a priory codes (navel, heart, mind, hands, and legs) as the study framework. Next, the coded data were retrieved into a separate Word document to code it again for triangulation purposes. Narrative analysis techniques (story as data collection and data analysis) were at the center of reporting study findings to be faithful to storytelling and the anatomy of the story framework. This dissertation is divided into four main parts plus Appendix. Part I, Anatomy of the story, presents the research questions and the guidelines for the anatomy of the story to guide the reader on what to expect in this dissertation. Part II, Visualizing the main characters of the story, provides a rich description of the study participants---the navel. Part III, The main elements of the story, presents the heart, mind, hands, and legs of the story in separate sections. Part IV, Stories harvested for new beginnings, discusses the main learning product of analyzing the collective story of learners and graduates. The Appendix section of the dissertation includes important pieces explaining the elements that are expected

  15. Introducing Taiwanese undergraduate students to the nature of science through Nobel Prize stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haim Eshach

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a broad agreement among scientists and science educators that students should not only learn science, but also acquire some sense of its nature, it has been reported that undergraduate students possess an inadequate grasp of the nature of science (NOS. The study presented here examined the potential and effectiveness of Nobel Prize stories as a vehicle for teaching NOS. For this purpose, a 36-hour course, “Albert Einstein’s Nobel Prize and the Nature of Science,” was developed and conducted in Taiwan Normal University. Ten undergraduate physics students participated in the course. Analysis of the Views of Nature of Science questionnaires completed by the students before and after the course, as well as the students’ own presentations of Nobel Prize stories (with an emphasis on how NOS characteristics are reflected in the story, showed that the students who participated in the course enriched their views concerning all aspects of NOS. The paper concludes with some suggestions for applying the novel idea of using Nobel Prize stories in physics classrooms.

  16. Interactive Story Development for the Unit of Turks on the Silk Road in Social Sciences Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamete, Aysen; Topraklioglu, Kivanç

    2017-01-01

    With this study, creating interactive story that includes interaction factors was purposed in order to support teaching of the unit of Turks on the Silk Road in Social Sciences course of 6th grades. The research method was defined as Design and Development Research and ADDIE pattern that is one of the teaching design pattern was based while…

  17. BUILDING A NEW GENERATION SCIENCE LIBRARY: THE KAUST STORY

    KAUST Repository

    Al Zahrani, Rashed

    2012-06-01

    If you had the opportunity to build a science library from scratch for a new generation of researchers and students, what would it look like and how would it operate? We will show you the vision and reality of the new King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Library that won the 2011 ALA/AIA Library Architecture award and that for the last three years has been providing a high level of information services to top level international scientists and graduate students. We will describe the major characteristics in contemporary science research, education, and information management that guided the design of our library facility, technical infrastructure, and services. We will give concrete examples and evaluations of our implementation of new information services and tools. And we will end with the challenges still before us, most notably the effective integration of science knowledge management into the workflow of scientific research and enterprise based information technology organization.

  18. The Community Science Workshop Network Story: Becoming a Networked Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The Community Science Workshops (CSWs)--with funding from the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation--created a network among the CSW sites in California. The goals of the CSW Network project have been to improve programs, build capacity throughout the Network, and establish new sites. Inverness Research has been…

  19. The "impressionist" force of creation stories in planetary sciences education and outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Z.

    2014-04-01

    Any truly meaningful presentation of a planetary science topic to both pupils/students and the general public should contain three modules. First, there should be all the necessary phenomenology, detailed description of "players" (i.e., planetary bodies and the sources of external influences). Second, there should be similarly complete description of "rules" (i.e., natural forces and factors). Third, one should not forget to provide a "life story", the evolutionary background (i.e., scenarios for origin, development and probable end of relevant planetary bodies). There is nothing new in this basic classification of the material presented to the class or to the general audience. It is a summary of collective wisdom of experienced teachers as well as that of non-teacher scientists engaged in public understanding of science activities. Nevertheless, there is an important caveat in this sequence. The audience could get lost a touch with the topic. This would lead to diminished attention in both the first module (overwhelming by facts and associated numbers) and in the second one (overwhelming by the complexity of interactions). It is suggested that this could be averted by partial inversion of the above working sequence in "emergency situations". For example, if the audience is distracted by some strong influence, like crucial football/ice-hockey match or a fashion display. That means, one should not present the topical material strictly in a usual 1-2-3 style (phenomenologycausality-evolution) but in modified 3-1-2-3 style (evolution-phenomenology-causality-evolution). Of course, a very natural question arises here: Is it possible, at all, to talk or write about evolution without presenting known facts and causes and effects involved beforehand? The answer, based on a large number of trial-and-error efforts, now seems to be: Yes, it is. One should take a lesson from great painters of the second half of the 19th century who have started and then pursued systematically

  20. Getting the Public Excited about Science through News Stories about Global Sporting Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufoe, A.

    2014-12-01

    News is all about opportunity, and no topic can pull an audience together across ages and countries better than international sports competitions. Sports news excites people, generating conversations at work and at home throughout the duration of the competition. The popularity of these sporting events engages the general public through print and video channels, but it also offers the opportunity for news beyond the competition results - specifically, how science and scientific principles and properties tie in to the sport. Take the Olympics and the World Cup, for example. News sites were more motivated to write and run stories about the aerodynamics of a soccer ball or science behind Olympic bobsleds because these topics are timely: timeliness is one of the most important reasons news stories get written and published. And analysis of even a small sample of news stories and the language used will show why the news organization posted the story. Since the science content is being translated for the general public, the topics can provide a more general explanation of the science behind sporting events, equipment and the act of doing the sport. But beyond international sporting events, even the opening day of baseball, first night of ice hockey, the start of football and the beginning of basketball season provide opportunities for news organizations to provide science news to the public. Scientists need to get ready to collaborate with journalists to tap into the next big sporting event - Super Bowl XLIX. Although it has not been determined which teams are playing yet, scientists can start preparing content-rich stories on the physics of a football, the climate of Phoenix, Arizona, and the green mission of the University of Phoenix Stadium (the location of Super Bowl 2015). This is an opportunity for scientists and media outlets to add science content knowledge to the hype of the event. After the Super Bowl comes the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, which has already

  1. Angels & Demons – the science behind the story

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A race against the clock to prevent antimatter stolen from CERN from blowing up the Vatican: following a tried and tested Hollywood formula, the ‘ticking-bomb’ thriller, Angles & Demons can hardly fail to entertain. But how does the science stand up to scrutiny? var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-049/CERN-MOVIE-2009-049-0753-kbps-640x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-049/CERN-MOVIE-2009-049-Multirate-200-to-753-kbps-640x360-25-fps.wmv', 'false', 533, 300, 'https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-049/CERN-MOVIE-2009-049-posterframe-640x360-at-10-percent.jpg', '1178304', true, 'Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-049/CERN-MOVIE-2009-049-0600-kbps-maxH-360-25-fps-audio-128-kbps-48-kHz-stereo.mp4'); Visitors at the inauguration of CERN’s new...

  2. Career Cartography: From Stories to Science and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deleise S; Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S; Visovatti, Moira; Munro-Kramer, Michelle L; Feetham, Suzanne

    2017-05-01

    To present four case scenarios reflecting the process of research career development using career cartography. Career cartography is a novel approach that enables nurses, from all clinical and academic settings, to actively engage in a process that maximizes their clinical, teaching, research, and policy contributions that can improve patient outcomes and the health of the public. Four early-career nurse researchers applied the career cartography framework to describe their iterative process of research career development. They report the development process of each of the components of career cartography, including destination statement, career map, and policy statement. Despite diverse research interests and career mapping approaches, common experiences emerged from the four nurse researchers. Common lessons learned throughout the career cartography process include: (a) have a supportive mentorship team, (b) start early and reflect regularly, (c) be brief and to the point, (d) keep it simple and avoid jargon, (e) be open to change, (f) make time, and (g) focus on the overall career destination. These four case scenarios support the need for nurse researchers to develop their individual career cartography. Regardless of their background, career cartography can help nurse researchers articulate their meaningful contributions to science, policy, and health of the public. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  3. Process tracing in political science: What's the story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasnow, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    Methodologists in political science have advocated for causal process tracing as a way of providing evidence for causal mechanisms. Recent analyses of the method have sought to provide more rigorous accounts of how it provides such evidence. These accounts have focused on the role of process tracing for causal inference and specifically on the way it can be used with case studies for testing hypotheses. While the analyses do provide an account of such testing, they pay little attention to the narrative elements of case studies. I argue that the role of narrative in case studies is not merely incidental. Narrative does cognitive work by both facilitating the consideration of alternative hypotheses and clarifying the relationship between evidence and explanation. I consider the use of process tracing in a particular case (the Fashoda Incident) in order to illustrate the role of narrative. I argue that process tracing contributes to knowledge production in ways that the current focus on inference tends to obscure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transmedia Storytelling in Science Communication: One Subject, Multiple Media, Multiple Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, M.; Moloney, K.

    2012-12-01

    Each communication medium has particular storytelling strengths. For example, video is particularly good at illustrating a progression of events, text at background and context, and games at describing systems. In what USC's Prof. Henry Jenkins described as "transmedia storytelling," multiple media are used simultaneously, in an expansive rather than repetitive way, to better tell a single, complex story. The audience is given multiple entry points to the story, and the story is exposed to diverse and dispersed audiences, ultimately engaging a broader public. We will examine the effectiveness of a transmedia approach to communicating scientific and other complex concepts to a broad and diverse audience. Using the recently developed Educational Visitor Center at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center as a case study, we will evaluate the reach of various means of presenting information about the geosciences, climate change and computational science. These will include an assessment of video, mechanical and digital interactive elements, animated movie segments, web-based content, photography, scientific visualizations, printed material and docent-led activities.

  5. Story Telling: Research and Action to Improve 6th Grade Students' Views about Certain Aspects of Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Feray; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    This study is a four-week section of ongoing attempts that aim to improve 6th grade students' understandings of the nature of science. The study was carried out in a sixth grade science and technology class at a rural middle school with 15 students on the basis of action research methodology. During the study, four different stories based on the…

  6. Challenging multicultural science education: Stories of urban elementary teachers implementing science standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Katherine Ann

    "Science for all" is at the center of today's science education reform movement. Unfortunately, the movement neither gives adequate advice nor provides strategies for teachers to make science for all a reality. This study details the struggles and successes of urban elementary teachers as they strive to make science for all a reality in their classrooms. Through ethnographic methods, this study documents the science educational practices of six elementary teachers as they negotiate between the California Science Education Standards, their students' knowledge and needs, and their own science knowledge. The teachers' multiple and evolving identities are used as lenses to better understand the teachers' science education practices in the context of urban classrooms. The teachers' practices are placed in a multicultural science education/social justice matrix. Patterns of science content, the reasons why these teachers teach science and how they teach science are discussed. The teachers used the science standards in a variety of different ways depending of who they were and where they taught. Practical implications for this research include the redesigning of science methods courses for teacher preparation to include multicultural issues and discussions of the theoretical debates about multicultural science education.

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Lipogems, a Reverse Story: from Clinical Practice to Basic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremolada, Carlo; Ricordi, Camillo; Caplan, Arnold I; Ventura, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The idea that basic science should be the starting point for modern clinical approaches has been consolidated over the years, and emerged as the cornerstone of Molecular Medicine. Nevertheless, there is increasing concern over the low efficiency and inherent costs related to the translation of achievements from the bench to the bedside. These burdens are also perceived with respect to the effectiveness of translating basic discoveries in stem cell biology to the newly developing field of advanced cell therapy or Regenerative Medicine. As an alternative paradigm, past and recent history in Medical Science provides remarkable reverse stories in which clinical observations at the patient's bedside have fed major advances in basic research which, in turn, led to consistent progression in clinical practice. Within this context, we discuss our recently developed method and device, which forms the core of a system (Lipogems) for processing of human adipose tissue solely with the aid of mild mechanical forces to yield a microfractured tissue product.

  8. Intersection of opposing pedagogical frameworks: Native Hawaiian ancestral stories and scientific inquiry in a high school science class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanahele-Mossman, Huihui

    Inquiry is defined as "an examination into facts and principles." In science education science inquiry is a process through which important discoveries are made by students through scientific methodology. The most important step in this process is forming the right question. The questions formed by students are usually the wrong questions which deem the remainder of the inquiry process impotent. This research will look at the pedagogy of ancestral stories for a solution. For the researcher, ancestral stories were a source of wonderment and learning not only from the lessons the stories revealed but mainly from the questions that still remained after the stories were told. Questions such as "why does the eel only swim near that part?", or "why does the story only talk about the uhu?" are examples of questions that remained after experiencing an ancestral narrative. The research questions were composed for the purpose of finding compatibility between the two pedagogies. The first research question which reads "how can Native Hawaiian ancestral stories encourage an increased level of student driven interactions at all levels of feedback from Native Hawaiian students in science classroom" focuses the research on the level of student feedback that initiate questions. Question two which reads "how can teachers of Native Hawaiian students facilitate the construction of science inquiry projects from ancestral stories" addresses the skill of the teacher and imbeds the concept of pedagogical knowledge into the literature. The last research question "how do analysis and discussion of the stories connect Native Hawaiian students to their ancestral intelligence" examines the role of identity and identity to ancestral intelligence. The method intended for this research was Grounded theory which allows the researcher to develop principles, concepts and theories based on the data presented. Another method utilized in this research is an undocumented but culturally imbedded method

  9. Professional development and poststructural analysis: Stories of African-American science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Felicia Michelle

    2003-10-01

    This interpretivist study focused on the professional development of three African American science teachers from a small rural school district, Carver School District (pseudonym), in the southeastern United States. Stories teachers shared of their experiences in teaching and learning science and in their professional development were analyzed using a feminist poststructural analysis of power, knowledge/meaning, language, and difference. For science teaching, power was viewed as a form of ownership or possession and also as effect and processes that impact teaching, learning, and professional development. Teachers through instructional practices exerted a certain amount of power in their classrooms. Teaching practices heavily influenced student learning in science classrooms. For teacher professional development, power was viewed as effecting relationships between administration, peers, and students as a shifting force within different social contexts. Science teachers were perceived as objects of the system and as active social agents who in particular relations of power acted in their best interests as they developed as science teachers. Teachers negotiated for themselves certain power relations to do as they wished for teaching science and for participating in teacher professional development activities. Power was an inherent and critically important aspect in understanding what science teachers do in their classrooms, in teaching and learning science, and in developing as science teachers. Knowledge was closely tied to relations of power in that teachers acquired knowledge about themselves, their teaching of science, and their students from their past experiences and professional development activities. Through language, interactions between teachers and students enabled or disabled access to the culture of power via instructional practices. Language was implicated in teacher professional development as a powerful force for advancing or hindering teachers

  10. Stories of Success: Understanding Academic Achievement of Hispanic Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Amanda

    A review of the literature shows that there is much evidence to suggest the challenges facing Hispanic students in American public schools. Hispanic enrollment in K--12 public schools has increased from 6 to 19% in the last thirty years, yet schools have not made adequate adjustments to accommodate this changing population. Issues such as remedial tracking and cultural differences have led to low high school graduate rates for Hispanic students and inequities in schooling experiences (Gay, 2000). Particularly in the area of science, Hispanic students struggle with academic success (Cole & Espinoza, 2008). Despite these obstacles, some Hispanic students are academically successful (Rochin & Mello, 2007; Merisotis & Kee, 2006). This dissertation tells the stories of these Hispanic students who have been successful in science in secondary public schools. This study followed a grounded theory methodology and utilized individual interviews to collect data about Hispanics who have demonstrated achievement in the area of science. Through the analysis of these interviews, factors were identified which may have contributed to the success of these Hispanics in the field of science. Implications for future practice in public schools are also discussed.

  11. Polar Voices: Relaying the Science and Story of Polar Climate Change through Podcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, M.; Quinney, A.; Murray, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    The resurgence of audio programming with the advent of podcasting in the early 2000's spawned a new medium for communicating advances in science, research, and technology. To capitalize on this informal educational outlet, the Arctic Institute of North America (AINA) partnered with the International Arctic Research Center, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the UA Museum of the North to develop a podcast series called PoLAR Voices for the Polar Learning and Responding (PoLAR) Climate Change Education Partnership. Now entering its third season of production, PoLAR Voices has facilitated the communication of scientific knowledge regarding the impact of climate change on the Arctic and Antarctic from the perspectives of both scientific researchers and Arctic indigenous peoples. We present a holistic program detailing both data and research related to climate change in addition to personal stories from those people and communities most affected. An evaluation of the program has been conducted by the Goodman Research Group to assess the effectiveness of the program for relaying the whole story of climate change to the public. The results of this assessment will be used to further develop the program to effectively reach larger and more diverse audiences. The series is currently available on thepolarhub.org and iTunes, and we are exploring opportunities to air the program on radio to reach as many people as possible.

  12. Scientific Story Telling & Social Media The role of social media in effectively communicating science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkhuis, D.; Peart, L.

    2012-12-01

    Scientific discourse generally takes place in appropriate journals, using the language and conventions of science. That's fine, as long as the discourse remains in scientific circles. It is only outside those circles that the rules and techniques of engaging social media tools gain importance. A young generation of scientists are eager to share their experiences by using social media, but is this effective? And how can we better integrate all outreach & media channels to engage general audiences? How can Facebook, Twitter, Skype and YouTube be used as synergy tools in scientific story telling? Case: during IODP Expedtion 342 (June-July 2012) onboard the scientific drillship JOIDES Resolution an onboard educator and videographer worked non-stop fort two months on an integrated outreach plan that tried and tested the limits of all social media tools available to interact with an international public while at sea. The results are spectacular!

  13. Context-based science education by newspaper story problems: A study on motivation and learning effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Kuhn

    2014-01-01

    In a quasi-experimental comparison of 6 physics classes of secondary level 1 (N=122; grade 10, topic: energy learning with newspaper based problems vs. conventional textbook problems (same content, lesson plan and teacher showed considerable positive effects. This holds for general motivation, including several subscales (p<0.01, ω2=0.52 as well as for achievement, including transfer (p<0.01, ω2=0.20. Moreover, these results show robustness towards to various individual and classroom features (e.g. gender, non-verbal intelligence and school type, and at least mid-term temporal stability. Newspaper story problems thus appear as a useful element of context-based science teaching.

  14. Responding to stories: The 1876 Loan Collection of Scientific Apparatus and the Science Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Robert Bud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that it is useful to see historical exhibitions as both responses and contributors to narratives about science that are circulating in the public sphere. It uses the example of the 1876 Loan Collection of Scientific Apparatus (which was the immediate predecessor of the Science Museum in London. The article demonstrates how, in promoting this huge exhibition and fighting for the necessary support and resources, leading scientific, cultural and political figures engaged with two rather different public interpretations of science’s past, present and future. One dealt with science as a vigorous part of culture with a fascinating and under-appreciated past and a dynamic future coming, internationally, to the fore. The other concerned the threat to Britain’s international economic ascendancy by countries with equal ingenuity and better education that could lead Britain into a decline reminiscent of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire. According to this second narrative, science would be the vaccine that would prevent this disease afflicting Britain. In the aftermath of the exhibition, the narratives were drawn upon again to form and sustain a permanent display that was known from 1885 as the Science Museum. While the memory of the Loan Collection itself was obscured in the 1920s during the Museum’s early life as a separate administrative body fighting for resources, the author suggests that continuity can be shown in the narrative arguments used by the creators of the two projects. A greater significance should therefore be given to this exhibition in the story of the development of the Science Museum.

  15. Connecting People to Place: Stories, Science, Deep Maps, and Geo-Quests for Place-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagley, C. A.; Silbernagel, J.; Host, G.; Hart, D. A.; Axler, R.; Fortner, R. W.; Axler, M.; Smith, V.; Drewes, A.; Bartsch, W.; Danz, N.; Mathews, J.; Wagler, M.

    2016-02-01

    The St. Louis River Estuary project (stlouisriverestuary.org) is about connecting the stories with the science of this special place to enhance spatial awareness and stewardship of the estuary. The stories, or spatial narratives, are told through vignettes of local resource activities, framed by perspectives of local people. The spatial narratives, developed through interviews and research, target six key activities of the estuary. The science is based on stressor gradients research, incorporating factors such as population and road density, pollutant point source density, and land use. The stressor gradient developed based on these factors was used as a basis for sampling water quality and plant and macroinvertebrate communities, with the intent of quantifying relationships between land-based stressors and aquatic ecosystem indicators of condition. The stories and science are interwoven, located in place on a Deep Map, and played out in GeoQuests to illustrate the complexity and multiple perspectives within the estuary's social, economic and ecological systems. Students, decision-makers, and Lake Superior enthusiasts can engage more deeply in the complexity of the stories and science by challenging themselves with these GeoQuests played on mobile devices. We hope these place-based learning tools will be valuable in advancing spatial literacy and conversation around environmental sustainability in coastal communities.

  16. Effectively Transforming IMC Flight into VMC Flight: An SVS Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Hughes, Monic F.; Parrish, Russell V.; Takallu, Mohammad A.

    2006-01-01

    A flight-test experiment was conducted using the NASA LaRC Cessna 206 aircraft. Four primary flight and navigation display concepts, including baseline and Synthetic Vision System (SVS) concepts, were evaluated in the local area of Roanoke Virginia Airport, flying visual and instrument approach procedures. A total of 19 pilots, from 3 pilot groups reflecting the diverse piloting skills of the GA population, served as evaluation pilots. Multi-variable Discriminant Analysis was applied to three carefully selected and markedly different operating conditions with conventional instrumentation to provide an extension of traditional analysis methods as well as provide an assessment of the effectiveness of SVS displays to effectively transform IMC flight into VMC flight.

  17. Female and male Hispanic students majoring in science or engineering: Their stories describing their educational journeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Susan Wightman

    National statistics clearly demonstrate an underrepresentation of minorities in the fields of science and engineering. Blacks, Hispanics, American Indians, and Asians do not typically choose science or engineering as their college major; therefore, there is a very small representation of these minorities in the science and engineering labor force. The decision not to major in science and engineering may begin as soon as the child can begin to recognize role models in the media. News stories, magazine articles, television programs, teachers, parents, administrators, and other agencies have painted the picture of a scientist or engineer as being dominantly a White male. Schools have continued society's portrayal by using curriculum, textbooks, role models, instructional strategies, and counseling that continues to encourage the White male to succeed in science and engineering, but discourages the minority students, male and female, from succeeding in these fields. In this qualitative study, 22 Hispanic students, 12 female and 10 male, who are majoring in science or engineering, were interviewed using Seidman's in-depth interviewing technique. These students were shadowed in their college science or engineering classes; their high school and college transcripts were analyzed; and, a focus group was brought together at the end of the interviewing process in order to allow interaction between the participants. The goal was to explore the educational journeys of the 22 Hispanic students. What made a difference in the journeys of these 22 students so that they could succeed in majors that have historically discouraged minority students? Seven themes emerged: family support, honors program, challenging and interactive curriculum, college preparation in high school courses, caring and kind teachers, small class size, and small communities. Gender comparison of the educational journeys documents these differences between the females and males: college preparation, mentoring

  18. Stories from the field: Teaching science in low-performing, rural schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conetta, Patrick John

    If teachers matter to the academic success of students, then having experienced teachers shows significant promise in eliminating persistent achievement gaps. However, high rates of teacher attrition are persistent in schools serving low-income and minority students serving to reinforce these persistent gaps. The purpose of this study is to allow the voices of science teachers working in low-performing, rural schools to be heard and expand our current understanding of teacher retention beyond "yes" or "no" decisions. The narratives teachers share demonstrate that persistence is constructed daily through frustrations and hard-won victories that are significant to one's career decisions. With an ear for the structures that guide teacher's practice and create professional tension, teacher narratives also represent hope for the subtle and splendid ways they challenge these tensions to carve out their existence as educators. Their stories are inspirational to future teachers and teacher educators because they provide insights to the ways teachers learn to persist. My research was guided by three general interests: What experiences bring individuals to teach science in hard to staff schools, what conditions did teachers find when they arrived, and how do science teachers respond to the circumstances in which they find themselves teaching. Steered by Holland, Lachicotte, Skinner, and Cain's (1998) theoretical framework of Figured Worlds, and inspired by previous work utilizing this framework, I gathered data through extended interviews with nine participants and examined their stories through qualitative narrative analysis to illustrate the delicate interplay between structure and agency and how this interplay is intertwined with teachers' willingness to persist. This study revealed that individual willingness to persist was interwoven with their ability to author themselves within and/or against existing cultural models of the "good teacher" and its implications lead to

  19. Myths, science and stories: working with peer educators to counter HIV/AIDS myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, David

    2011-01-01

    The failure to bring about widespread or effective behavioural change in response to South Africa's HIV epidemic requires that new forms of health communication be explored. This article reports on an action research project in which a group of workplace HIV/AIDS peer educators at a South African mining company recorded HIV/AIDS myths that they encountered, around which they then developed stories as an alternative response to repeating factual, scientific messages, which seem to have little effect on target populations. A total of 16 stories were developed during the project. Some of the peer educators appeared to be much better at using stories within their activities than others. In part, this was a reflection of the enthusiasm and abilities of individual peer educators. It was also observed that the stories were used to respond to situations that were sometimes quite different from the original stimulus for the story. The complex range of skills that allows an individual to introduce and effectively use a story in day-to-day conversation should not be underestimated. The article suggests that rather than repeating the project's focus on developing stories tailored to specific HIV/AIDS myths, a more effective approach could be to develop stories that support core messages for facilitating HIV prevention, testing and treatment.

  20. The role of a science story, activities, and dialogue modeled on Philosophy for Children in teaching basic science process skills to fifth graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Louise Brandes Moura

    This study was an application of Philosophy for Children pedagogy to science education. It was designed to answer the question, What roles do a science story (Harry Discovers Science), multi-sensorial activities designed to accompany the story, and classroom dialogue associated with the story---all modeled on the Philosophy for Children curriculum---play in the learning processes of a class of fifth graders with regard to the basic science process skills of classification, observation, and inference? To answer the question, I collected qualitative data as I carried out a participatory study in which I taught science to fifth graders at an international, bilingual private religious school in Brasilia, Brazil for a period of one semester. Twenty-one (n = 21) children participated in the study, 10 females and 11 males, who came from a predominantly middle and upper class social background. Data were collected through student interviews, student class reflection sheets, written learning assessments, audiotapes of all class sessions, including whole-class and small-class group discussions, and a videotape of one class session. Some of the key findings were that the story, activities and dialogue facilitated the children's learning in a number of ways. The story modeled the performance of classification, observation and inference skills for the children as well as reflection on the meaning of inference. The majority of the students identified with the fictional characters, particularly regarding traits such as cleverness and inquisitiveness, and with the learning context of the story. The multi-sensorial activities helped children learn observation and inference skills as well as dialogue. Dialogue also helped children self-correct and build upon each other's ideas. Some students developed theories about how ideal dialogue should work. In spite of the inherent limitations of qualitative and teacher research studies, as well as the limitations of this particular study

  1. Lanthanide amidinates and guanidinates in catalysis and materials science: a continuing success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Frank T

    2012-12-07

    Today the rare-earth elements play a critical role in numerous high-tech applications. This is why various areas of rare-earth chemistry are currently thriving. In organolanthanide chemistry the search for new ligand sets which are able to satisfy the coordination requirements of the large lanthanide cations continues to be a hot topic. Among the most successful approaches in this field is the use of amidinate and guanidinate ligands of the general types [RC(NR')(2)](-) (R = H, alkyl, aryl; R' = alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, SiMe(3)) and [R(2)NC(NR')(2)](-) (R = alkyl, SiMe(3); R' = alkyl, cycloalkyl, aryl, SiMe(3)), which can both be regarded as steric cyclopentadienyl equivalents. Mono-, di- and trisubstituted lanthanide amidinate and guanidinate complexes are all readily available. Various rare earth amidinates and guanidinates have turned out to be very efficient homogeneous catalysts e.g. for the polymerization of olefins and dienes, the ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters or the guanylation of amines. Moreover, certain alkyl-substituted lanthanide tris(amidinates) and tris(guanidinates) were found to be highly volatile and are thus promising precursors for ALD (= atomic layer deposition) and MOCVD (= metal-organic chemical vapor deposition) processes in materials science, e.g. for the production of lanthanide nitride thin layers. This tutorial review covers the continuing success story of lanthanide amidinates and guanidinates which have undergone an astonishing transition from mere laboratory curiosities to efficient homogeneous catalysts as well as ALD and MOCVD precursors within the past 10 years.

  2. Videos Designed to Watch but Audience Required Telling stories is a cliché for best practice in videos. Frontier Scientists, a NSF project titled Science in Alaska: using Multimedia to Support Science Education stressed story but faced audience limitations. FS describes project's story process, reach results, and hypothesizes better scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Telling stories is a cliché for best practice in science videos. It's upheld as a method to capture audience attention in many fields. Findings from neurobiology research show character-driven stories cause the release of the neurochemical oxytocin in the brain. Oxytocin motivates cooperation with others and enhances a sense of empathy, in particular the ability to experience others' emotions. Developing character tension- as in our video design showcasing scientists along with their work- holds the viewers' attention, promotes recall of story, and has the potential to clearly broadcast the feelings and behaviors of the scientists. The brain chemical change should help answer the questions: Why should a viewer care about this science? How does it improve the world, or our lives? Is just a story-driven video the solution to science outreach? Answer: Not in our multi-media world. Frontier Scientists (FS) discovered in its three year National Science Foundation project titled 'Science in Alaska: using Multimedia to Support Science Education': the storied video is only part of the effort. Although FS created from scratch and drove a multimedia national campaign throughout the project, major reach was not achieved. Despite FS' dedicated web site, YouTube channel, weekly blog, monthly press release, Facebook and G+ pages, Twitter activity, contact with scientists' institutions, and TV broadcast, monthly activity on the web site seemed to plateau at about 3000 visitors to the FS website per month. Several factors hampered the effort: Inadequate funding for social media limited the ability of FS to get the word to untapped markets: those whose interest might be sparked by ad campaigns but who do not actively explore unfamiliar agencies' science education content. However, when institutions took advantage of promoting their scientists through the FS videos we saw an uptick in video views and the participating scientists were often contacted for additional stories or were

  3. CineGlobe Film Festival, Wednesday programme with Science Story Telling Hackathon and Oculus Rift

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni De Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Besides the short-film competitions, the second day of 2015 CineGlobe included a Soirée Oculus Rift with the public launch of the “Storytelling Science” Hackathon. CineGlobe and Festival Tous Ecrans joined forces to launch the “Storytelling Science” hackathon, in collaboration with Tribeca Film Institute and LIFT Conference. The keynote speech was given by renowned filmmaker and transmedia creator Michel Reihlac, who spoke about the role of interactive and immersive storytelling techniques in cinematic narrative. By placing the viewer in the center of the story, these new technologies are profoundly changing the way we tell stories. Michel Reilhac designs innovative story based experiences, using digital platforms (cinema, tv, mobile, tablets, …) and real life events. His creative approach to storytelling ambitions to offer viewers/ participants a unique opportunity for an immersive, participatory and interactive experience. During the evening, Oculus Rift virtual reality headsets were available to...

  4. Three stories about the conduct of science: Past, future, and present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neylon Cameron

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this piece I would like to tell a few stories; three stories to be precise. Firstly I want to explain where I am, where I've come from and what has led me to the views that I hold today. I find myself at an interesting point in my life and career at the same point as the research community is undergoing massive change. The second story is one of what the world might look like at some point in the future. What might we achieve? What might it look like? And what will be possible? Finally I want to ask the question of how we get there from here. What is the unifying idea or movement that actually has the potential to carry us forward in a positive way? At the end of this I'm going to ask you, the reader, to commit to something as part of the process of making that happen.

  5. Three stories about the conduct of science: Past, future, and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neylon, Cameron

    2011-10-14

    In this piece I would like to tell a few stories; three stories to be precise. Firstly I want to explain where I am, where I've come from and what has led me to the views that I hold today. I find myself at an interesting point in my life and career at the same point as the research community is undergoing massive change. The second story is one of what the world might look like at some point in the future. What might we achieve? What might it look like? And what will be possible? Finally I want to ask the question of how we get there from here. What is the unifying idea or movement that actually has the potential to carry us forward in a positive way? At the end of this I'm going to ask you, the reader, to commit to something as part of the process of making that happen.

  6. Development of Case Stories by Interviewing Students about their Critical Moments in Science, Math, and Engineering Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Esselstein

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dartmouth’s Critical Moments project is designed to promote discussions among faculty and graduate students about the retention of students, particularly women and minorities, in science, math, and engineering (SME disciplines. The first phase of the ongoing project has been the development of four case stories, which are fictionalized composites drawn from surveys and interviews of real Dartmouth students. The surveyed population was 125 students in general chemistry. Of the 77 who agreed to be interviewed, 61 reported having experienced a critical moment – i.e., a positive or negative event or time that had a significant impact on the student’s academic life. Leading critical moments were a poor grade on an exam; challenge from group work; excitement from an internship; and falling in love with a non-SME discipline from other coursework. Interviews of 13 students who had negative critical moments led to the development of case stories for: Antoinetta ’09, who had a disappointing group experience; Dalila ’08, who was poorly prepared; Greg ’09, who got in over his head in his first year; and Michelle ’08, who was shocked by her result in the first exam. The case stories are being discussed by graduate students, TA and faculty in various workshops at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning.

  7. Initial development of a metric to describe the level of safety associated with piloting an aircraft with synthetic vision systems (SVS) displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolone, Anthony P.; Glaab, Louis J.; Hughes, Monica F.; Parrish, Russell V.

    2005-05-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) displays provide pilots with a continuous view of terrain combined with integrated guidance symbology in an effort to increase situation awareness (SA) and decrease workload during operations in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). It is hypothesized that SVS displays can replicate the safety and operational flexibility of flight in Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), regardless of actual out-the-window (OTW) visibility or time of day. Throughout the course of recent SVS research, significant progress has been made towards evolving SVS displays as well as demonstrating their ability to increase SA compared to conventional avionics in a variety of conditions. While a substantial amount of data has been accumulated demonstrating the capabilities of SVS displays, the ability of SVS to replicate the safety and operational flexibility of VMC flight performance in all visibility conditions is unknown to any specific degree. The previous piloted simulations and flight tests have shown better SA and path precision is achievable with SVS displays without causing an increase in workload, however none of the previous SVS research attempted to fully capture the significance of SVS displays in terms of their contribution to safety or operational benefits. In order to more fully quantify the relationship of flight operations in IMC with SVS displays to conventional operations conducted in VMC, a fundamental comparison to current day general aviation (GA) flight instruments was warranted. Such a comparison could begin to establish the extent to which SVS display concepts are capable of maintaining an "equivalent level of safety" with the round dials they could one day replace, for both current and future operations. Such a comparison was the focus of the SVS-ES experiment conducted under the Aviation Safety and Security Program's (AvSSP) GA Element of the SVS Project at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. A combination of

  8. Intersections of life histories and science identities : the stories of three preservice elementary teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avraamidou, Lucy

    Grounded within Connelly and Clandinin's conceptualization of teachers' professional identity in terms of stories to live by' and through a life-history lens, this multiple case study aimed to respond to the following questions: (a) How do three preservice elementary teachers view themselves as

  9. Earth Expeditions: Telling the stories of eight NASA field campaigns by focusing on the human side of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Earth Right Now communication team kicked off an ambitious multimedia campaign in March 2016 to tell the stories of eight major field campaigns studying regions of critical change from the land, sea and air. Earth Expeditions focused on the human side of science, with live reporting from the field, behind-the-scenes images and videos, and extended storytelling over a six-month period. We reported from Greenland to Namibia, from the eastern United States to the South Pacific. Expedition scientists explored ice sheets, air quality, coral reefs, boreal forests, marine ecosystems and greenhouse gases. All the while the campaign communications team was generating everything from blog posts and social media shareables, to Facebook Live events and a NASA TV series. We also participated in community outreach events and pursued traditional media opportunities. A massive undertaking, we will share lessons learned, best practices for social media and some of our favorite moments when science communication touched our audience's lives.

  10. Introducing Taiwanese Undergraduate Students to the Nature of Science through Nobel Prize Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshach, Haim; Hwang, Fu-Kwun; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Hsu, Ying-Shao

    2013-01-01

    Although there is a broad agreement among scientists and science educators that students should not only learn science, but also acquire some sense of its nature, it has been reported that undergraduate students possess an inadequate grasp of the nature of science (NOS). The study presented here examined the potential and effectiveness of Nobel…

  11. Using a Science Centre as a School Lab ? a Case Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Helene

    2004-01-01

    responsibility for their own learning committed themselves to learn the scientific language. The study shows that in school science there has to be scaffolding around a project to insure that all students gain experience with science as a learning process in an environment with self-motivated, self...... tenth graders were trained to become museum ?explainers? as part of their science education. The objectives were to investigate if it was possible to obtain a quality out-of?school experience using the Experimentarium as a science lab. The intention of the study was to look at science learning......, the level of science explanations and the science concepts learned. The research design was a combination of observations, discussions with students, semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. In the interviews the students said that they had learned to stand up in front of the public, but only when...

  12. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick ... Clinical Research Trials and You The Basics Finding a Clinical Trial List of Registries Personal Stories For ...

  13. Producing a Radio Show about Psychological Science: The Story of "Psychological Frontiers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Emily; Sachau, Daniel; Albertson, Dawn N.

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a campus-based radio show about psychological science. The authors' goals in creating the show were to inform the public about the science of psychology and to create a teaching and learning resource for faculty members and students. The show, "Psychological Frontiers," airs twice a week and consists of…

  14. Making Time for Spacetime: The Story of a National Science Cafe Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Kendra; Chakrabarti, Anish

    2012-03-01

    Science Cafes are live and lively events that take place in casual settings such as coffeehouses or bars, are open to everyone, and feature an engaging conversation with a scientist about a compelling scientific topic. The Science Cafe movement in the United States is a grassroots effort to really engage the public in discussions about science and its relevance to society, inspired by the United Kingdom Cafe Scientifique organization. With support from NOVA and the related website sciencecafes.org, a number of Society of Physics Students chapters hosted local Cosmic Cafes (cosmic themed science cafes) in late 2011 and early 2012. This presentation will discuss the goals and models of the Science Cafe movement, the Cosmic Cafe effort, lessons learned, and how you can get involved.

  15. To iron or to do science: A storied life of a Latina from scientist to science teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Sarida P.

    Reform initiatives such as Science for All Americans (AAA, 1989) and National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996) argue for making science accessible to all children regardless of age, sex, cultural and/or ethic background, and disabilities. One of the most popular and prevailing phrases highlighting science education reform in the last decade has been science for all. In terms of making science accessible to all, science educators argue that one role of science teachers ought to be to embrace students' experiences outside of the science classroom by becoming aware and inclusive of the cultural resources that student's households contain. Moll, Gonzalez and Amanti (1992) termed these cultural resources as funds of knowledge which refer to culturally developed bodies of knowledge and skills essential for household well being. This study examined the career transition of a former Latina scientist from a research scientist to a high school science teacher. Her lived experiences that influenced her career transition were examined using interpretive biography through a feminist theory lens. The following question guided the study: How have the lived experiences of the participant as engaged through cultural, historical, and social interactions influenced a transition in career from a research scientist to a classroom teacher? A former Latina scientist and her family participated in this study to facilitate the documentation, narration, and interpretation of her career transition. The researcher immersed herself in the field for five months and data collection included in-depth interviews with the participant and her family. In addition, the researcher kept a reflexive journal. Data were analyzed using socio-cultural thematic approach to identify snapshots and to develop emergent themes. Data analysis revealed that the participant's cultural socialization conflicted with the Eurocentric/Androcentric culture of science found in both the university and research

  16. Negotiating a space to teach science: Stories of community conversation and personal process in a school reform effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Heidi Bulmahn

    This is a qualitative study about elementary teachers in a school district who are involved in a science curricular reform effort. The teachers attempted to move from textbook-based science teaching to a more inquiry and process-based approach. I specifically explore how teachers negotiate their place within changes in pedagogy and curriculum and how this negotiation is enacted in the space of a teacher's own classroom. The account developed here is based on a two-year study. Presented are descriptions, analysis, and my own interpretations of teaching and conversations as teachers spoke with one another, with me and with children as they tried out the new science curriculum and pedagogies. I conclude that people interested in school reform should consider the following ideas as they work with teachers to implement pedagogical and curricular changes. (1) Teaching is a personal/individual process that takes place within a larger community. This leads to a complex context for working and making decisions. (2) Despite feeling that changes were imposed, teachers make the curriculum work for the needs in their own classroom. (3) Change is a process that teachers view as part of their work. Teachers expect that they will adapt curriculum and make it work for the children in their classes and for themselves. I suggest that those who advocate various reform efforts in teaching and curriculum should consider the spaces that teachers create as they become a part of the change process including intellectual, physical, and emotional ones. In my stories I assert: teachers create their own spaces for making changes in pedagogy and curriculum and they do this as a complex negotiation of external demands (such as their community, relationships with colleagues, and state standards) and their own values and interpretations. The ways that teachers implement the change process is a personal one, and because it is a personal process, school reform efforts largely depend on the teachers

  17. Emerging Marriage: One Story of Learning Sciences and Instructional Systems as a Possible Revisioned Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr-Chellman, Alison A.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the potentials for symbiotic partnering between traditional Instructional Systems and Learning Sciences disciplines. This confluence is explored through a narrative discussion of the changes happening at Penn State University over the past decade leading that program toward a name change, curricular revisions, new hiring…

  18. Counter-storying the grand narrative of science (teacher) education: towards culturally responsive teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peter Charles

    2011-12-01

    John Settlage's article— Counterstories from White Mainstream Preservice Teachers: Resisting the Master Narrative of Deficit by Default—outlines his endeavour to enable pre-service teachers to develop culturally responsive science teaching identities for resisting the master narrative of deficit thinking when confronted by the culturally different `other.' Case study results are presented of the role of counterstories in enabling five pre-service teachers to overcome deficit thinking. In this forum, Philip Moore, a cultural anthropologist and university professor, deepens our understanding of the power and significance of counterstories as an educational tool for enabling students to deconstruct oppressive master narratives. Jill Slay, dean of a science faculty, examines her own master narrative about the compatibility of culturally similar academics and graduate students, and finds it lacking. But first, I introduce this scholarship with background notes on the critical paradigm and its adversary, the grand narrative of science education, following which I give an appreciative understanding of John's pedagogical use of counterstories as a transformative strategy for multi-worldview science teacher education.

  19. Futuristic stories older than might appear: origin of ideas of science fiction screenplays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Machado

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the origin of the ideas of most movie scripts modern science fiction, and literaty concepts such as soft and hard, also present in the film. Pointed out the origin of these scripts mostly in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, they considered fertile periods in foreign science fiction literature. Also discusses about the casual predictions of the authors of this genre that end up bringing their ideas to contemporary unreasonably, but exciting, leading the media to call them visionary means. Some authors like Carrière, Xavier, Bez, Koff and Comparato assist in corroborating these ideas. Thus, the reader is led to reflect on the historical origin of these ideas.

  20. Stories from dynamic Earth: developing your sense of place through Landsat-based citizen science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P.; Kennedy, R. E.; Nolin, A. W.; Hughes, J.; Bianchetti, R. A.; O'Connell, K.; Morrell, P.

    2016-12-01

    Many citizen science activities provide opportunities to understand a specific location on Earth at human scale and to collect local ecological knowledge that can improve the scientific endeavor of monitoring Earth. However, it can be challenging to comprehend ecological changes occurring at larger spatial and temporal scales. Based on the results of two professional development workshops designed for Oregon middle school science teachers in 2011-2013 and 2013-2016, we describe how working with multi-decade Landsat imagery transformed participants and students. Collaborating with scientists, the teachers used 30 years of time-series Landsat imagery with LandTrendr and IceTrendr algorithms to distill several study sites in Oregon, Washington, and Alaska (U.S) into periods of consistent long or short-duration landscape dynamics (e.g. stable areas, forestry activities, flooding, urbanization, tree growth). Using the spatial, tabular, and graphic outputs from this process, the teachers created climate change curriculum aligned to state and national standards. Web-enabled visualization tools, such as Google Earth, provided a platform that engaged students in understanding the drivers of their local landscape changes. Students and teachers reported increased interest in and understanding of their landscape. In addition to fulfilling classroom needs, the activities contributed data used in regional carbon modeling and land cover monitoring throughout California, Oregon, and Washington (U.S). We will discuss strategies and challenges to translating expert-level scientific data, models, methods, vocabulary, and conclusions into citizen science materials that support place-based climate change education across age ranges and educational disciplines. Finally, we share ways you can deepen your own sense of place while participating in citizen science activities that improve land cover and land use monitoring at local, regional, and global scales.

  1. Planeta Vivo Radio: a 365 chapter story between science and radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, David; Villalba, Eustaquio; Rodríguez, Fátima; Álvarez, Domingo; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    PLANETA VIVO RADIO (http://www.planetavivoradio.es/) is a joint effort of the Spanish National Public Radio in the Canary Islands (RNE-Canarias) and Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN) to broadcast scientific and technological advances related to Earth Sciences and the Earth Planet. This initiative was born in a very special year, 2008, the International Year of the Planet Earth, and is actually co-financed by the Parque Científico y Tecnológico de Tenerife (PCTT) and co-financed by the PROCIVMAC project. This 50 minutes weekly radio program broadcast scientists' interviews and scientific/technological reports related to the state of the art of several topics of scientific and social interest in addition to a weekly report of natural hazards that have occurred in the Earth Planet during the last week turning "PLANETAVIVORADIO" as a milestone of the Earth Sciences for the society. Since that moment, Planeta Vivo Radio has been broadcasted through 365 weeks in a continuous way. Several modifications have been added to the program, being divided today into eight different parts, a mix with interviews, reports, ephemerals, bios, agenda and the review to the most prominent natural hazards occurring through the last seven days. Since October 2015, Planeta Vivo Radio is the longest science radio program ever broadcasted in the Canary Islands.

  2. Bring an axe and your wildest dreams: Post-apocalyptic desires, science distrust, and the de(con)struction of a zombie story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Samantha Jo

    Observing the current popularity of the zombie narrative in American culture, this thesis explores the questions "why zombie?" and "why now?" through a combination of research and the creation of an original zombie story. Moving beyond existing criticism which argues that the zombie transforms to fit each generation's specific fears, I argue that zombie movies, novels, and video games from George A. Romero-onwards continually speak to a distrust of science and scientific progress while additionally romanticizing the post-apocalyptic landscape. Consequently, the zombie's unprecedented mainstream popularity over the last fifteen years could be read as symptomatic of this distrust intensifying, paralleling an increasing politicization of science and a rise in apocalyptic thinking within the public sphere. Through the deconstruction of my own zombie story, I uncover not only what these timely narratives tell us about our perceptions of the future, but also how they can help us change them.

  3. When do Stories Work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelman, Andrew; Basbøll, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Storytelling has long been recognized as central to human cognition and communication. Here we explore a more active role of stories in social science research, not merely to illustrate concepts but also to develop new ideas and evaluate hypotheses, for example, in deciding that a research method...... is effective. We see stories as central to engagement with the development and evaluation of theories, and we argue that for a story to be useful in this way, it should be anomalous (representing aspects of life that are not well explained by existing models) and immutable (with details that are well...

  4. Nobel prize winner returns home to tell a fascinating 'Big Science' story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angiolillo, C.; Dranga, R. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    This paper is about the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. SNO achieved a major breakthrough on the study of the behavior of an elementary and enigmatic particle of the universe - the neutrino. The experiment was the result of the synthesis of over 30-years of work on particle physics, astrophysics and nuclear science that saw early germination at Chalk River Laboratories. Preliminary SNO results led to a major leap forward on how to measure sub-atomic phenomena that were never used to this extent before and have also provided new insights into the Standard Model of physics, and indeed in our fundamental understanding of the entire universe.

  5. Student Reported Growth: Success Story of a Master of Science in Education Learning Community Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Kabes, EdD

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative and qualitative data collected from students who have completed a Master of Science in Education Learning Community Program support the effectiveness of the learning community model in facilitating professional growth and transformation. Instructors model constructivist theory. Peer review, collaboration, and reflective analysis of theory and practice are essential components of the model. The program facilitates growth as educators build their understanding about teaching and learning, transfer their ideas and processes into the classroom, and take an active leadership role in promoting change in classrooms, school, and larger community.

  6. The story of light science from early theories to today's extraordinary applications

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderwerf, Dennis F

    2017-01-01

    This book traces the evolution of our understanding and utilization of light from classical antiquity and the early thoughts of Pythagoras to the present time.   From the earliest recorded theories and experiments to the latest applications in photonic communication and computation, the ways in which light has been put to use are numerous and astounding.  Indeed, some of the latest advances in light science are in fields  that until recently belonged to the realm of science fiction.  The author, writing for an audience of both students and other scientifically interested readers, describes fundamental investigations of the nature of light and ongoing methods to measure its speed as well as the emergence of the wave theory of light and the complementary photon theory.  The importance of light in the theory of relativity is discussed as is the development of electrically-driven light sources and lasers. The information here covers the range of weak single-photon light sources to super-high power lasers an...

  7. Science & Society seminar: Evolution is not only a story of genes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Memes are behaviours and ideas copied from person to person by imitation. These include songs, habits, skills, inventions and ways of doing things. Darwinian evolutionary theory, which holds that genes control the traits of organisms, has traditionally explained human nature. Susan Blackmore offers a new look at evolution, and considers evolving memes as well as genes. This will be the subject of the next Science and Society seminar, 'The evolution of Meme machines', that will take place on Thursday 24 October. According to the meme idea, everything changed in human evolution when imitation first appeared because imitation let loose a new replicator, the meme. Since that time, two replicators have been driving human evolution, not one. This is why humans have such big brains, and why they alone produce and understand grammatical language, sing, dance, wear clothes and have complex cumulative cultures. Unlike other brains, human brains had to solve the problem of choosing which memes to imitate. In other wor...

  8. [Story life CHENG Dan-an's, works and his achievements on acupuncture and moxibustion science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiang; Cai, Yue

    2011-05-01

    Mr. CHENG Dan-an, who devoted himself to the renaissance of the course of modern Chinese acupuncture, the establishment of acupuncture education unit, correspondence education, acupuncture personnel fostering and publication of periodicals on acupuncture, has great contribution to the academic exchanges and popularization of acupuncture. Mr. CHENG has completed over 10 articles and more than 20 works and translations. According to him, mechanism on meridians, collaterals, acupoints and acupuncture techniques were explored with the promotion on application of "Shen" and "qi" in clinic. Pulse and tongue diagnosis as well as acupuncture treatment were supplemented into Shanghanlun (Treatise on Febrile Diseases). And great importance was attached on the scientific validity and practicability. His professional ethics and dedication are worth to be learned by all medical workers nowadays. His acupuncture theories and academic achievements still inspire us today, which are also taken as the origin for the innovation and development of modern acupuncture science.

  9. The Rudolf Mössbauer story his scientific work and its impact on science and history

    CERN Document Server

    Kienle, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The “Rudolf Mössbauer Story” recounts the history of the discovery of the “Mössbauer Effect” in 1958 by Rudolf Mössbauer as a graduate student of Heinz Maier-Leibnitz for which he received the Nobel Prize in 1961 when he was 32 years old. The development of numerous applications of the Mössbauer Effect in many fields of sciences , such as physics, chemistry, biology and medicine is reviewed by experts who contributed to this wide spread research. In 1978 Mössbauer focused his research interest on a new field “Neutrino Oscillations” and later on the study of the properties of the neutrinos emitted by the sun.

  10. Societal views and animal welfare science: understanding why the modified cage may fail and other stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weary, D M; Ventura, B A; von Keyserlingk, M A G

    2016-02-01

    The innovations developed by scientists working on animal welfare are often not adopted in practice. In this paper, we argue that one important reason for this failure is that the solutions proposed do not adequately address the societal concerns that motivated the original research. Some solutions also fail because they do not adequately address perceived constraints within the industry. Using examples from our own recent work, we show how research methods from the social sciences can address both of these limitations. For example, those who persist in tail-docking cattle (despite an abundance of evidence showing that the practice has no benefits) often justify their position by citing concern for cow cleanliness. This result informs the nature of new extension efforts directed at farmers that continue to tail dock, suggesting that these efforts will be more effective if they focus on providing producers with methods (of proven efficacy) for keeping cows clean. Work on pain mitigation for dehorning shows that some participants reluctant to provide pain relief believe that the pain from this procedure is short lasting and has little impact on the calf. This result informs the direction of new biological research efforts to understand both the magnitude and duration of any suffering that result from this type of procedure. These, and other examples, illustrate how social science methodologies can document the shared and divergent values of different stakeholders (to ensure that proposed solutions align with mainstream values), beliefs regarding the available evidence (to help target new scientific research that meets the perceived gaps), and barriers in implementing changes (to ease adoption of ideas by addressing these barriers).

  11. An inquiry into the use of stories about scientists from diverse socio-cultural backgrounds in broadening grade one students' images of science and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkawy, Azza

    Students' "images of science" (Driver, Leach, Millar & Scott, 1996) and their images of scientists are widely accepted as important aspects of their scientific literacy (National Research Council, 1996) and have important implications for how they learn and engage with science in a classroom context (Hofer, 2001). While numerous studies have documented primary (grades 1 to 3) students' stereotypic images of scientists as sexist, racist, asocial, few have examined instructional strategies effective in broadening these views. Studies (Solomon, Duveen & Scott, 1994; Tao, 2003) involving intermediate and senior students have suggested that science stories can help students develop more authentic views of the nature of science. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how stories about scientists from diverse socio-cultural backgrounds (i.e., physical ability, gender, ethnicity), presented over a 15-week period, influence grade one students' images of science and scientists. Data sources included: pre and post audiotaped interviews, draw-a-scientist-test (Chambers, 1983), participant observation and student work. Results indicated that while students' stereotypic images of scientists were not eliminated, students acquired additional images more inclusive of less dominant socio-cultural backgrounds. Gains were noted in students' images of the purpose of science, the nature of scientific work and the social nature of scientific work. Less positive results involving student resistance to non-stereotypic images of scientists and a loss of interest in becoming a scientist highlight the complexity of using stories about scientists with primary students. The implications of these findings for research and classroom practice are discussed.

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology ...

  13. The impact of using student-dictated oral review stories on science vocabulary, content knowledge, and non-fiction writing skills of first grade students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishoff, Sandra Wells

    The purpose of this study was to determine if using an intervention called Student Dictated Oral Review Stories (SDORS) had an effect on science vocabulary usage and content knowledge for ninety-three students in six first grade classrooms and the subgroup of economically disadvantaged students in a mid-sized north Texas school district. The five science units involved in the study were written incorporating the strand of physical science. Data from pre- and posttests from each unit and an end-of-study assessment were compiled and analyzed. This study also looked at integration of science with literacy through analysis of students' science journal writings. Journal writings were analyzed for vocabulary usage and non-fiction writing skills of capitalization and punctuation. Average sentence length was also analyzed for Units 1--5 of the treatment group. It was anticipated that the outcomes of this study would allow school districts and curriculum writers to determine how to best integrate key concepts and important vocabulary with literacy particularly in the area of science. Results from the study showed significant differences in the end-of-study assessment, vocabulary usage as evidenced in journal writings, and average sentence length. Although there was gain over time for every student in the study in vocabulary and content knowledge, these gains could not be attributed to the intervention. This study also hoped to establish whether students were using science vocabulary routinely in their discussions and their writings and were building and continually assessing their own schemas about scientific concepts through using Student Dictated Oral Review Stories.

  14. Science of the Self as Depicted in the Story of the Snake-Catcher : Rumi's Mathnawī in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir H. Zekrgoo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract : The self is always become a central concept in the mysticism tradition, nonetheless for Jalāl al-Dīn Rūmī  (d.1207. Through Mathnawī, Rūmī uses metaphors to presents man’s multi-layered self. He communicates through stories with great potential to be developed into various forms of visual and performing arts. Through his creative imagination, and using elements from Persian mystical literature Rūmī presents his messages in an attractive and tangible form. Adopting metaphors and symbols he pictures various faces of nafs (self relating each face to an individual animal. “The Snake Catcher’s tale” is an excellent artistic display of man’s battle with his animal self. It offers a complex religious subject in an easy-to-digest manner that can be visualized and set into play. Keyword : Rūmī, ‘Ilm al-Nafs (Science of the Self, Mathnawī, snake symbolism, artistic expression Abstrak : Persoalan diri menjadi isu yang sangat sentral dalam tradisi mistisisme, tidak terkecuali bagi Jalaluddin Rūmī (d.1207. Melalui Matsnawī, Rūmī  menggunakan metafora untuk menunjukkan lapisan diri manusia. Ia berkomunikasi melalui kisah-kisah dengan potensi besar untuk dikembangkan menjadi berbagai bentuk seni visual dan pertunjukan. Melalui imajinasi kreatifnya, dan menggunakan unsur-unsur dari literatur mistik Persia, Rūmī menyajikan pesan dalam bentuk yang menarik dan nyata yang dapat diamati dalam kehidupan sehari-hari, bahwa rangkaian simbol-simbol tersebut merepresentasikan diri manusia. Melalui metafora dan simbol, Ia menggambarkan berbagai wajah nafs (diri dan menghubungkan setiap wajah dengan hewan. “Kisah Penangkap Ular” adalah tampilan artistik yang sangat baik mengenai pertempuran manusia dengan diri hewaninya. Ia menawarkan subjek keagamaan yang kompleks yang mudah dicerna dengan cara yang dapat divisualisasikan dan dimainkan. Kata kunci : Rūmī, Ilmu Jiwa, Matsnawī, simbolisme ular, ekspresi artistik

  15. Karuk Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; Davis, Shan

    Three illustrated stories from the Karuk Indians of northwestern California are told in free English translation and in Karuk with literal English translation. Stories tell of Bluejay who pretends to be sick to get higher pay for doctoring the person she is making sick, how the Karuk learned to kill the fattest deer, and the waterdog who kills the…

  16. Story of Fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 3. Story of Fission: Unlocking Power of the Nucleus. Amit Roy. General Article Volume 21 Issue 3 March 2016 pp 247-258. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/021/03/0247-0258 ...

  17. Applied Utility and the Auto-Ethnographic Short Story: Persuasions for, and Illustrations of, Writing Critical Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbourne, David; Jones, Robyn; Jordan, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    In some quarters it is argued that, narrative researchers might be classified as being either story-analysts or storytellers. They go on to suggest that one feature of storytellers is that they undertake a form of analysis as the process of writing unfolds. With these sentiments in mind, in the present paper, we consider how auto-ethnographical…

  18. Theoretical Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Serisier

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of Clare Hemmings, Why Stories Matter: The Political Grammar of Feminist Theory (Duke 2011 and Janet Halley & Andrew Parker (eds. After Sex? On Writing Since Queer Theory (Duke 2011.

  19. Data Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watts, Laura; Nafus, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    ‘Big Data’ rises and accumulates today from so much of our activity, off and online, that our lives seem almost suffused by ‘The Cloud’. But perhaps data might be otherwise? In this collection, Laura Watts and Dawn Nafus, two ethnographers, bring together stories from different data sites: from...... the marine energy industry, and from the Quantified Self movement. These Data Stories speak, not of clouds, but of transformations: in things, in energy, and in experience....

  20. Hacia una pedagogia Co-emergente, Transaccional y Transcultural: El Cuento Ultracorto de Cienca Ficcion en Ingles (Towards a Co-emerging Transactional and Transcultural Pedagogy: The Science Fiction Short Short Story in English).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoreda, Margaret Lee

    An outline of a "co-emergent" pedagogical perspective describes the conceptual framework for an advanced university-level English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) course. The course framework, which involves choosing and studying a brief science fiction story, allows for transcultural encounters via a transactional literary approach in which…

  1. Story Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaleb, Joseph L.

    2003-01-01

    Argues that the prevalence of print literacy has diminished the interest in and teaching of oral culture. Describes a storytelling experiences and illustrates the importance of considering oral narrative in the English classroom. Discusses the healing truth of stories, the mental health of adolescents, and the oral tradition and relational values.…

  2. Writing about Sustainability Science for the Media: How to Be Both True-to-Fact and Tell a Good Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Aliette K.

    2014-01-01

    Communicating the findings of sustainability science credibly, accurately, and in ways that meet the needs of public communities presents a challenge for academic researchers. This article reviews the findings of communicating sustainability science to a community audience through mainstream media, from an online blog written by a sustainability…

  3. Using Learning Stories to Capture "Gifted" and "Hard Worker" Mindsets within a NYC Specialized High School for the Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, Leah D.

    2014-01-01

    All science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educators working in urban public school systems are expected to provide opportunities for students to develop foundational scientific literacy skills in mathematics and science learning. However, the demands on STEM educators teaching the "gifted" or…

  4. Policy stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Carina Bregnholm; Rasmussen, Rasmus Kjærgaard

    This article uses Arctic Winter 2016 as an exploration site of values and futures in Greenland. By taking a valuation approach where the creation and interpretation of event values are seen as an ongoing and taxing accomplishment, we firstly expand the understanding of events beyond their actual...... present three central policy stories from the field. The stories tell of how the event was first interested, then activated and finally evaluated. Besides adding a new understanding to policy-driven events as a locus of value creation, we also argue that the AWG 2016 offer speculative bets for new...... planning and execution and of event outcomes beyond the narrow confines of bed nights and legacies. Second, we introduce policies as an entry point to unlock discussions and manifestations of value and futures which connect to AWG. In order to exemplify the workings of the AWG event in these domains, we...

  5. The intersection of discipline and roles: Dr. Pauline Mack's story as an instrumental case study with implications for leadership in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younkin, Winnifred Gail

    Widespread concerns currently exist regarding our nation's ability to attract, educate, and retain talented, diverse individuals in STEM fields. These concerns are exacerbated by globalized competition and critical economic conditions. With these issues in mind, this instrumental case study was designed to examine the life story of Dr. Pauline Beery Mack in order to inform secondary and tertiary educational leadership in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Dr. Mack's life story was written from the interpretive view and analyzed through a number of theoretical frameworks appropriate to understanding the complexity of an individual in time and place: the psychobiosocial model, constructivism, creativity, perspective of the field, and the capstone framework of leadership. Data for the construction of Dr. Mack's life story were obtained from Pennsylvania State University Archives, The Women's Collection at Texas Woman's University (TWU), original publications, news media archives, and other sources. Interviews conducted for TWU's archives and interviews conducted by the author provided personal insight into Dr. Mack's life and work. Dr. Mack (1891-1974) lived, learned, created, and taught in a STEM arena that was predominately male. She pursued research with zeal, and was highly adept in attracting jobs, funding, students, and the right people to get the jobs done. Her longitudinal nutrition research, based on a methodology she invented, was innovative in its scope and scale. She served as an advocate for consumers, the undernourished, women, and minorities. Along the way, she changed perceptions of what women could accomplish. Bone density, school lunches, Victory Gardens, flammability, textile industry scandal, and space travel. Dr. Mack with her insatiable need to know was involved in it all. Her multiplicity of roles and contexts yielded a rich and complex life from which to draw implications for educational leadership in secondary and

  6. Multi story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Law, Ho; Stelter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the use of narrative coaching as a powerful tool of co-creation and collaboration of the coach and client that emphasizes values and aspirations. Narrative coaches listen to the stories of lived experience and help clients identify values and skills. Narrative coaching has two...... central foundations which are societal/cultural and learning. The approach consists of the techniques of externalizing conversations and re-authoring and remembering....

  7. Indira's story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Eric Dawe

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Indira is an independent woman who does not live a traditional Nepali life. She rescues abandoned and abused young women from sexual exploitation and provides them with love, support, and education. Her story highlights the key role of the social determinants of health in caring for marginalized populations. Challenges and benefits of attempting to learn from another’s personal narrative are also considered.

  8. Unpacking science for all through the lens of identities-in-practice: the stories of Amelia and Ginny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Edna; Barton, Angela Calabrese

    2008-04-01

    This manuscript reports on an ethnographic study of two Latina students who attended an urban middle school in a low-income community, and how they exhibit agency by purposefully authoring identities-in-practice that value nontraditional ways of knowing and resources. Drawing from both global feminism and sociocultural theory, we argue that by paying careful attention to how and why urban girls author identities-in-practice we can gain deep insight into the noncommodified forms of knowledge, relationships and activities that make up their engagement in science and that girls often employ to participate in science related communities in ways that are culturally and socially just and sustainable.

  9. Darwin's Error: Using the Story of Pangenesis to Illustrate Aspects of Nature of Science in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, William F.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses a number of aspects of the nature of science that can be illustrated by considering the development of pangenesis, a principle proposed by Charles Darwin to describe the rules of inheritance, explain the source of new variation, and solve other natural history puzzles. Pangenesis--although false--can be used to illustrate…

  10. Clear as Crystal: The Story of the Braggs--How X-Ray Crystallography Has Contributed to Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Robert; Patterson, John

    2014-01-01

    Here is a brief history of the work of two of Australia's most famous scientists, Sir William Bragg and his son Sir Lawrence Bragg. Jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in 1915 for their groundbreaking research into the use of X-rays to study the chemical structure and function of molecules, they have contributed to our heritage and to science at an…

  11. Children's stories: what knowledge constitutes indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intention was to design a science module on a topic that learners identified as relevant. The method employed was to ask learners to write stories on the topic in an effort to determine what indigenous knowledge held with regard to the topic. While the stories contained examples of indigenous knowledge, the majority of ...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology ... Up next The Keeney Family discuss pediatric palliative care - Duration: 12:07. Hospice of the ...

  13. The Story of Quantum Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 7. The Story of Quantum Theory. Abhijit Saha. Book Review Volume 9 Issue 7 July ... Abhijit Saha1. IIA, Bangalore 560 034, India (till Dec. 28,2004), Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena, Chile (January-July 2005).

  14. The Story of Nuclear Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 10. The Story of Nuclear Matter. R Rajaraman. General Article Volume 10 Issue 10 October 2005 pp 8-32. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/10/0008-0032. Keywords. Nuclear ...

  15. Embedding With Scientists Results In Better Understanding Of How Science Is Really Done, More Human Stories, And More Effective Communication About Controversial Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.

    2015-12-01

    Until recently much science communication focused on press conferences and results, "Eureka"-moments issued from podiums. Recent documentaries, however, such as PARTICLE FEVER and THE YEAR OF PLUTO go behind the scenes to show long years of effort, and occasional failures, revealing a more honest—and more engaging—picture of how science is actually done. Audiences respond when researchers show a more human face, and candid moments of stress and exhaustion as well as exhilaration make eventual results more meaningful. This presentation will offer evidence that this approach is also effective on contested topics such as climate change, where long-term relationships between journalists and researchers can help structure communications that avoid distracting controversies. A cameraman spends a full week with ornithologist George Divoky on remote Cooper Island, Alaska: the resulting video podcast informs a stage play in London, and George goes on the road with POLAR-PALOOZA across America and internationally, sharing stories about the birds he studies and the polar bears he has to increasingly avoid, as climate change brings them onshore in search of food. POLAR-PALOOZA also introduced Richard Alley and other Arctic and Antarctic scientists to a team of producers and directors, resulting in a 3-part PBS series and museum outreach that is able to present climate change science in an authoritative and apolitical way. That leads, in turn, to leading researchers including video and more visually-dynamic approaches in communicating their work to the public. An upcoming public television series, THE CROWD & THE CLOUD, will devote one program to insights about climate change gained over decades of interaction between producers and scientists. Many mainstream media outlets have cut back on science coverage and released their dedicated "beat" reporters. However a wealth of new channels offer venues for this approach, and falling prices for high quality cameras and editing

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  17. Toy Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, Anne Jodon; Petersson Brooks, Eva

    2016-01-01

    a mediating device between adults and children. The question then becomes, how does a display of static toys speak to a child’s culture of play? Through interviews with toy museum curators and personal observations it was found that the exhibition was designed to have adults share and reflect stories about......Toys are considered to be children’s cultural objects, yet when placed in a toy museum context they become a collection for adult viewing. This article uses Kress and van Leeuwens’ concept of ‘semiotic landscape’ wherein the exhibit provides a specific context of communication that becomes...... the toys with children. Such activity reflects a representation of toys as collections for adults (child’s perspective) rather than the playthings of children (children’s perspectives). Material culture of children was implicitly represented through playful, sensory, and affective engagement. Key words...

  18. Toy Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, Anne Jodon; Petersson Brooks, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Toys are considered to be children’s cultural objects, yet when placed in a toy museum context they become a collection for adult viewing. This article uses Kress and van Leeuwens’ concept of ‘semiotic landscape’ wherein the exhibit provides a specific context of communication that becomes...... a mediating device between adults and children. The question then becomes, how does a display of static toys speak to a child’s culture of play? Through interviews with toy museum curators and personal observations it was found that the exhibition was designed to have adults share and reflect stories about...... the toys with children. Such activity reflects a representation of toys as collections for adults (child’s perspective) rather than the playthings of children (children’s perspectives). Material culture of children was implicitly represented through playful, sensory, and affective engagement. Key words...

  19. Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Radiation Detectors: Science Fiction, Horror Story, or Headlines (460th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Ralph (BNL Nonproliferation and National Security Department)

    2010-08-18

    With radiation constantly occurring from natural sources all around us -- from food, building materials, and rays from the sun, to name a few -- detecting radiotracers for medical procedures and other radiation to keep people safe is not easy. In order to make better use of radiation to diagnose or treat certain health conditions, or to track radiological materials being transported, stored, and used, the quest is on to develop improved radiation detectors. James gives a brief introduction on radiation detection and explain how it is used in applications ranging from medical to homeland security. He then discusses how new materials and better ways to analyze them here at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and the future NSLS-II will lead to a new class of radiation detectors that will provide unprecedented advances in medical and industrial imaging, basic science, and the nonproliferation of nuclear materials.

  20. Popcorn Story Frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLella, Carol Ann

    This paper presents "popcorn story frames"--holistic outlines that facilitate comprehension when reading and writing stories, useful for outlining stories read and for creating outlines for original student stories--that are particularly useful for elementary and intermediate school students. "Popcorn" pops in a horizontal…

  1. A hydrological prediction system based on the SVS land-surface scheme: efficient calibration of GEM-Hydro for streamflow simulation over the Lake Ontario basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaborit, Étienne; Fortin, Vincent; Xu, Xiaoyong; Seglenieks, Frank; Tolson, Bryan; Fry, Lauren M.; Hunter, Tim; Anctil, François; Gronewold, Andrew D.

    2017-09-01

    This work explores the potential of the distributed GEM-Hydro runoff modeling platform, developed at Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) over the last decade. More precisely, the aim is to develop a robust implementation methodology to perform reliable streamflow simulations with a distributed model over large and partly ungauged basins, in an efficient manner. The latest version of GEM-Hydro combines the SVS (Soil, Vegetation and Snow) land-surface scheme and the WATROUTE routing scheme. SVS has never been evaluated from a hydrological point of view, which is done here for all major rivers flowing into Lake Ontario. Two established hydrological models are confronted to GEM-Hydro, namely MESH and WATFLOOD, which share the same routing scheme (WATROUTE) but rely on different land-surface schemes. All models are calibrated using the same meteorological forcings, objective function, calibration algorithm, and basin delineation. GEM-Hydro is shown to be competitive with MESH and WATFLOOD: the NSE √ (Nash-Sutcliffe criterion computed on the square root of the flows) is for example equal to 0.83 for MESH and GEM-Hydro in validation on the Moira River basin, and to 0.68 for WATFLOOD. A computationally efficient strategy is proposed to calibrate SVS: a simple unit hydrograph is used for routing instead of WATROUTE. Global and local calibration strategies are compared in order to estimate runoff for ungauged portions of the Lake Ontario basin. Overall, streamflow predictions obtained using a global calibration strategy, in which a single parameter set is identified for the whole basin of Lake Ontario, show accuracy comparable to the predictions based on local calibration: the average NSE √ in validation and over seven subbasins is 0.73 and 0.61, respectively for local and global calibrations. Hence, global calibration provides spatially consistent parameter values, robust performance at gauged locations, and reduces the complexity and computation burden of the

  2. A hydrological prediction system based on the SVS land-surface scheme: efficient calibration of GEM-Hydro for streamflow simulation over the Lake Ontario basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    É. Gaborit

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work explores the potential of the distributed GEM-Hydro runoff modeling platform, developed at Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC over the last decade. More precisely, the aim is to develop a robust implementation methodology to perform reliable streamflow simulations with a distributed model over large and partly ungauged basins, in an efficient manner. The latest version of GEM-Hydro combines the SVS (Soil, Vegetation and Snow land-surface scheme and the WATROUTE routing scheme. SVS has never been evaluated from a hydrological point of view, which is done here for all major rivers flowing into Lake Ontario. Two established hydrological models are confronted to GEM-Hydro, namely MESH and WATFLOOD, which share the same routing scheme (WATROUTE but rely on different land-surface schemes. All models are calibrated using the same meteorological forcings, objective function, calibration algorithm, and basin delineation. GEM-Hydro is shown to be competitive with MESH and WATFLOOD: the NSE  √  (Nash–Sutcliffe criterion computed on the square root of the flows is for example equal to 0.83 for MESH and GEM-Hydro in validation on the Moira River basin, and to 0.68 for WATFLOOD. A computationally efficient strategy is proposed to calibrate SVS: a simple unit hydrograph is used for routing instead of WATROUTE. Global and local calibration strategies are compared in order to estimate runoff for ungauged portions of the Lake Ontario basin. Overall, streamflow predictions obtained using a global calibration strategy, in which a single parameter set is identified for the whole basin of Lake Ontario, show accuracy comparable to the predictions based on local calibration: the average NSE  √  in validation and over seven subbasins is 0.73 and 0.61, respectively for local and global calibrations. Hence, global calibration provides spatially consistent parameter values, robust performance at gauged locations, and reduces the

  3. Science Fiction on Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, David

    1985-01-01

    Reviews science fiction films used in a science fiction class. Discusses feature films, short science fiction films, short story adaptations, original science fiction pieces and factual science films that enrich literature. (EL)

  4. Telling the Human Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  5. Story of Fluoridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fluoride > The Story of Fluoridation The Story of Fluoridation Main Content It started as an observation, that ... fluoridate its drinking water.The Grand Rapids water fluoridation study was originally sponsored by the U.S. Surgeon ...

  6. When's a story not at story?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva

    . For example, as presented in this paper, a tourist guide tells the same story about a violent motorcycle gang, part of her ancetdotal reportoire, during two guided tours. The story is fixed in content and structure, but when brought into social interaction with tourists, it becomes part of a broader narrative...

  7. Story quality management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-12-15

    This book is written to explain quality management using stories, which have each story about quality management. The titles of stories are way to tell the meaning in mind, mom, house wife's meal costs a great deal, good bye digestive medicine, beans cooked in soy sauce, wedding and space rocket, each story is used to give descriptions of quality management like procedure and decision for division of labor, quality guaranteed and histogram.

  8. Designing a story database for use in automatic story generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oinonen, K.M.; Theune, Mariet; Nijholt, Antinus; Uijlings, J.R.R.; Harper, R.; Rauterberg, M; Combetto, M.

    In this paper we propose a model for the representation of stories in a story database. The use of such a database will enable computational story generation systems to learn from previous stories and associated user feedback, in order to create believable stories with dramatic plots that invoke an

  9. "Have I Got Science News for You?": Science Coverage by UK National Newspapers--An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Chris; Hyden, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    As part of the "scientific literacy" debate, a survey of the balance of science stories in the media was undertaken by reviewing UK newspapers late in 2011. The survey found a preponderance of health/medical stories (50%+) and many stories relating to environment/ecology. The percentage of other biology stories and of stories related to…

  10. Fragmented Work Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria; Reff Pedersen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    stories. We argue that meaning by story making is not always created by coherence and causality; meaning is created by different types of fragmentation: discontinuities, tensions and editing. The objective of this article is to develop and advance antenarrative practice analysis of work stories......Following a strand of narrative studies pointing to the living conditions of storytelling and the micro-level implications of working within fragmented narrative perspectives, this article contributes to narrative research on work stories by focusing on how meaning is created from fragmented...... by exploring how different types of fragmentation create meanings. This is done by studying the work stories of job and personnel consultants and by drawing on the results of a narrative, ethnographic study of a consultancy. The analysis demonstrates how work stories are social practices negotiated, retold...

  11. The story of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Mankiewicz, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Questioning how mathematics has evolved over the centuries and for what reasons; how human endeavour and changes in the way we live have been dependent on mathematics, this book tells the story of the impact this intellectual activity has had across cultures and civilizations. It shows how, far from being just the obsession of an elite group of philosophers, priests and scientists, mathematics has in some shape or other entered every area of human activity. The mysterious tally sticks of prehistoric peoples and the terrestial maps used for trade, exploration and warfare; the perennial fascination with the motions of heavenly bodies and changing perspectives on the art and science of vision; all are testament to a mathematics at the heart of history. The path of this changing discipline is marked by a wealth of images, from medieval manuscripts to the unsettling art of Dali or Duchamp, from the austere beauty of Babylonian clay tablets to the delicate complexity of computer-generated images. The text encompass...

  12. Karuk Stories #2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; And Others

    Three illustrated stories from the Karuk Indians of northwestern California are told in free English translation and in Karuk with literal English translation. English and Karuk Unifon alphabet charts are provided. Stories tell of seasonal migration of the mockingbird and the swamp robin, coyote's quest for the sun and how he determined the sun's…

  13. StoryTrek

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaled, Rilla; Barr, Pippin; Greenspan, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Narrative is an important aspect of persuasion, but persua- sive technologies often use narrative in its most traditional, linear form. We present StoryTrek, a prototype system which creates narratives based on a reader’s location and movements in the real world. StoryTrek yields a number of unique...

  14. Constructing Digital Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajder, Sara; Bull, Glen; Albaugh, Susan

    2005-01-01

    A digital story consists of a series of still images combined with a narrated soundtrack to tell a story. This document contains a sequence of seven steps for digital storytelling based on a two-year project in Curry School's Center for Technology and Teacher Education at the University of Virginia. The strategies outlined offer a starting point…

  15. Everybody Has a Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The book bears witness of Young peoples lived lives across Europe, Russia and Japan. It contains stories about love, loss of love and loss of loved ones, about dreams of future lives and wonders of lives as such. And it tells stories about bullying, mental illness and simple strives just to be able...

  16. Stories on the go

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karen Hvidtfeldt

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on 1001 Stories of Denmark: an internet site and a mobile app that collects and displays stories and visual material connected to places all over Denmark. This site offers a “social media-like” communication frame with various levels of participation. But in reality, 1001...... stories of Denmark is mainly a one-to-many dissemination of expert knowledge, and actual user participation is limited. However, the site does host user-generated material, e.g. a number of amateurish videos and stories that often do not follow the guidelines, but in some cases construct willful...... and affective narratives. I argue that these videos and stories demonstrate the potential of mobile and digital cultural heritage sites; however, it requires strategic initiatives and long-term engagement from museums and cultural institutions to create and maintain the level of the dialogue and participation....

  17. Glimpses of a Century-Old Story

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 4. Glimpses of a Century-Old Story - Agrobacterium, a Pathogen Deployed for Genetic Engineering. Jasmine M Shah. General Article Volume 18 Issue 4 April 2013 pp 336-344 ...

  18. The Untold Story of NASA's Trailblazers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 3. The Untold Story of NASA's Trailblazers: Hidden Figures sheds light on the contributions of black women to the US Space Race. Caitlin M Casey. Film Review Volume 22 Issue 3 March 2017 pp 317-318 ...

  19. A Journey into the Future: Using Sci-Fi Stories with EFL Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Anson

    2001-01-01

    Discusses using science fiction stories in the English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) classroom. Presents experiences in a science fiction course with some successful methods in eliciting EFL students' discussion. Concludes that using both film and text versions of science fiction stories can be useful devices in helping EFL students participate…

  20. Ancient communion: Guidance from the ancestors. An Indian grandmother and granddaughter sharing stories on Native spirituality and Western science: Toward a theory of wholeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Fire Moon, Tandie Vera

    This study seeks to address the causes and potential solutions to the divisiveness and human destructiveness to humanity and the environment now reflected on a planetary scale. The research question is: How can Native American values enhance western thinking for the purpose of greater individual and planetary health? Fundamental research has been to develop the concept of `Integrity' as a model to explore various western concepts and Native knowledge as inter-facing systems. The model's formula integrates three major scientific theories-Relativity and Quantum Physics and Chaos, as a demonstration of the product of doing integrative thinking and research. Applying knowledge of Lakota Visionary Black Elk and other indigenous world views, this has evolved into a Unified Perceptual Field-``Toward a Theory of Wholeness.'' Study's goal is to utilize knowledge gained from this process to create greater positive choice in our fives, by designing systems that are highest functioning-creating greatest fulfillment, health and wholeness in the individual and the society. Methods of looking at data and wisdom in this study are the intuitive and analytical methodologies as defined in the Integrity Model. Part I, Visions and Stories from the DREAMTIME, reflects these knowledge quests. Within Part II, Native BASKETWEAVER Weaving New Realities, the thesis statement contains three major validations to emerge from this study: (1)The exploration inward reveals the deepest core of the material universe as the foundational, most subtle, powerful, infinitesimal quantum level of creation that we experience as our spiritual nature. (2)Trauma of physical impact by action, thought or word at early stages of human development disfigures the natural pattern of harmony, which is set into the biology/physiology-magnified and amplified in adult life, and mirrored out into space/time. (3)Early disturbance of one's perceptual intention (will/desire) weakens or breaks the natural underlying energy

  1. Teaching Science Fiction by Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donawerth, Jane

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the 200-year-old tradition of women science fiction authors. Discusses the benefits of teaching science fiction written by women. Describes 5 science fiction short stories and 5 science fiction novels suitable for high school students. (RS)

  2. Türk Edebiyatında İlk Bilim-kurgu Öyküleri ve Orhan Duru The First Science-fiction Stories of Turkish Literature and Orhan Duru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan REYHANOĞULLARI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Orhan Duru (1933-2009 takes place in the story generation which emerged in the 1950s. This generation is changed the usual course of the story with a new view that they had brought to the story. This generation, which is very much benefit from Sait Faik, aims to deal with the individual and his problems. Orhan Duru is the author of themost different in this generation. He realizes more different and justconsidered new ventures than other authors. Also one of them isscience-fiction. He is the first author who attempted the science-fiction,which was limited with translations until his time, in his stories. Inaddition, he is the author who suggested the word of "science-fiction" toTurkish Language Institution. However, he had taken pains of sciencefiction,not only to be in a fantasy perception, but also to be in thesocial content. When he creates this kind of the stories, humorous andironic style takes place. Sometimes, Duru creates the absolute sciencefictionstory; sometimes he takes only some advantage of opportunitiesof these species. These stories, which are the first in our literature,represent an important place in the context of originality. Previously, inour Literature, these narratives, which untested in both fictional andthematic sense, moves to a different place in the 1950 generation.Although these stories didn’t reach the value which they deserve whenthey were brought to the body, they have affected the fantastic writersgroup who came after them and have been path-breaking for them.Duru who put fiction to writing, while he mention collectively theretrograde relationships, the history, the mythology, the traditions, thesocial affair, the individual efforts, the culturel esteems in this sciencefiction, he does not neglect to finish with universal perception. For thisreason, Duru has walked away from creating a dry science-fiction andwould be achieved the main purpose. Orhan Duru (1933-2009, 1950’li yıllarda ortaya çıkan öykü ku

  3. The Disarming Seduction of Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Pat C., II

    2001-01-01

    Contends that essays are the proper rhetorical domain of stories, the place where stories most naturally belong when they are being used for the development and enlargement of ideas. Notes that stories are so powerful and distracting that when used together to make a familiar story, they can divert attention away from the essay's idea. Concludes…

  4. Measuring Goodness of Story Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Karen; Coelho, Carl; Mozeiko, Jennifer; Grafman, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to evaluate a new measure of story narrative performance: story completeness. It was hypothesized that by combining organizational (story grammar) and completeness measures, story "goodness" could be quantified. Method: Discourse samples from 46 typically developing adults were compared with those from 24…

  5. Classical Cosmology Through Animation Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijic, Milan; Kang, E. Y. E.; Longson, T.; State LA SciVi Project, Cal

    2010-05-01

    Computer animations are a powerful tool for explanation and communication of ideas, especially to a younger generation. Our team completed a three part sequence of short, computer animated stories about the insight and discoveries that lead to the understanding of the overall structure of the universe. Our principal characters are Immanuel Kant, Henrietta Leavitt, and Edwin Hubble. We utilized animations to model and visualize the physical concepts behind each discovery and to recreate the characters, locations, and flavor of the time. The animations vary in length from 6 to 11 minutes. The instructors or presenters may wish to utilize them separately or together. The animations may be used for learning classical cosmology in a visual way in GE astronomy courses, in pre-college science classes, or in public science education setting.

  6. The Story of Azithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banić Tomišić, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The invention of azithromycin (1, Figure 1, the active pharmaceutical ingredient of the antibiotic Sumamed (Croatian brand name by PLIVA; Zithromax by Pfizer in the USA belongs among the great achievements in the history of science in Croatia. From the viewpoint of commercialization of research results, it may have been one of the greatest. In addition to contributing to science and to medicine, azithromycin has also brought about an improvement in the quality of life on the global level. Owing to its exceptional therapeutic properties, it has come to be one of the most successful antibiotics worldwide. Marking the 30th anniversary of the azithromycin Yugoslav patent application, this paper gives an overview of the research that led to its discovery and comes with a list of papers and patents through which the drug has been made known to the public (Table 1, Figures 4 and 6. The invention was due to the scientists from the Research Institute of the pharmaceutical company PLIVA in Zagreb, Croatia, D. Sc. S. Đokić, M. Sc. G. Kobrehel, D. Sc. G. Lazarevski, and D. Sc. Z. Tamburašev (Figure 3. Azithromycin became the first representative of the new class of 15-membered macrolides known as azalides after the introduction of nitrogen in the macrocycle of erythromycin A (2, Figure 1. Its synthesis involved several steps (Figure 2: oximation of erithromycin A, Beckmann rearrangement of erythromycin A oxime with aromatic sulphochlorides, reduction of the produced erithromycin A iminoether, and final methylation of the nitrogen introduced in the macrocycle of erythromycin A. Because of inadequate analytical support in the late 1970s and early 1980s, the precise structure of the LD product (Figure 5 in the Beckmann rearrangement step of azithromycin synthesis was confirmed only later as 7 and not 6 as assumed (Figure 5. Today, azithromycin is known under the common chemical name of 9-deoxo-9a-aza-9a-methyl-homoerythromycin A. This paper also deals with

  7. Telling My Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Sylvia

    1998-01-01

    Experiential education provides a safe environment for the sharing of personal stories that promote understanding of diversity and commonalities. Describes the Play for Peace program to promote understanding by facilitating the play and sharing of children of conflicting cultures. (SAS)

  8. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Educational Resources Glossary of Common Terms If You Have a Question In the News Researcher Story: Stuttering ... participation of research volunteers. If you stutter or have a family member who stutters, you could be ...

  9. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... List of Registries Personal Stories For Parents and Children For Health Care Providers For Researchers and Trial ... with a speech therapist to overcome this communication disorder heard in speeches such as this one he ...

  10. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the News Researcher Story: Stuttering In a 2010 movie, The King’s Speech, many learned for the first ... and Answers about NIDCD Stuttering Research The Long Road to Discovery: Stuttering Genes Turn Up in the ...

  11. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Personal Stories For Parents and Children For Health Care Providers For Researchers and Trial Sites Educational Resources ... can. The genetic methods for all sorts of medical genetic disorders have been refined over the past ...

  12. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have a Question In the News Researcher Story: Stuttering In a 2010 movie, The King’s Speech, many ... effects of the disorder. How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? Video of How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? A ...

  13. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Have a Question In the News Researcher Story: Stuttering In a 2010 movie, The King’s Speech, many ... effects of the disorder. How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? Video of How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? A ...

  14. The Story of Helium and the Birth of Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Biman B

    2013-01-01

    Biman Nath The Story of Helium and the Birth of Astrophysics Helium was the first element ever discovered by astronomers. Its presence was first indicated in the Sun and not on Earth. Further, its discovery marked the birth of the new science of astrophysics. However, it turns out that the events leading to the discovery of helium have been rather misrepresented in books, journals, and even encyclopedias. The usual story about its joint discovery during a solar eclipse in 1868 by French astronomer Pierre Janssen and late in England by Norman Lockyer, is far from the truth. Janssen never mentioned any new spectral line in his reports. The actual story turns out to be as dramatic as in fiction. This book tells the story without jargon, using the words of the scientists themselves (from their letters and reports), and rescues the real story from the backwaters of history.

  15. A unique collaborative nursing evidence-based practice initiative using the Iowa model: a clinical nurse specialist, a health science librarian, and a staff nurse's success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krom, Zachary R; Batten, Janene; Bautista, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to share how the collaboration of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS), a health science librarian, and a staff nurse can heighten staff nurses' awareness of the evidence-based practice (EBP) process. The staff nurse is expected to incorporate EBP into daily patient care. This expectation is fueled by the guidelines established by professional, accrediting, and regulatory bodies. Barriers to incorporating EBP into practice have been well documented in the literature. A CNS, a health science librarian, and a staff nurse collaborated to develop an EBP educational program for staff nurses. The staff nurse provides the real-time practice issues, the CNS gives extensive knowledge of translating research into practice, and the health science librarian is an expert at retrieving the information from the literature. The resulting collaboration at this academic medical center has increased staff nurse exposure to and knowledge about EBP principles and techniques. The collaborative relationship among the CNS, health science librarian, and staff nurse effectively addresses a variety of barriers to EBP. This successful collaborative approach can be utilized by other medical centers seeking to educate staff nurses about the EBP process.

  16. Connecting Indigenous Stories with Geology: Inquiry-Based Learning in a Middle Years Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Damian; King, Donna; Kidman, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    One way to integrate indigenous perspectives in junior science is through links between indigenous stories of the local area and science concepts. Using local indigenous stories about landforms, a teacher of Year 8 students designed a unit on geology that catered for the diverse student population in his class. This paper reports on the…

  17. The Story Format and the Cycle of Meaning Construction for Physics Education in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Cristina; Corni, Federico

    The story format may provide a stimulating environment, including tasks, questions or problems, giving space for scientific experimentation and group discussions guided by the teacher. In this contribution we present the main advantages of the story format for physics teaching and learning and the features that a story should have in order to implement what we call the "cycle of meaning construction", which constitutes an attempt to integrate the attributes already accredited to the story format in science teaching with pedagogical, methodological and didactic approaches. Lastly, a story will be presented in brief as a possible example for primary school physics education.

  18. [The story of Appendix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáš, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most frequent acute abdominal emergency. Appendicitis may have been recorded by Aretaeus the Cappadocean in 30 AD. A description of the appendix was provided by the anatomist Berengario de Carpi in 1521. The first appendicectomy was performed by Claudius Amyand in 1735. Turning point in the story of appendix was public lecture of pathologist-physician Reginald Fitz in 1886. Fitz used the term "appendicitis". The area of maximal tenderness with appendicitis was immortalised by Charles McBurney. In the story of appendicitis many names figure, for example Niels Thorkild Rovsing, Jacob Moritz Blumberg, Otto Lanz, Frederic Treves and other. Kurt Semm introduced laparoscopic appendicectomy in 1988.

  19. 'All stories bring hope because stories bring awareness': students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using narrative inquiry, and specifically Bamberg's (2006) 'small stories' approach, the research team analysed 30 stories students constructed in four focus group conversations at the end of the project. In these stories, most of Nussbaum's (2010) capabilities were evident. We found that, in the collective sharing of their ...

  20. The perfect shape spiral stories

    CERN Document Server

    Hammer, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    This book uses the spiral shape as a key to a multitude of strange and seemingly disparate stories about art, nature, science, mathematics, and the human endeavour. In a way, the book is itself organized as a spiral, with almost disconnected chapters circling around and closing in on the common theme. A particular strength of the book is its extremely cross-disciplinary nature - everything is fun, and everything is connected! At the same time, the author puts great emphasis on mathematical and scientific correctness, in contrast, perhaps, with some earlier books on spirals. Subjects include the mathematical properties of spirals, sea shells, sun flowers, Greek architecture, air ships, the history of mathematics, spiral galaxies, the anatomy of the human hand, the art of prehistoric Europe, Alfred Hitchcock, and spider webs, to name a few.

  1. Member State Event: Telling CERN's story !

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    As part of the events to mark the Laboratory's fiftieth anniversary, members of the CERN personnel are telling the story of CERN. Robert Cailliau (on the right), currently responsible for CERN's external communications, and Chiara Mariotti (in the center), a physicist working at CMS, were invited to talk about the history of CERN and the Web at a conference in the 'Science Thursdays' series entitled 'From the Quark to the Web' in Turin on 26 February.

  2. Whose Story Is It Anyway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korty, Carol

    1995-01-01

    Asks the question of what stories playwrights may use. States that dramatists have a deep commitment to explore the truth about life. Discusses questions regarding stories in the public domain, and issues of exclusive intellectual property. Concludes that the decision to use a story is a political one more than an ethical one. (PA)

  3. Storytelling? Everyone Has a Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    School librarians can assume an important role in preserving and perpetuating the oral tradition. The same skills and techniques when telling a personal story can be transmitted to telling various kinds of stories from literature and history. For school librarians to be successful storytellers, they need to select stories that they like and enjoy…

  4. Nurturing the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Carolyn; Chessin, Debby; Chambless, Martha

    2007-01-01

    Historical stories of scientists provide an excellent opportunity to help students see that science is indeed a human endeavor and demonstrate the interrelationships among science, technology, and society. A number of engaging historical accounts illustrate characteristics of the nature of science. The story of Lise Meitner leads students through…

  5. The Story of Iyal

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-08-24

    In this podcast, a mother tells her compelling story about a family living with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.  Created: 8/24/2009 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 8/24/2009.

  6. New Suburban Stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dines, M.; Vermeulen, T.J.V.

    2013-01-01

    Exploring fiction, film and art from across the USA, South America, Asia, Europe and Australia, New Suburban Stories brings together new research from leading international scholars to examine cultural representations of the suburbs, home to a rapidly increasing proportion of the world's population.

  7. From Story to Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Stanley

    1986-01-01

    Presents a developmental taxonomy which promotes sequencing activities to enhance the potential of matching these activities with learner needs and readiness, suggesting that the order commonly found in the classroom needs to be inverted. The proposed taxonomy (story, skill, and algorithm) involves problem-solving emphasis in the classroom. (JN)

  8. Tell a Piecewise Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Nathalie; Armstrong, Alayne

    2011-01-01

    Piecewise linear functions and story graphs are concepts usually associated with algebra, but in the authors' classroom, they found success teaching this topic in a distinctly geometrical manner. The focus of the approach was less on learning geometric concepts and more on using spatial and kinetic reasoning. It not only supports the learning of…

  9. Intercultural Collaboration Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertsen, Martine Cardel; Søderberg, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    to elucidate intercultural collaboration processes by analyzing how each member of a dyad of interacting managers narrates the same chain of events. We show how the narratological concepts of peripeteia and anagnorisis are well suited to identifying focal points in their stories: situations where change...... it clear how they overcome most of their differences and establish common ground through mutual learning....

  10. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You The Basics Finding a Clinical Trial List of Registries Personal Stories For Parents and ... recorded speech sample. For more information about this clinical trial, see Protocol NCT00001604 on ClinicalTrials.gov , or contact ...

  11. Putting Stories in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Mindi

    2012-01-01

    A very successful preschool project the author did at Ohio State University's Schoenbaum Family Center combined students' interest in storytelling, drama, and multiple literacies. For this particular project, a classic children's fairy tale was used, though the project is easily adaptable for other stories, texts, content, and age levels. In this…

  12. Why Story Circle Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, George Ella

    2016-01-01

    If adult attention is screen scrambled, what about kids, whose brains are still developing? In a world where we are over stimulated and hyperlinked-in we are deprived of the kind of time with a person or experience that deepens and sustains us. Here, poet laureate George Ella Lyon writes that the story circle can be such an experience. A school…

  13. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... List of Registries Personal Stories For Parents and Children For Health Care Providers For Researchers and Trial ... and who have a family history of the disorder. — CROSS FADE — The foundation of our studies is the human ... (a fact sheet from NIDCD) Questions ...

  14. Depressive Stories for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    While stories with a depressing message are now common for teenagers, resistance to them remains where smaller children are concerned. But is this more a case of the publishers and providers concerned protecting their own particular image of childhood? This article looks at the case for books that also convey a sense of sadness to infants,…

  15. Postcolonial Entanglements: Unruling Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini-Ketchabaw, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I use Donna Haraway's philosophy to think about postcolonial encounters between different species. I follow entangled stories of the deer/settler-child figure to trouble colonialisms and untangle the histories and trajectories that we inhabit with other species through colonial histories. I shy away from generalizations and…

  16. Beyond the Single Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Yekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Teachers of world literature have the opportunity to help students explore the more complex reality behind the stereotypes that they often see in the media. If we don't encourage students to challenge one-dimensional "single stories" that characterize an entire people--whether Muslims, Russians, Mexicans, African Americans, Chinese,…

  17. Stories of change

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sonia Navia, Carlos Narváez, Philip Oxhorn, Leonor Perilla, Luz Patricia Restrepo, Ernesto Rodríguez and Helen Thai. Healthier and more nutritious potatoes for food security in Colombia. Stories of change. Key messages. • Innovative ... content, increased resistance to late blight disease ... understanding for enhanced.

  18. Children Writing Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this book, the author reveals the creative force of children's narrative imagination and shows how this develops through childhood. He provides a new and powerful understanding of the significance of narrative for children's intellectual growth and for learning and teaching. The book explores a series of real stories written by children between…

  19. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH Clinical Research Trials and You NIH Clinical Research Trials and You The Basics Finding a Clinical Trial List of Registries Personal Stories For Parents and Children For Health Care Providers For Researchers and Trial Sites Educational Resources Glossary of Common Terms If You Have ...

  20. Personal Digital Video Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Henningsen, Birgitte Sølbeck; Louw, Arnt Vestergaard

    2016-01-01

    agenda focusing on video productions in combination with digital storytelling, followed by a presentation of the digital storytelling features. The paper concludes with a suggestion to initiate research in what is identified as Personal Digital Video (PDV) Stories within longitudinal settings, while...

  1. Keepers of Our Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiuk, Glen

    2010-01-01

    Storytelling is an integral part of life for Indigenous Australians. Before the arrival of Europeans and continuing after; gathered around the campfire in the evening stories were and are still shared; passed from one generation to the next. In modern times, in addition to a continuing oral traditions, another method of storytelling has risen from…

  2. Stories Under Your Feet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riesto, Svava; Støvring, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Review of the new Købmagergade design by Karres et Brandts and Polyform. The article discusses the new design, its uses and story-telling, seen in relation to the "urban space boom" in Copenhagen of the early 2000nds....

  3. Dancing Lights: Creating the Aurora Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. L.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Science tells a story about our world, our existence, our history, and the larger environment our planet occupies. Bearing this in mind, we created a series of lessons for 3rd-5th grades using a cross-disciplinary approach to teaching about the aurora by incorporating stories, photos, movies, and geography into the science in order to paint a broad picture and answer the question, “why do we care?” The fundamental backbone of the program is literacy. Students write and illustrate fiction and non-fiction work, poetry, and brochures that solidify both language arts skills and science content. In a time when elementary teachers relegate science to less than one hour per week, we have developed a novel science program that can be easily integrated with other topics during the typical school day to increase the amount of science taught in a school year. We are inspiring students to take an interest in the natural world with this program, a stepping-stone for larger things.

  4. [The processing unit and story structure in memory for story].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, E

    1988-04-01

    To investigate story memory, three experiments were conducted. In Experiment I, 60 professional school students were asked to sort the sentences of stories into groups. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to generate perceived story structure. Results indicated generally a good agreement between perceived structure and the structure induced by story grammar. In Experiment II and III, 72 university students and 72 professional school students learned three stories and were tested in recognition task. In the course of presenting the sentences in story, pauses were inserted between story clusters (BP) or within them (WP) (Experiment II). In BP condition, recognition time (RT) was faster than in WP condition. In Experiment III questions were inserted at the same points as in Experiment II (BQ, WP). In BQ condition RT was faster than in BP condition. These results indicated that pause or question inserted at the boundary of story cluster facilitated story processing and that question was more effective than pause. Story was processed in unit corresponding to perceived story structure.

  5. Science journalism in Latin America: how the scientific information from a scientific source is accommodated when it is transformed into a journalistic story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Veneu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific information ­ from the moment it is produced by the scientific community until it reaches the non- expert audience through the newspapers ­ is submitted to a complex process of adaptation. In this paper, we investigate the process of accommodating the scientific information provided by a primary scientific source (a peer-review journal into journalistic discourse (a newspaper. As case studies we analyzed four scientific papers published by the peer-reviewed scientific journals Nature and Science, which were simultaneously used as primary scientific sources by Latin American newspapers. We observed that the process of accommodation into a new space, journalistic space, represents a significant shift in the content of the texts, including information that appears, disappears and is transformed in the process; transformations in the lexica, the style and the argumentation; a change in the hierarchy of the information; a shift in the information emphasized and in the social impact it might have.

  6. Science journalism in Latin America: how the scientific information from a scientific source is accommodated when it is transformed into a journalistic story (Portuguese original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Veneu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific information ­ from the moment it is produced by the scientific community until it reaches the non- expert audience through the newspapers ­ is submitted to a complex process of adaptation. In this paper, we investigate the process of accommodating the scientific information provided by a primary scientific source (a peer-review journal into journalistic discourse (a newspaper. As case studies we analyzed four scientific papers published by the peer-reviewed scientific journals Nature and Science, which were simultaneously used as primary scientific sources by Latin American newspapers. We observed that the process of accommodation into a new space, journalistic space, represents a significant shift in the content of the texts, including information that appears, disappears and is transformed in the process; transformations in the lexica, the style and the argumentation; a change in the hierarchy of the information; a shift in the information emphasized and in the social impact it might have.

  7. Telling Your Stories: Why Stories Are Important for Your Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Johanna; Larsen, Diana

    We all tell stories. The stories we share are shared to some purpose; e.g. to communicate ideals, to share knowledge, to warn, to entertain, to educate or show status. The story we tell changes depending on the context - when we tell it and who we are telling it to - and how we choose to tell it is also revealing of our values and underlying beliefs. This workshop is designed to explore the way we tell our stories, and practice telling and retelling stories through a series of collaborative story-games. Attendees will help to explore the possibilities for designing a set of storycards to help teams construct and tell stories around software projects.

  8. Louis Pasteur's three artist compatriots-Henner, Pointelin, and Perraud: A story of friendship, science, and art in the 1870s and 1880s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bert; Weisberg, Richard E

    2017-02-01

    Biographers have largely ignored Louis Pasteur's many and varied connections with art and artists. This article is the second in a series of the authors' studies of Pasteur's friendships with artists. This research project has uncovered data that enlarge the great medical chemist's biography, throwing new light on a variety of topics including his work habits, his social life, his artistic sensibilities, his efforts to lobby on behalf of his artist friends, his relationships to their patrons and to his own patrons, and his use of works of art to foster his reputation as a leader in French medical science. In a prior article, the authors examined his unique working relationship with the Finnish painter Albert Edelfelt and the creation of the famous portrait of Pasteur in his laboratory in the mid-1880s. The present study documents his especially warm friendship with three French artists who came from Pasteur's home region, the Jura, or from neighboring Alsace. A forthcoming study gives an account of his friendships with Max Claudet and Paul Dubois, both of whom made important images of Pasteur, and it offers further illustrations of his devotion to the fine arts.

  9. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications ... Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  10. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ... Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics ...

  11. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, ...

  12. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Apply About Grants Policy & Compliance Grants News/Blog Contracts Loan Repayment More ... & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research ...

  13. Teddy Bear Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Caldas-Coulthardt, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a semiotic analysis of a key cultural artefact, the teddy bear. After introducing the iconography of the teddy bear, it analyses different kinds of stories to show how teddy bears are endowed with meaning in everyday life: stories from children's books, reminiscenses by adults...... about their childhood teddy bears, and children's accounts of what they do with teddy bears, both written for school and told 'out of school', The chapter sees teddy bears as artefacts that provide a cultural channeling for the child's need of a transitional object and argues that the meanings of teddy...... bears have traditionally centred on interpersonal relations within the nuclear family, but have recently been institutionalized and commercialized....

  14. Storie di genere, storie di partito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bellè

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lo studio delle narrazioni di genere all'interno di questo tipo di organizzazione desta inoltre un particolare interesse anche in ragione della sottorappresentazione delle donne nella sfera della politica. Si tratta di un deficit democratico che coinvolge i sistemi politici moderni nel loro complesso, ma che interessa l'Italia con una particolare gravità ed evidenza. La questione della sottorappresentazione politica delle donne è stata sinora affrontata prevalentemente in termini tecnico-legali (politiche di pari opportunità ed azione positiva, o di teoria politica (la dicotomia pubblico-maschile e privato-femminile come fondamento del contratto sessuale della politica. Mancano invece contributi che guardino ai partiti come organizzazioni largamente responsabili dei processi di selezione e promozione delle carriere politiche, dunque come luoghi di quotidiana produzione di pratiche e culture di genere, più o meno egualitarie o, viceversa, discriminatorie. Sulla base di tale vuoto di ricerca e riflessione, il presente articolo si propone di mettere in luce le pratiche e le culture di genere che emergono dai racconti di uomini e donne all'interno di due organizzazioni partitiche, una di destra e una di sinistra, situate nel contesto territoriale della provincia di Trento. La ricerca è stata condotta attraverso lo strumento dell'intervista semi-strutturata, coinvolgendo quattro donne e quattro uomini, divisi per coppie di età (un uomo ed una donna giovani ed un uomo ed una donna da lungo presenti nel partito, accostabili per quanto concerne ruolo e posizione nelle organizzazioni partitiche considerate. L'attenzione analitica si è concentrata sulla costruzione del genere di uomini e donne intervistati/e, intesa sia come dimensione ed esperienza individuale (le storie di genere dei/lle singoli/e, sia come dimensione organizzativa più ampia (le storie di genere delle organizzazioni, narrate dalle diverse voci. Un'ulteriore dimensione analitica

  15. Building our stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    . Aligned with previous TEFI conference themes, Euro TEFI 2017 focuses on strategic, inspirational and compassionately disruptive storytelling, that seek to activate change and empower engaged scholarship. Drawing inspiration from fairytales to philosopher kings, Copenhagen, Denmark, offers a unique setting...... for our first TEFI regional conference. Storytelling is a powerful way of exploring, linking and crafting values, articulating them is such a way as to instil action. This conference proceedings assembles 31research stories of sustainable, caring and ethical worldmaking in tourism....

  16. What's your story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Herminia; Lineback, Kent

    2005-01-01

    When you're in the midst of a major career change, telling stories about your professional self can inspire others' belief in your character and in your capacity to take a leap and land on your feet. It also can help you believe in yourself. A narrative thread will give meaning to your career history; it will assure you that, in moving on to something new, you are not discarding everything you've worked so hard to accomplish. Unfortunately, the authors explain in this article, most of us fail to use the power of storytelling in pursuit of our professional goals, or we do it badly. Tales of transition are especially challenging. Not knowing how to reconcile the built-in discontinuities in our work lives, we often relay just the facts. We present ourselves as safe--and dull and unremarkable. That's not a necessary compromise. A transition story has inherent dramatic appeal. The protagonist is you, of course, and what's at stake is your career. Perhaps you've come to an event or insight that represents a point of no return. It's this kind of break with the past that will force you to discover and reveal who you really are. Discontinuity and tension are part of the experience. If these elements are missing from your career story, the tale will fall flat. With all these twists and turns, how do you demonstrate stability and earn listeners' trust? By emphasizing continuity and causality--in other words, by showing that your past is related to the present and, from that trajectory, conveying that a solid future is in sight. If you can make your story of transition cohere, you will have gone far in convincing the listener--and reassuring yourself--that the change makes sense for you and is likely to bring success.

  17. Reflections on the journey: six short stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynie Sharon L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the goals of the 2011 International Year of Chemistry is to celebrate the contributions of women to science. A question that has been frequently asked in this regard is... Why is it necessary to highlight women in the "age of equality"? The reasons are varied but the facts are that many women scientists worked in obscurity throughout the 19th and even well into the 20th century, sometimes publishing anonymously to be heard. This celebration of Women in Science is one way to recognize both the resiliency and passion of these women. As part of this celebration, Chemistry Central Journal's Thematic Series of "Women in Chemistry" includes this article describing the path several women took as they pursued chemistry careers spanning the latter part of the 20th century and into the early 21st century. Sharon Haynie, Nancy Jones, Cheryl Martin, Paula Olsiewski, Mary Roberts and Amber Hinkle each have unique story of their personal journey from childhood to adulthood. As you read these stories, listen generously, and feel free to share your own stories, comments and thoughts.

  18. Stories as case knowledge: case knowledge as stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, K

    2001-09-01

    Every case contains a human story of illness and a medical story of disease, which together cover person management, case management, health system management and self-management. Much of that management can be learned via a thorough set of stories of typical and atypical core cases compiled by clinical teachers. Stories provide a highly flexible framework for illustrating the lessons of experience, the tips and traps for young players, and the dilemmas requiring careful judgement in the trade-offs between benefits and risks. Listening to real stories unfold is much more fun than being lectured (and better remembered). Stories illustrate 'what can happen' in a case as a guide to 'what to do'. A story begins with a real world situation with some predicament and a (causal) sequence of events or plot in which things are resolved one way or another. Patients tell their illness story; their clinician translates that into a disease story. Stories sort out what is important in such a predicament, consider the strategy and tactics of what to do, and speak about the outcomes. Each local situation provides relevance, context and circumstantial detail. Stories about case management can encapsulate practical knowledge, logical deduction, judgement and decision making, sharing with the student all the ingredients that develop expertise. Sometimes it is the plot that is important, sometimes the detail, sometimes it is the underlying message, the parable that resonates with the listener's experiences and feelings.1 Stories can also accommodate the complexity of multiple variables and the influence of other stakeholders, the uncertainties and dilemmas within the trade-offs, and the niceties of 'informed judgement'. This paper makes four points. First, clinical stories recount pointed examples of 'what happened' that expand our expertise in handling 'a case like that'. Second, cases are the unit of clinical work. Case stories expand the dimensions and details of case knowledge

  19. Pure Science and Applied Science*

    OpenAIRE

    Aumann, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    (Excerpt) The name of my talk is Pure Science and Applied Science, and the idea I would like to sell to you today is that there is no such thing as “pure” or “applied” science. In other words, there is such a thing as science, but there is no difference between pure and applied science. Science is one entity and cannot be separated into different categories. In order to back that up, I would like to tell you a little story. As an undergraduate, I studied mathematics at City College in New...

  20. Using Esri Story Map Technology to Demonstrate SERVIR Global Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, E. C.; Flores, A.; Muench, R.; Coulter, D.; Limaye, A. S.; Irwin, D.

    2016-12-01

    A joint development initiative of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), SERVIR works in partnership with leading regional organizations world-wide to help developing countries build their capacity to use information provided by Earth observing satellites and geospatial technologies for managing climate and weather risks, food security and agriculture, land use change, water resources, and natural disaster response. The SERVIR network currently includes 4 regional hubs: Eastern and Southern Africa, Hindu-Kush-Himalaya, the Lower Mekong region, and West Africa, and has completed project activities in the Mesoamerica region. SERVIR has activities in over 40 countries, has developed 70 custom tools, and has collaborated with 155 institutions to apply current state of the art science and technology to decision making. Many of these efforts have the potential to continue to influence decision-making at new institutions throughout the globe; however, engaging those stakeholders and society while maintaining a global brand identity is challenging. Esri story map technologies have allowed the SERVIR network to highlight the applications of SERVIR projects. Conventional communication approaches have been used in SERVIR to share success stories of our geospatial projects; however, the power of Esri story telling offers a great opportunity to convey effectively the impacts of the geospatial solutions provided through SERVIR to end users. This paper will present use cases of how Esri story map technologies are being used across the SERVIR network to effectively communicate science to SERVIR users and general public. The easy to use design templates and interactive user interface are ideal for highlighting SERVIR's diverse products. In addition, the SERVIR team hopes to continue using story maps for project outreach and user engagement.

  1. Connecting Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasants, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Helping students understand the Nature of Science (NOS) is a long-standing goal of science education. One method is to provide students examples of science history in the form of short stories. This article modifies that approach, using historical case studies to address both the history of science and the history of technology, as well as the…

  2. Stories in the Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gary

    2017-01-01

    To some degree, comics have always been used to convert data into stories, from ancient Egyptian heiroglyphics to crude biology diagrams in grade-school textbooks. By their very nature, comics communicate through a variety of visualization techniques. Benjamin Bach, who along with his coauthors Nathalie Henry Riche, Sheelagh Carpendale, and Hanspeter Pfister created this issue's Art on Graphics special contribution about the emerging genre of data comics, here talks about their attempts to leverage the massive untapped potential for data-driven comics to explain multiple threads of simultaneous data.

  3. Humidifier disinfectants, unfinished stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeyong Choi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Once released into the air, humidifier disinfectants became tiny nano-size particles, and resulted in chemical bronchoalveolitis. Families had lost their most beloved members, and even some of them became broken. Based on an estimate of two million potential victims who had experienced adverse effects from the use of humidifier disinfectants, we can say that what we have observed was only the tip of the iceberg. Problems of entire airways, as well as other systemic effects, should be examined, as we know these nano-size particles can irritate cell membranes and migrate into systemic circulation. The story of humidifier disinfectant is not finished yet.

  4. Telling better stories: strengthening the story in story and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp-Benedict, Eric

    2012-12-01

    information available at that time, based on statements that appear in the SRES itself. The CIB method is a technique for constructing internally consistent qualitative scenarios. Global-scale scenario exercises, in particular climate scenarios, typically include both qualitative (narrative) and quantitative (model) elements. As noted by Schweizer and Kriegler, the dominant method for such studies, which Alcamo (2001, 2008) formalized and named the 'story and simulation' (SAS) approach, relies at least in part on quantitative modeling to ensure consistency. Schweizer and Kriegler rightly criticize the idea that models alone can ensure consistency of a scenario narrative. By itself, this critique is not new. Indeed, if asked, both Alcamo and Raskin et al (Raskin et al 2005), whom Schweizer and Kriegler (2012) cite, would probably agree with them; both sources emphasize the need for qualitative storylines that go beyond what models can provide. However, Schweizer and Kriegler correctly point out that these sources provide little or no guidance to those responsible for the narratives beyond a dialog with the model outputs. The CIB method addresses this problem, and Schweizer and Kriegler's application of the method shows that even the best narrative-writing teams can benefit from this guidance. While the paper of Schweizer and Kriegler makes a compelling argument for using CIB in global scenarios, it should be used in combination with other methods. A scenario exercise has several aims, of which consistency is one. Another important goal is diversity: given a set of internally consistent scenarios, a diverse set covers the space of possibilities, and thereby helps users of the scenarios avoid underestimating or overestimating the potential for change in one or another key factor (e.g., see (Carlsen 2009)). From this point of view, the SRES authors could legitimately respond to Schweizer and Kriegler's finding that the SRES scenarios excluded interesting variants on coal

  5. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research ... speech-language-pathology programs in universities and speech clinics in places like England, Brazil and other places. ...

  6. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in ... can. The genetic methods for all sorts of medical genetic disorders have been refined over the past ...

  7. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, Regulation ...

  8. Artifacts as Stories: Understanding Families, Digital Literacies, and Storied Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Ellison, Tisha

    2016-01-01

    This column focuses on the interactions during family and group conversation circles that not only helped participants talk about personal, emotional, and social issues in their digital stories but also helped them make sense of artifacts and the meanings that stories carry in shared spaces and practices. This work adds to the bourgeoning…

  9. Mechanism of story elements in the Forud story of Shahname

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hojjatollah Hemmati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Which by their nature narrative structure elements , motifs and narrative action takes place . Author In light of these characteristics and structural elements such as plot , point of view , conflict, crisis , climax and relief , follow the narrative structure down. In this study is to investigate the structure of the story landed in Shahnameh . For this purpose, the definition of story and structure delivers And a review of such issues to investigate this story. And to provide this evidence to conclude that the text of traditions and story And a coherent and systematic plan and that it regulates the relations of cause and effect . And shows the text with the help of fictional elements From a stable position starts And stable position and different ends.     Abstract Which by their nature narrative structure elements , motifs and narrative action takes place . Author In light of these characteristics and structural elements such as plot , point of view , conflict, crisis , climax and relief , follow the narrative structure down. In this study is to investigate the structure of the story landed in Shahnameh . For this purpose, the definition of story and structure delivers And a review of such issues to investigate this story. And to provide this evidence to conclude that the text of traditions and story And a coherent and systematic plan and that it regulates the relations of cause and effect . And shows the text with the help of fictional elements From a stable position starts And stable position and different ends.

  10. 'All stories bring hope because stories bring awareness': students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    2014-11-10

    Nov 10, 2014 ... Using narrative inquiry, and specifically Bamberg's. (2006) 'small stories' ... on the link between personal experience/narrative and larger social issues that affect students' practice in South. African schools, we hope to ..... ports on findings from a deductive analysis of 30 small stories told in the focus group ...

  11. An International Inquiry: Stories of Poverty--Poverty Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffetelli Parker, Darlene; Craig, Cheryl J.

    2017-01-01

    This article features an international inquiry of two high-poverty urban schools, one Canadian and one American. The article examines poverty in terms of "small stories" that educators and students live and tell, often on the edges, unheard and unaccounted for in grand narratives. It also expands the story constellations approach to…

  12. Tracking Citations: A Science Detective Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirkina, Galina V.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2014-01-01

    The earliest hypothesis concerning the phonetic-phonological roots of reading and writing learning disabilities is usually attributed to Boder in the U.S. literature. Yet by following a trail of references to work in psychology and education conducted some 30 years earlier in the USSR, we find the seeds of this idea already well established in the…

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  14. Telling Feminist Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Hemmings

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies and analyses the dominant stories that academics tell about the development of Western second wave feminist theory. Through an examination of recent production of interdisciplinary feminist and cultural theory journals, I suggest that despite a rhetorical insistence on multiple feminisms, Western feminist trajectories emerge as startlingly singular. In particular, I am critical of an insistent narrative that sees the development of feminist thought as a relentless march of progress or loss. This dominant approach oversimplifies the complex history of Western feminisms, fixes writers and perspectives within a particular decade, and repeatedly (and erroneously positions poststructuralist feminists as ‘the first’ to challenge the category ‘woman’ as the subject and object of feminist knowledge. Rather than provide a corrective history of Western feminist theory, the article interrogates the techniques through which this dominant story is secured, despite the fact that we (feminist theorists know better. My focus, therefore, is on citation patterns, discursive framings and some of their textual, theoretical and political effects. As an alternative, I suggest a realignment of key theorists purported to provide a critical break in feminist theory with their feminist citational traces, to force a concomitant re-imagining of our historical legacy and our place within it.

  15. Ancient loons stories Pingree told me

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The book is a collection of short stories, small anecdotes in the life of some historical characters. More concretely, it focuses on the oddities and singularities of some well-known historical figures, not only in science, but also in arts, politics and social sciences. … the book shows the fascination for ancient history, the treasures hidden in original sources and the importance of exploring unusual connections.-Javier Martinez, The European Mathematical Society, January 2013… a rambling, illuminating and thoroughly enjoyable bio/autobiographical and historical sketch, setting Pingree's immense erudition in its professional and intellectual context. Besides a string of amusing and intriguing anecdotes plentifully sprinkled with photos and sketches, this small volume supplies a valuable reminder of how complex, surprising and just plain strange the history of the exact sciences can be.-Kim Plofker, MAA Reviews, October 2012.

  16. Origins the scientific story of creation

    CERN Document Server

    Baggott, Jim

    2015-01-01

    What is the nature of the material world? How does it work? What is the universe and how was it formed? What is life? Where do we come from and how did we evolve? How and why do we think? What does it mean to be human? How do we know? There are many different versions of our creation story. This book tells the version according to modern science. It is a unique account, starting at the Big Bang and travelling right up to the emergence of humans as conscious intelligent beings, 13.8 billion years later. Chapter by chapter, it sets out the current state of scientific knowledge: the origins of space and time; energy, mass, and light; galaxies, stars, and our sun; the habitable earth, and complex life itself. Drawing together the physical and biological sciences, Baggott recounts what we currently know of our history, highlighting the questions science has yet to answer.

  17. Evidence for anecdotes: Examining use of stories in introductory biology courses with a mixed-methods approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreps, Jennifer Susan

    2005-11-01

    Instructional stories can be an effective way to teach science concepts. However, research has not examined the extent to which stories are being used, and how they are received. More research on the use of story in biology classes may lead to more conscious use of story by instructors, which may lead to a better understanding of biological concepts by students. The purpose of this study was to examine how instructors and students use stories in university introductory biology courses, and the degree to which these stories are perceived to be effective. To examine this phenomenon, a nationwide instructor survey, a university-wide student survey, and multiple case studies were used. Two case studies included observation of lectures, interviews with (36) students, and interviews with instructors (4) over two semesters of an organismal biology course. Instructor survey participants (N = 78) were gathered by posting email invitations, and student survey participants (N = 260) were volunteers from introductory biology courses at a middle-sized university. Several types of stories were observed, including personal experience stories, historical anecdotes, and "you" stories. Students reported increased affective learning when stories were told, and remembered mostly humorous stories. In the instructor survey, no significant differences emerged between genders, type of biology taught, or communicator style and instructional story frequency. However, reports of personal experience story frequency did increase significantly (p differences in story use by gender or ethnicity, although non-science majors reported that their instructors used stories significantly more frequently (p < .01) than did science majors. Simultaneous-entry multiple regression analyses indicated that there was a significant positive relationship between story use and cognitive and affective learning for all groups of students. Story use was a significant predictor of perceived learning loss for non-science

  18. Narratives and neurons: stories of damaged brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickley, G Andrew; Hoyt, Daniel A

    2010-01-01

    Stories register in human memory in special ways, and stories about neurological cases can entertain and move a reader while simultaneously being an important part of any neuroscience curriculum. Here we describe a course taught in the context of the liberal arts curriculum of Baldwin-Wallace College. Students from a variety of disciplines learned basic neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neurochemistry and then used this information to help them understand published neurological case studies, which were analyzed for their literary as well as scientific qualities. Later in the course, students were paired with a person with a neurological disorder and they investigated their cases in some depth. The capstone experience was a monograph that aimed to be both good science and good story telling. Narratives and Neurons was team taught by faculty from the Neuroscience and English departments. However, the case studies were shaped and improved by all the class participants using writing workshop methods common to creative writing classes. Assessments of this course were very favorable, suggesting that students find that the work enhanced their resourcefulness and challenged their abilities to critically evaluate and problem solve. Some of the cases have found their way into the peer-reviewed literature. Moreover, the interaction between students and individuals with neurological disorders provided a diversity of experiences that enriched the lives of all the participants.

  19. Story Telling With Storyboards: Enhancements and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, T. A.; Grayzeck, E. J.; Galica, C.; Erickson, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    A year ago a tool to help tell stories, called the Planetary Data Storyboard, was introduced. This tool is designed to use today's technologies to tell stories that are rich multi-media experiences, blending text, animations, movies and infographics. The Storyboard tool presents a set of panels that contain representative images of an event with associated notes or instructions. The panels are arranged in a timeline that allow a user to experience a discovery or event in the same way it occurred. Each panel can link to a more detailed source such as a publication, the data that was collected or items derived from the research (like movies or animations). A storyboard can be used to make science discovery more accessible to people by presenting events in an easy to follow layout. A storyboard can also help to teach the scientific method, by following the experiences of a researcher as they investigate a phenomenon or try to understand a new set of observations. We present the new features of Storyboard tool and show example stories for scientific discoveries.

  20. SAGA: A DSL for Story Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Beyak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Video game development is currently a very labour-intensive endeavour. Furthermore it involves multi-disciplinary teams of artistic content creators and programmers, whose typical working patterns are not easily meshed. SAGA is our first effort at augmenting the productivity of such teams. Already convinced of the benefits of DSLs, we set out to analyze the domains present in games in order to find out which would be most amenable to the DSL approach. Based on previous work, we thus sought those sub-parts that already had a partially established vocabulary and at the same time could be well modeled using classical computer science structures. We settled on the 'story' aspect of video games as the best candidate domain, which can be modeled using state transition systems. As we are working with a specific company as the ultimate customer for this work, an additional requirement was that our DSL should produce code that can be used within a pre-existing framework. We developed a full system (SAGA comprised of a parser for a human-friendly language for 'story events', an internal representation of design patterns for implementing object-oriented state-transitions systems, an instantiator for these patterns for a specific 'story', and three renderers (for C++, C# and Java for the instantiated abstract code.

  1. Social Studies and Effective Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ian M.; McGuire, Margit E.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the use of storytelling and interactive story building as a technique for effective social studies teaching. Describes Storyline, a structured approach to teaching and learning, in which the students and teacher create a story together. Emphasizes the broad coverage of social studies content and skills that is achieved with the method.…

  2. Iconic Prosody in Story Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Marcus; Clark, Nathaniel; Falck, Marlene Johansson

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that people iconically modulate their prosody corresponding with the meaning of their utterance (e.g., Shintel et al., 2006). This article reports findings from a story reading task that expands the investigation of iconic prosody to abstract meanings in addition to concrete ones. Participants read stories that…

  3. Sweet Secrets: Stories of Menstruation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Kathleen; Wansbrough, Paula

    This book combines short stories with clear, factual health information for adolescent females about menstruation and their bodily changes they are experiencing. It focuses on young girls' concerns and questions about menstruation and educates through a combination of the front matter and the stories themselves. Coming from different generations…

  4. Magical Landscapes: Two Love Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John Noell

    2002-01-01

    Introduces two books about magic, one a collection of essays "Ex Libris: Confessions of a Common Reader," which describes the author's inherited lifelong passion for books and reading; and the other a novel, "Mangos, Bananas and Coconuts: A Cuban Love Story," which tells a story of love and magic that seems both real and…

  5. Writing Stories to Enhance Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Stephen M.; Tomas, Louisa; Tones, Megan

    2011-03-01

    In response to international concerns about scientific literacy and students' waning interest in school science, this study investigated the effects of a science-writing project about the socioscientific issue (SSI) of biosecurity on the development of students' scientific literacy. Students generated two BioStories each that merged scientific information with the narrative storylines in the project. The study was conducted in two phases. In the exploratory phase, a qualitative case study of a sixth-grade class involving classroom observations and interviews informed the design of the second, confirmatory phase of the study, which was conducted at a different school. This phase involved a mixed methods approach featuring a quasi-experimental design with two classes of Australian middle school students (i.e., sixth grade, 11 years of age, n = 55). The results support the argument that writing the sequence of stories helped the students become more familiar with biosecurity issues, develop a deeper understanding of related biological concepts, and improve their interest in science. On the basis of these findings, teachers should be encouraged to engage their students in the practice of writing about SSI in a way that integrates scientific information into narrative storylines. Extending the practice to older students and exploring additional issues related to writing about SSI are recommended for further research.

  6. Las Rocas Nos Cuentan (Rocks Tell Their Stories)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerandi-Roman, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    Many Earth science lessons today still focus on memorizing the names of rocks and minerals. This led the author to develop a lesson that reveals the fascinating stories told by rocks through the study of their physical properties. He first designed the lesson for Puerto Rican teachers, hence its Spanish title: "Las Rocas Nos Cuentan Su Historia."…

  7. The Crossett Story, Revised: Updating a Forestry Classic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don C. Bragg; James M. Guldin; Michael G. Shelton

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: The Crossett Story slide show was developed in 1980 to detail the history of logging, field forestry, and research centered on the USDA Forest Service's Crossett Experimental Forest (CEF). However, science and technology have advanced considerably over the last several decades and the regulatory environment has...

  8. Never Say Dye: The Story of Coloured Cotton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 12. Never Say Dye: The Story of Coloured Cotton. M S S Murthy. General Article Volume 6 Issue 12 December 2001 pp 29-35. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/12/0029-0035 ...

  9. Environments, people and environmental education: a story of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A story is used to address how the process of change has led to the development of political, social, economic and biophysical environmental stress. Comparative analogies illustrate how education as an institutional profession with an historically rooted didactic science perspective has not adequately responded to change, ...

  10. still in an environmental education curriculum research story

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RESEARCH STORY. Bridget Hughes. The Environmental Education Curriculum Initiative (EECI) in partnership with the Human Sciences Research ... of action adopted at the United Nations Conference on. Environment and Development in .... far removed from classroom practice needed to be challenged and overturned.

  11. The Unique Story of a High-Tech Polymer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 6. The Unique Story of a High-Tech Polymer. Panchanan Pramanik Ruby Chakraborty. General ... Author Affiliations. Panchanan Pramanik1 Ruby Chakraborty1. Department of Chemistry Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur 721302, India ...

  12. A storied-identity analysis approach to teacher candidates learning to teach in an urban setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibourk, Amal

    While many studies have investigated the relationship between teachers' identity work and their developing practices, few of these identity focused studies have honed in on teacher candidates' learning to teach in an urban setting. Drawing upon narrative inquiry methodology and a "storied identity" analytic framework, I examined how the storied identities of science learning and becoming a science teacher shape teacher candidates' developing practice. In particular, I examined the stories of three interns, Becky, David, and Ashley, and I tell about their own experiences as science learners, their transitions to science teachers, and the implications this has for the identity work they did as they navigated the challenges of learning to teach in high-needs schools. Initially, each of the interns highlighted a feeling of being an outsider, and having a difficult time becoming a fully valued member of their classroom community in their storied identities of becoming a science teacher in the beginning of their internship year. While the interns named specific challenges, such as limited lab materials and different math abilities, I present how they adapted their lesson plans to address these challenges while drawing from their storied identities of science learning. My study reveals that the storied identities of becoming a science teacher informed how they framed their initial experiences teaching in an urban context. In addition, my findings reveal that the more their storied identities of science learning and becoming a science teacher overlapped, the more they leveraged their storied identity of science learning in order to implement teaching strategies that helped them make sense of the challenges that surfaced in their classroom contexts. Both Becky and Ashley leveraged their storied identities of science learning more than David did in their lesson planning and learning to teach. David's initial storied identity of becoming a science teacher revealed how he

  13. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health ... & Compliance Grants News/Blog Contracts Loan Repayment More » ...

  14. A Little Solar Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Bashir

    1997-01-01

    Experiences from use of solar cookers in India and many other places are different. But the story which is based on a field study in Gujarat state of India shows that during last twenty years there has been a tendency that many families do not continue to use their solar cookers. The study shows...... that the tendency is related with the lack of compatibility of this new technology (solar cooker) with the everyday real-life conditions of the families. In principle the findings are supported by an evaluation report on a solar cooker project in Burkina Faso. The conclusion is that the user should be involved...... in the solar cooker technological development process....

  15. Story and Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Waxler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Why should we be concerned about the fate of literature as we move from a book culture to a screen culture in the digital age? Not primarily because we are losing our sense of story, but because we are losing our sense of the central importance of linguistic narrative. There is a difference. The technologies creating the digital revolution seem to devalue language and increasingly to do away with boundaries, celebrating instead speed and boundless exhilaration. The visual trumps the linguistic, the image and the screen trump the word and the book. As a result, we no longer seem to engage deeply with others or ourselves. We are beginning to move, in other words, from “a reading brain” to “a digital brain,” from a brain capable of deep reading and deep thinking to a brain increasingly addled by spectacle and surface sensation. We are losing our standing as “linguistic beings.”

  16. The Singapore research story

    CERN Document Server

    Teck Seng, Low; Thampuran, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Singapore became independent in 1965, its leaders have invested tremendous efforts and resources to develop its economy in order to create jobs for its people and to support national development. This book describes the challenging journey of Singapore in developing a knowledge-based economy driven by research and innovation and the roles played by research institutes, universities, research manpower and appropriate collaboration between research institutes and industry. The book traces the foundations of Singapore's research story from the time of its independence in 1965 to the present day. Through interviews with the key players and research into the records, the establishment of the key institutes and the roles of a global cast of researchers, scientists and engineers in setting up the R&D infrastructure are outlined. The impact that the concerted efforts of the last 25 years to build up a credible and world-class research capability in Singapore is discussed, as are the tremendous challeng...

  17. What stories unfold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Vorre

    2017-01-01

    of service-dominant logic and customer-dominant logic. Findings The research elucidated how value is both socially created and deconstructed through stories. Moreover, narrative analysis revealed how residents’ perceptions of services are deeply embedded in context and time. In this way, the study...... sector in Denmark, the research explored how residents perceive and co-create value in a long-term service relationship. The point of departure is an understanding of value co-creation as a phenomenological construct determined by the beneficiary, and the research is based primarily on the perspectives....... Originality/value Prevailing streams in service research on value co-creation argue for more studies and empirically grounded examples of value co-creation processes, especially those based in the customer sphere. This paper contributes to such an enhanced understanding of the process of value co...

  18. StoryTrek: Experiencing Stories in the Real World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaled, Rilla; Barr, Pippin James; Greenspan, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce StoryTrek, a locative hypernarrative system developed to generate stories based on a reader’s location and specific movements in the real world. This creates, for readers, an interplay between navigation, narrative, and agency, as well as between the fictional and real...... world experience. In early tests we observed the emergence of a number of recurrent themes in participants’ experiences which are characteristic of the StoryTrek system, but which also help us to understand locative media storytelling affordances more generally. In this paper we present the system...

  19. Stories of Power, Powerful Stories: The Drunken Priest in Donegal

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Lawrence J.

    1990-01-01

    This story is one of twenty-three “priest stories” collected in one notebook by folklorist Sean Ó’hEochaidh from his natal community of Teelin in Donegal, Ireland. The notebook containing these Gaelic tales is dated 1945, but there are also dozens of other priest stories scattered through the more than seventy volumes of oral lore recorded by Ó’hEochaidh in his nearly half century (beginning in the early 1930s) of folklore collecting in the area. The stories relate the exploits of local cur...

  20. Life Stories and Interculturality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toldi Éva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines two short stories: Teréz Müller’s Igaz történet [A True Story] and József Bálint senior’s Imádkozzál és dolgozzál [Pray and Work]. The argument explores the way the texts reflect on shifts in power in the Hungarian region of Vojvodina, and the way power structures define the relationship between majority and minority in a society that undergoes constant and radical changes. Contemporary historical events of the twentieth century, changes, faultlines, traumatic life events and identity shifts emerge as the contexts for these narratives of the daily experiences of a Jewish merchant family and a farmer family respectively. Thus, the two texts analysed are representative works rooted in two fundamentally different social backgrounds. The discourse about the I is always also about the other; the construction of identity is already in itself a dialogic, intercultural act, which makes it an ideal topic for the exploration of the changes and shifts in one’s own and the other’s cultural identity. Translational processes of transmission are also required for the narration of traumatic experiences. Teréz Müller was the grandmother of the Serbian writer Aleksandar Tišma. Her book is not primarily a document of their relationship; however, it does throw light on diverse background events of the writer’s life and oeuvre. Comparing the experiences of identity in the autobiographical novel of Aleksandar Tišma and the recollections of his grandmother reveals geocultural characteristics of their intercultural life experiences.

  1. TEACHING SPEAKING THROUGH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF STORY TELLING TECHNIQUE BY USING STORY-TELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwatiningsih Purwatiningsih

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning a language especially English is expected to help students to be able to use it as a means of communication. Communicating is understanding and expressing information, thought and feeling, and expanding science, technology and culture. Communicating ability means being able to understand a discourse, namely being able to understand and produce spoken and written texts through the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing this classroom action research was conducted to solve the students’ problems in speaking. It is to improve the students’ ability in speaking through story-telling technique using picture series in terms of content and delivery of the story. The design of this study is classroom action research which was conducted in two cycles consisting of six meetings. The subjects of this study were students of grade x-9 of MAN 2 Madiun in 2012/2013 academic year. The instruments to collect the data were observation checklists, field notes, speaking task measured using scoring rubrics, and questionnaire. The criteria of success were determined on the basis of the students’ participation in the teaching-learning process, the students’ speaking achievement in terms of score (telling a story individually, and the students’ responses to the implementation of story-telling technique using picture series. The finding of the study indicated that the implementation of the technique was successful in improving the students’ speaking ability, since the criteria of success were achieved. The first criterion was if 70% of the students participate or are actively involved in the teaching and learning process, and the data analysis confirmed that 84% of students were actively involved. Concerning the second criterion was if 70% of the students achieve the score greater than or equal to 75, the finding showed that 81% of the students already achieved scores greater than 75. The last criterion, if 70% of students

  2. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the American Recovery Act News & Events News Releases Digital Media Kits Media Resources Media Contacts Images and B-roll Events Social Media More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science ...

  3. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics ... Social Media More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research ... Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  4. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Resources Media Contacts Images and B-roll Events Social Media More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics ...

  5. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Media Contacts Images and B-roll Events Social Media More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics ...

  6. An X-Band Radar Terrain Feature Detection Method for Low-Altitude SVS Operations and Calibration Using LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steve; UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Campbell, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    To enable safe use of Synthetic Vision Systems at low altitudes, real-time range-to-terrain measurements may be required to ensure the integrity of terrain models stored in the system. This paper reviews and extends previous work describing the application of x-band radar to terrain model integrity monitoring. A method of terrain feature extraction and a transformation of the features to a common reference domain are proposed. Expected error distributions for the extracted features are required to establish appropriate thresholds whereby a consistency-checking function can trigger an alert. A calibration-based approach is presented that can be used to obtain these distributions. To verify the approach, NASA's DC-8 airborne science platform was used to collect data from two mapping sensors. An Airborne Laser Terrain Mapping (ALTM) sensor was installed in the cargo bay of the DC-8. After processing, the ALTM produced a reference terrain model with a vertical accuracy of less than one meter. Also installed was a commercial-off-the-shelf x-band radar in the nose radome of the DC-8. Although primarily designed to measure precipitation, the radar also provides estimates of terrain reflectivity at low altitudes. Using the ALTM data as the reference, errors in features extracted from the radar are estimated. A method to estimate errors in features extracted from the terrain model is also presented.

  7. The story of a largely unknown evolution - Germ theory hoax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Milton; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali

    2011-10-01

    The Piltdown Man debacle provides us with the most infamous forgery in science. However, another equally intriguing story exists concerning a document by a Bostonian called George Sleeper, which purported to be a pre-Darwin-Wallace anticipation of evolution and an equally convincing account of the germ theory published before Louis Pasteur's famous studies on this subject. The story involves two giants in the world of evolutionary theory, Alfred Russel Wallace and E.B. Poulton. While Wallace was convinced that the Sleeper document was genuine, Poulton's detailed investigations showed that it was a fake and a hoax. Despite this conclusion, doubts still exist about the authenticity of the Sleeper document.

  8. Introducing Interactive Technology--"Toy Story 3"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    "To infinity and beyond!" is the catchphrase of Buzz Lightyear, Universe Protection Unit space ranger, a character in the Disney/Pixar "Toy Story" franchise. The three films in the franchise--"Toy Story," 1993; "Toy Story 2," 1999; and "Toy Story 3," 2010--incorporate an innovative blend of many different genres, having spun off video games and…

  9. A Data Sharing Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Crosas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From the early days of modern science through this century of Big Data, data sharing has enabled some of the greatest advances in science. In the digital age, technology can facilitate more effective and efficient data sharing and preservation practices, and provide incentives for making data easily accessible among researchers. At the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University, we have developed an open-source software to share, cite, preserve, discover and analyze data, named the Dataverse Network. We share here the project’s motivation, its growth and successes, and likely evolution.

  10. Science Comic Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Jang, Hae Gwon; Shin, Dong Sun; Kim, Sun-Ja; Yoo, Chang Young; Chung, Min Suk

    2012-01-01

    Science comic strips entitled Dr. Scifun were planned to promote science jobs and studies among professionals (scientists, graduate and undergraduate students) and children. To this end, the authors collected intriguing science stories as the basis of scenarios, and drew four-cut comic strips, first on paper and subsequently as computer files.…

  11. Co-Story-ing: Collaborative Story Writing with Children Who Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrsson, Dale-Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This article offers a guide for using collaborative story writing (co-story-ing), an assessment technique as well as a therapeutic intervention for children who demonstrate fears, extreme shyness and difficulty in establishing relationships. Co-story-ing draws from Gardner's Mutual Story Telling Technique. Co-story-ing guides clients as they…

  12. Reviews Equipment: Vibration detector Equipment: SPARK Science Learning System PS-2008 Equipment: Pelton wheel water turbine Book: Atomic: The First War of Physics and the Secret History of the Atom Bomb 1939-49 Book: Outliers: The Story of Success Book: T-Minus: The Race to the Moon Equipment: Fridge Rover Equipment: Red Tide School Spectrophotometer Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND Vibration detector SEP equipment measures minor tremors in the classroom SPARK Science Learning System PS-2008 Datalogger is easy to use and has lots of added possibilities Atomic: The First War of Physics and the Secret History of the Atom Bomb 1939-49 Book is crammed with the latest on the atom bomb T-Minus: The Race to the Moon Graphic novel depicts the politics as well as the science Fridge Rover Toy car can teach magnetics and energy, and is great fun Red Tide School Spectrophotometer Professional standard equipment for the classroom WORTH A LOOK Pelton wheel water turbine Classroom-sized version of the classic has advantages Outliers: The Story of Success Study of why maths is unpopular is relevant to physics teaching WEB WATCH IOP webcasts are improving but are still not as impressive as Jodrell Bank's Chromoscope website

  13. A Study of Plot in Siavash Story

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, A.(Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)

    2012-01-01

    Plot is the main element of a story based on a temporal chain and causality. Although Siavash story is an epic story, there are some structural elements on the basis of which we should call the first episode of this story âfrom Siavash birth till his emigrationâ a âDramatic storyâ and its second episode âfrom his emigration till being killedâ a âTragic storyâ. Analysing the plot of this story, we can summarize it in three sequences. Every sequence consists of three to five functions and ev...

  14. A true case story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Bjørg Walker

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism is not generally recognized as a condition which can be bio-medically influenced. As of today, there are no biomarkers for autism that are recognized by traditional medicine. Treating autism medically is a difficult and hopeless task according to official guidelines (even though it is seldom written in official documents. Parents of many children who have or had an ASD diagnosis have witnessed significant improvements in their children after dietary interventions as well as after interventions with vitamins, minerals and biogene substances which can be bought over the counter. The parents of individual children are their best observers. With a high degree of certainty, they are able to see which substances improve or weaken their children. Their observations are usually accurate, but their rationale for why is often wrong. Observations from parents can often be of greater importance for the child than advice from so called experts. This is a true story about a girl whose parents lost contact with her when she was only 6 months old. In her first 14 days she lost her ability to roll over, to babble and make sounds. She did not look at her parents any more – just stared up at the roof. At 9 months she did not respond to words such as, ‘look at mommy’. Through the parents own experiences with her older siblings and 4 months of frantic searching for a diet that would agree with the child, she made a remarkable journey from 10 months of age to 18 months. There is one thing worth mentioning – she refused to eat solid food throughout this time. The story does not end there. Today she is 12 years old and has had to be regulated with diet and biogene substances every day since she was 4 years old. During the last 5 months she has shown more stability and can even go a day or two without biogene substances as long as she keeps to her dietary plan. If you had just met her and spent a day with her, you would never know.

  15. Transmedia storytelling on travel stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Baltar Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Travel stories form part of a great tradition inside Western Culture which has served historically to describe, to understand and to imagine other cul - tures and communities, far or near, being constituted into a real narra - tive genre. This type of story has been and is a reflection of the perception of the world based on the imaginary worlds created by the travelling narrators. How do modern authors of travel stories take advantage of the opportunities offered by transmedia storytelling? The present article explores the potential of these types of stories as a privileged object of study for transmedia storytelling studies, from the analysis of a sample of 80 narrative productions based on experiences of travel and presented in diverse editions of the Festival Le Grand Bivouac (France. It also shows the existence of a new contemporary trend inside this narrative form that transcends its literary nature.

  16. Telling stories through visual art

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James Kochalka; Cara Bean

    2015-01-01

      Storytelling is at the core of visual art. Movies, photographs, comic books, advertisements, portraits, scrolls, and interdisciplinary arts communicate some kind of story, even if the meaning is unclear...

  17. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research ... Who We Are What We Do Jobs at NIH Visitor Information Frequently Asked Questions Contact ...

  18. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science ... work with speech therapy organizations in the United States that have provided a steady flow of subjects ...

  19. Ice Stories: Engaging Polar Scientists as Field Correspondents for IPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.

    2006-12-01

    The International Polar Year (IPY 2007-09) gives the public, teachers, and students an extraordinary opportunity to experience the process of scientific discovery in action. The Exploratorium, working in partnership with international scientists at both poles, will create educational resources for museum and online visitors that celebrate life, legacy and science in the world's polar regions. In this session, Senior Science Producer Mary Miller will discuss the Exploratorium's proposed IPY project, Ice Stories. This unique educational project will provide a public face for IPY by using the power of contemporary media to bring current research to mass audiences with unprecedented intimacy and immediacy. Ice Stories includes: a media-rich, dynamic and continuously updated public Web site; a media-assets database for journalists, media producers, educators, and museum partners; a training program in media production and story-telling for polar scientists Ice Stories provides the public with access to IPY research through the development of a network of Exploratorium-trained polar field correspondents. It makes use of the design, education and production capacity of an informal science center to create a bridge between scientific discovery and interested members of the public. Ice Stories employs sophisticated media production and communication technology as well as strong partnerships with allied research groups and with scientists and international organizations at the poles. The Exploratorium has pioneered in translating current science research into exhibits and presentations accessible to museum and Web audiences. It also has long experience creating award-winning Web sites, professional-development workshops, community outreach, and institutional alliances.

  20. Cognitive Processes in Skimming Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    timed recognition test to study the formation of macrostructure repre- sentations of narrative and newspaper stories while reading at rates ranging...increasing reading rate is achieved by readers who have greater flexibility (Thompson & Whitehill , 1970). Part of the ability to develop flexible reading...centered around the formation of a macrostructure as a memory representation of information explicitly presented in and inferred from a story. The

  1. Philoctetes and the Good Companion Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur W. Frank

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a companion story is developed through an analysis of Sophocles’ play Philoctetes, about living in chronic pain. That story is anchored by an ethnographic report of a boy living with pain, and his companion story. The good companion story is distinguished by three qualities: it consoles its companion, it complicates lives that it enters, and it promises a form of hope. The article thus seeks to demonstrate the therapeutic capacity of stories to effect healing.

  2. Prerana: a success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Prerana-Associate CEDPA, a women- and youth-focused community organization headquartered in New Delhi, has expanded its program activities with recent grants from two leading donors, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation. CEDPA provides important support through grants from The Xerox Foundation, The Turner Foundation, World Bank, and the US Agency for International Development. Founded in 1976, Prerana--whose name means "Inspiration" in Hindi--has grown steadily as knowledge of its comprehensive community-based program has spread. The organization conducts the CEDPA Better Life Options health, education, and vocational skills programs for girls and young women, maternal and child health services, and integrated community-based family planning. A parallel Better Life Options program for boys and young men was recently started. With almost 20 years of experience in the private sector, Prerana provides training and assistance to other private organizations. Prerana's Better Life Options program received international recognition in UNFPA's "The State of World Population 1994." The publication featured an article by a young Indian woman who participated in the program and as a result was able to develop life skills, improve her self-esteem, and, with her husband, decide to delay parenthood. "This success story," said Prerana Executive Director Dr. Uma Agarwal (WIM 29), "is being repeated by many other girls who find support at Prerana." full text

  3. Communicating Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Nicholas

    2009-10-01

    Introduction: what this book is about and why you might want to read it; Prologue: three orphans share a common paternity: professional science communication, popular journalism, and literary fiction are not as separate as they seem; Part I. Professional Science Communication: 1. Spreading the word: the endless struggle to publish professional science; 2. Walk like an Egyptian: the alien feeling of professional science writing; 3. The future's bright? Professional science communication in the age of the internet; 4. Counting the horse's teeth: professional standards in science's barter economy; 5. Separating the wheat from the chaff: peer review on trial; Part II. Science for the Public: What Science Do People Need and How Might They Get It?: 6. The Public Understanding of Science (PUS) movement and its problems; 7. Public engagement with science and technology (PEST): fine principle, difficult practice; 8. Citizen scientists? Democratic input into science policy; 9. Teaching and learning science in schools: implications for popular science communication; Part III. Popular Science Communication: The Press and Broadcasting: 10. What every scientist should know about mass media; 11. What every scientist should know about journalists; 12. The influence of new media; 13. How the media represents science; 14. How should science journalists behave?; Part IV. The Origins of Science in Cultural Context: Five Historic Dramas: 15. A terrible storm in Wittenberg: natural knowledge through sorcery and evil; 16. A terrible storm in the Mediterranean: controlling nature with white magic and religion; 17. Thieving magpies: the subtle art of false projecting; 18. Foolish virtuosi: natural philosophy emerges as a distinct discipline but many cannot take it seriously; 19. Is scientific knowledge 'true' or should it just be 'truthfully' deployed?; Part V. Science in Literature: 20. Science and the Gothic: the three big nineteenth-century monster stories; 21. Science fiction: serious

  4. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education ... are here Home » Health Information » NIH Clinical Research Trials and You NIH Clinical Research Trials and You ...

  5. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH News in Health Wellness Toolkits Grants & Funding Grants Home ...

  6. Stories of Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascazine, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents three biographical sketches of scientists including John Wesley Powell (first to explore the geology of the Grand Canyon), Joseph von Fraunhofer (his work in optics led to the science of spectroscopy), and Gregor Mendel (of Mendelian genetics fame). Other scientists are mentioned along with sources for additional biographical information.…

  7. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ...

  8. Telling our stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    You and I are really lucky. We live at a time when there are so many tools and resources available to us in the sciences. With all of our digital technologies we can connect with almost anyone in the world, whenever we want. We can share data and ideas almost instantaneously. We can contribute t...

  9. The story of God

    CERN Document Server

    Winston, Robert

    2005-01-01

    From a leading voice in the debate on genetic engineering comes a look at the contemporary relationship of science and religion. It begins with the primitive worship of our early ancestors, and concludes with a vivid portrait of faith in the modern world.

  10. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » ...

  11. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH News in ...

  12. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications ... Parents and Children For Health Care Providers For Researchers and Trial Sites Educational Resources ...

  13. Ice Stories: Connecting Polar Scientists with Web and Museum Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    The Exploratorium, a science museum in San Francisco, trained polar scientists in media production and story-telling and provided them with audio, video and photography gear to communicate their research during the International Polar Year and beyond. With funding from the National Science Foundation, museum designers, producers and educators created an interactive Website using open-source blogging software and trained scientists in a week-long intensive workshop in video and audio production, digital photography, and writing. Using a variety of Web 2.0 tools including blogging, video and audio podcasts, narrated slide shows, Twitter, and live webcasts, the two-dozen participating scientists contributed dispatches to the Website and interacted with audiences on the Web and in the museum from their field sites in the Arctic and Antarctic. This partnership between an informal science education institution and working researchers and science institutions allowed scientists to pool and leverage their outreach efforts and interact with a much larger audience than would otherwise be possible. The media and story-telling training provided young scientists with Web communication tools and experience that will serve them throughout their careers. Exploratorium's Ice Stories Website

  14. Dark matter and cosmic web story

    CERN Document Server

    Einasto, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    The concepts of dark matter and the cosmic web are some of the most significant developments in cosmology in the past century. They have decisively changed the classical cosmological paradigm, which was first elaborated upon during the first half of the 20th century but ran into serious problems in the second half. Today, they are integral parts of modern cosmology, which explains everything from the Big Bang to inflation to the large scale structure of the Universe. Dark Matter and Cosmic Web Story describes the contributions that led to a paradigm shift from the Eastern point of view. It describes the problems with the classical view, the attempts to solve them, the difficulties encountered by those solutions, and the conferences where the merits of the new concepts were debated. Amidst the science, the story of scientific work in a small country occupied by the Soviet Union and the tumultuous events that led to its breakup are detailed as well. This book is accompanied by a website which contains addit...

  15. The novel as short story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Schlueter

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent history, the novel has been thought of and defined primarily as a long prose narrative. However, this has not been the case historically, as the original meaning of "novel" was for "a piece of news" or "a short story or novella." Returning to this original definition, I propose a new way of viewing the work known contemporarily as the novel as a collection, or sequence, of united short stories rather than a single indivisible work, with the component short stories or novellas comprising the sequence renamed as "novels." A brief examination of several classic works traditionally considered novels serves to illustrate how this change in definition will affect reading.

  16. Mystery in Sepedi detective stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Mojalefa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to illustrate the importance of the concept “mystery” in the classification of Sepedi detective stories. Mystery is therefore first defined, and then some rules governing how mystery is created and sustained in a narrative are reviewed. Examples are given of how the writers of Sepedi detective stories mislead their readers in order to create mystery. Mystery is then examined according to five of its constituent elements, namely the real character of the detective, the name of the criminal, the identity of the victim, the evidence that reveals the mystery in the end, and the investigation that reveals the mystery. Each category is explored by citing relevant examples from Sepedi detective stories.

  17. American Association for the Advancement of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KavliAwards_teaser(21).jpg 2017 AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award Winners Named Full Story journals_science_20171117_ ... Call for Applications: Marion Milligan Mason Award for Women in... Apply Here View more events 4,016 ...

  18. Hidden Stories, Toxic Stories, Healing Stories: The Power of Narrative in Peace and Reconciliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Marks

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on narrative is more than simply listening to (more or less nice stories. There are stories that are hidden between the lines; these need to be noticed and retrieved. There are stories that can be toxic to be exposed to; these need to be coped with and conceived. But there may be stories that have a healing quality, too—stories that can contribute to peace and reconciliation. These three possible qualities of narratives are the focus of the following paper, which was delivered in October 2008, at the launch of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Narrative at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. The lecture was based on his interdisciplinary research project "Geschichte und Erinnerung" [History and Memory, www.geschichte-erinnerung.de] in which interviews with Nazi followers, bystanders, and perpetrators were conducted and analysed. Marks presented one of the key findings of this research—shame—and its effect on what the interviewees recounted, as well as its relevance for National Socialism and present-day German society.

  19. Exaggerated Claims for Interactive Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thue, David; Bulitko, Vadim; Spetch, Marcia; Webb, Michael

    As advertising becomes more crucial to video games' success, developers risk promoting their products beyond the features that they can actually include. For features of interactive storytelling, the effects of making such exaggerations are not well known, as reports from industry have been anecdotal at best. In this paper, we explore the effects of making exaggerated claims for interactive stories, in the context of the theory of advertising. Results from a human user study show that female players find linear and branching stories to be significantly less enjoyable when they are advertised with exaggerated claims.

  20. Once upon an algorithm how stories explain computing

    CERN Document Server

    Erwig, Martin

    2017-01-01

    How Hansel and Gretel, Sherlock Holmes, the movie Groundhog Day, Harry Potter, and other familiar stories illustrate the concepts of computing. Picture a computer scientist, staring at a screen and clicking away frantically on a keyboard, hacking into a system, or perhaps developing an app. Now delete that picture. In Once Upon an Algorithm, Martin Erwig explains computation as something that takes place beyond electronic computers, and computer science as the study of systematic problem solving. Erwig points out that many daily activities involve problem solving. Getting up in the morning, for example: You get up, take a shower, get dressed, eat breakfast. This simple daily routine solves a recurring problem through a series of well-defined steps. In computer science, such a routine is called an algorithm. Erwig illustrates a series of concepts in computing with examples from daily life and familiar stories. Hansel and Gretel, for example, execute an algorithm to get home from the forest. The movie Groundho...

  1. Stories as integrated patterns of knowing in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Linda A

    2008-01-01

    The primary aim of this qualitative study was to explore the scholarly benefits of storytelling as a means to promote students' understanding and integration of both the art and science of nursing. As one of the oldest methods of communication, storytelling has been used in a variety of ways in nursing education. Despite this myriad of literature, there were no studies found that analyzed the actual content of students' stories. Using Carper's (1978) Fundamental Patterns of Knowing as a guiding framework for narrative analysis, twenty-five personal stories written by junior level nursing students were examined for evidence of empirics, ethics, esthetics, and personal knowing. Results indicated students were able to not only integrate art and science within their experiences but were also able to see themselves one day as caring nurses. Moreover, Carper's patterns add credibility to storytelling as a worthwhile teaching strategy with benefits to both students and faculty.

  2. Generation and discourse in working life stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Karen

    2013-06-01

    Following Mannheim's (1970) Problem of Generations, many scholars have warned of the analytical and political risks of conflating generation with cohort. Yet the temptation persists, as relying on cohort is a convenient method of dividing a population to study it. This article proposes that cohort is only convenient if the objective is understanding generations as definitive groups of people. It suggests a supplementary objective: understanding generation as a matter of discourse. Qualitative data from interviews with 52 Canadians illustrates how the discursive forms of generation in their stories render difference, human agency and social change in atomistic or voluntaristic terms. The most extreme manifestations of this theme appear related to the perception of generational conflict. Guided by James' principle of pragmatism, this article maintains that understanding generation as a discursive, historically contingent 'thought' with 'effects' is as important as understanding its structural form and contents. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2013.

  3. The colourful story of the strong force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-05-01

    The development of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is one of the greatest achievements of human intellect, or so Andrew Watson claims in The Quantum Quark. I am a little reluctant to go along with such a grand statement, given that I personally developed QCD together with Murray Gell-Mann in 1971. But certainly the invention of QCD - the theory that describes the strong force - was a big step in particle physics and in physics in general. The Quantum Quark describes the story of QCD very well. Physics is not a very logical science, and the physics of the strong force in particular is full of bizarre phenomena and strange ideas. Watson does a good job in describing this strange world and in leading the reader to the idea of QCD itself. (U.K.)

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel Unsubscribe ... The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  11. Science Fairs for Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Science literacy is imperative for well informed civic and personal decision making, yet only a quarter of American adults are proficient enough in science to understand science stories reported in the popular press. Hands-on research increases confidence in and understanding of science. When guiding students in designing and conducting science fair projects, mentors can foster science literacy by helping students focus on three goals: (1) articulating hypotheses or questions, (2) designing feasible projects, and (3) learning to make and interpret graphs. These objectives introduce students to the methodological nature of scientific research and give them the tools to interpret scientific facts and data in order to make informed decisions for themselves and society.

  12. Stains and Stories: Latent narrative in worn clothing

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsmith, Shelly

    2008-01-01

    Stains and Stories is a series of textile-based installations and limited-edition prints, which form part of an ongoing project to examine perceived latent matter (memories and experiences) in worn clothing. The work seeks to present complex ideas about easily accessible objects (clothes), in order to provoke contemplation about human experience and enhance psychological knowledge. I consulted with Dr. Alison Fendley, Senior Biologist at the Forensic Science Service, in developing approa...

  13. The story of a largely unknown evolution – Germ theory hoax

    OpenAIRE

    Wainwright, Milton; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali

    2011-01-01

    The Piltdown Man debacle provides us with the most infamous forgery in science. However, another equally intriguing story exists concerning a document by a Bostonian called George Sleeper, which purported to be a pre-Darwin–Wallace anticipation of evolution and an equally convincing account of the germ theory published before Louis Pasteur’s famous studies on this subject. The story involves two giants in the world of evolutionary theory, Alfred Russel Wallace and E.B. Poulton. While Wallace ...

  14. Worldviews in Isan-Thai Stories

    OpenAIRE

    Jaruwan Thammawat; Pathom Hongsuwan; Wajuppa Tossa

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: This study aimed to investigate two-fold: To present worldviews in Isan-Thai Stories and to explain the connections between the worldviews and their societal contexts. Approach: Following the methodology of folklore studies, both oral and written versions of Isan-Thai stories were analyzed in order to find out their structures, contents, motifs and contexts. The 76 stories which were chosen fall into five types: Legends, episodes of the Buddhas birth stories, chakchak wongw...

  15. Archrtypal Analysis of Bijan and Manije Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Jafari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available  Abstract Manije and Bijan story, a poem by a great poet, Firdausi Tousi, like his other stories in Shahname is a story which can be analyzed by archetyoal approach. According to this approach, this story can be considered as the individuation of here of this story, Bijan, who voluntarily enters into the individuation and psychological growth by being called. In his perfection cycle which is started and in Iran, by the trickery of evil wise old (gorgin, Bijan meets his Anima of unconscious. Bijan, who lived in Ashkanian era as some researchers believe, is one of the prime characters in Shahnameh. From mythical point of view, Bijan story, which is known as one of ancient myths, is the indicator of feminine society in Iran. Bijan story, like Bahram Chobin, Rustam and Sohrab, Ardeshir Babakan, and Rustam and Esfandiar, is an independent story added to Shahnameh. The comparison of Bijan story with other stories of Shahnameh represents this issue that Ferdowsi composed Bijan story in his youth and just after Daghighi’s death. Because Bijan story, like most other stories of Shahnameh and other myths, has a quite symbolic structure and motifs, Jung archetypal point of view is helpful to discover a lot of mysteries. In the present article, Bijan story is analyzed from Jung’s archetypal point of view. According to this theory, there are a lot of symbols, motifs and archetypes in this story. There is a united structure in every story formed base on its plot thus, to discover the structure of a symbolic story is an important act.   The symbolic motif of Bijan story is reaching the perfection and the story structure is completely commensurate with this motif the move is started from Iran, which is the indicator of Bijan story’s consciousness, then the hero after getting individual experience in land of unconscious, Turan, comes back to Iran. Bijan voluntary goes on a dangerous and symbolic way as the hero. Actually he is the portrayal

  16. AMIDST: Attracting Minorities to Geosciences Through Involved Digital Story Telling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A.; Ohler, J.; Cooper, C.; McDermott, M.; Heinrich, J.; Johnson, R.; Leeper, L.; Polk, N.; Wimer, T.

    2009-12-01

    Attracting Minorities to Geosciences Through Involved Digital Story Telling (AMIDST) is a project funded by the Geoscience Directorate of the National Science Foundation through their program entitled Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in Geosciences. This project centers around the idea of integrating place-based geoscience education with culturally sensitive digital story telling, to engage and attract Alaska’s native and rural children from grades 3 through 5 to geosciences. In Spring 2008 we brought together a team 2 native elders, a group of scientists and technicians, an evaluator, 2 teachers and their 24 third grade students from Fairbanks (interior Alaska) to create computer-based digital stories around the geoscience themes of permafrost, and forest fires. These two to four minutes digital narratives consisted of a series of images accompanied by music and a voice-over narration by the children. In Fall 2008 we worked with a similar group from Nome (coastal town in western Alaska). The geoscience themes were climate change, and gold in Alaska. This time the students used the same kind of “green screen” editing so prevalent in science fiction movies. Students enacted and recorded their stories in front of a green screen and in post-production replaced the green background with photos, drawings and scientific illustrations related to their stories. Evaluation involved pre and post project tests for all participants, mid-term individual interviews and exit-interviews of selected participants. Project final assessment results from an independent education evaluator showed that both students and teachers improved their geo science content knowledge about permafrost, forest fires, gold mining, and sea ice changes. Teachers and students went through a very steep learning curve and gained experience and new understanding in digital storytelling in the context of geologic phenomena of local interest. Children took pride in being creators, directors and

  17. Reform of the College Science Lecture through Storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses innovating college science education by reforming the traditional lecture through the systematic introduction of storytelling as a way of teaching the core material in college science courses. Highlights different kinds of science stories and molding of individual stories into a coherent course-long lesson plan. Contains 42 references.…

  18. Popcorn Story Frames from a Multicultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLella, Carol Ann

    Popcorn story frames from a multicultural perspective are holistic outlines that in the reading/writing process facilitate comprehension for all cultures learning to read and write stories. Popcorn story frames are structured and modeled in a horizontal fashion just like popcorn pops in a horizontal fashion. The frames are designed for learners…

  19. The Earth story ... a facebook world in the geo blogosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Facebook has become one of the dominant virtual worlds of our planet, and among the plethora of cute pictures of cats and unintelligible photos of plates of food are a few gems that attract a strong following. I have been contributing as an 'admin' to one facebook community - 'The Earth Story', over the past few months. The initial driver was writing short pieces of geo-news for my first-year undergraduate students, but quickly I discovered that far more people were reading the small newsy items on facebook than would ever hear my lectures or read my academic papers. This is not to negate the latter, but highlights the capacity for short snippets of Earth Science news from the virtual community out there. Each post on 'The Earth Story' (TES) typically gets read by more than 100k people, and the page has more than 0.5 million followers. Such outlets offer great opportunities for conveying the excitement and challenges of our subject, and the responses from readers often take the discussion further. Since contributing to TES I have also had the opportunity to work for 6 weeks at the BBC as a science journalist in BBC world service radio and online news, and again have seen the appetite for readers for good science stories. Here, I reflect on these experiences and consider the challenge of bringing cutting edge discovery to a general audience, and how social media offer routes to discovery that bypass traditional vehicles.

  20. Story Lab: Student Data Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Student data privacy is an increasingly high-profile--and controversial--issue that touches schools and families across the country. There are stories to tell in virtually every community. About three dozen states have passed legislation addressing student data privacy in the past two years, and eight different proposals were floating around…

  1. Teaching about Consumerism through Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Kay Parks

    2010-01-01

    One of the best methods in the English language arts classroom is to educate students through the world of stories. The beauty of storytelling is that it often has a more powerful impact on young adults than a didactic lecture or a textbook chapter. Many times students would say that they internalize a message much more willingly through reading a…

  2. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My World From the Label to the Table! Food Labels Tell the Story! What is in food? Food provides your body with all of the ... your food choices. Nutrition Facts—the Labels on Food Products Beginning in 1994, the US government began ...

  3. Women Leaders Tell Their Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Marilyn L.; Curley, Virginia Russell; Lacost, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to identify examples of women education leaders at their best. There were two parts to the study procedures. First, the women were asked to write a case story about a time when they were involved in a successful leadership experience. Second, the women were divided into small groups of 5-8. In the small…

  4. Bibliography of Cinderella Stories & Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Price, Marisol

    This annotated bibliography considers diverse versions of Cinderella, including books for all ages and reading abilities and film versions. The bibliography is organized into four categories: picture books, books for youths, books for adults with a Cinderella theme, and Cinderella films. Noting that Cinderella is one of the few stories with many…

  5. Dramatic Presence in Improvised Stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes, I.M.T.; Theune, Mariet

    2009-01-01

    We investigate how to achieve a sense of dramatic presence (the perception of being “in” a story, playing the role of one of its characters), with the aim of building systems that can offer the same. Improvisational theatre might serve as a model for this experience, where there is no guiding plot;

  6. The Warped Science of Interstellar

    OpenAIRE

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The science fiction film, Interstellar, tells the story of a team of astronauts searching a distant galaxy for habitable planets to colonize. Interstellar's story draws heavily from contemporary science. The film makes reference to a range of topics, from established concepts such as fast-spinning black holes, accretion disks, tidal effects, and time dilation, to far more speculative ideas such as wormholes, time travel, additional space dimensions, and the theory of everything. The aim of th...

  7. Reporting Science and Conflicts of Interest in the Lay Press

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Daniel M.; Boyd, Elizabeth A.; Grossmann, Claudia; Bero, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Forthright reporting of financial ties and conflicts of interest of researchers is associated with public trust in and esteem for the scientific enterprise. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched Lexis/Nexis Academic News for the top news stories in science published in 2004 and 2005. We conducted a content analysis of 1152 newspaper stories. Funders of the research were identified in 38% of stories, financial ties of the researchers were reported in 11% of stories, and 5% report...

  8. Migrant life stories and the Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi

    2013-01-01

    The life stories of migrants are increasingly being told, as part of the work of cultural organizations, and websites are well suited to making such life story projects accessible to the public. However, by using the lives of real people as raw material in a public forum, Web projects raise...... important questions about the terms on which participants are given a voice. This article focuses on a Danish website which depicts the life stories of migrant men through written texts, audio clips, and photographs. It presents a detailed analysis of the life story of one young man from a Muslim background...... who has openly declared himself an atheist. The article examines his experience of having this somewhat sensitive story made public. The religious aspect inevitably positioned his story in relation to broader political debates about Muslims in Denmark. Since migrants’ stories often touch on highly...

  9. THE FORMS AND METHODS OF THE COMIC IN STORIES BY Z. KHAKIMOV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Венера Файзиевна Макарова

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the comic part in the Tatar story of the 1980s on the material of the analysis of short stories by young novelist Zulfat Hakim. It is noted that the comic in stories by Z. Khakimov is different with philosophicity. Analysis of the stories allows us to observe the transformation of traditional "household" conflicts into the grotesque model of the reality. In the stories the points of the changing plot collisions become the point of changing forms of laughter: humor becomes a satire or sarcasm, even irony. The irony is mixed with dramatic and tragic motives. There are interesting observations of the functioning in the writer's works such approaches as pastiche, science fiction, illogic, allegory, etc. In particular, on the analysis material of the story "The struggle in the Pacific ocean' it is revealed techniques such as playing with the myth of the man’s heroic struggle with nature, recreation of the grotesque model of the reality, typing of the characters. As a result of the skillful use of similar artistic techniques the comic stories become metatext about human nature in general.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-11-6

  10. Constructing leadership identities through stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimann, Søren; Hersted, Lone

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes the construction of leadership identities through stories found in four narrative interviews from a qualitative study and leadership development project based on social constructionism and action learning. We argue that leadership development and the construction of leadership...... identities in a postmodern paradigm are based on the negotiation and co-construction of meanings, relationships, and stories. The following questions are investigated: What happens when a group of leaders from different organizations construct, deconstruct, and reconstruct their identity as leaders through...... narrative interviews about their challenges as leaders? In addition, how do these discursive constructions restrict or enable new perspectives, other voices, and the possibilities for learning and change? Our analysis identified traces of both modern and postmodern leadership discourses. We suggest...

  11. Constructing leadership identities through stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimann, Søren; Hersted, Lone

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes the construction of leadership identities through stories found in four narrative interviews from a qualitative study and leadership development project based on social constructionism and action learning. We argue that leadership development and the construction of leadership...... narrative interviews about their challenges as leaders? In addition, how do these discursive constructions restrict or enable new perspectives, other voices, and the possibilities for learning and change? Our analysis identified traces of both modern and postmodern leadership discourses. We suggest...... identities in a postmodern paradigm are based on the negotiation and co-construction of meanings, relationships, and stories. The following questions are investigated: What happens when a group of leaders from different organizations construct, deconstruct, and reconstruct their identity as leaders through...

  12. The Copernican Revolution as Story: an Antidote for Scientific Illiteracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, P. M.

    2005-08-01

    ``When a white-robed scientist, momentarily looking away from his microscope or cyclotron [or telescope], makes some pronouncement for the general public, he may not be understood but at least he is certain to be believed.'' The truth of this opening sentence of Anthony Standen's 1950 book Science is a Sacred Cow, as clear today as it was then, is the motivation for a new astronomy course at Berry College near Atlanta, GA, USA. To non-scientists, science is known by its products, not by what it is: a human progress. For this illiteracy an antidote is offered: the history of astronomy. In this course the story of the Copernican Revolution is told, for within this story the true nature of science can be found in its fullness. For example, Aristotle's uniform circular motion is used to emphasize the role of assumptions, and the occasional value of wrong ideas is evident in Tycho's theory and in Kepler's universe of perfect solids. Tycho's observations of Mars and Kepler's analysis illustrate the interplay of observation, theory, and technology. As a final example, the indirectness and often-unintentional nature of scientific advance can be seen in the work of Copernicus. The roles of personality and the intersections of science and society are themes throughout the course, as are the merging of disparate fields and the power of strong theories. There are other themes (e.g., coherence, the role of mathematics), but the emphasis is on the science and much of the work is quantitative. There is a laboratory component that features observations and experiments, and in order to bring the narrative to life the class spends two weeks in Poland, the Czech Republic, and Italy, touring sites that are relevant to the story of the Copernican Revolution.

  13. Cyberterrorism: the story so far

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Maura

    2003-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the origins and development of the concept of cyberterrorism. It seeks to excavate the story of the concept through an analysis of both popular/media renditions of the term and scholarly attempts to define the borders of same. The contention here is not that cyberterrorism cannot happen or will not happen, but that, contrary to popular perception, it has not happened yet.

  14. Murder on the Einstein express and other stories

    CERN Document Server

    Šiljak, Harun

    2016-01-01

    This collection of stories touches upon many genres: Normed Trek is a clever and witty Alice-in-Wonderland-type narrative set in the realm of mathematical analysis, The Cantor Trilogy is a dystopia about the consequences of relying upon computer-based mathematical proofs, In Search of Future Time bears the flavor of Tales from Arabian Nights set in the future, and – last but not least - Murder on the Einstein Express is a short, non-technical primer on probabilities and modern classical physics, disguised as a detective story. Written primarily for an audience with some background or a strong interest in mathematics, physics and computer science (in particular artificial intelligence), these stories explore the boundaries between science and fiction in a refreshingly unconventional fashion. In the Afterthoughts the author provides some further insights and annotations. Harun Šiljak got his BoEE and MoEE degrees at the Department of Control and Electronics, University of Sarajevo and his PhD in Signal Proce...

  15. Contrasting stories of life-threatening illness: a narrative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheilds, L; Molzahn, A; Bruce, A; Schick Makaroff, K; Stajduhar, K; Beuthin, R; Shermak, S

    2015-01-01

    Advances in science and technology have resulted in longer lives for people with life-threatening illnesses. However, little research compares the stories of people with different life-threatening illnesses. The objectives of this study were to explore and contrast how people story and re-story life-threatening illness specifically cancer, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and HIV. Narrative inquiry within a social constructionist perspective was used. A total of 113 in-depth interviews were conducted with 32 participants over a period of three years. Study participants included 32 people: 10 with cancer, 14 with CKD and 8 with HIV/AIDS. Participants varied in age (37-83 years old, mean=61.2 years), gender (17 men and 14 women), location (urban and rural), time post-diagnosis (median=8 years), intensity or invasiveness of treatment, and prognosis (continuous treatment, remission, cure, palliative). Participants described living with a life-threatening illness as a delicate balance. They focused on living their lives yet were fully and acutely aware of their own mortality. There was an undercurrent of sustained uncertainty that permeated their lives. Stories of life-threatening illness differed across the three illness groups and shifted over time as disease trajectories changed. Each disease brought specific challenges. With cancer, turning points and uncertainty were prominent. With CKD, a stealthy beginning to life-extending treatment through dialysis or transplant was evident, and with HIV, a shift from a perceived death sentence to a focus on hope and living was notable. Findings revealed that trajectories of illness for participants living with cancer, CKD and HIV are complex and differ markedly across the groups. Narratives shifted across all of the illness groups as participants navigated and re-storied the terrains of their life-threatening illness. Findings illuminated the need for health care providers to focus on person specific and contextualized aspects of

  16. Member State Event: Telling CERN's Story

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    As part of the events to mark the Laboratory's fiftieth anniversary, members of the CERN personnel are telling the story of CERN. Robert Cailliau (on the right of the photograph), co-inventor of the Web and currently responsible for CERN's external communications, and Chiara Mariotti (in the center), a physicist working at CMS, were invited to talk about the history of CERN and the Web at a conference in the 'Science Thursdays' series entitled 'From the Quark to the Web' in Turin on 26 February. This was not their first appearance before a non-specialist audience (almost 1000 people that day!) eager to find out what goes on in a unique research centre like CERN as talking about the Laboratory's activities and its history are part and parcel of their work for the Organization. Anniversary Events in the Member States: This 'Science Thursday' event devoted to CERN was one of Italy's contributions to CERN's fiftieth anniversary celebrations. Coming up soon in the Member States: Italy International Centre...

  17. NX15 science workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Science. For some of us, it's daunting or maybe even terrifying. How to tell a good science story? That's the question we will explore together in this workshop. Conceived and produced by journalist and Scientific News producer Claudio Rosmino of Euronews, and presented by Euronews' Jeremy Wilks, the workshop will look at actual case studies (from Euronews and beyond) where science news proved exciting, inspiring and accessible to audiences around the world. These might include the Rosetta mission and CERN's work on Science for Peace. Together, we'll share ideas and knowledge around how science journalism and science news can increase its visibility in the media and maybe save the planet...!

  18. RE-Powering Success Stories: Green Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    These success stories discuss sites on formerly contaminated lands, landfills, and mine sites that are manufacturing components for renewable energy, either solar panels, wind turbines, or other components.

  19. Automated Story Capture From Conversational Speech

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gordon, Andrew S; Ganesan, Kavita

    2005-01-01

    While storytelling has long been recognized as an important part of effective knowledge management in organizations, knowledge management technologies have generally not distinguished between stories...

  20. Story Time From Space — Astronomy and Astronauts Together in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Story Time From Space is an exciting new program in which astronauts aboard the International Space Station combine two key educational activities: (1) reading aloud science-based stories for children and (2) conducting specially built science demonstrations designed to reinforce science lessons from the stories. Both activity types are videotaped, with the videos to be posted freely on the web for access by classrooms (and individuals) around the world. Longer term plans include the creation of downloadable activities to take the lessons further. While the stories tend to focus on elementary ages, the demos are more sophisticated and can be used for middle school, high school, and even college. The first set of five books has been aboard the ISS since January 2014, with readings videotaped so far for all books in English and selected books in German and Japanese; the science demos are scheduled for launch this summer, followed by a second set of books in the fall. The first set of books, written by the presenter, focus heavily on astronomy and space science. In this presentation, I will introduce the program, how it can be used in classrooms around the world, and plans for its future development. The in-progress web site is www.storytimefromspace.com.

  1. Getting the story right: making computer-generated stories more entertaining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oinonen, K.M.; Theune, Mariet; Nijholt, Antinus; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Maybury, Mark; Stock, Oliviero; Wahlster, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe our efforts to increase the entertainment value of the stories generated by our story generation system, the Virtual Storyteller, at the levels of plot creation, discourse generation and spoken language presentation. We also discuss the construction of a story database that

  2. The Stories They Tell: Story Production Difficulties of Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Benjamin D.; Hayden, Angela; Lorch, Elizabeth P.; Milich, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated differences in the structure of stories created by children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and their comparison peers. Children created one story without pictorial cues and one with pictorial cues available. Without cues, children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder told fewer stories based on a…

  3. Everybody Has a Story III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This is the third book in the series “Everybody Has a Story”. The story behind the idea for these books and their title goes back to The Freedom Writers Diary that came about as the result of the teachings of young teacher at a high school in a socially deprived area in Long Beach near Los Angeles...... the participating students as these products might be very personal. And personal it has to be, when you become aware of whom you actually are!...

  4. Marvels of Science: 50 Fascinating 5-minute Reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Kendall

    This book is a collection of 50 stories of the people, events, and processes that give us our rich scientific heritage with the goal of fostering an appreciation for the process of science and for the great variety of personalities that have graced the world of science. In addition to the actual text, each story in this book contains focusing and…

  5. Magnetoresistance stories of double perovskites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-28

    May 28, 2015 ... Author Affiliations. Abhishek Nag1 Sugata Ray1 2. Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032, India; Centre for Advanced Materials, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032, India ...

  6. Chemistry and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Jack H.

    1998-11-01

    This lively collection looks at science as filtered through literature, film, and television. It discusses classic works in science fiction and provides an in-depth look at the chemistry depicted in popular culture, particularly in Start Trek , Star Wars , and Doctor Who . It includes an examination by Nebula Award winner Connie Willis of how science fiction authors use science, and reprints two tongue-in-cheek short stories by Isaac Asimov. The book also includes suggestions for using science fiction as an educational resource.

  7. "Robinson Crusoe" and the Story of the Novel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Quentin G.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses stories in general, stories in the novel, and "Robinson Crusoe," focusing on what happens in and to narrative--the transformation in the nature of story--that brings the novel into existence. (DD)

  8. Maths and physics, a love story

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    Denis Guedj brings one of his plays to CERN. The writer and mathematician is working on a new novel in which LHC research figures prominently. In Denis Guedj’s plays, the number One is a self-absorbed character, Zero is not to be underestimated, and the Line Segment wants the Curve to straighten out. In his novels, mathematical entities come to life—and turn out to have exciting stories to tell. Denis Guedj is a mathematician and professor of the history of science and epistemology at the University of Paris VIII; over the years he has also indulged a personal passion for bringing maths to the stage. His novels and plays reach a broad public. Among his notable successes is a crime thriller called “The Parrot’s Theorem”, which has been translated into 20 languages. The popularity of his work owes much to the author’s refusal to be didactic. “If it works, it’s because I don’t try to teach maths,” he explains....

  9. Interactive Story Writing in the Classroom: Using Computer Games

    OpenAIRE

    Schaeffer, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Computer games offer a new medium for creative writing – immersive stories where the "reader" is an active participant in the story. These stories are rich in visual and audio texture. Decisions made by the reader influence how the story unfolds (possibly even changing the outcome). In contrast to traditional pen-and-paper story writing, where the author is expected to specify everything textually, in interactive stories the "writer" uses computer tools to create visual representations of a v...

  10. Picture Stories for ESL Health Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Kate

    These picture stories help English as a Second Language teachers address topics affecting their students' health and wellbeing. They are useful for beginner and low-literacy students, offering a safe, impromptu way to discuss difficult topics, ask questions, and obtain information. As the stories are about cartoon characters, students are not…

  11. AHP 10: Story: A Stolen Journey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blo bzang tshe ring བློ་བཟང་ཚེ་རིང་།

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BIo bzang tshe ring (b 1984 is from A mgon Village, A mchog Town, Bsang chu County, Kan Iho Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Kan su'u Province. He says, "I wrote this story based on what I was told by the three men who brought the main character of the story to Zi ling City in their car."

  12. Stories of Innovation: Roles, Perspectives, and Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the roles of stories in the innovation process. Design/methodology/approach: An integrative literature review was used to identify and analyze studies that examined stories of innovation in various organizational settings. The conceptual framework of the review was based on three perspectives of organizational…

  13. Stories | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Young, locally-trained economists guide Francophone Africa towards a more prosperous future. Learn moreYoung, locally-trained economists guide Francophone Africa towards a more prosperous future. A man and a woman looking at a poster. Story. The untold story: IDRC supported researchers transform economic ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Couple's Story of Living While Dying - Duration: 2:20. HPCancer 9,964 views 2:20 Palliative Care & Me: Pat's story - Duration: 6:37. NYGHNews 2,079 views 6:37 Understanding Palliative Care - Duration: ...

  15. Coyote Stories of the Navaho People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessel, Robert A., Jr., Ed.; Platero, Dillon, Ed.

    Intended as a supplementary reading book for elementary level Navaho children, this book is one of a series being developed by the Navaho Curriculum Center in Rough Rock, Arizona. This volume contains a collection of 14 illustrated coyote stories collected from Navaho storytellers and translated into English. These stories have great significance…

  16. Campfire Stories of the Fort Belknap Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Minerva, Comp.

    This collection contains 21 brief stories told by members of the Fort Belknap (Montana) American Indian community. These tales of the Assiniboine, Sioux, and Gros Ventres include legends, ghost stories, and reminiscences of heroic deeds, traditional life, and unusual events. Recollections of the past contain descriptions of the daily life of the…

  17. Stories to Be Read Aloud (Booksearch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    English Journal, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Presents junior and senior high school teachers' suggestions for short stories to read aloud in a single class period, including "The Laughing Man" (J. D. Salinger), "A & P" (John Updike), "Epicac" (Kurt Vonnegut), "The Story of an Hour" (Kate Chopin), and "The Yellow Wallpaper" (Charlotte…

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  19. Story Map: How to Improve Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidekli, Sabri

    2013-01-01

    The aim of written expression studies is to have students explain their knowledge, feelings, ideas and imaginations in a correct and effective manner. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of story map on story writing skills of first grade teacher candidates who study at the Department of Elementary Education. The…

  20. A Narrative Inquiry of International Adoption Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Christin; Pettinelli, J. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The international adoption entrance story is an unexplored topic in the adoption literature. The stories that families tell of beginning life with their new children has important implications for the development of an autobiographical narrative of an adopted child. A coherent autobiographical narrative is vital for healthy childhood development.…

  1. The Virtual Storyteller: story generation by simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes, I.M.T.; Theune, Mariet

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Storyteller is a multi-agent framework that generates stories based on a concept called emergent narrative. In this paper, we describe the motivation and approach of the Virtual Storyteller, and give an overview of the computational processes involved in the story generation process. We

  2. Telling War Stories: The Things They Carry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Paige; Warren, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This webtext reveals two modern-day methods for soldiers to share their war stories: 1) soldiers sharing their stories with cadets from West Point through a project linking veterans from the Global War on Terror with composition students; and 2) soldiers learning in online composition classrooms designed specifically for them.

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Care & Me: Pat's story - Duration: 6:37. NYGHNews 2,145 views 6:37 Last Days: HammondCare's Palliative ... One Couple's Story of Living While Dying - Duration: 2:20. HPCancer 10,360 views 2:20 Pediatric ...

  4. Beijing Bicycle - Stories from a Transformative Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Petersen, Mai Corlin

    2012-01-01

    Ideas, words, images and stories travel from west to east – and from east to west. Stories are chosen and retold in different settings and images are reproduced and appropriated into new contexts – and in new times. Cinema, in this case the mainland Chinese, becomes both a space of production...... and a production of space that reveals how transnational and translocal mechanisms affect the cinematic language, transforming the images and stories chosen for the cinematic representation. Wang Xiaoshuai’s Beijing Bicycle (Shiqi Sui de Danche) (2001) is a result of transnational currents weaving the carpet...... relevant in a new context – that of the Chinese mainland society in the 21st century. Doreen Massey (2005: 9) defines space as “a simultaneity of stories-so-far”, a space that is constantly exploding and imploding with the influx of new and old stories. Within this theoretical framework Wang Xiaoshuai...

  5. Dental stories for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Ian W; Nelson, Travis M; Sheller, Barbara; McKinney, Christy M; Scott, JoAnna M

    2016-07-01

    To investigate caregivers' preference regarding dental stories to prepare children with autism for dental visits. Caregivers of children with autism were allowed use of dental stories available via different media (paper, tablet computer, computer) and image types (comics or drawings, photographs, video). Caregivers completed pre- and postintervention surveys. Fisher's exact tests were used to determine associations between predictive factors and preferences. Forty initial and 16 follow-up surveys were completed. Subjects were primarily male (85%). Mean child age was 6.7 years. Nine (64%) caregivers found the dental story useful for themselves and their child. Two (14%) caregivers found the aid only helpful for themselves. Preferred media type was associated with language understanding (p = .038) and home media preference (p = .002). Practitioners should consider using dental stories to help prepare families and children for dental visits. Individual preferences for dental stories vary; using prior history can aid in selection. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences. U Deva Priyakumar. Articles written in Journal of Chemical Sciences. Volume 115 Issue 1 February 2003 pp 49-66 Organic. Measures to evaluate heteroaromaticity and their limitations: Story of skeletally substituted benzenes · U Deva Priyakumar G Narahari Sastry.

  7. "Tell Me a Story": The Use of Narrative as a Learning Tool for Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Renate; Avraamidou, Lucy; Goedhart, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Grounded within literature pointing to the value of narrative in communicating scientific information, the purpose of this study was to examine the use of stories as a tool for teaching about natural selection in the context of school science. The study utilizes a mixed method, case study approach which focuses on the design, implementation, and…

  8. Sewing Seams of Stories: Becoming a Teacher during the First World War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinner, Anita

    2006-01-01

    In this article the author shares a partial biography of Elizabeth Evans, who became a domestic science teacher in Britain during the First World War. This story begins with a small collection of artefacts--professional letters and personal photographs--which infuse our understanding of teaching and learning and Elizabeth's everyday life nearly a…

  9. Hum Kohn Hai: The Inspiring Story of Walter Kohn, The Nice Guy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 8. Hum Kohn Hai: The Inspiring Story of Walter Kohn, The Nice Guy Who Won a Nobel. Shobhana Narasimhan. Article-in-a-Box Volume 22 Issue 8 August 2017 pp 725-729 ...

  10. A narratological methodology for identifying archetypal story patterns in autobiographical narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Christian

    2006-09-01

    Based on Jung's definition of archetype the concept 'archetypal story pattern' is developed as well as a research method drawing on narrative analysis and biographical research to identify these archetypal story patterns in life stories. Jung pointed out that personal myths, archetypal patterns found, e.g., in mythology, can govern the life course of individuals unconsciously. In the Theory of Narrative Identity comparable concepts have been mentioned but were never fully developed. In my research I try to combine Jung's concept of the archetype with the elaborated methodology of narrative analysis. Archetypes can manifest as narratives and the identity construction of a person via narrating the life story can be influenced or even totally structured by archetypal stories which give a specific form as well as a specific meaning to the person's identity. The method of extracting an underlying archetypal pattern from an autobiographical narrative is demonstrated. The results of the research on 20 autobiographical interviews and the inherent archetypal patterns are summarized. The major aim of this paper is to describe in detail the application of a well established method of the social sciences on a key concept of Jungian psychology to show that these concepts can be integrated into recent research frameworks of academic sciences. On the other hand it shows that Jungian concepts can be investigated through established and well defined research methods in empirical research settings.

  11. Mi'kmaq Night Sky Stories; Patterns of Interconnectiveness, Vitality and Nourishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P.; Bartlett, C.; Marshall, M.; Marshall, A.

    2010-10-01

    This article shares some of the experiences of an integrative science team based at Cape Breton University, Canada. Integrative science is defined as "bringing together Indigenous and Western scientific knowledge and ways of knowing" and the team includes Mi'kmaq Elders and educators, Cheryl Bartlett and her Research Associates. Together we worked to rekindle the Mi'kmaq Sky Story, Muin and the Seven Hunters, to produce a DVD of the story as well as a children's book, and then to share it with people throughout Canada and the world. We offer insights into the manner in which night sky stories engender interconnectiveness and interdependability through their cultural, scientific and ecological teachings and so help to revitalise the culture and the individual by feeding all aspects of the human experience (spiritual, emotional, physical and cognitional). We explore the concept of storywork, with emphasis on the relationship between storyteller and listener as a story is told, as well as considering the multi-layered aspect of Indigenous stories.

  12. The story of Prosenjit Poddar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamonud Modak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of "Tarasoff duty" is familiar to mental health professionals. Entwined with the name of Tarasoff, is that of Prosenjit Poddar, the other important character in the story which led to the courts giving directions for mental health professionals with regard to their duty of warn. Prosenjit Poddar killed Tatiana Tarasoff when his advances toward her were rebuffed. However, the court ruled that the mental health professional who was treating Poddar and was in knowledge of his intentions to harm Tarasoff, did not take adequate measures to warn the potential victim. This led to courts laying statutes for warning the potential victims by mental health professionals when their clients disclose such threats. However, the ruling has been a matter of debate about when to take any threat seriously and how to tread cautiously given the therapist-client privilege. The case of Prosenjit Poddar throws light on complex issues related to balancing confidentiality and potential harm to others.

  13. The Story of the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Outreach

    2003-01-01

    These pages were extracted from the 2003 CMS Experiment Brochure. These pages explain the story of our universe and how it was formed over time. All explanations are coupled with simple colorful illustrations, one per sheet. Each can be used as an individual teaching aid or together as a set. Topics covered: - Quantum Gravity Era- Grand Unification Era - Electro Weak Era - Protons and Neutrons Formation- Nuclei formation- Atoms and Light Era - Galaxy Formation - Today Humans wondering where this all came from- The Size of Things - Instruments and the observables- Particles (Leptons & Quarks) -Forces - Interactions: coupling of forces to matter - Short history and new frontiers - Unification of forces - Summary (includes timeline of theories/discoveries)

  14. Enhancing the Teaching of Astronomy with Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2004-12-01

    Dozens of scientists and science educators with advanced degrees in science have been writing literate and scientifically reasonable science fiction stories in the last two decades, although these are often drowned out by the din of popular magic teenagers and space battle epics. The paper will give examples of stories and novels with good science, which can be used as a way of making astronomy concepts "come alive" for non-science majors. A list of science fiction authors with astronomy and physics degrees will be included. We will also have examples from a web-site devoted to astronomy in science fiction (see link) that has some 200 brief reviews of stories organized by 40 astronomy topics. We will discuss how instructors are using such stories for classroom and homework assignments.

  15. An early story of Kho Ping Hoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CW Watson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Kho Ping Hoo (1926–1994 is the most well-known of all Indonesian writers of popular silat stories, largely set in China, which describe the adventures and romances of legendary heroes famed for their skill in martial arts. It is less well-known that he began his career writing critical stories about socio-economic conditions in the late 50s and early 60s. This paper discusses one of these stories. It places the story in the context of political developments of the time, in particular as they affected the Chinese Indonesian community. The paper argues that this story and one or two others like it come at the end of a tradition of Sino-Indonesian literature which had flourished from the end of the nineteenth century until the mid-1950s. After 1960, Chinese-Indonesian writers cease writing realist fiction of any kind and write either silat stories or romantic stories set in middle class urban environments.

  16. Visualizing Nonlinear Narratives with Story Curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Wook; Bach, Benjamin; Im, Hyejin; Schriber, Sasha; Gross, Markus; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present story curves, a visualization technique for exploring and communicating nonlinear narratives in movies. A nonlinear narrative is a storytelling device that portrays events of a story out of chronological order, e.g., in reverse order or going back and forth between past and future events. Many acclaimed movies employ unique narrative patterns which in turn have inspired other movies and contributed to the broader analysis of narrative patterns in movies. However, understanding and communicating nonlinear narratives is a difficult task due to complex temporal disruptions in the order of events as well as no explicit records specifying the actual temporal order of the underlying story. Story curves visualize the nonlinear narrative of a movie by showing the order in which events are told in the movie and comparing them to their actual chronological order, resulting in possibly meandering visual patterns in the curve. We also present Story Explorer, an interactive tool that visualizes a story curve together with complementary information such as characters and settings. Story Explorer further provides a script curation interface that allows users to specify the chronological order of events in movies. We used Story Explorer to analyze 10 popular nonlinear movies and describe the spectrum of narrative patterns that we discovered, including some novel patterns not previously described in the literature. Feedback from experts highlights potential use cases in screenplay writing and analysis, education and film production. A controlled user study shows that users with no expertise are able to understand visual patterns of nonlinear narratives using story curves.

  17. Teaching reading with stories vs. cognitive hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Fuller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Suggestopedia emphasizes the use of interesting stories as vehicles for teaching classroom material such as reading or arithmetic. Independent support for this notion comes from the work of the author in teaching reading via stories in the Ball-Stick-Bird method. Suggestopedagogiek benadruk die gebruik van interessante stories as boustof by die onderrig van byvoorbeeld lees en wiskunde. Steun vir die sienswyse kom van die skrywer van hierdie artikel waarin die resultate bespreek word van die onderrig van lees met behulp van die "Ball-Stick-Bird"-metode.

  18. Time Dilation: Flash Based Interactive Story For College, Pre-college, And Public Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun-Young; Lollar, I.; Armitage, P.; Perreault, S.; Shitanishi, J.; Shvarts, E.; Wells, D.; Longson, T.; Mijic, M.; State LA SciVi Project, Cal

    2009-05-01

    Concepts of Einstein's Theory of Relativity are usually considered complicated enough that in the context of public science education they are often stated but seldom explained. In our game-like interactive animated story we explain the effect of Time Dilation in the Special Theory of Relativity by pushing to the limit a real life question: can Relativity help two students in love who want the same but in a different amount of time? The user is guided to the answer with the help of a familiar looking character. This interactive story can be used in variety of educational environments.

  19. Utilizing verbally told stories for informal knowledge management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.G.; Klebl, M.; Buttler, T.

    2011-01-01

    In knowledge management, the act of telling stories is utilized to capture and convey knowledge. Spoken language is the basis for telling stories. Collaborative audio-based storytelling uses the act of verbally telling stories in groups. In this paper, we explore how to utilize verbally told stories

  20. Social Stories[TM] and Young Children: Strategies for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Cori M.

    2012-01-01

    Social Stories are becoming a popular intervention used to improve the social skills of children with disabilities. This article examines the use of Social Stories with young children with disabilities. Social Stories are described, creation guidelines are recommended, and strategies for Social Story implementation in the classroom are discussed.…

  1. From transuranic to superheavy elements a story of dispute and creation

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2018-01-01

    The story of superheavy elements  - those at the very end of the periodic table  - is not well known outside the community of heavy-ion physicists and nuclear chemists. But it is a most interesting story which deserves to be known also to historians, philosophers, and sociologists of science and indeed to the general public. This is what the present work aims at. It tells the story or rather parts of the story, of how physicists and chemists created elements heavier than uranium or searched for them in nature. And it does so with an emphasis on the frequent discovery and naming disputes concerning the synthesis of very heavy elements. Moreover, it calls attention to the criteria which scientists have adopted for what it means to have discovered a new element. In this branch of modern science it may be more appropriate to speak of creation instead of discovery. The work will be of interest to scientists as well as to scholars studying modern science from a meta-perspective.

  2. Pure Science and Applied Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Aumann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available (Excerpt The name of my talk is Pure Science and Applied Science, and the idea I would like to sell to you today is that there is no such thing as “pure” or “applied” science. In other words, there is such a thing as science, but there is no difference between pure and applied science. Science is one entity and cannot be separated into different categories. In order to back that up, I would like to tell you a little story. As an undergraduate, I studied mathematics at City College in New York. At that time, what was called Pure Mathematics was in vogue, and the more prominent mathematicians were a little contemptuous of any kind of application. A very famous, prominent mathematician in the first half of the previous century by the name of G. H. Hardy, who was in a branch of mathematics called number theory, said that the only thing he regretted was that he unwittingly did some important work in mathematical genetics that eventually turned out to have some application. … Such was the atmosphere in the late ’40s of the previous century and, being a young man and impressionable, I was swept up in this atmosphere.

  3. SketchStory: telling more engaging stories with data through freeform sketching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bongshin; Kazi, Rubaiat Habib; Smith, Greg

    2013-12-01

    Presenting and communicating insights to an audience-telling a story-is one of the main goals of data exploration. Even though visualization as a storytelling medium has recently begun to gain attention, storytelling is still underexplored in information visualization and little research has been done to help people tell their stories with data. To create a new, more engaging form of storytelling with data, we leverage and extend the narrative storytelling attributes of whiteboard animation with pen and touch interactions. We present SketchStory, a data-enabled digital whiteboard that facilitates the creation of personalized and expressive data charts quickly and easily. SketchStory recognizes a small set of sketch gestures for chart invocation, and automatically completes charts by synthesizing the visuals from the presenter-provided example icon and binding them to the underlying data. Furthermore, SketchStory allows the presenter to move and resize the completed data charts with touch, and filter the underlying data to facilitate interactive exploration. We conducted a controlled experiment for both audiences and presenters to compare SketchStory with a traditional presentation system, Microsoft PowerPoint. Results show that the audience is more engaged by presentations done with SketchStory than PowerPoint. Eighteen out of 24 audience participants preferred SketchStory to PowerPoint. Four out of five presenter participants also favored SketchStory despite the extra effort required for presentation.

  4. Minimalism in the modern short story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Razi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Short story has recently become the focus of attention in the late decades in Iran. The expanding value of writing short story is actually a reasonable outcome of the dominance of minimalism- a movement which is based upon simplicity and shortness. Minimalist writers, leaving out redundant features of narration, mainly focus on essentialities through applying a variety of techniques such as cuttings from the interesting moments of real life, evading introduction, applying inter-referents, choice of words, short stanzas and sentences and so on. Looking upon critic’s opinion about such a tendency over the past and present, this article will come up with a brief explanation of the properties of such stories. Finally a sample story “candles will never go dead” will be analyzed and discussed in the lights of such techniques.

  5. Stories, Action and Ethics in Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kenneth Mølbjerg

    2018-01-01

    This chapter discusses ethics in management education from Hannah Arendt’s notion of action. Action for Arendt is disclosed in storytelling and other artful expression whereby people make their appearance in the world as distinct human beings with passions, feelings, intentions, and voices. Stories...... are collective, situated, embodied, and material. It is through stories that people disclose themselves as subjects in interaction with other people. The chapter suggests that stories have ethical consequences in three areas. Firstly, they emphasize the creative act and the new beginning. “True” action distorts...... for the world and our worldly becoming. These three areas serve as important signposts for reworking management students’ stories. They have consequences for the design of teaching practices for heightening students’ moral awareness. These concern both management students’ work of the self on the self...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. LIFE Before Death 15,777 views 5:27 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: ...

  7. Enhancing children's health through digital story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tami H; Hauenstein, Emily

    2008-01-01

    Stories in all of their many forms, including books, plays, skits, movies, poems, and songs, appeal to individuals of all ages but especially the young. Children are easily engaged in stories, and today's generation of children, the millennium generation, demands interactive, multimedia-rich environments. Story as a teaching and learning technique is pervasive in the classroom but is infrequently used to promote health. Because of advancing technology, it is possible to create interactive digital storytelling programs that teach children health topics. Using digital storytelling in an interactive environment to promote health has not been tested, but there is empirical support for using story in health education and interactive technology to promote health. This article briefly reviews the literature and discusses how technology and storytelling can be joined to promote positive health outcomes.

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search Loading... Close Yeah, keep it Undo Close This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue Watch Queue ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ... later? Sign in to add this video to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to ...

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and ... 56:31 4 Cardiac arrests in 14 hours, How our son survived - Duration: 4:38. usrooks 38, ...

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... story - Duration: 6:02. Consumers Health Forum of Australia 31,420 views 6:02 Palliative Care: One ... Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History Help Loading... Loading... Loading... About Press Copyright Creators ...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,209 views ... Riley's journey with Medulloblastoma...A survivor's story!! - Duration: 3:50. Melissa Saban 73,475 ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... report inappropriate content. Sign in Transcript Add translations 4,327 views Like this video? Sign in to ... now. Please try again later. Published on Jan 8, 2014 This vignette shares the story of Rachel— ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search Loading... Close Yeah, keep it Undo Close This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue Watch Queue Queue Remove ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Close Yeah, keep it Undo Close This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue Watch Queue Queue Remove ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ... Unsubscribe 405 Loading... Loading... Working... Add to Want to watch this again later? Sign in to add ...

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category ... of Life and palliative care: Thinking about the words we use - Duration: 4:48. Social Care Institute ...

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to report the video? Sign in to report ... of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively ...

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... now. Please try again later. Published on Jan 8, 2014 This vignette shares the story of Rachel— ... of Living While Dying - Duration: 2:20. HPCancer 8,199 views 2:20 Grief and nurses working ...

  20. Cultural Trauma and Life Stories / Ene Kõresaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõresaar, Ene

    2007-01-01

    Aili Aarelaid-Tarti 15-aastase uuringu tulemused raamatus "Cultural Trauma and Life Stories", Hesinki, Kikimora Publications, 2006. Uuritud on kolme suurt rahvusgruppi 1940-test tingitud trauma kontekstis: eestlased kodumaal, eestlased eksiilis ja venekeelne rahvusgrupp Eestis postsovetlikus diskursuses

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel ... later? Sign in to add this video to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to ...

  2. Exploring Culture : Exercises, Stories and Synthetic Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    A unique training book containing over 100 culture awareness exercises, dialogues, stories incidents and simulations that bring to life Geert Hofstede's five dimensions of culture. These dimensions are: power distance, collectivism versus individualism, femininity versus masculinity, uncertainly

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 193,342 views 13:34 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 24,448 views 5:39 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. Little Stars 12, ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 92,619 views 13:34 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. LIFE Before Death 14,141 ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... University (NEOMED) 24,012 views 5:39 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. Little Stars 11,702 views 10:35 Last Days: HammondCare's ...

  7. The story of 'Scientist: The Story of a Word'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David Philip

    2017-10-01

    This examination of an important paper by Sydney Ross is the first in a projected series of occasional reflections on 'Annals of Science Classic Papers' that have had enduring utility within the field of history of science and beyond. First the messages of the paper are examined, some well known but others, particularly Ross's own contemporary concerns about the use of the word 'scientist', less so. The varied uses made of the paper by scholars are then traced before Ross's biography is examined in order to try to understand how a figure professionally marginal to the field of history of science came to write such a significant piece. Ross's interest in the topic appears to have been informed by a romantically tinged scientific progressivism and a deep concern with the importance of linguistic precision in science and in public affairs. The inspirations of the author and the interests of his audience have been only partially aligned, but the paper's insights remain of broad historical interest and have wider ramifications since the denotation 'scientist' and its proper application are much debated today in contests over the authority of science.

  8. Ensinando ciências sociais em uma escola de medicina: a história de um curso (1965-90 Teaching social sciences at a medical school: the story of one course (1965-90

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everardo Duarte Nunes

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa a história do curso de ciências sociais aplicadas à medicina ministrado na Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp, durante 25 anos (1965-90. Identifica as influências sobre o referido curso dos seminários internacionais que, na década de 1950, redefiniram os rumos da educação médica, assim como o papel da Organização Pan-Americana de Saúde (OPAS e de instituições nacionais na problematização da saúde como questão social. A história do curso é dividida em três períodos: as primeiras experiências, de 1965 a 1969; rumo a um projeto social em saúde, na década de 1970 ; e consolidação do projeto social em saúde na década seguinte. As diversas formas de enfrentar o ensino pretenderam incorporar a dimensão do social e sua dinâmica para a melhor compreensão do processo saúde-doença e da organização das práticas de saúde.This article analyzes the history of the course in social sciences applied to the field of medicine, offered at Unicamp’s Faculdade de Ciências Médicas for 25 years (1965-90. It shows how this particular course was influenced by the international seminars that defined new directions in medical education during the 1950s. It also explores the role played by the Pan-American Health Organization and by Brazilian institutions in posing health care as a social issue. This history is divided into three periods: initial experiences, from 1965 to 1969; construction of a social health-care project in the 1970s; and the 1980s consolidation of this project. The various teaching approaches always sought to incorporate the social dimension and its dynamics in order to gain a better understanding of the health-sickness process and the organization of health practices.

  9. How to create a UX story

    OpenAIRE

    Michailidou, Ioanna; von Saucken, Constantin; Kremer, Simon; Lindemann, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Narratives are a tool used in many disciplines. In the area of User Experience Design (UXD), in particular, a storytelling approach can be applied during the whole design process to improve the quality of developed concepts regarding user experience (UX). Furthermore stories support designers in ex-ploring and communicating their new concept ideas. However, the guidelines on how to create a story are either too abstract or do not focus on the experience elements of the interaction. This paper...

  10. Stories of Pasts and Futures in Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar Borges, Luciane

    2016-01-01

    Societies are constantly changing, facing new challenges and possibilities generated by innovative technologies, sociospatial re-structuring and mobilities. This research approaches these challenges by exploring the role that stories about pasts, presents and futures play in planning. It sees stories as interlinked spaces of struggle over meanings, legitimacies and powers through which “our” valuable pasts and “our” desirable futures become re-constructed, framed and projected. It argues that...

  11. [The story of oxygen (2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, F; Radin, S; Tenchini, P

    1985-04-01

    The authors, in this second part of the oxygen story, resolutely cross the borders of the biophysical field, and face the origins and becoming of life, the stages of which are synthesized in "casket" terms, unusual for surgeons: "protobionts", "procariots", "cyanobacteria", "chlorophyll", "caroteonides", "fermentation", "anaerobic glycolysis", "eucariots", "respiratory chain", "mitocondria". This is not an unconventional biological exercise, but the effort to give clinics a more legible ground, a sort of common denominator of the most different pathologies, and, among these ones, at the first place, just those of the specialistic branch, also less frequenter of biology, that is, surgery. This common denominator, the oxygen radicals represent the emerging apex of, like the peak of an iceberg, in fact, can be only investigated through an exasperated "philogenetic" recovering. Such process of "archaeology" seems to be the only suitable to supply us the cipher-key of the ambiguous, shifty character of oxygen, and entrust us with a cultural patrimony being unique as it is spendable in an immediate clinical future.

  12. Top medical news stories 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Here is our list of the top seven medical news stories for 2015 with special emphasis on the Southwest. 7. Wearable health devices: A wave of wearable computing devices such as Fitbit and UP wristbands have people keeping track of how much they sit, stand, walk, climb stairs and calories they consume (1. These fitness-tracking devices herald a series of devices that will detect and monitor serious diseases. However, these so-called medical-grade wearables require approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a regulatory hurdle avoided by the fitness-tracking devices which will likely slow their introduction. 6. Caitlyn Jenner: Caitlyn Jenner became the most famous transgender woman in the world following an interview published in Vanity Fair (2. The Vanity Fair website saw 11.6 million visits curious about the former Olympic athlete. Though Jenner publicly shared her gender identity, many transgender Americans do not-12% of gender non-conforming adults said they ...

  13. Framing a Story of Possibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Marie Kofod

    2017-01-01

    The article investigates the dynamics of photographic production by refugee and immigrant youth in a participatory photography project in San Diego, United States (The AjA Project). Based on five months of fieldwork and the concepts of ‘the takeable photograph’ and ‘the subjunctive mood’, it exam......The article investigates the dynamics of photographic production by refugee and immigrant youth in a participatory photography project in San Diego, United States (The AjA Project). Based on five months of fieldwork and the concepts of ‘the takeable photograph’ and ‘the subjunctive mood......’, it examines under what ideals the photographic production takes place. I argue that there are particular ‘takeable’ photographs in AjA framed by the emic concept of story and defined in opposition to students’ private photographs. ‘Takeable’ photographs are produced in and aim for the subjunctive mood...... to instill the process with a potential for positive change....

  14. Story understanding of a nonexplanatory film affects viewers' premotor activity and empathy for fictional characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa Y

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yukiko Ogawa,1 Sotaro Shimada2 1Faculty of Social Sciences, Hosei University, Tokyo, 2Department of Electronics and Bioinformatics, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, Kanagawa, Japan Objective: The present study aimed to examine whether the story understanding of a nonexplanatory film affects mirror neuron system (MNS activity and to discuss the interactive process involved in generating empathy for fictional characters during participants’ viewing of the film under natural viewing conditions.Methods: The material of the experiment was a Japanese film entitled Dolls. It is a nonexplanatory fiction film, in which the two (male and female main characters show only minimal actions or facial expressions; therefore, the viewers hardly understand the story until it has been developed to some extent. We measured twelve participants’ MNS activity by using near-infrared spectroscopy during the viewing of the first 20 minutes of the film. Additionally, we measured the brain activity while performing their own hand and leg motions after viewing the film to identify their motor cortices.Results: The results showed that the viewer’s MNS activity increased gradually as the introductory part of the story developed. Subsequent analyses revealed a significant increase in MNS activity in the later chapters of the film at the right premotor and supplementary motor cortices (P<0.05. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the MNS activity and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index scores (P<0.05.Conclusion: These results indicate that the viewer’s MNS activity was enhanced by the story understanding of a fiction film. We suggest that MNS activity during viewing fiction films can be used as a measure of how much the story, and rhetoric of a narrative, induces empathy in the viewers even if characters show only minimal actions or facial expressions. Keywords: mirror neuron system, MNS, empathy, nonexplanatory film, story

  15. Telling Stories about the Changing Landscape: One Center's Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. L., Jr.; Wilson, E. H.; Chadwick, C.; Dickson, D.

    2016-12-01

    Since its inception, the Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR) at the University of Connecticut has had a strong applied research and public outreach focus. As a center that focuses on topics that virtually all have a geographic component, the intersection of Web and mapping technologies over the past decade has been an invaluable tool for communicating information. The primary target audience of this information is land use decision makers, who in New England are almost exclusively at the local (municipal) level and are often unpaid volunteers with little or no science background. Data-driven science communication focusing on this very worthy - and very needy - sector of the populace poses problems different from communicating with academic peers at one end of the spectrum, or the general public on the other end. The information must be understandable and accessible to non-technical users, yet specific and authoritative enough to inform decisions. CLEAR's approach to reaching this audience has evolved over the years in response to new internet and GIS technologies on the one hand, and internal deliberations on the other. A critical point was the 2004 public debut of the Center's Changing Landscape project, comprised of complex remotely-sensed land cover data: CLEAR principals decided to make the data publicly available via the Center website, but also to design a website to make the information accessible in as many ways, and for as many different audiences, as possible. This approach has had considerable success, as evidenced in the widespread use of the land cover information by communities, NGOs, federal and state agencies, and academia. Over the past several years, CLEAR has embraced the ESRI story map as a technological tool that embodies the Center's goal of "democratization" of science-based information through multifaceted accessibility. CLEAR's Story Map Gallery currently has six maps, covering a wide range of topics including the Changing

  16. Gesture Frequency Linked Primarily to Story Length in 4-10-Year Old Children's Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoladis, Elena; Marentette, Paula; Navarro, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that older children gesture more while telling a story than younger children. This increase in gesture use has been attributed to increased story complexity. In adults, both narrative complexity and imagery predict gesture frequency. In this study, we tested the strength of three predictors of children's gesture use in…

  17. Using Counter-Stories to Challenge Stock Stories about Traveller Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Critical Race Theory (CRT) is formed from a series of different methodological tools to expose and address racism and discrimination. Counter-stories are one of these tools. This article considers the potential of counter-stories as a methodological, theoretical and practical tool to analyse existing educational inequalities for Traveller…

  18. The geologic story of Isle Royale National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, N. King

    1975-01-01

    Isle Royale is an outstanding example of relatively undisturbed northwoods lake wilderness. But more than simple preservation of such an environment is involved in its inclusion in our National Park System. Its isolation from the mainland provides an almost untouched laboratory for research in the natural sciences, especially those studies whose very nature depends upon such isolation. One excellent example of such research is the intensive study of the predator-prey relationship of the timber wolf and moose, long sponsored by the National Park Service and Purdue University. In probably no other place in North America are the necessary ecological conditions for such a study so admirably fulfilled as on Isle Royale. The development of a natural laboratory with such conditions is ultimately dependent upon geologic processes and events that although not unique in themselves, produced in their interplay a unique result, the island archipelago as we know it today, with its hills and valleys, swamps and bogs the ecological framework of the plant and animal world. Even the most casual visitor can hardly fail to be struck by the fiordlike nature of many of the bays, the chains of fringing islands, the ridge-and-valley topography, and the linear nature of all these features. The distinctive topography of the archipelago is, of course, only the latest manifestation of geologic processes in operation since time immemorial. Fragments of geologic history going back over a billion years can be read from the rocks of the island, and with additional data from other parts of the Lake Superior region, we can fill in some of the story of Isle Royale. After more than a hundred years of study by man, the story is still incomplete. But then, geologic stories are seldom complete, and what we do know allows a deeper appreciation of one of our most naturally preserved parks and whets our curiosity about the missing fragments.

  19. Stories from an Appalachian Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Marie

    Fifty-one years of working in Appalachia on land resettlement and preservation of local values have taught Marie Cirillo the importance of not thinking in terms of either/or. It is not science/technology versus indigenous knowledge; it is how one connects the two so there can be proper balance. It is not capital versus labor; it is not…

  20. Extensive Graded Reading in the Liberal Arts and Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulshock, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    For this research, learners did extensive graded reading (EGR) with traditional graded readers, and they also interacted with short graded stories in the liberal arts and sciences (LAS). This study describes the purpose and format of the LAS stories used by hundreds of university students and adult learners in Japan. It summarizes the results of…

  1. [E. M. Jellinek's silenced and silencing transgenerational story].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Gábor; Márk, Mónika

    2013-01-01

    Jellinek is a kind of archetypal character for future generations in the field of addiction studies. His implosion in the arena of alcoholism around the age of 50 was an unexpected challenge to medical science. We know very little about his own role models giving an intellectual and moral compass to his pragmatic creativity. More than 30 years has passed since Jellinek's death when an American sociologist Ron Roizen started unearthing his silent story. Roizen discerned that there are a lot of unsaid and muted issues in his personal Hungarian past. Our paper, based on the authors' research in Hungarian archives and other sources reveals that not just Jellinek's personal but his transgenerational narrative has been not-yet-said. This silenced and silencing history appears an unfinished business of acculturation of the family, which started prior to four generations. Authors have been concluding that the issue of religious conversion is a critical point in the process of acculturation. They examine the counter move of loyalty to family values and driving force of assimilation making their story unspeakable.

  2. Myths, science and stories: working with peer educators to counter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The failure to bring about widespread or effective behavioural change in response to South Africa's HIV epidemic requires that new forms of health communication be explored. This article reports on an action research project in which a group of workplace HIV/AIDS peer educators at a South African mining company ...

  3. Transnationalism as a motif in family stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Elizabeth; Gomez, Erica; Hotzoglou, Despina; Lipnitsky, Jane Y

    2005-12-01

    Family stories have long been recognized as a vehicle for assessing components of a family's emotional and social life, including the degree to which an immigrant family has been willing to assimilate. Transnationalism, defined as living in one or more cultures and maintaining connections to both, is now increasingly common. A qualitative study of family stories in the family of those who appear completely "American" suggests that an affiliation with one's home country is nevertheless detectable in the stories via motifs such as (1) positively connotated home remedies, (2) continuing denigration of home country "enemies," (3) extensive knowledge of the home country history and politics, (4) praise of endogamy and negative assessment of exogamy, (5) superiority of home country to America, and (6) beauty of home country. Furthermore, an awareness of which model--assimilationist or transnational--governs a family's experience may help clarify a clinician's understanding of a family's strengths, vulnerabilities, and mode of framing their cultural experiences.

  4. Tell Story with Sing and Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Wiyat Purnanto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to improve the ability of storytelling in third grade elementary school and also the researcher intends to improve learning in the aspect of speaking competence narrating personal experience. The method of this research is Tell Story With Sing And Motion. The results of this study were : (1 Introducing the Tell story with sing and motion method in children; (2 Train children to socialize with their friends through personal experiences; (3 Grow courage and confidence in children through storytelling activities; (4 Improving the creativity of children in conveying personal experiences (5 Reminding children of the importance of learning from an experience (6 Supporting factors; (7 Inhibiting factors. Based on the discussion of the research results, the conclusions obtained are: Tell Story with Sing and Motion method can improve the ability to tell the children in grade III SD.

  5. Stories of change in drug treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    treatment institution shapes how particular stories make sense of the past, present and future; and (4) storytelling in drug treatment is an interactive achievement. A fine-grained analysis illuminates in particular how some stories on gender and drug use are silenced, while others are encouraged......Addiction research has demonstrated how recovering individuals need narratives that make sense of past drug use and enable constructions of future, non-addict identities. However, there has not been much investigation into how these recovery narratives actually develop moment-to-moment in drug...... treatment. Building on the sociology of storytelling and ethnographic fieldwork conducted at two drug treatment institutions for young people in Denmark, this article argues that studying stories in the context of their telling brings forth novel insights. Through a narrative analysis of both ‘the whats...

  6. Narrative visualization: telling stories with data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segel, Edward; Heer, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Data visualization is regularly promoted for its ability to reveal stories within data, yet these “data stories” differ in important ways from traditional forms of storytelling. Storytellers, especially online journalists, have increasingly been integrating visualizations into their narratives, in some cases allowing the visualization to function in place of a written story. In this paper, we systematically review the design space of this emerging class of visualizations. Drawing on case studies from news media to visualization research, we identify distinct genres of narrative visualization. We characterize these design differences, together with interactivity and messaging, in terms of the balance between the narrative flow intended by the author (imposed by graphical elements and the interface) and story discovery on the part of the reader (often through interactive exploration). Our framework suggests design strategies for narrative visualization, including promising under-explored approaches to journalistic storytelling and educational media.

  7. Thematic irony in the story of Susanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dichk M. Kanonge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly held that irony features significantly in Susanna. This seemingly plausible hypothesis, however, has not yet been supported by compelling evidence resulting from a systematic analysis of Susanna. This study attempts to fill this gap by investigating the main ironic expressions, words and incidents featuring in Susanna. The approach followed consists of uncovering expressions of irony embedded in the story by paying attention to ironic use of metaphor, ironic use of wordplay, ironic use of rhetorical questions, ironic understatements (e.g. litotes, ironic exaggeration (e.g. hyperbole, ironic use of social conventions and traditions and ironic attribution. It is the contention of this study that Susanna is a thematically ironic story. The use of reversed social conventions is the most powerful and the most abundant expression of irony in the story. This dominant derisive technique is possibly aimed at addressing the irrelevance as well as the abuse of Jewish social conventions in the Second Temple period.

  8. SHORT STORIES IN THE BALKANS AND CONTEMPORARYSHORT STORIES IN THE WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Softic - Gasal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of selected short stories in the Balkan countries, as well as contemporary short stories of the world, will show us that the key themes of those stories are very similar to the short stories written during the period of transition in Bosnia and Herzegovina (1995-2010. For example, the story of the Soul Operation by an Iranian writer Mohsen Mahmalbafa, The Falcons by a Dutch writer Kader Abdolaha and On the Kitchen Stairs by a Polish writer Witold Gombrowic zinter connect with short stories by authors from Bosnia and Herzegovina, such as The Secret of Raspberry jam by Karim Zaimović or The Devilish work of Zoran Riđanović. A common thread manifests itself in the aforementioned stories, more specifically, a common theme which focuses on the need for eradication of the seeds of submission and compliance with the political system. Most authors focus on their domestic political systems; however, some portray and analyze systems in other countries as they see it, such as a Dutch narrator who focuses on a potential threat of infringement of human freedom. Moreover, Bellow Hubei by an Argentinian writer Anhelika Gorodis her underlines the importance of humanization within a political order. Faruk Šehić examines the political system in Bosnia and Herzegovina from a slightly different perspective. His collection of stories Under Pressure emphases the issue of pressure in the above war model of short stories in Bosnia and Herzegovina. These stories are the product of pressure and anxiety, with intent to latently promote new ways of spiritual survival, directly relating to the concept and the theme of the story The Past Age Man by Christian Karlson Stead. Further analysis of the alienation theme singled out short stories in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Plants are Something Else by Alma Lazarevska and Dialogues by Lamija Begagić, and pointed out their connection with some recent international short stories such as The Last Defence by

  9. Stories and story telling in first-levellanguage learning: a re-evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Blair

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes that in the midst of all our theories on language teaching and language learning, we might have overlooked an age-old tool that has always been at the disposal of mankind; the telling of stories. Attention is drawn to how some have found in stories and story telling a driving force of natural language acquisition, a key that can unlock the intuitive faculties ofthe mind. A case is being made out for the re-instalment of stories and associated activities as a means of real, heart-felt functional communication in a foreign language, rather than through a direct assault on the structure of the language itself. Met hierdie artikel word daar voorgestel dat daar opnuut gekyk moet word na 'n hulpmiddel wat so oud is as die mensheid self en wat nog altyd tot ons beskikking was, naamlik stories en die vertel daarvan. Die aandag word daarop gevestig dat daar persone is wat in stories en die verbale oordrag daarvan 'n stukrag ontdek het tot natuurlike taalvaardigheid, 'n sleutel tot die intultiewe breinfunksies. Daar word 'n saak uitgemaak vir die terugkeer na stories en gepaardgaande aktiwiteite as middel tot 'n egte, diep deurleefde en funksionele wyse van kommunikasie in 'n vreemde taal, eerder as 'n direkte aanslag op die taalstruktuur self.

  10. Stories and narratives in early childhood education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline de Fatima dos Santos Morais

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the importance of oral and written narrative for the maintenance of tradition and history of each one of us, in a society that seems to valorize the information more than the stories lived and told. It stresses the need, at school, of the teachers to read stories to children from early childhood education to boys and girls love to the world of literature. The text also contains situations en countered in schools that show the value of reading and the magic that literature provides in the lives of children.

  11. Telling business stories as fellowship-tales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Robert; Neergaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    – The research indicates that “fellowship-tales” provide a viable and credible alternative to the fairy-tale rendition common in entrepreneur and business stories. Research limitations/implications – An obvious limitation is that one merely swaps one narrative framework for another, albeit it offers dissenting...... voices a real choice. Practical implications – This study has the potential to be far reaching because at a practical level, it allows disengaged entrepreneurs and significant others the freedom to exercise their individual and collective voices within a framework of nested stories. Originality...

  12. European Success Stories in Industrial Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Esteban, Maria J; Lery, Thibaut; Maday, Yvon

    2011-01-01

    This unique book presents real world success stories of collaboration between mathematicians and industrial partners, showcasing first-hand case studies, and lessons learned from the experiences, technologies, and business challenges that led to the successful development of industrial solutions based on mathematics. It shows the crucial contribution of mathematics to innovation and to the industrial creation of value, and the key position of mathematics in the handling of complex systems, amplifying innovation. Each story describes the challenge that led to the industrial cooperation, how the

  13. The Power of Influence: School Nurse Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazyck, Donna; Cellucci, Margaret; Largent, Piper

    2015-07-01

    School nurses have influence, and this influence is ignited with school nurse stories. School nurses must tell school staff, leaders, families, and students what they do to help students access their education. School boards, city councils, and legislators need to know the knowledge, skills, and judgment school nurses use daily. NASN understands that school nurses benefit from a "how to" kit and has developed tools to empower school nurses in advocating for their important role in supporting the health and learning of students. This article provides an overview this newly developed electronic toolkit while at the same time reinforcing the power of influence when sharing your stories. © 2015 The Author(s).

  14. Untold stories of Syrian women surviving war

    OpenAIRE

    Alhayek, Katty

    2015-01-01

    Issue title: Sympathetic stereotypes: the Syrian Uprising in western media and scholarship In "I must save my life and not risk my family’s safety!”: Untold Stories of Syrian Women Surviving War, Alhayek provides several case studies of Syrian women whose lives were irreversibly changed as a result of the events that unfolded after March 2011. The stories of these women vividly illustrate how difficult it is to come up with a neat and easily accessible profile for the suffering of Syrian w...

  15. Stories from a Geisha: Den stygge Andy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remi Johansen Hovda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available I artikkelen beskrives det kunstneriske utviklingsarbeidet Stories from a Geisha. Arbeidet består av fire forskjellige dragshow i en performativ serie med én tematisk helhet. Tematikken serien bygger, på er hentet fra cross-dressingtradisjonen i det Canadiske forsvaret under andre verdenskrig. Artikkelen belyser utviklingen av seriens første show, ‘Den stygge Andy’, og diskuterer arbeidet med sjangerfornying. Fortellerkunst og dragshows kombineres i Stories from a Geisha som dermed fremstår som en ny sjanger: FortellerDrag.

  16. Story and Recall in First-Person Shooters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Pinchbeck

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Story has traditionally been seen as something separate to gameplay—frequently relegated to an afterthought or epiphenomenon. Nevertheless, in the FPS genre there has been something of a renaissance in the notion of the story-driven title. Partially, this is due to advances in technology enabling a greater capacity for distributed storytelling and a better integration of story and gameplay. However, what has been underrecognised is the dynamic, epistemological, and psychological impact of story and story elements upon player behaviour. It is argued here that there is evidence that story may have a direct influence upon cognitive operations. Specifically, evidence is presented that it appears to demonstrate that games with highly visible, detailed stories may assist players in recalling and ordering their experiences. If story does, indeed, have a more direct influence, then it is clearly a more powerful and immediate tool in game design than either simply reward system or golden thread.

  17. Can classic moral stories promote honesty in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; Talwar, Victoria; McCarthy, Anjanie; Ross, Ilana; Evans, Angela; Arruda, Cindy

    2014-08-01

    The classic moral stories have been used extensively to teach children about the consequences of lying and the virtue of honesty. Despite their widespread use, there is no evidence whether these stories actually promote honesty in children. This study compared the effectiveness of four classic moral stories in promoting honesty in 3- to 7-year-olds. Surprisingly, the stories of "Pinocchio" and "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" failed to reduce lying in children. In contrast, the apocryphal story of "George Washington and the Cherry Tree" significantly increased truth telling. Further results suggest that the reason for the difference in honesty-promoting effectiveness between the "George Washington" story and the other stories was that the former emphasizes the positive consequences of honesty, whereas the latter focus on the negative consequences of dishonesty. When the "George Washington" story was altered to focus on the negative consequences of dishonesty, it too failed to promote honesty in children. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. More than pretty pictures? How illustrations affect parent-child story reading and children’s story recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Follmer Greenhoot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research showed that story illustrations fail to enhance young preschoolers’ memories when they accompany a pre-recorded story (e.g., Greenhoot & Semb, 2008. In this study we tested whether young children might benefit from illustrations in a more interactive story-reading context. For instance, illustrations might influence parent-child reading interactions, and thus children’s story comprehension and recall. Twenty-six 3.5- to 4.5-year-olds and their primary caregivers were randomly assigned to an Illustrated or Non-Illustrated story-reading condition, and parents were instructed to read or tell the story as they normally would read with their child. Children recalled the story after a distracter and again after one week. Analyses of the story-reading interactions showed that the illustrations prompted more interactive story reading and more parent and child behaviors known to predict improved literacy outcomes. Furthermore,in the first memory interview, children in the Illustrated condition recalled more story events than those in the Non-Illustrated condition. Story reading measures predicted recall, but did not completely account for picture effects. These results suggest that illustrations enhance young preschoolers’ story recall in an interactive story reading context, perhaps because the joint attention established in this context supports children’s processing of the illustrations.

  19. Future Tense: Science Fiction Confronts the New Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antczak, Janice

    1990-01-01

    Describes 10 science fiction stories for young readers whose contents address recent developments on the frontiers of scientific research, including genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, and robotics. The use of these materials to inform young readers about the issues and dangers involved in scientific developments is discussed. (CLB)

  20. Indigenous Sky Stories: Reframing How We Introduce Primary School Students to Astronomy--A Type II Case Study of Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, Nicholas; Danaia, Lena; McKinnon, David

    2016-01-01

    The Indigenous Sky Stories Program may have the potential to deliver significant and long-lasting changes to the way science is taught to Year 5 and 6 primary school students. The context for this article is informed by research that shows that educational outcomes can be strengthened when Indigenous knowledge is given the space to co-exist with…

  1. Into the Curriculum. Reading/Language Arts: My Story [and] Science: The Wonder of Rainbows! [and] Science: Take a Dive! Submerge and Immerse Yourself with Marine Animals [and] Social Studies: Monkey and Ox. Parts Two and Three of Three Programs [and] Social Studies: Famous People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Lori; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents five curriculum guides for reading, language arts, science, and social studies. Each activity identifies library media skills objectives, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, librarian and teacher instructional roles, activity and procedures for completion, activity samples, guidelines for evaluating finished activities, and…

  2. dramatization of character in selected nigerian short stories

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization in the short story endears the short story genre more to the conventions of the stage because of its dramatization of character. By paying strict attention to the manipulation of action and dialogue, the short story writer creates dramatic characters who illuminate setting, promote the plot and ultimately realize ...

  3. Improving agile requirements: the Quality User Story framework and tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, Garm; Dalpiaz, Fabiano; van der Werf, Jan Martijn E. M.; Brinkkemper, Sjaak

    2016-01-01

    User stories are a widely adopted requirements notation in agile development. Yet, user stories are too often poorly written in practice and exhibit inherent quality defects. Triggered by this observation, we propose the Quality User Story (QUS) framework, a set of 13 quality criteria that user

  4. Telling Their Stories: Women Construct/Instruct through Survival Rhetoric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Eileen M.

    Malika Oufkir of Morocco recounts her story in "Stolen Lives." Loung Ung of Cambodia relates her story in "First, They Killed My Father." Susan McDougal of Arkansas, USA, tells her story in the aptly named, "The Woman Who Wouldn't Talk." This paper looks at the struggles of these three very different women from very…

  5. Non-Linear Interactive Stories in Computer Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø, Olav; Jensen, Ole Guttorm; Kocka, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    The paper introduces non-linear interactive stories (NOLIST) as a means to generate varied and interesting stories for computer games automatically. We give a compact representation of a NOLIST based on the specification of atomic stories, and show how to build an object-oriented Bayesian network...

  6. The Story of Story Mill-A Montana Community Working to Restore Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story Mill, a 55-acre site on the outskirts of Bozeman, Montana, has undergone several transformations in recent history. The place is virtually a “mill of stories” with respect to land use, but originally it was a wetland.

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 31:23 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,790 views 5: ... 04. giffordproductions 69,295 views 3:04 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 22:27 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,413 views 5: ... 3:34. Nemours 975 views 3:34 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,039 views 3:29 Carmen's story - Duration: 6:02. Consumers Health Forum of Australia 20,462 views 6:02 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Content location: United States Restricted Mode: Off ...

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 5:27 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 24,322 views 5:39 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. ...

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 24,259 views 5:39 My Wishes: An End Of Life Care Story (Patient) - Duration: 27:40. Medway ... Last Days: HammondCare's Palliative Care Home Support program featured on ABC NSW 7.30 - ...

  12. Stories of Human Autonomy, Law, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    Considering the relationship between human autonomy, law and technology has deep origins. Both technology studies and legal theory tell origin stories about human autonomy as the prize from either a foundational technological or jurisprudential event. In these narratives either law is considered a second order consequence of technology or…

  13. AHP 10: Story: Is It Karma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pad ma rgya mtsho པད་མ་རྒྱ་མཚོ།

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pad ma rgya mtsho (b. 1988 is from Wuzong Village, Darto (Nanduo Township, Garzi (Ganzi County, Garzi (Ganzi Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan (Sichuan Province. He says, "I wrote this story based on what I heard from neighboring villagers."

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 5:53 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 59,483 views 5: ... Medway CCG 173,217 views 27:40 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Little Stars 11,912 views 10:35 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 253,855 ... views 56:31 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,687 views 5: ...

  16. The Porno Girl: And Other Stories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeff Zaleski

    2003-01-01

    ... stay with the family--with disturbing consequences. Frances, the suddenly single mother of a young son in "Don Giovanni in the Tub," feels "terribly stunted, inadequate to the tasks of being his mother," an anxiety echoed by many of the characters in the collection. Several stories negotiate the perilous terrain of illicit love and lust, ...

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Little Stars 11,437 views 10:35 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 248,569 views 11:08 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,073 views 5: ...

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Little Stars 11,437 views 10:35 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 248,967 views 11:08 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,073 views 5: ...

  19. A compendium of energy conservation success stories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    Three-quarters of DOE's Conservation R and D funds have been devoted to technology research and development: basic and applied research, exploratory R and D, engineering feasibility studies, pilot-scale prototype R and D, and technology demonstration. Non R and D projects have involved technology assessment program planning and analysis, model development, technology transfer and consumer information, health effects and safety research, and technical support for rule making. The success stories summarized in this compendium fall into three general categories: Completed Technology Success Stories, projects that have resulted in new energy-saving technologies that are presently being used in the private sector; Technical Success Stories, projects that have produced or disseminated important scientific/technical information likely to result in future energy savings; Program Success Stories, non-R and D activities that have resulted in nationally significant energy benefits. The Energy Conservation research and development program at DOE is managed by the Office of Conservation under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. Three subordinate Program Offices correspond to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors. A fourth subordinate Program Office/endash/Energy Utilization Research/endash/sponsors research and technical inventions for all end-use sectors.

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 34 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. LIFE Before Death 14,141 views 5:27 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family ... Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 19,558 ...

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 3:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,393 views 5: ... 51. WesternReservePBS 6,220 views 54:51 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 22:27 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,413 views 5: ... 3:34. Nemours 936 views 3:34 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  3. THE mSTORY OF GROIN HERNIA*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-07-03

    Jul 3, 1971 ... Kahn, J. 1.. and Koiransky H. (1933): Amer. J. Dis. Child.. 46, 40. THE mSTORY OF GROIN HERNIA*. SIMO I. WAPNICK, M.D., FR.C.S., Lecturer in Surgery, University of Rhodesia, Salisbury. SUMMARY. In The first century AD Cefsus described a method of recognition of groin hernia. It was not until Casper.

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 31 Children's Palliative Care - Duration: 2:26. Filmkaar 1,050 views 2:26 Sevanah Marecle's Story - Another ... Child is Seriously Ill: Living Each Day - Duration: 1:59. Canadian Virtual Hospice 241 views 1:59 ...

  5. Mathematical Story: A Metaphor for Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietiker, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical framework for interpreting the content found in mathematics curriculum in order to offer teachers and other mathematics educators comprehensive conceptual tools with which to make curricular decisions. More specifically, it describes a metaphor of "mathematics curriculum as story" and defines and…

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 56:31. painpallcare 703 views 56:31 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 255,892 views 11:08 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,046 views 5: ...

  7. Tell the story of what you did.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Liz

    2015-03-01

    Writing for publication can be a daunting experience for the novice and experienced researcher. Writing is an acquired skill that only develops through regular practice and persistence in working to improve each piece. Yet telling the story of what you did, what you found or what worked is so important for all researchers.

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 27. HammondCare 19,943 views 22:27 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 248,855 views 11:08 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,073 views 5: ...

  9. Resistance Stories of African-Brazilian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Nazareth Meneghel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study consists of an intervention using narrative workshops as a device to stimulate the empowerment of women. Ten women, victims of gender violence, took part in a workshop developed by non-governmental organization for African-Brazilian women Maria Mulher, which gives assistance to women living in Vila Cruzeiro do Sul, in the city of Porto Alegre. The main objective of the research was to debate questions related to gender and violence, making use of stories and histories related to the feminine, specifically African-Brazilian stories. Five meetings were held, where the women told and were told stories, took part in group discussions, experiences and rituals. The workshops gave those women a space where they could tell and hear stories, take part in the rituals of the orixás [African-Brazilian deities] of the black culture and tell their personal histories using those experiences. This intervention was an attempt at invoking different subjective experiences, and made it possible to empower the women who took part in the research, contributing for the rescue of the individual and collective memory of this group.

  10. A Compendium of Energy Conservation Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Three-quarters of DOE's Conservation R and D funds have been devoted to technology research and development: basic and applied research, exploratory R and D, engineering feasibility studies, pilot-scale prototype R and D, and technology demonstration. Non R and D projects have involved technology assessment program planning and analysis, model development, technology transfer and consumer information, health effects and safety research, and technical support for rule making. The success stories summarized in this compendium fall into three general categories: Completed Technology Success Stories, projects that have resulted in new energy-saving technologies that are presently being used in the private sector; Technical Success Stories, projects that have produced or disseminated important scientific/technical information likely to result in future energy savings; Program Success Stories, non-R and D activities that have resulted in nationally significant energy benefits. The Energy Conservation research and development program at DOE is managed by the Office of Conservation under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. Three subordinate Program Offices correspond to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors. A fourth subordinate Program Office{endash}Energy Utilization Research{endash}sponsors research and technical inventions for all end-use sectors.

  11. Stories in Different Domains of Child Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnjatovic, Dragana

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on the results gained from the research about the perception teachers have about stories. The study was conducted in Sweden and the main purpose was to partially fulfil the requirements for Erasmus Mundus joint degree "International Master of Early Childhood Education and Care". In accordance with previous research…

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 5:53 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 59,483 views 5: ... 04. giffordproductions 65,705 views 3:04 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  13. Generosity and Hospitality in Christmas Story

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, T.

    2013-01-01

    This short subject discusses what might be understood as Santa Claus’ essence, which is the logic of and limits to his overarching generosity, as depicted in the film Christmas Story (Wuolijoki, 2007). The plot centres on the orphan Nikolas, who grew up to be Santa Claus. Young Nikolas moves to a

  14. The Story of the Trojan Octagon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derado, Josip; Garner, Mary; Edwards, Belinda P.; Garrett, Violette L.

    2010-01-01

    Stories that are presented through literature or popular media can be used to invite students into the world of math; stir their mathematical imaginations; and enhance their ability to read about, write about, and discuss math. This article explores how literature ("Flatland," the book and the movie) and an existing seventh-grade unit…

  15. Using Stories in English Omani Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Harrasi, Kothar Talib Sulaiman

    2012-01-01

    Learning a FL [foreign language] may be frustrating for some young learners; however, integrating fun in learning would encourage them to develop positive attitudes towards learning a language (Ellis & Brewster, 1991). Stories are an effective and enthusiastic technique in teaching young learners; they inject lots of amusement and help…

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 27. HammondCare 19,764 views 22:27 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 248,569 views 11:08 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,073 views 5: ...

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 10:35 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 60,479 views 5: ... 21. PHCMediaServices 144,428 views 45:21 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  18. Personal Stories: Why Flu Vaccination Matters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-12-08

    In this podcast, moving personal stories help inform parents about the dangers of flu to children and the benefits of vaccination.  Created: 12/8/2008 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 12/8/2008.

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 10:35 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 60,479 views 5: ... FORA.tv 42,319 views 3:02 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 27. HammondCare 19,699 views 22:27 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 248,474 views 11:08 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,073 views 5: ...

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 22:27 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 60,320 views 5: ... Gavin Grubb 32,872 views 31:23 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 2:20 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 60,479 views 5: ... 51. WesternReservePBS 5,714 views 54:51 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Western Reserve 10,324 views 12:07 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 130,784 views 13:34 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. LIFE Before ...

  4. A Contemporary Story of School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Jean; Priestley, Anna

    2012-01-01

    A review of recent school psychology publications was conducted to discover the espoused theory of contemporary school psychology, as distinct from school psychology practice. We considered that identification of the espoused theory of school psychology, the story of school psychology, would support professional reflection and the identification…

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 10:35 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,267 views 5: ... 3:34. Nemours 936 views 3:34 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 10:35 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,413 views 5: ... 3:34. Nemours 936 views 3:34 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  7. The Story of a Charter School Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Susan L.; Arguelles, Lourdes

    2001-01-01

    The story of a charter school closure is told from the perspectives of students, parents, teachers, and community members, who felt that the sponsoring district revoked the charter for political reasons despite broad local support. The experience underscores the necessity of publicly subjecting the relationship of the public school system and the…

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 27. HammondCare 20,280 views 22:27 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 249,120 views 11:08 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,073 views 5: ...

  9. Dangote cement : an African success story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akinyoade, A.; Uche, C.U.

    2016-01-01

    This paper critiques the rise of Dangote Cement plc to become the dominant player in the Nigerian cement industry. Although the close relationship between the company's founder, Aliko Dangote, and subsequent Nigerian governments has been an important factor in this success story, we argue that it is

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 27. HammondCare 20,459 views 22:27 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 249,400 views 11:08 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,073 views 5: ...

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 3:02 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 60,433 views 5: ... 21. PHCMediaServices 142,670 views 45:21 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Little Stars 11,702 views 10:35 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 253,557 views 11:08 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,687 views 5: ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 10:35 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,353 views 5: ... 50. PCC4UProject 36,368 views 12:50 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Little Stars 11,912 views 10:35 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 253,855 views 11:08 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 61,687 views 5: ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PHCMediaServices 145,518 views 45:21 Palliative Care: One Couple's Story of Living While Dying - Duration: 2: ... Pediatric Palliative Care- Tara - Duration: 3:37. sharingwisdomppc 1,667 views 3:37 Loading more suggestions... Show ...

  16. Teaching and Learning, Stories and Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govier, Trudy

    2013-01-01

    This paper explains and illustrates a method of argumentative reconstruction that may be used in the teaching of stories. Without maintaining that argument is superior to narrative or that all narratives should be cast as arguments, I illustrate the benefits of this approach for critical thinking and the discussion that ensues when one seeks to…

  17. Related Information | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "How cultural stereotypes lure women away form careers in science" · "Edavaleth Kakkat Janaki Ammal - A path breaking botanist" · Mary Leakey - a British paleoanthropologist who discovered the first fossilized Proconsul skull. Milla Baldo Ceolin - story of an Italian physicist. "The science of missing women" - an editorial ...

  18. NASA/MSFC/NSSTC Science Communication Roundtable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. L.; Gallagher, D. L.; Koczor, R.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Science Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducts a diverse program of Internet-based science communication through a Science Roundtable process. The Roundtable includes active researchers, writers, NASA public relations staff, educators, and administrators. The Science@NASA award-winning family of Web sites features science, mathematics, and space news to inform, involve, and inspire students and the public about science. We describe here the process of producing stories, results from research to understand the science communication process, and we highlight each member of our Web family.

  19. The Effect of Using the Story-Mapping Technique on Developing Tenth Grade Students' Short Story Writing Skills in EFL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibnian, Salem Saleh Khalaf

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed at investigating the effect of using the story-mapping technique on developing tenth grade students' short story writing skills in EFL. The study attempted to answer the following questions: (1) What are the short story writing skills needed for tenth grade students in EFL?; and (2) What is the effect of the using the…

  20. Death with a Story: How Story Impacts Emotional, Motivational, and Physiological Responses to First-Person Shooter Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Edward F.; Lang, Annie; Shin, Mija; Bradley, Samuel D.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates how game playing experience changes when a story is added to a first-person shooter game. Dependent variables include identification, presence, emotional experiences and motivations. When story was present, game players felt greater identification, sense of presence, and physiological arousal. The presence of story did not…

  1. Functions of personal and vicarious life stories: Identity and empathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Majse; Thomsen, Dorthe Kirkegaard

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates functions of personal and vicarious life stories focusing on identity and empathy. Two-hundred-and-forty Danish high school students completed two life story questionnaires: One for their personal life story and one for a close other’s life story. In both questionna......The present study investigates functions of personal and vicarious life stories focusing on identity and empathy. Two-hundred-and-forty Danish high school students completed two life story questionnaires: One for their personal life story and one for a close other’s life story. In both...... questionnaires, they identified up to 10 chapters and self-rated the chapters on valence and valence of causal connections. In addition, they completed measures of identity disturbance and empathy. More positive personal life stories were related to lower identity disturbance and higher empathy. Vicarious life...... stories showed a similar pattern with respect to identity but surprisingly were unrelated to empathy. In addition, we found positive correlations between personal and vicarious life stories for number of chapters, chapter valence, and valence of causal connections. The study indicates that both personal...

  2. The ancient story of Bora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, R. R.; Lomabrdi, R.

    2010-09-01

    Every part of the world is characterized by his own climatological peculiarities, and sometimes some restricted areas can be influenced by local, singular, characteristical metereological phenomena. Trieste, capital of the region Friuli Venezia Giulia, and the Karst ( northeastern Italy) are included in this category. Since the old age it has been narrated the "raids" caused by the Bora, strong dry and cold north eastern wind that, with one of his most northern branch, which born in the karstic inland near Postumia (Slovenia), affects the Karst plateau and the Gulf of Trieste. In literature we can find how on September 5th, 394 a.C. the "miraculous wind" Bora has been decisive for the defeat of Arbogaste (West Roman Empire) in the Vipavska valley; he was with his army against the wind in the battle whereas the troops of the Catholic Emperor Teodosio (East Roman Empire) has been able to through their darts further thank to the wind. The fairy tales about "Bora" and "Borino" are part of the local literature since many centuries, whereas in the XX Century we can find images, postcards and books concerning the tempestuous wind of Trieste. When television born, developed a new way to communicate the deeds of Bora thanks to some extreme events occurred among 30s and 50s which contributes to increase his mith. The goal of this work is to retrace the history of Bora in the words of the common people rather than the science in order to understand how his legend has grown during the ages. Now, in the age of internet, a new way of telling the Bora adventures is born.

  3. THE STORY OF THE BC FAMILY JUSTICE INNOVATION LAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Morley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Many in the justice system know that fundamental change is needed but few know the best way to do it.  Previous attempts using strategic planning approaches have not achieved meaningful change.  Something different is needed.  The BC Family Justice Innovation Lab (the Lab is experimenting with a different approach drawing on complexity science, the experience of other jurisdictions and disciplines and incorporating human-centred design as a way of focusing on the well-being of families going through the transition of separation and divorce.  This article is the story of the first few years of the Lab’s life.  It has been a fascinating and challenging path so far, and it remains to be seen whether it will ultimately succeed. The story is offered so that others with similar ambitions can learn from the Lab’s experience – its successes and its failures.  It is the nature and strength of stories that the reader will take from them what they will. For the authors, one overriding theme that emerges from this story is that transforming a complex social system, such as the family justice system in British Columbia, requires embracing the complexity of paradox and refusing to be defeated by the tension of opposites and a multitude of wicked, unanswerable questions.    Bon nombre d’intervenants du système de justice savent qu’un changement fondamental s’impose, mais peu connaissent la meilleure façon de le réaliser. Dans le passé, l’utilisation d’approches de planification stratégique n’a pas donné les résultats escomptés. Une approche différente est nécessaire. S’inspirant de l’expérience vécue dans d’autres ressorts et d’autres disciplines, le BC Family Justice Innovation Lab (le Lab expérimente actuellement une approche différente fondée sur la science de la complexité, et s’efforce d’intégrer une conception axée sur la personne afin de mettre de l’avant le bien-être des familles

  4. Overcoming the obstacles: Life stories of scientists with learning disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Crista Marie

    Scientific discovery is at the heart of solving many of the problems facing contemporary society. Scientists are retiring at rates that exceed the numbers of new scientists. Unfortunately, scientific careers still appear to be outside the reach of most individuals with learning disabilities. The purpose of this research was to better understand the methods by which successful learning disabled scientists have overcome the barriers and challenges associated with their learning disabilities in their preparation and performance as scientists. This narrative inquiry involved the researcher writing the life stories of four scientists. These life stories were generated from extensive interviews in which each of the scientists recounted their life histories. The researcher used narrative analysis to "make sense" of these learning disabled scientists' life stories. The narrative analysis required the researcher to identify and describe emergent themes characterizing each scientist's life. A cross-case analysis was then performed to uncover commonalities and differences in the lives of these four individuals. Results of the cross-case analysis revealed that all four scientists had a passion for science that emerged at an early age, which, with strong drive and determination, drove these individuals to succeed in spite of the many obstacles arising from their learning disabilities. The analysis also revealed that these scientists chose careers based on their strengths; they actively sought mentors to guide them in their preparation as scientists; and they developed coping techniques to overcome difficulties and succeed. The cross-case analysis also revealed differences in the degree to which each scientist accepted his or her learning disability. While some demonstrated inferior feelings about their successes as scientists, still other individuals revealed feelings of having superior abilities in areas such as visualization and working with people. These individuals revealed

  5. Building Stories about Sea Level Rise through Interactive Visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, S. H.; DeLorme, D. E.; Hagen, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Digital media provide storytellers with dynamic new tools for communicating about scientific issues via interactive narrative visualizations. While traditional storytelling uses plot, characterization, and point of view to engage audiences with underlying themes and messages, interactive visualizations can be described as 'narrative builders' that promote insight through the process of discovery (Dove, G. & Jones, S. 2012, Proc. IHCI 2012). Narrative visualizations are used in online journalism to tell complex stories that allow readers to select aspects of datasets to explore and construct alternative interpretations of information (Segel, E. & Heer, J. 2010, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comp. Graph.16, 1139), thus enabling them to participate in the story-building process. Nevertheless, narrative visualizations also incorporate author-selected narrative elements that help guide and constrain the overall themes and messaging of the visualization (Hullman, J. & Diakopoulos, N. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comp. Graph. 17, 2231). One specific type of interactive narrative visualization that is used for science communication is the sea level rise (SLR) viewer. SLR viewers generally consist of a base map, upon which projections of sea level rise scenarios can be layered, and various controls for changing the viewpoint and scenario parameters. They are used to communicate the results of scientific modeling and help readers visualize the potential impacts of SLR on the coastal zone. Readers can use SLR viewers to construct personal narratives of the effects of SLR under different scenarios in locations that are important to them, thus extending the potential reach and impact of scientific research. With careful selection of narrative elements that guide reader interpretation, the communicative aspects of these visualizations may be made more effective. This presentation reports the results of a content analysis of a subset of existing SLR viewers selected in order to comprehensively

  6. Linear stories in Carlo Scarpa's architectural drawings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dayer, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    , an architect guides the viewer’s imagination into another not-yet-real world that is projected much like divinatory practices of reading palms or tarot cards. The magic-real field of facts and fictions coexisting in one realm can be understood as a confabulation. A confabulation brings together both fact....... This linearity is closely related to how we live and how stories are made, connecting all the parts despite the apparent contradictions. One could argue that Scarpa, has in fact, only done one drawing in his life, one extremely long drawing, and that one drawing has made him. When the designers of drawings...... are no longer present to present their story, we must rely on reading the clues from the making of the drawings. This paper deepens into Scarpa’s marks to reveal what has been blindly exposed into the surface of his fabulous drawings...

  7. Ethnographic Stories as Generalizations that Intervene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Brit Ross; Verran, Helen

    2012-01-01

    partners in a development aid project; it tells about the seemingly magic actions of a database used for monitoring. We use the note for discussing why we think it is important, in a situation where ethnographic stories are bought and sold as products, to name some of the ontological commitments that go......In this paper, we show why we think the notion of instrumental ethnography should be revived (compared to Steve Woolgar's 1982 use of the term). We see instrumental ethnography as a particular form of ethnography that recognizes ethnographic stories as agential through their capacity to work...... as generalizations. We outline two different logics of generalizing (one-many and whole-parts) and show how these logics can be identified in a note from fieldwork that one of the authors is currently involved in. The field note displays how a project worker in a large environmental NGO engage in monitoring her...

  8. Defense Mechanism Card Pull in TAT Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Phebe

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the question of whether different Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Murray, 1943 ) cards are likely to prompt stories that are characterized by different defense mechanisms. This condition is known as card pull and refers to the probability that different TAT cards elicit different personality scores for the same variable. If so, the assessment of defense use would be importantly influenced by the TAT cards used in an assessment. TAT stories from 3 different community samples were examined (Ns = 91, 98, 121), using a statistical method developed by Stein et al ( 2014 ). The results indicated that different TAT cards pull for different defenses, as assessed by the Defense Mechanism Manual (DMM: Cramer, 1991b ). However, the nature of card pull was not always consistent across samples. These dissimilarities could be due to group differences, or to the presence of different TAT cards used in the test battery, indicating that card pull is importantly determined by context.

  9. 2014's top southwest medical stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The end of the year has traditionally been a time to reflect on the top stories of the year. Here's our list of the top local medical stories. 1. VA scandal: Phoenix was the epicenter of the VA scandal but Albuquerque and the Greeley, Colorado clinic also figured prominently in the falsification of patient wait lists. Investigations revealed that at least 70% of the VA hospitals falsified records leading to the resignation of VA secretary, Eric Shinseki, and his under secretary for health, Dr. Robert Petzel. Eventually the director of the Phoenix VA, Sharon Helman, was fired-not for the falsification of medical records but for taking inappropriate gifts. However, most of the directors of the VA hospitals that falsified data remain untouched, still receiving their bonuses. Similarly, the politicians, the inspector general and those in the VA central office whose job was to provide oversight remain unscathed. On the bright ...

  10. The Engineering Project as Story and Narrative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lars Bo

    2012-01-01

    Engineers most often organise their work in projects and consequently project management becomes an essential part of an engineer’s work and working life in general. Even if most engineers are trained in project management, it seems that this is a challenge to most engineers. It also seems...... that the traditional project management tools are not always sufficient when it comes to managing engineering projects. In this chapter, an engineering project is examined, and it turns out that the language, the stories, and the narratives connected to the project is of greater importance to the engineers than...... the formal project management tools that were offered to the engineers. It also turns out that the term “project” could itself be a problem when it comes to fulfilling the project goals. Therefore, it is concluded that when working on engineering projects, language, stories, and narratives are just...

  11. Researching transformative learning spaces through learners' stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maslo, Elina

    spaces, learning to learn through languages, learners´ stories, qualitative research method Methodology or Methods/Research Instruments or Sources Used A number of semi structured qualitative interviews have been conducted with three learners of Danish as second language. The language learners......31. LEd – Network on Language and Education Abstract Elina Maslo, Department of Education, Aarhus University, Denmark Researching transformative learning spaces through language learners´ stories Proposal information Despite rapid development of learning theory in general and language learning...... does not exist. Learning is an extremely complex multidimensional process that happens differently for everyone. The aim of this paper is to present a research method that allow researchers making an insight in unique, practical, emotional and symbolic life of the individuals in the concrete historical...

  12. Popular Science Journalism: Facilitating Learning through Peer Review and Communication of Science News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuten, Holly; Temesvari, Lesly

    2013-01-01

    In a multisemester Popular Science Journalism course that met for 2 hours once a week at Clemson University, students produced science news articles for the university newspaper by using primary literature, the internet, and interviews with researchers. Short lectures were given on topic choice, story development, literature surveys, common…

  13. Focal Points on Constructing News Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Yuryevna Ilyinova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The issues stated in the article line with the current interest to pragmatic value of news releases in modern media. The news is thought to be a verbalized focal reflection of some event that was chosen by media professionals for setting the current information agenda. Having generated the opinions on the newsworthiness the authors present a set of values that may be used for measurement of relevance and clarity of an event reflection in the news content with frequency, clarity, predictability, unexpectedness, amplitude, cultural proximity, elite nations, elite people, personification, negativity among them. The novelty of the research is that the newsworthiness is checked with the focus to lexical (thematic representation of the news in a diachronic approach: the empirical base of the research was taken from the archives of UK national and local media sources (18–20th cent. and implied comparison of lexical means that reflected an event itself and some values of human interest potential in the news stories written in defined periods. The article states the trend for dynamics in the way the event is reflected in the news stories – the information core of the story is merged with detailed reporting parts, and their content is conditioned by social and moral values.

  14. Situating math word problems: the story matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattarella-Micke, Andrew; Beilock, Sian L

    2010-02-01

    In two experiments, we explored how the situation model of a math story problem impacts math problem performance. Participants completed multiplication story problems in which a set of objects was associated with or dissociated from a protagonist, making them more or less accessible in memory during answer retrieval. On the basis of previous findings that the sum of two numbers interferes with retrieval of their product, the number of objects in the math problem was either highly interfering ("9" for 4 x 5) or less interfering ("8" for 4 x 5) for multiplication retrieval in the problem. Participants made more errors in problem solving when highly interfering numerical content was associated with the protagonist and, thus, foregrounded. Moreover, the lower one's working memory, the bigger this effect. In sum, small changes in the situation model of a math story problem can harm performance. These changes shift the balance of factors that influence math performance away from math knowledge and toward individual differences in general cognitive capacity.

  15. Science in the Press in Nine Latin American Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Massarani

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to present a panorama of the journalistic coverage of science and technology themes in Latin America, taking as a case study 12 newspapers of signifcant impact in the region, involving nine countries. We collected the stories published in the science section from January to April 2006, and analyzed them based on the constructed week methodology and using quantitative tools. In total, our sample amounted to 681 stories. Among our fndings, we observed an important presence of medicine and health issues as main topics of the stories. National science has space in the newspapers, although less than scientifc results from developed countries. Benefts are stressed in the stories, while a low level of controversies is observed. Scientists are the main source for the journalists, with a low representation of the former in stereotyped images in most of the newspapers.

  16. Making up History: False Memories of Fake News Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle C. Polage

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that information that is repeated is more likely to be rated as true than information that has not been heard before. The current experiment examines whether familiarity with false news stories would increase rates of truthfulness and plausibility for these events. Further, the experiment tested whether false stories that were familiar would result in the creation of a false memory of having heard the story outside of the experiment. Participants were exposed to false new stories, each portrayed by the investigator as true news stories. After a five week delay, participants who had read the false experimental stories rated them as more truthful and more plausible than participants who had not been exposed to the stories. In addition, there was evidence of the creation of false memories for the source of the news story. Participants who had previously read about the stories were more likely to believe that they had heard the false stories from a source outside the experiment. These results suggest that repeating false claims will not only increase their believability but may also result in source monitoring errors.

  17. The story of a largely unknown evolution – Germ theory hoax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Milton; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali

    2011-01-01

    The Piltdown Man debacle provides us with the most infamous forgery in science. However, another equally intriguing story exists concerning a document by a Bostonian called George Sleeper, which purported to be a pre-Darwin–Wallace anticipation of evolution and an equally convincing account of the germ theory published before Louis Pasteur’s famous studies on this subject. The story involves two giants in the world of evolutionary theory, Alfred Russel Wallace and E.B. Poulton. While Wallace was convinced that the Sleeper document was genuine, Poulton’s detailed investigations showed that it was a fake and a hoax. Despite this conclusion, doubts still exist about the authenticity of the Sleeper document. PMID:23961141

  18. Pseudoscience and science fiction

    CERN Document Server

    May, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Aliens, flying saucers, ESP, the Bermuda Triangle, antigravity … are we talking about science fiction or pseudoscience? Sometimes it is difficult to tell the difference. Both pseudoscience and science fiction (SF) are creative endeavours that have little in common with academic science, beyond the superficial trappings of jargon and subject matter. The most obvious difference between the two is that pseudoscience is presented as fact, not fiction. Yet like SF, and unlike real science, pseudoscience is driven by a desire to please an audience – in this case, people who “want to believe”. This has led to significant cross-fertilization between the two disciplines. SF authors often draw on “real” pseudoscientific theories to add verisimilitude to their stories, while on other occasions pseudoscience takes its cue from SF – the symbiotic relationship between ufology and Hollywood being a prime example of this. This engagingly written, well researched and richly illustrated text explores a wide range...

  19. Developing teachers, developing as a teacher: A story about a story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Bennie

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I reflect on my changing roles as a mathematics educator, that is, as a teacher educator and as a classroom teacher in a secondary school. This is a personal account of the challenge of translating my beliefs about mathematics teaching and learning into everyday classroom practice. The presentation I use is based on the work of Rowland − the account is presented in the form of personal reflections on a story written about playing the two different roles of teacher educator and classroom teacher. I use the process of writing to try to make sense of my experiences and to explore the use of story as a research methodology. Although the story is intensely personal, there are identifiable themes that run through the narrative, which I suggest may resonate with the experience of other mathematics educators.

  20. The Science Buffet: Exploring students' images of high school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbrecht, Justin Jacob

    Science curriculum reform documents, as well as research in science education, call for changes in how high school science is taught and learned. In spite of these calls for change, classroom practices are still dominated by traditional science instruction. In this thesis, I report the results of a study in which I disrupted the traditional discourses of teaching and learning high school science in order to explore students' images of science and the discursive practices that shape these images. By listening to students' accounts of their school science experiences, I sought to uncover some of the implicit images of science held by students and, in doing so, to bring a fresh perspective to teaching and learning and science education. Two classes of grade twelve students were asked to keep journals to tell the story of their experiences in the many activities and assignments of a physics course. Using the journal entries, eight students were identified and asked to participate in group interviews. The interviews expanded on the details of the students' experiences, providing deep insights into the student's images of science and how these images came to be. The students' comments and journal entries were used to create a narrative entitled, "The Science Buffet" which conveys a story of the data collected through this study. Through the metaphorical thread of a buffet table, this research text presents and interprets students' experiences in the physics course using such themes as Where's The Beef?, Who Wants Dessert?, and Can I Have A Doggie Bag Please? Findings of the study suggest that high school students often have clearly defined images of school science and what it means to learn. Unfortunately, however, these images of science and learning may not coincide with what we would expect (and desire) as teachers, thus providing some insight into resistance to change in school science classrooms.