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Sample records for suwannee river estuary

  1. Suwannee river basin and estuary integrated science workshop: September 22-24, 2004 Cedar Key, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Brian; Raabe, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    In response to the growing number of environmental concerns in the mostly pristine Suwannee River Basin and the Suwannee River Estuary system, the States of Florida and Georgia, the Federal government, and other local organizations have identified the Suwannee River as an ecosystem in need of protection because of its unique biota and important water resources. Organizations with vested interests in the region formed a coalition, the Suwannee Basin Interagency Alliance (SBIA), whose goals are to promote coordination in the identification, management, and scientific knowledge of the natural resources in the basin and estuary. To date, an integrated assessment of the physical, biological, and water resources has not been completed. A holistic, multi-disciplinary approach is being pursued to address the research needs in the basin and estuary and to provide supportive data for meeting management objectives of the entire ecosystem. The USGS is well situated to focus on the larger concerns of the basin and estuary by addressing specific research questions linking water supply and quality to ecosystem function and health across county and state boundaries. A strategic plan is being prepared in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies to identify and implement studies to address the most compelling research issues and management questions, and to conduct fundamental environmental monitoring studies. The USGS, Suwannee River Water Management District and the Florida Marine Research Institute are co-sponsoring this scientific workshop on the Suwannee River Basin and Estuary to: Discuss current and past research findings, Identify information gaps and research priorities, and Develop an action plan for coordinated and relevant research activities in the future. This workshop builds on the highly successful basin-wide conference sponsored by the Suwannee Basin Interagency Alliance that was held three years ago in Live Oak, Florida. This years workshop will focus on

  2. 2011 Suwannee River Water Management District Lidar: Upper Suwannee (FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Suwannee River project area in Florida. The entire survey area encompasses 1,151 square miles. The...

  3. 2008 Florida Division of Emergency Management Lidar: Middle Suwannee River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR Survey for the Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD), Florida. The LiDAR aerial acquisition was conducted in January of 2008, and the breaklines and...

  4. 2012 Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD) Lidar: Bradford (FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS - Suwannee River Water Management District Contract No.G10PC00093, Task Order No.G12PD00242 Prime Contractor: Digital Aerial Solutions (DAS) Sub-Contractor:...

  5. Defining winter trophic habitat of juvenile Gulf Sturgeon in the Suwannee and Apalachicola rivermouth estuaries, acoustic telemetry investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulak, K.J.; Randall, M.T.; Edwards, R.E.; Summers, T.M.; Luke, K.E.; Smith, W.T.; Norem, A.D.; Harden, William M.; Lukens, R.H.; Parauka, F.; Bolden, S.; Lehnert, R.

    2009-01-01

    Three automated listening post-telemetry studies were undertaken in the Suwannee and Apalachicola estuaries to gain knowledge of habitats use by juvenile Gulf Sturgeons (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi) on winter feeding grounds. A simple and reliable method for external attachment of small acoustic tags to the dorsal fin base was developed using shrink-tubing. Suspending receivers on masts below anchored buoys improved reception and facilitated downloading; a detection range of 500–2500 m was realized. In the Apalachicola estuary, juvenile GS stayed in shallow water (McKenzie et al., 2001; Singer and Ballantyne, 2002) for short periods in deep offshore waters seems adaptively advantageous relative to the risk of cold-event mortality in shallow inshore waters of lower salinity. Thus, while juveniles can tolerate high salinities for days to weeks to escape cold events, they appear to make only infrequent use of open polyhaline waters. Throughout the winter foraging period, juvenile GS stayed primarily within the core area of Suwannee River mouth influence, extending about 12 km north and south of the river mouth, and somewhat seaward of Suwannee Reef (< 5 km offshore). None were detected departing the core area past either of the northern or southern acoustic gates, located 66 and 52 km distant from the river mouth, respectively.

  6. Progress Report: Chemical contaminants study of the Withlacoochee/Upper Suwannee River Systems reconnaissance field evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Withlacoochee/Upper Suwannee River component of the Suwannee River Basin contains valuable habitat utilized by important trust resources, as well as species of...

  7. 2013 Suwannee River Water Management District Lidar: Obrien (FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of Suwannee River G13PD00141 1.0 Meter LiDAR Survey Area 1, Classified Point Cloud, in north-central...

  8. 2013 Suwannee River Water Management District Lidar: Ocean Pond (FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of Suwannee River G13PD00141 1.0 Meter LiDAR Survey Area 3, Classified Point Cloud, in north-central...

  9. Suwannee River Water Management District Lidar: Falmouth (FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Suwannee River G12PD00242 1.0 Meter LiDAR Survey area 5 in north-central Florida and encompasses...

  10. 2011 USGS Topographic LiDAR: Suwannee River Expansion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Task Order No. G10PD00236 USGS Contract No. G10PC00093 The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Suwannee River Expansion in...

  11. 2013 Suwannee River Water Management District Lidar: Greenville (FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of Suwannee River G12PD00242 1.0 Meter LiDAR Survey Area 3, Classified Point Cloud, in north-central...

  12. 2013 Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD) Lidar: Ichetucknee (FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Suwannee River G12PD00242 1.0 Meter LiDAR Survey area 2 in north-central Florida and encompasses...

  13. 2014 Suwannee River Water Management District Lidar: Cooks Hammock (FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Suwannee River G14PD00206 0.7 Meter LiDAR Survey in central Florida and encompasses 571 square...

  14. 2013 Suwannee River Water Management District Lidar: Lee (FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of Suwannee River G13PD00141 1.0 Meter LiDAR Survey Area 2, Classified Point Cloud, in north-central...

  15. 2013 Suwannee River Water Management District Lidar: Bell (FL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of Suwannee River G13PD00141 1.0 Meter LiDAR Survey Area 4, Classified Point Cloud, in north-central...

  16. The Mtata River estuary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-02-28

    Feb 28, 1989 ... A survey of the fish fauna of Transkei estuaries. Part Three: The Mtata River estuary. E.E. Plumstead* and J.F. Prinsloo. Department of Zoology, University of Transkei, Private Bag X1 001, Unitra, Umtata, Republic of Transkei. H.J. Schoonbee. Department of Zoology, Rand Afrikaans University, P.O. Box 524, ...

  17. The Hudson River estuary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levinton, J.S; Waldman, J.R

    2006-01-01

    ... emphasis on important issues specific to the Hudson, such as the effect of power plants and high concentrations of PCBs. The chapters are written by specialists at a level that is accessible to students, teachers, and the interested layperson. The Hudson River Estuary is a unique scientifi c biography of a major estuary, with relevance to the s...

  18. MODFLOW datasets for simulations of groundwater flow with downscaled global climate model data for the Suwannee River Basin, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A previously-developed groundwater model of the Suwannee River Basin was modified and calibrated to represent transient conditions. A simulation of recent conditions...

  19. Suwannee River flow variability 1550-2005 CE reconstructed from a multispecies tree-ring network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Grant L.; Maxwell, Justin T.; Larson, Evan; Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.; Henderson, Joseph; Huffman, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the long-term natural flow regime of rivers enables resource managers to more accurately model water level variability. Models for managing water resources are important in Florida where population increase is escalating demand on water resources and infrastructure. The Suwannee River is the second largest river system in Florida and the least impacted by anthropogenic disturbance. We used new and existing tree-ring chronologies from multiple species to reconstruct mean March-October discharge for the Suwannee River during the period 1550-2005 CE and place the short period of instrumental flows (since 1927 CE) into historical context. We used a nested principal components regression method to maximize the use of chronologies with varying time coverage in the network. Modeled streamflow estimates indicated that instrumental period flow conditions do not adequately capture the full range of Suwannee River flow variability beyond the observational period. Although extreme dry and wet events occurred in the gage record, pluvials and droughts that eclipse the intensity and duration of instrumental events occurred during the 16-19th centuries. The most prolonged and severe dry conditions during the past 450 years occurred during the 1560s CE. In this prolonged drought period mean flow was estimated at 17% of the mean instrumental period flow. Significant peaks in spectral density at 2-7, 10, 45, and 85-year periodicities indicated the important influence of coupled oceanic-atmospheric processes on Suwannee River streamflow over the past four centuries, though the strength of these periodicities varied over time. Future water planning based on current flow expectations could prove devastating to natural and human systems if a prolonged and severe drought mirroring the 16th and 18th century events occurred. Future work in the region will focus on updating existing tree-ring chronologies and developing new collections from moisture-sensitive sites to improve

  20. Magnitude and frequency of floods in the Suwannee River Water Management District, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, G.L.; Franklin, Marvin A.

    1996-01-01

    Flood-frequency statistics for 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-. 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals, based on three methods of analysis, are presented for 25 continuous-record and seven peak flow partial-record gaging stations in the Suwannee River Water Management District. The first method, for gaged stations, utilizes station records; the second method, for ungaged sites, utilizes regional regression analysis; and the third method uses a weighted combination of the station and regional values. Because the weighted values utilize two more or less independent estimates of the peak flow statistic, they are considered more accurate than the station estimates or the regression estimates alone. Also, the use of another weighting scheme to improve estimates of flood frequency statistics at ungaged sites is demonstrated. The karstic nature of much of the Suwannee River Water Management District significantly attenuates flood peaks in some streams by providing substantial subsurface storage when river stages are high. At such times, springs discharging into rivers may reverse flow temporarily and become sinks.

  1. from cross river estuary, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    U,F1,:1.,U_ rt as so. 75 $00 o 25 so 15 109 i. FIG. 3: VARIATION IN STOMACH FULLNESS OF PELLONULA Ieonesis FROM CROSS. RIVER ESTUARY, NIGERIA WITH SEXES, SIZES AND SEASONS. Results on ontogenetic diet composition shows that LSG ate more preyfishes and ants than. 886 while 886 ate ,more ...

  2. The Gulf Sturgeon in the Suwannee River - Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulak, Kenneth J.; Randall, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Sturgeons and paddlefishes are modern descendants of an ancient group of freshwater fishes, the Chondrostei (a group of bony fishes with mostly cartilaginous skeletons). Sturgeons evolved during the Age of the Dinosaurs, and have prospered in the large rivers and lakes of North America, Europe and Asia for 200 million years. Together with alligators and crocodiles, they survived the mass extinction at the end of the Mesozoic Era, when the dinosaurs and many other groups of animals disappeared forever. They originated prior to the creation of the Atlantic Ocean, when the Northern Hemisphere supercontinent Pangea broke into North America and Eurasia. Most sturgeons are highly specialized to feed in the sediment on small invertebrate prey, a radical evolutionary departure from most of their fish-eating ancestors.

  3. Molecular Signature of Organic Carbon Along a Salinity Gradient in Suwannee River Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Bianchi, T. S.; Ward, N. D.; Arellano, A. R.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Tolic, N.; Kuo, L. J.

    2016-12-01

    Humic and fulvic acid isolates from Suwannee River dissolved organic matter (DOM) have served as reference standards for the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) for many decades. The large database on Suwannee DOM provides an excellent framework to further expand the application of Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) in characterizing the chemical composition of aquatic DOM. In this study, we examined the DOM signature of the lower Suwannee River and plume region at 5 stations along a salinity gradient (0 to 28) using FT-ICR-MS. The chemical characteristics of DOM show distinct differences across this steep salinity gradient. In general, samples collected from the coastal station have lower carbon number and are less aromatic. Molecular level analysis reveals that the magnitude weighted proportion of lipids increased as salinity increased. Interestingly, a similar trend was observed for lignin-like compounds. Target quantification of lignin-phenols showed that while the concentrations of these compounds were lower at the coastal station, the DOC-normalized concentrations were not significantly different between the river and coastal stations. In addition to traditional DOM moieties, we identified for the first time, halogenated organic compounds (HOC). We observed more chlorinated compounds in DOM and increased Cl/C as salinity increased. A relatively high proportion of halogenated lipids (compared to non-halogenated) were observed in the total pool of HOC across all stations. Although not significant in relative proportion, halogenated lignin-like compounds were the most abundant HOC moieties in our samples. CO2 concentrations decreased and became more 13C-enriched along the salinity gradient, ranging from 3,990 ppm (13CO2 = -17.3‰) at salinity 0 to 520 ppm (13CO2 = -7.5‰) at salinity 28, indicating high levels of DOM degradation in the river and a shift to primary production in the marine receiving waters, which is

  4. Discovery of South American suckermouth armored catfishes (Loricariidae, Pterygoplichthys spp.) in the Santa Fe River drainage, Suwannee River basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Leo G.; Butt, Peter L.; Johnston, Gerald R.; Jelks, Howard L.; Kail, Matthew; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the occurrence of South American suckermouth armored catfishes (Loricariidae) in the Suwannee River basin, southeastern USA. Over the past few years (2009-2012), loricariid catfishes have been observed at various sites in the Santa Fe River drainage, a major tributary of the Suwannee in the state of Florida. Similar to other introduced populations of Pterygoplichthys, there is high likelihood of hybridization. To date, we have captured nine specimens (270-585 mm, standard length) in the Santa Fe River drainage. One specimen taken from Poe Spring best agrees with Pterygoplichthys gibbiceps (Kner, 1854) or may be a hybrid with either P. pardalis or P. disjunctivus. The other specimens were taken from several sites in the drainage and include seven that best agree with Pterygoplichthys disjunctivus (Weber, 1991); and one a possible P. disjunctivus x P. pardalis hybrid. We observed additional individuals, either these or similar appearing loricariids, in Hornsby and Poe springs and at various sites upstream and downstream of the long (> 4 km) subterranean portion of the Santa Fe River. These specimens represent the first confirmed records of Pterygoplichthys in the Suwannee River basin. The P. gibbiceps specimen represents the first documented record of an adult or near adult of this species in open waters of North America. Pterygoplichthys disjunctivus or its hybrids (perhaps hybrid swarms) are already abundant and widespread in other parts of peninsular Florida, but the Santa Fe River represents a northern extension of the catfish in the state. Pterygoplichthys are still relatively uncommon in the Santa Fe drainage and successful reproduction not yet documented. However, in May 2012 we captured five adult catfish (two mature or maturing males and three gravid females) from a single riverine swallet pool. One male was stationed at a nest burrow (no eggs present). To survive the occasional harsh Florida winters, these South American catfish apparently use

  5. Characterizing seston in the Penobscot River Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseck, Shannon L; Li, Yaqin; Sunila, Inke; Dixon, Mark; Clark, Paul; Lipsky, Christine; Stevens, Justin R; Music, Paul; Wikfors, Gary H

    2017-10-01

    The Penobscot River Estuary is an important system for diadromous fish in the Northeast United States of American (USA), in part because it is home to the largest remnant population of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, in the country. Little is known about the chemical and biological characteristics of seston in the Penobscot River Estuary. This study used estuarine transects to characterize the seston during the spring when river discharge is high and diadromous fish migration peaks in the Penobscot River Estuary. To characterize the seston, samples were taken in spring 2015 for phytoplankton identification, total suspended matter (TSM), percent organic TSM, chlorophyll a, particle size (2 μm-180 μm), particulate carbon and nitrogen concentrations, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes. The estuarine profiles indicate that TSM behaved non-conservatively with a net gain in the estuary. As phytoplankton constituted only 1/1000 of the particles, the non-conservative behavior of TSM observed in the estuary was most likely not attributable to phytoplankton. Particulate carbon and nitrogen ratios and stable isotope signals indicate a strong terrestrial, allochthonous signal. The seston in the Penobscot River Estuary was dominated by non-detrital particles. During a short, two-week time period, Heterosigma akashiwo, a phytoplankton species toxic to finfish, also was detected in the estuary. A limited number of fish samples, taken after the 2015 Penobscot River Estuary bloom of H. akashiwo, indicated frequent pathological gill damage. The composition of seston, along with ichthyotoxic algae, suggest the need for further research into possible effects upon resident and migratory fish in the Penobscot River Estuary. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Heavy metals in Mindhola river estuary, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.; Rokade, M.A; Mandalia, A

    The heavy metal concentrations are studied along the Mindhola river estuary. Surface and bottom water samples were collected using Niskin Sampler. The sediment samples were collected using a Van Veen grab. The heavy metal concentration is estimated...

  7. Models of metal binding structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, G.K.; Cabaniss, S.E. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); MacCarthy, P. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-08-15

    Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca{sup 2+} ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The metal binding fraction was characterized by quantitative {sup 13}C NMR, {sup 1}H NMR, and FT-IR spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that carboxyl groups were clustered in short-chain aliphatic dibasic acid structures. The Ca{sup 2+} binding data suggested that ether-substituted oxysuccinic acid structures are good models for the metal binding sites at pH 6. Structural models were derived based upon oxidation and photolytic rearrangements of cutin, lignin, and tannin precursors. These structural models rich in substituted dibasic acid structures revealed polydentate binding sites with the potential for both inner-sphere and outer-sphere type binding. The majority of the fulvic acid molecule was involved with metal binding rather than a small substructural unit.

  8. Copper binding by dissolved organic matter. I. Suwannee River fulvic acid equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabaniss, S.E.; Shuman, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    A cupric ion-selective electrode measured free Cu in solutions of Suwannee River fulvic acid (FA) in a series of 30 titrations carried out both at variable and at constant (5.14, 7.00, 8.44) pH. Total Cu varied 0.1-100 ..mu..m, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 1-10 mg C/l, Ca and Mg 0-10 mM, and ionic strength 0.005-0.1. Copper complexation by FA is first order in DOC for 1-10 mg C/liter, and variable-order in pH. Increasing Ca/sup + +/ or Mg/sup + +/ from 0 to 10 mM slightly increases Cu/sup + +/ activity, while increasing ionic strength from 0.005 to 0.1 significantly increases Cu/sup + +/ activity. An empirical N-site model was calibrated using a pooled set of six titrations with varying pH and DOC. Five binding components of varying proton dependence predict Cu binding by FA over a range of pH, DOC and total Cu in two verification tests of the model parameters. Parameters in this and other models tested are only empirical constructs.

  9. Interactions between Rotavirus and Suwannee River Organic Matter: Aggregation, Deposition, and Adhesion Force Measurement

    KAUST Repository

    Gutierrez, Leonardo

    2012-08-21

    Interactions between rotavirus and Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) were studied by time-resolved dynamic light scattering, quartz crystal microbalance, and atomic force microscopy. In NOM-containing NaCl solutions of up to 600 mM, rotavirus suspension remained stable for over 4 h. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement for interaction force decay length at different ionic strengths showed that nonelectrostatic repulsive forces were mainly responsible for eliminating aggregation in NaCl solutions. Aggregation rates of rotavirus in solutions containing 20 mg C/L increased with divalent cation concentration until reaching a critical coagulation concentration of 30 mM CaCl2 or 70 mM MgCl2. Deposition kinetics of rotavirus on NOM-coated silica surface was studied using quartz crystal microbalance. Experimental attachment efficiencies for rotavirus adsorption to NOM-coated surface in MgCl2 solution were lower than in CaCl2 solution at a given divalent cation concentration. Stronger adhesion force was measured for virus-virus and virus-NOM interactions in CaCl2 solution compared to those in MgCl2 or NaCl solutions at the same ionic strength. This study suggested that divalent cation complexation with carboxylate groups in NOM and on virus surface was an important mechanism in the deposition and aggregation kinetics of rotavirus. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Nutrient characterisation of river inflow into the estuaries of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-02

    Oct 2, 2014 ... estuaries (POE), temporarily open/closed estuaries (TOCE), estuarine lakes ... estuaries where DWA has water quality monitoring data for the rivers that flow ...... relationship, but in this instance it could not be linked to point-.

  11. Environmental Nitrogen Losses from Commercial Crop Production Systems in the Suwannee River Basin of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rishi; Hochmuth, George J

    2016-01-01

    The springs and the Suwannee river of northern Florida in Middle Suwanee River Basin (MSRB) are among several examples in this planet that have shown a temporal trend of increasing nitrate concentration primarily due to the impacts of non-point sources such as agriculture. The rate of nitrate increase in the river as documented by Ham and Hatzell (1996) was 0.02 mg N L-1 y-1. Best management practices (BMPs) for nutrients were adopted by the commercial farms in the MSRB region to reduce the amounts of pollutants entering the water bodies, however the effectiveness of BMPs remains a topic of interest and discussion among the researchers, environmental administrators and policy makers about the loads of nitrogen entering into groundwater and river systems. Through this study, an initiative was taken to estimate nitrogen losses into the environment from commercial production systems of row and vegetable crops that had adopted BMPs and were under a presumption of compliance with state water quality standards. Nitrogen mass budget was constructed by quantifying the N sources and sinks for three crops (potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), sweet corn (Zea mays L.) and silage corn (Zea mays L.)) over a four year period (2010-2013) on a large representative commercial farm in northern Florida. Fertilizer N was found to be the primary N input and represented 98.0 ± 1.4, 91.0 ± 13.9, 78.0 ± 17.3% of the total N input for potato, sweet corn, and silage corn, respectively. Average crop N uptake represented 55.5%, 60.5%, and 65.2% of the mean total input N whereas average mineral N left in top 0.3 m soil layer at harvest represented 9.1%, 4.5%, and 2.6% of the mean total input N. Mean environmental N losses represented 35.3%, 34.3%, and 32.7% of the mean total input N for potato, sweet corn, and silage corn, respectively. Nitrogen losses showed a linear trend with increase in N inputs. Although, there is no quick fix for controlling N losses from crop production in MSRB, the

  12. Concentrations and distributions of metals associated with dissolved organic matter from the Suwannee River (GA, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, M. Keshia; Neubauer, Elisabeth; Hofmann, Thilo; von der Kammer, Frank; Aiken, George R.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations and distributions of metals in Suwannee River (SR) raw filtered surface water (RFSW) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) processed by reverse osmosis (RO), XAD-8 resin (for humic and fulvic acids [FA]), and XAD-4 resin (for “transphilic” acids) were analyzed by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF). SR samples were compared with DOM samples from Nelson's Creek (NLC), a wetland-draining stream in northern Michigan; previous International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) FA and RO samples from the SR; and an XAD-8 sample from Lake Fryxell (LF), Antarctica. Despite application of cation exchange during sample processing, all XAD and RO samples contained substantial metal concentrations. AsFlFFF fractograms allowed metal distributions to be characterized as a function of DOM component molecular weight (MW). In SR RFSW, Fe, Al, and Cu were primarily associated with intermediate to higher than average MW DOM components. SR RO, XAD-8, and XAD-4 samples from May 2012 showed similar MW trends for Fe and Al but Cu tended to associate more with lower MW DOM. LF DOM had abundant Cu and Zn, perhaps due to amine groups that should be present due to its primarily algal origins. None of the fractograms showed obvious evidence for mineral nanoparticles, although some very small mineral nanoparticles might have been present at trace concentrations. This research suggests that AsFlFFF is important for understanding how metals are distributed in different DOM samples (including IHSS samples), which may be key to metal reactivity and bioavailability.

  13. TiO2 nanoparticles aggregation and disaggregation in presence of alginate and Suwannee River humic acids. pH and concentration effects on nanoparticle stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosli, Frédéric; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Stoll, Serge

    2013-10-15

    The behavior of manufactured TiO2 nanoparticles is studied in a systematic way in presence of alginate and Suwannee River humic acids at variable concentrations. TiO2 nanoparticles aggregation, disaggregation and stabilization are investigated using dynamic light scattering and electrophoretic experiments allowing the measurement of z-average hydrodynamic diameters and zeta potential values. Stability of the TiO2 nanoparticles is discussed by considering three pH-dependent electrostatic scenarios. In the first scenario, when pH is below the TiO2 nanoparticle point of zero charge, nanoparticles exhibit a positively charged surface whereas alginate and Suwannee River humic acids are negatively charged. Fast adsorption at the TiO2 nanoparticles occurs, promotes surface charge neutralization and aggregation. By increasing further alginate and Suwannee River humic acids concentrations charge inversion and stabilization of TiO2 nanoparticles are obtained. In the second electrostatic scenario, at the surface charge neutralization pH, TiO2 nanoparticles are rapidly forming aggregates. Adsorption of alginate and Suwannee River humic acids on aggregates leads to their partial fragmentation. In the third electrostatic scenario, when nanoparticles, alginate and Suwannee River humic acids are negatively charged, only a small amount of Suwannee River humic acids is adsorbed on TiO2 nanoparticles surface. It is found that the fate and behavior of individual and aggregated TiO2 nanoparticles in presence of environmental compounds are mainly driven by the complex interplay between electrostatic attractive and repulsive interactions, steric and van der Waals interactions, as well as concentration ratio. Results also suggest that environmental aquatic concentration ranges of humic acids and biopolymers largely modify the stability of aggregated or dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Birds of Mahi River estuary, Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J. Pandya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mahi river estuary is one of the major estuaries of Gujarat. This paper presents a comprehensive list of birds of the Mahi river estuary (nearly 50 km stretch and the adjacent banks/ravines and defines the avian diversity at three major estuarine gradations with a brief check of similarity and diversity within the three. The present observation is the outcome of a 3 year period from August 2006 to July 2009. A sum total of 118 species belonging to 42 families were reported and listed as on Upstream, Midstream, and Downstream of estuary. No significant difference was seen in the species richness at the three zones; a change in avian composition at upstream and downstream was notable.

  15. MODFLOW datasets for simulations of groundwater flow with downscaled global climate model data for the Suwannee River Basin, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Eric D.; Davis, J. Hal

    2016-01-01

    A previously-developed groundwater model of the Suwannee River Basin was modified and calibrated to represent transient conditions. A simulation of recent conditions was developed for the 372-month period 1970-2000, and was compared with a simulation of future conditions for a similar-length period 2039-2069, which uses downscaled GCM (Global Climate Model) data. The MODFLOW groundwater-simulation code was used in both of these simulations, and two different MODFLOW boundary condition “packages” (River and Streamflow Routing Packages) were used to represent interactions between surface-water and groundwater features. The parameters for the simulation of future conditions were developed from dynamically downscaled precipitation and evapotranspiration data generated by the Community Climate System Model. The model was developed to examine the effect of downscaled climate model data on the predictions of future hydrology in the Suwannee River Basin. The development of the model input and output files included in this data release are documented in a journal article for the American Journal of Climate Change. Support is provided for correcting errors in the data release and clarification of the modeling conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. Users are encouraged to review the model documentation report to understand the purpose, construction, and limitations of this model.

  16. The importance of the river-estuary interface (REI) zone in estuaries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the REI zone on fish was examined in the freshwater-rich Great Fish Estuary and in the freshwater-deprived Kariega Estuary. Estuarine associated fishes responded strongly to river flow in the Great Fish Estuary but a number of these taxa were limited or absent from the Kariega Estuary. These findings are ...

  17. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for the counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District in Florida, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.; Berry, Darbi R.

    2016-07-28

    A detailed inventory of irrigated crop acreage is not available at the level of resolution needed to accurately estimate agricultural water use or to project future water demands in many Florida counties. A detailed digital map and summary of irrigated acreage during the 2015 growing season was developed for 13 of the 15 counties that compose the Suwannee River Water Management District. The irrigated areas were delineated using land-use data, orthoimagery, and information obtained from the water management district consumptive water-use permits that were then field verified between May and November of 2015. Selected attribute data were collected for the irrigated areas, including crop type, primary water source, and type of irrigation system. Results indicate that an estimated 113,134 acres were either irrigated or had potential for irrigation in all or part of the 13 counties within the Suwannee River Water Management District during 2015. This estimate includes 108,870 acres of field-verified, irrigated crops and 4,264 acres of irrigated land observed as (1) idle (with an irrigation system visible but no crop present at the time of the field-verification visit), (2) acres that could not be verified during field visits, or (3) acres that were located on publicly owned research lands.

  18. Estuary-wide genetic stock distribution and salmon habitat use, tidal-fluvial estuary - Columbia River Estuary Tidal Habitats

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goal of the tidal-fluvial estuary study is to determine the estuary's contribution to the spatial structure and life history diversity of Columbia River salmon...

  19. Characterisation of Fe-oxide nanoparticles coated with humic acid and Suwannee River natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekli, Laura; Phuntsho, Sherub; Roy, Maitreyee; Shon, Ho Kyong

    2013-09-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are becoming increasingly popular for various applications including the treatment of contaminated soil and groundwater; however, their mobility and reactivity in the subsurface environment are significantly affected by their tendency to aggregate. One solution to overcome this issue is to coat the nanoparticles with dissolved organic matter (DOM). The advantages of DOM over conventional surface modifiers are that DOM is naturally abundant in the environment, inexpensive, non-toxic and readily adsorbed onto the surface of metal oxide nanoparticles. In this study, humic acid (HA) and Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) were tested and compared as surface modifiers for Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs). The DOM-coated Fe2O3 NPs were characterised by various analytical methods including: flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF), high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The stability of the coated NPs was then evaluated by assessing their aggregation and disaggregation behaviour over time. Results showed that both HA and SRNOM were rapidly and readily adsorbed on the surface of Fe2O3 NPs, providing electrosteric stabilisation over a wide range of pH. HPSEC results showed that the higher molecular weight components of DOM were preferentially adsorbed onto the surface of Fe2O3. As SRNOM consists of macromolecules with a higher molecular weight than HA, the measured size of the SRNOM-coated Fe2O3 NPs was 30% larger than the HA-coated Fe2O3 NPs. FTIR results indicated the occurrence of hydrogen bonding arising from electrostatic interaction between the DOM and Fe2O3 NPs. Finally, a stability study showed that after 14 days, small agglomerates and aggregates were formed. The HA-coated Fe2O3 NPs formed agglomerates which were easily disaggregated using a vortex mixer, with the coated NPs returning to their initial size. However, SRNOM-coated Fe2O3 NPs were only partially disaggregated

  20. Competition from Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) in Pb(II) binding to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakraborty, P.; Chakrabarti, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    This is a study of trace metal competition in the complexation of Pb(II) by well-characterized humic substances, namely Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) in model solutions. It was found that Cu(II) seems to compete with Pb(II) for strong binding sites of SRFA when present at the same concentration

  1. Mouth Bar Formation in Yangtze River Estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, C.

    2002-01-01

    The periodic shifting of the bifurcation point of the North Channel and South Channel of the Yangtze river is very important in the estuary. The North Channel is bifurcated from the South Branch by cutting a channel through the submerged sandbanks. Once a bifurcation channel is formed, the

  2. Gammaridean amphipods in the Columbia River Estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holton, R.L.; Higley, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution, abundance, and habitat preference of the amphipods Corophium salmonis, C. spinicorne, and Anisogammarus confervicolus were studied in the Columbia River estuary as part of baseline research during 1974 to 1976. A figure is presented showing densities of two species at selected stations in the Columbia River. Studies were also conducted on changes in faunal composition and substrate texture existing across an intertidal mudflat on the southwest shore of Youngs Bay. (HLW)

  3. Salmon habitat use, tidal-fluvial estuary - Columbia River Estuary Tidal Habitats

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goal of the tidal-fluvial estuary study is to determine the estuary's contribution to the spatial structure and life history diversity of Columbia River salmon...

  4. In-stream PIT detection, estuary wetlands - Columbia River Estuary Tidal Habitats

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goal of the tidal-fluvial estuary study is to determine the estuary's contribution to the spatial structure and life history diversity of Columbia River salmon...

  5. Skagit IMW - Skagit River Estuary Intensively Monitored Watershed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study evaluates system-level effects of several estuary restoration projects on juvenile Chinook salmon production in the Skagit River estuary. The monitoring...

  6. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 1. Minor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the strong-acid characteristics (pKa 3.0 or less) of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was conducted. Quantitative determinations were made for amino acid and sulfur-containing acid structures, oxalate half-ester structures, malonic acid structures, keto acid structures, and aromatic carboxyl-group structures. These determinations were made by using a variety of spectrometric (13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and ultraviolet spectrometry) and titrimetric characterizations on fulvic acid or fulvic acid samples that were chemically derivatized to indicate certain functional groups. Only keto acid and aromatic carboxyl-group structures contributed significantly to the strong-acid characteristics of the fulvic acid; these structures accounted for 43% of the strong-acid acidity. The remaining 57% of the strong acids are aliphatic carboxyl groups in unusual and/or complex configurations for which limited model compound data are available.

  7. Examination of Cadmium(II) Complexation by the Suwannee River Fulvic Acid Using 113Cd NMR Relaxation Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, William; Burton, Sarah D.; Carper, W. R.; Larive, Cynthia K.

    2001-12-15

    Aquatic and terrestrial fulvic acids are environmentally important because they affect the bioavailability and transport of metal ions. Prior studies demonstrated that Cd(II) binds to the oxygen containing functional groups of fulvic acids. The complexation of Cd(II) is further investigated in this study using 113Cd NMR relaxation measurements. Spin-lattice (T1), and spin- spin (Tz) relaxation times are measured over a range of Cd(II):FA ratios. The results clearly indicate two types of Cd(II) binding sites for the Suwannee River FA (SRFA). A series of model ligands were also examined to gain further understanding of the two types of binding motifs present in the fulvic acid. The results for a model compound containing four carboxylate functionalities in near proximity, correspond very closely to the results obtained for the strong binding sites of the Cd(II)-SRF A complexes.

  8. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 2. Major structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polycarboxylic acid structures that account for the strong-acid characteristics (pKa1 near 2.0) were examined for fulvic acid from the Suwannee River. Studies of model compounds demonstrated that pKa values near 2.0 occur only if the ??-ether or ??-ester groups were in cyclic structures with two to three additional electronegative functional groups (carboxyl, ester, ketone, aromatic groups) at adjacent positions on the ring. Ester linkage removal by alkaline hydrolysis and destruction of ether linkages through cleavage and reduction with hydriodic acid confirmed that the strong carboxyl acidity in fulvic acid was associated with polycarboxylic ??-ether and ??-ester structures. Studies of hypothetical structural models of fulvic acid indicated possible relation of these polycarboxylic structures with the amphiphilic and metal-binding properties of fulvic acid.

  9. Survival of hatchery Gulf sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi Mitchill, 1815) in the Suwannee River, Florida: a 19-year evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulak, Kenneth J.; Randall, Michael T.; Clugston, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental release of 1192 hatchery-reared, individually PIT tagged, 220 days old (296–337 mm TL) Gulf sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi, was undertaken in 1992 in the Suwannee River, Florida. The original objectives of the 1992 release experiment were to: (1) evaluate survival rate of cultured Gulf sturgeon in the wild vs survival rate of their wild 1992 cohort counterparts, (2) determine the differential effect of release site within the river upon long-term survival, and (3) evaluate comparative growth rates of recaptured hatchery vs captured wild 1992 cohort Gulf sturgeon. The present investigation addressed those original objectives, plus an additional fourth objective: (4) evaluation of hatchery fish recapture rate change over the 19-year experiment. The primary objective was to determine efficacy of potential conservation aquaculture for this species in terms of long-term survival in the wild. Follow-up 1993–2011 gill net sampling in freshwater reaches (rkm 4–237) and the estuarine river mouth (rkm −6 to 4) yielded recaptures representing 13.0% of the total released. Mean annual hatchery fish mortality (including emigration) rate estimated for the 19-year period (1993–2011) was more than twice that for same cohort wild fish. Mark-recapture survival probability (phi) for hatchery fish, 1993–2011, was substantially lower (0.733) than for their wild counterparts (0.888). Mean annual hatchery fish recapture rate, as a percentage of all 1992 cohort fish recaptures, declined significantly after age-7, coinciding with age of onset of migration into the open Gulf of Mexico. Hypothesized causal factors may be differentially lower fitness in the marine habitat or permanent outmigration due to natal river imprinting failure. Hatchery fish recapture rates varied significantly for fish from the ten release sites, being highest near the river mouth, and lowest for the furthest upriver sites in the Suwannee River and its Santa Fe River tributary

  10. The physico-chemical characteristics of Imo River Estuary in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The physicochemical characteristics of Imo River Estuary were studied from April to September, 2011 to assess the water quality. The estuary is located at the coastal part of Ikot Abasi Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom State in southeastern Nigeria. Sampling was done monthly at fishing grounds in the estuary ...

  11. The importance of the river-estuary interface (REI) zone in estuaries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    2002-07-03

    Jul 3, 2002 ... Two estuaries with contrasting river flow regimes were investigated. The Great Fish system was selected for this project because it receives a regular freshwater input and is navigable by boat beyond the estuarine section. This facilitated comparable sampling in both the river and estuary regions. In contrast ...

  12. TiO2 nanoparticles aggregation and disaggregation in presence of alginate and Suwannee River humic acids. pH and concentration effects on nanoparticle stability

    OpenAIRE

    Loosli Frédéric LeCoustumer Philippe Stoll Serge

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of manufactured TiO2 nanoparticles is studied in a systematic way in presence of alginate and Suwannee River humic acids at variable concentrations. TiO2 nanoparticles aggregation disaggregation and stabilization are investigated using dynamic light scattering and electrophoretic experiments allowing the measurement of z average hydrodynamic diameters and zeta potential values. Stability of the TiO2 nanoparticles is discussed by considering three pH dependent electrostatic scenar...

  13. Aggregation and disaggregation of ZnO nanoparticles: influence of pH and adsorption of Suwannee River humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Omar, Fatehah; Abdul Aziz, Hamidi; Stoll, Serge

    2014-01-15

    The surface charge and average size of manufactured ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were studied as a function of pH to understand the aggregation behavior and importance of the electrostatic interactions in solution. The interactions between ZnO and Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) were then investigated under a range of environmentally relevant conditions with the ZnO nanoparticles pHPZC as the point of reference. The anionic charges carried by aquatic humic substances were found to play a major role in the aggregation and disaggregation of ZnO nanoparticles. At low concentrations of SRHA (<0.05 mg/L) and below the pHPZC, anionic SRHA was rapidly adsorbed onto the positively charged ZnO NPs hence promoting aggregation. With similar SHRA concentrations, at pHPZC, SRHA was able to control the suspension behavior of the ZnO and promote partial disaggregation in small volumes. This was more distinguishable when the pH was greater than pHPZC as SRHA formed a surface coating on the ZnO nanoparticles and enhanced stability via electrostatic and steric interactions. In most cases, the NP coating by SRHA induced disaggregation behavior in the ZnO nanoparticles and decreased the aggregate size in parallel to increasing SRHA concentrations. Results also suggest that environmental aquatic concentration ranges of humic acids largely modify the stability of aggregated or dispersed ZnO nanoparticles. © 2013.

  14. Fractionation of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid and Aldrich Humic Acid on α-Al2O3: Spectroscopic Evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claret, F.; Schäfer, T; Brevet, J; Reiller, P

    2008-01-01

    Sorptive fractionation of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) and Purified Aldrich Humic Acid (PAHA) on a-Al2O3 at pH 6 was probed in the supernatant using different spectroscopic techniques. Comparison of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis with UV/vis spectrophotometric measurements at 254 nm, including specific UV absorbance (SUVA) calculation, revealed a decrease in chromophoric compounds for the nonsorbed extracts after a 24 h contact time. This fractionation, only observable below a certain ratio between initial number of sites of humic substances and of a-Al2O3, seems to indicate a higher fractionation for PAHA. C(1s) near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) confirmed this trend and points to a decrease in phenolic moieties in the supernatant and to an eventual increase in phenolic moieties on the surface. Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy (TRLS) of Eu(III) as luminescent probe showed a decrease in the ratio between the 5D0?7F2 and 5D0?7F1 transitions for the fractionated organic matter (OM) that is thought to be associated with a lower energy transfer from the OM to Eu(III) due to the loss of polar aromatics. These modifications in the supernatant are a hint for the modification of sorbed humic extracts on the surface.

  15. Estuary fish data - Juvenile salmon in migratory corridors of lower Columbia River estuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sampling juvenile salmon and associated fishes in open waters of the lower Columbia River estuary. Field work includes bi-weekly sampling during the spring...

  16. The hydrodynamics of the Bot River Estuary revisited | van Niekerk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is concluded that the increasingly closed state of the Bot Estuary in recent years is most likely due to reduction in runoff from its tributaries and premature artificial breaching of the Kleinmond arm of the system. These findings, coupled with the high conservation importance of the Bot River Estuary, suggest that the current ...

  17. mysidacea of the mtentu river estuary, transkei, south africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mtentu River has a straight open tidal estuary flowing between steep grassy or indigenous forest. covered ... During the entire duration of the study, from February 1971 to March 1972, the estuary was tidal, with a ... gently sloping mudbanks about 10 m wide, bordered by mangrove (Bruguiera gymnorhiza) and hibiscus ...

  18. The recreational value of river inflows into South African estuaries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contingent valuation method was used to estimate the value of recreational benefits that would result at 40 South African estuaries if water-inflow reductions were averted. The studies were undertaken between 2000 and 2007. All the estuaries selected were known to be vulnerable to changes in river inflows.

  19. mysidacea of the mtentu river estuary, transkei, south africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mtentu River has a straight open tidal estuary flowing between steep grassy or indigenous forest. covered slopes. Total high-water surface area is about 0,3 kin·. The zooplankton was studied by periodic sampling over a period of thirteen months. Some physical characteristics of the estuary are presented. The seasonal ...

  20. Improving navigability on the Kromme River Estuary: A choice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-14

    Mar 14, 2013 ... this difference included different samples of users, as well as the possibility of embedding bias in the derived .... structure, and this annual sum will then be directed back to the Kromme River Estuary. This annual ..... HAY D, HOSKING SG and McKENZIE M (2008) Estuaries,. Economics and Freshwater: An ...

  1. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Hydrogeomorphic Reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  2. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Geomorphic Catena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  3. Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification Ecosystem Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Charles M.; Ramirez, Mary F.; Heatwole, Danelle W.; Burke, Jennifer L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Marcoe, Keith Marcoe

    2012-01-01

    Estuarine ecosystems are controlled by a variety of processes that operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Understanding the hierarchical nature of these processes will aid in prioritization of restoration efforts. This hierarchical Columbia River Estuary Ecosystem Classification (henceforth "Classification") of the Columbia River estuary is a spatial database of the tidally-influenced reaches of the lower Columbia River, the tidally affected parts of its tributaries, and the landforms that make up their floodplains for the 230 kilometers between the Pacific Ocean and Bonneville Dam. This work is a collaborative effort between University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (henceforth "UW"), U.S. Geological Survey (henceforth "USGS"), and the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership (henceforth "EP"). Consideration of geomorphologic processes will improve the understanding of controlling physical factors that drive ecosystem evolution along the tidal Columbia River. The Classification is organized around six hierarchical levels, progressing from the coarsest, regional scale to the finest, localized scale: (1) Ecosystem Province; (2) Ecoregion; (3) Hydrogeomorphic Reach; (4) Ecosystem Complex; (5) Geomorphic Catena; and (6) Primary Cover Class. For Levels 4 and 5, we mapped landforms within the Holocene floodplain primarily by visual interpretation of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) topography supplemented with aerial photographs, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soils data, and historical maps. Mapped landforms are classified as to their current geomorphic function, the inferred process regime that formed them, and anthropogenic modification. Channels were classified primarily by a set of depth-based rules and geometric relationships. Classification Level 5 floodplain landforms ("geomorphic catenae") were further classified based on multivariate analysis of land-cover within the mapped landform area and attributed as "sub

  4. Short term variations in particulate matter in Mahi river estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Rokade, M.A.; Zingde, M.D.

    The particulate matter (PM) collected from Mahi River Estuary was analysed for organic carbon (POC), nitrogen (PON), and chlorophyll a (Chl a). The concentration of PM, POC, PON and Chl a showed short term variations. Average surface concentration...

  5. St. Louis River Estuary 2011 - 2013 Faucet snail location data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset consists of GPS coordinates for benthic invertebrate collections made in the St. Louis River Estuary in 2011 through 2013, and information on whether and...

  6. Juvenile salmon usage of the Skeena River estuary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Carr-Harris

    Full Text Available Migratory salmon transit estuary habitats on their way out to the ocean but this phase of their life cycle is more poorly understood than other phases. The estuaries of large river systems in particular may support many populations and several species of salmon that originate from throughout the upstream river. The Skeena River of British Columbia, Canada, is a large river system with high salmon population- and species-level diversity. The estuary of the Skeena River is under pressure from industrial development, with two gas liquefaction terminals and a potash loading facility in various stages of environmental review processes, providing motivation for understanding the usage of the estuary by juvenile salmon. We conducted a juvenile salmonid sampling program throughout the Skeena River estuary in 2007 and 2013 to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of different species and populations of salmon. We captured six species of juvenile anadromous salmonids throughout the estuary in both years, and found that areas proposed for development support some of the highest abundances of some species of salmon. Specifically, the highest abundances of sockeye (both years, Chinook in 2007, and coho salmon in 2013 were captured in areas proposed for development. For example, juvenile sockeye salmon were 2-8 times more abundant in the proposed development areas. Genetic stock assignment demonstrated that the Chinook salmon and most of the sockeye salmon that were captured originated from throughout the Skeena watershed, while some sockeye salmon came from the Nass, Stikine, Southeast Alaska, and coastal systems on the northern and central coasts of British Columbia. These fish support extensive commercial, recreational, and First Nations fisheries throughout the Skeena River and beyond. Our results demonstrate that estuary habitats integrate species and population diversity of salmon, and that if proposed development negatively affects the

  7. Hydrology, vegetation, and soils of riverine and tidal floodplain forests of the lower Suwannee River, Florida, and potential impacts of flow reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Helen M.; Darst, Melanie R.; Lewis, Lori J.; Howell, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A study relating hydrologic conditions, soils, and vegetation of floodplain forests to river flow was conducted in the lower Suwannee River, Florida, from 1996 to 2000. The study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Suwannee River Water Management District to help determine the minimum flows and levels required for wetlands protection. The study area included forests within the 10-year floodplain of the Suwannee River from its confluence with the Santa Fe River to the tree line (lower limit of forests) near the Gulf of Mexico, and covered 18,600 hectares (ha) of forests, 75 percent of which were wetlands and 25 percent uplands. The floodplain was divided into three reaches, riverine, upper tidal, and lower tidal, based on changes in hydrology, vegetation, and soils with proximity to the coast. The Suwannee River is the second largest river in Florida in terms of average discharge. Median flow at the confluence of the Suwannee and Santa Fe Rivers is approximately 181 cubic meters per second (m3/s) or 6,480 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) (1933-99). At the upper end of the riverine reach, river stages are unaffected by tides and have a typical annual range of 4.1 meters (m). Tides affect river stages at low and medium flows in the upper tidal reach, and at all flows in the lower tidal reach. Median tidal range at the mouth of the Suwannee River is about 1 m. Salinity of river water in the lower tidal reach increases with decreasing flow and proximity to the Gulf of Mexico. Vertically averaged salinity in the river near the tree line is typically about 5 parts per thousand at medium flow. Land-surface elevation and topographic relief in the floodplain decrease with proximity to the coast. Elevations range from 4.1 to 7.3 m above sea level at the most upstream riverine transect and from 0.3 to 1.3 m above sea level on lower tidal transects. Surface soils in the riverine reach are predominantly mineral and dry soon after floods recede except in

  8. A Centennial Tribute, 1906-2006: History of U.S. Geological Survey Streamgaging Activities for the Suwannee River at White Springs, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Richard Jay; Tomlinson, Stewart A.

    2009-01-01

    For centuries, the banks of the Suwannee River at White Springs were considered a sacred ground where people sought refuge in its 'healing waters'. Many believed that the mineral-enriched waters cured illnesses. The U.S. Geological Survey began continuous streamgaging activities at White Springs, Florida, in 1906 after an increase in congressional appropriations and rapid town development due to growing tourism and residential population. In 1906, streamgage data was a once-per-day gage reading that were handwritten in a water-level booklet by a local observer with discharge measurements taken every 6 to 8 weeks by a hydrographer. In 2006, real-time data were recorded at 1-hour increments and transmitted to U.S. Geological Survey computer networks using the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, thus enabling the general public to access readings within minutes of the actual measurement. Additional data and measurements are taken and made available for high or low flows that occur during significant floods and droughts. The gage at White Springs has recorded several historic hydrologic events that affected the Suwannee River and surrounding areas. Major droughts include those during 1931-35, 1949-57, and 1998-2002. Severe floods occurred in 1948, 1973, and 2004. On April 10, 1973, the discharge was 38,100 cubic feet per second, which is the highest recorded discharge for the period of record. A flood of this magnitude is expected at a recurrence interval of about once every 200 to 500 years.

  9. The recreational value of river inflows into South African estuaries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the elicited responses median estuary user willingness to pay bids were predicted using. Tobit and OLS ... median values of river inflow into estuaries was calculated to be 3.4 c/m3 (South African cents, ZAR) and standard devia- tion 3.84 c/m3. .... forestry expansion and by-products, and has taken the form of reduced ...

  10. Biogeochemistry of the Kem' River estuary, White Sea (Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Shevchenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The biogeochemistry of the river-sea interface was studied in the Kem' River (the largest river flowing to the White Sea from Karelian coast estuary and adjacent area of the White Sea onboard the RV 'Ekolog' in summer 2001, 2002 and 2003. The study area can be divided into 3 zones: I - the estuary itself, with water depth from 1 to 5m and low salinity in the surface layer (salinity is lower than 0.2psu in the Kem' River and varies from 15 to 20psu in outer part of this zone; II - the intermediate zone with depths from 5 to 10m and salinity at the surface from 16 to 22psu; III - the marine zone with depths from 10 to 29 m and salinity 21-24.5psu. Highest concentrations of the suspended particulate matter (SPM were registered in the Kem' mouth (5-7mg/l. They sharply decreased to values org to nitrogen (N ratio (Corg/N in both suspended matter and bottom sediments decreases from the river to the marine part of the mixing zone (from 8.5 to 6.1 in the suspended matter and from 14.6 to 7.5 in the bottom sediments, demonstrating that content of terrestrial-derived organic matter decreases and content of marine organic matter increases from the river mouth to the sea. The Kem' estuary exhibits a similar character of biogeochemial processes as in the large Arctic estuaries, but the scale of these processes (amount of river input of SPM, POC, area of estuaries is different.

  11. Alternating current anodic stripping voltammetry in the study of cadmium complexation by a reference Suwannee river fulvic acid: a model case with strong electrode adsorption and weak binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrigosa, Anna M.; Arino, Cristina; Diaz-Cruz, Jose M.; Esteban, Miquel [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Quimica Analitica, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-01-15

    The possibilities of anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) using an alternating current (AC) scan in the stripping step have been checked through the study of the complexation of cadmium by Suwannee river fulvic acid (SRFA), a reference fulvic acid from the International Humic Substances Society. Because of the strong electrode adsorption of SRFA, AC mode appears to be a good approach to the study when proper selection of the phase angle is made. The goodness of AC mode in ASV has been demonstrated, and the complexation constant of 3.71 {+-} 0.04 determined is in good agreement with the value of the constant obtained by the reference technique of reverse pulse polarography. Some particularities of SRFA have been observed, among them its homofunctional and strongly heterogeneous behaviour in cadmium complexation and the impossibility of avoiding electrode adsorption problems in ASV measurements at very low metal concentrations. (orig.)

  12. Composition of macrobenthos in the Wouri River estuary mangrove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Composition of macrobenthos in the Wouri River estuary mangrove, Douala, Cameroon. VM Ngo-Massou, GL Essome-Koum, E Ngollo-Dina, N Din. Abstract. The macrobenthos of mangroves is dominated by crabs and molluscs, which have a significant ecological role in terms of the structure and function of mangroves.

  13. in cross River Estuary and Adjacent Coastal waters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on the length distribution of bonga, Ethmalosa fimbriata, in the Cross River estuary and adjacent coastal waters were conducted from October 1999 to December 2000. A total of 15,182 specimens of bonga from gill nets, purse seine and boat seine fisheries were measured. Post-larvae measuring between 2 cm and ...

  14. Invasion by stages in the St Louis River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    The St. Louis River estuary is recognized as an invasive species “hotspot” - the harbor ranks among the top locations in the Great Lakes reporting the first occurrence of new, aquatic non-native species. To date, 18 non-native benthic invertebrate, 4 non-native crusta...

  15. Phenology of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little work has been done on the phenology of fish larvae in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. As part of an aquatic invasive species early detection study, we conducted larval fish surveys in the St. Louis River estuary (SLRE) in 2012 and 2013. Using multiple gears in a spatially ba...

  16. Flushing characteristics of Mahim river estuary (Bombay)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sabnis, M.M.; Zingde, M.D.

    to the influence of wastewater. Flushing time of 19 tidal cycles was estimated by applying modified tidal prism method. After a large number of tidal cycles the estuary would retain 9.3x10 super(4) m super(3) of wastewater which was over 15% of the spring high tide...

  17. Large wood in the Snowy River estuary, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinwood, Jon B.; McLean, Errol J.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we report on 8 years of data collection and interpretation of large wood in the Snowy River estuary in southeastern Australia, providing quantitative data on the amount, sources, transport, decay, and geomorphic actions. No prior census data for an estuary is known to the authors despite their environmental and economic importance and the significant differences between a fluvial channel and an estuarine channel. Southeastern Australian estuaries contain a significant quantity of large wood that is derived from many sources, including river flood flows, local bank erosion, and anthropogenic sources. Wind and tide are shown to be as important as river flow in transporting and stranding large wood. Tidal action facilitates trapping of large wood on intertidal bars and shoals; but channels are wider and generally deeper, so log jams are less likely than in rivers. Estuarine large wood contributes to localised scour and accretion and hence to the modification of estuarine habitat, but in the study area it did not have large-scale impacts on the hydraulic gradients nor the geomorphology.

  18. Salinity and turbidity distributions in the Brisbane River estuary, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingying; Zhang, Hong; Lemckert, Charles

    2014-11-01

    The Brisbane River estuary (BRE) in Australia not only plays a vital role in ecosystem health, but is also of importance for people who live nearby. Comprehensive investigations, both in the short- and long-term, into the salinity and turbidity distributions in the BRE were conducted. Firstly, the analysis of numerical results revealed that the longitudinal salinity varied at approximately 0.45 and 0.61 psu/h during neap and spring tides, respectively. The turbidity stayed at a higher level and was less impacted by tide in the upper estuary, however, the water cleared up while the tide changed from flood to ebb in the mid and lower estuary. The second investigation into the seasonal variations of salinity and turbidity in the BRE was conducted, using ten-year field measurement data. A fourth-order polynomial equation was proposed, describing the longitudinal variation in salinity dilution changes as the upstream distance in the BRE during the wet and dry seasons. From the observation, the mid and upper estuaries were vertically well-mixed during both seasons, but the lower BRE was stratified, particularly during the wet season. The estuary turbidity maximum (ETM) zone was about 10 km longer during the wet season than the dry season. Particular emphasis was given to the third investigation into the use of satellite remote sensing techniques for estimation of the turbidity level in the BRE. A linear relationship between satellite observed water reflectance and surface turbidity level in the BRE was validated with an R2 of 0.75. The application of satellite-observed water reflectance therefore provided a practical solution for estimating surface turbidity levels of estuarine rivers not only under normal weather conditions, but also during flood events. The results acquired from this study are valuable for further hydrological research in the BRE and particularly prominent for immediate assessment of flood impacts.

  19. Reduced river discharge intensifies phytoplankton bloom in Godavari estuary, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Acharyya, T.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Sridevi, B.; Venkataramana, V.; Bharathi, M.D.; Naidu, S.A.; Kumar, B.S.K.; Prasad, V.R.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Reddy, N.P.C.; DileepKumar, M.

    ) rainfall (July-September). Most of these rivers are dammed at several locations along their course for crop irrigation and domestic as well as industrial consumptive usages. Availability of fresh water in the downstream rivers and estuaries are thus...://indiastat.com/agriculture/2/stats.aspx). Cultivation of paddy, which is the major crop in India, is done during the ISM period when the rainfall is plentiful throughout the alluvial plain. Excess of the fertilizers that are applied in the field during this time is washed...

  20. Experimental evidence for ternary colloid-facilitated transport of Th(IV) with hematite (α-Fe2O3) colloids and Suwannee River fulvic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Hilary P; Hickok, Katherine A; Powell, Brian A

    2016-12-01

    Previous field experiments have suggested colloid-facilitated transport via inorganic and organic colloids as the primary mechanism of enhanced actinide transport in the subsurface at former nuclear weapons facilities. In this work, research was guided by the hypothesis that humic substances can enhance tetravalent actinide (An(IV)) migration by coating and mobilizing natural colloids in environmental systems and increasing An(IV) sorption to colloids. This mechanism is expected to occur under relatively acidic conditions where organic matter can sorb and coat colloid surfaces and facilitate formation of ternary colloid-ligand-actinide complexes. The objective of this work was to examine Th transport through packed columns in the presence of hematite colloids and/or Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). In the presence of SRFA, with or without hematite colloids, significant transport (>60% recovery within the effluent) of thorium occurred through quartz columns. It is notable that the SRFA contributed to increased transport of both Th and hematite colloids, while insignificant transport occurred in the absence of fulvic acid. Further, in the presence of a natural sandy sediment (as opposed to pure quartz), transport is negligible in the presence of SRFA due to interactions with natural, clay-sized sediment coatings. Moreover, this data shows that the transport of Th through quartz columns is enhanced in ternary Th-colloid-SRFA and binary Th-SRFA systems as compared to a system containing only Th. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Alternating current anodic stripping voltammetry in the study of cadmium complexation by a reference Suwannee river fulvic acid: a model case with strong electrode adsorption and weak binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrigosa, Anna Maria; Ariño, Cristina; Díaz-Cruz, José Manuel; Esteban, Miquel

    2008-01-01

    The possibilities of anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) using an alternating current (AC) scan in the stripping step have been checked through the study of the complexation of cadmium by Suwannee river fulvic acid (SRFA), a reference fulvic acid from the International Humic Substances Society. Because of the strong electrode adsorption of SRFA, AC mode appears to be a good approach to the study when proper selection of the phase angle is made. The goodness of AC mode in ASV has been demonstrated, and the complexation constant of 3.71 +/- 0.04 determined is in good agreement with the value of the constant obtained by the reference technique of reverse pulse polarography. Some particularities of SRFA have been observed, among them its homofunctional and strongly heterogeneous behaviour in cadmium complexation and the impossibility of avoiding electrode adsorption problems in ASV measurements at very low metal concentrations. Figure DP anodic stripping and AC anodic stripping voltammograms at -12 degrees and -65 degrees during the titration of a 10(-7) mol L(-1) Cd(II) solution with SRFA at pH 7.5 in 0.05 L(-1) Tris.

  2. Characterization of Nanoparticles and Colloids in Aquatic Systems 1. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Investigations of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid Aggregates in Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, Mamadou S. [California Institute of Technology, Materials and Process Simulation Center, Beckman Institute 139-74 (United States)], E-mail: diallo@wag.caltech.edu; Glinka, Charles J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Center for Neutron Research (United States); Goddard, William A. [California Institute of Technology, Materials and Process Simulation Center, Beckman Institute 139-74 (United States); Johnson, James H. [Howard University, Department of Civil Engineering (United States)

    2005-10-15

    Fulvic acids (FA) and humic acids (HA) constitute 30-50% of dissolved organic matter in natural aquatic systems. In aqueous solutions, a commonly accepted view is that FA and HA exist as soluble macroligands at low concentration and as supramolecular aggregates at higher concentration. The size, shape and structure of these aggregates are still the subject of ongoing debate in the environmental chemistry literature. In this article, we use small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to assess the effects of solute concentration, solution pH and background electrolyte (NaCl) concentration on the structures of Suwannee River FA (SRFA) aggregates in D{sub 2}O. The qualitative features of the SANS curves and data analysis are not consistent with the view point that SRFA forms micelle-like aggregates as its concentration in aqueous solution increases. We find that SRFA forms fractal aggregates in D{sub 2}0 with size greater than 242 nm. The SRFA aggregates undergo a significant degree of restructuring in compactness as solution pH, solute concentration and NaCl concentration increase.

  3. Preparative free-flow electrophoretic offline ESI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance/MS analysis of Suwannee River fulvic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Andras; Harir, Mourad; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2010-06-01

    Free-flow electrophoresis (FFE), a preparative free zone electrophoretic method, was used offline in conjunction with ultrahigh-resolution FT/ion cyclotron resonance -MS to resolve the complexity of Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). Before MS, the FFE separation conditions and the compatibility with ESI were optimized. The constituents in SRFA were effectively separated based on their charge states and sizes. The obtained mass spectra were compared by means of van Krevelen diagrams and the calculated aromaticity indices of the individual constituents were used to describe the distribution of aromatic/unsaturated structures across the FFE-fractionated samples. The consolidated number of ions observed within the individual SRFA fractions were much higher than those of the bulk samples alone, demonstrating extensive ion suppression effects in bulk SRFA likely also operating in the analysis of complex biogeochemical mixtures in flow injection mode. The FFE approach allows for producing sizable amounts of sample from dilute solutions, which can be easily fractionated into dozens of individual samples with the possibility of further in-depth characterization.

  4. Fractionation of Suwannee River fulvic acid and Aldrich humic acid on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: spectroscopic evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claret, F.; Reiller, P.E. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR, Lab Speciat Radionucleides et Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Claret, F. [BRGM, Environm and Process Div, F-45060 Orleans, (France); Schaefer, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Inst Nukl Entsorgung INE, D-76021 Karlsruhe, (Germany); Brevet, J. [Univ Evry Val Essonne, Lab Analyse et Environm Biol et Environm, CNRS, UMR 8587, F-91025 Evry, (France)

    2008-07-01

    Sorptive fractionation of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) and Purified Aldrich Humic Acid (PAHA) on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at pH 6 was probed in the supernatant using different spectroscopic techniques. Comparison of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis with UV/vis spectrophotometric measurements at 254 nm, including specific UV absorbance (SUVA) calculation, revealed a decrease in chromophoric compounds for the non-sorbed extracts after a 24 h contact time. This fractionation, only observable below a certain ratio between initial number of sites of humic substances and of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, seems to indicate a higher fractionation for PAHA. C(1s) near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) confirmed this trend and points to a decrease in phenolic moieties in the supernatant and to an eventual increase in phenolic moieties on the surface. Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy (TRLS) of Eu(III) as luminescent probe showed a decrease in the ratio between the {sup 5}D{sub 0}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub 2} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub 1} transitions for the fractionated organic matter (OM) that is thought to be associated with a lower energy transfer from the OM to Eu(III) due to the loss of polar aromatics. These modifications in the supernatant are a hint for the modification of sorbed humic extracts on the surface. (authors)

  5. Assessment of water quality of a river-dominated estuary with hydrochemical parameters: A statistical approach.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Padma, P.; Sheela, V.S.; Suryakumari, S.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Nair, S.M.; Kumar, N.C.

    in developmental and urbanization activ- ities, demands on our natural resources also shoot up and hence protection of rivers and estuaries for all their natural, economic and aesthetic values is very important (Song et al. 2011; USEPA 2012). When a river... or estuary is altered in its natural functions, it becomes polluted and can harm living beings. The rivers play a pivotal role in carrying industrial and urban wastes and this makes rivers more susceptible to environmental problems like pollution. Hence...

  6. Quantifying nitrogen inputs to the Choptank River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarty, G.; Hapeman, C. J.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Hively, W. D.; Denver, J. M.; Lang, M. W.; Downey, P. M.; Rice, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the US, and over 50% of its streams have been rated as poor or very poor, based on the biological integrity yearly index. The Choptank River, a Bay tributary on the Delmarva Peninsula, is dominated by intensive corn and soybean farming associated with poultry and some dairy production. The Choptank River is under Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) total maximum daily load restrictions. However, reducing nonpoint source pollution contributions from agriculture requires that source predictions be improved and that mitigation and conservation measures be properly targeted. Therefore, new measurement strategies have been implemented. In-situ sensors have been deployed adjacent to US Geological Survey gauging stations in the Tuckahoe and Greensboro sub-basins of the Choptank River watershed. These sensors measure stream water concentrations of nitrate along and water quality parameters every 30 min. Initial results indicate that ~40% less nitrate is exported from the Greensboro sub-basin, even though the total amount of agricultural land use is similar to that in the Tuckahoe sub-basin. This is most likely due to more efficient nitrate processing in the Greensboro sub-basin where the amount of cropland on poorly-drained soils is much larger. Another potential nitrogen source to the Choptank River estuary is atmospheric deposition of ammonia. Over 550 million broilers are produced yearly on the Delmarva Peninsula potentially leading to the release of 20,000 Mtons of ammonia. USEPA recently estimated that as much as 22% of nitrogen in the Bay is due to ammonia deposition. We have initiated a collaborative effort within the LTAR network to increase coverage of ammonia sampling and to explore the spatial and temporal variability of ammonia, particularly in the Choptank River watershed. All these measurements will be useful in improving the handling of nitrogen sources and its fate and transport in the Chesapeake Bay model.

  7. Linking the river to the estuary : Influence of river discharge on tidal damping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, H.; Savenije, H.H.G.; Toffolon, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of river discharge on tidal damping in estuaries is explored within one consistent theoretical framework where analytical solutions are obtained by solving four implicit equations, i.e., the phase lag, the scaling, the damping and the celerity equation. In this approach the damping

  8. River-tide dynamics: Exploration of nonstationary and nonlinear tidal behavior in the Yangtze River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Leicheng; van der Wegen, Mick; Jay, David A.; Matte, Pascal; Wang, Zheng Bing; Roelvink, Dano; He, Qing

    2015-05-01

    River-tide dynamics remain poorly understood, in part because conventional harmonic analysis (HA) does not cope effectively with nonstationary signals. To explore nonstationary behavior of river tides and the modulation effects of river discharge, this work analyzes tidal signals in the Yangtze River estuary using both HA in a nonstationary mode and continuous wavelet transforms (CWT). The Yangtze is an excellent natural laboratory to analyze river tides because of its high and variable flow, its length, and the fact that there are do dams or reflecting barriers within the tidal part of the system. Analysis of tidal frequencies by CWT and analysis of subtidal water level and tidal ranges reveal a broad range of subtidal variations over fortnightly, monthly, semiannual, and annual frequencies driven by subtidal variations in friction and by variable river discharges. We employ HA in a nonstationary mode (NSHA) by segregating data within defined flow ranges into separate analyses. NSHA quantifies the decay of the principal tides and the modulation of M4 tide with increasing river discharges. M4 amplitudes decrease far upriver (landward portion of the estuary) and conversely increase close to the ocean as river discharge increases. The fortnightly frequencies reach an amplitude maximum upriver of that for over tide frequencies, due to the longer wavelength of the fortnightly constituents. These methods and findings should be applicable to large tidal rivers globally and have broad implications regarding management of navigation channels and ecosystems in tidal rivers.

  9. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  10. Factors affecting the occurrence of Escherichia coli O157 contamination in irrigation ponds on produce farms in the Suwannee River Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ganyu; Luo, Zhiyao; Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan M; Adams, Paige; Vellidis, George; Wright, Anita; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2013-03-01

    Outbreaks of enteritis caused by Escherichia coli O157 associated with fresh produce have resulted in questions about the safety of irrigation water; however, associated risks have not been systematically evaluated. In this study, the occurrence and distribution of the human pathogen E. coli O157 from vegetable irrigation ponds within the Suwannee River Watershed in Georgia were investigated, and the relationship to environmental factors was analyzed. Surface and subsurface water samples were collected monthly from 10 vegetable irrigation ponds from March 2011 to February 2012. Escherichia coli O157 was isolated from enriched filtrates on CHROMagar and sorbitol MacConkey agar media and confirmed by an agglutination test. Presence of virulence genes stx1, stx2 , and eae was tested by polymerase chain reaction. In addition, 27 environmental variables of the sampled ponds were measured. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was conducted for the analysis of bacterial communities in the water samples. Biserial correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate the log10 colony-forming unit per millilitre correlations between the environmental factors and the occurrence of E. coli O157. Stepwise and canonical discriminant analyses were used to determine the factors that were associated with the presence and absence of E. coli O157 in water samples. All 10 ponds were positive for E. coli O157 some of the time, mainly in summer and fall of 2011. The temporal distribution of this bacterium differed among the 10 ponds. Temperature, rainfall, populations of fecal coliform, and culturable bacteria were positively correlated with the occurrence of E. coli O157 (P pond margins) in periods with relatively high temperatures, suggesting that prevention of runoff may be important to minimize the risk of enteric pathogens in irrigation ponds.

  11. Simultaneous determination of speciation parameters of Cu, Pb, Cd and Zn in model solutions of Suwannee River fulvic acid by pseudopolarography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Fasfous, Ismail I.; Chakrabarti, Chuni L. [Carleton University, Ottawa-Carleton Chemistry Institute, Department of Chemistry, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Murimboh, John [Acadia University, Department of Chemistry, Wolfville, NS (Canada)

    2007-05-15

    There is a growing awareness of the importance of quantitative determinations of speciation parameters of the trace metals Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in aqueous samples containing chemically heterogeneous humic substances, especially when they are present together, interacting with one another and competing for specific binding sites of the humic substances. Such determinations require fundamental knowledge and understanding of these complex interactions, gained through basic laboratory-based studies of well-characterized humic substances in model solutions. Since the chemical heterogeneity of humic substances plays an important role in the thermodynamics (stability) and kinetics (lability) of trace metal competition for humic substances, a metal speciation technique such as pseudopolarography that can reveal the special, distinctive nature of metal complexation is required, and it was therefore used in this study. A comparison of the heterogeneity parameters ({gamma}) for Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) complexes in model solutions of Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) shows that {gamma}{sub Cd}>{gamma}{sub Zn}>{gamma}{sub Pb}>{gamma}{sub Cu}, suggesting that SRFA behaves as a relatively homogeneous complexant for Zn(II) and Cd(II), whereas it behaves as a relatively heterogeneous complexant for Pb(II) and an even more heterogeneous complexant for Cu(II) under the experimental conditions used. The order of values of logK{sup *} (from the differential equilibrium function, DEF) for the trace metals at pH 5.0 follow the sequence: logK{sup *}{sub Cu}>logK{sup *}{sub Pb}>logK{sup *}{sub Zn}>logK{sup *}{sub Cd} These results are in good agreement with the literature values. The results of this work suggest the possibility of simultaneously determining several metals in a sample in a single experiment, and hence in a shorter time than required for multiple experiments. (orig.)

  12. Seasonal variation of surface sediments composition in Mondego River estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Patrícia; Vale, Carlos; Ferreira, Ana Maria; Pereira, Eduarda; Pardal, Miguel Angelo; Marques, João Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Concentrations of major (Al, Si, Ca, Mg, Fe), minor (Mn), and trace elements (Zn, Pb, Cr, Cu, Ag, Cd, Hg) and organochlorine compounds (PCB congeners, pp'DDT, and metabolites) were determined in 24 samples of surface sediments (0-5 cm) collected along the Mondego River estuary in two periods: February and August 2003. All sediment samples showed low levels of contamination reflecting the weak industrialization of the region. Higher incorporation of elements (Mg, Fe, Zn, Cr, Cu, Cd, Hg) and DDT was registered in muds deposited in the inner part of the south channel. Sediments of the rest of the estuary are coarser (mean Si/Al ratio around 11) and showed much lower Me/Al ratios. Concentrations of Mn, Pb, Ag, and PCB showed no geographical distribution tendency. However, Pb, Cu, Ag, Zn, Cd ratios to Al and PCB concentrations were higher in coarser sediments collected in February than in August. In addition, the lower chlorinated CBs (tri + tetra-CB) showed a higher proportion in sediments collected in February, due to its higher mobility and low contamination in the area. The results obtained in this river-dominated estuarine system, with weak local contamination sources, indicate that chemical composition of surface sediments reflects the diffuse source of contaminants associated with the rainy season.

  13. Subtidal sea level variability in a shallow Mississippi River deltaic estuary, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snedden, G.A.; Cable, J.E.; Wiseman, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    The relative roles of river, atmospheric, and tidal forcings on estuarine sea level variability are examined in Breton Sound, a shallow (0.7 m) deltaic estuary situated in an interdistributary basin on the Mississippi River deltaic plain. The deltaic landscape contains vegetated marshes, tidal flats, circuitous channels, and other features that frictionally dissipate waves propagating through the system. Direct forcing by local wind stress over the surface of the estuary is minimal, owing to the lack of significant fetch due to landscape features of the estuary. Atmospheric forcing occurs almost entirely through remote forcing, where alongshore winds facilitate estuary-shelf exchange through coastal Ekman convergence. The highly frictional nature of the deltaic landscape causes the estuary to act as a low-pass filter to remote atmospheric forcing, where high-frequency, coastally-induced fluctuations are significantly damped, and the damping increases with distance from the estuary mouth. During spring, when substantial quantities of controlled Mississippi River inputs (q?? = 62 m3 s-1) are discharged into the estuary, upper estuary subtidal sea levels are forced by a combination of river and remote atmospheric forcings, while river effects are less clear downestuary. During autumn (q?? = 7 m3 s-1) sea level variability throughout the estuary is governed entirely by coastal variations at the marine boundary. A frequency-dependent analytical model, previously used to describe sea level dynamics forced by local wind stress and coastal forcing in deeper, less frictional systems, is applied in the shallow Breton Sound estuary. In contrast to deeper systems where coastally-induced fluctuations exhibit little or no frictional attenuation inside the estuary, these fluctuations in the shallow Breton Sound estuary show strong frequency-dependent amplitude reductions that extend well into the subtidal frequency spectrum. ?? 2007 Estuarine Research Federation.

  14. The fish community of the berg river estuary and an assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data concerning the species composition, abundance and distribution of fishes inhabiting the Berg River estuary are presented and used to assess the value of the estuary to fish, and the likely eflects of reduced freshwater inflows. A total of 31 species was recorded, eight of which were classified as estuarine residents, ...

  15. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Tortorici, Cathy; Yerxa, Tracey; Leary, J.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-02-05

    The purpose ofthis document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision-making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows. 1. Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. 2. Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. 3. Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. 4. Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. 5. Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. In conclusion, the estuary RME effort is designed to meet the research and monitoring needs of the estuary Program using an adaptive management process. Estuary RME's success and usefulness will depend on the actual conduct of adaptive management, as embodied in the objectives, implrementation, data, reporting, and synthesis, evaluation, and decision-making described herein.

  16. Hydrodynamic and Salinity Intrusion Model in Selangor River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, N. F.; Tahir, W.

    2016-07-01

    A multi-dimensional hydrodynamic and transport model has been used to develop the hydrodynamic and salinity intrusion model for Selangor River Estuary. Delft3D-FLOW was applied to the study area using a curvilinear, boundary fitted grid. External boundary forces included ocean water level, salinity, and stream flow. The hydrodynamic and salinity transport used for the simulation was calibrated and confirmed using data on November 2005 and from May to June 2014. A 13-day period for November 2005 data and a 6-day period of May to June 2014 data were chosen as the calibration and confirmation period because of the availability of data from the field-monitoring program conducted. From the calibration results, it shows that the model was well suited to predict the hydrodynamic and salinity intrusion characteristics of the study area.

  17. Role of Temperature and Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter on Inactivation Kinetics of Rotavirus and Bacteriophage MS2 by Solar Irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Romero, Ofelia C.

    2011-12-15

    Although the sunlight-mediated inactivation of viruses has been recognized as an important process that controls surface water quality, the mechanisms of virus inactivation by sunlight are not yet clearly understood. We investigated the synergistic role of temperature and Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM), an exogenous sensitizer, for sunlight-mediated inactivation of porcine rotavirus and MS2 bacteriophage. Upon irradiation by a full spectrum of simulated sunlight in the absence of SRNOM and in the temperature range of 14-42 °C, high inactivation rate constants, kobs, of MS2 (k obs ≤ 3.8 h-1 or 1-log10 over 0.6 h) and rotavirus (kobs ≤ 11.8 h-1 or ∼1-log10 over 0.2 h) were measured. A weak temperature (14-42 °C) dependence of kobs values was observed for both viruses irradiated by the full sunlight spectrum. Under the same irradiation condition, the presence of SRNOM reduced the inactivation of both viruses due to attenuation of lower wavelengths of the simulated sunlight. For rotavirus and MS2 solutions irradiated by only UVA and visible light in the absence of SRNOM, inactivation kinetics were slow (kobs < 0.3 h-1 or <1-log10 unit reduction over 7 h) and temperature-independent for the range considered. Conversely, under UVA and visible light irradiation and in the presence of SRNOM, temperature-dependent inactivation of MS2 was observed. For rotavirus, the SRNOM-mediated exogenous inactivation was only important at temperatures >33 °C, with low rotavirus kobs values (kobs ≈ 0.2 h-1; 1-log10 unit reduction over 12 h) for the temperature range of 14-33 °C. These kobs values increased to 0.5 h-1 at 43 °C and 1.5 h-1 (1-log10 reduction over 1.6 h) at 50 °C. While SRNOM-mediated exogenous inactivation of MS2 was triggered by singlet oxygen, the presence of hydrogen peroxide was important for rotavirus inactivation in the 40-50 °C range. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Fish abundance in the Elwha River estuary, Washington, from 2006 to 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This portion of the data release presents fish abundance data from samples collected in the Elwha River estuary, Washington, in 2006, 2007, 2013, and 2014 (no...

  19. Determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in sediment samples from Bombay harbour, Dharamtar creek and Amba river estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, S.A.; Dhaktode, S.S.; Kadam, A.N.

    The surface sediment samples were collected by van Veen grab sampler during premonsoon, monsoon and postmonsoon seasons from Bombay harbour, Dharamtar creek and Amba river estuary Moisture content of the samples ranges from 36 to 67.5...

  20. 2009 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Snohomish River Estuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) co-acquired Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data and Truecolor Orthophotographs of the Snohomish River Estuary, WA on July 20 &...

  1. PARASITIC AND SYMBIONIC FAUNA IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) COLLECTED FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER AND ESTUARY, FLORIDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, collected from ten sites in the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary, Florida, revealed a varied parasite and symbiotic fauna that have never been reported from this area. Organisms observed included ovacystis virus infecting gametes...

  2. Aquatic invertebrate abundance in the Elwha River estuary, Washington, in 2007 and 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This portion of the data release presents aquatic invertebrate abundance data from samples collected in the Elwha River estuary, Washington, in 2007 and 2013 (no...

  3. Riparian vegetation abundance (percent cover) in the Elwha River estuary, Washington, in 2007 and 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This portion of the data release presents riparian plant species abundance (percent cover) data from plots sampled in the Elwha River estuary, Washington, in 2007...

  4. Riparian vegetation species richness in the Elwha River estuary, Washington, in 2007 and 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This portion of the data release presents riparian plant species richness (number of unique taxa) data from plots sampled in the Elwha River estuary, Washington, in...

  5. Comparison of common persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the Vistula (Poland) and Douro (Portugal) River estuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Ilona; Dabrowska, Henryka; Komar-Szymczak, Katarzyna

    2014-04-15

    Groups of flounder (Platichthys flesus) females were collected in 2011 from the Vistula River and the Duoro River estuaries and corresponding reference sites in the southern Baltic Sea and Portuguese coast of the Atlantic Ocean to measure and compare the levels and profiles of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The estuaries' sediments were also investigated. Several differences were found in the POPs between the estuaries and between the two marine regions, which were highlighted by PCA. The Vistula River estuary POPs, significantly higher than in the Douro River estuary, were dominated by DDTs followed by PCBs. PBDEs levels, indifferent between the estuaries, were relatively low. The POP levels in flounder and sediment evaluated against environmental assessment criteria (EACs) indicated that none of the measured contaminants for which EAC had been established exceeded the criterion, except for CB-118 in flounder from the Vistula River estuary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Concentrations, loads, and sources of polychlorinated biphenyls, Neponset River and Neponset River Estuary, eastern Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are known to contaminate the Neponset River, which flows through parts of Boston, Massachusetts, and empties into the Neponset River Estuary, an important fish-spawning area. The river is dammed and impassable to fish. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game, Division of Ecological Restoration, Riverways Program, collected, analyzed, and interpreted PCB data from bottom-sediment, water, and (or) fish-tissue samples in 2002, 2004-2006. Samples from the Neponset River and Neponset River Estuary were analyzed for 209 PCB congeners, PCB homologs, and Aroclors. In order to better assess the overall health quality of river-bottom sediments, sediment samples were also tested for concentrations of 31 elements. PCB concentrations measured in the top layers of bottom sediment ranged from 28 nanograms per gram (ng/g) just upstream of the Mother Brook confluence to 24,900 ng/g measured in Mother Brook. Concentrations of elements in bottom sediment were generally higher than background concentrations and higher than levels considered toxic to benthic organisms according to freshwater sediment-quality guidelines defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Concentrations of dissolved PCBs in water samples collected from the Neponset River (May 13, 2005 to April 28, 2006) averaged about 9.2 nanograms per liter (ng/L) (annual average of monthly values); however, during the months of August (about 16.5 ng/L) and September (about 15.6 ng/L), dissolved PCB concentrations were greater than 14 ng/L, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's freshwater continuous chronic criterion for aquatic organisms. Concentrations of PCBs in white sucker (fillets and whole fish) were all greater than 2,000 ng/g wet wt, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guideline for safe consumption of fish: PCB concentrations measured in fish-tissue samples collected from the Tileston and Hollingsworth and

  7. [Assessing the benthic ecological status in Yangtze River Estuary using AMBI and M-AMBI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wen-qian; Meng, Wei; Liu, Lu-san; Zhu, Yan-zhong; Zhou, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Both AMBI and M-AMBI could effectively assess the benthic ecological status of estuaries and coastal systems with soft sediments, and show the response of benthic communities to human pressures and natural changes. To monitor the ecological status of Yangtze River Estuary, macroinvertebrate samples and environmental data were collected in April 2009. Results showed that the benthic habit of Yangtze River Estuary was disturbed to various degrees, especially in the watersheds of Hangzhou Bay, coastal areas of Zhoushan islands and in the inner part of Yangtze River Estuary, which was related to land resourced discharges, eutrophication and large amounts of coastal projects. No significant difference was found between the calculation results of AMBI and M-AMBI based on density and biomass, as indicated by one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Compared with AMBI, M-AMBI could be more effective to assess the ecological status of Yangtze River Estuary because M-AMBI matched the community structure and environmental variables better. Moreover, according to results of Pearson correlation and linear regression analysis, significant negative relationships were found between the eutrophication index both in the surface and bottom water layers and M-AMBI, but no significant relationship was found between the eutrophication index and AMBI. Therefore, M-AMBI could be more suitable in indicating the eutrophication stress of Yangtze River Estuary.

  8. The importance of the river-estuary interface (REI) zone in estuaries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    2002-07-03

    Jul 3, 2002 ... The effect of the REI zone on fish was examined in the freshwater-rich Great Fish Estuary and in the freshwater-deprived Kariega Estuary. Estuarine associated fishes responded ... required to sustain ecologically sound estuarine ecosystems in terms of the South African National Water Act (36) of 1998.

  9. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2008-02-20

    The purpose of this document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program, hereafter called 'the Estuary Program'. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows: (1) Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. (2) Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. (3) Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. (4) Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. (5) Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. The goal leads to three primary management questions pertaining to the main focus of the Estuary Program: estuary habitat conservation and restoration. (1) Are the estuary habitat actions achieving the expected biological and environmental performance targets? (2) Are the offsite habitat actions in the estuary improving juvenile salmonid performance and which actions are most effective at addressing the limiting factors preventing achievement of habitat, fish, or wildlife performance objectives? (3) What are the limiting factors or threats in the estuary/ocean preventing the achievement of desired habitat or fish performance objectives? Performance measures

  10. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

    2008-08-01

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

  11. Sediment transport due to extreme events: The Hudson River estuary after tropical storms Irene and Lee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, David K.; Warner, John C.; Geyer, W. Rockwell; Wall, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical Storms Irene and Lee in 2011 produced intense precipitation and flooding in the U.S. Northeast, including the Hudson River watershed. Sediment input to the Hudson River was approximately 2.7 megaton, about 5 times the long-term annual average. Rather than the common assumption that sediment is predominantly trapped in the estuary, observations and model results indicate that approximately two thirds of the new sediment remained trapped in the tidal freshwater river more than 1 month after the storms and only about one fifth of the new sediment reached the saline estuary. High sediment concentrations were observed in the estuary, but the model results suggest that this was predominantly due to remobilization of bed sediment. Spatially localized deposits of new and remobilized sediment were consistent with longer term depositional records. The results indicate that tidal rivers can intercept (at least temporarily) delivery of terrigenous sediment to the marine environment during major flow events.

  12. Nutrient dynamics in mangrove areas of the Red River Estuary in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wösten, J.H.M.; Willigen, de P.; Tri, N.H.; Lien, T.V.; Smith, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Nutrient dynamics of mangrove in the 107 kmr large estuary of the Red River Delta in Vietnam are studied using the existing LOICZ-CABARET budget model. The methodology and assumptions underlying this model are described. Input data for evaporation, rainfall, river discharge, and concentrations of

  13. Upriver transport of dissolved substances in an estuary and sub-estuary system of the lower James River, Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bo; Shen, Jian; Xu, Hongzhou

    2018-01-01

    The water exchange between the James River and the Elizabeth River, an estuary and sub-estuary system in the lower Chesapeake Bay, was investigated using a 3D numerical model. The conservative passive tracers were used to represent the dissolved substances (DS) discharged from the Elizabeth River. The approach enabled us to diagnose the underlying physical processes that control the expansion of the DS, which is representative of potential transport of harmful algae blooms, pollutants from the Elizabeth River to the James River without explicitly simulating biological processes. Model simulations with realistic forcings in 2005, together with a series of processoriented numerical experiments, were conducted to explore the correlations of the transport process and external forcing. Model results show that the upriver transport depends highly on the freshwater discharge on a seasonal scale and maximum upriver transport occurs in summer with a mean transport time ranging from 15-30 days. The southerly/easterly wind, low river discharge, and neap tidal condition all act to strengthen the upriver transport. On the other hand, the northerly/westerly wind, river pulse, water level pulse, and spring tidal condition act to inhibit the upriver transport. Tidal flushing plays an important role in transporting the DS during spring tide, which shortens the travel time in the lower James River. The multivariable regression analysis of volume mean subtidal DS concentration in the mesohaline portion of the James River indicates that DS concentration in the upriver area can be explained and well predicted by the physical forcings (r = 0.858, p = 0.00001).

  14. The effects of monovalent and divalent cations on the stability of silver nanoparticles formed from direct reduction of silver ions by Suwannee River humic acid/natural organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akaighe, Nelson [Chemistry Department, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Depner, Sean W.; Banerjee, Sarbajit [Department of Chemistry, 410 Natural Sciences Complex, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260-3000 (United States); Sharma, Virender K. [Chemistry Department, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Sohn, Mary, E-mail: msohn@fit.edu [Chemistry Department, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The formation and characterization of AgNPs (silver nanoparticles) formed from the reduction of Ag{sup +} by SRNOM (Suwannee River natural organic matter) is reported. The images of SRNOM-formed AgNPs and the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were captured by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The colloidal and chemical stability of SRNOM- and SRHA (Suwannee River humic acid)-formed AgNPs in different ionic strength solutions of NaCl, KCl, CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} was investigated in an effort to evaluate the key fate and transport processes of these nanoparticles in natural aqueous environments. The aggregation state, stability and sedimentation rate of the AgNPs were monitored by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), zeta potential, and UV-vis measurements. The results indicate that both types of AgNPs are very unstable in high ionic strength solutions. Interestingly, the nanoparticles appeared more unstable in divalent cation solutions than in monovalent cation solutions at similar concentrations. Furthermore, the presence of SRNOM and SRHA contributed to the nanoparticle instability at high ionic strength in divalent metallic cation solutions, most likely due to intermolecular bridging with the organic matter. The results clearly suggest that changes in solution chemistry greatly affect nanoparticle long term stability and transport in natural aqueous environments. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of SRNOM-AgNPs under environmentally relevant conditions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of monovalent versus divalent cations on SRHA- and SRNOM-AgNP stability Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of AgNPs on organic matter removal from water columns.

  15. Tidal straining effect on the suspended sediment transport in the Huanghe (Yellow River) Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Hua; Wang, Houjie

    2010-10-01

    Tidal straining effect on sediment transport dynamics in the Huanghe (Yellow River) estuary was studied by field observations and numerical simulations. The measurement of salinity, suspended sediment concentration, and current velocity was conducted during a flood season in 1995 at the Huanghe river mouth with six fishing boats moored at six stations for 25-h hourly time series observations. Based on the measurements, the intra-tidal variations of sediment transport in the highly turbid river mouth was observed and the tidal straining effect occurred. Our study showed that tidal straining of longitudinal sediment concentration gradients can contribute to intra-tidal variability in sediment stratification and to asymmetries in sediment distribution within a tidal cycle. In particular, the tidal straining effect in the Huanghe River estuary strengthened the sediment-induced stratification at the flood tide, thus producing a higher bottom sediment concentration than that during the ebb. A sediment transport model that is capable of simulating sediment-induced stratification effect on the hydrodynamics in the bottom boundary layers and associated density currents was applied to an idealized estuary to demonstrate the processes and to discuss the mechanism. The model-predicted sediment processes resembled the observed characteristics in the Huanghe River estuary. We concluded that tidal straining effect is an important but poorly understood mechanism in the transport dynamics of cohesive sediments in turbid estuaries and coastal seas.

  16. Particulate organic matter predicts bacterial productivity in a river dominated estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries act as coastal filters for organic and inorganic fluvial materials in which microbial, biogeochemical, and ecological processes combine to transform organic matter and nutrients prior to export to the coastal ocean. The function of this estuarine 'bioreactor' is linked to the residence times of those materials and to rates of microbial heterotrophic activity. Our ability to forecast the impact of global change on estuarine bioreactor function requires an understanding of the basic controls on microbial community activity and diversity. In the Columbia River estuary, the microbial community undergoes a dramatic seasonal shift in species composition during which a spring bacterioplankton community, dominated by Flavobacteriaceae and Oceanospirillales, is replaced by a summer community, dominated by Rhodobacteraceae and several common marine taxa. This annual shift occurs in July, following the spring freshet, when river flow and river chlorophyll concentration decrease and when estuarine water residence time increases. Analysis of a large dataset from 17 research cruises (1990-2014) showed that the composition of particulate organic matter in the estuary changes after the freshet with decreasing organic carbon and nitrogen content, and increasing contribution of marine and autochthonous estuarine organic matter (based on PO13C and pigment ratios). Bacterial production rates (measured as leucine or thymidine incorporation rates) in the estuary respond to this change, and correlate strongly with labile particulate nitrogen concentration and temperature during individual sampling campaigns, and with the concentration of chlorophyll in the Columbia River across all seasons. Regression models suggest that the concentration of labile particulate nitrogen and the rate of bacterial production can be predicted from sensor measurements of turbidity, salinity, and temperature in the estuary and chlorophyll in the river. These results suggest that the quality of

  17. Evaluation of mixing and stratification in Geum River Estuary, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Hoon; Hwang, Jin Hwan

    2017-04-01

    The mixing and stratification processes evaluate the effect of freshwater discharge in Geum River Estuary which can be controlled by an artificial gate operation. Field observations have been performed to obtain data of current and oceanic variables (i.e. temperature, salinity, and density). The mixing and stratification processes in this region can be determined by tidal currents and time of after freshwater discharge. Most of the discharged freshwater appears to be advected back and forth by the tidal currents. As time goes on, discharged freshwater is mixed during flood tide and forms a stratified layer during ebb tide because of high and low shear or low and high buoyancy between upper and lower layer. Such cyclic processes can be quantitatively evaluated by conducting field observation and analyzing in accordance with tidal currents and time of after freshwater discharge. The gradient Richardson numbers show that discharged freshwater forms strong stratification for a short time of after freshwater discharge during ebb tide. In the flood tide after the ebb tide, this stratification gradually becomes unstable and mixing occurs slowly. In the case where the freshwater has been discharged for a long time, mixing is dominant irrespective of the tidal currents. This is because mixing has progressed by the cyclic process and buoyancy is weakened. Key words: stratification, mixing, gradient Richardson number, observation Acknowledgement: This research was a part of the project titled "Development of integrated estuarine management system", funded by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, Korea and the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant (No. 2015R1A5A 7037372) funded by MSIP of Korea.

  18. Sedimentary Records of Hyperpycnal Flows and the Influence of River Damming on Sediment Dynamics of Estuaries: Examples from the Nelson, Churchill, Moisie and Sainte-Marguerite Rivers (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, G.; Duboc, Q.; Boyer-Villemaire, U.; Lajeunesse, P.; Bernatchez, P.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment cores were sampled in the estuary of the Nelson and Churchill Rivers in western Hudson Bay, as well as in the estuary of the Moisie and Sainte-Marguerite Rivers in Gulf of St. Lawrence in order to evaluate the impact of hydroelectric dams on the sedimentary regime of these estuaries. The gravity cores at the mouth of the Nelson River recorded several cm-thick rapidly deposited layers with a reverse to normal grading sequence, indicating the occurrence of hyperpycnal flows generated by major floods during the last few centuries. These hyperpycnal flows were probably caused by ice-jam formation, which can increase both the flow and the sediment concentration following the breaching of such natural dams. Following the construction of hydroelectric dams since the 1960s, the regulation of river discharge prevented the formation of hyperpycnal flows, and hence the deposition of hyperpycnites in the upper part of the cores. In the core sampled in the estuary of the Churchill River, only one hyperpycnite was recorded. This lower frequency may be due to the enclosed estuary of the Churchill River, its weaker discharge and the more distal location of the coring site.In the Gulf of St. Lawrence, grain size measurements allowed the identification of a major flood around AD 1844±4 years in box cores from both the Sainte-Marguerite and Moisie Rivers, whereas a drastic decrease in variations in the median grain size occurred around AD ~1900 in the estuary of the Sainte-Marguerite River, highlighting the offshore impact of the SM1 dam construction in the early 1900s. Furthermore, sedimentological variations in the box cores from both estuaries have been investigated by wavelet analysis and the sharp disappearance of high frequencies around AD 1900 in the estuary of the dammed river (Sainte-Marguerite River), but not in the estuary of the natural river (Moisie River), also provides evidence of the influence of dams on the sedimentary regime of estuaries.

  19. Modelling Suspended Sediment Transport in Monsoon Season: A Case Study of Pahang River Estuary, Pahang, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariya, Razak; Ahmad, Zuhairi; Saad, Shahbudin; Yaakop, Rosnan

    2013-04-01

    Sediment transport based on 2-dimensional real time model was applied to Pahang River estuary, Pahang, Malaysia and has been evaluated and verified with time series of tidal elevation, flow and suspended sediment load. Period of modelling was during highest high tide and lowest low tide in Northeast Monsoon (NE) which happened in December 2010 and Southwest Monsoon (SW) in July 2011. Simulated model outputs has been verify using Pearson's coefficient and has showed high accuracy. The validated model was used to simulate hydrodynamic and sediment transport of extreme conditions during both monsoon seasons. Based on field measurement and model simulation, tidal elevation and flow velocity, freshwater discharge of Pahang River were found to be higher during NE Monsoon. Based on the fluxes, the estuary also showed 'ebb-dominant' characteristic during highest high tide and lowest low tide in NE monsoon and normal ebbing-flooding characteristics during SW monsoon. In the Pahang River estuary, inflow and outflow patterns were perpendicular to the open boundary with circular flow formed at the shallow area in the middle of estuary during both monsoons. Referring to sea water intrusion from the river mouth, both seasons show penetration of more than 9 km (upstream input boundary) during higher high water tide. During higher lower water tide, the water intrusion stated varies which 5.6km during NE monsoon and 7.8km during SW monsoon. Regarding to the times lap during high tide, the sea water takes 2.8 hours to reach 9km upstream during NE monsoon compared to 1.9 hour during SW monsoon. The averages of suspended sediment concentration and suspended sediment load were higher during Northeast monsoon which increased the sedimentation potentials.Total of suspended sediment load discharged to the South China Sea yearly from Pahang River is approximately 96727.5 tonnes/day or 3.33 tonnes/km2/day which 442.6 tonnes/day during Northeast Monsoon and 25.3 tonnes/day during Southwest

  20. River discharge controls phytoplankton dynamics in the northern San Francisco Bay estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, J.E.; Alpine, A.E.; Cole, B.E.; Wong, R.L.J.; Arthur, J.F.; Ball, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    Phytoplankton dynamics in the upper reach of the northern San Francisco Bay estuary are usually characterized by low biomass dominated by microflagellates or freshwater diatoms in winter, and high biomass dominated by neritic diatoms in summer. During two successive years of very low river discharge (the drought of 1976-77), the summer diatom bloom was absent. This is consistent with the hypothesis that formation of the diatom population maximum is a consequence of the same physical mechanisms that create local maxima of suspended sediments in partially-mixed estuaries: density-selective retention of particles within an estuarine circulation cell. Because the estuary is turbid, calculated phytoplankton growth rates are small in the central deep channel but are relatively large in lateral shallow embayments where light limination is less severe. When river discharge falls within a critical range (100-350 m3 s-1) that positions the suspended particulate maximum adjacent to the productive shallow bays, the population of neritic diatoms increases. However, during periods of high discharge (winter) or during periods of very low discharge (drought), the suspended particulate maximum is less well-defined and is uncoupled (positioned downstream or upstream) from the shallow bays of the upper estuary, and the population of neritic diatoms declines. Hence, the biomass and community composition of phytoplankton in this estuary are controlled by river discharge. ?? 1983.

  1. Pollutant fate and spatio-temporal variability in the choptank river estuary: Factors influencing water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitall, D.; Hively, W.D.; Leight, A.K.; Hapeman, C.J.; McConnell, L.L.; Fisher, T.; Rice, C.P.; Codling, E.; McCarty, G.W.; Sadeghi, A.M.; Gustafson, A.; Bialek, K.

    2010-01-01

    Restoration of the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States, is a national priority. Documentation of progress of this restoration effort is needed. A study was conducted to examine water quality in the Choptank River estuary, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay that since 1998 has been classified as impaired waters under the Federal Clean Water Act. Multiple water quality parameters (salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a) and analyte concentrations (nutrients, herbicide and herbicide degradation products, arsenic, and copper) were measured at seven sampling stations in the Choptank River estuary. Samples were collected under base flow conditions in the basin on thirteen dates between March 2005 and April 2008. As commonly observed, results indicate that agriculture is a primary source of nitrate in the estuary and that both agriculture and wastewater treatment plants are important sources of phosphorus. Concentrations of copper in the lower estuary consistently exceeded both chronic and acute water quality criteria, possibly due to use of copper in antifouling boat paint. Concentrations of copper in the upstream watersheds were low, indicating that agriculture is not a significant source of copper loading to the estuary. Concentrations of herbicides (atrazine, simazine, and metolachlor) peaked during early-summer, indicating a rapid surface-transport delivery pathway from agricultural areas, while their degradation products (CIAT, CEAT, MESA, and MOA) appeared to be delivered via groundwater transport. Some in-river processing of CEAT occurred, whereas MESA was conservative. Observed concentrations of herbicide residues did not approach established levels of concern for aquatic organisms. Results of this study highlight the importance of continued implementation of best management practices to improve water quality in the estuary. This work provides a baseline against which to compare future changes in water quality and may be used

  2. Late Holocene (~ 2 ka) East Asian Monsoon variations inferred from river discharge and climate interrelationships in the Pearl River Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nan, Q.; Li, T.; Chen, J.; Nigam, R.

    A sediment core from the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) was analyzed for grain size and organic geochemistry parameters (TOC and δ13Corg). The results showed that high mean grain-size value and increased sand content were correlated...

  3. Trace metals in estuaries in the Russian Far East and China: case studies from the Amur River and the Changjiang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulkin, Vladimir; Zhang, Jing

    2014-11-15

    This paper compares the distributions of dissolved and particulate forms of Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in the estuaries of the largest rivers in East Asia: the Amur River and the Changjiang (Yangtze River). High suspended solid concentrations, elevated pH, and relatively low dissolved trace metal concentrations are characteristics of the Changjiang. Elevated dissolved Fe and Mn concentrations, neutral pH, and relatively low suspended solid concentrations are characteristics of the Amur River. The transfer of dissolved Fe to suspended forms is typical in the Amur River estuary, though Cd and Mn tend to mobilize to solution, and Cu and Ni are diluted in the estuarine system. Metal concentrations in suspended matter in the Amur River estuary are controlled by the ratio of terrigenous riverine material, enriched in Al and Fe, and marine biogenic particles, enriched in Cu, Mn, Cd, and in some cases Ni. The increase in dissolved forms of Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb compared with river end-member is unique to the Changjiang estuary. Particle-solution interactions are not reflected in bulk suspended-solid metal concentrations in the Changjiang estuary due to the dominance of particulate forms of these metals. Cd is an exception in the Changjiang estuary, where the increase in dissolved Cd is of comparable magnitude to the decrease in particulate Cd. Despite runoff in the Amur River being lower than that in the Changjiang, the fluxes of dissolved Mn, Zn and Fe in the Amur River exceed those in the Changjiang. Dissolved Ni, and Cd fluxes are near equal in both estuaries, but dissolved Cu is lower in the Amur River estuary. The hydrological and physico-chemical river characteristics are dominated at the assessment of river influence on the adjoining coastal sea areas despite differences in estuarine processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  5. The fish community of the Berg River estuary and an assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zoology Department and Marine Biology Research Institute, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7700. Republic of South Africa. Received I May 1993; accepted 6 October /993. Data concerning the species composition, abundance and distribution of fishes inhab~ing the Berg River estuary are presented and used to ...

  6. Spatial and vertical distribution of bacteria in the Pearl River estuary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... Bacterial phylotypes in different stations were closely related uniquely to the overlying water environment. ... sediment samples. Key words: Bacterial community structure, the Pearl River estuary, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis ... employed for monitoring microbial diversity under the changing ...

  7. Spatial and vertical distribution of bacteria in the Pearl River estuary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to investigate the spatial and vertical change of bacteria community structure in the Pearl River estuary sediment, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and multivariate statistical analyses were carried out in this study. Results of multidimensional scaling analyses (MDS) were in good agreement with the ...

  8. Protocols for Monitoring Habitat Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roegner, G. Curtis; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2008-04-25

    Protocols for monitoring salmon habitat restoration projects are essential for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' environmental efforts in the Columbia River estuary. This manual provides state-of-the science data collection and analysis methods for landscape features, water quality, and fish species composition, among others.

  9. The faucet snail (Bithynia tentaculata) invades the St. Louis River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    The European-origin faucet snail (Bithynia tentaculata) now numbers among the aquatic invasive species present in the St. Louis River Estuary. This snail has been in the lower Great Lakes since the early 20th century but is new to the Lake Superior basin. We found faucet snails...

  10. Complex movement patterns of greenback flounder (Rhombosolea tapirina) in the Murray River estuary and Coorong, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Jason; Fowler, Anthony J.; Ye, Qifeng; Dittmann, Sabine

    2017-04-01

    The greenback flounder Rhombosolea tapirina is a commercially-important flatfish species in southern Australia and New Zealand, whose population dynamics are poorly understood. Acoustic telemetry was used to assess movement patterns and area use for R. tapirina in the Murray River estuary and Coorong, South Australia. Twenty fish (221-313 mm total length) equipped with acoustic transmitters were monitored for up to seven months during a period of high freshwater inflow. Fish were detected over a large part of the system, but showed a strong preference for brackish and near-marine conditions in the inner estuary. Tagged fish exhibited complex movement patterns that differed among individuals, including: (1) within estuary movements; (2) dispersal from the estuary to the sea; and (3) return migrations between the estuary and the sea. A diurnal shift in fine-scale area use was observed in the part of the estuary where residency was highest, with individuals occupying deeper habitats during the day and shallower areas during the night. The results demonstrate the individualistic and often highly transient behaviour of this species and its ability to undertake regular movements over the spatial scale of 10s of km. Understanding such movement patterns can improve effective management of estuarine flatfish populations and ecosystems.

  11. Use of glacier river-fed estuary channels by juvenile coho salmon: transitional or rearing habitats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoem Neher, Tammy D.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Walker, Coowe M.; Baird, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are among the most productive ecosystems in the world and provide important rearing environments for a variety of fish species. Though generally considered important transitional habitats for smolting salmon, little is known about the role that estuaries serve for rearing and the environmental conditions important for salmon. We illustrate how juvenile coho salmonOncorhynchus kisutch use a glacial river-fed estuary based on examination of spatial and seasonal variability in patterns of abundance, fish size, age structure, condition, and local habitat use. Fish abundance was greater in deeper channels with cooler and less variable temperatures, and these habitats were consistently occupied throughout the season. Variability in channel depth and water temperature was negatively associated with fish abundance. Fish size was negatively related to site distance from the upper extent of the tidal influence, while fish condition did not relate to channel location within the estuary ecotone. Our work demonstrates the potential this glacially-fed estuary serves as both transitional and rearing habitat for juvenile coho salmon during smolt emigration to the ocean, and patterns of fish distribution within the estuary correspond to environmental conditions.

  12. Flushing characteristics of Amba river estuary, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.; Sarma, R.V.; Josanto, V.

    of 22 tidal cycles for neap, 6 to 7 tidal cycles for spring and dry weather flushing time of 45 tidal cycles for neap, 6 to 7 tidal cycles for spring based on modified tidal prism method indicated that the load retained in the estuary after infinite...

  13. Physico-chemical investigations in Auranga river estuary (Gujarat)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.; Sharma, P.; Sabnis, M.M.

    currents. The flushing time calculated (2.7-4.1 tidal cycles) by applying the fraction of fresh water method was at least three times higher than computed on the basis of the tidal prism method. The load retained in the estuary under continuous flow...

  14. The recreational value of river inflows into South African estuaries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    estimate the value of recreational benefits that would result at 40 South African estuaries if water-inflow reductions were averted. The studies were undertaken .... population and demand pressure. 'Turning back the clock' to ..... Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Pretoria, South Africa. LAMBERTH S and TURPIE J (2003) ...

  15. Improving navigability on the Kromme River Estuary: A choice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to options for improving navigability and methods to fund these interventions. It is concluded that an increase in licence fee of ZAR402 would improve recreational value. Keywords: estuary, recreational attributes, navigability, choice experiment, willingness-to-pay, conditional logit model, random parameters logit model ...

  16. River-estuary-coast continuum: Biogeochemistry and ecological response to increasing human and climatic changes - Editorial overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huasheng; Chen, Nengwang; Wang, Deli

    2015-12-01

    The World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) 2002 highlighted the integrated management from hilltops to oceans. The multidisciplinary and ecosystem approach has become a fundamental tool of developing realistic, ecologically sound, and cost-effective management strategies for river-estuary-coast systems. These systems have been suffering both anthropogenic and climatic perturbations, including population growth, land use/cover change, temperature and precipitation for some time. During the transport from river to estuary to coast, terrestrial constituents experience a series of biogeochemical and ecological processes. The aim of this issue is therefore to synthesize our knowledge of biogeochemical and ecological processes occurring across the river-estuary-coast continuum.

  17. Beluga whale summer habitat associations in the Nelson River estuary, western Hudson Bay, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Smith

    Full Text Available To understand beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas estuarine use in the Nelson River estuary, southwest Hudson Bay, we recorded and examined beluga movements and habitat associations for the July through August period in 2002-2005. We compared locations of belugas fitted with satellite transmitters ("tags" (2002-2005 and aerial-surveyed (2003 and 2005 belugas for years of differing freshwater flow from the Nelson River which is influenced by hydroelectric activity. Using the beluga telemetry location data, we estimated an early August behavioral shift in beluga distribution patterns from local estuarine use to a progressively more migratory behavior away from the estuary. The timing of this shift in behavior was also apparent in results of beluga aerial surveys from the 1940s-1960s, despite environmental changes including later freeze-up and warming ocean temperatures. Overall, during the higher than average discharge ("wet" year of 2005, the three tagged belugas ranged farther from the Nelson River but not farther from the nearest shore along southwestern Hudson Bay, compared to the 10 tagged belugas tracked during the "dry" years of 2002-2004 with below average discharges. Aerial survey data for 2003 and 2005 display a similar dry vs. wet year shift in spatial patterns, with no significant change in overall density of belugas within the study area. In the Nelson estuary, proximity to the fresh-salt water mixing area may be more important than the shallow waters of the upper estuary. Killer whales (Orcinus orca were observed in the Churchill area (200 km northwest during each year of study, 2002-05, and belugas may benefit from the proximity to shallow estuary waters that provide protection from the larger-bodied predator. Study results contribute to an understanding of the influence of environmental variation on how and why belugas use estuaries although considerable uncertainties exist and additional research is required.

  18. River-sea transitions of sediment dynamics: A case study of the tide-impacted Yangtze River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. F.; Yang, S. L.; Xu, K. H.

    2017-09-01

    Hydrodynamics and sediment dynamics vary greatly in tide-dominated estuaries worldwide, but there is a paucity of data of large tide-dominated estuary systems due to difficulties of observation in a large spatial scale. In this study, we investigate sediment dynamic transitions in a 660-km long section between the tidal limit and mouth of the Yangtze River. We found that tidal effects are almost undetectable in the uppermost 100-km section, but the mean tidal range gradually increases downstream to nearly 3 m at the river mouth. Flow is generally unidirectional in the uppermost 400-km section, although its velocity changes in response to flood/ebb tidal dynamics; in the lowest 250-km section, flow is bidirectional, and ebb flow durations decrease towards the sea. In the lowermost 100 km, the ebb flow durations decreases to below 60%, and the flow is dominated by tidal currents. Salinity is only detectable in the lowest 100-km section due to the dominance of Yangtze River water discharge. Bed sediments mainly include sand in the uppermost 500-km section, whereas mud dominates in the remaining areas. In contrast, the median grain size of the suspended sediments was found to be greater in the lowest 100-km section (8-13 μm) than in the upper sections (5-6 μm) due to strong exchanges between suspended and near bed sediments. The suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was found to be low (1 g/L and both surface-bottom and intratidal variabilities occurred. The rates of sediment parameter changes were rapid in the river-sea transitional zone, and this zone may shift upstream and downstream in response to the relative contributions of the river, tides and waves. A conceptual model of the river-sea transition of sediment dynamics for the Yangtze estuary was established, and this model shed light on quantitative studies of sediment dynamics in other large tide-impacted estuaries worldwide.

  19. Effects of Nitrogen Availability and Form on Phytoplankton Growth in a Eutrophied Estuary (Neuse River Estuary, NC, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K Cira

    Full Text Available Nitrogen availability and form are important controls on estuarine phytoplankton growth. This study experimentally determined the influence of urea and nitrate additions on phytoplankton growth throughout the growing season (March 2012, June 2011, August 2011 in a temperate, eutrophied estuary (Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA. Photopigments (chlorophyll a and diagnostic photopigments: peridinin, fucoxanthin, alloxanthin, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll b and microscopy-based cell counts were used as indicators of phytoplankton growth. In March, the phytoplankton community was dominated by Gyrodinium instriatum and only fucoxanthin-based growth rates were stimulated by nitrogen addition. The limited response to nitrogen suggests other factors may control phytoplankton growth and community composition in early spring. In June, inorganic nitrogen concentrations were low and stimulatory effects of both nitrogen forms were observed for chlorophyll a- and diagnostic photopigment-based growth rates. In contrast, cell counts showed that only cryptophyte and dinoflagellate (Heterocapsa rotundata growth were stimulated. Responses of other photopigments may have been due to an increase in pigment per cell or growth of plankton too small to be counted with the microscopic methods used. Despite high nitrate concentrations in August, growth rates were elevated in response to urea and/or nitrate addition for all photopigments except peridinin. However, this response was not observed in cell counts, again suggesting that pigment-based growth responses may not always be indicative of a true community and/or taxa-specific growth response. This highlights the need to employ targeted microscopy-based cell enumeration concurrent with pigment-based technology to facilitate a more complete understanding of phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems. These results are consistent with previous studies showing the seasonal importance of nitrogen availability in

  20. Effects of Nitrogen Availability and Form on Phytoplankton Growth in a Eutrophied Estuary (Neuse River Estuary, NC, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Emily K; Paerl, Hans W; Wetz, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and form are important controls on estuarine phytoplankton growth. This study experimentally determined the influence of urea and nitrate additions on phytoplankton growth throughout the growing season (March 2012, June 2011, August 2011) in a temperate, eutrophied estuary (Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA). Photopigments (chlorophyll a and diagnostic photopigments: peridinin, fucoxanthin, alloxanthin, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll b) and microscopy-based cell counts were used as indicators of phytoplankton growth. In March, the phytoplankton community was dominated by Gyrodinium instriatum and only fucoxanthin-based growth rates were stimulated by nitrogen addition. The limited response to nitrogen suggests other factors may control phytoplankton growth and community composition in early spring. In June, inorganic nitrogen concentrations were low and stimulatory effects of both nitrogen forms were observed for chlorophyll a- and diagnostic photopigment-based growth rates. In contrast, cell counts showed that only cryptophyte and dinoflagellate (Heterocapsa rotundata) growth were stimulated. Responses of other photopigments may have been due to an increase in pigment per cell or growth of plankton too small to be counted with the microscopic methods used. Despite high nitrate concentrations in August, growth rates were elevated in response to urea and/or nitrate addition for all photopigments except peridinin. However, this response was not observed in cell counts, again suggesting that pigment-based growth responses may not always be indicative of a true community and/or taxa-specific growth response. This highlights the need to employ targeted microscopy-based cell enumeration concurrent with pigment-based technology to facilitate a more complete understanding of phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems. These results are consistent with previous studies showing the seasonal importance of nitrogen availability in estuaries, and also

  1. Place branding and endogenous rural development. Departure points for developing an inner brand for the River Minho estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez Garcia, M.D.; Horlings, L.G.; Swagemakers, P.; Simón Fernández, X.

    2013-01-01

    Place branding holds a promising contribution to sustainable territorial development and requires changes in the social organisation of places, which implies complex transitional processes towards new management regimes. This article explores place branding of the River Minho estuary in the

  2. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 15, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  3. Acquistion Log in PDF Format Maintained on USGS Cruise 07005 in the Corsica River Estuary (FA07005_LOGBOOK.PDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  4. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 16, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  5. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 17, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  6. Study of iron and aluminum binding to Suwannee River fulvic acid using absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy: comparison of data interpretation based on NICA-Donnan and Stockholm humic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingquan; Benedetti, Marc F; Korshin, Gregory V

    2013-09-15

    This study examined the evolution of absorbance and fluorescence spectra of standard Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) induced by its interactions with iron and aluminum. The results show that changes of SRFA absorbance are associated with a consistent response of the carboxylic and phenolic functional groups to iron and aluminum forming bonds with these groups, and their deprotonation induced by such binding. The observed changes of SRFA absorbance were quantified via the use of DSlope325-375 parameter that determines the behavior of the slope of logarithms of SRFA absorbance in the range of wavelengths 325-375 nm in the presence of varying concentrations of iron or aluminum. DSlope325-375 values were correlated linearly with the concentration of SRFA-bound iron and aluminum determined using either NICA-Donnan or Stockholm Humic Model (SHM) but the correlation was stronger for the former model (R(2) > 0.98). The slopes of these correlations were similar for both iron and aluminum concentrations <10.0 μM and at a wide pH range. Fluorescence of SRFA was responsive to metal binding but it changed less consistently in the presence of the examined metals, especially in the case of aluminum. The combination of these techniques can help explore in more detail manifestations of DOM site specificity at realistically low concentrations of DOM and metal ions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Spatial distribution and ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in the estuaries surface sediments from the Haihe River Basin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Shu-Cong; Zhang, Hong; Shan, Bao-Qing; Li, Li-Qing

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that the rivers in the Haihe River Basin have been seriously polluted. However, what is the present condition of the estuary pollution and how the polluted inland rivers affect the estuary areas are not clear. 10 main estuaries of the Haihe River Basin were selected to measure the contents of typical heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr and Ni) in the surface sediments and to analyze the spatial distribution of these heavy metals. The potential ecological risk index was used to assess the ecological risk of the six heavy metals in the estuaries. The results showed that the contents of Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr and Ni in the surface sediments of the 10 estuaries were all higher than their background values in the main local soil types and the contents of Cu, Ni and Pb were 2.3-2.6 times as high as their background values, which indicated that the estuaries were contaminated by the six heavy metals. The results also indicated that the contents of the six heavy metals in surface sediment varied from one estuary to another. The four heavy metals of Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn had bigger spatial differences than Pb and Cd in the contents in sediment from different estuaries. The contents of Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn in sediment were higher in the estuaries of the Yongdingxin River, Ziyaxin River and Beipai River than those in the other estuaries, and there were significant correlations between each other (R(Cu-Zn) = 0.891, R(Cu-Cr) = 0.927, R(Cu-Ni) = 0.964, R(Zn-Cr) = 0.842, R(Zn-Ni) = 0.939, and R(Cr-Ni) = 0.879, P estuaries than the other heavy metals, with the values ranged 23.3-95.8 mg x kg(-1) and 0.051-0.200 mg x kg(-1). Contents of the two heavy metals had no significant correlation with the other heavy metals or with the populations of sub-river basins, indicating that Cd and Pb had little connection with the in-land polluted sources. The results of ecological risk assessment showed that estuaries of the Haihe River Basin had the potential ecological risk at lower levels

  8. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Whiting, Allan H.

    2007-12-06

    This report is the third annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration action in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). The project is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce. Measurement of the cumulative effects of ecological restoration projects in the Columbia River estuary is a formidable task because of the size and complexity of the estuarine landscape and the meta-populations of salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Despite the challenges presented by this system, developing and implementing appropriate indicators and methods to measure cumulative effects is the best way to enable estuary managers to track the overall effectiveness of investments in estuarine restoration projects. This project is developing methods to quantify the cumulative effects of multiple restoration activities in the CRE. The overall objectives of the 2006 study were to continue to develop techniques to assess cumulative effects, refine the standard monitoring protocols, and initiate development of an adaptive management system for Corps of Engineers’ habitat restoration monitoring efforts in the CRE. (The adaptive management effort will be reported at a later date.) Field studies during 2006 were conducted in tidal freshwater at Kandoll Farm on the lower Grays River and tidal brackish water at Vera Slough on Youngs Bay. Within each of area, we sampled one natural reference site and one restoration site. We addressed the overall objectives with field work in 2006 that, coupled with previous field data, had specific objectives and resulted in some important findings that are summarized here by chapter in this report. Each chapter of the report contains data on particular monitored variables for pre- and post

  9. Coastal upwelling supplies oxygen-depleted water to the Columbia River estuary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Curtis Roegner

    Full Text Available Low dissolved oxygen (DO is a common feature of many estuarine and shallow-water environments, and is often attributed to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment from terrestrial-fluvial pathways. However, recent events in the U.S. Pacific Northwest have highlighted that wind-forced upwelling can cause naturally occurring low DO water to move onto the continental shelf, leading to mortalities of benthic fish and invertebrates. Coastal estuaries in the Pacific Northwest are strongly linked to ocean forcings, and here we report observations on the spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentration in the Columbia River estuary. Hydrographic measurements were made from transect (spatial survey or anchor station (temporal survey deployments over a variety of wind stresses and tidal states during the upwelling seasons of 2006 through 2008. During this period, biologically stressful levels of dissolved oxygen were observed to enter the Columbia River estuary from oceanic sources, with minimum values close to the hypoxic threshold of 2.0 mg L(-1. Riverine water was consistently normoxic. Upwelling wind stress controlled the timing and magnitude of low DO events, while tidal-modulated estuarine circulation patterns influenced the spatial extent and duration of exposure to low DO water. Strong upwelling during neap tides produced the largest impact on the estuary. The observed oxygen concentrations likely had deleterious behavioral and physiological consequences for migrating juvenile salmon and benthic crabs. Based on a wind-forced supply mechanism, low DO events are probably common to the Columbia River and other regional estuaries and if conditions on the shelf deteriorate further, as observations and models predict, Pacific Northwest estuarine habitats could experience a decrease in environmental quality.

  10. Sedimentology and ichnology of the fluvial reach to inner estuary of the Ogeechee River estuary, Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepetkina, Alina; Gingras, Murray K.; Pemberton, S. George

    2016-08-01

    Through the integration of sedimentological and ichnological observations, this paper explores the character of sediments deposited across the fluvio-tidal transition zone of the upper microtidal, mixed-energy, sand-dominated Ogeechee River estuary, Georgia, USA. A transect of tidally influenced to fluvial channel-bars and their facies variability is reported. Field and laboratory methods were employed, including observation of physical and biogenic sedimentary structures on the point-bar surfaces and in trenches, collection of grab samples, suction and box coring, grain size and total organic carbon analyses, optical microscopy, core logging, and daylight photography. The data presented in the paper can help in predicting facies changes across the fluvio-tidal transition of sand-dominated fluvio-tidal deposits in the rock record. The lower inner estuary is characterized by medium-fine and fine-medium sand with planar and trough cross-bedding, small-scale ripple lamination, tidal sedimentary structures (flaser and wavy bedding, herringbone cross-stratification), abundant organic debris, and mud rip-up clasts. Bioturbation of the intertidal point bars is low, but cryptobioturbation is locally observed. Upper inner estuary deposits comprise coarse-medium- and medium-coarse-grained sand, and are characterized by faint high-angle planar and trough cross-bedding. Organic debris, mud rip-up clasts, herringbone and current-ripple lamination are rarely observed. Bioturbation is absent to sparse. The fluvio-tidal transition is represented by very-coarse- to coarse-grained sand and granules. Physical sedimentary structures constitute massive, graded planar and trough cross-bedding with abundant plant detritus. Except for rare Siphonichnus- and Lockeia-like traces, bioturbation is absent. The fluvial setting is characterized by coarse-medium sand with unidirectional cross-bedding, current-ripple lamination, and rare organic-rich mud clasts. Bioturbation is absent. Inner

  11. Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2012-05-01

    This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediment of typical estuaries and the spatial distribution in Haihe river basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing L; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Lu L

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with carcinogenic and mutagenic characteristics have been detected in many estuaries and bays around the world. To detect the contaminated level in typical estuaries in Haihe river basin, China, a comprehensive survey of 16 PAHs in surface sediment has been conducted and an ecological risk assessment has been taken. It showed that Haihe river estuary had the highest concentration, ranging from 92.91 to 15886.00 ng g(-1). And Luan river estuary has the lowest polluted level, ranging from 39.55 to 328.10 ng g(-1). PAHs in sediment were dominated by low and mid molecular weight PAHs in all the sampling sites. Most of the sampling sites in all sampling seasons indicated a rarely happened ecological risk of ΣPAHs, while the S6 in Haihe river estuary was in an occasionally anticipated risk. To illustrate the spatial distribution pattern of PAHs in surface sediment in Haihe river basin, the results were compared with previous research of the research team. Based on data of the comparison, it had been revealed that Haihe river had the most serious PAHs pollution, with an average concentration of 5884.86 ng g(-1), and showed the highest contamination level in all four ecological units. The ΣPAHs concentration showed in a rank of reservoir > estuary > rural area > city.

  13. Nitrification and inorganic nitrogen distribution in a large perturbed river/estuarine system: the Pearl River Estuary, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dai

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the spatial distribution and seasonal variation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in a large perturbed estuary, the Pearl River Estuary, based on three cruises conducted in winter (January 2005, summer (August 2005 and spring (March 2006. On-site incubation was also carried out for determining ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates (nitrification rates. We observed a year-round pattern of dramatic decrease in NH4+, increase in NO3, but insignificant change in NO2 in the upper estuary at salinity ~0–5. However, species and concentrations of inorganic nitrogen at upper estuary significantly changed with season. In winter, with low runoff, the most upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary showed relatively low rates of ammonia oxidation (0–5.4 μmol N L−1 d−1 and nitrite oxidation (0–5.2 μmol N L−1 d−1, accompanied by extremely high concentrations of ammonia (up to >800 μmol L−1 and nitrate (up to >300 μmol L−1. In summer, the upper estuary showed higher nitrification rates (ammonia oxidation rate ~1.5–33.1 μmol N L−1 d−1, nitrite oxidation rate ~0.6–32.0 μmol N L−1 d−1 with lower concentrations of ammonia (<350 μmol L−1 and nitrate (<120 μmol L−1. The Most Probable Number test showed relatively lower nitrifier abundance in summer at most sampling stations, indicating a greater specific nitrification rate per cell in the warm season. Temperature appeared to control nitrification rates to a large degree in different seasons. Spatial variability of nitrification rates appeared to be controlled by a combination of many other factors such as nutrient concentrations, nitrifier abundance and dissolved oxygen (DO concentrations. In addition to aerobic respiration, nitrification contributed significantly

  14. [Temporal and spatial distribution of red tide in Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent waters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu-San; Li, Zi-Cheng; Zhou, Juan; Zheng, Bing-Hui; Tang, Jing-Liang

    2011-09-01

    The events of red tide were collected in Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent waters from 1972 to 2009. Based on geographic information system (GIS) analysis on the temporal and spatial distribution of red tide, the distribution map was generated accordingly. The results show: (1) There are three red tide-prone areas, which are outside the Yangtze River estuary and the eastern of Sheshan, Huaniaoshan-Shengshan-Gouqi, Zhoushan and the eastern of Zhujiajian. The red tide occurred 174 times in total, in which there were 25 times covered the area was larger than 1 000 km2. After 2000, the frequency of red tide were significantly increasing; (2) The frequent occurrence of red tide was in May (51% of total occurrence) and June (20% of total occurrence); (3) In all of the red tide plankton, the dominant species were Prorocentrum danghaiense, Skeletonema costatum, Prorocentrum dantatum, Nactiluca scientillans. The red tides caused by these species were 38, 35, 15, 10 times separately.

  15. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Jeff; Skalski, J. R.; Teel, D. J.; Brewer, Taylor; Bryson, Amanda J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Kuligowski, D. R.; Whitesel, T.; Mallette, Christine

    2013-11-30

    The study reported herein was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), University of Washington (UW), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The goal of the study was to evaluate the ecological benefits of restoration actions for juvenile salmon in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; rkm 0–234).

  16. Density-salinity-suspended sediment experimental curves for Guadalquivir River estuary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpintero García, M.; Jurado López, A.; Contreras Arribas, E.; Polo Gómez, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    Estuarine water in Mediterranean watersheds contains high suspended sediment concentrations due to both the fine textured nature of the materials reaching the final stretch of the fluvial network, and the agricultural predominance of soil uses upstream. Saline conditions induce flocculation processes which alter the original behavior of the soil particles in water. The final high density mixture of water-salts-sediments has physicochemical characteristics very different from the saline water alone. However, this is not often included when modeling the dynamics of estuaries, adopting the density, viscosity, etc., values corresponding to the present level of salinity found at each point. The nature of the local sediments influences the density values finally found. The Guadalquivir River estuary (southwestern Spain) extends along the 105 km between the Alcalá del Río dam, upstream, and its mouth in Sanlúcar de Barrameda. It is an Atlantic mesotidal estuary (Díez-Minguito et al., 2010) with a mainly longitudinal salinity gradient. The sediments in the estuary are very fine-textured due to the great length of the river and, mainly, the extreme trapping efficiency of the dense reservoir network upstream along the 57400 km2 of the contributing area. With an average value of 0.5 - 4.5 g L-1 for the suspended sediment range along the estuary, extreme values up to 160 g L-1 can be found associated with persistent turbidity events forced by different combinations of conditions. This work shows the density variation with changing bivariate conditions of salinity-suspended sediments, following the combined range found along the estuary. Laboratory measurements were made at 19° C for synthetic seawater with 35 g L-1salinity and the decreasing range found upstream by dilution until a final value of 0.2 g L-1, for which an increasing suspended sediment concentration (SSC) was induced by adding sediments locally extracted from the estuary. The final density of these sets of

  17. Comparison of empirical models with intensively observed data for prediction of salt intrusion in the Sumjin River estuary, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Shaha

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Performance of empirical models has been compared with extensively observed data to determine the most suitable model for prediction of salt intrusion in the Sumjin River estuary, Korea. Intensive measurements of salt intrusion were taken at high and low waters during both spring and neap tide in each season from August 2004 to April 2007. The stratification parameter varied with the distance along the estuary, tidal period and freshwater discharge, indicating that the Sumjin River estuary experiences a transition from partially- or well-mixed during spring tide to stratified during neap tide. The salt intrusion length at high water varied from 13.4 km in summer 2005 to 25.6 km in autumn 2006. The salt intrusion mostly depends on the freshwater discharge rather than spring-neap tidal oscillation. Analysis of three years observed salinity data indicates that the scale of the salt intrusion length in the Sumjin River estuary is proportional to the river discharge to the −1/5 power. Four empirical models have been applied to the Sumjin River estuary to explore the most suitable model for prediction of the salt intrusion length. Comparative results show that the Nguyen and Savenije (2006 model, developed under both partially- and well-mixed estuaries, performs best of all models studied (relative error of 4.6%. The model was also applied under stratified neap tide conditions, with a relative error of 5.2%, implying applicability of this model under stratified conditions as well.

  18. [Ecological risk assessment of organophosphorus pesticides in aquatic ecosystems of Pearl River Estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Tian, Hui; Mao, Xiao-Xuan; Huang, Tao; Gao, Hong; Ma, Jian-Min; Wu, Jun-Nian

    2014-03-01

    The risk quotient method and a probabilistic risk assessment method were applied for assessing aquatic ecological risk of nine organophosphorus pesticides, including thimet, dichlorovos, disulfoton, dimethoate, dimethyl parathion, chlorpyrifos, ethoprophos, sumithion and malathion on eight aquatic organisms in the Pearl River Estuary. Results using the risk quotient method revealed that the risk level of opossum shrimp was the highest among eight aquatic organisms of the Pearl River Estuary. The risk of water flea and midge was in medium level, followed by the rest six aquatic organisms, including diatom, oyster, carp, catfish and eel, which were in the low risk by the examined organophosphorus pesticides. It was found that thimet made the largest contribution to total aquatic ecological risk among nine organophosphorus pesticides to every organism. The results from probabilistic risk assessment showed that the total ecological risk in high water period was higher than that in low water period determined by the HC5 under the 95% confidence level. The largest contribution of thimet to total aquatic ecological risk subject to the HC5 in 50% confidence level was regarded as the toxic reference value. The probabilistic risk of a single contaminant showed that thimet and disulfoton were harmful to exceeded 10% organisms in the estuarine. The probabilistic risk of nine pesticides mixture in high water period was also higher than that in low water period, and both risks were greater than 5% which exceeded safety threshold for 95% organisms in the Pearl River Estuary.

  19. Macrozoobenthos Community Structure In The Estuary of Donan River, Cilacap, Central Java Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufik Fakih Hakiki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Estuary of Donan Riverwhich is adjacent to Segara Anakan Lagoon in Cilacap, Central Java Province (Indonesia has been used for a number of activities such asfishieries, agriculture, industry, harbor, and tourism activities.  The aim of this study is to analyze the ecosystem condition based on mazcrozoobenthos community structure. This study was conducted from Augustus 2015 to January 2016. Samples were collected monthly at five stations from the river close area to the ocean close area. The study was conducted to identify kinds of generaand densityof themacrozoobenthos, and analyze substrates and water quality.Data analysis was performed onabundance, diversity, evenness and dominance indexes.Based on the study, macrozoobenthos at the estuary of Donan River consists of three classes i.e Gastropod (12 genera, Bivalvia(9 genera, and Polychaeta (6 genera. Based on the sampling location, Gastropod and Bivalvia are the largest composition found at five stations. Based on the sampling location, the macrozoobenthos density, diversity index, evennes index,and dominance index can be inferred that the estuary of Donan River is classified to be moderately ecological polluted.

  20. Spatio-Temporal Variation of Flushing Time in the Sumjin River Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Chandra Shaha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flushing is a very complicated process in estuarine environments. In order to examine the effects of tidal amplitude, river discharge, and stratification on the spatially varying flushing time of the Sumjin River Estuary (SRE, 24 longitudinal salinity transects were obtained during spring and neap tides from August 2004 to April 2007. The widely accepted freshwater fraction method has been used to calculate the flushing time for multiple estuarine segments using a spatially varying freshwater fraction. The effects of tidal amplitude, river discharge, and stratification on estuarine flushing were identified reasonably well by the spatially varying time scale. The flushing time appears to be close to the semidiurnal (M2 tidal period during spring tide, but it is twice as long during a neap tide near the mouth. The flushing time increases in the central regions with a decrease in the tidal amplitudes and reduces in the inner-most regions owing to the strong influence of gravitational circulation. A linear function negatively relates estuarine flushing to the tidal amplitudes near the mouth of the estuary, whereas a power-law function relates estuarine flushing to the freshwater inflow near the head. In addition, strong stratification induced by freshwater discharge and small tidal amplitude exerts dominant control to reduce the estuarine flushing in the central and upper regions of the estuary during a neap tide.

  1. Analysis of change of red tide species in Yodo River estuary by the numerical ecosystem model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Mitsuru; Yanagi, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    Occurrence number of red tides in Osaka Bay in Japan is more than 20 cases every year. Diatom red tide was dominant in Osaka Bay, but the non-diatom red tide was dominant in early 1990s. Therefore, the material cycling in Yodo River estuary in Osaka Bay during August from 1991 to 2000 was analyzed by using the numerical ecosystem model and field observation data to clarify the reasons of change in red tide species. Year-to-year variation in calculated concentration ratio of diatom to non-diatom corresponds to the variation in observed ratio of red tide days of diatom to non-diatom. Limiting nutrient of primary production is phosphate over the period. Diatom dominated from 1991 to 1993, but it was difficult for non-diatom to grow due to the limitation by physical condition. Non-diatom was able to grow because of good physical and nutrient conditions from 1994 to 1996. And diatom dominated again under the good physical condition, and phosphorus supply was not enough for non-diatom to grow from 1998 to 2000. Phosphate concentration in the lower layer of Yodo River estuary was important to the variation in red tide species in the upper layer of Yodo River estuary.

  2. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Monitoring Study, 2011 - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borde, Amy B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kaufmann, Ronald M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cullinan, Valerie I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zimmerman, Shon A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thom, Ronald M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wright, Cynthia L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The Ecosystem Monitoring Program is a collaborative effort between the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), University of Washington, Wetland Ecosystem Team (UW), US Geological Survey, Water Science Center (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA-Fisheries, hereafter NOAA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Sciences Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the program is to conduct emergent wetland monitoring aimed at characterizing salmonid habitats in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) from the mouth of the estuary to Bonneville Dam (Figure 1). This is an ecosystem based monitoring program focused on evaluating status and trends in habitat and reducing uncertainties regarding these ecosystems to ultimately improve the survival of juvenile salmonids through the LCRE. This project comprehensively assesses habitat, fish, food web, and abiotic conditions in the lower river, focusing on shallow water and vegetated habitats used by juvenile salmonids for feeding, rearing and refugia. The information is intended to be used to guide management actions associated with species recovery, particularly that of threatened and endangered salmonids. PNNL’s role in this multi-year study is to monitor the habitat structure (e.g., vegetation, topography, channel morphology, and sediment type) as well as hydrologic patterns.

  3. Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary in 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.; Carter, Jessica A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Hughes, Michael S.

    2010-08-01

    The study reported herein was funded as part of the Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program, which is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program study code is EST P 02 01: A Study of Salmonid Survival and Behavior through the Columbia River Estuary Using Acoustic Tags. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries for the USACE Portland District. Estimated survival of acoustic-tagged juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead through the lower Columbia River and estuary in 2009 was lowest in the final 50 km of the estuary. Probability of survival was relatively high (>0.90) for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon from the Bonneville Dam forebay (rkm 236) to Three-tree Point (rkm 49.6). Survival of juvenile Chinook salmon declined sharply through the lower 50 km of the estuary. Acoustic-tagged steelhead smolts did not survive as well as juvenile Chinook salmon between Bonneville Dam and the mouth of the Columbia River. Steelhead survival began to decline farther upstream (at rkm 86) relative to that of the Chinook salmon stocks. Subyearling Chinook salmon survival decreased markedly as the season progressed. It remains to be determined whether later migrating subyearling Chinook salmon are suffering increasing mortality as the season progresses or whether some portion of the apparent loss is due to fish extending their freshwater residence. This study provided the first glimpse into what promises to be a very informative way to learn more about how juvenile salmonid passage experiences through the FCRPS may influence their subsequent survival after passing Bonneville Dam. New information regarding the influence of migration pathway through the lower 50 km of the Columbia River estuary on probability of survival of juvenile salmonids, combined with increased understanding regarding the foraging distances and time periods of

  4. Integrated Database Construction for Efficient Support of Yeongsan River Estuary Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G. H.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, S. J.

    2014-02-01

    Yeongsan River is one of the four major rivers in South Korea, and it flows toward the Yellow Sea by passing through Damyang and Gwangju. In particular, the skewness of the main stream in Yeongsan River is relatively higher compared to other rivers. Accordingly, flood damage occurred frequently due to the flooding of sea water during tidal periods. Additionally, the environment of the estuary in Yeongsan River has been severely damaged due to indiscreet development and the inflow of various waste waters. Therefore, water quality improvement and management are crucial. For better water quality management, the government ministry is collecting various data from different fields to identify the water quality conditions. The necessity of collected data is being heightened in order to apply them into the estuary management system. However, in terms of the observed data, the observed field or items frequently modified according to social interests. Additionally, index is needed in order to search for massive amount of observation data. Due to this, the process of construction into database is relatively difficult. Therefore, in this study, these characteristics were considered for construction into the integrated DB.

  5. Seasonal phytoplankton composition, productivity and biomass in the Neuse River estuary, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Michael A.; Paerl, Hans W.; Rudek, Joseph

    1991-06-01

    Phytoplankton community composition, productivity and biomass characteristics of the mesohaline lower Neuse River estuary were assessed monthly from May 1988 to February 1990. An incubation method which considered water-column mixing and variable light exposure was used to determine phytoplankton primary productivity. The summer productivity peaks in this shallow estuary were stimulated by increases in irradiance and temperature. However, dissolved inorganic nitrogen loading was the major factor controlling ultimate yearly production. Dynamic, unpredictable rainfall events determined magnitudes of seasonal production pulses through nitrogen loading, and helped determine phytoplankton species composition. Dinoflagellates occasionally bloomed but were otherwise present in moderate numbers; rainfall events produced large pulses of cryptomonads, and dry seasons and subsequent higher salinity led to dominance by small centric diatoms. Daily production was strongly correlated ( r = 0·82) with nitrate concentration and inversely correlated ( r = -0·73) with salinity, while nitrate and salinity were inversely correlated ( r = -0·71), emphasizing the importance of freshwater input as a nutrient-loading source to the lower estuary. During 1989 mean daily areal phytoplankton production was 938 mgC m -2, mean chlorophyll a was 11·8 mg m -3, and mean phytoplankton density was 1·56 × 10 3 cells ml -1. Estimated 1989 annual areal phytoplankton production for the lower estuary was 343 gC m -2.

  6. Nutrients and carbon fluxes in the estuaries of major rivers flowing into the tropical Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacyr Cunha De Araujo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the seasonal variability of river discharge and the concentration of nutrients in the estuary waters of large rivers flowing into the tropical Atlantic contributes to a better understanding of the biogeochemical processes that occur in adjacent coastal and ocean systems. The monthly averaged variations of the physical and biogeochemical contributions of the Orinoco, Amazon, São Francisco, Paraíba do Sul (South America, Volta, Niger and Congo (Africa Rivers are estimated from models or observations. The results indicate that these rivers deliver approximately 0.1 Pg C yr-1 in its dissolved organic (DOC 0.046 Pg C yr-1 and inorganic (DIC 0.053 Pg C yr-1 forms combined. These values represent 27.3% of the global DOC and 13.2% of the global DIC delivered by rivers into the world’s oceans. Estimations of the air-sea CO2 fluxes indicate a slightly higher atmospheric liberation for the African systems compared with the South American estuaries (+10.67 mmol m-2 day-1 and +5.48 mmol m-2 day-1, respectively. During the high river discharge periods, the fluxes remained positive in all of the analyzed systems (average +128 mmol m-2 day-1, except at the mouth of the Orinoco River, which continued to act as a sink for CO2. During the periods of low river discharges, the mean CO2 efflux decreased to +5.29 mmol m-2 day-1. The updated and detailed review presented here contributes to the accurate quantification of CO2 input into the atmosphere and to ongoing studies on the oceanic modeling of biogeochemical cycles in the tropical Atlantic.

  7. Nutrient characterisation of river inflow into the estuaries of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results indicate that DIP concentrations exceeded the eutrophic limits for aquatic ecosystems (DWA) in 50% of the catchments assessed. Anthropogenic activities such as agriculture, wastewater discharge, urbanisation, and afforestation were significant factors influencing nutrient levels within these rivers. For the ...

  8. Spatial assessment of water quality using chemometrics in the Pearl River Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meilin; Wang, Youshao; Dong, Junde; Sun, Fulin; Wang, Yutu; Hong, Yiguo

    2017-03-01

    A cruise was commissioned in the summer of 2009 to evaluate water quality in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE). Chemometrics such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Cluster analysis (CA) and Self-Organizing Map (SOM) were employed to identify anthropogenic and natural influences on estuary water quality. The scores of stations in the surface layer in the first principal component (PC1) were related to NH4-N, PO4-P, NO2-N, NO3-N, TP, and Chlorophyll a while salinity, turbidity, and SiO3-Si in the second principal component (PC2). Similarly, the scores of stations in the bottom layers in PC1 were related to PO4-P, NO2-N, NO3-N, and TP, while salinity, Chlorophyll a, NH4-N, and SiO3-Si in PC2. Results of the PCA identified the spatial distribution of the surface and bottom water quality, namely the Guangzhou urban reach, Middle reach, and Lower reach of the estuary. Both cluster analysis and PCA produced the similar results. Self-organizing map delineated the Guangzhou urban reach of the Pearl River that was mainly influenced by human activities. The middle and lower reaches of the PRE were mainly influenced by the waters in the South China Sea. The information extracted by PCA, CA, and SOM would be very useful to regional agencies in developing a strategy to carry out scientific plans for resource use based on marine system functions.

  9. Effects of Spartina alterniflora invasion on soil respiration in the Yangtze River estuary, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naishun Bu

    Full Text Available Many studies have found that plant invasion can enhance soil organic carbon (SOC pools, by increasing net primary production (NPP and/or decreased soil respiration. While most studies have focused on C input, little attention has been paid to plant invasion effects on soil respiration, especially in wetland ecosystems. Our study examined the effects of Spartina alterniflora invasion on soil respiration and C dynamics in the Yangtze River estuary. The estuary was originally occupied by two native plant species: Phragmites australis in the high tide zone and Scirpus mariqueter in the low tide zone. Mean soil respiration rates were 185.8 and 142.3 mg CO2 m(-2 h(-1 in S. alterniflora and P. australis stands in the high tide zone, and 159.7 and 112.0 mg CO2 m(-2 h(-1 in S. alterniflora and S. mariqueter stands in the low tide zone, respectively. Aboveground NPP (ANPP, SOC, and microbial biomass were also significantly higher in the S. alterniflora stands than in the two native plant stands. S. alterniflora invasion did not significantly change soil inorganic carbon or pH. Our results indicated that enhanced ANPP by S. alterniflora exceeded invasion-induced C loss through soil respiration. This suggests that S. alterniflora invasion into the Yangtze River estuary could strengthen the net C sink of wetlands in the context of global climate change.

  10. Variation of phytoplankton community structure from the Pearl River estuary to South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhao-Yu; Wang, You-Shao; Cheng, Hao; Sun, Cui-Ci; Wu, Mei-Lin

    2015-10-01

    The Pearl River is located in the northern part of South China Sea. The environment of the Pearl River estuary (PRE) is significantly impacted by nutrients from anthropogenic activities. Along the anthropogenic pollution gradient from the PRE to South China Sea, the phylogenetic diversity and biomass of phytoplankton was examined in relation to physic-chemical variables. The richness of rbcL gene was higher in the open sea than the estuary, while the concentration of chlorophyll a (Chl a) was higher in the estuary than in the open sea. The cluster analysis of the sequences data resulted in seven phytoplankton community types and the dominant species of phytoplankton changed from Cryptophytes and Diatoms to Prymnesiophytes and Diatoms along the gradient. The community structure of phytoplankton was shaped by nutrients and salinity. The phytoplankton biomass was significantly positively affected by phosphorus, nitrite and ammonium (P phytoplankton diversity was highly positively affected by salinity (P phytoplankton distribution and biomass of the study area. Further research is necessary to reveal the influence mechanism of environmental factors on the phytoplankton.

  11. Regime shifts in muddy estuaries: tidal response to river deepening and canalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterwerp, J. C.; Wang, Z. B.

    2012-04-01

    Johan C. Winterwerp, Zheng Bing Wang A number of tidal rivers in Europe, amongst which the Ems River in Germany/Netherlands, and the Loire River in France are characterized by hyper-concentrated conditions with pronounced layers of fluid mud and suspended sediment concentrations exceeding 30 g/l. From an ecological point of view the sedimentary conditions in these rivers are highly problematic, as oxygen levels and primary production are very low. The present study aims at defining the conditions at which a regime shift in these rivers may occur, yielding a transition from a "normal estuary" with a classical estuarine turbidity maximum governed by estuarine circulation mainly, to hyper-concentrated conditions where sediment dynamics are mainly governed by tidal asymmetry. We hypothesize that these hyper-concentrated conditions are the result of large amplification of the tide and strong flood-dominant conditions, induced by ongoing deepening and embanking of the tidal river. Indeed, today many European rivers, amongst which the Loire and Ems, can be classified as synchronous, with an almost constant tidal amplitude along the main part of the river. Here we present the behavior of tidal asymmetry in response to deepening and embanking based on an analytical solution of the one-dimensional, linearized water movement in a converging channel, with or without intertidal area.

  12. A Coupled Model of the 1D River Network and 3D Estuary Based on Hydrodynamics and Suspended Sediment Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available River networks and estuaries are very common in coastal areas. Runoff from the upper stream interacts with tidal current from open sea in these two systems, leading to a complex hydrodynamics process. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the two systems as a whole to study the flow and suspended sediment transport. Firstly, a 1D model is established in the Pearl River network and a 3D model is applied in its estuary. As sufficient mass exchanges between the river network and its estuary, a strict mathematical relationship of water level at the interfaces can be adopted to couple the 1D model with the 3D model. By doing so, the coupled model does not need to have common nested grids. The river network exchanges the suspended sediment with its estuary by adding the continuity conditions at the interfaces. The coupled model is, respectively, calibrated in the dry season and the wet season. The results demonstrate that the coupled model works excellently in simulating water level and discharge. Although there are more errors in simulating suspended sediment concentration due to some reasons, the coupled model is still good enough to evaluate the suspended sediment transport in river network and estuary systems.

  13. The physical and geochemical interaction between a tidally-dominated estuary system (Wassaw Sound, GA) and a river-dominated estuary (Savannah River, GA) through salinity and inorganic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike Scaboo; Christopher Hintz

    2016-01-01

    The Wilmington, Bull, and Savannah Rivers are interconnected waterways that flow through adjacent Savannah and Wassaw Sound Estuaries. These systems are linked by the upper reaches of the Wilmington River maintained as part of the Intracoastal Waterway. Significant changes to the Savannah River began in December 2014 with the initiation of the Savannah Harbor Expansion...

  14. Baseline sediment trace metals investigation: Steinhatchee River estuary, Florida, Northeast Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, C.A.; Hoenstine, R.W.; Highley, A.B.; Donoghue, J.F.; Ragland, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    This Florida Geological Survey/U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service Cooperative Study provides baseline data for major and trace metal concentrations in the sediments of the Steinhatchee River estuary. These data are intended to provide a benchmark for comparison with future metal concentration data measurements. The Steinhatchee River estuary is a relatively pristine bay located within the Big Bend Wildlife Management Area on the North Central Florida Gulf of Mexico coastline. The river flows 55 km through woodlands and planted pines before emptying into the Gulf at Deadman Harbor. Water quality in the estuary is excellent at present. There is minimal development within the watershed. The estuary is part of an extensive system of marshes that formed along the Florida Gulf coast during the Holocene marine transgression. Sediment accretion rate measurements range from 1.4 to 4.1 mm/yr on the basis of lead-210 measurements. Seventy-nine short cores were collected from 66 sample locations, representing four lithofacies: clay- and organic-rich sands, organic-rich sands, clean quartz sands, and oyster bioherms. Samples were analyzed for texture, total organic matter, total carbon, total nitrogen, clay mineralogy, and major and trace-metal content. Following these analyses, metal concentrations were normalized against geochemical reference elements (aluminum and iron) and against total weight percent organic matter. Metals were also normalized granulometrically against total weight percent fines (analysis (by Carlo-Erba Furnace) of carbon and nitrogen. X-ray diffraction was used to determine clay mineralogy. Trace-metal concentrations were best correlated when normalized with respect to sediment aluminum concentrations. Normalizations indicate that most major and trace-metal concentrations fall within 95% prediction limits of the expected value. This finding suggests that little significant metal contamination occurred within this system prior to

  15. Acoustic propagation in the Hudson River Estuary: Analysis of experimental measurements and numerical modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Sreeram

    Underwater intrusion detection is an ongoing security concern in port and harbor areas. Of particular interest is to detect SCUBA divers, unmanned underwater vehicles and small boats from their acoustic signature. A thorough understanding of the effects of the shallow water propagating medium on acoustic signals can help develop new technologies and improve the performance of existing acoustic based surveillance systems. The Hudson River Estuary provides us with such a shallow water medium to conduct research and improve our knowledge of shallow water acoustics. Acoustic propagation in the Hudson River Estuary is highly affected by the temporal and spatial variability of salinity and temperature due to tides, freshwater inflows, winds etc. The primary goal of this research is to help develop methodologies to predict the formation of an acoustic field in the realistic environment of the lower Hudson River Estuary. Shallow water high-frequency acoustic propagation experiments were conducted in the Hudson River near Hoboken, New Jersey. Channel Impulse Response (CIR) measurements were carried out in the frequency band from 10 to 100 kHz for distances up to 200 meters in a water depth of 8-10 meters which formed the basis for experimental Transmission Loss (TL). CIR data was also utilized to demonstrate multi-path propagation in shallow water. Acoustic propagation models based on Ray Theory and Parabolic Equation methods were implemented in the frequency band from 10 to 100 kHz and TL was estimated. The sound velocity profiles required as input by acoustic propagation models were calculated from in-situ measurements of temperature, salinity and depth. Surface reflection loss was obtained from CIR data and incorporated into the acoustic propagation models. Experimentally obtained TL was used to validate the acoustic model predictions. An outcome of this research is an operational acoustic transmission loss (TL) forecast system based on the existing, Stevens New York

  16. Dynamic genetic features of eukaryotic plankton diversity in the Nakdong River estuary of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Eun; Chung, Ik Kyo; Lee, Sang-Rae

    2017-07-01

    Estuaries are environments where freshwater and seawater mix and they display various salinity profiles. The construction of river barrages and dams has rapidly changed these environments and has had a wide range of impacts on plankton communities. To understand the dynamics of such communities, researchers need accurate and rapid techniques for detecting plankton species. We evaluated the diversity of eukaryotic plankton over a salinity gradient by applying a metagenomics tool at the Nakdong River estuary in Korea. Environmental samples were collected on three dates during summer and autumn of 2011 at the Eulsukdo Bridge at the mouth of that river. Amplifying the 18S rDNA allowed us to analyze 456 clones and 122 phylotypes. Metagenomic sequences revealed various taxonomic groups and cryptic genetic variations at the intra- and inter-specific levels. By analyzing the same station at each sampling date, we observed that the phylotypes presented a salinity-related pattern of diversity in assemblages. The variety of species within freshwater samples reflected the rapid environmental changes caused by freshwater inputs. Dinophyceae phylotypes accounted for the highest proportion of overall diversity in the seawater samples. Euryhaline diatoms and dinoflagellates were observed in the freshwater, brackish and seawater samples. The biological data for species composition demonstrate the transitional state between freshwater and seawater. Therefore, this metagenomics information can serve as a biological indicator for tracking changes in aquatic environments.

  17. Chromium in water, suspended particles, sediments and biota in the Iraja River estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, W.C.; Fiszman, M.; de Lacerda, L.D.; van Weerfelt, M.; Carbonell, N.

    1982-11-01

    Analyses of chromium concentrations in waters, suspended particles, bottom sediments, fish (Poecilia reticulata), plants (Paspalum vaginatum, Sesuvium portulacastrum, Philoxeros vermicularis), soils and barnacles (Balanus sp.) were performed from August 1976 to September 1980 in samples collected from the Iraja River and inside its estuary in Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Sediments and water from the Iraja River showed chromium concentrations of 17536 and 23.39 ppm--a thousand times higher than the published data for freshwater systems. Chromium removed from solution by bottom sediments reaches Guanabara Bay linked to particulate matter. Fish and emergent grass inside the river concentrate chromium from water and/or sediment, returning the metal to the system as detritus. Soil and plants inside the estuary concentrate chromium thirty and ten times higher than in the control area. The vegetal community exhibits a concentration factor smaller than that related to soil and prevents the return of chromium to the estuarine waters. Inside the Guanabara Bay, Balanus sp. appears to be an effective biological monitor as it concentrates chromium in soft tissues 10/sup 3/ times higher than values found in suspended particles (0.012 ..mu..g ml/sup -1/).

  18. Late Holocene evolution of the River Bensafrim estuary, Lagos (Portugal) - Gearchaeological remarks concerning geomorphological changings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J. A.; Ramos-Pereira, A.; Trindade, J.

    2012-04-01

    1. The site Lagos is a city in western Algarve situated on the right margin of the Ribeira de Bensafrim. Its dissymmetric estuary has two hills: one that supports the town of Lagos and the hill of Monte Molião, known for its archaeological site. During the Late Iron Age the establishment was constrained to the top of that small hill Molião After that period, in Roman Age, people moved their location to the right river margin, founding what was then known as Laccobriga - Lagos. 2. Objectives and methodology The main objective of this study is to understand the possible causes for the abandonment of Monte Molião and what were the reasons behind the foundation of the roman city of Laccobriga? The data used were the results from the sedimentary analysis of cores in the alluvial plain of the Bensafrim valley, radiocarbon data, together with the previous excavation results and structure analysis. 3. First results: (i) In the sedimentary record, the rate sand/clay as well as several statistical parameters and shells, show different energetic environments. (ii) Radiocarbon data shows that the estuary remained open until 2800 cal BP, when a spit developed at the mouth of the estuary and a salt marsh begin to develop behind the sand barrier. (iii) Remnants of fishing activities since the Iron Age found in the archaeological site highlight different strategies for the establishment around the estuary. Archeological data tells us that, the Iron Age fishing was mainly fluvial, while later shellfish remains point that in the roman period fishing activities were made in open sea. (iv) The analyzed roman structures in the archaeological site of Monte Molião, show a clear sign of a violent seismic destruction probably related to the known 63 b.C. earthquake. 4. Conclusions (i) It is proven that in the river Bensafrim the estuary changed from an open estuary before 2800 cal BP to a closed one. This could have forced the change of the fishing habits of the populations that

  19. Trace metal pollution and carbon and nitrogen isotope tracing through the Yongdingxin River estuary in Bohai Bay, Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Conghui; Wei, Qi; Ma, Lixia; Li, Li; Wu, Guanghong; Pan, Ling

    2017-02-15

    A tide gate was built in 2010 to prevent seawater from moving upstream into the Yongdingxin River estuary in Bohai Bay, Northern China. We analysed the concentrations of Hg, Cd, Pb, TOC, TN, δ13C and δ15N and studied their variations in the surface layer and vertical profiles of sediment cores collected from the Yongdingxin River estuary. Contamination factors and geo-accumulation indices were calculated for each metal, which revealed high levels of contamination for Hg and Cd in the sediments, likely from anthropogenic sources. δ13C and δ15N were used as natural tracers to determine the sources of TOC and TN. The results revealed that sewage was the main source of TOC, while TN may have more than one source in the Yongdingxin River estuary. Sewage dominated trace metal pollution in the Yongdingxin River estuary. Our results provide a baseline for trace metal contamination in an estuary facing a large water project. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of distribution and sources of sewage molecular marker (LABs) in selected rivers and estuaries of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magam, Sami M; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Halimoon, Normala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Kannan, Narayanan; Masood, Najat; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Alkhadher, Sadeq; Keshavarzifard, Mehrzad; Vaezzadeh, Vahab; Sani, Muhamad S A; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2016-03-01

    This is the first extensive report on linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) as sewage molecular markers in surface sediments collected from the Perlis, Kedah, Merbok, Prai, and Perak Rivers and Estuaries in the west of Peninsular Malaysia. Sediment samples were extracted, fractionated, and analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The concentrations of total LABs ranged from 68 to 154 (Perlis River), 103 to 314 (Kedah River), 242 to 1062 (Merbok River), 1985 to 2910 (Prai River), and 217 to 329 ng g(-1) (Perak River) dry weight (dw). The highest levels of LABs were found at PI3 (Prai Estuary) due to the rapid industrialization and population growth in this region, while the lowest concentrations of LABs were found at PS1 (upstream of Perlis River). The LABs ratio of internal to external isomers (I/E) in this study ranged from 0.56 at KH1 (upstream of Kedah River) to 1.35 at MK3 (Merbok Estuary) indicating that the rivers receive raw sewage and primary treatment effluents in the study area. In general, the results of this paper highlighted the necessity of continuation of water treatment system improvement in Malaysia.

  1. Inventory of mollusks from the estuary of the Paraíba River in northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Silvio Felipe Barbosa; Lucena,Rudá Amorim; Santos, Galdênia Menezes; Souza, José Weverton; Christoffersen, Martin Lindsey; Guimarães,Carmen Regina; Oliveira, Geraldo Semer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Coastal ecosystems of northeastern Brazil have important biodiversity with regard to marine mollusks, which are insufficiently studied. Here we provide an inventory of mollusks from two sites in the estuary of the Paraíba River. Mollusks were collected in 2014 and 2016 on the coast and sandbanks located on the properties of Treze de Maio and Costinha de Santo Antônio. The malacofaunal survey identified 12 families, 20 genera and 21 species of bivalves, 17 families, 19 genera and 20 ...

  2. Annual cycle and composition of the phytoplankton in the Quempillen River Estuary, southern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, J. E.

    1985-10-01

    Phytoplankton species and abundance were studied in the Quempillen River Estuary, from August 1979 to July 1980 in addition to some important environmental factors: salinity, temperature and dissolved oxygen. In order to determine the seasonal variations in cell density and biomass of the phytoplankton in this brackish aquatic environment, phytoplankton data obtained by the Uthermöhl (1958) technique were analysed. A total of 109 phytoplankton species were identified within the samples. Throughout the year there were two periods of population maxima, September and May, and one period of high biomass, February. The phytoflagellates were always present but only dominated the flora when diatoms were extremely reduced, especially during low tide periods.

  3. Impact of river basin management on coastal water quality and ecosystem services: A southern Baltic estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernewski, Gerald; Hürdler, Jens; Neumann, Thomas; Stybel, Nardine; Venohr, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Eutrophication management is still a major challenge in the Baltic Sea region. Estuaries or coastal waters linked to large rivers cannot be managed independently. Nutrient loads into these coastal ecosystems depend on processes, utilisation, structure and management in the river basin. In practise this means that we need a large scale approach and integrated models and tools to analyse, assess and evaluate the effects of nutrient loads on coastal water quality as well as the efficiency of river basin management measures on surface waters and especially lagoons and estuaries. The Odra river basin, the Szczecin Lagoon and its coastal waters cover an area of about 150,000 km² and are an eutrophication hot-spot in the Baltic region. To be able to carry out large scale, spatially integrative analyses, we linked the river basin nutrient flux model MONERIS to the coastal 3D-hydrodynamic and ecosystem model ERGOM. Objectives were a) to analyse the eutrophication history in the river basin and the resulting functional changes in the coastal waters between early 1960's and today and b) to analyse the effects of an optimal nitrogen and phosphorus management scenario in the Oder/Odra river basin on coastal water quality. The models show that an optimal river basin management with reduced nutrient loads (e.g. N-load reduction of 35 %) would have positive effects on coastal water quality and algae biomass. The availability of nutrients, N/P ratios and processes like denitrification and nitrogen-fixation would show spatial and temporal changes. It would have positive consequences for ecosystems functions, like the nutrient retention capacity, as well. However, this optimal scenario is by far not sufficient to ensure a good coastal water quality according to the European Water Framework Directive. A "good" water quality in the river will not be sufficient to ensure a "good" water quality in the coastal waters. Further, nitrogen load reductions bear the risk of increased

  4. Microplastics in oysters Saccostrea cucullata along the Pearl River Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng-Xiang; Ma, Li-Sha; Lin, Lang; Ni, Zhi-Xin; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Shi, Hua-Hong; Yan, Yan; Zheng, Guang-Ming; Rittschof, Daniel

    2018-02-09

    As a transitional zone between riverine and marine environments, an estuary plays an important role for the sources, accumulation and transport of microplastics. Although estuarine environments are hotspots of microplastic pollution, the correlation between microplastic pollution and aquatic organisms is less known. Here we investigated microplastic pollution in wild oysters Saccostrea cucullata from 11 sampling sites along the Pearl River Estuary in South China. The microplastic abundances in oysters ranged from 1.4 to 7.0 items per individual or from 1.5 to 7.2 items per gram tissue wet weight, which were positively related to those in surrounding waters. The oysters near urban areas contained significantly more microplastics than those near rural areas. Fibers accounted for 69.4% of the total microplastics in oysters. Microplastic sizes varied from 20 to 5000 μm and 83.9% of which were less than 100 μm. Light color microplastics were significantly more common than dark color ones. Based on the results, oysters are recommended as a biomonitor for the microplastic pollution in estuaries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Activity of methane oxidizing bacteria along the River Elbe downstream to its estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoušu, A.; Šimek, K.; Bussmann, I.

    2012-04-01

    Contribution of rivers and estuarine systems to the global methane (CH4) budget is still not clear yet and for improving the estimations on the CH4 emission it is essential to cover the whole natural system in large-scale studies. In this context we quantified the activity of methane oxidizing bacteria (as a microbial "biofilter") over almost two seasons along a large European river system, the river Elbe, from its source in the Czech Republic towards to its estuary in the North Sea. Determination of methane oxidation rate was measured using a tritiated CH4 radiotracer technique. Methane concentrations in the water column were analyzed by the headspace method. The range of CH4concentrations and related microbial oxidation activities displayed a strong increase from the upper river parts, which includes mainly natural river, to the polluted downstream canalized parts of the river with high CH4concentrations and microbial activities, where anaerobic sediments occur. In the water column of the estuarine zone a sharp decrease of the CH4 concentration- and CH4 oxidation rates is mainly influenced by the increasing salinity. Additional parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, amount of suspended particular matter and nutrient content) are possible factors influencing the methanotrophic activity. Further investigations will compare the population structure of MOB at the different sites along the whole transect.

  6. Characteristics of depositional environments in the Nakdong River Estuary, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Han Jun; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kang, Jeongwon; Choi, Jae Ung

    2017-04-01

    Most of the major Korean estuaries, under high pressure from development, have dams with environmental problems, including restricted water circulation, low water quality, decreased biodiversity and wetland destruction. The Nakdong estuary on the southeastern coast of Korean Peninsula is an enclosed type with two large estuarine dams that were constructed in 1934 and between 1983 and 1987. The construction of dams has led to geomorphologic evolution of the barrier islands within Nakdong estuary. The estuary has been characterized as barrier-lagoon system with various subenvironments and microtidal with a 1.5 m tidal range. The sedimentary analyses and monitoring short-term sedimentation rates were investigated to understand characteristics of depositional environments in barrier-lagoon system of the Nakdong River Estuary. The surface sediments in the system were classified into three sedimentary facies in summer 2015. Generally, sand sediment was dominated in the seaward side of barrier islands and muddy sand sediment was dominated on the lagoon. Sandy mud and mud sediments were distributed in the tidal flat near Noksan industrial district and channels near dams. Fourteen a priori subenvironments were distinguished based on differences in landscape characterization (sediment texture, salinity, total organic carbon, pH and C/N ratios). The dendrogram resulting from cluster analysis of environmental variables from 14 a priori subenvironments could be clustered into 4 groups that were characterized by different sediment texture and hydrodynamic energy. The short-term sedimentation rates were obtained seasonally from three lines by burying a plate at sub-bottom depth from May 2015 to May 2016. The deposition was dominated on the tidal flat between mainland and Jinudo (JW- Line) and Sinjado (SJ-Line) with the net deposition rate of 10.09 mm/year and 12.38 mm/year, respectively. The erosion was dominated on the tidal flats at Eulsukdo (ES-Line) on the east side of the

  7. Phytoplankton pigments and functional community structure in relation to environmental factors in the Pearl River Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Chai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two cruises were undertaken in the Pearl River Estuary in November 2011 and March 2012 to analyze the distribution of phytoplankton pigments and to define the relationships of pigment indices and functional community structure with environmental factors. Among 22 pigments, 17 were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. Chlorophyll a was found in all samples, with a maximum of 7.712 μg L−1 in spring. Fucoxanthin was the most abundant accessory pigment, with mean concentrations of 2.914 μg L−1 and 0.207 μg L−1 in spring and autumn, respectively. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c2, fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, and diatoxanthin were high in the northern or northwest estuary in spring and in the middle-eastern and northeast estuary in autumn. Chlorophyll b, chlorophyll c3, prasinoxanthin, and peridinin were similarly distributed during the two cruises. Chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin positively correlated with nutrients in spring, whereas 19′-hex-fucoxanthin and 19′-but-fucoxanthin negatively correlated. The biomass proportion of microphytoplankton (BPm was higher in spring, whereas that of picophytoplankton (BPp was higher in autumn. BPm in spring was high in areas with salinity 30. BPm increased but BPn reduced with the increase in nutrient contents. By comparison, BPp reduced with the increase in nutrient contents in spring, but no relationship was found between BPp and nutrient contents in autumn. The ratios of photosynthetic carotenoids to photoprotective carotenoids in the southern estuary approached unity linear relationship in spring and were under the unity line in autumn.

  8. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume I. Entrainment-impact estimates for six fish populations inhabiting the Hudson River estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreman, J.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Vaughn, D.S.; Goodyear, C.P.; Christensen, S.W.; Kumar, K.D.; Kirk, B.L.; Van Winkle, W.

    1982-01-01

    This volume is concerned with the estimation of the direct (or annual) entrainment impact of power plants on populations of striped bass, white perch, Alosa spp. (blueback herring and alewife), American shad, Atlantic tomcod, and bay anchovy in the Hudson River estuary. Entrainment impact results from the killing of fish eggs, larvae, and young juveniles that are contained in the cooling water cycled through a power plant. An Empirical Transport Model (ETM) is presented as the means of estimating a conditional entrainment mortality rate (defined as the fraction of a year class which would be killed due to entrainment in the absence of any other source of mortality). Most of this volume is concerned with the estimation of several parameters required by the ETM: physical input parameters (e.g., power-plant withdrawal flow rates); the longitudinal distribution of ichthyoplankton in time and space; the duration of susceptibility of the vulnerable organisms; the W-factors, which express the ratios of densities of organisms in power plant intakes to densities of organisms in the river; and the entrainment mortality factors (f-factors), which express the probability that an organism will be killed if it is entrained. Once these values are obtained, the ETM is used to estimate entrainment impact for both historical and projected conditions.

  9. Fluorescence characterization of the interaction Suwannee river fulvic acid with the herbicide dichlorprop (2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid) in the absence and presence of aluminum or erbium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M; Dickerson, Matthew A; Traudt, Elizabeth M

    2011-11-01

    This study uses fluorescence spectroscopy to better understand the role of environmental metal ions in the interaction of charged herbicides with biochemical degradation product Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). The interactions between the widely-used herbicide dichlorprop (2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propionic acid) (DCPPA) with Al(3+) and the comparative metal Er(3+) were probed at pH 4.0. Fluorescence experiments on binary solutions at pH 4.0 clearly indicated that Al(3+) and Er(3+) strongly interact with both SRFA and DCPPA alone in solution as demonstrated by fluorescence quenching with DCPPA and enhancement with SRFA by Al(3+) and fluorescence quenching of both SRFA and DCPPA fluorescence by Er(3+). Titrating Al(3+) or Er(3+) to SRFA-DCPPA quenched SRFA fluorescence as compared to the SRFA-metal ion binary complexes. Formation constants were determined using the Ryan-Weber model for the titration data. The DCPPA fluorescence results strongly support the formation of DCPPA-Al(3+) and DCPPA-Er(3+) complexes at pH values above the pK(a) (3.0) of DCPPA. Excitation and emission data obtained on ternary solutions of SRFA-Al(3+)-DCPPA and SRFA-Er(3+)-DCPPA complexes at pH 4.0 suggest that at this pH where the predominant DCPPA species is negatively-charged, Al(3+) and Er(3+) metal ions may function to "bridge" negatively-charged fulvic acids to negatively-charged pesticides. Fluorescence data collected on UV-irradiated ternary complexes indicate that both metals can also bridge DCPPA interactions with SRFA under those conditions. The results of our studies suggest that creation of a herbicide-free boundary corridor is recommended near mines and runoff areas with metal ions in surface waters to control possible complexation among fulvic acids, DCPPA and metal ions that maintains these molecules in a bioavailable state to plants and animals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Historical eutrophication in a river-estuary complex in mid-coast Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Dörte; Lichter, John; Lea, Peter D; Nurse, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    European settlement of New England brought about a novel disturbance regime that impacted rivers and estuaries through overfishing, deforestation, dams, and water pollution. The negative consequences of these activities intensified with industrialization in the 19th and 20th centuries, often resulting in ecosystem degradation. Since environmental legislation was implemented in the 1970s, improvement in water quality has been tangible and widespread; however, ecological recovery can require substantial amounts of time and may never be complete. To document the natural baseline conditions and investigate the recovery of a severely degraded river-estuary complex in mid-coast Maine, we examined diatoms, pollen, total organic carbon, total nitrogen, stable isotopes, total phosphorus, biogenic silica, and trace metals in intertidal sediments and established a chronology with 14C, 210Pb, and indicator pollen horizons. Both climate variability and human effects were evident in the sedimentary record of Merrymeeting Bay, the freshwater tidal portion of the Kennebec estuary. Natural climate variability was apparent in an episode of high sedimentation and altered diatom abundance during the 12th and 13th centuries and in changing pollen abundances between the 16th and 19th centuries, indicative of regional cooling. During the 18th century, colonial land clearance began an era of high sedimentation and eutrophication that strongly intensified with industrialization during the late 19th and 20th centuries. Improvements in water quality over the past 30 years in response to environmental regulation had little effect on ecosystem recovery as represented by the sedimentary record. Diatom composition and productivity and high fluxes of organic C, total P, and biogenic Si in recent sediments indicate that rates of nutrient loading remain high. These environmental proxies imply that aquatic productivity in Merrymeeting Bay was originally nutrient limited and water clarity high

  11. River flow control on intertidal mudflat sedimentation in the mouth of a macrotidal estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvilliez, Antoine; Lafite, Robert; Deloffre, Julien; Lemoine, Maxence; Langlois, Estelle; Sakho, Issa

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the impact of hydrological variability influenced by climatic phenomena upon the sedimentary exchange between the turbidity maximum (TM) and a river mouth intertidal mudflat. This study, carried out over a period of 10 years (1997-2006) in the Seine Estuary (France), is specifically focused on two extreme periods: a wet one from 2001 to 2002 and a drier one from 2005 to 2006. This study is based on an original approach combining data gathered via low-altitude remote sensing with altimeter readings and ground-level measurements. During this 10 year period, we observed a link between climate change and the sedimentary processes on the mudflat surface. The modifications of sedimentary processes are mainly connected to the multiannual variability of hydrological flow rates that control the positioning of the turbidity maximum, the source of the sedimentary material deposited in this intertidal zone. The TM at the mouth of the Seine estuary is well developed; its maximum mass is estimated to be between 300,000 tons and 500,000 tons (Avoine et al., 1981) with maximum concentrations in the surface waters ranging from 1 to 2 g • l- 1 (Le Hir et al., 2001). Most of the fine particles stored within the TM have been found to originate from within the catchment area (Dupont et al., 1994). In the Seine estuary, the dynamics of the estuarine TM, in response to hydrodynamic forcings, have been previously described (Avoine et al., 1981) and modeled (e.g. Brenon and Le Hir, 1999; Le Hir et al., 2001). The TM is upstream of the northern mudflat when the river flow is low (< 450 m • s- 1) and nearby the study area when the river flow is higher. Thus during wet periods, the sedimentation rates increase by + 17 cm • y- 1, while during the drier one (when the turbidity maximum is located upstream of the estuary) we observed an erosion rate of 7.6 cm • y- 1. Sedimentation events in the mudflat resulting from spring tides are less frequent

  12. Multiproxies (benthic foraminifera, ostracods and biopolymers approach applied to identify the environmental partitioning of the Guadiana River Estuary (Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaro Luiz Mattos Laut

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Guadiana River is the fourth longest river in Europe and is a natural frontier between southern Portugal and Spain. This river was historically used to transport minerals exploited in the region since the Roman Empire and therefore suffered human interventions that have been intensified after the industrial revolution. The Guadiana River has in its limits the Guadiana Valley Natural Park, which is of great value for the Conservation of Geobiodiversity. This study mainly aims to identify zones with the environmental characteristics in the estuarine area of the Guadiana River based on the distribution and ecology of microorganisms (ostracods and foraminifera associated with physicochemical parameters and sedimentological and geochemical (carbohydrate, lipid, protein, total organic carbon and total sulfur data. Fifty-five foraminifera taxa were identified along the estuary with dominance of Ammonia tepida and Miliammina fusca and 13 ostracods taxa with dominance Leptocythere lacertosa and Loxoconcha elliptica. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA performed using biotic and abiotic variables indicated that pH, grain size, total organic carbon (TOC and lipids were the most influent factors in the distribution of these organisms. Four zones were identified in the Guadiana River estuary: i Low estuary - region with the largest marine influence with sandy sediment, higher salinity and total sulfur and mainly represented by the dominance of estuarine species of foraminifera (Ammonia tepida and Cribroelphidium vadescens and by the ostracods (Darwinula stevensoni, Semicytherura sulcata and Urocythereis oblonga; ii Intermediate estuary - region characterized by neutral pH and sandy sediment enriched in carbohydrates; this region is characterized by the presence of the ostracods species Cytherois fischeri and Neocytherideis subulata and by calcareous and agglutinated species in foraminiferal assemblages; iii Upper estuary - silt, high TOC, proteins and

  13. Spatial and Temporal Comparison of DNRA Communities in New River Estuary, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, B.; Lisa, J.; Tobias, C. R.

    2016-02-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) is an important nitrate respiring pathway, competing with denitrification, in various ecosystems. Studies examining the diversity and composition of DNRA communities are limited and their link to DNRA activity is unknown. We conducted a multidisciplinary investigation of sediment communities in the upper reaches of a eutrophic estuary to examine spatial and temporal variation of DNRA community structures and determine their linkage to activities. Sediment samples were collected seasonally from two study sites (AA2 and JAX) in the New River Estuary, North Carolina, USA. 15N-nitrate tracer experiments were conducted to measure potential DNRA rates while abundance of DNRA communities was measured using quantitative PCR of cytochrome C nitrite reductase genes (nrfA). Composition and diversity of DNRA communities were also examined based on next generation sequencing (NGS) of nrfA genes using an Ion Torrent PGM. Bioinformatic analysis was conducted using the FunGene pipeline and Mothur program. Higher DNRA activities were measured at JAX and associated with higher abundance of nrfA genes. Seasonal variation in DNRA rates and nrfA gene abundance was more evident at JAX than AA2. Nitrate concentration and dissolved oxygen in bottom water were significantly and positively correlated with activities and abundance of DNRA communities. The nrfA NGS analysis revealed that spatial variation of DNRA communities was much greater than temporal variation with salinity, dissolved organic carbon, and nitrate as the most important environmental variables affecting these communities. Diversity of DNRA communities was negative correlated with the DNRA rates and nrfA gene abundance, which suggests that dominant members of the DNRA community are responsible for higher rates. Thus, our multidisciplinary study clearly demonstrates the linkage between structure and activities of DNRA communities in the upper reaches of New River Estuary.

  14. Ship Emission Inventories in Estuary of the Yangtze River Using Terrestrial AIS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Estuary forms a transition zone between inland river and open sea. In China, the estuary of the Yangtze River plays a vital role in connecting the inland and oversea shipping, and witnesses heavy vessel traffic in the recent decades. Nowadays, more attentions have been directed to the issue of ship pollution in busy waterways. In order to investigate the ship emission inventory, this paper presents an Automatic Identification System(AIS based method. AIS data is the realistic data of vessel traffic including dynamic information (position, speed, course, etc. and static information (ship type, dimensions, name, etc.. According to ship dimensions, the power of engines is estimated for different ship types. By using AIS based bottom-up approach, ship emission inventories and shares of air pollutants and GHGs (Greenhouse gases are developed. Spatial distribution of ship emissions is illustrated in the form of heat map. As a case study, the emission inventories are analyzed using AIS data of 2010 in the estuary, and following results are made:(1 shares of the emission are cruise ships 6.59%, bulk carriers 5.16%, container ships 52.96%, tankers 15.16%, fishing ships 9.16%, other ships 10.97%; (2 CO2 is the dominant part of the emission. (3 Areas of highest emission intensity are generally clustered around the South Channel, the North Channel and ports in the vicinity. The proposed method is promising because it is derived from the AIS data which contains not only real data of individual ship but also vessel traffic situation in the study area. It can server as a reference for other researchers and policy makers working in this field.

  15. Stakeholder perceptions of ecosystem services of the Wami River and Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine G. McNally

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Management of riverine and coastal ecosystems warrants enhanced understanding of how different stakeholders perceive and depend upon different kinds of ecosystem services. Employing a mixed methods approach, this study compares and contrasts the use and perceptions of upstream residents, downstream residents, tourism officials, and conservation organizations regarding the value of 30 ecosystem services provided by the Wami River and its estuary in Tanzania, and investigates their perceptions of the main threats to this system. Our findings reveal that all of the stakeholder groups place a high value on the provision of domestic water, habitat for wild plants and animals, tourism, and erosion control, and a relatively low value on the prevention of saltwater intrusion, refuge from predators, spiritual fulfillment, nonrecreational hunting, and the provision of traditional medications and inorganic materials for construction. Differences emerge, however, between the groups in the value assigned to the conservation of riverine and estuarine fauna and the provision of raw materials for building and handicrafts. Declining fish populations and an increasing human population are identified by the residents and conservation employees, respectively, as their prime concerns regarding the future conditions of the Wami River and its estuary. These groups also acknowledge increasing salinity levels and the loss of mangroves as other key concerns. The identification of these mutual interests and shared concerns can help build common ground among stakeholders while the recognition of potential tensions can assist managers in balancing and reconciling the multiple needs and values of these different groups.

  16. [Ecological characteristics of phytoplankton in coastal area of Pearl River estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ming; Li, Chunhou; Jia, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanhua; Chen, Ruiwen

    2004-08-01

    Five cruises of phytoplankton survey were made in costal area of Pearl River estuary in 1998-1999. The results showed that 239 species were identified, 72.4% of which belonging to Bacillariophyta, 23.8% to Pyrrophyta, and 3.8% to others. The dominant species were warm and eurythermic species Thalassiothrix frauenfeldii, Nitzschia delicatissima, Thalassiothrix frauenfeldii and Thalassiosira subtilis, and changed with an obvious seasonal succession. The cell density ranged from 0.2 x 10(4) to 2,767.1 x 10(4) cell x m(-3), with an average of 98.7 x 10(4) cell x m(-3), and the mean cell density was obviously higher in summer and winter than in spring and autumn. The regional variation revealed that the cell density in shore area was visibly higher than that in offshore area, and the largest density area was at the southeast of Shangchuan Island all the year around. The range of mean Shannon-Wiener index, Pielou evenness index and biodiversity threshold was 2.63-3.17, 0.53-0.71 and 1.74-2.23, respectively. According to the diversity index, it was concluded that the diversity level of phytoplankton community in coastal area of Pearl River estuary was relatively high and stable.

  17. Occurrence of PPCPs in Pearl River Estuary and South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Kathrin; Waniek, Joanna J.; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2017-04-01

    The development of a coastal megacity has put the South China Sea under human induced stress. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are ubiquitous contaminants and can be used as anthropogenic indicators for pollution of the marine environment. They enter the marine environment indirectly via waste water or directly due to recreational activities. PPCPs make up a group of different pharmaceuticals such as antibiotic, anti-inflammatories etc. and personal care products such as UV-filters. A mayor concern is the unknown fate and the effect these pollutants on the marine environment and especially its organisms. In some studies it was proven that some of these PPCPs have an endocrine disrupting and/or a subtle chronic effect on aquatic organisms. They are of concern for the health of the marine environment and may have an effect on human health. With our study we could determine the occurrence of PPCPs in the Pearl River estuary and the South China Sea. Salicylic acid (metabolite of acetylsalicylic acid) and octocrylene (UV-filter) were found in the open Sea in low ng/L concentration. Octocrylene is used in sunscreen and as a light stabilizer in paints and polymer-based products. It is of environmental concern because of its potential to be bioaccumulative. In addition to our findings in the open South China Sea, could we detect PPCPs, especially antibiotics, in higher ng/L-concentrations in the Pearl River Estuary.

  18. Seasonal changes in the demersal nekton community off the Changjiang River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yazhou; Ling, Jianzhong; Li, Jiansheng; Yang, Linlin; Li, Shengfa

    2014-03-01

    The diversity, community structure and seasonal variation in demersal nekton off the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary was evaluated using monthly trawl survey data, collected between December 2008 and November 2009. A total of 95 species (56 teleosts, 11 cephalopods, and 28 decapod crustaceans) from 69 genera, 49 families and 15 orders were collected. These species could be classified into six groups on the basis of temporal distribution patterns. The resident crab Ovalipes punctatus dominated the community, both in number and biomass. A clear seasonal succession was observed in the species composition. Cluster analysis revealed three primary seasonal groups corresponding to the samples collected in winter-spring, late spring-summer and late summer-autumn. The highest biomass and lowest diversity were observed in summer, while the lowest biomass and highest diversity in winter. The abundance-biomass comparison curves and community composition suggested that the investigated community was moderately disturbed. The results suggest that reduction in fishing pressure and in the degree of seasonal hypoxia are essential for sustainable resource management off the Changjiang River estuary.

  19. Relationship between nutrients and plankton biomass in the turbidity maximum zone of the Pearl River Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhen; Xu, Jie; Huang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xia; Jiang, Zhijian; Ye, Feng; Liang, Ximei

    2017-07-01

    Nutrients, dissolved and particulate organic carbon and plankton (bacterio-, phyto- and zoo-) were compared in the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) and adjacent areas (non-TMZ) in the Pearl River estuary. Our results showed that high levels of suspended substances had marked effect on dynamics of nutrients and plankton in the TMZ. Based on the cluster analysis of total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations, all stations were divided into two groups, TMZ with average TSS of 171mg/L and non-TMZ of 45mg/L. Suspended substances adsorbed PO4(3-) and dissolved organic carbon, resulting in higher particulate phosphorus and organic carbon (POC) and lower PO4(3-) and DOC in the TMZ, compared to the non-TMZ. However, suspended substances had limited effect on nitrogenous nutrients. Phytoplankton growth was light-limited due to high concentrations of suspended substances in the TMZ and a peak of phytoplankton abundance appeared in the non-TMZ. In contrast, the highest bacterial abundance occurred in the TMZ, which was likely partly responsible for low DOC levels. Two peaks of zooplankton abundance observed in the TMZ and non-TMZ in the Pearl River estuary were primarily supported by bacteria and phytoplankton, respectively. Our finding implied that high levels of suspended solids in the TMZ affect the trophic balance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  1. Economic compensation standard for irrigation processes to safeguard environmental flows in the Yellow River Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Aiping; Sun, Tao; Yang, Zhifeng

    2013-03-01

    SummaryAgriculture and ecosystems are increasingly competing for water. We propose an approach to assess the economic compensation standard required to release water from agricultural use to ecosystems while taking into account seasonal variability in river flow. First, we defined agricultural water shortage as the difference in water volume between agricultural demands and actual supply after maintaining environmental flows for ecosystems. Second, we developed a production loss model to establish the relationship between production losses and agricultural water shortages in view of seasonal variation in river discharge. Finally, we estimated the appropriate economic compensation for different irrigation stakeholders based on crop prices and production losses. A case study in the Yellow River Estuary, China, demonstrated that relatively stable economic compensation for irrigation processes can be defined based on the developed model, taking into account seasonal variations in river discharge and different levels of environmental flow. Annual economic compensation is not directly related to annual water shortage because of the temporal variability in river flow rate and environmental flow. Crops that have stable planting areas to guarantee food security should be selected as indicator crops in economic compensation assessments in the important grain production zone. Economic compensation may be implemented by creating funds to update water-saving measures in agricultural facilities.

  2. Radium isotopes assess water mixing processes and its application in the Zhujiang River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyi; Xu, Bochao; Yu, Zhigang; Li, Xiuqin; Nan, Haiming; Jian, Huimin; Jiang, Xueyan; Diao, Shaobo; Gao, Maosheng

    2017-09-01

    Radium (Ra) isotopes are useful for tracing water mass transport and examining estuarine hydrological dynamics. In this study, several hydrological parameters, nutrients, chlorophyll- a (chl- a), suspended particulate matter (SPM) and Ra isotopes (223Ra, 224Ra and 226Ra) of surface waters of the Zhujiang (Pearl) River estuary (ZRE) were measured. This was done for both winter (December) and summer (July) seasons, to quantitatively understand the seasonal characteristics of river plume flow rate and trajectories, as well as the ecological response. The results show that Ra concentrations in summer were higher than in winter, especially 224Ra (about 2-5 times higher). The spatial distribution of three Ra isotopes and relative Ra water ages indicated that river water mainly flushed out of ZRE through the western side in winter, where the water transport was about 5 days faster than in the eastern zone. In summer, diluted river water expended to the east side, resulting in fairly similar water ages for both sides of the river mouth. Although nutrients were higher during the summer season, lower chl- a concentrations indicated that reduced primary production might be caused by high SPM (low light penetration). The results obtained from this study will provide knowledge needed for effectively developing and managing the ZRE.

  3. Integrated estuary management for diffused sediment pollution in Dapeng Bay and neighboring rivers (Taiwan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chung-Yi; Chen, Jen-Jeng; Lee, Chang-Gai; Chiu, Chun-Yen; Lai, Wen-Liang; Liao, Shao-Wei

    2011-02-01

    neighboring rivers. Our results yield useful information concerning estuary recovery and water resources management and may be applicable to other basins with similar characteristics that are experiencing similar coastal environmental issues.

  4. Sources and fate of bioavailable dissolved organic nitrogen in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, H. W.; Peierls, B. L.; Hounshell, A.; Osburn, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Eutrophication is a widespread problem affecting the structure and function of estuaries and is often linked to anthropogenic nitrogen (N) enrichment, since N is the primary nutrient limiting algal production. Watershed management actions typically have ignored dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) loading because of its perceived refractory nature and instead focused on inorganic N as targets for loading reductions. A fluorescence-based model indicated that anthropogenic sources of DON near the head of the microtidal Neuse River Estuary (NRE), NC were dominated by septic systems and poultry waste. A series of bioassays were used to determine the bioavailability of river DON and DON-rich sources to primary producers and whether those additions promoted the growth of certain phytoplankton taxa, particularly harmful species. Overall, at time scales up to two to three weeks, estuarine phytoplankton and bacteria only showed limited responses to additions of high molecular weight (HMW, >1 kDa) river DON. When increases in productivity and biomass did occur, they were quite small compared with the response to inorganic N. Low molecular weight (LMW) river DON, waste water treatment plant effluent, and poultry litter extract did have a positive effect on phytoplankton and bacterial production, indicating a bioavailable fraction. High variability of bulk DON concentration suggested that bioavailable compounds added in the experimental treatments were low in concentration and turned over quite rapidly. Some phytoplankton taxa, as measured by diagnostic photopigments, appeared to be selectively enhanced by the HMW and specific source DON additions, although the taxa could not be positively identified as harmful species. Preliminary tests show that labile autochthonous organic matter may act as a primer for the mineralization of the HMW DON. These and other, longer-term bioavailability studies will be needed to adequately address the fate of watershed DON in estuarine ecosystems.

  5. Tideless estuaries in brackish seas as possible freshwater-marine transition zones for bacteria: the case study of the Vistula river estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołębiewski, Marcin; Całkiewicz, Joanna; Creer, Simon; Piwosz, Kasia

    2017-04-01

    Most bacteria are found either in marine or fresh waters and transitions between the two habitats are rare, even though freshwater and marine bacteria co-occur in brackish habitats. Estuaries in brackish, tideless seas could be habitats where the transition of freshwater phylotypes to marine conditions occurs. We tested this hypothesis in the Gulf of Gdańsk (Baltic Sea) by comparing bacterial communities from different zones of the estuary, via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. We predicted the existence of a core microbiome (CM, a set of abundant OTUs present in all samples) comprising OTUs consisting of populations specific for particular zones of the estuary. The CMs for the entire studied period consisted of only eight OTUs, and this number was even lower for specific seasons: five in spring, two in summer, and one in autumn and winter. Six of the CM OTUs, and another 21 of the 50 most abundant OTUs consisted of zone-specific populations, plausibly representing micro-evolutionary forces. The presence of up to 15% of freshwater phylotypes from the Vistula River in the brackish Gulf of Gdańsk supported our hypothesis, but high dissimilarity between the bacterial communities suggested that freshwater-marine transitions are rare even in tideless estuaries in brackish seas. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Historic Habitat Opportunities and Food-Web Linkages of Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report of Research.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottom, Daniel L.; Simenstad, Charles A.; Campbell, Lance [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-05-15

    In 2002 with support from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), an interagency research team began investigating salmon life histories and habitat use in the lower Columbia River estuary to fill significant data gaps about the estuary's potential role in salmon decline and recovery . The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided additional funding in 2004 to reconstruct historical changes in estuarine habitat opportunities and food web linkages of Columbia River salmon (Onchorhynchus spp.). Together these studies constitute the estuary's first comprehensive investigation of shallow-water habitats, including selected emergent, forested, and scrub-shrub wetlands. Among other findings, this research documented the importance of wetlands as nursery areas for juvenile salmon; quantified historical changes in the amounts and distributions of diverse habitat types in the lower estuary; documented estuarine residence times, ranging from weeks to months for many juvenile Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha); and provided new evidence that contemporary salmonid food webs are supported disproportionately by wetland-derived prey resources. The results of these lower-estuary investigations also raised many new questions about habitat functions, historical habitat distributions, and salmon life histories in other areas of the Columbia River estuary that have not been adequately investigated. For example, quantitative estimates of historical habitat changes are available only for the lower 75 km of the estuary, although tidal influence extends 217 km upriver to Bonneville Dam. Because the otolith techniques used to reconstruct salmon life histories rely on detection of a chemical signature (strontium) for salt water, the estuarine residency information we have collected to date applies only to the lower 30 or 35 km of the estuary, where fish first encounter ocean water. We lack information about salmon habitat use, life histories, and growth within the long tidal

  7. Factors initiating phytoplankton blooms and resulting effects on dissolved oxygen in Duwamish River estuary, Seattle, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Eugene Brummer

    1969-01-01

    Phytoplankton productivity, standing stock, and related environmental factors were studied during 1964-66 in the Duwamish River estuary, at Seattle, Wash., to ascertain the factors that affect phytoplankton growth in the estuary; a knowledge of these factors in turn permits the detection and evaluation of the influence that effluent nutrients have on phytoplankton production. The factors that control the concentration of dissolved oxygen were also evaluated because of the importance of dissolved oxygen to the salmonid populations that migrate through the estuary. Phytoplankton blooms, primarily of diatoms, occurred in the lower estuary during August 1965 and 1966. No bloom occurred during 1964, but the presence of oxygen-supersaturated surface water in August 1963 indicates that a bloom did occur then. Nutrients probably were not the primary factor controlling the timing of phytoplankton blooms. Ammonia ,and phosphate concentrations increased significantly downstream from the Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle's Renton Treatment Plant outfall after the plant began operation in June 1965, and concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were relatively high before operation of the Renton Treatment Plant and during nonbloom periods. The consistent coincidence of blooms with minimum fresh-water discharge and tidal exchange during August throughout the study period indicates that bloom timing probably was controlled mostly by hydrographic factors that determine retention time and stability of the surface-water layer. This control was demonstrated in part by a highly significant correlation of gross productivity with retention time (as indicated by fresh-water discharge) and vertical stability (as indicated by the difference between mean surface and mean bottom temperatures). The failure of a bloom to develop in 1964 is related to a minimum fresh-water discharge that was much greater than normal during that summer. Hydrographic factors are apparently important because

  8. Remote Sensing and GIS Application for Sedimentation Modeling in Porong River Estuary as an Impact of Lapindo Mudflow, Sidoarjo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdausy, A. P.; Sudaryatno

    2017-12-01

    Lapindo mudflow that has occurred since May 2006 in Porong, Sidoarjo have raised thorny issue. One of the consequences that turned up physically was the alteration that has occurred in Porong River estuary. Porong River estuary has undergone drastic morphological change since 2006 to 2016 that became interesting phenomenon studied using remote sensing imagery. Landsat 7 ETM+ and Landsat 8 OLI/TIRS images were used to observe the changes that occurred in Porong River estuary. Porong River estuary had additional land area of 149.4 Ha in 2000-2006, 93.79 Ha in 2006-2010 and 100.24 Ha in 2010-2016. This addition was largely due to the change of land use in the sub-watershed, input from Lapindo mudflow, as well as human activities in the development of a new delta called Sarinah Island. There were several algorithms that were used in the calculation of the sediment concentration value (SSC), such as blue, green, near infrared band, also Doxaran, NDSSI, and the red/near infrared band ratio. However, the SSC of pixel value did not have strong correlation with the SSC field value. The dynamic of object and accuracy of the algorithm became the most influential factor that must be considered in calculating the value of SSC.

  9. [Distribution of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in the Tidal Reach and Estuary of the Daliao River and Analysis of Potential Eutrophication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Cao, Wei; Ma, Ying-qun; Han, Chao-nan; Qin, Yan-wen; Zhao, Yan-min; Liu, Zhi-chao; Yang, Cheng-cheng

    2016-05-15

    Based on the monitoring data in the tidal reach and estuary of the Daliao river in August and November, 2013, the seasonal and spatial distribution of the nitrogen and phosphorus forms were studied, and the degree of eutrophication was evaluated. The results showed that nitrate nitrogen was the main chemical species and occupied about fifty-five percent of inorganic nitrogen, and the particulate phosphorus was the main chemical species and occupied about fifty percent of total phosphorus in the tidal reach and estuary of the Daliao river in wet and dry seasons, 2013. The concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients decreased in the direction from tidal reach to estuary of the Daliao river. Correlation analysis showed that there was a significant negative correlation between the nitrogen and phosphorus forms and salinity in most of the water body, which illustrated that physical dilution of seawater played a major role in the spatial distribution of nitrogen and phosphorus forms. The concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients in the dry season were higher than those in the wet season, this was mainly related to the seasonal terrestrial input of the tidal reach. The concentration of the dissolved inorganic nitrogen was higher than 0.30 mg · L⁻¹, and the value of N/P was higher than 60, which indicated that PO₄³⁻-P was the nutrient limiting phytoplankton growth in the tidal reach and estuary of the Daliao river in August and November, 2013.

  10. A decade of aquatic invasive species (AIS) early detection method development in the St. Louis River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    As an invasion prone location, the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE) has been a case study for ongoing research to develop the framework for a practical Great Lakes monitoring network for early detection of aquatic invasive species (AIS). Early detection, however, necessitates findi...

  11. River-tide dynamics : Exploration of nonstationary and nonlinear tidal behavior in the Yangtze River estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, L.; Van der Wegen, M.; Jay, D.A.; Matte, P.; Wang, Z.B.; Roelvink, J.A.; He, Q.

    2015-01-01

    River-tide dynamics remain poorly understood, in part because conventional harmonic analysis (HA) does not cope effectively with nonstationary signals. To explore nonstationary behavior of river tides and the modulation effects of river discharge, this work analyzes tidal signals in the Yangtze

  12. Physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the Duwamish River Estuary, King County, Washington, 1963-67

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, John F.; Stoner, J.D.

    1972-01-01

    This report describes the significant results to 1967 of a comprehensive study that began in 1963 to evaluate what changes take place in an estuary as the loads .of raw and partially treated industrial and municipal wastes are replaced by effluent from a secondary treatment plant. The study area is the Duwamish River estuary, about 18.3 river kilometers long. At mean sea level the estuary has a water-surface area of about 1 square mile and a mean width of 440 feet. At the lowest and highest recorded tides, the volume of the estuary is about 205 and 592 million cubic feet, respectively. The estuary is well stratified (salt-wedge type) at fresh-water inflows greater than 1,000 cfs (cubic feet per second), but when inflow rates are less than 1,000 cfs the lower 5.6 kilometers of the estuary grades into the partly mixed type. The crosschannel salinity distribution is uniform for a given location and depth. Salinity migration is controlled by tides and fresh-water inflow. At fresh-water inflow rates greater than 1,000 cfs, water in the upper 8.4 kilometers of the estuary is always fresh regardless of tide. At inflow rates less than 600 cfs and tide heights greater than 10 feet; some salinity has been detected 16.1 kilometers above the mouth of the estuary. Studies using a fluorescent dye show that virtually no downward mixing into the salt wedge occurs; soluble pollutants introduced at the upper end of the estuary stay in the surface layer (5-15 ft thick). On the basis of dye studies when fresh-water inflow is less than 400 cfs, it is estimated that less than 10 percent of a pollutant will remain in the estuary a minimum of 7 days. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients for the surface layer have been determined to be on the order of 100-400 square feet per second. Four water-quality stations automatically monitor DO (dissolved oxygen), water temperature, pH, and specific conductance; at one station solar radiation also is measured. DO concentration in the surface layer

  13. [Preliminary results concerning summer-time denitrification in the Jiulong River Estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Neng-Wang; Wu, Jie-Zhong; Hong, Hua-Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Denitrification is an important process mitigating nitrogen (N) pollution in aquatic systems. Water samples in 13 sites throughout the Jiulong River Estuary were collected in July, 2010 in a preliminary investigation of the denitrification rate in this area. As end-products of denitrification, dissolved N2 was measured by determining N2 : Ar ratios using MIMS (HPR-40), while the concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) dissolved in water was determined by Purge and Trap-Gas Chromatography. The results showed significant spatial variance of net increase of dissolved N2 (ranging between - 9.9 and 66.8 micromol x L(-1)) and N2O (ranging between 4.3 and 31.5 nmol x L(-1)) in the Jiulong River Estuary. The net increase of dissolved N2 and N2O declined gradually from river sites to sea sites. Dissolved N2O was supersaturated by 170%-562%. The air-water fluxes of N2 ranged between -2.9 and 53.2 mmol x (m2 x d) (-1), and N2O between 5.2 and 23.9 micromol x (m2 x d)(-1). The N2O yield shared only 0.03% - 1.2% (average 0.25%) of total N air-water flux. The results suggested that water temperature and nutrient (N and P) were the key factors influencing denitrification. The denitrification rate is controlled by nitrate level at fresh-water sites with salinity mixing.

  14. Spatial variation in organic matter utilization by benthic communities from Yura River-Estuary to offshore of Tango Sea, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Emily S.; Kasai, Akihide; Ueno, Masahiro; Won, Nam-il; Ishihi, Yuka; Yokoyama, Hisashi; Yamashita, Yoh

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of δ 13C and δ 15N of organic matter among benthic communities from the upper estuary of Yura River to offshore of Tango Sea, Japan, to determine spatial variation in utilization of organic matter by benthic communities. The δ 13C values of benthic animals ranged from -27 to -15‰ in the upper estuary, -21 to -15‰ in the lower estuary, -20 to -16‰ in the shallow coast (5-10 m depths), -18 to -16‰ in the deep coast (30-60 m depths) and -19 to -15‰ in offshore (100-150 m depths) stations. Adapting the dual isotope values to mixing models, we estimated the relative contributions of potential food sources to the benthos diet. Phytoplankton and macroalgae that intruded the estuary in summer were utilized as alternative food aside from the terrestrial-origin organic matter assimilated by the estuarine benthic consumers. Resuspended benthic microalgae were important source of energy in the shallow coastal stations, while abundant supply of phytodetritus fueled the deep coastal and offshore benthic food webs. Spatial difference in the diet of benthic communities depends largely on the shifts in the primary carbon source. Thus, benthic communities are important link of autochthonous/allochthonous production and secondary production in the continuous river-estuary-marine system.

  15. Geochemistry of the suspended sediment in the estuaries of the Mandovi and Zuari rivers, central west coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessarkar, Pratima M; Shynu, R; Rao, V Purnachandra; Chong, Feng; Narvekar, Tanuja; Zhang, Jing

    2013-05-01

    The geochemistry of the suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected during the monsoon was determined to identify the sources of SPM and to understand the physicochemical processes in the Mandovi and Zuari river estuaries. The concentrations of SPM decrease seaward in both estuaries, but are relatively high at bay stations. Kaolinite is the most dominant clay mineral in the upstream of both rivers. Smectite increases seaward in both estuaries and is abundant in the bay. Upstream stations of Mandovi, where ore deposits are stored on the shore, exhibit high Fe, Mn, total rare earth elements (∑REE), and middle REE- and heavy REE-enriched patterns. Channel stations of both estuaries exhibit middle REE- and light REE-enriched patterns, which gradually changed seaward to middle REE- and heavy REE-enriched patterns. Canal stations exhibit the highest concentrations of major and trace metals. High metal/Al ratios occur at stations in the upstream of Zuari and at the confluence of canals in the Mandovi estuary. Enrichment factors of metals indicate that Mn is significantly polluted while other metals are moderately polluted. The δ(13)C and δ(15)N of organic matter indicate that the terrigenous organic matter at the upstream is diluted seaward by marine organic matter. Organic matter at bay stations is largely marine and altered-type. The compositions of SPM are controlled by the particulates from ore dust, the geology of the drainage basins, and the physicochemical processes in the estuaries. Particulates resuspended from the bay are dominated by ore dust, which are advected into the channels of both estuaries during the lull periods of the monsoon.

  16. Distinct distribution patterns of prokaryotes between sediment and water in the Yellow River estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guangshan; Li, Mingcong; Li, Fenge; Li, Han; Gao, Zheng

    2016-11-01

    There are close exchanges between sediment and water in estuaries; however, the patterns of prokaryotic community assembly in these two habitat types are still unclear. This study investigated the bacterial and archaeal abundance, diversity, and community composition in the sediment and the overlying water of the Yellow River estuary. Notably higher prokaryotic abundance and diversity were detected in the sediment than in the water, and bacterial abundance and diversity were remarkably higher than those of archaea. Furthermore, the ratio of bacterial to archaeal 16S rRNA gene abundance was significantly lower in the sediment than in the water. Bacterial communities at different taxonomic levels were apparently distinct between the sediment and water, but archaeal communities were not. The most dominant bacteria were affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in sediment and with Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria in water. Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota were the most abundant archaea in both habitats. Although distinct prokaryotic distribution patterns were observed, most of the dominant bacteria and archaea present were related to carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycling processes, such as methanogenesis, ammonia oxidation, and sulfate reduction. Unexpectedly, prokaryotes from the water showed a higher sensitivity to environmental factors, while only a few factors affected sediment communities. Additionally, some potential co-occurrence relationships between prokaryotes were also found in this study. These results suggested distinct distribution patterns of bacterial and archaeal communities between sediment and overlying water in this important temperate estuary, which may serve as a useful community model for the further ecological and evolutionary study of prokaryotes in estuarine ecosystems.

  17. Coastline Change Surround Sekampung River Estuary Estimated by Geographic Information System Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Surround a big river estuary coastline has a dynamic characteristic and change along a period of time, because of a natural process and/or it is accelerated by human activities. The surround Sekampung river estuary coastline located in Rawa Sragi area is one of the most dynamic coastlines in southern Lampung Province that has changed significantly from 1959 (as a natural process to year 1987 (as an accelerated process by human activities since the government of Indonesia has applied swamp drainage system for Rawa Sragi area. It is likely that the coastline has changed significantly in the period of 1987 to 2009 (as an increasing intensity of the human activities in the surrounding Rawa Sragi land. The objective of this research was to analyze the coastline change in the surrounding of Sekampung river estuary in two periods of time: (1 the change of the 1959 – 1987 period coastlines; and (2 the change of the 1987 – 2009 period coastlines. The method of this research was a GIS technique, the implementation was divided into three main steps: (1 the first analysis was conducted in laboratory include raster data source analysis and registration, coastline digitations, and overlaying and analysis of the coastline data; (2 field observation (ground check was conducted to observe and verify the ground existing coastline; and (3 the last analysis was conducted after ground check activity to improve and to verify the first coastline analysis results. The result of this research indicated that coastline change in the period of 1959 to 1987 increased the coast land as much as 717.19 hectares, but decreased the coast land as much as 308.51 hectares. Furthermore the coastline change in the period of 1987 to 2009 increased the coast land as much as 162.504 hectares, but decreased the coast land as much as 492.734 hectares. The 1959 – 1987 coastline change was a coast land increasing period, but the 1987 – 2009 coastline change was a coast land

  18. Oceanographic data collected from Saturn Estuary Station 01 by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2008-04-13 to 2017-07-01 (NCEI Accession 0162182)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162182 contains biological, chemical and physical data collected at Saturn Estuary Station 01, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary -...

  19. Oceanographic data collected from Saturn Estuary Station 03 by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2008-04-19 to 2017-08-01 (NCEI Accession 0162617)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162617 contains biological, chemical and physical data collected at Saturn Estuary Station 03, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary -...

  20. Conservation paleobiology in near time: Isotopic estimates for restoration flows to the estuary of the Colorado River, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessa, Karl; Dettman, David; Cintra-Buenrostro, Carlos; Rowell, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    In most years since 1960, the Colorado River has not reached the sea. Upstream dams and diversions in the U.S.A. and Mexico have diverted the river's water for agricultural and municipal use. The river's estuary in the upper Gulf of California, in Mexico, once supported very large populations of Mulinia coloradoensis, a trophically important bivalve mollusk, and Totoaba macdonaldi, a now-endangered scianid fish,. Because Colorado River water is isotopically distinct from Gulf of California seawater, we used the δ18O composition of the pre-dam bivalve shells and fish otoliths to estimate past salinities and river flows. We estimate that five to ten percent of the river's annual flow would be needed to restore M. coloradoensis habitat in the river's mouth and to restore the nursery grounds of T. macdonaldi. The dead can speak to the living.

  1. CO2 emissions from a temperate drowned river valley estuary adjacent to an emerging megacity (Sydney Harbour)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, E. L.; Mulhearn, P. J.; Eyre, B. D.

    2017-06-01

    The Sydney Harbour Estuary is a large drowned river valley adjacent to Sydney, a large urban metropolis on track to become a megacity; estimated to reach a population of 10 million by 2100. Monthly underway surveys of surface water pCO2 were undertaken along the main channel and tributaries, from January to December 2013. pCO2 showed substantial spatio-temporal variability in the narrow high residence time upper and mid sections of the estuary, with values reaching a maximum of 5650 μatm in the upper reaches and as low as 173 μatm in the mid estuary section, dominated by respiration and photosynthesis respectively. The large lower estuary displayed less variability in pCO2 with values ranging from 343 to 544 μatm controlled mainly by tidal pumping and temperature. Air-water CO2 emissions reached a maximum of 181 mmol C m-2 d-1 during spring in the eutrophic upper estuary. After a summer high rainfall event nutrient-stimulated biological pumping promoted a large uptake of CO2 transitioning the Sydney Harbour Estuary into a CO2 sink with a maximum uptake of rate of -10.6 mmol C m-2 d-1 in the mid-section of the estuary. Annually the Sydney Harbour Estuary was heterotrophic and a weak source of CO2 with an air-water emission rate of 1.2-5 mmol C m-2 d-1 (0.4-1.8 mol C m-2 y-1) resulting in a total carbon emission of around 930 tonnes per annum. CO2 emissions (weighted m3 s-1 of discharge per km2 of estuary surface area) from Sydney Harbour were an order of magnitude lower than other temperate large tectonic deltas, lagoons and engineered systems of China, India, Taiwan and Europe but were similar to other natural drowned river valley systems in the USA. Discharge per unit area appears to be a good predictor of CO2 emissions from estuaries of a similar climate and geomorphic class.

  2. Effects of Tidal Range Variability and Local Morphology on Hydrodynamic Behavior and Salinity Structure in the Caeté River Estuary, North Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geórgenes H. Cavalcante

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tidal influence and local morphology on circulation and salt transport are investigated in the Caeté river estuary, a well-mixed estuary along the north coast of Brazil. Velocity, temperature, and salinity data were collected in three different locations along the estuary’s main channel, over three single, 13 h tidal cycles. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between tidal distortion and salinity by using classical methods of comparison of three cross-channel circulation characteristics, as well as computation of salt flux and vertical mixing. Findings indicate a flood-ebb asymmetry in currents, due to the distinct funneling morphology of the estuary, with shallow marginal areas being dominant towards the estuary head, while both stratification and shear dominate near the estuary mouth. The tidal currents enhanced vertical diffusion in the mid- and lower reaches, explaining the prevailing weakly stratified conditions, while the dominant well-mixed conditions in the upper estuary are a result of a combination of stronger flood currents and negligible vertical saline gradient. The predominant downstream salt transport supports the conclusion that there is little accumulation of salt in the Caeté river estuary. In addition, findings indicate that tidal correlation and Stokes drift are important components in the upper estuary, while tidal correlation played an important role in the middle estuary, with fluvial discharge most important in the lower estuary.

  3. Spatial distribution and seasonal variation of phthalate esters in the Jiulong River estuary, Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongli; Liang, Jing; Duan, Hualing; Gong, Zhenbin

    2017-09-15

    The spatial distribution and seasonal variation of 16 phthalate esters (PAEs) in water, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediment were investigated in the Jiulong River estuary, Fujian, Southeast China. Of the 16 PAE congeners analyzed, only six PAEs, including dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and diisononyl phthalate (DINP), were identified and quantified. The total concentrations of the six PAEs (∑6PAEs) detected for all seasons ranged from 3.01 to 26.4μg/L in water, 1.56 to 48.7mg/kg in SPM, and 0.037 to 0.443μg/kg in sediment. DEHP, DIBP and DBP were the most abundant PAE congeners in all of the water, SPM and sediment phases. The spatial distributions of PAEs in the estuary were controlled not only by the riverine runoff, seasons, hydrodynamic condition and human activities but also the physicochemical properties of PAEs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Flood-ebb and spring-neap variations of lateral circulation in the James River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Wei; Chant, Robert; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2017-09-01

    Mooring observations in the James River estuary show one-cell lateral circulation that persists from spring to neap tides despite large changes in vertical stratification. The lateral circulation is twice as strong on ebb than on flood during neap tide, but shows little flood-ebb asymmetry during spring tide. A numerical model is developed to simulate the lateral circulation. It captures an observed three-fold change in stratification and reproduces the observed temporal evolution of the lateral circulation. An analysis of the streamwise vorticity equation reveals that the lateral circulation is generated by the tilting of the planetary vorticity by the along-channel flow but opposed by turbulent diffusion and lateral baroclinic forcing due to sloping isopycnals. Tilting of the vertical component of relative vorticity by the along-channel flow is insignificant. Vortex stretching is also weak in the straight segment of the estuary where mooring observations were available. During neap tide, vorticity generation is larger on ebb due to stronger vertical shear in the along-channel current, thereby leading to stronger lateral circulation on ebb. During spring tide, however, turbulent mixing reduces the shear and the flood-ebb asymmetry in the vorticity generation, resulting in little flood-ebb variations in the lateral circulation strength. Such strength is comparable between spring and neap tides because of the compensative changes in the vorticity budget: increased baroclinic forcing and decreased diffusion during neap tides versus decreased baroclinic forcing and increased diffusion during spring tides.

  5. Metagenomic Analysis of Virioplankton of the Subtropical Jiulong River Estuary, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanlan Cai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans, and encompass a significant reservoir of genetic diversity. However, little is known about their biodiversity in estuary environments, which represent a highly dynamic and potentially more diverse habitat. Here, we report a metagenomic analysis of the dsDNA viral community from the Jiulong River Estuary (JRE, China, and provide a comparative analysis with other closely related environments. The results showed that the majority of JRE virome did not show any significant similarity to the database. For the major viral group (Caudovirales detected in the sample, Podoviridae (44.88% were the most abundant family, followed by Siphoviridae (32.98% and Myoviridae (17.32%. The two most abundant viruses identified in the virome were phages HTVC010P and HMO-2011, which infect bacteria belonging to marine SAR11 and SAR116 clades, respectively. Two contigs larger than 20 kb, which show similar overall genome architectures to Celeribacter phage P12053L and Thalosomonas phage BA3, respectively, were generated during assembly. Comparative analysis showed that the JRE virome was more similar to marine viromes than to freshwater viromes, and shared a relative coarse-grain genetic overlap (averaging 14.14% ± 1.68% with other coastal viromes. Our study indicated that the diversity and community structure of the virioplankton found in JRE were mainly affected by marine waters, with less influence from freshwater discharge.

  6. Species composition and gear characteristics of the Macrobrachium fishery of the Cross River Estuary, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Francis M.

    2010-03-01

    The Cross River Estuary, Nigeria, is an important shrimping area for artisanal fishermen of the coastal communities. The multi-species Macrobrachium fishery is exploited with three main gears, namely beach seine, push net and trap. Studies on species composition of this fishery recorded thirteen shrimp species, one swimming crab ( Callinectes amnicola) and two fish species ( Eleotris sp. and Pellonula leonensis). The shrimp species identified included Macrobrachium macrobrachion (83.39% and 55.69% by number and weight, respectively), M. vollenhovenii (9.66% and 37.18%), M. equidens (3.8% and 2.87%), juveniles-sub-adults of Penaeus notialis (1.11% and 1.3%), M. dux, M. felicinum, Palaemonetes africanus, Palaemon maculatus, Palaemon elegans, Desmocaris sp., Leander sp., Nematopalaemon hastatus and Alpheus pontederiae. While the selectivity index for trap was 0.25, beach seine and push net had a lower index of 0.063. The results present the first comprehensive and representative report for the Estuary shrimp fishery and will assist in the management of the biodiversity of this ecosystem.

  7. Assessing pollution trends in the Guadalquivir River estuary using N-way analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-López J. A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Human activities have contributed to a deployment of environmental quality. In the last decades the problem of water preservation has gained increasing attention, and new policies have been developed for water resources remediation. Statistical techniques for data treatment are based on the organization of data in a bi-dimensional array; thus, some shades on the trend of the distribution tend to be ignored. Multiway techniques, where data are gathered in n directions, allow the analysis of the results through different directions at the same time. In particular, for 3MPCA a principal components analysis is conducted using three modes and a “core” matrix that allows assessing their interactions. The Guadalquivir River estuary has been used as a model system for the application of 3MPCA in the study of long term evolution of pollutants. Nutrients and heavy metals ultra-traces level have been used to characterize the estuary. The 3MPCA was used to assess the relationships within chemical variables, sampling stations and sampling campaigns.

  8. Effect of water flux and sediment discharge of the Yangtze River on PAHs sedimentation in the estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rufeng; Feng, Chenghong; Wang, Dongxin; He, Maozhi; Hu, Lijuan; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-12-01

    Historical distribution characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their carriers (i.e., organic matter and mineral particles) in the sediment cores of the Yangtze Estuary were investigated, with emphasis laid on the role of the Yangtze River. Grain size component of sediments (clay, silt, and sand) and organic carbon (black carbon and total organic carbon) in the sediment cores were markedly affected by water flux and sediment discharge of the Yangtze River. Qualitative and quantitative analysis results showed that sands and black carbon acted as the main carriers of PAHs. The sedimentation of two-ring to three-ring PAHs in the estuary had significant correlations with water flux and sediment discharge of the Yangtze River. The relative lower level of the four-ring and five-ring to six-ring PAHs concentrations appeared around the year 2003 and remained for the following several years. This time period accorded well with the water impoundment time of the Three Gorges Reservoir. The decreased level of two-ring to three-ring PAHs occurred in the year 1994, and the peak points around the year 2009 indicated that PAHs sedimentation in the estuary also had close relationship to severe drought and flood in the catchments. The findings presented in this paper could provide references for assessing the impacts of water flux and sediment discharge on the historical deposition of PAHs and their carriers in the Yangtze Estuary.

  9. Capacity of humic substances to complex with iron at different salinities in the Yangtze River estuary and East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rujun; Su, Han; Qu, Shenglu; Wang, Xuchen

    2017-05-03

    The iron binding capacities (IBC) of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA) were determined in the salinity range from 5 to 40. The results indicated that IBC decreased while salinity increased. In addition, dissolved iron (dFe), FA and HA were also determined along the Yangtze River estuary's increasing salinity gradient from 0.14 to 33. The loss rates of dFe, FA and HA in the Yangtze River estuary were up to 96%, 74%, and 67%, respectively. The decreases in dFe, FA and HA, as well as the change in IBC of humic substances (HS) along the salinity gradient in the Yangtze River estuary were all well described by a first-order exponential attenuation model: y(dFe/FA/HA, S) = a0 × exp(kS) + y0. These results indicate that flocculation of FA and HA along the salinity gradient resulted in removal of dFe. Furthermore, the exponential attenuation model described in this paper can be applied in the major estuaries of the world where most of the removal of dFe and HS occurs where freshwater and seawater mix.

  10. The distribution and partitioning of common antibiotics in water and sediment of the Pearl River Estuary, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ximei; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Xiangping; Shi, Zhen; Huang, Xiaoping; Li, Xiangdong

    2013-09-01

    Antibiotics released into the aquatic environment play an important role in the spread of antibiotic resistance. In the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and the coastal zone, the concentrations of antibiotics decreased from the Pearl River to the estuary, suggesting that antibiotics primarily originated from river tributaries and terrigenous sources. Within the PRE area, the concentrations of antibiotics in water were higher in the west coast than the east side, reflecting the high density of anthropogenic activities and hydraulic conditions along the west riverbank. Seasonal variations were also observed for most of detected antibiotics in water. The pseudo-partitioning coefficient of norfloxacin had a good correlation with the TOC content of sediments, as did erythromycin-H2O with the pH of water. The results suggest that environmental conditions can significantly affect the distribution of antibiotics between water and sediment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Water quality in the tidal Potomac River and Estuary, hydrologic data report, 1979 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Stephen F.; Hahl, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    This report contains data on the physical and chemical properties measured during the 1979 water year for the tidal Potomac River and estuary. Data were collected routinely at five major stations and periodically at 14 intervening stations. Each major station represents a cross section through which the transport of selected dissolved and suspended materials will be computed. The intervening stations represent locations at which data were collected for special studies such as: salt water migration, dissolved oxygen dynamics, and other synoptic studies. About 960 samples were analyzed for silicate, Kjeldhal nitrogen, nitrite, phosphorus, chlorophyll and suspended sediment, with additional samples analyzed for organic carbon, calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, sulfate, potassium, chloride, fluoride, seston and dissolved solids residue. In addition, about 1400 in-situ measurements of dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, temperature, and Secchi disk transparency are reported. (USGS)

  12. Zooplankton community analysis in the Changjiang River estuary by single-gene-targeted metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fangping; Wang, Minxiao; Li, Chaolun; Sun, Song

    2014-07-01

    DNA barcoding provides accurate identification of zooplankton species through all life stages. Single-gene-targeted metagenomic analysis based on DNA barcode databases can facilitate longterm monitoring of zooplankton communities. With the help of the available zooplankton databases, the zooplankton community of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary was studied using a single-gene-targeted metagenomic method to estimate the species richness of this community. A total of 856 mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences were determined. The environmental barcodes were clustered into 70 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs). Forty-two MOTUs matched barcoded marine organisms with more than 90% similarity and were assigned to either the species (similarity>96%) or genus level (similaritymetagenomic analysis is a useful tool for zooplankton studies, with which specimens from all life history stages can be identified quickly and effectively with a comprehensive database.

  13. Tidal Hydrodynamics in the Lower Columbia River Estuary through Depth Averaged Adaptive Hydraulics Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Savant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive hydraulics (AdH numerical code was applied to study tidal propagation in the Lower Columbia River (LCR estuary. The results demonstrate the readiness of this AdH model towards the further study of hydrodynamics in the LCR. The AdH model accurately replicated behavior of the tide as it propagated upstream into the LCR system. Results show that the MSf tidal component and the M4 overtidal component are generated in the middle LCR and contain a substantial amount of tidal energy. An analysis was performed to determine the causes of MSf tide amplification, and it was found that approximately 80% of the amplification occurs due to nonlinear interaction between the M2 and the S2 tidal components.

  14. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

  15. The hydrokinetic power resource in a macrotidal estuary: the Kennebec River of the central Maine coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Power levels available from the kinetic energy of tidal flows can be significant in coastal or estuarine regions with relatively modest tidal ranges. For example, the central Maine coast, where the mean semidiurnal tidal range is about 3 m, includes several river estuaries with narrow interconnecting passages where tidal currents exceed 2 m s-1. A numerical circulation model applied to this region shows that the vigorous tidal flows lead to available power peaks exceeding 3 Kw per square meter of turbine aperture in several sites during a spring tide. At one promising location, the peak power density is 6.5 Kw/m2 near the surface and the energy capacity in a 500 m2 section under mean tidal conditions is about 2700 Mwh per year, sufficient to meet the average consumption needs of about 150 homes connected to an electrical grid capable of accepting the tidal power pulses and blending them with traditional sources.

  16. Ecological status and sources of anthropogenic contaminants in mangroves of the Wouri River Estuary (Cameroon)

    KAUST Repository

    Fusi, Marco

    2016-07-07

    Mangroves are critically threatened by human activities, despite the important ecosystem functions and services they provide. Mangroves in Cameroon represent no exception to the worldwide trend of mangrove destruction, especially around Douala, on the Wouri river estuary. In two sites around Douala, we assessed the presence of sterols, PAHs, PCBs, DEHP, DDT and its metabolite p,p\\'-DDE and potentially toxic metals in sediment samples. As a proxy of ecological quality, we measured the diversity and abundance of macrobenthos assemblages. We detected p,p\\'-DDE contamination, with concentrations higher than 3μgkg-1 in 16 out of 26 samples which were attributed to recent widespread use of DDT. The detection of sterols revealed faecal contamination. Significant sensitivity of the macrobenthos to contaminants was revealed, with possible implications on the overall mangrove vulnerability to climate change and on the provision of ecosystem services to local populations. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Bioconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in roots of three mangrove species in Jiulong River Estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.Q.; Zheng, W.J.; Ma, L. [Xiamen University, Xiamen (China). School of Life Science

    2005-07-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations were determined in the root of three mangrove species (Kandelia candel, Avicennia marina and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza) and their growing environment (sediment) in mangrove wetlands of Jiulong River Estuary, Fujian, China. The total PAHs (16 parent PAHs) in mangrove sediments ranged from 193.44 to 270.53 ng/g dw, with a mean value of 231.76 +/- 31.78 ng/g dw. Compared with other mangrove and coastal marine sediments, the PAHs concentrations of all the sampling areas in this study were at relatively lower level. The total PAHs (13 parent PAHs) values varied from 30.83 to 62.73 ng/g dw in mangrove roots. Benzo(a) pyrene, fluoranthene and pyrene dominated in mangrove sediments. Based on ratios of phenathrene/anthracene, fluoranthene/pyrene and fluoranthene/pyrene + fluoranthene, the main possible sources of surface sediment PAHs were identified as grass, wood or coal combustion for mangrove wetlands of Jiulong River Estuary. Naphthalene and phenathrene were the most abundant compounds in mangrove roots. Sediment-to-vegetation bioconcentration factors (BCF(SV)s) were calculated and their relationships with PAHs' physico-chemical properties were investigated. The average BCF(SV)s of PAHs for three mangrove species roots were almost all under the level of 1 except for naphthalene. Good linear relationship between BCFSV values for mangrove roots and PAHs water solubility, octanol-water partitioning coefficients was derived in present study. The solubility and the octanol-water partition coefficient were proved to be good predictors for the accumulation of PAHs in mangrove roots, respectively.

  18. Stratification and salt-wedge in the Seomjin river estuary under the idealized tidal influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jin Hwan; Jang, Dongmin; Kim, Yong Hoon

    2017-09-01

    Advection, straining, and vertical mixing play primary roles in the process of estuarine stratification. Estuaries can be classified as salt-wedge, partially-mixed or well-mixed depending on the vertical density structure determined by the balancing of advection, mixing and straining. In particular, straining plays a major role in the stratification of the estuarine water body along the estuarine channel. Also, the behavior of a salt wedge with a halocline shape in a stratified channel can be controlled by the competition between straining and mixing induced by buoyancy from the riverine source and tidal forcing. The present study uses Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) to show that straining and vertical mixing play major roles in controlling along-channel flow and stratification structures in the Seomjin river estuary (SRE) under idealized conditions. The Potential Energy Anomaly (PEA) dynamic equation quantifies the governing processes thereby enabling the determination of the stratification type. By comparing terms in the equation, we examined how the relative strengths of straining and mixing alter the stratification types in the SRE due to changes in river discharge and the depth resulting from dredging activities. SRE under idealized tidal forcing tends to be partially-mixed based on an analysis of the balance between terms and the vertical structure of salinity, and the morphological and hydrological change in SRE results in the shift of stratification type. While the depth affects the mixing, the freshwater discharge mainly controls the straining, and the balance between mixing and straining determines the final state of the stratification in an estuarine channel. As a result, the development and location of a salt wedge along the channel in a partially mixed and highly stratified condition is also determined by the ratio of straining to mixing. Finally, our findings confirm that the contributions of mixing and straining can be assessed by using the

  19. Sensitivity of Circulation in the Skagit River Estuary to Sea Level Rise and Future Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Long, Wen; Sackmann, Brandon; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Hamlet, Alan F.

    2016-01-01

    Future climate simulations based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions scenario (A1B) have shown that the Skagit River flow will be affected, which may lead to modification of the estuarine hydrodynamics. There is considerable uncertainty, however, about the extent and magnitude of resulting change, given accompanying sea level rise and site-specific complexities with multiple interconnected basins. To help quantify the future hydrodynamic response, we developed a three dimensional model of the Skagit River estuary using the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The model was set up with localized high-resolution grids in Skagit and Padilla Bay sub-basins within the intermediate-scale FVCOM based model of the Salish Sea (greater Puget Sound and Georgia Basin). Future changes to salinity and annual transport through the basin were examined. The results confirmed the existence of a residual estuarine flow that enters Skagit Bay from Saratoga Passage to the south and exits through Deception Pass. Freshwater from the Skagit River is transported out in the surface layers primarily through Deception Pass and Saratoga Passage, and only a small fraction (≈4%) is transported to Padilla Bay. The moderate future perturbations of A1B emissions, corresponding river flow, and sea level rise of 0.48 m examined here result only in small incremental changes to salinity structure and inter-basin freshwater distribution and transport. An increase in salinity of ~1 ppt in the near-shore environment and a salinity intrusion of approximately 3 km further upstream is predicted in Skagit River, well downstream of the drinking water intakes.

  20. Response of the turbidity maximum zone in the Yangtze River Estuary due to human activities during the dry season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Shen, Zhenyao; Yang, Ye

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between a river and the sea results in a turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) within the estuary, which has a great impact on the local ecosystem. In the Yangtze River Estuary, the magnitude and extent of the TMZ vary with water discharge. In this study, the cumulative human activity altered the water discharge regime from the river to the estuary. In the post-Three Gorges Dam (TGD) period, water discharge increased by 35.10 % at Datong in February compared with that in the pre-TGD period. The effects of water discharge variation on the characteristics of the TMZ were analyzed during spring and neap tidal periods using the three-dimensional environmental fluid dynamic code (EFDC) model. The area of the TMZ decreased by 3.11 and 17.39 % during neap and spring tides, respectively. In addition, the upper limit of the TMZ moved 11.68 km seaward during neap tide, whereas the upper limit of the TMZ in the upstream and downstream areas moved seaward 9.65 and 2.34 km, respectively, during spring tide. These findings suggest that the area and location of the TMZ are more sensitive to upstream runoff during spring tide than during neap tide. These changes in the TMZ will impact the biochemical processes in the Yangtze River Estuary. In the foreseeable future, the distribution characteristic of TMZ will inevitably change due to variations in the Yangtze River discharge resulting from new human activities (i.e., new dams), which are being constructed upstream in the Yangtze River system.

  1. Estimating salinity intrusion effects due to climate change on the Lower Savannah River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Paul; Roehl, Edwin A.; Daamen, Ruby C.; Cook, John B.; Sexton, Charles T.; Tufford, Daniel L.; Carbone, Gregory J.; Dow, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    The ability of water-resource managers to adapt to future climatic change is especially challenging in coastal regions of the world. The East Coast of the United States falls into this category given the high number of people living along the Atlantic seaboard and the added strain on resources as populations continue to increase, particularly in the Southeast. Increased temperatures, changes in regional precipitation regimes, and potential increased sea level may have a great impact on existing hydrological systems in the region. The Savannah River originates at the confluence of the Seneca and Tugaloo Rivers, near Hartwell, Ga., and forms the state boundary between South Carolina and Georgia. The J. Strom Thurmond Dam and Lake, located 238 miles upstream from the Atlantic Ocean, is responsible for most of the flow regulation that affects the Savannah River from Augusta, Ga., to the coast. The Savannah Harbor experiences semi-diurnal tides of two low and two high tides in a 24.8-hour period with pronounced differences in tidal range between neap and spring tides occurring on a 14-day and 28-day lunar cycle. Salinity intrusion results from the interaction of three principal forces - streamflow, mean tidal water levels, and tidal range. To analyze, model, and simulate hydrodynamic behaviors at critical coastal streamgages in the Lower Savannah River Estuary, data-mining techniques were applied to over 15 years of hourly streamflow, coastal water-quality, and water-level data. Artificial neural network (ANN) models were trained to learn the variable interactions that cause salinity intrusions. Streamflow data from the 9,850 square-mile Savannah River Basin were input into the model as time-delayed variables. Tidal inputs to the models were obtained by decomposing tidal water-level data into a “periodic” signal of tidal range and a “chaotic” signal of mean water levels. The ANN models were able to convincingly reproduce historical behaviors and generate

  2. Tracing the origin of the oxygen-consuming organic matter in the hypoxic zone in a large eutrophic estuary: the lower reach of the Pearl River Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jianzhong; Dai, Minhan; He, Biyan; Wang, Lifang; Gan, Jianping; Guo, Xianghui; Zhao, Huade; Yu, Fengling

    2017-09-01

    We assess the relative contributions of different sources of organic matter, marine vs. terrestrial, to oxygen consumption in an emerging hypoxic zone in the lower Pearl River Estuary (PRE), a large eutrophic estuary located in Southern China. Our cruise, conducted in July 2014, consisted of two legs before and after the passing of Typhoon Rammasun, which completely de-stratified the water column. The stratification recovered rapidly, within 1 day after the typhoon. We observed algal blooms in the upper layer of the water column and hypoxia underneath in bottom water during both legs. Repeat sampling at the initial hypoxic station showed severe oxygen depletion down to 30 µmol kg-1 before the typhoon and a clear drawdown of dissolved oxygen after the typhoon. Based on a three endmember mixing model and the mass balance of dissolved inorganic carbon and its isotopic composition, the δ13C of organic carbon remineralized in the hypoxic zone was -23.2 ± 1.1 ‰. We estimated that 65 ± 16 % of the oxygen-consuming organic matter was derived from marine sources, and the rest (35 ± 16 %) was derived from the continent. In contrast to a recently studied hypoxic zone in the East China Sea off the Changjiang Estuary where marine organic matter dominated oxygen consumption, here terrestrial organic matter significantly contributed to the formation and maintenance of hypoxia. How varying amounts of these organic matter sources drive oxygen consumption has important implications for better understanding hypoxia and its mitigation in bottom waters.

  3. Combined Stable Carbon Isotope and C/N Ratios as Indicators of Source and Fate of Organic Matter in the Bangpakong River Estuary, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanomsak Boonphakdee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable carbon isotopes and C/N ratios of particulate organic matter (POM in suspended solids and surficial sediment were used to define the spatial and temporal variability in an anthropogenic tropical river estuary, the Bangpakong River Estuary. Samples were taken along salinity gradients during the four different river discharges in the beginning, high river discharge and at the end of the wet season, and low river discharge during the dry season. The values of [C/N]a ratio and d13C in the river estuary revealed significant differences from those of the offshore station. Conservative behaviors of [C/N]a and d13C in the estuary during the wet season indicated major contribution of terrigenous C3 plants derived OM. By contrast, during the dry season, marine input mainly dominated OM contribution with an evidence of anthropogenic input to the estuary. These compositions of the bulk sedimentary OM were dominated by paddy rice soils and marine derived OM during the wet and dry seasons, respectively. These results show that the combined stable carbon isotopes and C/N ratios can be used to identify the source and fate of OM even in a river estuary. This tool will be useful to achieve sustainable management in coastal zone.

  4. Esri Format Binary Grid of the Merged Bathymetry and Elevation Data from the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland For Use with USGS Cruise 07005 (COMBELEV)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  5. Raw and Modified Raw Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 17, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  6. Raw and Modified Raw Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 15, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  7. Modified Processed Continous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 15 and May 16 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  8. RES2DINV Format Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 16, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  9. RES2DINV Format Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 17, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  10. Raw and Modified Raw Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 16, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  11. RES2DINV Format Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 15, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  12. RES2DINV Format for Modified Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 15 and May 16, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  13. Upstream freshwater and terrestrial sources are differentially reflected in the bacterial community structure along a small Arctic river and its estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviaja Lyberth Hauptmann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Glacier melting and altered precipitation patterns influence Arctic freshwater and coastal ecosystems. Arctic rivers are central to Arctic water ecosystems by linking glacier meltwaters and precipitation with the ocean through transport of particulate matter and microorganisms. However, the impact of different water sources on the microbial communities in Arctic rivers and estuaries remains unknown. In this study we used 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to assess a small river and its estuary on the Disko Island, West Greenland (69°N. Samples were taken in August when there is maximum precipitation and temperatures are high in the Disko Bay area. We describe the bacterial community through a river into the estuary, including communities originating in a glacier and a proglacial lake. Our results show that water from the glacier and lake transports distinct communities into the river in terms of diversity and community composition. Bacteria of terrestrial origin were among the dominating OTUs in the main river, while the glacier and lake supplied the river with water containing fewer terrestrial organisms. Also, more psychrophilic taxa were found in the community supplied by the lake. At the river mouth, the presence of dominant bacterial taxa from the lake and glacier was unnoticeable, but these taxa increased their abundances again further into the estuary. On average 23% of the estuary community consisted of indicator OTUs from different sites along the river. Environmental variables showed only weak correlations with community composition, suggesting that hydrology largely influences the observed patterns.

  14. A Profile of Suwannee County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Lionel J.

    Agriculture and the railroad were significant forces in the development of Suwannee County, Florida, formally created in 1858 but explored and settled beginning some 300 years earlier. Lumber and cotton caused an early 20th century boom in the county which soon saw the negative effects of both industries. The introduction of tobacco in the late…

  15. Effects of intratidal and tidal range variability on circulation and salinity structure in the Cape Fear River Estuary, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, May Ling; Luettich, Richard A.; Seim, Harvey

    2009-04-01

    Tidal influences on circulation and the salinity structure are investigated in the largely unstudied Cape Fear River Estuary (CFRE), North Carolina, a partially mixed estuary along the southeast coast of the United States. During two different tidal conditions (high versus low tidal range) and when river flow was low, salinity and velocity data were collected over a semidiurnal tidal cycle in a 2.8 km long transect along the estuary axis. Water level data were recorded nearby. Mechanisms that influence salt transport characteristics are diagnosed from an analysis of the field data. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between tidal range and salinity through comparison of along-channel circulation characteristics, computed salt fluxes, and coefficients of vertical eddy diffusivity (Kz) based on a parameterization and on salt budget analysis. Findings indicate up-estuary tidally driven salt fluxes resulting from oscillatory salt transport are dominant near the pycnocline, while mean advective transport dominates near the bottom during both tidal range periods. Earlier research related to salt transport in estuaries with significant gravitational circulation suggests that up-estuary salt transport increases during low tidal ranges as a result of increased gravitational circulation. In the CFRE, in contrast, net (tidally averaged) near-bottom along-channel velocities are greater during higher tidal range conditions than during lower tidal range conditions. Findings indicate stronger tidal forcing and associated mixing contribute to greater near-bottom salinity gradients and, consequently, increased baroclinic circulation. Lower near-bottom salinities during the higher tidal range period are a result of a combination of increased vertical turbulent salt fluxes near the pycnocline and increased bottom-generated mixing.

  16. Changes of Benthic Macroinvertebrates in Thi Vai River and Cai Mep Estuaries Under Polluted Conditions with Industrial Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huong Nguyen Thi Thanh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The pollution on the Thi Vai River has been spreading out rapidly over the two lasted decades caused by the wastewater from the industrial parks in the left bank of Thi Vai River and Cai Mep Estuaries. The evaluation of the benthic macroinvertebrate changes was very necessary to identify the consequences of the industrial wastewater on water quality and aquatic ecosystem of Thi Vai River and Cai Mep Estuaries. In this study, the variables of benthic macroinvertebrates and water quality were investigated in Thi Vai River and Cai Mep Estuaries, Southern Vietnam. The monitoring data of benthic macroinvertebrates and water quality parameters covered the period from 1989 to 2015 at 6 sampling sites in Thi Vai River and Cai Mep Estuaries. The basic water quality parameters were also tested including pH, dissolved oxygen (DO, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus. The biodiversity indices of benthic macroinvertebrates were applied for water quality assessment. The results showed that pH ranged from 6.4 – 7.6 during the monitoring. The DO concentrations were in between 0.20 - 6.70 mg/L. The concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorous ranged from 0.03 - 5.70 mg/L 0.024 - 1.380 mg/L respectively. Macroinvertebrate community in the study area consisted of 36 species of polychaeta, gastropoda, bivalvia, and crustacea, of which, species of polychaeta were dominant in species number. The benthic macroinvertebartes density ranged from 0 - 2.746 individuals/m−1 with the main dominant species of Neanthes caudata, Prionospio malmgreni, Paraprionospio pinnata, Trichochaeta carica, Maldane sarsi, Capitella capitata, Terebellides stroemi, Euditylia polymorpha, Grandidierella lignorum, Apseudes vietnamensis. The biodiversity index values during the monitoring characterized for aquatic environmental conditions of mesotrophic to polytrophic. Besides, species richness positively correlated with DO, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus. The results

  17. Sources and preservation of organic matter in recent sediment from the Changjiang (Yangtze River Estuary, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lü Xiaoxia

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The vertical distributions of bulk and molecular biomarker compositions in the samples from four sediment cores of the Changjiang (Yangtze River Estuary were determined. The changes in the bulk and molecular compositions with depth suggest that there have been recent changes in the marine autogenic and terrigenous supply. In the site at the boundary of the turbidity maximum (Site 8 and the most southern site (Site 26, the autogenic and allochthonous inputs make almost the same contribution to sedimentary organic matter. In the site close to the river mouth (Site 11, the organic matter mainly comes from the terrestrial input carried by the Changjiang water, whereas, in the most eastern site (Site 17, the organic matter consists of a mixture of recent and ancient Changjiang delta sedimentary residues. Significant downcore fluctuations were observed in the patterns of the bulk and molecular compositions, as well as in several biomarker ratios, which also indicates the different anoxic conditions at different depths of the core besides the source variation. In addition, the distributions of molecular compounds show that the organic matter is a mixture of immature and mature in the sediments of the four cores, which further indicates that the microbial activity is active in anoxic conditions, especially in the surface sediment. The vertical distributions of molecular compounds also show that the autogenic marine organic matter is more easily degraded, and that the molecular compounds evolve from unstable steric configurations to stable ones in the early diagenetic processes.

  18. Water quality of the tidal Potomac River and estuary hydrologic data report, 1980 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Stephen; Coupe, R.H.; Woodward, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains data on the physical and chemical properties measured in the Tidal Potomac River and Estuary during the 1980 Water Year. Data were collected routinely at five stations, and periodically at 17 stations including three stations near the mouth of the Potomac River in Chesapeake Bay. Each of the five stations represent a cross section through which the transport of selected dissolved and suspended materials can be computed. The remaining stations represent locations at which data were collected for special synoptic studies such as salt water migration, and dissolved oxygen dynamics. Routinely, samples were analyzed for silica, nitrogen, phosphorus, chlorophyll-a, pheophytin, and suspended sediment. Additional samples were analyzed for organic carbon, calcium, manganese, magnesium, sodium, alkalinity, sulfate, iron, potassium, chloride, fluoride, seston, algal growth potential, adenosine triphosphate, nitrifying bacteria and dissolved-solids residue. In addition, solar radiation measurements and in-situ measurements of dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, pH, temperature, and Secchi disk transparency are reported. (USGS)

  19. Distribution of PBDEs, HBCDs and PCBs in the Brisbane River estuary sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anim, Alfred K; Drage, Daniel S; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Mueller, Jochen F; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2017-07-15

    To date, very little or no data exist in literature for some brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and polychlorinated biphenyls in Queensland sediments. These pollutants were measured in the sediments along the Brisbane River estuary. The target compounds were regularly detected in measurable concentrations: PBDEs=33.3-97.8% (n=45), PCBs=94.1-100% (n=51) and HBCDs=79-98% (n=48). Consistently, >90% of the observed ∑8PBDE concentration was attributed to BDE-209. Mean PBDE levels (ng/g dry wt.) were: 4.4±3.2 (∑8PBDE) and 4.4±3.0 (BDE-209) across 22 sampling sites. The mean ∑7PCB and ∑HBCD were 5.4±4.5 and 1.0±1.5ng/g dry wt. respectively. The 25% (α-HBCD), 8% (β-HBCD) and 67% (γ-HBCD) diastereoisomer contributions observed were consistent with values reported in the literature. Contaminant levels are fairly distributed along the River and were generally low compared to similar studies around the world. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Tidal currents and bedload transport at the mouth of a rock-bound estuary during low river discharge conditions (Guadiana Estuary, Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garel, E.; Pacheco, A.; Ferreira, Ó.

    2009-04-01

    The present study documents the poorly-described hydro-sediment dynamics of narrow bedrock-controlled estuaries during periods of low-river discharge. The results also contribute to assess the geomorphological evolution of these systems, when affected by drastic flow regulation. The Guadiana Estuary is a narrow rock-bound mesotidal estuary, 80 km in length, located at the southern border between Spain and Portugal. Until recently, the river inputs to the estuary displayed high (annual and seasonal) variability, characterized by periods of droughts, and episodic flood events with (monthly-averaged) fluvial discharge as high as 5,000 m3s-1 (160 m3s-1 in average, for the period 1947/2001). This pattern has ceased in February 2002, with the impoundment of the main river by the large Alqueva dam, 60 km upstream from the estuary head. At present, the daily-averaged river discharge is generally kept low throughout the year (< 50 m3s-1). In the absence of significant flood events to expel massively sediment out of the estuary, concerns have been raised about sand infilling at the mouth and increased erosion at the adjacent coastline. For the assessment of the sediment balance of the estuary under present hydrodynamic conditions, this study examines the tidal currents and bedload transport at the entrance of the estuarine channel. Current measurement transects were performed across the 600 m-wide channel entrance using a ship borne Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP, operating at 1.5 MHz frequency) during 2 entire tidal cycles, at spring (17 September 2008, 3.0 m tidal range) and at neap tide (21 October 2008, 1.6 m tidal range). Surficial sediment samples were also collected across the channel during the spring tidal cycle. The bed sediment consists of well-sorted medium sand with mean grain size ranging from 0.5 to 0.3 mm (with coarser material at the deepest part of the channel cross-section). Tidal currents were analysed along 6 sub-sections to take into account these grain

  1. Sedimentation and lithological structure of the surface sedimentary strata in the shallow estuary of the River Grendalen (Gren-fjord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshcheryakov N. I.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of studies of the River Grendalen estuary shallow (Gren-fjord. It is based on materials of the field work carried out in 2014. The waters sonar research, sampling in the intertidal zone, selection of ground shock tube samples, sensing by thermohaline component, determining the amount of particulate matter in the surface water have been produced. The granulometric analysis of samples of loose deposits has been made. According to the sonar data the bathymetric model of the study area has been built. The scheme of distribution of suspended matter in the estuarial area of the River Grendalen and adjacent waters has been made. The factors influenced the movement of sediment and the formation of the modern subaqueous landscape in the region have been analyzed

  2. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Blaine, Jennifer; Kuligowski, D. R.; Kropp, Roy K.; Dawley, Earl M.

    2012-05-31

    The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.

  3. Spatiotemporal variability of wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitall, D.R.; Paerl, H.W. [University of North Carolina, Morehad City, NC (USA). Inst. of Marine Sciences

    2001-10-01

    Excessive nitrogen (N) loading to N-sensitive waters such as the Neuse River estuary (North Carolina) has been shown to promote changes in microbial and algal community composition and function (harmful algal blooms), hypoxia and anoxia, and fish kills. Previous studies have estimated that wet atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (WAD-N), as deposition of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN: NO{sub 3}{sup -} NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and dissolved organic nitrogen, may contribute at least 15% of the total externally supplied or 'new' N flux to the coastal waters of North Carolina. In a 3-yr study from June 1996 to June 1999, the weekly wet deposition of inorganic and organic N was counted at eleven sites on a northwest-southeast transect in the watershed. The annual mean total (wet DIN + wet organics) WAD-N flux for (15,026 Mg N/yr). Seasonally the spring (March-May) and summer (June - August) months contain the highest total weekly N depositions; this pattern appears to be driven by N concentration in precipitation. There is also spatial variability in WAD-N deposition; in general, the upper portion of the watershed receives the lowest annual deposition and the middle portion of the watershed receives the highest deposition. Based on a range of watershed N retention and in-stream riverine processing values, it was estimated that this flux contributes approximately 24% of the total 'new' N flux to the estuary. 61 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River, Estuary, and Plume in 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Harnish, Ryan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Skalski, John R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Deters, Katherine A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ham, Kenneth D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Townsend, Richard L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Titzler, P. Scott [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hughes, Michael S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Jin A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Trott, Donna M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Uncertainty regarding the migratory behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids passing through the lower Columbia River and estuary after negotiating dams on the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) prompted the development and application of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS). The JSATS has been used to investigate the survival of juvenile salmonid smolts between Bonneville Dam (river kilometer (rkm) 236) and the mouth of the Columbia River annually since 2004. In 2010, a total of 12,214 juvenile salmonids were implanted with both a passive integrated transponder (PIT) and a JSATS acoustic transmitter. Using detection information from JSATS receiver arrays deployed on dams and in the river, estuary, and plume, the survival probability of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts tagged at John Day Dam was estimated form multiple reaches between rkm 153 and 8.3 during the spring. During summer, the survival probability of subyearling Chinook salmon was estimated for the same reaches. In addition, the influence of routes of passage (e.g., surface spill, deep spill, turbine, juvenile bypass system) through the lower three dams on the Columbia River (John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville) on juvenile salmonid smolt survival probability from the dams to rkm 153 and then between rkm 153 and 8.3 was examined to increase understanding of the immediate and latent effects of dam passage on juvenile salmon survival. Similar to previous findings, survival probability was relatively high (>0.95) for most groups of juvenile salmonids from the Bonneville Dam tailrace to about rkm 50. Downstream of rkm 50 the survival probability of all species and run types we examined decreased markedly. Steelhead smolts suffered the highest mortality in this lower portion of the Columbia River estuary, with only an estimated 60% of the tagged fish surviving to the mouth of the river. In contrast, yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts survived to the mouth

  5. Use of fishing resources by women in the Mamanguape River Estuary, Paraíba state, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha,Michelle S.P.; Santiago,Idalina M.F.L.; Cortez,Creuza S.; Trindade,Priscila M.; Mourão,José S.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the appropriation and use of fishing resources by women residing near the Mamanguape River Estuary (MRE), Paraíba state, Brazil. Were used combinations of qualitative (interviews and direct observations) and quantitative methods (use value and corrected principal use concordance). Thirty women were interviewed and reported the use of 41 species (30 fish, 8 crustaceans, and 3 mollusks), mainly for local consumption and sale. The species with the highest use value were Genidens gen...

  6. Weight-of-evidence approach in assessment of ecotoxicological risks of acid sulphate soils in the Baltic Sea river estuaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallin, Jaana, E-mail: jaana.wallin@jyu.fi [Finnish Environment Institute SYKE, Survontie 9 A, FI-40500 Jyväskylä (Finland); Karjalainen, Anna K. [Finnish Environment Institute SYKE, Survontie 9 A, FI-40500 Jyväskylä (Finland); Schultz, Eija [Finnish Environment Institute SYKE, Hakuninmaantie 6, FI-00430 Helsinki (Finland); Järvistö, Johanna; Leppänen, Matti; Vuori, Kari-Matti [Finnish Environment Institute SYKE, Survontie 9 A, FI-40500 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2015-03-01

    Acidity and leaching of metals from acid sulphate soils (ASSs) impair the water quality of receiving surface waters. The largest ASS areas in Europe are found in the coasts of the northern Baltic Sea. We used weight-of-evidence (WoE) approach to assess potential risks in 14 estuary sites affected by ASS in the Gulf of Finland, northern Baltic Sea. The assessment was based on exposure and effect profiles utilizing sediment and water metal concentrations and concurrent pH variation, sediment toxicity tests using the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the midge Chironomus riparius, and the ecological status of benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Sediment metal concentrations were compared to national sediment quality criteria/guidelines, and water metal concentrations to environmental quality standards (EQSs). Hazard quotients (HQs) were established for maximum aluminium, cadmium and zinc concentrations at low pH based on applicable US EPA toxicity database. Sediment metal concentrations were clearly elevated in most of the studied estuaries. The EQS of cadmium (0.1 μg/l) was exceeded in 3 estuaries out of 14. The pH-minima were below the national threshold value (5.5) between good and satisfactory water quality in 10 estuaries. V. fischeri bioluminescence indicated toxicity of the sediments but toxic response was not observed in the C. riparius emergence test. Benthic invertebrate communities were deteriorated in 6 out of 14 sites based on the benthic invertebrate quality index. The overall ecotoxicological risk was assessed as low in five, moderate in three and high in five of the estuary sites. The risk assessment utilizing the WoE approach indicated that harmful effects of ASSs are likely to occur in the Baltic Sea river estuaries located at the ASS hotspot area. - Highlights: • Acid sulphate soils release high amounts of metals and acidity. • Metals and acidity are transported to estuary sites. • Acid sulphate soils impair the ecological status

  7. Salmon Life Histories, Habitat, and Food Webs in the Columbia River Estuary: An Overview of Research Results, 2002-2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottom, Daniel L.; Anderson, Greer; Baptisa, Antonio

    2008-08-01

    From 2002 through 2006 we investigated historical and contemporary variations in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha life histories, habitat associations, and food webs in the lower Columbia River estuary (mouth to rkm 101). At near-shore beach-seining sites in the estuary, Chinook salmon occurred during all months of the year, increasing in abundance from January through late spring or early summer and declining rapidly after July. Recently emerged fry dispersed throughout the estuary in early spring, and fry migrants were abundant in the estuary until April or May each year. Each spring, mean salmon size increased from the tidal freshwater zone to the estuary mouth; this trend may reflect estuarine growth and continued entry of smaller individuals from upriver. Most juvenile Chinook salmon in the mainstem estuary fed actively on adult insects and epibenthic amphipods Americorophium spp. Estimated growth rates of juvenile Chinook salmon derived from otolith analysis averaged 0.5 mm d-1, comparable to rates reported for juvenile salmon Oncorhynchus spp. in other Northwest estuaries. Estuarine salmon collections were composed of representatives from a diversity of evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) from the lower and upper Columbia Basin. Genetic stock groups in the estuary exhibited distinct seasonal and temporal abundance patterns, including a consistent peak in the Spring Creek Fall Chinook group in May, followed by a peak in the Western Cascades Fall Chinook group in July. The structure of acanthocephalan parasite assemblages in juvenile Chinook salmon from the tidal freshwater zone exhibited a consistent transition in June. This may have reflected changes in stock composition and associated habitat use and feeding histories. From March through July, subyearling Chinook salmon were among the most abundant species in all wetland habitat types (emergent, forested, and scrub/shrub) surveyed in the lower 100 km of the estuary. Salmon densities

  8. Large-river delta-front estuaries as natural “recorders” of global environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Thomas S.; Allison, Mead A.

    2009-01-01

    Large-river delta-front estuaries (LDE) are important interfaces between continents and the oceans for material fluxes that have a global impact on marine biogeochemistry. In this article, we propose that more emphasis should be placed on LDE in future global climate change research. We will use some of the most anthropogenically altered LDE systems in the world, the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River and the Chinese rivers that enter the Yellow Sea (e.g., Huanghe and Changjiang) as case-studies, to posit that these systems are both “drivers” and “recorders” of natural and anthropogenic environmental change. Specifically, the processes in the LDE can influence (“drive”) the flux of particulate and dissolved materials from the continents to the global ocean that can have profound impact on issues such as coastal eutrophication and the development of hypoxic zones. LDE also record in their rapidly accumulating subaerial and subaqueous deltaic sediment deposits environmental changes such as continental-scale trends in climate and land-use in watersheds, frequency and magnitude of cyclonic storms, and sea-level change. The processes that control the transport and transformation of carbon in the active LDE and in the deltaic sediment deposit are also essential to our understanding of carbon sequestration and exchange with the world ocean—an important objective in global change research. U.S. efforts in global change science including the vital role of deltaic systems are emphasized in the North American Carbon Plan (www.carboncyclescience.gov). PMID:19435849

  9. PAHs in sediment cores at main river estuaries of Chaohu Lake: implication for the change of local anthropogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chen; Wu, Yaketon; Zhang, Shuo; Wu, Liang-Liang; Liang, Xiao-Guo; Chen, Tian-Hu; Zhu, Cheng-Zhu; Sojinu, Samuel O; Wang, Ji-Zhong

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, 28 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in four sediment cores collected from the main river estuaries of Chaohu Lake, one of the severely polluted lakes in China. The results indicate that elevated concentrations of total PAHs (Σ28PAH) were found in the samples from the estuary of Nanfei River (ENF), considering BaP-based total toxicity equivalent (TEQ-BaP) and toxic unit (TU) results; there are potential adverse environmental implications. The total organic carbon (TOC) played an important role on the accumulation of PAHs at ENF and the estuary of Tongyang River (ETY). The predominant PAHs are high molecular weight (HMW) homologous for all samples; as a result, industrial wastewater from a steel company is expectedly the key source of PAHs in ENF, while coke consumption would be the important source of PAHs at other three sampling sites. Vertical distribution of PAHs in the sediment cores could be explained by the local social and economic activities. Furthermore, a minor variation of PAH composition in the sediment core could be justified by the stable structure of energy consumption in the Anhui Province. These results justify the need for further enhancement of industrial wastewater treatment and development of renewable energies which are the key factors on the control of PAH pollution in China.

  10. Upstream Freshwater and Terrestrial Sources Are Differentially Reflected in the Bacterial Community Structure along a Small Arctic River and Its Estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauptmann, Aviaja Zenia Edna Lyberth; Markussen, Thor N; Stibal, Marek

    2016-01-01

    of different water sources on the microbial communities in Arctic rivers and estuaries remains unknown. In this study we used 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to assess a small river and its estuary on the Disko Island, West Greenland (69°N). Samples were taken in August when there is maximum precipitation......Glacier melting and altered precipitation patterns influence Arctic freshwater and coastal ecosystems. Arctic rivers are central to Arctic water ecosystems by linking glacier meltwaters and precipitation with the ocean through transport of particulate matter and microorganisms. However, the impact...... and temperatures are high in the Disko Bay area. We describe the bacterial community through a river into the estuary, including communities originating in a glacier and a proglacial lake. Our results show that water from the glacier and lake transports distinct communities into the river in terms of diversity...

  11. Weight-of-evidence approach in assessment of ecotoxicological risks of acid sulphate soils in the Baltic Sea river estuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Jaana; Karjalainen, Anna K; Schultz, Eija; Järvistö, Johanna; Leppänen, Matti; Vuori, Kari-Matti

    2015-03-01

    Acidity and leaching of metals from acid sulphate soils (ASSs) impair the water quality of receiving surface waters. The largest ASS areas in Europe are found in the coasts of the northern Baltic Sea. We used weight-of-evidence (WoE) approach to assess potential risks in 14 estuary sites affected by ASS in the Gulf of Finland, northern Baltic Sea. The assessment was based on exposure and effect profiles utilizing sediment and water metal concentrations and concurrent pH variation, sediment toxicity tests using the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the midge Chironomus riparius, and the ecological status of benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Sediment metal concentrations were compared to national sediment quality criteria/guidelines, and water metal concentrations to environmental quality standards (EQSs). Hazard quotients (HQs) were established for maximum aluminium, cadmium and zinc concentrations at low pH based on applicable US EPA toxicity database. Sediment metal concentrations were clearly elevated in most of the studied estuaries. The EQS of cadmium (0.1 μg/l) was exceeded in 3 estuaries out of 14. The pH-minima were below the national threshold value (5.5) between good and satisfactory water quality in 10 estuaries. V. fischeri bioluminescence indicated toxicity of the sediments but toxic response was not observed in the C. riparius emergence test. Benthic invertebrate communities were deteriorated in 6 out of 14 sites based on the benthic invertebrate quality index. The overall ecotoxicological risk was assessed as low in five, moderate in three and high in five of the estuary sites. The risk assessment utilizing the WoE approach indicated that harmful effects of ASSs are likely to occur in the Baltic Sea river estuaries located at the ASS hotspot area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Tracing the origin of the oxygen-consuming organic matter in the hypoxic zone in a large eutrophic estuary: the lower reach of the Pearl River Estuary, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Su

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We assess the relative contributions of different sources of organic matter, marine vs. terrestrial, to oxygen consumption in an emerging hypoxic zone in the lower Pearl River Estuary (PRE, a large eutrophic estuary located in Southern China. Our cruise, conducted in July 2014, consisted of two legs before and after the passing of Typhoon Rammasun, which completely de-stratified the water column. The stratification recovered rapidly, within 1 day after the typhoon. We observed algal blooms in the upper layer of the water column and hypoxia underneath in bottom water during both legs. Repeat sampling at the initial hypoxic station showed severe oxygen depletion down to 30 µmol kg−1 before the typhoon and a clear drawdown of dissolved oxygen after the typhoon. Based on a three endmember mixing model and the mass balance of dissolved inorganic carbon and its isotopic composition, the δ13C of organic carbon remineralized in the hypoxic zone was −23.2 ± 1.1 ‰. We estimated that 65 ± 16 % of the oxygen-consuming organic matter was derived from marine sources, and the rest (35 ± 16 % was derived from the continent. In contrast to a recently studied hypoxic zone in the East China Sea off the Changjiang Estuary where marine organic matter dominated oxygen consumption, here terrestrial organic matter significantly contributed to the formation and maintenance of hypoxia. How varying amounts of these organic matter sources drive oxygen consumption has important implications for better understanding hypoxia and its mitigation in bottom waters.

  13. [Assessment of ecosystem energy flow and carrying capacity of swimming crab enhancement in the Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin Qun; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhong-yi; Wu, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Stock enhancement is increasingly proved to be an important measure of the fishery resources conservation, and the assessment of carrying capacity is the decisive factor of the effects of stock enhancement. Meanwhile, the variations in the energy flow patterns of releasing species and ecosystem were the basis for assessing carrying capacity of stock enhancement. So, in the present study, based on the survey data collected from the Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters during 2012-2013, three Ecopath mass-balance models were established in June, August and October, and the variations in ecosystem energy flow in these months were analyzed, as well as the assessment of carrying capacity of swimming crab enhancement. The energy flow mainly concentrated on trophic level I-III in Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters, and was relatively less on trophic level IV or above. The system flow proportion on the trophic level I was the highest in June, and was the lowest in August. The highest system flow proportion on the trophic level II was found in August, and the lowest in June. The relative and absolute energy flow of swimming crab mainly concentrated on the trophic level III, and the mean trophic level of swimming crab among June, August and October were 3.28. Surplus production was relatively higher in Yellow River estuary and adjacent waters, the highest value was found in June, and the lowest value in August. The ratios of total primary production/total respiration (TPP/TR) were 5.49, 2.47 and 3.01 in June, August and October, respectively, and the ratios of total primary production/total biomass (TPP/B) were 47.61, 33.30 and 29.78, respectively. Combined with the low Finn' s cycling index (FCI: 0.03-0.06), these changes indicated that the Yellow River estuary ecosystem was at an early development stage with higher vulnerability. The energy conversion efficiency of system was from 7.3% to 11.5%, the mean trophic levels of the catch were 3.23, 2.97 and 2.82 in

  14. The exploited population of the brackish river prawn (Macrobrachium macrobrachion Herklots 1851 in the Cross River estuary, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis M. Nwosu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the exploited population of Macrobrachium macrobrachion in the Cross River estuary, Nigeria, were studied based on monthly length-frequency data collected from January 1997 to June 1998 (18 months, from the landings of the artisanal Macrobrachium fishery. Sexual dimorphism was indicated in the growth and mortality parameters. For the males, the von Bertalanffy growth parameters were estimated as L∞ = 141.35 mm, K = 1.21 year-1, C = 1.0 and WP = 0.15. For the females, they were L∞ = 117.55 mm, K = 1.60 year-1, C = 0.81 and WP = 0.51. The instantaneous rate of total mortality (Z was estimated as 9.53 year-1 (males and 9.14 year-1 (females. The instantaneous rate of natural mortality (M was estimated as 2.44 year-1 (males and 3.09 year-1 (females, while the instantaneous rate of fishing mortality (F was estimated as 7.09 year-1 (males and 6.05 year-1 (females. The exploitation rate (E obtained was 0.74 for the males and 0.66 for the females, suggesting that the prawn population was over-fished for both sexes. It is necessary to analyse the catch and effort data for the last 10 years and to apply other methods of stock assessment in order to estimate the long term trends in the fishery.

  15. Spatial-temporal distribution and risk assessment of mercury in different fractions in surface sediments from the Yangtze River estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingrui; Liu, Ruimin; Men, Cong; Xu, Fei; Guo, Lijia; Shen, Zhenyao

    2017-11-15

    The temporal and spatial distributions of mercury in different fractions and its potential ecological risk were investigated in sediments from the Yangtze River estuary (YRE) by analyzing data collected from the study area. The results showed that mercury in the organic and residual fractions had dominant proportions, from 15.2% to 48.52% and from 45.96% to 81.59%, respectively. The fractions were more susceptible to seasonal changes than other fractions. Higher proportions of mercury in organic fraction were found in wet seasons; the opposite was true for mercury in residual fraction. With respect to the spatial distribution, the concentration mercury in exchangeable, carbonate and Fe-Mn oxide fractions showed a decreasing trend from the inner estuary to the outer estuary, but no obvious trends were found in the distributions of mercury in the organic and residual fractions. The risk assessment code (RAC) was used to evaluate the potential ecological risk in the study area based on the proportions of exchangeable and carbonate fractions. The average RAC values during the four periods were 6.00%, 2.20%, 2.83%, and 0.61%. Although these values show that the risk in the study area is generally low, the distribution of RAC values indicates that the inner estuary has a medium risk, with a value up to 10%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Geographic specificity of Aroclor 1268 in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) frequenting the Turtle/Brunswick River Estuary, Georgia (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulster, Erin L. [Marine Sciences Department, Savannah State University, Savannah, Georgia, 31404 (United States); Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, 10 Ocean Science Circle, Savannah, Georgia, 31411 (United States)], E-mail: epulster@mote.org; Maruya, Keith A. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, 10 Ocean Science Circle, Savannah, Georgia, 31411 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Coastal marine resources are at risk from anthropogenic contaminants, including legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) with half-lives of decades or more. To determine if polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) signatures can be used to distinguish among local populations of inshore bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) along the southeastern U.S. coast, blubber from free-ranging and stranded animals were collected along the Georgia coast in 2004 and analyzed for PCB congeners using gas chromatography with electron capture and negative chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection (GC-ECD and GC-NCI-MS). Mean total PCB concentrations (77 {+-} 34 {mu}g/g lipid) were more than 10 fold higher and congener distributions were highly enriched in Cl{sub 7}-Cl{sub 10} homologs in free-ranging animals from the Turtle/Brunswick River estuary (TBRE) compared with strandings samples from Savannah area estuaries 90 km to the north. Using principal components analysis (PCA), the Aroclor 1268 signature associated with TBRE animals was distinct from that observed in Savannah area animals, and also from those in animals biopsied in other southeastern U.S estuaries. Moreover, PCB signatures in dolphin blubber closely resembled those in local preferred prey fish species, strengthening the hypothesis that inshore T. truncatus populations exhibit long-term fidelity to specific estuaries and making them excellent sentinels for assessing the impact of stressors on coastal ecosystem health.

  17. Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, António M. [Oregon Health & Science University, Science and Technology Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction

    2009-08-02

    This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary

  18. Acoustic tag detections of green sturgeon in the Columbia River and Coos Bay estuaries, Washington and Oregon, 2010–11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Hal C.; Romine, Jason G.; Perry, Russell W.

    2017-11-08

    The Columbia River, in Washington and Oregon, and Coos Bay, in Oregon, are economically important shipping channels that are inhabited by several fishes protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Maintenance of shipping channels involves dredge operations to maintain sufficient in-channel depths to allow large ships to navigate the waterways safely. Fishes entrained by dredge equipment often die or experience delayed mortality. Other potential negative effects of dredging include increased turbidity, reductions in prey resources, and the release of harmful contaminants from the dredged sediments. One species of concern is the ESA-listed green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris; Southern Distinct Population Segment). In this study, we used acoustic telemetry to identify habitat use, arrival and departure timing, and the extent of upstream migration of green sturgeon in the Columbia River and Coos Bay to help inform dredge operations to minimize potential take of green sturgeon. Autonomous acoustic receivers were deployed in Coos Bay from the mouth to river kilometer (rkm) 21.6 from October 2009 through October 2010. In the Columbia River Estuary, receivers were deployed between the mouth and rkm 37.8 from April to November in 2010 and 2011. A total of 29 subadult and adult green sturgeon were tagged with temperature and pressure sensor tags and released during the study, primarily in Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor, Washington, and the Klamath River, Oregon. Green sturgeon detected during the study but released by other researchers also were included in the study.The number of tagged green sturgeon detected in the two estuaries differed markedly. In Coos Bay, only one green sturgeon was detected for about 2 hours near the estuary mouth. In the Columbia River Estuary, 9 green sturgeon were detected in 2010 and 10 fish were detected in 2011. Green sturgeon entered the Columbia River from May through October during both years, with the greatest numbers of fish being

  19. Numerical Study on Effects of Coastline Change on Salinity variation in the Liao River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Xue-qing; Zhao, Yang; Li, Qing-zhen; Yu, Jin-zhen

    2017-08-01

    A 3D numerical model is used to simulate the effect of coastline change on salinity distribution variation in the Liao River Estuary (LHE), China, consists of shallow channel and extensive tidal flat. Simulations are run with reclamation and land-ocean interaction to evaluate their effects on salinity transport for LHE. It is so evident to express the salinity diurnal varying with tide rather than the amount of runoff discharge; the LHE is always the rising tide advantage free of reclamation. To succinctly quantify the asymmetry degree of salinity distribution across the Gaizhou beach (GZB), the calculated parameter of low-salinity area is chosen. For dry seasons, such as May, the amplitude of its scale is from 209.54 km2 reducing to 185.6 km2. More interestingly, it demonstrates the variation shape divided into increasing at the west of GZB and decreasing in the east, varying from 7.4 to 20.9 km2, especially the east of GZB. Despite the trend is basically consistent with flood seasons, the scale is 1.6 times higher than dry seasons. Reclamation has impact on low-salinity area variation enhanced coastal change influences on salinity distribution are less distinctive, but significant in ecological sustainability just like fishery breeding stability.

  20. Diurnal variation of nitric oxide emission flux from a mangrove wetland in Zhangjiang River Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Xiao, Qiang; Yang, Zhang-Hua; Huang, Sheng-Kai; Wang, Jian; Wu, Yu-Guang; Dong, Xue-Jun; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2010-12-01

    The diurnal variation of nitric oxide (NO) emission fluxes from a Kandelia obovata and Avicennia marina mangrove wetland were studied in the Zhangjiang River Estuary Mangrove National Nature Reserve using a dynamic chamber-based technique and a chemiluminescent analyzer. Results from field experiments show that NO emission from K. obovata and A. marina sampling sites reached maximal values of 1.07 ng N m -2 s -1 and 1.23 ng N m -2 s -1, respectively after the night tide. Meanwhile NO emission maintained at a steady lower level in daytime for both wetland sites. In laboratory experiments, NO emission from the mangrove wetland soil samples treated with simulated tides in the darkness exhibited higher values than those in the light, therefore it seems that tides and darkness could increase NO emission from mangrove wetlands, while intensive light, high temperature, and dryness in the daytime decreased NO emission. Compared with K. obovata soil samples, the diurnal average NO emission rate of the A. marina site was significantly higher, which was closely related to relatively higher diurnal average CO 2 emission rate, soil available nitrogen content and soil net nitrification rate of the A. marina site. Moreover, soil samples of the A. marina site were more responsive to simulated tides and the addition of nitrogen than those of the K. obovata site.

  1. Growth and production of Pisidium amnicum in the freshwater tidal area of the River Minho estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ronaldo; Nogueira, António J. A.; Antunes, Carlos; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2008-09-01

    Pisidium amnicum is an important indigenous species in the freshwater tidal portion of the River Minho estuary and until the introduction of the non-indigenous invasive species Corbicula fluminea was the most abundant bivalve in this ecosystem. Between January 2005 and August 2006 monthly samples were collected in three sites to study the abundance, biomass, growth and production of P. amnicum. Results indicate that P. amnicum has continuous growth throughout its life span and growth rates were higher during the early phases of development, coincident with the spring and summer months. Life span estimated was 24 months. The annual 2005 growth production of P. amnicum estimated was 2.339 g AFDW m -2 year -1, and the mean annual biomass was 1.594 g AFDW m -2, resulting in a P/B¯ ratio of 1.47 year -1 and a turnover time of 248.7 days. The annual 2005 elimination production estimated was 7.541 g AFDW m -2 year -1, resulting in an E/B¯ ratio of 4.73 year -1. It is concluded that P. amnicum continues to play an important role in the food web in areas where it coexists with C. fluminea. Previous studies showed declines in the indigenous population after the introduction of C. fluminea and currently, areas of high abundance are restricted to small patches in the upper limit of the tidal influence. Consequently, P. amnicum is now under considerable pressure and this situation requires ecological and conservational attention.

  2. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

    2012-05-31

    The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

  3. Body condition and gametogenic cycle of Galatea paradoxa (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the Volta River estuary, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei-Boateng, D.; Wilson, J. G.

    2013-11-01

    The reproductive cycle of Galatea paradoxa which is the basis for an artisanal fishery in the Volta River estuary, Ghana, was studied using condition indices and histological methods from March 2008 to July 2009. The cycle is annual with a single spawning event between June and October. Gametogenesis starts in November progressing steadily to a peak in June-July when spawning begins until October when the animal is spent. The condition indices (shell-free wet weight/total wet weight, ash-free dry weight/shell weight and gonad wet weight/shell weight) showed a clear relationship with the gametogenic stage rising from a minimum at stage (I) start of gametogenesis, to their highest values at stages (IIIA) ripe and (IIIB) start of spawning before declining significantly to stage (IV) spent.It is suggested that condition index may prove a valuable technique in fishery management to recognise the reproductive stages of G. paradoxa as it is less expensive and time consuming than histological techniques in addition to being easier to teach to non-specialists. The data presented in this study provide information on the timing of spawning events for G. paradoxa, which is necessary for developing sustainable management strategies and selection of broodstock for aquaculture.

  4. [Distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in aquatic species from the Pearl River Estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Cai-hong; Luo, Xiao-jun; Yu, Mei; Meng, Xiang-zhou; Mai, Bi-xian; Zeng, Eddy

    2006-09-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were detected in biota samples collected from the Pearl River Estuary. The concentrations of sigma10 PBDEs (BDE28, 47, 66, 100, 99, 85, 154, 153, 138, 183) in fish species (including Platycephalus indicus, Pseudosiaena crocea , Pampus argenteus, Cynoglossus robustus, and Harpodon nehereus), shrimps (including Metapenaeus ensis and Metapenaeus affinis) and Squilla oratoria were from 37.8 ng x g(-1) to 407.1 ng x g(-1) (normalized to lipid), from 49.0 ng x g(-1) to 239.1 ng x g(-1) and from 142 ng x g(-1) to 444.5 ng x g(-1), respectively. BDE47 was the dominant congener in all biota samples, with a contribution to sigma10 PBDEs ranging from 53.7% to 66.9%. Differences in concentrations of PBDEs and PBDE patterns in different species may be related to the different feeding habit, living environment and uptaking or elimination rate. High ratios of concentrations of PBDEs in liver /muscle in fish species indicated that PBDEs tended to accumulate more in liver than in muscle.

  5. Dissolved Fe(II) in a river-estuary system rich in dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Mark J.; Statham, Peter J.; Milani, Ambra

    2014-12-01

    Reduced iron, Fe(II), accounts for a significant fraction of dissolved Fe across many natural surface waters despite its rapid oxidation under oxic conditions. Here we investigate the temporal and spatial variation in dissolved Fe redox state in a high dissolved organic matter (DOM) estuarine system, the River Beaulieu. We couple manual sample collection with the deployment of an autonomous in situ analyser, designed to simultaneously measure dissolved Fe(II) and total dissolved Fe, in order to investigate processes operating on the diurnal timescale and to evaluate the performance of the analyser in a high DOM environment. Concentrations of dissolved Fe available to the ligand ferrozine are elevated throughout the estuary (up to 21 μM in freshwater) and notably higher than those previously reported likely due to seasonal variation. Fe(II) is observed to account for a large, varying fraction of the dissolved Fe available to ferrozine (25.5 ± 12.5%) and this fraction decreases with increasing salinity. We demonstrate that the very high DOM concentration in this environment and association of this DOM with dissolved Fe, prevents the accurate measurement of dissolved Fe concentrations in situ using a sensor reliant on rapid competitive ligand exchange.

  6. [Changes of wetland landscape pattern in Dayang River Estuary based on high-resolution remote sensing image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Zhao, Dong-zhi; Zhang, Feng-shou; Wei, Bao-quan

    2011-07-01

    Based on the comprehensive consideration of the high resolution characteristics of remote sensing data and the current situation of land cover and land use in Dayang River Estuary wetland, a classification system with different resolutions of wetland landscape in the Estuary was established. The landscape pattern indices and landscape transition matrix were calculated by using the high resolution remote sensing data, and the dynamic changes of the landscape pattern from 1984 to 2008 were analyzed. In the study period, the wetland landscape components changed drastically. Wetland landscape transferred from natural wetland into artificial wetland, and wetland core regional area decreased. Natural wetland's largest patch area index descended, and the fragmentation degree ascended; while artificial wetland area expanded, its patch number decreased, polymerization degree increased, and the maximum patch area index had an obvious increasing trend. Increasing human activities, embankment construction, and reclamation for aquaculture were the main causes for the decrease of wetland area and the degradation of the ecological functions of Dayang River Estuary. To constitute long-term scientific and reasonable development plan, establish wetland nature reserves, protect riverway, draft strict inspective regimes for aquaculture reclamation, and energetically develop resource-based tourism industry would be the main strategies for the protection of the estuarine wetland.

  7. Sources and distribution of organic matter in a river-dominated estuary (Winyah Bay, SC, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi, Miguel A.; Teixeira, Maria J.; Perkey, David W.

    2003-08-01

    The sources and distribution of organic matter (OM) in surface waters and sediments from Winyah Bay (South Carolina, USA) were investigated using a variety of analytical techniques, including elemental, stable isotope and organic biomarker analyses. Several locations along the estuary salinity gradient were sampled during four different periods of contrasting river discharge and tidal range. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of surface waters ranged from 7 mg l -1 in the lower bay stations closest to the ocean to 20 mg l -1 in the river and upper bay samples. There was a general linear relationship between DOC concentrations and salinity in three of the four sampling periods. In contrast, particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations were significantly lower (0.1-3 mg l -1) and showed no relationship with salinity. The high molecular weight dissolved OM (HMW DOM) isolated from selected water samples collected along the bay displayed atomic carbon:nitrogen ratios ([C/N]a) and stable carbon isotopic compositions of organic carbon ( δ13C OC) that ranged from 10 to 30 and from -28 to -25‰, respectively. Combined, such compositions indicate that in most HMW DOM samples, the majority of the OM originates from terrigenous sources, with smaller contributions from riverine and estuarine phytoplankton. In contrast, the [C/N]a ratios of particulate OM (POM) samples varied significantly among the collection periods, ranging from low values of ˜5 to high values of >20. Overall, the trends in [C/N]a ratios indicated that algal sources of POM were most important during the early and late summer, whereas terrigenous sources dominated in the winter and early spring. In Winyah Bay bottom sediments, the concentrations of the mineral-associated OM were positively correlated with sediment surface area. The [C/N]a ratios and δ13C OC compositions of the bulk sedimentary OM ranged from 5 to 45 and from -28 to -23‰, respectively. These compositions were consistent

  8. Eutrophication Model Accuracy - Comparison of Calibration and Verification Performance of a Model of the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    A modified version of an existing two-dimensional, laterally averaged model (CE-QUAL-W2) was applied to predict water quality conditions in the lower 80-km of the Neuse River Estuary. Separate time periods were modeled for calibration and verification (model testing). The calibration time period ran from June 1997 to December 1999, while the verification time period ran from January to December 2000. During this time the estuary received two periods of unusually high inflows in early 1998 and again in September and October 1999. The latter rainfall event loaded the estuary with the equivalent of nearly two years worth of water and dissolved inorganic nitrogen in just six weeks. Overall, the level of calibration performance achieved by the model was comparable to that attained in other eutrophication model studies of eastern U.S. estuaries. The model most accurately simulated water quality constituents having a consistent spatial variation within the estuary (e.g. nitrate, salinity), and was least accurate for constituents without a consistent spatial variation (e.g. phosphate, chlorophyll-a). Calibration performance varied widely between the three algal groupings modeled (diatoms and dinoflagellates, cryptomonads and chlorophytes, cyanobacteria). Model performance during verification was comparable to the performance seen during calibration. The model's salinity prediction capabilities were somewhat better in the validation, while dissolved oxygen performance in the validation year was slightly poorer compared to calibration performance. Nutrient and chlorophyll-a performance were virtually the same between the calibration and verification exercises. As part of the TMDL analysis, an unsuccessful attempt was made to capture model error as a component of model uncertainty, but it was found that model residuals were neither unbiased nor normally distributed.

  9. The level of mercury contamination in mariculture sites at the estuary of Pearl River and the potential health risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, H C; Zhao, K Y; Ding, W Y; Li, J B; Liang, P; Wu, S C; Wong, M H

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, the Hg contamination in mariculture sites located at the estuary of Pearl River was to investigate with an attempt to analyse associated health risks of dietary exposure to both total mercury (THg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) in cultured fish and shellfish. The highest total mercury concentration (7.037 ± 0.556 ng L(-1)) of seawater was observed at Zhuhai Estuary. The Hg concentrations of sediment in Guishan Island were significantly higher (p mercury methylation mostly occurred at the sediment-water interface. Results of health risk assessments showed that fish consumption would impose a higher risk to children but less to adults, while shellfish produced in the studied area was safe for consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Phytosociology of planted and natural mangrove forests in the estuary of the Ostras River, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Bernini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The phytosociology of planted and natural mangrove forests were compared in the estuary of the Ostras River, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Vegetation sampling was performed by the plot method, and the diameter at breast height (DBH and height of individuals > 1 m tall were recorded. The results indicated that the planted forest had lower average DBH and basal area and higher density of trunks in relation to natural forest. The distribution of individuals by height class and the distribution of stems per diameter class showed that the planted forest was younger. Laguncularia racemosa and Rhizophora mangle occurred in both forests, while Avicennia schaueriana was found only in the planted forest. Laguncularia racemosa showed greater dominance and relative density at all sites analyzed, probably because it is characteristic of sites with less marine influence and the fact that the estuary had been altered by human disturbance.

  11. Factors affecting the distribution and abundance of Macrobrachium petersi (Hilgendorf) in the Keiskamma River and estuary, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, G. H. L.

    1985-09-01

    A dry (1979-1980) and a wet (1980-1981) season had a marked effect on the freshwater inflow into the Keiskamma estuary. Under low inflow conditions, which results in elevated salinities in the upper reaches, an upstream migration of adult Macrobrachium petersi (Hilgendorf) to freshwater takes place. During periods of increased river inflow adult M. petersi move downstream to the more saline reaches of the estuary. These two migratory responses have been interpreted as (a) a breeding migration under high inflow conditions which ensures that larvae are in close proximity to salinities that favour growth and development, and (b) an adult upstream migration back to freshwater to escape elevated estuarine salinities as a result of the low freshwater inflow.

  12. Historical trends of hypoxia in Changjiang River estuary: Applications of chemical biomarkers and microfossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Bianchi, T.S.; Yang, Z.; Osterman, L.E.; Allison, M.A.; DiMarco, Steven F.; Yang, G.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades China has become the largest global consumer of fertilizers, which has enhanced river nutrient fluxes and caused eutrophication and hypoxia in the Yangtze (Changjiang) large river delta-front estuary (LDE). In this study, we utilized plant pigments, lignin-phenols, stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) and foraminiferal microfossils in 210Pb dated cores to examine the history of hypoxia in the Changjiang LDE. Two sediment cores were collected onboard R/V Dong Fang Hong 2 using a stainless-steel box-corer; one at a water depth of 24.7 m on Jun. 15, 2006 and the other at 52 m on Nov. 20, 2007, both in the hypoxic region off the Changjiang LDE. There has been a significant increase in the abundance of plant pigments after 1979 that are indicators of enhanced diatom and cyanobacterial abundance, which agrees with post-1980 record of increasing nutrient loads in the Changjiang River. The increased inputs of terrestrially derived materials to the LDE are largely woody plant sources and most likely due to deforestation that began in the early 1950s. However, post-1960 lignin data did not reflect enhanced loading of woody materials despite continued deforestation possibly due to increased trapping from greater dam construction, a reduction of deforestation in the drainage basin since the last 1990s, and soil conservation practices. The lack of linkages between bulk indices (stable isotopes, % OC, molar C/N ratios) and microfossil/chemical biomarkers may reflect relative differences in the amount of carbon tracked by these different proxies. Although NO3− is likely responsible for most of the changes in phytoplankton production (post 1970s), historical changes in N loading from the watershed and hypoxia on the LDE shelf may not be as well linked in East China Sea (ECS) sediments due to possible denitrification/ammonification processes; finally, increases in low-oxygen tolerant foraminiferal microfossils indicate there has been an increase in the

  13. Vegetation of the Elwha River estuary: Chapter 8 in Coastal habitats of the Elwha River, Washington--biological and physical patterns and processes prior to dam removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafroth, Patrick B.; Fuentes, Tracy L.; Pritekel, Cynthia; Beirne, Matthew M.; Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Magirl, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The Elwha River estuary supports one of the most diverse coastal wetland complexes yet described in the Salish Sea region, in terms of vegetation types and plant species richness. Using a combination of aerial imagery and vegetation plot sampling, we identified 6 primary vegetation types and 121 plant species in a 39.7 ha area. Most of the estuary is dominated by woody vegetation types, with mixed riparian forest being the most abundant (20 ha), followed by riparian shrub (6.3 ha) and willow-alder forest (3.9 ha). The shrub-emergent marsh transition vegetation type was fourth most abundant (2.2 ha), followed by minor amounts of dunegrass (1.75 ha) and emergent marsh (0.2 ha). This chapter documents the abundance, distribution, and floristics of these six vegetation types, including plant species richness, life form, species origin (native or introduced), and species wetland indicator status. These data will serve as a baseline to which future changes can be compared, following the impending removal of Glines Canyon and Elwha Dams upstream on the Elwha River. Dam removals may alter many of the processes, materials, and biotic interactions that influence the estuary plant communities, including hydrology, salinity, sediment and wood transport, nutrients, and plant-microbe interactions.

  14. Change in Land Cover along the Lower Columbia River Estuary as Determined from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garono, Ralph; Anderson, Becci; Robinson, Rob

    2003-10-01

    The Lower Columbia River Estuary Management Plan (Jerrick, 1991) recognizes the positive relationship between the conservation of fish and wildlife habitat, and sustaining their populations. An important component of fish and wildlife conservation and management is the identification of habitats, trends in habitat change, and delineation of habitat for preservation, restoration or enhancement. Alterations to the environment, such as hydropower generation, dredging, forestry, agriculture, channel alteration, diking, bank stabilization and floodplain development, have dramatically altered both the type and distribution of habitats along the Columbia River Estuary (CRE) and its floodplain. Along the Columbia River, tidally influenced habitats occur from the river mouth to the Bonneville Dam, a distance of 230 km. If we are to effectively manage the natural resources of the Columbia River ecosystem, there is a need to understand how habitats have changed because fish and wildlife populations are known to respond to changes in habitat quality and distribution. The goal of this study was to measure the amount and type of change of CRE land cover from 1992 to 2000. We performed a change analysis on two spatial data sets describing land cover along the lower portion of the estuary (Fig. 1). The 1992 data set was created by the NOAA Coastal Remote Sensing, Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) in cooperation with Columbia River Estuary Study Task Force (CREST), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Point Adams Field Station, and State of Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The 2000 data set was produced by Earth Design Consultants, Inc. (EDC) and the Wetland Ecosystem Team (WET: University of Washington) as part of a larger Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) habitat mapping study. Although the image classification methodologies used to create the data sets differed, both data sets were produced by classifying Landsat

  15. Sampling surface particle size distributions and stability analysis of deep channel in the Pearl River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao-chuan; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Yu-liang; Lei, Zhi-yi; Ji, Xiao-mei

    2017-06-01

    Particle size distributions (PSDs) of bottom sediments in a coastal zone are generally multimodal due to the complexity of the dynamic environment. In this paper, bottom sediments along the deep channel of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) are used to understand the multimodal PSDs' characteristics and the corresponding depositional environment. The results of curve-fitting analysis indicate that the near-bottom sediments in the deep channel generally have a bimodal distribution with a fine component and a relatively coarse component. The particle size distribution of bimodal sediment samples can be expressed as the sum of two lognormal functions and the parameters for each component can be determined. At each station of the PRE, the fine component makes up less volume of the sediments and is relatively poorly sorted. The relatively coarse component, which is the major component of the sediments, is even more poorly sorted. The interrelations between the dynamics and particle size of the bottom sediment in the deep channel of the PRE have also been investigated by the field measurement and simulated data. The critical shear velocity and the shear velocity are calculated to study the stability of the deep channel. The results indicate that the critical shear velocity has a similar distribution over large part of the deep channel due to the similar particle size distribution of sediments. Based on a comparison between the critical shear velocities derived from sedimentary parameters and the shear velocities obtained by tidal currents, it is likely that the depositional area is mainly distributed in the northern part of the channel, while the southern part of the deep channel has to face higher erosion risk.

  16. Surface sediment properties and heavy metal pollution assessment in the Pearl River Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guangming; Ye, Siyuan; Yuan, Hongming; Ding, Xigui; Wang, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Grain size and concentrations of heavy metals (arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn)) of 148 surface sediments and activities of 210Pb and heavy metal concetrantions of one sediment core from the Pearl River Estuary were analyzed. The surface sediments were dominated by silt and sandy silt. Sediment type controlled the spatial distribution patterns of the heavy metals. The heavy metal concentrations in the sediments ranged from 3.34 to 37.11 mg/kg for As, 0.06 to 2.06 mg/kg for Cd, 12 to 130 mg/kg for Cr, 5.8 to 170.6 mg/kg for Cu, 0.01 to 0.25 mg/kg for Hg, 23 to 78 mg/kg for Pb, and 32 to 259 mg/kg for Zn. Both contents of clay and organic carbons were significantly positively correlated with heavy metals. The baseline values of elements in the study area were 12.97 mg/kg for As, 0.14 mg/kg for Cd, 68 mg/kg for Cr, 28.9 mg/kg for Cu, 0.08 mg/kg for Hg, 33 mg/kg for Pb, and 92 mg/kg for Zn. The metal enrichment factor (EF) and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) were calculated to assess anthropogenic contamination. Results showed slight to moderate Cd contamination in the region. Principle component analysis indicated that Cd could be attributed to anthropogenic sources; As and Hg were predominantly affected by human activities; and Pb, Cr, Cu, and Zn were associated with both natural and anthropogenic sources.

  17. Stratified active archaeal communities in the sediments of Jiulong River Estuary, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian eLi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Here the composition of total and active archaeal communities in a sediment core of Jiulong River estuary at Fujian Province, Southern China was reported. Profiles of CH4 and SO42- concentrations from the sediment core indicated the existence of a sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ in which sulfate reduction-coupled anaerobic oxidation of methane occurs. Accordingly, three sediment layers (16-18.5 cm, 71-73.5 cm, 161-163.5 cm from the 1.2 m sediment core were sectioned and named top, middle and bottom, respectively. Total DNA and RNA of each layer were extracted and used for clone libraries and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes, the reverse transcription (RT-PCR products of 16S rRNA and methyl CoM reductase alpha subunit (mcrA genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that archaeal communities of the three layers were dominated by the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (MCG whose ecological functions were still unknown. The MCG could be further divided into seven subgroups, named MCG-A, B, C, D, E, F and G. MCG-A and MCG-G were the most active groups in the estuarine sediments. Known anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANMEs were only found as minor components in these estuarine archaeal communities. This study, together with the studies of deep subsurface sediments, would be a very good start point to target and compare the specific active archaeal groups and their roles in the dark, deep subsurface sediment environments.

  18. Microphytobenthic biomass and species composition in intertidal flats of the Nakdong River estuary, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, GuoYing; Son, Moonho; Yun, Misun; An, Soonmo; Chung, Ik Kyo

    2009-05-01

    Intertidal microphytobenthos (MPB) were investigated monthly from August 2006 to March 2008 at four different sites in the sand flats of Nakdong River estuary, Korea. Samples of surface sediment (ca. 1 cm) were collected, and chlorophyll a was extracted as biomass estimation. Species identification and enumeration were carried out by light microscopy, assisted where necessary by scanning electronic microscopy. Biomass varied between 0.47 and 16.58 μg cm -3, abundance changed from 5.25 to 414.75 × 10 3 cells cm -3, while the Shannon diversity indexes ranged between 0.69 and 2.35 H'. Thirty-nine MPB taxa were identified, primarily composed of epipelic diatoms, among which Amphora and Navicula were the most abundant genera. Based on the biomass, abundance, species composition and their dynamics, MPB assemblages of sampling sites were grouped into three distinct communities corresponding to their sediment composition characteristics. Multivariate correlation analysis revealed that biomass was positively related to mud and very fine sand, negatively related to fine and medium sand, but not significantly related to environmental factors such as pore water nutrients, light intensity and salinity, which fluctuated rapidly during emersion period. Cluster analysis corroborated the division of MPB communities according to site types on seasonal scales, and also showed seasonality between sites by cluster of all summer groups. Principal component analysis identified that variability in species composition was significantly affected by mud, very fine sand, fine sand, light intensity, and sediment temperature. This study suggests that sediment composition plays an important role in the functioning of intertidal MPB communities in estuarine ecosystems.

  19. Waterbird Population Changes in the Wetlands at Chongming Dongtan in the Yangtze River Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhijun; Wang, Yong; Gan, Xiaojing; Li, Bo; Cai, Yinting; Chen, Jiakuan

    2009-06-01

    We studied the changes in wetland habitats and waterbird communities between the 1980s and the 2000s at Chongming Dongtan, a Ramsar site in the Yangtze River estuary, an ecologically important region. This region is an important stopover site for shorebirds along the East Asian-Australasian flyway and is extensively used by waterfowl. A net loss of 11% of the wetland area was estimated during study periods at Chongming Dongtan. The change was dependent on wetland types: while the area of artificial habitats such as paddy fields and aquacultural ponds more than doubled, more than 65% of natural habitats including sea bulrush ( Scirpus mariqueter) and common reed ( Phragmites australis) marshes were lost over the two decades. An exotic plant species introduced from North America, smooth cordgrass ( Spartina alterniflora), occupied 30% of the vegetated intertidal zone by the 2000s. Although waterbird species richness did not change between the 1980s (110) and the 2000s (111), 13 species found in 1980s were replaced by 14 newly recorded species. Moreover, there were more species with declining trends (58) than with increasing trends (19). The population trends of species were affected by residential status and habitat types. Transients, wintering migrants, and habitat specialists were more likely to show declining trends compared to those breeding at Dongtan (including year-round and summer residents) and habitat generalists. Furthermore, species associated mainly with natural wetlands were more likely to decline than those associated mainly with artificial wetlands. These patterns suggest that the loss and change of wetland habitats at Chongming Dongtan adversely affected local population dynamics and might have contributed to the global decline of some waterbird species. Because Chongming Dongtan provides stopover and wintering habitats for many migratory waterbirds, protection and restoration of natural wetlands at Chongming Dongtan are urgently needed.

  20. Tempo-spatial dynamics of water quality and its response to river flow in estuary of Taihu Lake based on GOCI imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chenggong; Li, Yunmei; Wang, Qiao; Liu, Ge; Zheng, Zhubin; Mu, Meng; Li, Yuan

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge of tempo-spatial dynamics of water quality and its response to river flow is important for the management of lake water quality because river discharge associated with rainstorms can be an important source of pollutants to the estuary. Total phosphorus (TP), chlorophyll a (Chl-a), and total suspended matter (TSM) are important indexes of water quality and important factors influencing eutrophication and algal blooms. In this study, remote sensing was used to monitor these indexes to investigate the effects of river discharge on the estuary of Taihu Lake by the largest inflow river which is Chendong River using a total of 136 Geostationary Ocean Color Images (GOCI). In situ datasets collected during the four cruise experiments on Taihu Lake between 2011 and 2015 were used to develop the TP, Chl-a, and TSM inversion models based on simple empirical algorithms: 154 points for TP (mg/L), 114 for Chl-a (μg/L), and 181 for TSM (mg/L). The spatial and temporal changes of the concentration of the three parameters in the Chendong River estuary were analyzed by combining the GOCI data, the flow of the Chendong River, and meteorological data throughout the year in 2014. The several key findings are as follows: (1) In summer and autumn, TP, Chl-a, and TSM contents were significantly higher than in winter and spring. TP and Chl-a have a few similar distribution characteristics. And organic suspended matter in summer was the main reason for the increase of the TSM concentration. (2) The severe surface erosion in the rivers cannot be ignored; the high erodibility is an important factor in the increase of TP and TSM concentrations in the estuary. The concentration of the water quality parameter showed exponential decay with distance from the shore. The concentration decreased slowly after 12 km and then remained essentially constant. (3) TP content in the Chendong River estuary decreased under steady flow inputs and dramatically increased when the flow became large

  1. Impact of Water-Sediment Regulation Scheme on seasonal and spatial variations of biogeochemical factors in the Yellow River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujue; Liu, Dongyan; Lee, Kenneth; Dong, Zhijun; Di, Baoping; Wang, Yueqi; Zhang, Jingjing

    2017-11-01

    Seasonal and spatial distributions of nutrients and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), together with temperature, salinity and total suspended matter (TSM), were investigated in the Yellow River estuary (China) to examine the biogeochemical influence of the ;Water and Sediment Regulation Scheme (WSRS); that is used to manage outflows from the river. Four cruises in April, June (early phase of WSRS), July (late phase of WSRS) and September were conducted in 2013 (WSRS from 19th June to 12th July). The results showed that nutrient species could be divided into two major groups according to their seasonal and spatial distributions. One group included NO3-, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and Si(OH)4, primarily from freshwater discharge. NO3- and DON related to anthropogenic sources were also separated from Si(OH)4, which was related to weather. The other group included dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP), dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP), NO2-, and NH4+. Along with freshwater inputs, sediment absorption/desorption showed impacts on DIP and DOP concentration and distribution. Nitrification was a dominant factor controlling NO2- concentrations. NH4+ was influenced by both sediment absorption/desorption and nitrification. The WSRS not only shifted the seasonal patterns of nutrients in the estuary, with high concentrations moved from autumn to June and July, but also promoted the nutrient spread to the south central part of the Bohai Sea. Spatial distribution of Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) was influenced by the WSRS, with high concentrations being found in the river mouth in June and September, flanking the river mouth in July, and in the south central part of the Bohai Sea in September. Although Chl-a concentrations increased in June and July, the seasonal patterns did not change. The highest concentrations were found in September. Nutrient loadings during the WSRS relieved DIP and Si(OH)4 limitation in the estuary and south central Bohai Sea, causing an excess of DIN and disrupting

  2. [Preliminary analysis of the characteristics of red tide areas in Changjiang River estuary and its adjacent sea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mingjiang; Yan, Tian; Zhou, Jingzhong

    2003-07-01

    A review was made on the main environmental characteristics such as currents and water body, diluted water and its turning direction, upwelling, front, nutrients and its sources and plankton community in the Changjiang River estuary and its adjacent sea areas which could affect the growth, migration, assembling, resting and competition of harmful algae to form red tides. Analyses were also conducted to reveal features of the red tides events recorded in this area in terms of time, location and causative species. Some preliminary results from recent cruises carried out in the investigated sea area, where red tides were frequently occurring, were introduced.

  3. Physical aspects of estuarine pollution - A case study in Amba river estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.; Josanto, V.; Sarma, R.V.; Zingde, M.D.

    in the estuary is protected from contamination and will meet the required quality standards which necessitated the study of tides, current and freshwater flow paths, dispersion potential, flushing time and also the propagation characteristics of the wastewater...

  4. Holocene stratigraphy of the Ångermanälven River estuary, Bothnian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyttinen, O.; Kotilainen, A. T.; Virtasalo, J. J.; Kekäläinen, P.; Snowball, I.; Obrochta, S.; Andrén, T.

    2017-06-01

    This study explores the Holocene depositional succession at the IODP Expedition 347 sites M0061 and M0062 in the vicinity of the Ångermanälven River estuary in the Bothnian Sea sector of the Baltic Sea in northern Scandinavia. Site M0061 is located in a coastal offshore setting (87.9 m water depth), whereas site M0062 is fully estuarine (69.3 m water depth). The dataset comprises acoustic profiles and sediment cores collected in 2007 and late 2013 respectively. Three acoustic units (AUs) were recognized. Lowermost AU1 is interpreted as a poorly to discontinuous stratified glaciofluvial deposit, AU2 as a stratified conformable drape of glaciolacustrine origin, and AU3 as a poorly stratified to stratified mud drift. A strong truncating reflector separates AU2 and AU3. Three lithological units (LUs) were defined in the sediment cores. LU1 consists of glaciofluvial sand and silt gradating into LU2, which consists of glaciolacustrine varves. A sharp contact interpreted as a major unconformity separates LU2 from the overlying LU3 (brackish-water mud). In the basal part of LU3, one debrite (site M0061) or two debrites (site M0062) were recognized. Information yielded from sediment physical properties (magnetic susceptibility, natural gamma ray, dry bulk density), geochemistry (total carbon, total organic carbon, total inorganic carbon and nitrogen), and grain size support the LU division. The depositional succession was formally subdivided into two alloformations: the Utansjö Alloformation and overlying Hemsön Alloformation; the Utansjö Alloformation was further subdivided into two lithostratigraphic formations: the Storfjärden and Åbordsön formations. The Storfjärden (sandy outwash) and Åbordsön (glaciolacustrine rhythmite) formations represent a glacial retreat systems tract, which started at ca. 10.6 kyr BP. Their deposition was mainly controlled by meltwater from the retreating ice margin, glacio-isostatic land uplift and the regressive (glacial) lake level

  5. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

    2005-12-15

    indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

  6. Spatio-temporal distribution and environmental risk of sedimentary heavy metals in the Yangtze River Estuary and its adjacent areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Jian; Qiu, Jiandong; Zhang, Xilin; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Jinqing

    2017-03-15

    Twenty-five surface sediments and one sediment core sample were collected from the study area. Grain size, major elements, and heavy metals were determined. The content of fine-grained sediments (silt and clay), as well as the concentrations of major elements and heavy metals, showed seaward decreasing trends, with high content in the coastal areas of the East China Sea (ECS) and south west of Jeju Island. Low enrichment factor (EF) and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) values were found, indicating that the ecological risk of heavy metals was low. The EF values obtained from the high-resolution sedimentary records of heavy metals in the Yangtze River Estuary could be divided into Stage 1 (1950s to the late 1970s) and Stage 2 (late 1970s to the current sampling day), which coincided with economic development of the Yangtze River Basin, implementation of environmental protection, and impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Temporal trends of hydrocarbons in sediment cores from the Pearl River Estuary and the northern South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xianzhi Peng; Zhendi Wang; Yiyi Yu (and others) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry

    2008-11-15

    Concentrations and fluxes of unresolved complex mixture of hydrocarbons (UCM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed for two {sup 210}Pb dated sediment cores from the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and the adjacent northern South China Sea (NSCS). Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual n-alkanes were also measured for identification of the hydrocarbon sources. The historical records of PAHs in the NSCS reflected the economic development in the Pearl River Delta during the 20th century. PAHs in the NSCS predominantly derive from combustion of coal and biomass, whereas PAHs in the PRE are a mixture of petrogenic and pyrogenic in origins. The isotopic profiles reveal that the petrogenic hydrocarbons in the PRE originate predominantly from local spillage/leakage of lube oil and crude oils. The accumulation rates of pyrogenic PAHs have significantly increased, whereas UCM accumulation has slightly declined in the NSCS in the recent three decades.

  8. Benthic habitat quality assessment based on biological indices in Xiaoqing River estuary and its adjacent sea of Laizhou Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xianxiang; Lin, Song; Yang, Jianqiang; Shen, Jiayu; Fan, Yuqing; Zhang, Longjun

    2017-06-01

    Based on the macrofauna data (2008-2011) in Xiaoqing River estuary and its adjacent sea, Laizhou Bay of Bohai Sea, China, the AZTI Marine Biotic Index (AMBI) and Multivariate AMBI (M-AMBI) were used for benthic habitat quality (BHQ) assessment. Results showed that BHQ presented an obvious trend of improvement along the direction of stream channel and river mouth, and in the coastal areas. AMBI and M-AMBI were significantly related to environmental pressure gradient data. Therefore, the two indices can well indicate BHQ in the studied area. However, there were significant differences between results of the two indices. In the cases of low taxa number and high abundance of single species, AMBI might overestimate BHQ. We thus adjusted its thresholds to solve this problem. And M-AMBI might overestimate BHQ when benthic assemblage was dominated by the opportunistic species. Then we could raise the weight of AMBI in the calculation of M-AMBI to handle the problem.

  9. A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2013-12-01

    This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

  10. The Accumulation and Seasonal Dynamic of the Soil Organic Carbon in Wetland of the Yellow River Estuary, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianxiang Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The wetland of the Yellow River estuary is a typical new coastal wetland in northern China. It is essential to study the carbon pool and its variations for evaluating the carbon cycle process. The study results regarding the temporal-spatial distribution and influential factors of soil organic carbon in four typical wetlands belonging to the Yellow River estuary showed that there was no significant difference in the contents of the surface soil TOC to the same season among the four types of wetlands. For each type of wetlands, the TOC content in surface soils was significantly higher in October than that in both May and August. On the whole, the obvious differences in DOC contents in surface soils were not observed in the different wetland types and seasons. The peak of TOC appeared at 0–10 cm in the soil profiles. The contents of TOC and DOC were significantly higher in salsa than those in reed, suggesting that the rhizosphere effect of organic carbon in salsa was more obvious than that in reed. The results of the principal component analysis showed that the nitrogen content, salinity, bulk density, and water content were dominant influential factors for organic carbon accumulation and seasonal variation.

  11. Temporal and spatial distribution of red tide outbreaks in the Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent waters, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lusan; Zhou, Juan; Zheng, Binghui; Cai, Wenqian; Lin, Kuixuan; Tang, Jingliang

    2013-07-15

    Between 1972 and 2009, evidence of red tide outbreaks in the Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent waters was collected. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to analyze the temporal and spatial distribution of these red tides, and it was subsequently used to map the distribution of these events. The results show that the following findings. (1) There were three red tide-prone areas: outside the Yangtze River Estuary and the eastern coast of Sheshan, the Huaniaoshan-Shengshan-Gouqi waters, and the Zhoushan areas and eastern coast of Zhujiajian. In these areas, red tides occurred 174 total times, 25 of which were larger than 1000 km(2) in areal extent. After 2000, the frequency of red tide outbreaks increased significantly. (2) During the months of May and June, the red tide occurrence in these areas was 51% and 20%, respectively. (3) Outbreaks of the dominant red tide plankton species Prorocentrum dong-haiense, Skeletonema costatum, Prorocentrum dantatum, and Noctiluca scientillan occurred 38, 35, 15, and 10 times, respectively, during the study interval. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of secondary circulation on the salt distribution in a sinuous coastal plain estuary: Satilla River, GA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, H. E.; Blanton, J. O.; Elston, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of observational data suggests salt exchange in a sinuous coastal plain estuary is significantly impacted by counter-rotating residual horizontal eddies formed by channel curvature in meandering channels. The parts of adjacent eddies that advect material downstream follow the deep part of the channel where the flow continually criss-crosses from one side of the channel to the other and follows a relatively unimpeded trajectory to the sea. On the other hand, the parts of adjacent eddies that advect material upstream cross the channel at a different location where it encounters a series of shoals. In this case, the resulting upstream transport of salt is relatively inefficient and retards the rate at which salt can disperse upstream into the estuary. The strength of these circulations is modulated by the spring/neap cycle, allowing for a stronger gravitational mode of exchange to develop near neap tides, but has minimal impact on the length of the salt intrusion. It is suggested that the impeded upstream salt transport accounts for the observation that an impulse of river discharge advects a given isohaline 10 km downstream in 20 days, but that after the impulse, 70 days are required to return the isohaline to a similar position, counter to the notion of a simple dependence of intrusion length on river discharge.

  13. Surface water characteristics and trace metals level of the Bonny/New Calabar River Estuary, Niger Delta, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onojake, M. C.; Sikoki, F. D.; Omokheyeke, O.; Akpiri, R. U.

    2017-05-01

    Surface water samples from three stations in the Bonny/New Calabar River Estuary were analyzed for the physicochemical characteristics and trace metal level in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Results show pH ranged from 7.56 to 7.88 mg/L; conductivity, 33,489.00 to 33,592.00 µScm-1; salinity, 15.33 to 15.50 ‰; turbidity, 4.35 to 6.65 NTU; total dissolved solids, 22111.00 to 23263.00 gm-3; dissolved oxygen, 4.53 to 6.65 mg/L; and biochemical oxygen demand, 1.72 mg/L. The level of some trace metals (Ca, Mg, K, Zn, Pb, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Na) were also analyzed by Atomic absorption spectrometry with K, Zn, and Co being statistically significant ( P water quality standards. It was observed that the water quality parameters in the Bonny Estuary show seasonal variation with higher values for pH, DO, BOD, temperature, and salinity during the dry season than wet season. Concentrations of trace metals such as Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Cr were higher than stipulated limits by WHO (2006). The result of the Metal Pollution Index suggests that the river was slightly affected and therefore continuous monitoring is necessary to avert possible public health implications of these metals on consumers of water and seafood from the study area.

  14. First occurrence of thinlip grey mullet, Liza ramada (Risso, 1827 in the Odra River estuary (NW Poland: genetic identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigiusz Panicz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of exotic fish species in the Baltic Sea and its tributaries poses a serious threat for native ichthyofauna, mainly due to the spread of new pathogens. As the accurate identification of species is essential for an effective assessment of changes related to the appearance of non-native species in an aquatic environment, in this paper we tested the usefulness of biometrics and molecular markers in identifying a specimen from the Mugilidae family found in the Odra estuary. The results demonstrated that unambiguous identification of the specimen using biometric features was impossible due to high morphological similarities shared by grey mullets. Unambiguous identification was possible only due to molecular markers, e.g. rhodopsin gene, which helped to identify the collected fish specimen as Liza ramada (Risso, 1827, the first specimen of this species found in the Odra River estuary. The presence of an L. ramada specimen in the Odra River – which could signal the expansion of non-native species into wider ranges – may be linked to climate change or human activity.

  15. Heavy Metal Contain Cu and Cd on the Mullet in the estuary of Donan River, Cilacap, Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudha Prastyo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The estuary of Donan River is an aquatic area that commonly utilized for some activities such as industrial, fisheries and domestic activities. The effluents of many activities may be cause heavy metal contamination for water enivornemant and organism live in the water. The aim of this research was to analyse heavy metal contain Cu and Cd on the mullet (Chelon subviridis muscle caught at estuary of Donan River, and to determine the safety limit for community consumption. Sampling had been carried out for 6 months, from August 2015 to January 2016. Heavy metal concentration was measured by AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Result of the study shows that heavy metal Cu and Cd in the fish muscle were 0.5009-2.6021 mg/kg and 0.0165-0.2307 mg/kg, respectively that were higher than safety limit.  Based on the study, the safety limit for consumption is 151.72 g meat/week (for adult 50 kg body weight and 45.52g meat/week (for child 15 kg body weight.

  16. Effect of the exotic plant Spartina alterniflora on macrobenthos communities in salt marshes of the Yangtze River Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongbing; Guo, Li; Jin, Binsong; Wu, Jihua; Zheng, Guanghong

    2009-04-01

    The Yangtze River Estuary is an important eco-region of China; it has, however, been heavily infested with the invasive plant Spartina alterniflora. This study examined the benthic communities associated with the invasive S. alterniflora and two native plants ( Scirpus mariqueter and Phragmites australis) at three tidal elevations to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the impacts of marsh plant invasions on intertidal macrofauna of the Yangtze River Estuary. Spartina alterniflora had significantly sparser and taller stems than S. mariqueter, whereas the traits of S. alterniflora and P. australis were relatively similar. A total of 23 macrofaunal taxa were recorded during this study and their mean density was 1885 ind. m -2. Numerically, gastropods and bivalves were the dominant group; together they constituted 95.72% of the total macrofaunal individuals. The differences in macrofaunal community structure were greater among different elevations than between native and exotic plants. The effects of plant types on species richness and densities of macroinvertebrates were generally weak. Densities of only one species ( Glaucomya chinensis) differed significantly between S. alterniflora and S. mariqueter marshes at the lower elevation. The tolerance of the macrobenthos to plant invasions thus depends on various factors, including habitats, species of macrofauna, and local plants.

  17. Reservoir impacts downstream in highly regulated river basins: the Ebro delta and the Guadalquivir estuary in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, María J.; Rovira, Albert; García-Contreras, Darío; Contreras, Eva; Millares, Agustín; Aguilar, Cristina; Losada, Miguel A.

    2016-05-01

    Regulation by reservoirs affects both the freshwater regime and the sediment delivery at the area downstream, and may have a significant impact on water quality in the final transitional water bodies. Spain is one the countries with more water storage capacity by reservoirs in the world. Dense reservoir networks can be found in most of the hydrographic basins, especially in the central and southern regions. The spatial redistribution of the seasonal and annual water storage in reservoirs for irrigation and urban supply, mainly, has resulted in significant changes of water flow and sediment load regimes, together with a fostered development of soil and water uses, with environmental impacts downstream and higher vulnerability of these areas to the sea level rise and drought occurrence. This work shows these effects in the Guadalquivir and the Ebro River basins, two of the largest regulated areas in Spain. The results show a 71 % decrease of the annual freshwater input to the Guadalquivir River estuary during 1930-2014, an increase of 420 % of the irrigated area upstream the estuary, and suspended sediment loads up to 1000 % the initial levels. In the Ebro River delta, the annual water yield has decreased over a 30 % but, on the contrary, the big reservoirs are located in the main stream, and the sediment load has decreased a 99 %, resulting in a delta coastal regression up to 10 m per year and the massive presence of macrophytes in the lower river. Adaptive actions proposed to face these impacts in a sea level rise scenario are also analyzed.

  18. Linkages between the spatial toxicity of sediments and sediment dynamics in the Yangtze River Estuary and neighboring East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinjuan; Shi, Huahong; Dai, Zhijun; Mei, Xuefei; Zong, Haibo; Yang, Hongwei; Hu, Lingling; Li, Shushi

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic activities are driving an increase in sediment contamination in coastal areas. This poses significant challenges for the management of estuarine ecosystems and their adjacent seas worldwide. However, few studies have been conducted on how dynamic mechanisms affect the sediment toxicity in the estuarine environment. This study was designed to investigate the linkages between sediment toxicity and hydrodynamics in the Yangtze River Estuary (YRE) area. High sediment toxicity was found in the Yangtze River mouth (Region I), the depocenter of the Yangtze River Delta (Region II), and the southeastern area of the adjacent sea (Region III), while low sediment toxicity was found in the northeastern offshore region (Region IV). A spatial comparison analysis and regression model indicated that the distributed pattern of sediment toxicity was likely related to hydrodynamics and circumfluence in the East China Sea (ECS) shelf. Specifically, high sediment toxicity in Region I may be affected by the Yangtze River Pump (YRP) and the low hydrodynamics there, and high toxicity in Region II can be influenced by the low sediment dynamics and fine sediment in the depocenter. The high sediment toxicity in Region III might be related to the combination of the YRP and Taiwan Warm Current, while the low toxicity in Region IV may be influenced by the local coarse-grained relict sand with strong sediment dynamics there. The present research results further suggest that it is necessary to link hydrodynamics and the spatial behavior of sediment and sediment-derived pollutants when assessing the pollution status of estuarine environments, especially for those mega-estuaries and their neighboring ocean environments with complex waves, tides and ocean currents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diversity of fish sound types in the Pearl River Estuary, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Tao Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Repetitive species-specific sound enables the identification of the presence and behavior of soniferous species by acoustic means. Passive acoustic monitoring has been widely applied to monitor the spatial and temporal occurrence and behavior of calling species. Methods Underwater biological sounds in the Pearl River Estuary, China, were collected using passive acoustic monitoring, with special attention paid to fish sounds. A total of 1,408 suspected fish calls comprising 18,942 pulses were qualitatively analyzed using a customized acoustic analysis routine. Results We identified a diversity of 66 types of fish sounds. In addition to single pulse, the sounds tended to have a pulse train structure. The pulses were characterized by an approximate 8 ms duration, with a peak frequency from 500 to 2,600 Hz and a majority of the energy below 4,000 Hz. The median inter-pulsepeak interval (IPPI of most call types was 9 or 10 ms. Most call types with median IPPIs of 9 ms and 10 ms were observed at times that were exclusive from each other, suggesting that they might be produced by different species. According to the literature, the two section signal types of 1 + 1 and 1 + N10 might belong to big-snout croaker (Johnius macrorhynus, and 1 + N19 might be produced by Belanger’s croaker (J. belangerii. Discussion Categorization of the baseline ambient biological sound is an important first step in mapping the spatial and temporal patterns of soniferous fishes. The next step is the identification of the species producing each sound. The distribution pattern of soniferous fishes will be helpful for the protection and management of local fishery resources and in marine environmental impact assessment. Since the local vulnerable Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis mainly preys on soniferous fishes, the fine-scale distribution pattern of soniferous fishes can aid in the conservation of this species. Additionally, prey and predator

  20. [Faunal characteristics and distribution pattern of crustaceans in the vicinity of Pearl River estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zi-Rong; Sun, Dian-Rong; Chen, Zuo-Zhi; Zhang, Han-Hua; Wang, Xue-Hui; Wang, Yue-Zhong; Fang, Hong-Da; Dong, Yan-Hong

    2009-10-01

    Based on the data of bottom trawl surveys in the vicinity of Pearl River estuary in August (summer), October (autumn), December (winter) 2006, and April (spring) 2007, the faunal characteristics and distribution pattern of crustaceans were analyzed. A total of 54 species belonging to 25 genera, 17 families, and 2 orders were collected, including 22 species of shrimps, 22 species of crabs, and 10 species of squills. Most of the crustaceans were tropical-subtropical warm-water species, a few of them were eurythermal species, and no warm-water and cold-water species occurred. Euryhaline species were most abundant, followed by halophile species, and the low-salinity species were the least. Most of the crustacean species belonged to the fauna of Indian Ocean-western Pacific Ocean. The faunal assemblages were closer to those of the East China Sea, Philippine Sea, Indonesia Sea, and the Japan Sea, and estranger with those of the Yellow Sea, Bohai Sea, and Korea Sea. The dominant species were Metapenaeus joyner, Oratosquilla oratoria, Charybdis miles, Portunus sanguinolentus, Harpiosquilla harpax, Charybdis feriatus, Charybdis japonica, Oratosquilla nepa, Solenocera crassicornis, Portunus trituberculatus, and Calappa philargius. The crustaceans had the largest species number (33) in autumn and the least one (26) in spring, and the highest stock density at the water depth of < 40 m, especially at 10-20 m. The average stock density of the crustaceans was estimated to be 99.60 kg x km(-2), with the highest (198.93 kg x km(-2)) in summer and the lowest (42.35 kg x km(-2)) in spring. Of the 3 species groups, crabs had the highest stock density (41.81 kg x km(-2)), followed by shrimps (38.91 kg x km(-2)), and squills (18.88 kg x km(-2)). The stock densities of the 3 species groups showed an obvious seasonal variation. Shrimps had the highest stock density (120.32 kg x km(-2)) in summer and the lowest density (0.67 kg x km(-2)) in spring, while crabs and squills had the highest

  1. Foraging strategies of Southern sea lion females in the La Plata River Estuary (Argentina-Uruguay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Diego H.; Dassis, Mariela; Ponce de León, Alberto; Barreiro, César; Farenga, Marcelo; Bastida, Ricardo O.; Davis, Randall W.

    2013-04-01

    The stocks of Southern sea lions (Otaria flavescens, SSL) and South American fur seals (SAFS) that breed on coastal islands of Uruguay constitute the most important focal concentration of pinnipeds in South America, with a significant increase in SAFS and a steady decrease of SSL over the past decades. Because females are a key element of population dynamics and no information exists on the post-breeding pup rearing period, we studied the foraging patterns of SSL females in the La Plata River Estuary (LPRE) during mid and late lactation (late austral autumn and winter), analyzing the foraging performance, geographic coverage and ontogenetic differences in foraging strategies for a period of 1-5 months. At-sea movements of 22 SSL females (6 subadults and 16 adults) from Isla de Lobos (IL, 35°01'28"S-54°52'59"W, Uruguay) were monitored using satellite transmitters (SPOT4, SPOT5 and STDR-S16, Wildlife Computers) in 2007 and 2010. An algorithm [McConnell, B.J., Chambers, C., Fedak, M.A., 1992. Foraging ecology of southern elephant seals in relation to the bathymetry and productivity of the Southern Ocean. Antarct. Sci. 4, 393-398.] with a maximum transit speed of 3 m s-1 was applied to the Argos information, resulting in a total of 2522 filtered locations. A daily mean of 3.5±1.74 filtered locations per animal was received. One hundred and eighty three foraging trips (FT) were recorded with no significant differences (plactating females decrease FT duration by increasing transit speed but maintain a similar spatial coverage compared with FT later in lactation. Although several aquatic areas of high priority for conservation in LPRE have been identified and proposed, only 15% of the foraging habitat of SSL females is currently included in these areas. This emphasizes the importance of the inclusion of the at-sea foraging distributions of central point foragers in marine protected areas. If conservation efforts focus only on coastal breeding concentrations, key

  2. Learning Lessons from Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittka, Christine

    2006-01-01

    There is something that draws all people to the sea and especially to the fertile estuaries that nuzzle up to its shores. An estuary serves as both a nursery and a grave for sea creatures. If life evolved from some primordial sea, it may well have been an estuary--a place where ocean and rivers meet and fresh and salty waters mingle in the…

  3. 76 FR 8345 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan Module for Columbia River Estuary Salmon and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ...) are listed as threatened or endangered under the ESA: Snake River Sockeye salmon, Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon, Snake River fall Chinook salmon, Snake River steelhead, Upper Columbia River... Water Resources Education Center, 6:30-8:30 p.m. We received nine comment letters by mail, fax, or e...

  4. Molecular Fingerprint and Dominant Environmental Factors of Nitrite-Dependent Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria in Sediments from the Yellow River Estuary, China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yan, Pengze; Li, Mingcong; Wei, Guangshan; Li, Han; Gao, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    ...), which connects the carbon and nitrogen global nutrient cycles. In the present study, M. oxyfera-like bacteria sequences were successfully recovered from Yellow River Estuary sediments using specific primers for 16S rRNA and pmoA genes. A M...

  5. Estuarine Landcover Along the Lower Columbia River Estuary Determined from Compact Ariborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garono, Ralph; Robinson, Rob

    2003-10-01

    Developing an understanding of the distribution and changes in estuarine and riparian habitats is critical to the management of biological resources in the lower Columbia River. In a recently completed comprehensive ecosystem protection and enhancement plan for the lower Columbia River Estuary (CRE), Jerrick (1999) identified habitat loss and modification as one of the key threats to the integrity of the CRE ecosystem. This management plan called for an inventory of habitats as key first step in the CRE long-term restoration effort. While previous studies have produced useful data sets depicting habitat cover types along portions of the lower CRE (Thomas, 1980; Thomas, 1983; Graves et al., 1995; NOAA, 1997; Allen, 1999), no single study has produced a description of the habitats for the entire CRE. Moreover, the previous studies differed in data sources and methodologies making it difficult to merge data or to make temporal comparisons. Therefore, the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) initiated a habitat cover mapping project in 2000. The goal of this project was to produce a data set depicting the current habitat cover types along the lower Columbia River, from its mouth to the Bonneville Dam, a distance of {approx}230-km (Fig. 1) using both established and emerging remote sensing techniques. For this project, we acquired two types of imagery, Landsat 7 ETM+ and Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). Landsat and CASI imagery differ in spatial and spectral resolution: the Landsat 7 ETM+ sensor collects reflectance data in seven spectral bands with a spatial resolution of 30-m and the CASI sensor collects reflectance data in 19 bands (in our study) with a spatial resolution of 1.5-m. We classified both sets of imagery and produced a spatially linked, hierarchical habitat data set for the entire CRE and its floodplain. Landsat 7 ETM+ classification results are presented in a separate report (Garono et al., 2003). This report

  6. Eelgrass Enhancement and Restoration in the Lower Columbia River Estuary, Period of Performance: Feb 2008-Sep 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, C.; Thom, R; Borde, A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability to enhance distribution of eelgrass (Zostera marina) in the Columbia River Estuary to serve as refuge and feeding habitat for juvenile salmon, Dungeness crab, and other fish and wildlife. We strongly suspected that limited eelgrass seed dispersal has resulted in the present distribution of eelgrass meadows, and that there are other suitable places for eelgrass to survive and form functional meadows. Funded as part of the Bonneville Power Administration's call for Innovative Projects, we initiated a multistage study in 2008 that combined modeling, remote sensing, and field experimentation to: (1) Spatially predict habitat quality for eelgrass; (2) Conduct experimental plantings; and (3) Evaluate restoration potential. Baseline in-situ measurements and remote satellite observations were acquired for locations in the Lower Columbia River Estuary (LCRE) to determine ambient habitat conditions. These were used to create a habitat site-selection model, using data on salinity, temperature, current velocity, light availability, wave energy, and desiccation to predict the suitability of nearshore areas for eelgrass. Based on this model and observations in the field, five sites that contained no eelgrass but appeared to have suitable environmental conditions were transplanted with eelgrass in June 2008 to test the appropriateness of these sites for eelgrass growth. We returned one year after the initial planting to monitor the success rate of the transplants. During the year after transplanting, we carried out a concurrent study on crab distribution inside and outside eelgrass meadows to study crab usage of the habitat. One year after the initial transplant, two sites, one in Baker Bay and one in Young's Bay, had good survival or expansion rates with healthy eelgrass. Two sites had poor survival rates, and one site had a total loss of the transplanted eelgrass. For submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) restoration

  7. [Effects of macro-jellyfish abundance dynamics on fishery resource structure in the Yangtze River estuary and its adjacent waters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xiu-Juan; Zhuang, Zhi-Meng; Jin, Xian-Shi; Dai, Fang-Qun

    2011-12-01

    Based on the bottom trawl survey data in May 2007 and May and June 2008, this paper analyzed the effects of the abundance dynamics of macro-jellyfish on the species composition, distribution, and abundance of fishery resource in the Yangtze River estuary and its adjacent waters. From May 2007 to June 2008, the average catch per haul and the top catch per haul of macro-jellyfish increased, up to 222.2 kg x h(-1) and 1800 kg x h(-1) in June 2008, respectively. The macro-jellyfish were mainly distributed in the areas around 50 m isobath, and not beyond 100 m isobath where was the joint front of the coastal waters of East China Sea, Yangtze River runoff, and Taiwan Warm Current. The main distribution area of macro-jellyfish in June migrated northward, as compared with that in May, and the highest catches of macro-jellyfish in May 2007 and May 2008 were found in the same sampling station (122.5 degrees E, 28.5 degrees N). In the sampling stations with higher abundance of macro-jellyfish, the fishery abundance was low, and the fishery species also changed greatly, mainly composed by small-sized species (Trachurus japonicus, Harpadon nehereus, and Acropoma japonicum) and pelagic species (Psenopsis anomala, Octopus variabilis) and Trichiurus japonicus, and P. anomala accounted for 23.7% of the total catch in June 2008. Larimichthys polyactis also occupied higher proportion of the total catch in sampling stations with higher macro-jellyfish abundance, but the demersal species Lophius litulon was not found, and a few crustaceans were collected. This study showed that macro-jellyfish had definite negative effects on the fishery community structure and abundance in the Yangtze River estuary fishery ecosystem, and further, changed the energy flow patterns of the ecosystem through cascading trophic interactions. Therefore, macro-jellyfish was strongly suggested to be an independent ecological group when the corresponding fishery management measures were considered.

  8. Evaluation of the Ecotoxicity of Sediments from Yangtze River Estuary and Contribution of Priority PAHs to Ah Receptor-Mediated Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Chen, Ling; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Lili; Floehr, Tilman; Xiao, Hongxia; Yan, Yan; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Hollert, Henner; Wu, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, in vitro bioassays were performed to assess the ecotoxicological potential of sediments from Yangtze River estuary. The cytotoxicity and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated toxicity of sediment extracts with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver cells were determined by neutral red retention and 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assays. The cytotoxicity and AhR-mediated activity of sediments from the Yangtze River estuary ranged from low level to moderate level compared with the ecotoxicity of sediments from other river systems. However, Yangtze River releases approximately 14 times greater water discharge compared with Rhine, a major river in Europe. Thus, the absolute pollution mass transfer of Yangtze River may be detrimental to the environmental quality of estuary and East China Sea. Effect-directed analysis was applied to identify substances causing high dioxin-like activities. To identify unknown substances contributing to dioxin-like potencies of whole extracts, we fractionated crude extracts by open column chromatography. Non-polar paraffinic components (F1), weakly and moderately polar components (F2), and highly polar substances (F3) were separated from each crude extract of sediments. F2 showed the highest dioxin-like activities. Based on the results of mass balance calculation of chemical toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQs), our conclusion is that priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons indicated a low portion of bio-TEQs ranging from 1% to 10% of crude extracts. Further studies should be conducted to identify unknown pollutants. PMID:25111307

  9. Evaluation of the ecotoxicity of sediments from Yangtze river estuary and contribution of priority PAHs to ah receptor--mediated activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Chen, Ling; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Lili; Floehr, Tilman; Xiao, Hongxia; Yan, Yan; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Hollert, Henner; Wu, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, in vitro bioassays were performed to assess the ecotoxicological potential of sediments from Yangtze River estuary. The cytotoxicity and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated toxicity of sediment extracts with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver cells were determined by neutral red retention and 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assays. The cytotoxicity and AhR-mediated activity of sediments from the Yangtze River estuary ranged from low level to moderate level compared with the ecotoxicity of sediments from other river systems. However, Yangtze River releases approximately 14 times greater water discharge compared with Rhine, a major river in Europe. Thus, the absolute pollution mass transfer of Yangtze River may be detrimental to the environmental quality of estuary and East China Sea. Effect-directed analysis was applied to identify substances causing high dioxin-like activities. To identify unknown substances contributing to dioxin-like potencies of whole extracts, we fractionated crude extracts by open column chromatography. Non-polar paraffinic components (F1), weakly and moderately polar components (F2), and highly polar substances (F3) were separated from each crude extract of sediments. F2 showed the highest dioxin-like activities. Based on the results of mass balance calculation of chemical toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQs), our conclusion is that priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons indicated a low portion of bio-TEQs ranging from 1% to 10% of crude extracts. Further studies should be conducted to identify unknown pollutants.

  10. Dynamics of circulation and salt balance in the upper reaches of Periyar river estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varma, P.U.; Pylee, A.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    -January and became highly stratified during February-May. September-November was the transition period. The residual flux of salt was directed down the estuary just after the south-west monsoon period and was low. Main source of salt was through vertical shear...

  11. Petroleum hydrocarbons in a water-sediment system from Yellow River estuary and adjacent coastal area, China: Distribution pattern, risk assessment and sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Wang, Chuanyuan; Li, Yuanwei

    2017-09-15

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs), biomarker and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations of surface water and sediment samples collected from Yellow River Estuary and adjacent coastal area in China were measured to determine their spatial distributions, analyze their sources and evaluate the ecological risk of PAHs in the water-sediment system. The spatial distributions of n-alkane in sediments are mainly controlled by the mixing inputs of terrigenous and marine components. In comparison with AHs, the total concentrations of Σ16PAHs in surface sediments from a transect of the offshore area were noticeably higher than that of the riverine and estuary areas. Additionally, the AHs and total PAHs concentrations all indicated an overall pattern of a seaward decrease. The PAHs concentrations during the dry season (mainly in the form of dissolved phase) were higher than that of PAHs (mainly dissolved phase and particulate phase form) in the flooding season. In comparison with global concentration levels of PAHs, the level of PAHs in suspended particulate matter and sediments from the Yellow River Estuary was lower than those from other countries, while the concentration of PAHs in the dissolved phase were in the middle range. Petroleum contamination, mainly from oil exploration and discharge of pollutants from rivers, was the main source of n-alkanes. The PAHs in the river were mostly of petrogenic origin, while those in the estuarial and marine areas originated mainly from pyrogenic sources. The results of the toxicology assessment suggested that the PAHs in sediments from Yellow River Estuary and adjacent coastal area exhibited a low potential eco-toxicological contamination level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A modeling study of the impacts of Mississippi River diversion and sea-level rise on water quality of a deltaic estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongqing; Chen, Qin; Hu, Kelin; LaPeyre, Megan K.

    2017-01-01

    Freshwater and sediment management in estuaries affects water quality, particularly in deltaic estuaries. Furthermore, climate change-induced sea-level rise (SLR) and land subsidence also affect estuarine water quality by changing salinity, circulation, stratification, sedimentation, erosion, residence time, and other physical and ecological processes. However, little is known about how the magnitudes and spatial and temporal patterns in estuarine water quality variables will change in response to freshwater and sediment management in the context of future SLR. In this study, we applied the Delft3D model that couples hydrodynamics and water quality processes to examine the spatial and temporal variations of salinity, total suspended solids, and chlorophyll-α concentration in response to small (142 m3 s−1) and large (7080 m3 s−1) Mississippi River (MR) diversions under low (0.38 m) and high (1.44 m) relative SLR (RSLR = eustatic SLR + subsidence) scenarios in the Breton Sound Estuary, Louisiana, USA. The hydrodynamics and water quality model were calibrated and validated via field observations at multiple stations across the estuary. Model results indicate that the large MR diversion would significantly affect the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of the studied water quality variables across the entire estuary, whereas the small diversion tends to influence water quality only in small areas near the diversion. RSLR would also play a significant role on the spatial heterogeneity in estuary water quality by acting as an opposite force to river diversions; however, RSLR plays a greater role than the small-scale diversion on the magnitude and spatial pattern of the water quality parameters in this deltaic estuary.

  13. Assessing Environmental Drivers of DOC Fluxes in the Shark River Estuary: Modeling the Effects of Climate, Hydrology and Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, P.; Briceno, H.; Jaffe, R.

    2016-02-01

    Urban and agricultural development of the South Florida peninsula has disrupted freshwater flow in the Everglades, a hydrologically connected ecosystem stretching from central Florida to the Gulf of Mexico. Current system-scale restoration efforts aim to restore natural hydrologic regimes to reestablish pre-drainage ecosystem functioning through increased water availability, quality and timing. However, it is uncertain how hydrologic restoration combined with climate change will affect the downstream section of the system, including the mangrove estuaries of Everglades National Park. Aquatic transport of carbon, primarily as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), plays a critical role in biogeochemical cycling and food-web dynamics, and will be affected both by water management policies and climate change. To better understand DOC dynamics in these estuaries and how hydrology, climate and water management may affect them, 14 years of monthly data collected in the Shark River estuary were used to build a DOC flux model. Multi-variate methods were applied to long-term data-sets for hydrology, water quality and climate to untangle the interconnected environmental drivers that control DOC export at intra and inter-annual scales. DOC fluxes were determined to be primarily controlled by hydrology but also by seasonality and long-term climate patterns. Next, a 4-component model (salinity, inflow, rainfall, Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation) capable of predicting DOC fluxes (R2=0.78, p<0.0001, n=161) was established. Finally, potential climate change scenarios for the Everglades were applied to this model to assess DOC flux variations in response to climate and restoration variables. Although global predictions anticipate that DOC export will generally increase in the future, the majority of scenario runs indicated that DOC export from the Everglades is expected to decrease due to changes in rainfall, evapotranspiration, inflows and sea-level rise.

  14. Spatiotemporal Distribution of Metals along a Salinity Gradient in a River Estuary of the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S.; Xu, Y. J.

    2015-12-01

    Saltwater intrusion has become a significant problem for many coastal rivers due to global climate change and the continuous sea level rise. The flocculation of dissolved metals during estuarine mixing plays a critical role in self-purification of metals. A number of studies have investigated pH and salinity effects on metal mobility. Many of these studies were conducted in a laboratory setting. The reported field studies considered only few metals and their dynamics under marginal pH / salinity variation, typically over a short period of time. Since the spring of 2013, we have been conducting a study on spatiotemporal distribution of metals along a 90-km reach of the Calcasieu River estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Monthly field trips were made to conduct in-situ measurements and collect water samples at six sites along the river. In addition, sediment samples from the riverbed surface were collected at the same sites four times to assess metal accumulation. Field measurements included water temperature, pH, salinity, and specific conductivity; Water samples were analyzed for concentration of a range of metals including Al, Ba, B, Cd, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Li, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, K, Si, Ag, Na, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn. The estuarine river reach showed a wide range of salinity and pH (salinity: 0.04 - 21.78 ppt; pH: 6.2-8.1), strongly affected by river hydrology and tidal mixing. Concentration and spatial distribution of the metals in river water show response to flow regimes from the low (400 cfs) to the intermediate (400-2600 cfs) and high flows. This paper presents the dynamics of the metals under varying flow, pH and salinity gradients over the seasons and discusses a potential "intrusion" of metal accumulation in riverbed upstream as sea level rise persists.

  15. Contribution of Priority PAHs and POPs to Ah Receptor-Mediated Activities in Sediment Samples from the River Elbe Estuary, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Jens C.; Keiter, Steffen; Faßbender, Christopher; Higley, Eric B.; Rocha, Paula Suares; Brinkmann, Markus; Wahrendorf, Dierk-Steffen; Manz, Werner; Wetzel, Markus A.; Braunbeck, Thomas; Giesy, John P.; Hecker, Markus; Hollert, Henner

    2013-01-01

    The estuary of the River Elbe between Hamburg and the North Sea (Germany) is a sink for contaminated sediment and suspended particulate matter (SPM). One major concern is the effect of human activities on the hydrodynamics, particularly the intensive dredging activities in this area that may result in remobilization of sediment-bound pollutants. The aim of this study was to identify pollutants contributing to the toxicological risk associated with re-suspension of sediments in the Elbe Estuary by use of an effect-directed analysis that combines chemical and biological analyses in with specific fractionation techniques. Sediments were collected from sites along the Elbe Estuary and a site from a small harbor basin of the Elbe Estuary that is known to be polluted. The sixteen priority EPA-PAHs were quantified in organic extracts of sediments. In addition, dioxin equivalents of sediments were investigated by use of the 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase assay with RTL-W1 cells and the Ah receptor-mediated luciferase transactivation assay with H4IIE-luc cells. Quantification of the 16 priority PAHs revealed that sediments were moderately contaminated at all of the sites in the Elbe River Estuary (Sediments contained relatively small concentrations of dioxin equivalents (Bio-TEQ) with concentrations ranging from 15.5 to 322 pg/g dw, which were significantly correlated with dioxin equivalents calculated based on toxicity reference values and concentrations of PAH. The concentration of Bio-TEQ at the reference site exceeded 200,000 pg/g dw. In a potency balance the 16 PAHs explained between 47 and 118% of the Bio-TEQ in the luciferase assay, which can be explained by the constant input of PAHs bound to SPM from the upper course of the Elbe River into its estuary. Successful identification of a significant portion of dioxin-like activity to priority PAHs in complex environmental samples such as sediments has rarely been reported. PMID:24146763

  16. Heavy metal fractions and ecological risk assessment in sediments from urban, rural and reclamation-affected rivers of the Pearl River Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangliang; Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Qingqing; Jia, Jia; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2017-10-01

    Rapid urbanization and reclamation processes in coastal areas have resulted in serious pollution to the aquatic environment. Less is known on the geochemical fractions and ecological risks in river sediment under various human activities pressures, which is essential for addressing the connections between heavy metal pollution and anthropogenic influences. River sediments were collected from different landscapes (i.e., urban, rural and reclamation areas) to investigate the impacts of urbanization and reclamation on the metallic pollution levels and ecological risks in the Pear River Estuary of China. Results showed that Cd, Zn and Cu with high total contents and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) were the primary metals in the Peal River sediments. Generally, urban river sediments, especially the surface sediment layer (0-10 cm), exhibited higher metallic pollution levels. As for geochemical fractions, reducible and residual fractions were the dominant forms for six determined metals. And the percentage of heavy metals bound to Fe-Mn oxides decreased with increasing soil depth but the reverse tendency was observed for residual fractions. Compared with rural river sediments, heavy metals were highly associated with the exchangeable and carbonate fractions in both urban and reclamation-affected river sediments, suggesting that anthropogenic activities mainly increased the active forms of metals. Approximately 80% of Cd existed in the non-residual fraction and posed medium to high ecological risk according to the risk assessment code (RAC) values. The redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that both urbanization and reclamation processes would cause similar metallic characteristics, and sediment organic matter (SOC) might be the prominent influencing factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Movement of a solute in the Potomac River estuary at Washington, D.C., at low inflow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James F.; Cobb, Ernest D.; Yotsukura, Nobuhiro

    1969-01-01

    The movement of a solute, as represented by a soluble fluorescent dye, was observed in the Potomac River estuary at Washington, D.C. The average net rate of downstream movement of the solute centroid was less than 0.6 mile per day. The movement of a solute is highly dependent on the nontidal inflow to the estuary. During the study, the average inflow was 900 cubic feet per second a very low value, equaled or exceeded 98 percent of the time. Using a storage equation, the average movement of a solute was estimated for nontidal inflow of 3,100 and 6,500 cubic feet per second; these inflows are equaled or exceeded 75 and 50 percent of the time, respectively. The study showed that tidal action was fairly efficient in dispersing the solute longitudinally. The solute, which was dumped 1,000 feet upstream from the 14th Street Bridge, was observed as far upstream as Roosevelt Island. A transient longitudinal dispersion coefficient at the end of 150 hours was determined to be 210 square feet per second. On the other hand, the lateral diffusion was a slow process and the lateral distribution of the solute was far from uniform at the end of 6? days after the release.

  18. Effect of Migration Pathway on Travel Time and Survival of Acoustic-Tagged Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Johnson, Gary E.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Hughes, Michael S.; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2012-02-01

    Off-channel areas (side channels, tidal flats, sand bars, and shallow-water bays) may serve as important migration corridors through estuarine environments for salmon and steelhead smolts. Relatively large percentages (21-33%) of acoustic-tagged yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts were detected migrating through off-channel areas of the Columbia River estuary in 2008. The probability of survival for off-channel migrants (0.78-0.94) was similar to or greater than the survival probability of main channel migrants (0.67-0.93). Median travel times were similar for all species or run types and migration pathways we examined, ranging from 1-2 d. The route used by smolts to migrate through the estuary may affect their vulnerability to predation. Acoustic-tagged steelhead that migrated nearest to avian predator nesting colonies experienced higher predation rates (24%) than those that migrated farthest from the colonies (10%). The use of multiple migration pathways may be advantageous to out-migrating smolts because it helps to buffer against high rates of mortality, which may occur in localized areas, and helps to minimize inter- and intraspecific competition.

  19. Tidal-fluvial interaction in the Guadalquivir River Estuary: Spatial and frequency-dependent response of currents and water levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losada, M. A.; Díez-Minguito, M.; Reyes-Merlo, M. Á.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a study on the tidal-fluvial interaction in the highly regulated Guadalquivir River Estuary (SW Spain), which is occasionally subjected to high discharge episodes that affect navigational conditions and increase flood risks. The study specifically focuses on the processes and controlling mechanisms of the nonstationary response of water levels and currents to high discharges. Measurements show a 60 day postdischarge amplification of tidal current and elevation amplitudes and a clockwise rotation of the tidal ellipse in the upper layers. A decrease of amplitudes and an anticlockwise rotation predominate near the bed. Such episodes significantly increase the tidal wave celerity, and especially at high and low water. These features are due to the suspended sediment stratification triggered by the discharge event. The increase in stratification restricts frictional influence to bottom layers, partially decoupling the overlying flow from the bottom. A nonstationary harmonic decomposition method, intended for identifying which nonlinear terms in the governing hydrodynamic equations control overtide and compound tide generation, shows that quadratic bottom stress contributes the most during high discharge periods. The consequence in the subtidal balance is that, during peak discharge and in the upper stretches, friction is largely balanced by the water level gradient, although the density gradient term becomes comparable to the friction term soon after peak discharge. Advection is also important to the force balance in the lower estuary. For both parts, to correctly explain subtidal dynamics, it is necessary to account for the time variability of the friction coefficient due to flow-sediment feedback.

  20. Using mercury isotopes to understand the bioaccumulation of Hg in the subtropical Pearl River Estuary, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Runsheng; Feng, Xinbin; Zhang, Junjun; Pan, Ke; Wang, Wenxiong; Li, Xiangdong

    2016-03-01

    Coastal and estuarine regions are important areas of mercury pollution. Therefore, it is important to properly characterize the sources and bioaccumulation processes of mercury in these regions. Here, we present mercury stable isotopic compositions in 18 species of wild marine fish collected from the Pearl River Estuary (PRE), south China. Our results showed variations in mass-independent fractionation (Δ(199)Hg: +0.05 ± 0.10‰ to +0.59 ± 0.30‰) with a Δ(199)Hg/Δ(201)Hg of ∼1.26, suggesting that aqueous MeHg underwent photo-degradation prior to incorporation into the food chain. For the results, we discovered small but significant differences of Δ(199)Hg values among herbivorous, demersal, and carnivorous fish, indicating that different feeding guilds of fish may have incorporated MeHg with various degrees of photo-demethylation. The consistent mercury isotope compositions between fish feeding habitat and mercury sources in the estuary provide potentially important findings on the transformation and bioaccumulation of this toxic metal in subtropical coastal environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled “Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary.” The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as “Salmonid Benefits,” was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  2. A multi-scale integrated modeling framework to measure comprehensive impact of coastal reclamation activities in Yellow River estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Cai, Yanpeng; Sun, Tao; Tan, Qian

    2017-09-15

    In this paper, an improved multi-scale integrated modeling framework has been established to evaluate coastal reclamation intensity (CRI). About 7 indicators are considered, including ecological degradation intensity (EDI), hydrodynamic disturbance (IHD), engineering types, water quality, economic investment, population growth, and reclaimed land area. Meanwhile, an integrated framework enhanced methods in terms of (a) measuring intensity of ecological degradation process under multi-scale impact, (b) developing the indicator system of CRI, and discussing the driving forces and trends of coastal reclamation, (c) determining fuzzy preference relations of weight and calculating the specific value of CRI with the case study areas of Yellow River estuary from 2000 to 2015. As the result, the CRI has been expanded unceasingly in recent years. The total growth rate from 2000 to 2015 is about 37.97%. It is concluded that CRI has climbed to a higher intensity level in resent 15years. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Use of fishing resources by women in the Mamanguape River Estuary, Paraíba state, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Michelle S P; Santiago, Idalina M F L; Cortez, Creuza S; Trindade, Priscila M; Mourão, José S

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated the appropriation and use of fishing resources by women residing near the Mamanguape River Estuary (MRE), Paraíba state, Brazil. Were used combinations of qualitative (interviews and direct observations) and quantitative methods (use value and corrected principal use concordance). Thirty women were interviewed and reported the use of 41 species (30 fish, 8 crustaceans, and 3 mollusks), mainly for local consumption and sale. The species with the highest use value were Genidens genidens (0.7), Callinectes exasperatus (0.73) and Anomalocardia brasiliana (0.46). The diversity of resources exploited demonstrates the importance of the mangrove ecosystem to MRE families, and the data gathered can serve as a basis for formulating public policies to promote the equal participation of women in fishing and environmental conservation.

  4. Distributions of Core- and Polar- Archaeal Lipids in the Lower Pearl River and Estuary: Implications for TEX86 Proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, C.; Zhu, C.; Wei, Y.; Dong, H.; Liu, W.

    2011-12-01

    Core isoprenoidal glycerol dibiphytanyl dlycerol tetraethers (C-iGDGTs) are the most widespread archaeal lipids in sediments and water, and have been used to construct a molecular proxy, TEX86, for studying past sea surface temperatures. However, recent analyses of intact polar (IP)-iGDGTs that are indicative of living archaea suggest that IP-iGDGTs produced in situ in marine sediments may subsequently convert IP-iGDGTs to C-iGDGTs after the cell death, thus compromising the validity of TEX86 for paleoclimate research. To help address this question, we investigated the distribution and abundance of IP- and C- iGDGTs in suspended particulates and surface sediments from the lower Pearl River and estuary. Our results show a strong positive correlation between the C- and P-iGDGTs pools, especially the iGDGT-0 (R2 = 0.786, pCrenarchaeota.

  5. Sedimentary BSi and TOC quantifies the degradation of the Changjiang Estuary, China, from river basin alteration and warming SST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maotian; Wang, Hong; Li, Yimiao; Ai, Wei; Hou, Lijun; Chen, Zhongyuan

    2016-12-01

    Environmental degradation in the Changjiang Estuary has recently become a global topic, given its proximity to Shanghai with a population >23 million. Intensification of human activities affecting the river basin is responsible for this degradation. Dam construction has cut off ca. 2/3 of the sediment flux to the sea, ca. 60% of the dissolved silicate load (DSi) has been retained in the reservoirs, while total phosphorous (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) transport to the sea are many times more than they were a few decades ago. Under such circumstances, details of the estuarine degradation remain poorly understood. This study uses sedimentary biological silicate (BSi) and total organic carbon (TOC) as environmental proxies to reveal the process-response of such degradation since the 1950s. Our results demonstrate the spatial differences of such degradation. The inner zone of the estuary used to be highly turbid, but presently has increasing diatom (BSi) and primary production (TOC), due to lower suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in relation to dam construction. In contrast, increasing riverine dissolved inorganic nitrate (DIN) and dissolved inorganic phosphorous (DIP) input (up to 2-5 times) and decreasing DSi provide a unique setting, with an excess in N and P, which catalyzes non-diatom algae in the less-turbid middle zone of the estuary. These are reflected by decreasing BSi and BSi/TOC since the 1950s, together with an increase of TOC of 20-40%. In the outer zone of the estuary, increasing DIN, DIP, and sea surface temperatures (SSTs), have resulted in the increase of diatom biomass by 15-20% and the growth of primary production by 30-60% since the 1950s. But the drastic decrease in DSi, Si/N, and Si/P depresses the ability of diatoms to develop, resulting in a reduction of 5-10% diatom proportion (BSi/TOC) since the 1930s. This study improves the understanding of the changing estuarine ecosystem in response to global change.

  6. n-Alkanes in sediments from the Yellow River Estuary, China: Occurrence, sources and historical sedimentary record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Guijian; Yuan, Zijiao; Da, Chunnian

    2018-04-15

    A total of 21 surface sediments from the Yellow River Estuary (YRE) and a sediment core from the abandoned Old Yellow River Estuary (OYRE) were analyzed for n-alkanes using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). n-Alkanes in the range C12-C33 and C13-C34 were identified in the surface sediments and the core, respectively. The homologous series were mainly bimodal distribution pattern without odd/even predominance in the YRE and OYRE. The total n-alkanes concentrations in the surface sediments ranged from 0.356 to 0.572mg/kg, with a mean of 0.434mg/kg on dry wt. Evaluation of n-alkanes proxies indicated that the aliphatic hydrocarbons in the surface sediments were derived mainly from a petrogenic source with a relatively low contribution of submerged/floating macrophytes, terrestrial and emergent plants. The dated core covered the time period 1925-2012 and the mean sedimentation rate was ca. 0.5cm/yr. The total n-alkanes concentrations in the core ranged from 0.0394 to 0.941mg/kg, with a mean of 0.180mg/kg. The temporal evolution of n-alkanes reflected the historical input of aliphatic hydrocarbons and was consistent with local and regional anthropogenic activity. In general, the investigation on the sediment core revealed a trend of regional environmental change and the role of anthropogenic activity in environmental change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pathways of organic matter through food webs of diverse habitats in the regulated Nakdong River estuary (Korea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Eun Jung; An, Soonmo; Kang, Chang-Keun

    2008-06-01

    The benthic macroinvertebrates of the Nakdong River estuary were sampled at three different habitats: two salt marsh ( Scirpus triqueter and Phragmites australis) beds and a bare intertidal flat. Fishes were sampled in the main channel. The trophic importance of marsh vascular plants, microphytobenthos, and riverine and channel particulate organic matter to macroinvertebrate and fish production was studied using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope tracers. There was a dramatic change in coverage of macrophytes (salt marshes and seagrass) after the construction of an estuarine barrage in 1987 in the Nakdong River estuary, with the S. triqueter bed increasing, the P. australis bed decreasing, and Zostera marina habitats being nearly lost. Although the invertebrate δ 13C were within a narrower range than those of the primary producers, the values varied considerably among consumers in these habitats. However, the isotope signatures of consumers showed similarities among different habitats. Cluster analysis based on their isotopic similarity suggested that the isotope variability among species was related more to functional feeding groups than to habitats or taxonomic groups. While δ 13C values of suspension feeders were close to that of the channel POM (mainly phytoplankton), other benthic feeders and predators had δ 13C similar to that of microphytobenthos. Isotopic mixing model estimates suggest that algal sources, including microphytobenthos and phytoplankton, play an important role in supporting the benthic food web. Despite the huge productivity of emergent salt marshes, the contribution of the marsh-derived organic matter to the estuarine food webs appears to be limited to some nutrition for some invertebrates just within marsh habitats, with little on the bare intertidal flats or in the channel fish communities. Isotope signatures of the channel fishes also confirm that algal sources are important in supporting fish nutrition. Our findings suggest that

  8. Multi-way analysis for decadal pollution trends assessment: the Guadalquivir River estuary as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, José A; Mendiguchía, Carolina; García-Vargas, Manuel; Moreno, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Alongside history, human activities have contributed to the deployment of environmental quality. In particular, during the last decades the problem of water preservation has gained increasing attention. Statistical analysis is essential to analyze environmental data and to identify trends of pollutants over space and time. Usually applied techniques for data treatment are based on the organization of data in a two-way array, missing some shades on pollutants distribution. This fact supports the use of multi-way techniques, which allow the analysis of the results through different directions at the same time. For Three Modes Principal Components Analysis (3MPCA) a principal components analysis is conducted using three modes and a "core" matrix that allows assessing their interactions. In the case of environmental studies, it offers information about the spatial-temporal evolution of pollutants in a certain water body. The Guadalquivir River estuary has been used as a model system. It is a representative human influenced system, where different pollution inputs have been characterized. In this study, decadal evolution of pollutants has been discussed, to evaluate among others the effects of EU legislation on river water quality. The aim of this work is the establishment of the evolution, during the last decade, of nutrients and metals ultra-traces distribution in an estuary affected by anthropic activities. As examples, Pb and PO4(3-) show a trend to decrease their weight on water pollution, total suspended solids (TSS) behavior is related with massive rain events, and the rising of new technologies appears as a source of emerging pollutants as Co in urban-industrial areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A multi-band semi-analytical algorithm for estimating chlorophyll-a concentration in the Yellow River Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Quan, Wenting; Cui, Tingwei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, two sample semi-analytical algorithms and one new unified multi-band semi-analytical algorithm (UMSA) for estimating chlorophyll-a (Chla) concentration were constructed by specifying optimal wavelengths. The three sample semi-analytical algorithms, including the three-band semi-analytical algorithm (TSA), four-band semi-analytical algorithm (FSA), and UMSA algorithm, were calibrated and validated by the dataset collected in the Yellow River Estuary between September 1 and 10, 2009. By comparing of the accuracy of assessment of TSA, FSA, and UMSA algorithms, it was found that the UMSA algorithm had a superior performance in comparison with the two other algorithms, TSA and FSA. Using the UMSA algorithm in retrieving Chla concentration in the Yellow River Estuary decreased by 25.54% NRMSE (normalized root mean square error) when compared with the FSA algorithm, and 29.66% NRMSE in comparison with the TSA algorithm. These are very significant improvements upon previous methods. Additionally, the study revealed that the TSA and FSA algorithms are merely more specific forms of the UMSA algorithm. Owing to the special form of the UMSA algorithm, if the same bands were used for both the TSA and UMSA algorithms or FSA and UMSA algorithms, the UMSA algorithm would theoretically produce superior results in comparison with the TSA and FSA algorithms. Thus, good results may also be produced if the UMSA algorithm were to be applied for predicting Chla concentration for datasets of Gitelson et al. (2008) and Le et al. (2009).

  10. Distribution and abundance of Cladocera (Branchiopoda in the Paraíba do Sul River estuary, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Mauro Sterza

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the cladoceran community of the Paraíba do Sul River estuary, located in the district of São João da Barra, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, cladocerans were collected monthly in nine sampling stations from September 2002 until August 2003. Samples were obtained by subsurface tows using a plankton net with a 30 cm opening mouth and 70 micron mesh size, fitted with a mechanical flowmeter. Environmental parameters such as salinity and temperature were also obtained. Seventeen species of Cladocera were identified: Pseudoevadne tergestina, Penilia avirostris, Macrothrix triserialis, Moina micrura, Simocephalus kerhervei, Simocephalus vetalus, Simocephalus latirostris, Simocephalus serrulatus, Alona rectangula, Alona quadrangularis, Bosmina longirostris, Bosminopsis deitersi, Camptocercus dadayi, Ceriodaphnia richardi, Diaphanosoma fluviatile, Kurzia latissima and Pleuroxus similis. The highest total abundance of Cladocera occurred in April in the marine zone of the estuary. The most abundant species during this period was Penilia avirostris. At the mixing and freshwater zones of the estuary, the most abundant species were Moina micrura, mainly in January; and Simocephalus vetalus and Bosmina longirostris during spring. From this scenario, it can be inferred that the cladoceran community of the Paraíba do Sul River estuary presents characteristics of marine, brackish and freshwater environments. Temperature and salinity seem to limit the occurrence and distribution of cladocerans in the estuary.O presente estudo teve como objetivo caracterizar a comunidade zooplanctônica de cladóceros no estuário do Rio Paraíba do Sul, localizado no município de São João da Barra, RJ. O zooplâncton foi coletado mensalmente de setembro/2002 a agosto/2003 em nove estações através de arrastos subsuperficiais com uma rede de plâncton com abertura de boca de 30 cm e malha de 70 mµ, dotada de fluxômetro mecânico. Foram medidas simultaneamente a

  11. Microstructure, CTD and ADCP data collected from R/V ONRUST in Hudson River Estuary during 6 short cruises from 1994-05-19 to 2001-05-01 (NCEI Accession 0146260)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations of turbulent mixing, stratification and currents in the Hudson River Estuary made in 6 short cruises in 1994/1995 and 2001 were assembled. The lower...

  12. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Columbia River estuary - Washington/Oregon as part of the Low Level Waste Ocean Disposal project from 13 August 1979 - 27 September 1984 (NODC Accession 9500016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Columbia River estuary - Washington/Oregon from August 13, 1979 to September 27, 1984. Data...

  13. Navigation and Bathymetry Points of Ship Position During Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collection in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 17, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005 f(RESGPSPNTS_JD137.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  14. Ship Trackline along which Continuous Resistivity Profile Data were Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 16, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005 (RESGPSLNS_JD136.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  15. Ship Trackline along which Continuous Resistivity Profile Data were Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 17, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005 (RESGPSLNS_JD137.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  16. Navigation and Bathymetry Points of Ship Position During Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collection in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 16, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005 (RESGPSPNTS_JD136.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  17. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profile (CRP) Data Below the Sediment Water Interface From the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland Collected from May 15 to May 17, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005 (MRG2007_CORSICA_ALLXYZ.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  18. Navigation and Bathymetry Points of Ship Position During Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collection in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 15, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005 (RESGPSPNTS_JD135.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  19. RESGPSLNS_JD135.SHP: Ship Trackline along which Continuous Resistivity Profile Data were Collected in the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland on May 15, 2007 on USGS Cruise 07005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine the importance of nutrient...

  20. The source of natural and anthropogenic heavy metals in the sediments of the Minjiang River Estuary (SE China): implications for historical pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonghang; Sun, Qinqin; Yi, Liang; Yin, Xijie; Wang, Aijun; Li, Yunhai; Chen, Jian

    2014-09-15

    Two sedimentary cores in the Minjiang River estuary (SE China) are documented for grain size, clay minerals, heavy metals, magnetic parameters and Pb isotopes to investigate the source and historical variation of heavy metals. The MJK9 core was collected outside of the Minjiang River estuary, and the core is composed of mixed sediments, of which ~70% from the Yangtze River and 30% from the Minjiang River. It is thus difficult to be used for tracing the human activity along the Minjiang River. In contrast, the sediments of MJK16 core which was collected in a nearshore area are primarily from the Minjiang River. The enrichment factors of the sediments were pollution. The results indicate that the sediments of the MJK16 core have Cu and Pb concentrations increasing since 1980, associated with the increase of magnetic mineral concentration and (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (206)Pb/(208)Pb of the sediments. We compared the Pb isotopic compositions between our results and those for the deposit mining in the Minjiang River basin, and aerosols and coal dust in south China, and considered that Pb in the sediments of the MJK16 core was derived primarily from weathered rocks as well as industrial emission (e.g. coal combustion). The sediments have anthropogenic Pb concentrations ranging from 6% in 1950 to 23.7% in 2010, consistent with the impact of rapid urban and industrial development in China. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Benthic Bacillariophyta of the Paripe River estuary in Pernambuco state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AN. Moura

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the benthic diatom composition from the estuary sediment in the Pernambuco State, based on 32 samples. Samples were collected monthly from September through December 1999 (dry period and from April through July 2000 (rainy period during four pre established sampling stations. Results indicated 19 families and 31 specific and infraspecific taxa. Eight new records were founded for Pernambuco State: Auliscus coelatus, Fallacia nummularia, Navicula algida, Plagiograma pulchellum, Terpsinoe americana, Triceratium antideluvianna and Tryblionella coarctata and one, Auliscus punctatus Bailey, in northeastern Brazil.

  2. [Distribution characteristics and source apportionment of dichloro-diphenyl-tricgloroethanes in Zhangiiang River Estuary of Fujian, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dong-lian

    2014-12-01

    The concentration, distribution and transfer of dichloro-diphenyl-tricgloroethanes (DDTs) in the surface layer water, sediments and aquatic organisms from the Zhangjiang River Estuary were investigated using GC-ECD method. The possible sources were assessed based on the distribution and composition characteristics of DDTs together with the investigation results of dicofol. The results showed that the concentration of DDTs in surface layer water ranged from ND (not detected) to 20.1 ng x L(-1) with an average of 10.5 ng x L(-1) in dry period, from ND to 45.2 ng +/- L(-1) with an aver- age of 28.3 ng x L(-1) in wet period, and from ND to 18.8 ng x L(-1) with an average of 5.03 ng x L(-1) in level period. Concentration of DDTs in surface sediment (dry mass) ranged from 1.87 ng x g(-1) to 144 ng x g(-1) with an average of 17.3 ng x g(-1), and that in 11 species of aquatic organisms ranged from 1.09 ng x g(-1) to 432 ng x g(-1) with an average of 37.0 ng x g(-1). Compared to other areas, the residues of DDTs in the Zhangjiang River Estuary were at the medium level. The accumulation factors of DDTs in sediment and aquatic organisms were 1185 and 2534, respectively. The capacities for DDTs accumulation were in the order of fish>shellfish>shrimp>aquatic plants. The concentrations of DDTs showed downtrend along the Zhangjiang River, indicating that the residues of DDTs mainly came from terrigenous pollution rather than from the release of antifouling agent of ships. Based on the composition profile, DDTs mainly came from the early residues. However, the highest value of dicofol was recently detected both in the water and sediment of Y8 station, which suggested that new DDTs inputs at the Y8 station might be related to the recent usage of dicofol.

  3. Ecological carryover effects associated with partial migration in white perch (Morone americana) within the Hudson River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Brian K.; Piccoli, Philip M.; Secor, David H.

    2018-01-01

    Partial migration in complex life cycles allows environmental conditions experienced during one life-stage to interact with genetic thresholds and produce divergent spatial behaviors in the next stage. We evaluated partial migration over the entire life cycle of white perch, (Morone americana) within the Hudson River Estuary, combining otolith microchemistry, population demographics and environmental data analysis. Ecological carryover effects were used as a framework to test how environmental variation during the larval period influenced migration behaviors and growth characteristics in subsequent life-stages. Two annual cohorts of juveniles were classified based on whether they persisted in natal habitats (freshwater resident contingent) or dispersed into non-natal habitats (brackish water migratory contingent) as juveniles. The migratory contingent tended to hatch earlier and experience cooler temperatures as larvae, while the availability of zooplankton prey during the larval period appeared to influence growth dynamics before and after metamorphosis. Juvenile migration behaviors were reversible but usually persisted into adulthood. As juveniles, the consequences of partial migration on growth appeared to be modified by river flow, as demonstrated by the influence of a large storm event on feeding conditions in one of the study years. Migratory adults grew faster and attained larger maximum sizes, but may also experience higher rates of mortality. The interplay uncovered between life-stage transitions, conditional migration behaviors and habitat productivity throughout the life cycle shapes white perch population dynamics and will likely play an important role in responses to long-term environmental change.

  4. Initial dilution zone impact assessment of selected industries in the Fraser River estuary. Technical report series No. 93-06

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The initial dilution zone (IDZ) monitoring program is a study to document impacts of wastewater discharges on the receiving environment of the Lower Fraser River in the immediate vicinity of the selected effluent discharges. The IDZ study formed part of the first year of the Fraser River Estuary Monitoring Program environmental monitoring program. The study sampled receiving water and sediments within the IDZs of 10 companies that were also sampled as part of FREMP`s effluent characterization study. A reference site was established near the FREMP water quality monitoring station at Mission. Field measurements included pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and salinity. Sediment samples were analyzed for physico-chemical parameters and toxicity. All samples were analyzed for particle size, total organic carbon, and total metals. Sediments from sites related to the forest industry were analyzed for chlorophenols, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in samples from two companies. Effluent dilutions at the edge of the IDZ were calculated based on the drogue data.

  5. Temporal trends of hydrocarbons in sediment cores from the Pearl River Estuary and the northern South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Xianzhi [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehau Street, Guangzhou 510640 (China)], E-mail: pengx@gig.ac.cn; Wang Zhendi [Environmental Science and Technology Centre, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3 (Canada); Yu Yiyi; Tang Caiming; Lu Hong; Xu Shiping; Chen Fanrong; Mai Bixian; Chen Shejun; Li Kechang [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehau Street, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yang Chun [Environmental Science and Technology Centre, Environment Canada, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3 (Canada)

    2008-11-15

    Concentrations and fluxes of unresolved complex mixture of hydrocarbons (UCM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed for two {sup 210}Pb dated sediment cores from the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and the adjacent northern South China Sea (NSCS). Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual n-alkanes were also measured for identification of the hydrocarbon sources. The historical records of PAHs in the NSCS reflected the economic development in the Pearl River Delta during the 20th century. PAHs in the NSCS predominantly derive from combustion of coal and biomass, whereas PAHs in the PRE are a mixture of petrogenic and pyrogenic in origins. The isotopic profiles reveal that the petrogenic hydrocarbons in the PRE originate predominantly from local spillage/leakage of lube oil and crude oils. The accumulation rates of pyrogenic PAHs have significantly increased, whereas UCM accumulation has slightly declined in the NSCS in the recent three decades. - The accumulation rates of pyrogenic PAHs have significantly increased in the northern South China Sea in the recent decades.

  6. Partitioning the effects of environmental and spatial heterogeneity on distribution of plant diversity in the Yellow River Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiu; Ma, Keming; Wang, De

    2012-06-01

    For successful conservation and restoration of biodiversity, it is important to understand how diversity is regulated. In the ecological research community, a current topic of interest is how much of the variation in plant species richness and composition is explained by environmental variation (niche-based model), relative to spatial processes (neutral theory). The Yellow River Estuary (YRE) is a newly formed and fragile wetland ecosystem influenced by both the Yellow River and Bohai Bay. Here, we applied variance partitioning techniques to assess the relative effects of spatial and environmental variables on species richness and composition in the YRE. We also conducted a species indicator analysis to identify characteristic species for three subestuaries within the YRE. Partial redundancy analysis showed that the variations in species richness and composition were explained by both environmental and spatial factors. The majority of explained variation in species richness and composition was attributable to local environmental factors. Among the environmental variables, soil salinity made the greatest contribution to species abundance and composition. Soil salinity was the most important factor in the Diaokou subestuary, while soil moisture was the most important factor influencing species richness in the Qingshui and Chahe subestuaries. The combined effects of soil salinity and moisture determined species richness and composition in the wetlands. These results increase our understanding of the organization and assembly of estuarine plant communities.

  7. [Phytoplankton assemblages in Yangtze River Estuary in the first sluice discharge duration of Three Gorges Dam in late spring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Zhao, Ran; Zhang, Li-yong

    2011-04-01

    In June 15-25, 2003, the first sluice discharge duration of the Three Gorges Dam, water samples were taken from a grid of survey stations around the Yangtze River Estuary and its adjacent waters to analyze the characteristics of phytoplankton assemblages. In the survey area, the major phytoplankton groups were diatoms and dinoflagellates, and a few species belonging to Chrysophyceae and Chlorophyceae were observed. The cell abundance of the assemblages ranged from 0.2 to 1504.2 cells ml(-1), with an average of 72.7 cells ml(-1), and the dominant species were Skeletonema spp., Prorocentrum dentatum, and Scrippsiella trochoidea. The highest cell abundance was appeared in north diluted waters and southwest inshore waters. The cell abundance was the maximum in mid (10 m) water layer, and the minimum in bottom layer. In diluted waters, Skeletonema spp. was the dominant species, and mainly presented in surface water layer; while in the waters with the diluted water of Yangtze River and the mixed water of Taiwan Warmer Current and Yellow Sea, Prorocentrum dentatum dominated, and mainly distributed in surface and mid water layers.

  8. Distributions and source apportionment of sediment-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and hopanes in rivers and estuaries of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzifard, Mehrzad; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Hwai, Tan Shau; Yusuff, Ferdius Mohamat; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the distributions and sources of sediment-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and hopanes in the Malaysian rivers and estuaries were evaluated. The concentrations of 16 USEPA PAHs varied from 225.5 to 293.9 (Perlis River), 195.2 to 481.2 (Kedah River), 791.2 to 1995.4 (Merbok River), 231.2 to 426.7 (Perak River), and 3803.2 to 7442.7 ng g(-1) (Klang River) dry weight. PAHs can be classified as moderate in the Perlis, Kedah, and Perak Rivers, moderate to high in the Merbok River, and high to very high in the Klang River. The comparison of PAHs with sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) indicates that occasionally adverse biological effects may occur from total PAHs, low molecular weight (LMW), and high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs at stations 1, 2, and 3 of the Klang River and from total PAHs at station 2 of the Merbok River. The diagnostic ratios of individual PAHs indicate both petrogenic and pyrogenic origin PAHs with significant dominance of pyrogenic sources in the study areas. The results suggest that Malaysian sediments had hopane ratios (C29/C30) similar to MECO suggesting MECO as a major source of the petroleum hydrocarbons found in the sediments, which is consistent with results reported in previous studies. These findings demonstrate that effective and improved environmental regulations in Malaysia have shifted the source of petroleum hydrocarbons from petrogenic to pyrogenic origin.

  9. Change characteristics of DSi and nutrition structure at the Yangtze River Estuary after Three Gorges Project impounding and their ecological effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The variation law of dissolved silica (DSi, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP and nutrition structure after the Three Gorges Project (TGP impounding as well as their ecological effect were analyzed according to monitoring survey of the Yangtze River Estuary in spring (May and summer (August from 2004-2009. The results showed that after impounding, DSi and DIN concentration decreased and increased, respectively. During the study period, DSi decreased by about 63%, while DIN almost tripled. DIP concentration fluctuated slightly. With respect to nutrition structure, N:P increased, whereas Si:P and Si:N declined. According to chemometry standard of nutrient limits, nutrition structure tended to be imbalanced and the limiting factor of phytoplankton growth (P was studied. Changes of nutrition structure have largely decreased diatom and caused different composition of dominant phytoplankton species. This may change ecosystem structure of the Yangtze River Estuary.

  10. The Bot River, a closed estuary in the south-western Cape

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    River_ The Swedish Africa Expedition visited the area in. 1950 and described it as 'Dry heath with dwarf ... that the Bot River vlei could be divided into several zones. (Figure 1) characterized by the composition of the ..... The level decreases gradually after a period of flooding, then rises rapidly with the onset of fresh floods.

  11. Metagenomic evidence for reciprocal particle exchange between the mainstem estuary and lateral bay sediments of the lower Columbia River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya W Smith

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lateral bays of the lower Columbia River estuary are areas of enhanced water retention that influence net ecosystem metabolism through activities of their diverse microbial communities. Metagenomic characterization of sediment microbiota from three disparate sites in two brackish lateral bays (Baker and Youngs produced approximately 100 Gbp of DNA sequence data analyzed subsequently for predicted SSU rRNA and peptide-coding genes. The metagenomes were dominated by Bacteria. A large component of Eukaryota was present in Youngs Bay samples, i.e. the inner bay sediment was enriched with the invasive New Zealand mudsnail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, known for high ammonia production. The metagenome was also highly enriched with an archaeal ammonia oxidizer closely related to Nitrosoarchaeum limnia. Combined analysis of sequences and continuous, high-resolution time series of biogeochemical data from fixed and mobile platforms revealed the importance of large-scale reciprocal particle exchanges between the mainstem estuarine water column and lateral bay sediments. Deposition of marine diatom particles in sediments near Youngs Bay mouth was associated with a dramatic enrichment of Bacteroidetes (58% of total Bacteria and corresponding genes involved in phytoplankton polysaccharide degradation. The Baker Bay sediment metagenome contained abundant Archaea, including diverse methanogens, as well as functional genes for methylotrophy and taxonomic markers for syntrophic bacteria, suggesting that active methane cycling occurs at this location. Our previous work showed enrichments of similar anaerobic taxa in particulate matter of the mainstem estuarine water column. In total, our results identify the lateral bays as both sources and sinks of biogenic particles significantly impacting microbial community composition and biogeochemical activities in the estuary.

  12. In situ fate and partitioning of waterborne perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the Youngsan and Nakdong River Estuaries of South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seongjin [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Khim, Jong Seong, E-mail: jskocean@snu.ac.kr [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinsoon [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Minhee; Kim, Woong-Ki; Jung, Jinho; Hyun, Seunghun; Kim, Jeong-Gyu [Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyojin; Choi, Heeseon J. [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Ecology, GeoSystem Research Corporation, Gunpo (Korea, Republic of); Codling, Garry [Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Giesy, John P. [Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Department of Zoology, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Biology and Chemistry and State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, SAR (China)

    2013-02-15

    Concentrations, distributions, fate, and partitioning of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) were investigated in surface water (n = 34) collected from the Youngsan and Nakdong River Estuaries of South Korea. Thirteen individual PFAAs in water and suspended solids (SS) were quantified by use of HPLC–MS/MS. PFAAs were detected in all samples, which indicated that they were widely distributed in the study area. Greater concentrations of PFAAs were found at some inland sites which seemed to be affected by direct input from point sources, such as wastewater treatment plants, and/or indirect diffusive sources, such as surface runoff. Spatial distributions of PFAAs in estuaries along transects toward the open sea demonstrated that these chemicals were transported to the outer region primarily by water discharged during the rainy season. Field-based partition coefficients (K{sub d}) for long-chain PFAAs (C ≥ 8) were significantly correlated with salinity (r{sup 2} = 0.48 to 0.73, p < 0.01); K{sub d} values increased exponentially as a function of salinity. Due to the ‘salting-out’ effect, PFAAs were largely scavenged by adsorption onto SS and/or sediments in estuarine environments. In addition, values for K{sub d} of those PFAAs were directly proportional to the number of carbon atoms in the PFAAs. Salting constants of selected PFAAs were notably greater than those of other environmental organic contaminants, which indicated that adsorption of PFAAs is largely associated with salinity. Overall, the results of the present study will provide better understanding of the fate and transport of PFAAs in the zone of salinity boundary that can be used for developing fate models of PFAAs in the coastal marine environment. - Highlights: ► In situ fate and partitioning of PFAAs were described along salinity gradients in estuaries. ► Salinity was found to be the key factor controlling adsorption of waterborne PFAAs. ► The K{sub d} for longer-chain PFAAs (C ≥ 8) increased as

  13. Surface circulation and vertical structure of current off the Keum River estuary, Korea in later spring 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Moon-Jin; Kim, Chang-Soo; Choi, Byoung-Ju; Moon, Hong-Bae

    2017-09-01

    To examine the surface circulation and vertical structure of currents in the region of the Keum River (KR) plume, we analyzed the subinertial surface currents obtained by high frequency radar and the vertical profiles of currents measured at a station (M1) located 10 km distance from the estuary mouth for one month in late spring 2008. Monthly-mean surface circulation is composed of the westward flow from the estuary mouth and the northward flow in the offshore. These surface mean currents are a gradient (geostrophic) current around the monthly-mean plume bulge. Dominant variabilities of the surface currents, winds, and KR-outflow are decomposed by the Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF). The first current EOF mode, explaining 39% of total variation, is primarily related to the first wind EOF mode varying along the coast and the second current mode, explaining 33% of total variation, is mainly related to the first KR-outflow EOF mode varying along the mean KR-outflow direction. Meanwhile, vertical profile of the monthly-mean current at M1 shows a two-layer structure of the current flowing offshore (onshore) in the upper (lower) layer because the water column is divided by a pycnocline at 7-9 m depths below the plume water. This two layer structure is a background persisting current structure, at least in spring, maintained by the geostrophic balance induced by the sea level slope and density gradient along the line normal to the westward mean surface current direction due to monthly-mean plume bulge off the KR estuary. EOF analysis of vertical current profiles reveals that the first mode, explaining 43% of total variation, represents the two-layer structure of the current variability. The upper-layer current varies along a line normal to the mainland coastline and the low-layer one varies approximately along a line parallel to the coastline, with direction difference of about 115° between the upper-and low-layer. From the correlation analysis it is found that 60

  14. Novel Method for Estimating Variations in Salinity and River Discharge in the Hudson Estuary Using Stable Isotopes of Leaf Waxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanpour, B.; Nichols, J. E.; Isles, P. D.; Peteet, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding variations in the hydrological cycle of the Hudson Valley has important implications for water resources management, affecting millions of New Yorkers. Paleoclimatological records of hydrological variability from this region, however, are sparse, as the typical enivronments used for paleohydrological reconstruction do not exist. However, salt marshes are common features of the Hudson River, where the influence of tides is felt far upstream. To take advantage of these environments as recorders of paleohydrology, we present a new method for estimating annual river discharge using salt marsh sediments. We will be examining hydrogen isotopes of leaf waxes in vascular plants to estimate salinity, which will be calibrated to Hudson River discharge using United States Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow data. Freshwater flux from the Hudson Valley is proportional to the salinity at a particular location in the estuary. We estimate the relationship between the salinity and δD using a two-part mixing model where the salinity and δD of ocean water is 35 ppt and 0‰ VSMOW respectively, and the salinity and δD of continental water is 0 ppt and -55‰ (approximately annual average precipitation in the region). It has been shown that the δD of the leaf waxes of aquatic vegetation accurately reflect the δD of growth water. For our experiment, we collected common members of the generaTypha, Spartina, Phragmites, and Scirpus from salt marshes along the Hudson River, and the north and south shores of Long Island to calibrate the specific relationship between marsh plant leaf wax δD and marsh water δD. We compare the measured δD of these plant waxes to the δD of marsh water estimated from salinity measurements made at USGS gage stations near each collection location. We then used the new calibration to estimate late Holocene variations in marsh salinity and thus Hudson River discharge using fossil leaf waxes. This novel method will help us better understand

  15. Declining riverine sediment input impact on spring phytoplankton bloom off the Yangtze River Estuary from 17-year satellite observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Mao, Zhihua; Tang, Fuping; Han, Guoqi; Jiang, Yazhou

    2017-03-01

    Off the Yangtze River Estuary and its adjacent waters (the YRE) are one of the fastest changing regions in the world in terms of the effects of anthropogenic disturbance. Here we address quantitative analysis whether reducing river to sea sediment may cause declining water turbidity then a better light available condition for the algal growth, therefor increasing phytoplankton bloom magnitude in the YRE in the bloom season. An area of high phytoplankton productivity zone is estimated by theoretical and satellite data analysis, which matches well with the spatial distribution of accumulative times of the reported algal bloom events at the decadal time scale. We present 17-year (1998-2014) satellite and hydrological data to reveal an increasing trend in Chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a) in the spring bloom season (May to June), which has strong correlation with the decreasing in the sediment discharge from the Yangtze river to the East China Sea. Changes in Chl-a and the sediment load are inversely related in terms of both temporal variation and their corresponding magnitudes (R2=0.38, p=0.008, n=17). Furtherly, this relationship is not sensitivity to one-year time lag analysis. On the other hand, euphotic depth in the bloom period shows no significant change, which reflects a balance between the increasing phytoplankton biomass enhancing water turbidity and declining riverine sediment decreasing turbidity. Finally, a stepwise multiple linear regression is used to determine which of the five relatively independent environmental variables most significantly contribute to the interannual variability of the bloom magnitude. The most significant effect (p=0.00007) is also found in the riverine sediment load. Therefor, our results suggest that anthropogenic derived riverine sediment change has been significantly impacted spring phytoplankton production in the YRE.

  16. Total mercury flux and offshore transport via submarine groundwater discharge and coal-fired power plant in the Jiulong River estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jigang; Liu, Qian; Chen, Jinmin; Chen, Hongzhe; Lin, Hui; Sun, Xiuwu

    2018-02-01

    A mass balance of total mercury (Hg T , dissolved+particulate) is constructed for China's Jiulong River estuary based on measured Hg T concentrations in the surface water, sediment, porewater, and groundwater for May, August, and November 2009, combined with data from the literature. The Hg T mass budget results show that the dominant source (39-55%) is desulfurized seawater discharged from the Songyu coal-fired power plant. Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD)-derived Hg T flux into the estuary is equivalent to 8-58% of the Hg T input from the Jiulong River, which is remarkable when compared with SGD-derived Hg T fluxes reported in coastal systems worldwide. Hence, SGD is a significant pathway for the transport of Hg T into the Jiulong River estuary. The primary Hg T sinks is export to the Taiwan Strait (53-88%), which has important environmental implications on the Hg cycling and marine ecosystems in marginal seas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Water quality in the Elwha River estuary, Washington, from 2006 to 2014.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This portion of the data release presents water column dissolved nutrient concentration data and water quality parameters from samples collected in the Elwha River...

  18. High CO2 emissions from the tropical Godavari estuary (India) associated with monsoon river discharges

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Kumar, N.A.; Prasad, V.R.; Venkataramana, V.; Appalanaidu, S.; Sridevi, B.; Kumar, B.S.K.; Bharati, M.D.; Subbaiah, C.V.; Acharyya, T.; Rao, G.D.; Viswanadham, R.; Gawade, L.; Manjary, D.T.; Kumar, P.P.; Rajeev, K.; Reddy, N.P.C.; Sarma, V.V.; Kumar, M.D.; Sadhuram, Y; Murty, T.V.R.

    . Appalanaidu, B. Sridevi, B.S.K. Kumar, M.D. Bharati, Ch.V. Subbaiah, T. Acharya, G.D. Rao, R. Viswanadham, L. Gawade, D.T. Manjary, P. P. Kumar, K. Rajeev, N.P.C. Reddy, V.V. Sarma, M.D. Kumar, Y. Sadhuram and T.V.R. Murty National Institute...). The evaluated CO 2 uptake by continental shelves (Borges et al., 2005; Laruelle et al., 2010) range between -0.22 and -1.0 PgC y -1 while Laruelle et al. (2010) estimated emission of CO 2 from estuaries to be +0.27 PgC y -1 . All these estimates, however...

  19. Estuarine Habitat and Juvenile Salmon: Current and Historical Linkages in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    freshwater and mid-estuary zone 2006 2007 Total Taxon n = 124 n = 102 n (%) Turbellaria 81 81 0.56 Trematoda 6 7 13 0.09 Nematoda 26 82 108 0.74...Turbellaria 2 7 14 15 27 65 0.18 Trematoda 1 41 42 0.12 Nematoda 68 109 76 69 73 395 1.12 Polychaeta 1 2 3 0.01 Oligochaeta 1 2 3 0.01...137 n = 162 n = 139 n (%) Turbellaria 120 18 2 37 177 1.20 Trematoda 1 35 36 0.24 Nematoda 111 91 10 21 178 411 2.78 Polychaeta 5 3 3 2 4

  20. Estimation of chlorophyll-a concentration in estuarine waters: case study of the Pearl River estuary, South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuanzhi; Lin Hui [Institute of Space and Earth Information Science, Yuen Yuen Research Centre for Satellite Remote Sensing, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Chen, Chuqun [South China Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Chen Liding [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhang Bing [Center for Earth Observation and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Gitelson, Anatoly A, E-mail: yuanzhizhang@cuhk.edu.hk [Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies (CALMIT), School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (United States)

    2011-04-15

    The objective of this work is to estimate chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration in the Pearl River estuary in China. To test the performance of algorithms for the estimation of the chl-a concentration in these productive turbid waters, the maximum band ratio (MBR) and near-infrared-red (NIR-red) models are used in this study. Specific focus is placed on (a) comparing the ability of the models to estimate chl-a in the range 1-12 mg m{sup -3}, which is typical for coastal and estuarine waters, and (b) assessing the potential of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) to estimate chl-a concentrations. Reflectance spectra and water samples were collected at 13 stations with chl-a ranging from 0.83 to 11.8 mg m{sup -3} and total suspended matter from 9.9 to 21.5 g m{sup -3}. A close relationship was found between chl-a concentration and total suspended matter concentration with the determining coefficient (R{sup 2}) above 0.89. The MBR calculated in the spectral bands of MODIS proved to be a good proxy for chl-a concentration (R{sup 2} > 0.93). On the other hand, both the NIR-red three-band model, with wavebands around 665, 700, and 730 nm, and the NIR-red two-band model (with bands around 665 and 700 nm) explained more than 95% of the chl-a variation, and we were able to estimate chl-a concentrations with a root mean square error below 1 mg m{sup -3}. The two- and three-band NIR-red models with MERIS spectral bands accounted for 93% of the chl-a variation. These findings imply that the extensive database of MODIS and MERIS images could be used to quantitatively monitor chl-a in the Pearl River estuary.

  1. Sources of suspended-sediment loads in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary, south Texas, 1958–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Wehmeyer, Loren L.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District; City of Corpus Christi; Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority; San Antonio River Authority; and San Antonio Water System, developed, calibrated, and tested a Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) watershed model to simulate streamflow and suspended-sediment concentrations and loads during 1958-2010 in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary in south Texas. Data available to simulate suspended-sediment concentrations and loads consisted of historical sediment data collected during 1942-82 in the study area and suspended-sediment concentration data collected periodically by the USGS during 2006-7 and 2010 at three USGS streamflow-gaging stations (08211000 Nueces River near Mathis, Tex. [the Mathis gage], 08211200 Nueces River at Bluntzer, Tex. [the Bluntzer gage], and 08211500 Nueces River at Calallen, Tex. [the Calallen gage]), and at one ungaged location on a Nueces River tributary (USGS station 08211050 Bayou Creek at Farm Road 666 near Mathis, Tex.). The Mathis gage is downstream from Wesley E. Seale Dam, which was completed in 1958 to impound Lake Corpus Christi. Suspended-sediment data collected before and after completion of Wesley E. Seale Dam provide insights to the effects of the dam and reservoir on suspended-sediment loads transported by the lower Nueces River downstream from the dam to the Nueces Estuary. Annual suspended-sediment loads at the Nueces River near the Mathis, Tex., gage were considerably lower for a given annual mean discharge after the dam was completed than before the dam was completed.

  2. Salinity adaptation of the invasive New Zealand mud snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) in the Columbia River estuary (Pacific Northwest, USA): Physiological and molecular studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Marshal; Boese, Bruce L.; Taylor, Louise; Reusser, Deborah; Rodriguez, Rusty

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine salinity stress tolerances of two populations of the invasive species New Zealand mud snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum, one population from a high salinity environment in the Columbia River estuary and the other from a fresh water lake. In 1996, New Zealand mud snails were discovered in the tidal reaches of the Columbia River estuary that is routinely exposed to salinity at near full seawater concentrations. In contrast, in their native habitat and throughout its spread in the western US, New Zealand mud snails are found only in fresh water ecosystems. Our aim was to determine whether the Columbia River snails have become salt water adapted. Using a modification of the standard amphipod sediment toxicity test, salinity tolerance was tested using a range of concentrations up to undiluted seawater, and the snails were sampled for mortality at daily time points. Our results show that the Columbia River snails were more tolerant of acute salinity stress with the LC50 values averaging 38 and 22 Practical Salinity Units for the Columbia River and freshwater snails, respectively. DNA sequence analysis and morphological comparisons of individuals representing each population indicate that they were all P. antipodarum. These results suggest that this species is salt water adaptable and in addition, this investigation helps elucidate the potential of this aquatic invasive organism to adapt to adverse environmental conditions.

  3. Longshore suspended sediment transport and its implications for submarine erosion off the Yangtze River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bing; Wu, Hui; Yang, Shilun; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Coastal currents that originate from large rivers play a key role in delivering sediment to shelf regions. Quantifying their transport capability is therefore essential to understanding the sediment budgets and the consequent deposition or erosion of coastal areas. In February 2012, we observed the sediment transport carried by the Min-Zhe Coastal Current that originates from the Yangtze River mouth and calculated a flux of 18.7 tons per second on a cross-shore section. In this period the coastal current was at a typical status, which allowed us to estimate a total annual sediment transport of 0.27billion tons southward. This result was more than three times the present annual Yangtze River sediment discharge, suggesting that considerable net sediment removal occurs in the coastal regions. The sediment transport 0.27 billion tons/year is probably the deposition/erosion threshold for the East China Sea coast north of our study site. Analysis of historical Yangtze River sediment influx records showed, that the onset and acceleration of coastal erosion was closely linked with the operation of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) upstream of the Yangtze River.

  4. Tidal wetlands of the Yaquina and Alsea River estuaries, Oregon: Geographic Information Systems layer development and recommendations for National Wetlands Inventory revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Laura S.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Janousek, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) layers of current, and likely former, tidal wetlands in two Oregon estuaries were generated by enhancing the 2010 National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) data with expert local field knowledge, Light Detection and Ranging-derived elevations, and 2009 aerial orthophotographs. Data were generated for two purposes: First, to enhance the NWI by recommending revised Cowardin classifications for certain NWI wetlands within the study area; and second, to generate GIS data for the 1999 Yaquina and Alsea River Basins Estuarine Wetland Site Prioritization study. Two sets of GIS products were generated: (1) enhanced NWI shapefiles; and (2) shapefiles of prioritization sites. The enhanced NWI shapefiles contain recommended changes to the Cowardin classification (system, subsystem, class, and/or modifiers) for 286 NWI polygons in the Yaquina estuary (1,133 acres) and 83 NWI polygons in the Alsea estuary (322 acres). These enhanced NWI shapefiles also identify likely former tidal wetlands that are classified as upland in the current NWI (64 NWI polygons totaling 441 acres in the Yaquina estuary; 16 NWI polygons totaling 51 acres in the Alsea estuary). The former tidal wetlands were identified to assist strategic planning for tidal wetland restoration. Cowardin classifications for the former tidal wetlands were not provided, because their current hydrology is complex owing to dikes, tide gates, and drainage ditches. The scope of this project did not include the field evaluation that would be needed to determine whether the former tidal wetlands are currently wetlands, and if so, determine their correct Cowardin classification. The prioritization site shapefiles contain 49 prioritization sites totaling 2,177 acres in the Yaquina estuary, and 39 prioritization sites totaling 1,045 acres in the Alsea estuary. The prioritization sites include current and former (for example, diked) tidal wetlands, and provide landscape units appropriate for basin

  5. Fate of mercury species in the coastal plume of the Adour River estuary (Bay of Biscay, SW France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, Abubaker; Monperrus, Mathilde; Tessier, Emmanuel; Bouchet, Sylvain; Pinaly, Hervé; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Pablo [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Matériaux, UMR 5254 CNRS, Université de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Hélioparc Pau Pyrénées, 2 av. P. Angot, 64053 Pau cedex 9 (France); Maron, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Ingénieur Appliquées à la Mécanique et au Génie Electrique, Institut Supérieur Aquitain du Bâtiment et des Travaux Publics, Université de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Allée du Parc Montaury, 64600 Anglet (France); Amouroux, David, E-mail: david.amouroux@univ-pau.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, Institut Pluridisciplinaire de Recherche sur l' Environnement et les Matériaux, UMR 5254 CNRS, Université de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Hélioparc Pau Pyrénées, 2 av. P. Angot, 64053 Pau cedex 9 (France)

    2014-10-15

    Because mercury (Hg) undergoes significant biogeochemical processes along the estuarine-coastal continuum, the objective of this work was to investigate the distribution and reactivity of methylmercury (MeHg), inorganic mercury (Hg(II)) and gaseous Hg (DGM) in plume waters of the Adour River estuary (Bay of Biscay). Vertical profiles, spatial and tidal variability of Hg species concentrations were evaluated during two campaigns (April 2007 and May 2010) characterized by significant plume extents over the coastal zone. Incubations with isotopically enriched tracers were performed on bulk and filtered waters under sunlight or dark conditions to investigate processes involved in Hg methylation, demethylation and reduction rates. Total Hg(II) concentrations were more dispersed in April 2007 (5.2 ± 4.9 pM) than in May 2010 (2.5 ± 1.1 pM) while total MeHg concentrations were similar for both seasons and averaged 0.13 ± 0.07 and 0.18 ± 0.11 pM, respectively. DGM concentrations were also similar between the two campaigns, averaging 0.26 ± 0.10 and 0.20 ± 0.09 pM, respectively. Methylation yields remained low within the estuarine plume (< 0.01–0.4% day{sup −1}) while MeHg was efficiently demethylated via both biotic and abiotic pathways (2.3–55.3% day{sup −1}), mainly photo-induced. Hg reduction was also effective in these waters (0.3–43.5% day{sup −1}) and was occurring in both light and dark conditions. The results suggest that the plume is overall a sink for MeHg with integrated net demethylation rates, ranging from 2.0–3.7 g (Hg) d{sup −1}, in the same range than the estimated MeHg inputs from the estuary (respectively, 0.9 and 3.5 g (Hg) d{sup −1}). The large evasion of DGM from the plume waters to the atmosphere (8.8–26.9 g (Hg) d{sup −1}) may also limit Hg{sub T} inputs to coastal waters (33–69 g (Hg) d{sup −1}). These processes are thus considered to be most significant in controlling the fate of Hg transferred from the river to the

  6. Investigating the Impacts of Landuse-landcover (LULC Change in the Pearl River Delta Region on Water Quality in the Pearl River Estuary and Hong Kong’s Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Xi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Water quality information in the coastal region of Hong Kong and the Pearl River Estuary (PRE is of great concern to the local community. Due to great landuse-landcover (LULC changes with rapid industrialization and urbanization in the Pearl River Delta (PRD region, water quality in the PRE has worsened during the last 20 years. Frequent red tide and harmful algal blooms have occurred in the estuary and its adjacent coastal waters since the 1980s and have caused important economic losses, also possibly threatening to the coastal environment, fishery, and public health in Hong Kong. In addition, recent literature shows that water nutrients in Victoria Harbor of Hong Kong have been proven to be strongly influenced by both the Pearl River and sewage effluent in the wet season (May to September, but it is still unclear how the PRE diluted water intrudes into Victoria Harbor. Due to the cloudy and rainy conditions in the wet season in Hong Kong, ASAR images will be used to monitor the PRE river plumes and track the intruding routes of PRE water nutrients. In this paper, we first review LULC change in the PRD and then show our preliminary results to analyze water quality spatial and temporal information from remote observations with different sensors in the coastal region and estuary. The study will also emphasizes on time series of analysis of LULC trends related to annual sediment yields and critical source areas of erosion for the PRD region since the 1980s.

  7. Atmospheric influence on the distribution of organic pollutants in the Guadalquivir River estuary, SW Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Gómez, Cristal; López-López, José Antonio; Matamoros, Victor; Díez, Sergi; García-Vargas, Manuel; Moreno, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    In the lower Guadalquivir river basin, a system stressed by a wide variety of anthropogenic activities, eight pesticides (four triazines, two chloroacetanilide herbicides, one organochlorine, and one organophosphorus insecticide); and four emerging pollutants (two personal care products, one organophosphorous flame retardant, and one xanthine alkaloid) were analyzed in river water during a 2-year monitoring program, and after rain episodes. Samples were extracted using the solid phase extraction (SPE) technique prior to determination of compounds using gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer detector. Except for caffeine, recoveries were mostly above 80 %, while limits of detection and quantification were in the low nanograms per liter level (except for dimethoate). Terbuthylazine, simazine (triazine herbicides), and dimethoate (organophosphorus insecticide), present in agrochemicals, were predominant in the river water, although concentrations were below the quality standards established by the EU Water-Framework-Directive. A general trend to increase concentration was observed after rain events, in particular for pesticides, possibly as a consequence of surface runoff.

  8. Macrobenthic assemblages of the Changjiang River estuary (Yangtze River, China) and adjacent continental shelf relative to mild summer hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yibo; Shou, Lu; Tang, Yanbin; Zeng, Jiangning; Gao, Aigen; Chen, Quanzhen; Yan, Xiaojun

    2017-05-01

    To assess the effects of hypoxia, macrobenthic communities along an estuarine gradient of the Changjiang estuary and adjacent continental shelf were analyzed. This revealed spatial variations in the communities and relationships with environmental variables during periods of reduced dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in summer. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in macrobenthic community composition among the three zones: estuarine zone (EZ), mildly hypoxic zone (MHZ) in the continental shelf, and normoxic zone (NZ) in the continental shelf (Global R =0.206, P =0.002). Pairwise tests showed that the macrobenthic community composition of the EZ was significantly different from the MHZ (pairwise test R =0.305, P =0.001) and the NZ (pairwise test R =0.259, P =0.001). There was no significant difference in macrobenthic communities between the MHZ and the NZ (pairwise test R =0.062, P =0.114). The taxa included small and typically opportunistic polychaetes, which made the greatest contribution to the dissimilarity between the zones. The effects of mild hypoxia on the macrobenthic communities are a result not only of reduced DO concentration but also of differences in environmental variables such as temperature, salinity, and nutrient concentrations caused by stratification.

  9. Seasonal changes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in response to hydrology and anthropogenic activities in the Pearl River estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Niu, Lixia; Chen, Hui; Li, Ping; Tian, Feng; Yang, Qingshu

    2017-04-15

    The behaviours of PAHs (containing 2-6 aromatic rings) in the Pearl River estuary were examined each month in 2011. This study was designed to investigate the abundance of 16 priority PAHs and their response to the seasonal dynamics of anthropogenic activities and hydrological cycles. Monthly mean concentrations of ∑ 16 PAHs in water and suspended particulate matter (SPM) were 88.31ng/L and 252.31ng/L respectively, with higher concentrations in the wet season (April to September). Heavy precipitation in the wet season resulted in relatively increased PAH input via riverine discharges and atmospheric deposition. Seasonal variations in suspended sediment concentration (SSC), temperature and salinity have considerably affected the PAH phase association. Higher SSC in the wet season contributed to higher concentration of the PAHs in SPM, and higher temperature and lower salinity facilitated desorption from SPM. The PAH sources were largely attributed to vehicular emissions, coal combustion and coke ovens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reproductive cycle of Tagelus plebeius (Mollusca: Bivalvia in the estuary of the Cachoeira River, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LO. Ceuta

    Full Text Available This study characterized the reproductive cycle of the stout razor clam Tagelus plebeius in the estuary of the Cachoeira River, Ilhéus, Bahia, northeastern Brazil. Samples of 20 animals per collection were taken biweekly from August 2005 to August 2006. The 480 specimens were measured on the antero-posterior axis (length and then removed from the shell. After macroscopic analysis, the gonads were fixed in Davidson's solution, processed by routine histology and stained by Harris hematoxylin and eosin. The gonads of both males and females appeared milky white, without sexual dimorphism. Microscopic analyses indicated a M: F ratio of 1.06: 1 and continuous reproduction of T. plebeius in the region. The period from August to October showed the most intense spawning. This study provides another example of continuous reproduction of bivalves in tropical waters, and because this species is a heavily exploited fishery resource in the region, it draws attention to the need for a management plan aimed at reducing harvests.

  11. Spatial intertidal distribution of bivalves and polychaetes in relation to environmental conditions in the Natori River estuary, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Takeshi; Komizunai, Nobuhiro; Shirase, Tatsuya; Ito, Kinuko; Omori, Michio

    2008-11-01

    This paper aims to reveal spatial variation in the abundance of infaunal bivalves and polychaetes at different spatial scales (station: 200-800 m intervals; plot: 5-20 m), and to reveal environmental variables affecting the spatial distribution of animals in the Natori River estuary, Japan. We found six bivalve species and eight polychaete species from 52 plots at 12 stations. Nuttallia olivacea and Heteromastus sp. were found to be the most abundant species of bivalves and polychaetes, respectively. Assemblage patterns of bivalves and polychaetes were classified into five distinct groups. Substrata (silt-clay contents), salinity, and relative elevation were the variables found to affect the infaunal assemblage patterns. Chlorophyll a was not a significant variable, but benthic animals were absent at sites with extremely low chlorophyll a conditions. Macrobenthic assemblage patterns were different not only between stations but often differed between plots at the same station, reflecting the complex assemblage structure of benthic invertebrates. Detailing such animal-environment relationship is essential in understanding the potential food supply for estuarine fishes.

  12. Soil As Levels and Bioaccumulation in Suaeda salsa and Phragmites australis Wetlands of the Yellow River Estuary, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Little information is available on As contamination dynamics in the soil-plant systems of wetlands. Total arsenic (As in soil and plant samples from Suaeda salsa and Phragmites australis wetlands was measured in the Yellow River Estuary (YRE in summer and autumn of 2007 to investigate the seasonal changes in As concentrations in different wetlands. The results showed that soil As levels greatly exceeded the global and regional background values. As levels in soil and the roots and stems of both types of plants were much higher in summer than in autumn, whereas leaf As showed higher level in autumn. Soil sulfur was the main factor influencing As levels in Suaeda salsa wetlands, whereas soil porosity was the most important factor for Phragmites australis wetlands. The contamination factor (CF showed moderately to considerably polluted levels of As in both wetland soils. Plant roots and leaves of Suaeda salsa had higher As concentrations and biological concentration factors (BCFs than stems, while the leaves and stems of Phragmites australis showed higher As levels and BCFs than roots. Compared to Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa generally showed higher translocation factor (TF, while TF values for both plant species were higher in summer than in autumn.

  13. [Preliminary studies on the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes in typical aquaculture area of the Pearl River Estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xi-Mei; Nie, Xiang-Ping; Shi, Zhen

    2013-10-01

    Traditional and quantitative PCR techniques were used to determine the occurrence and quantities of ARGs, including three types of genes resistant to sulfonamide, seven for tetracycline resistance and one for quinolone resistance, as well as one integron gene in typical aquaculture of the Pearl River Estuary. The results showed that all genes except for tetW were detectable in the aquaculture environment, and sull, sul2 and int1 were the most frequently detected genes (detectable percentage, 100% ). Relative abundances of ARGs increased with the prolongation of rearing time under the same aquaculture pattern, suggesting a cumulative effect. Moreover, the occurrences of ARGs in the ponds were different with different aquaculture patterns, indicating that the aquaculture pattern might play an important role in the abundances and distributions of ARGs. Relative abundances of intl, as a horizontal mobile genetic element, were significantly correlated to the levels of sull and the total ARGs (P aquaculture substantially increased the abundances of ARGs probably owning to the induction of horizontal gene transfer of ARGs among bacteria.

  14. Tissue distribution and fate of persistent organic pollutants in Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins from the Pearl River Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Duan; Yu, Riqing; He, Xuan; Tu, Qin; Wu, Yuping

    2014-09-15

    Eleven persistent organic pollutant (POP) compounds including ∑PCBs, ∑DDTs, ∑HCHs, aldrin, mirex, endrin, ∑CHLs, dieldrin, HCB, heptachlor and pentachlorobenzene were measured in the kidney, liver, muscle, melon and other tissues of Sousa chinensis stranded on the western coast of the Pearl River Estuary in China during 2007-2013. For most parameters of POPs measured, melon tissues contained the highest mean concentrations with the exception of aldrin, which was higher in the kidney and liver tissues. The concentrations of PCBs, DDTs, heptachlor and endrin in the melon tissue exhibited significant correlations with body length, whereas PCBs and heptachlor also displayed significant regression with age. Our studies showed hepatic concentrations of ∑DDTs, ∑HCHs and mirex in S. chinensis were generally higher than those found in cetaceans from other geographic locations. The high levels of POP residues in the testis of one male dolphin suggested an increasing risk of infertility in the species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Valuing Ecosystem Services with Fishery Rents: A Lumped-Parameter Approach to Hypoxia in the Neuse River Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry B. Crowder

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Valuing ecosystem services with microeconomic underpinnings presents challenges because these services typically constitute nonmarket values and contribute to human welfare indirectly through a series of ecological pathways that are dynamic, nonlinear, and difficult to quantify and link to appropriate economic spatial and temporal scales. This paper develops and demonstrates a method to value a portion of ecosystem services when a commercial fishery is dependent on the quality of estuarine habitat. Using a lumped-parameter, dynamic open access bioeconomic model that is spatially explicit and includes predator-prey interactions, this paper quantifies part of the value of improved ecosystem function in the Neuse River Estuary when nutrient pollution is reduced. Specifically, it traces the effects of nitrogen loading on the North Carolina commercial blue crab fishery by modeling the response of primary production and the subsequent impact on hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen. Hypoxia, in turn, affects blue crabs and their preferred prey. The discounted present value fishery rent increase from a 30% reduction in nitrogen loadings in the Neuse is $2.56 million, though this welfare estimate is fairly sensitive to some parameter values. Surprisingly, this number is not sensitive to initial conditions.

  16. Parasites in the mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae cultivated in the estuary of the Graciosa River in Taperoá, Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliane Watanabe Cova

    Full Text Available In this work, parasites associated with the mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae were studied at a cultivation unit in the estuary of the Graciosa River in Taperoá, Bahia. On a monthly basis, between April 2011 and March 2012, 20 oysters were collected, measured and fixed in 10% formaldehyde. In order to identify the parasites, routine histological techniques were used. The specimens were embedded in paraffin and sections, 7 µm thick, were cut. These were then stained with Harris hematoxylin and eosin and were examined using an optical microscope. The parameters analyzed to investigate water quality showed that the temperature ranged from 23.9 °C to 29.3 °C, water salinity from 0.4 to 24.2 Practical Salinity Units PSU and recorded rainfall from 80 mm to 406.4 mm/month. During the parasitological analyses, infestation of the polychaete Neanthes succinea was observed in 41% of the oysters. Through histological techniques, the following parasites were identified: colonies of Rickettsia-like organisms (RLOs; the protozoa Nematopsis sp. and Ancistrocoma sp.; the turbellarian Urastoma sp.; the metacestode Tylocephalum sp. and an unidentified tapeworm. The data collected showed that there was low-intensity infection with and prevalence of parasites, except for Nematopsis sp., thus attesting that these cultivated oysters were in a healthy condition.

  17. Application of large capacity air gun in three-dimensional crustal structure exploration of the Pearl River estuary area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Gong, Xuan; Sun, Jinlong

    2017-06-01

    The air gun source has been widely used as an artificial source in seismic exploration of the sea area because of its simple operation, low risk, automatic continuous operation and almost no influence on the observation environment. In 2015, we carried out the 3-D crustal structural exploration project in the Pearl River estuary, 13 seismic sounding explorations were set up in the sea area, and activated air gun source for more than 12,000 times. Through records of ocean bottom seismograph (OBS) and fixed seismic stations, we found that seismic records of OBS can be clearly identified Pg, PmP, and other phases, the records of the fixed seismic stations can be clearly identified the air gun shot events. The results show that the energy of the air gun shot in this field exploration is quite good, and data can support the study of the three-dimensional structure of the crust in the sea by air gun shot records of seismometers.

  18. Reproductive cycle of Tagelus plebeius (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the estuary of the Cachoeira River, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceuta, L O; Boehs, G

    2012-08-01

    This study characterized the reproductive cycle of the stout razor clam Tagelus plebeius in the estuary of the Cachoeira River, Ilhéus, Bahia, northeastern Brazil. Samples of 20 animals per collection were taken biweekly from August 2005 to August 2006. The 480 specimens were measured on the antero-posterior axis (length) and then removed from the shell. After macroscopic analysis, the gonads were fixed in Davidson's solution, processed by routine histology and stained by Harris hematoxylin and eosin. The gonads of both males and females appeared milky white, without sexual dimorphism. Microscopic analyses indicated a M: F ratio of 1.06: 1 and continuous reproduction of T. plebeius in the region. The period from August to October showed the most intense spawning. This study provides another example of continuous reproduction of bivalves in tropical waters, and because this species is a heavily exploited fishery resource in the region, it draws attention to the need for a management plan aimed at reducing harvests.

  19. Non-aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments near the Pearl River estuary in the South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Xuelu [Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Environmental Dynamics, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, CAS, Guangzhou 510301 (China) and Laboratory of Marine Ecosystem and Biogeochemistry, Second Institute of Oceanography, SOA, Hangzhou 310012 (China)]. E-mail: xlgao@scsio.ac.cn; Chen Shaoyong [Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Environmental Dynamics, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, CAS, Guangzhou 510301 (China); Xie Xueliang [Shandong Light Industry Engineering School, Qingdao 266112 (China); Long Aimin [Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Environmental Dynamics, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, CAS, Guangzhou 510301 (China); Ma Fujun [Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Environmental Dynamics, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, CAS, Guangzhou 510301 (China)

    2007-07-15

    Surface sediment samples at 4 sites along an offshore transect from outer continental shelf off the Pearl River estuary to the shelf slope region of the northern South China Sea, have been analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), solvent extractable organic matter (EOM) and non-aromatic hydrocarbons. TOC, TN and EOM show distinct spatial variations. Their highest values are all recorded at the shelf slope region. EOM varies from 18.70-38.58 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry sediment and accounts for 0.20-0.72% of the TOC contents. The non-aromatic hydrocarbons are an important fraction of EOM. Their contents range from 3.43-7.06 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry sediment. n-Alkanes with carbon number ranging from 15-38 are identified. They derive from both biogenic and petrogenic sources in different proportions. Results of isoprenoid hydrocarbons, hopanes and steranes also suggest possible petroleum contamination. - Anthropogenic activities have influences on the composition of non-aromatic hydrocarbons in the surface sediments of the northern South China Sea outer continental shelf.

  20. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration, April 29-30, 2008, Astoria, Oregon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Sutherland, G. Bruce [Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (retired)

    2008-09-29

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C. A compact disk, attached to the back cover, contains material in hypertext-markup-language from the conference website (http://cerc.labworks.org/) and the individual presentations.

  1. Ducks change wintering patterns due to changing climate in the important wintering waters of the Odra River Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Marchowski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Some species of birds react to climate change by reducing the distance they travel during migration. The Odra River Estuary in the Baltic Sea is important for wintering waterfowl and is where we investigated how waterbirds respond to freezing surface waters. The most abundant birds here comprise two ecological groups: bottom-feeders and piscivores. Numbers of all bottom-feeders, but not piscivores, were negatively correlated with the presence of ice. With ongoing global warming, this area is increasing in importance for bottom-feeders and decreasing for piscivores. The maximum range of ice cover in the Baltic Sea has a weak and negative effect on both groups of birds. Five of the seven target species are bottom-feeders (Greater Scaup Aythya marila, Tufted Duck A. fuligula, Common Pochard A. ferina, Common Goldeneye Bucephala clangula and Eurasian Coot Fulica atra, and two are piscivores (Smew Mergellus albellus and Goosander Mergus merganser. Local changes at the level of particular species vary for different reasons. A local decline of the Common Pochard may simply be a consequence of its global decline. Climate change is responsible for some of the local changes in the study area, disproportionately favoring some duck species while being detrimental to others.

  2. Postlarval development of Halicarcinus planatus females (Crustacea, Decapoda, Hymenosomatidae in the estuary of the Deseado River, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio H. Vinuesa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses morphology and morphometric growth changes of Halicarcinus planatus females until their terminal moult, and characterises new juvenile stages. Monthly samples were collected in the estuary of the Deseado River, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. Crabs were sampled between the mid-intertidal and upper subtidal levels. Intermoult stages were analysed in sub-samples of adolescents and adults, and the presence of epizoic organisms was registered. Juveniles and adults were reared at the laboratory and examined for moult changes. All 3376 crabs caught were females, indicating a clear spatial segregation between sexes. Five juvenile stages (immature 1, 2, 3, 4 and adolescent and a mature one were recognised on the basis of morphology and morphometry. All immature stages differed in cephalothorax width (CW and abdomen width (AW. Positive allometry was observed in some juvenile stages and isometry in an immature stage and in mature females. Adolescents and adults encompassed a wide range of sizes, and the considerable size overlap between them suggests an anomalous growth process. Moult staging analysis indicated that adolescents have a high incidence of pre-moult stages in winter, when the terminal moult occurs. The measurements performed in laboratory-reared females indicated no abnormal increases during the moult. The terminal moult occurs within a wide size range, perhaps in association with mating.

  3. A survey of benthic sediment contaminants in reaches of the Columbia River Estuary based on channel sedimentation characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counihan, Timothy D.; Waite, Ian R.; Nilsen, Elena B.; Hardiman, Jill M.; Elias, Edwin; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Zaugg, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    While previous studies have documented contaminants in fish, sediments, water, and wildlife, few specifics are known about the spatial distribution of contaminants in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). Our study goal was to characterize sediment contaminant detections and concentrations in reaches of the CRE that were concurrently being sampled to assess contaminants in water, invertebrates, fish, and osprey (Pandion haliaetus) eggs. Our objectives were to develop a survey design based on sedimentation characteristics and then assess whether sediment grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), and contaminant concentrations and detections varied between areas with different sedimentation characteristics. We used a sediment transport model to predict sedimentation characteristics of three 16 km river reaches in the CRE. We then compartmentalized the modeled change in bed mass after a two week simulation to define sampling strata with depositional, stable, or erosional conditions. We collected and analyzed bottom sediments to assess whether substrate composition, organic matter composition, and contaminant concentrations and detections varied among strata within and between the reaches. We observed differences in grain size fractions between strata within and between reaches. We found that the fine sediment fraction was positively correlated with TOC. Contaminant concentrations were statistically different between depositional vs. erosional strata for the industrial compounds, personal care products and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons class (Indus–PCP–PAH). We also observed significant differences between strata in the number of detections of Indus–PCP–PAH (depositional vs. erosional; stable vs. erosional) and for the flame retardants, polychlorinated biphenyls, and pesticides class (depositional vs. erosional, depositional vs. stable). When we estimated mean contaminant concentrations by reach, we observed higher contaminant concentrations in the furthest

  4. Distributions of dimethylsulfide and its related compounds in the Yangtze (Changjiang) River Estuary and its adjacent waters in early summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ting-Ting; Wu, Xi; Liu, Chun-Ying; Yang, Gui-Peng

    2017-08-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is an important and dominant sulfur compound that is transferred from the ocean to the atmosphere. In this study, the spatiotemporal variations in DMS concentrations and its two closely related compounds, namely, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and acrylic acid (AA), were investigated in the Yangtze (Changjiang) River Estuary and its adjacent waters, where the salinity changed dramatically in June 2014. The concentration ranges (average values) of DMS, DMSP, and AA were 1.10-27.5 (8.53), 5.93-195 (40.1), and 4.2-122.6 (17.9) nmol L-1 in the surface waters, respectively. The DMS and DMSP concentrations were higher in the study area than in its neighboring regions because of the high levels of nutrients originating in the Yangtze and Qiantang Rivers. However, the AA concentration was lower in the study area. Although no significant correlations were found between DMS, DMSP, or AA and salinity, high concentrations of DMS, AA, and DMSP were recorded between the salinity levels of 26‰ and 31‰. DMS and AA concentrations were positively correlated with chlorophyll a. The average AA/(DMSP+AA) and DMS/(DMSP+AA) ratios were 36.9% and 17.1%, respectively. The vertical profiles of DMSP and DMS presented similar variation patterns, and high concentrations of both compounds were mostly detected in the surface waters. By contrast, AA showed a different variation pattern compared with those of DMSP and DMS because AA could have other potential sources. The low average sea-to-air flux of DMS (that is, 6.55 μmol m-2 d-1) was mainly attributed to the low wind speed in early summer.

  5. Temporal trends of select pharmaceutical compounds entering an estuary from a small, urban river

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fate and effects of pharmaceutical compounds have been widely studied in freshwater systems; however, less is known about their behavior in marine ecosystems. In many coastal watersheds, there are river systems that are receiving waters for domestic wastewater treatment effl...

  6. Behaviour of boron, calcium and magnesium in Mindola river estuary (Gujarat)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narvekar, P.V.; Zingde, M.D.; Dalal, V.N.K.

    Ratios of B:Cl, Ca:Cl and Mg:Cl were generally within limit of river water at one end and seawater at the other. Percentage addition or removal (PA & PR) of B, Ca and Mg was calculated using the concept of the theoretical dilution line. High...

  7. Nutrient characterisation of river inflow into the estuaries of the Gouritz Water Management Area, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lemley, DA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available environments. Long-term water quality monitoring data (dissolved inorganic nitrogen, i.e. DIN; and dissolved inorganic phosphorus, i.e. DIP), collected by the Department of Water Affairs (DWA), were used to assess historical trends of river nutrient inflow...

  8. Hydrocarbons in surface sediments from the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary, East China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Fillaux, Joelle; Saliot, Alain [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Lab. de Biogeochimie et Chimie Marines, Paris, 75 (France)

    2001-07-01

    Sedimentary aliphatic (AH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied in the Changjiang Estuary and the adjacent East China Sea. Total AH ranged from 2.20 to 11.82 {mu}g g {sup -1} and consisted of n-alkanes and a dominant petroleum-related unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Within the n-alkanes, terrestrial plant wax compounds prevailed at nearly all stations. Of the PAHs, biogenic perylene dominated at stations receiving riverine inputs. Anthropogenic PAHs originating from combustion/pyrolysis processes varied from 17 to 157 ng g {sup -1}, while fossil PAH concentrations ranged from 42 to 187 ng g {sup -1}. Both biogenic and anthropogenic hydrocarbons are primarily derived from riverine discharges and accumulate at shallow-water stations. Distinct phase associations lead, nevertheless, to different sedimentation patterns. Fossil PAHs are enhanced at offshore stations where they are introduced directly by shipping activities. Biomarker fingerprints ascribe their source to Chinese crude oils. The overall levels of anthropogenic hydrocarbons are low compared to relevant areas worldwide and reveal a low/moderate level of hydrocarbon pollution. (Author)

  9. 6 Structural variation in mangrove forests of the estuary of the River Itabapoana, ES-RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Bernini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the structure of 13 sites of mangrove vegetation in the Itabapoana estuary by use of the methodology of permanent plots. Considering all individuals >1m within the plots, the average height of forests ranged from 4.0 to 10.1m, the average DBH (diameter at breast height ranged from 3.7 to 13.5cm, the basal area of living individuals was 13.5 to 48.3m2.ha-1, and the density of trunks was 1,475 to 21,000 trunks.ha-1. Overall, there was a greater contribution of the live basal area in relation to diameter >10.0cm (59%. Forests with better structural development exhibited a dominance of Avicennia germinans (L. Stearn, while Laguncularia racemosa (L. Gaertn. f. was dominant in less-developed forests. Our results showed that environmental features and biotic factors contribute to mangrove differentiation among sites. Such differences highlight the peculiarities of each mangrove and emphasize the need of specific management plans for ecosystem maintenance.

  10. Phytoplankton nyctemeral variation at a tropical river estuary (Itamaracá - Pernambuco - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Lacerda

    Full Text Available The Botafogo estuary is of socio-economical importance for Pernambuco State. It is located at the north of Santa Cruz Channel, Itamaracá, Pernambuco, Brazil (07º42'50"S and 34º52'10"W. There is a critical need to understand its functioning because of the rate at which this area is being converted to land uses. The phytoplankton dynamics was studied to enhance the knowledge of and verify the possible changes which have occurred in this ecosystem. Sampling was carried out with a plankton net 65 micrometers mesh size for qualitative data, and a Van Dorn bottle for quantitative data. Concurrent hydrological and chlorophyll-a data were collected. Samplings were made in one fixed station in July 1996 (rainy season and December 1996 (dry season, at 3-hour intervals during 24 hours. Eighty-seven specific and infra-specific taxa were identified from net plankton samples. Diatoms were most frequent, mainly Coscinodiscus centralis and Odontella regia in the rainy and dry seasons, respectively. Phytoplankton density varied from 205,000 to 1,210,000 cell.L-1 in the dry season, and from 230,000 to 2,510,000 cell.L-1 in the rainy season, indicating eutrophic conditions. Most numerically abundant were the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana and Cylindrotheca closterium and the phytoflagellates. The ecosystem is polluted, and deleterious effects are minimized by the marine influence which allows periodic water renewal.

  11. Evolution of heavy-metal profiles in river Weser Estuary sediments, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronek, F.; Sagemann, J.; Stenzel, F.; Schulz, H. D.

    1994-11-01

    Studies of heavy metal concentrations in porewaters and in sediments from the Weser Estuary, Germany, indicate that the depth distribution of Mn, Cd, and Cu in the solid phase is predominantly influenced by the subsurface redox regime, while Ni shows only moderate alteration. Based on solid-phase heavy metal data from eight locations in the study area, linear regressions of Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, and Cd on Al allowed differences between the initial metal concentration and the concentration preserved in the sediments to be predicted. We calculate that, due to early diagenetic processes, Mn is enriched to 145 percent, while Cu and Cd are depleted to 71 percent and 46 percent, respectively, of the initial metal concentration in the near-surface sediment. Maximum depletion of Cd (84 percent), Cu (68 percent), Mn (54 percent), and Ni (24 percent) concentrations in the sediment, observed at a restricted area downcore, indicate the importance of post-depositional processes to metal preservation in the sediment. Without knowledge of the quantitative effects of diagenetic reactions on the preservation of metal concentrations in sediments, the depth distribution of metals in sediment cores may be misinterpreted as the effect of human activities.

  12. Spatial variation and toxicity assessment for heavy metals in sediments of intertidal zone in a typical subtropical estuary (Min River) of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhigao; Li, Jiabing; He, Tao; Ren, Peng; Zhu, He; Gao, Hui; Tian, Liping; Hu, Xingyun

    2017-10-01

    Sediment samples were collected in five marshes (C1, Phragmites australis marsh; C2, P. australis and Cyperus malaccensis marsh; C3, C. malaccensis marsh; C4, Spartina alterniflora marsh; and C5, Cyperus compressus marsh) respectively along two typical transects (T1 and T2) extending from the vegetated marsh to the mudflat in a typical subtropical estuary (Min River) of China in July 2015 to investigate the spatial variation and toxicity of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Ni) in intertidal zone. Results showed that the concentrations of heavy metal in surface sediments of the two transects were in the order of Zn > Cr > Pb > Cu > Ni and slightly decreased from the land to the sea except for Pb and Zn. The levels of the five metals at C5 marsh were generally the lowest, while those of Pb, Cr, and Zn at C2 marsh were the highest. The vertical variations of Pb, Cr, and Zn concentrations in profiles differed among marshes or transects, and in most cases, there was no evidence of sediment organic matter (SOM) contributing to the sorption of significant amount of metals in sediments along the two transects, while grain composition was a primary factor controlling the spatial variations of metals. Both the vertical distributions of Cu and Ni levels among marshes or transects showed little fluctuation, which could be better explained by the effects of sulfur on the solubility and mobility of the two metals in profiles. Heavy metal levels in sediments of the Min River estuary were much higher compared with most estuaries in Asia, Europe, Africa, and South America. The sediments in intertidal zone of the Min River estuary were moderately polluted by the five metals, and particularly, Ni was identified as heavy metal of primary concern. Both Ni and Pb in sediments of the intertidal zone showed high potential toxicity and high contributions to the sum of the toxic units (ΣTUs). In future, the metal pollutions in intertidal zone of the Min River estuary might be more

  13. Summer nutrients structure and phytoplankton growth under the influence of freshwater-saline water mixing in the Changjiang River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Kui; Chen, Jianfang

    2015-04-01

    The spatial distribution of NO3-, PO43-, SiO32- in summer were studied in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary and the adjacent East China Sea(ECS), the nutrients distribution was mainly controlled by the Changjiang dilution water and offshore seawater mixing. NO3-, PO43-, SiO32- were high west and low east, presenting two tongues shape nearshore. Combined with the nutrient structure difference along the estuary gradient, the potential relative nutrient limitation of surface water at each station was distinguished. Coastal water was featured with excess nitrogen, in summer DIN/P ratio was up to 160 in the frequent algae blooms area, while Si/N reached as low as 0.5, which could be caused by luxury consumption of P and Si by diatom bloom. For better understanding the process of nutrients structure variation and influence on phytoplankton growth under the Changjiang dilution water and seawater mixing, we also conducted field incubation simulating different fresh-saline water mixing scale, by 100%, 75%, 50%, 25% and 0% for about 3 days. The results were as follows: (1) The lower the percentage of freshwater, the lower the growth rate and pH increase rate of phytoplankton during the exponential growth period; (2) Macronutrients were apparently consumed. PO43- in the 100%, 75% and 50% dilution treatments were depleted within 48 h, suggesting that PO43- limit phytoplankton growth below salinity of 26. (3) For the 100% treatment the DIN/P ratio doubled as PO43- was consumed rapidly, while DIN decreased slowly. The DIN/Si ratio decreased to about 0.7 times the original level during the first 48 h, reflecting the lower initial DIN/Si value compared to the diatom uptake ratio (dDIN/dSi) during the incubation period. The incubation presented the phytoplankton growth extent and rate difference during fresh-saline water mixing, which makes nutrients gradient, and this mixing process may cause local blooms to change the nutrient structure, then might result in phytoplankton

  14. Influence of river discharge on plankton metabolic rates in the tropical monsoon driven Godavari estuary, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Gupta, S.N.M.; Babu, P.V.R.; Acharyya, T.; Harikrishnachari, N.; Vishnuvardhan, K.; Rao, N.S.; Reddy, N.P.C.; Sarma, V.V.; Sadhuram, Y.; Murty, T.V.R.; Kumar, M.D.

    including contaminants, from land and exchange with the open ocean. Particularly watersheds (Meybeck 1982; Kemp 1984, Howarth et al. 1996) export significant amounts of organic matter to the system. Besides the externally supplied organic carbon..., the active biological pump in coastal regions contributes to significant accumulation of carbon in sediments (Wollast and Mackenzie 1989; Wollast 1998; Smith and Hollibaugh 1993). River-borne organic matter, mainly in dissolved form, is expected...

  15. Flow model of the Hudson River estuary from Albany to New Hamburg, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedfast, David A.

    1982-01-01

    A one-dimensional transient-flow-simulation model was developed to represent a 76-mile reach of the tidal Hudson River between Albany and New Hamburg, N.Y. The river 's direction of flow reverses four times daily as a result of tidal influence, and this process produces complex current patterns and retards the rate at which the river can flush out pollutants. In the model, the reach studied is treated as two subreaches to incorporate differences in channel conditions and to simplify model calibration. This report provides all stage (water-level) and discharge data that were used to calibrate and verify the model and compares the model results with measured data. The model accurately simulated observed flows, but further calibration based upon additional prototype flow measurements would improve simulation of the flow magnitude and phasing of the tide reversal under low-flow conditions. The model can be used to calculate instantaneous stage, velocity, and discharge for any location in the reach and can also be used to calculate net volume flux between tide reversals. (USGS)

  16. Pair-Trawl Detection of PIT-Tagged Juvenile Salmonids Migrating in the Columbia River Estuary, 2008 Report of Research.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magie, Robert J.; Morris, Matthew S.; Ledgerwood, Richard D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-06-03

    In 2008, we sampled migrating juvenile Pacific salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags using a surface pair trawl in the upper Columbia River estuary (rkm 61-83). The cod-end of the trawl was replaced with a cylindrical PIT-tag detection antenna with an 86-cm-diameter fish-passage opening and two detection coils connected in series. The pair trawl was 105 m long with a 91.5-m opening between the wings and a sample depth of 4.9 m. Also during 2008, we finalized the development of a prototype 'matrix' antenna, which was larger than previous antennas by a considerable magnitude. The matrix antenna consisted of 6 coils: a 3-coil front component and a 3-coil rear component, which were separated by 1.5-m of net mesh. The fish-passage opening was 2.5 m wide by 3.0 m tall and was attached to a standard-size pair trawl net. Intermittent sampling with a single crew began on 7 March and targeted yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. Daily sampling using two crews began on 30 April and continued through 14 June; during this period we detected 2.7% of all juvenile salmonids previously detected at Bonneville Dam--a measure of sample efficiency. Sampling with a single crew continued through 20 August and targeted subyearling Chinook salmon. We detected 7,397 yearling Chinook salmon, 2,735 subyearling Chinook salmon, 291 coho salmon O. kisutch, 5,950 steelhead, and 122 sockeye salmon O. nerka in the upper estuary. We deployed the matrix antenna system and the older, cylindrical antenna system (86-cm-diameter fish-passage opening) simultaneously in mid-May 2008 to test matrix detection efficiency. The cylindrical antenna system had been used successfully in 2007 and early 2008. Because distribution of migrating salmonids in the estuary changes rapidly, we felt that a tandem sampling effort between the two systems was the only way to truly evaluate comparative detection efficiency. We deployed both systems

  17. Research Note:Effects of human activities on the Yangtze River suspended sediment flux into the estuary in the last century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Yang

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface erosion area in the Yangtze River basin increased from 364×103 km2 in the 1950s to 707×103 km2 in 2001 due to a great increase in population. Based on the regression relationship between surface erosion area and population, the surface erosion area was predicted to be about 280×103 km2 at the beginning of the 20th century. The sediment yield, which increased by about 30% during the first six decades of the 20th century, was closely related to the surface erosion area in this river basin. The Yangtze annual suspended sediment flux into the estuary was about 395×106 t a-1 at the beginning of the century, and this gradually increased to an average of 509×106 t a-1 in the 1960s. The increase in the suspended sediment flux into the estuary was accelerated in the 1950s and the 1960s due to the rapid increase in population and land use immediately after the Second World War and the Liberation War. After the riverine suspended sediment flux reached its maximum in the 1960s, it decreased to 6 t a-1 in 2003. Construction of dams was found to be the principal cause for this decreasing trend because, during the same period, (a the riverine water discharge did not show a decreasing trend, (b water diversion was not influential and (c sedimentation in lakes and canals of the middle and lower reaches did not increase. The total storage capacity of reservoirs has increased dramatically over the past half century. The amount of sediment trapped in reservoirs has increased to more than half a billion t a-1. As a result, the suspended sediment flux into the estuary dramatically decreased, even though the sediment yield from many areas of the basin increased in recent decades. Human activities gradually increased the suspended sediment flux into the estuary before the 1960s and then rapidly decreased it. The last century was a period when the Yangtze suspended sediment flux into the estuary was dramatically affected by human activities. Keywords

  18. A numerical analysis of biogeochemical controls with physical modulation on hypoxia during summer in the Pearl River estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional (3-D physical–biogeochemical coupled model was applied to explore the mechanisms controlling the dissolved oxygen (DO dynamics and bottom hypoxia during summer in the Pearl River estuary (PRE. By using the numerical oxygen tracers, we proposed a new method (namely the physical modulation method to quantify the contributions of boundary conditions and each source and sink process occurring in local and adjacent waters to the DO conditions. A mass balance analysis of DO based on the physical modulation method indicated that the DO conditions at the bottom layer were mainly controlled by the source and sink processes, among which the sediment oxygen demand (SOD at the water–sediment interface and the re-aeration at the air–sea interface were the two primary processes determining the spatial extent and duration of bottom hypoxia in the PRE. The SOD could cause a significant decrease in the bottom DO concentrations (averaged over July–August 2006 by over 4 mg L−1 on the shelf off the Modaomen sub-estuary, leading to the formation of a high-frequency zone of hypoxia (HFZ. However, the hypoxia that occurred in the HFZ was intermittent and distributed in a small area due to the combined effects of re-aeration and photosynthesis, which behaved as sources for DO and offset a portion of the DO consumed by SOD. The bottom DO concentrations to the west of the lower Lingdingyang Bay (i.e. the western shoal near Qi'ao Island were also largely affected by high SOD, but there was no hypoxia occurring there because of the influence of re-aeration. Specifically, re-aeration could lead to an increase in the bottom DO concentrations by ∼ 4.8 mg L−1 to the west of the lower Lingdingyang Bay. The re-aeration led to a strong vertical DO gradient between the surface and the lower layers. As a result, the majority (∼ 89 % of DO supplemented by re-aeration was transported to the lower layers through vertical diffusion and

  19. A numerical analysis of biogeochemical controls with physical modulation on hypoxia during summer in the Pearl River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Hu, Jiatang; Li, Shiyu; Liu, Dehong

    2017-06-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) physical-biogeochemical coupled model was applied to explore the mechanisms controlling the dissolved oxygen (DO) dynamics and bottom hypoxia during summer in the Pearl River estuary (PRE). By using the numerical oxygen tracers, we proposed a new method (namely the physical modulation method) to quantify the contributions of boundary conditions and each source and sink process occurring in local and adjacent waters to the DO conditions. A mass balance analysis of DO based on the physical modulation method indicated that the DO conditions at the bottom layer were mainly controlled by the source and sink processes, among which the sediment oxygen demand (SOD) at the water-sediment interface and the re-aeration at the air-sea interface were the two primary processes determining the spatial extent and duration of bottom hypoxia in the PRE. The SOD could cause a significant decrease in the bottom DO concentrations (averaged over July-August 2006) by over 4 mg L-1 on the shelf off the Modaomen sub-estuary, leading to the formation of a high-frequency zone of hypoxia (HFZ). However, the hypoxia that occurred in the HFZ was intermittent and distributed in a small area due to the combined effects of re-aeration and photosynthesis, which behaved as sources for DO and offset a portion of the DO consumed by SOD. The bottom DO concentrations to the west of the lower Lingdingyang Bay (i.e. the western shoal near Qi'ao Island) were also largely affected by high SOD, but there was no hypoxia occurring there because of the influence of re-aeration. Specifically, re-aeration could lead to an increase in the bottom DO concentrations by ˜ 4.8 mg L-1 to the west of the lower Lingdingyang Bay. The re-aeration led to a strong vertical DO gradient between the surface and the lower layers. As a result, the majority (˜ 89 %) of DO supplemented by re-aeration was transported to the lower layers through vertical diffusion and ˜ 28 % reached the bottom eventually

  20. The impact of poultry litter application on sediment chemistry of the Broadkill River estuary system, Delaware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewumi, Oluyinka; Schreiber, Madeline E; Ciparis, Serena

    2014-01-01

    This project examined the impact of long-term poultry litter application on the chemical signatures of As, Cu, Zn, and P in stream sediments of the Broadkill River watershed within the Delmarva Peninsula, a region of intense poultry production. Thirty-seven sediment samples were collected from Broadkill River drainage systems and analyzed for litter-derived elements (As, Cu, Zn, P) and basic soil parameters such as particle size distribution, organic matter, and soluble salts. Results showed that concentrations of elements in stream sediments are approximately log-normally distributed. Spatial variability in concentrations of elements was evident, with most elements increasing in concentration and enrichment from upgradient headwaters to downgradient reaches draining predominantly agricultural areas. Results of correlation analyses showed positive significant correlation among elements; elements were also positively correlated with percent clay and silt in the sediment. Using GIS maps with overlays of hydrology and land use activities, statistical correlations between As, Cu, Zn, and P enrichment factors and land use were examined. Results showed statistically significant relationships between As, Mn, and Zn enrichment factors and residential areas within the watershed, but did not show a statistically significant relationship between element enrichment factors and agricultural land use. Factors that complicate this type of landscape-scale study include the presence of poultry processing plants, impoundments, changes in land use over time, and the influence of tides, all of which can have direct and indirect influences on element mobility.

  1. Interannual sea level variability in the Pearl River Estuary and its response to El Niño-Southern Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linlin; Li, Qiang; Mao, Xian-zhong; Bi, Hongsheng; Yin, Peng

    2018-03-01

    The South China coast, especially the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) region, is prosperous and densely populated, but vulnerable to sea level changes. Sea level anomalies (SLA) during 1954-2012 from tide gauge station data and regional SLAs during 1993-2012 from satellite altimetry are analyzed and compare to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Results show that sea level declines during El Niño events and rises during La Niña. Sea level in the PRE responds to ENSO with 3-month lag. The ENSO can cause sea level in the PRE to fluctuate from -8.70 to 8.11 cm. Sea level cycles of 3 and 5 years are related to ENSO. The ENSO mechanism affecting sea level in the PRE was analyzed by identifying dominant regional and local forces. Weak/strong SLAs in most El Niño/La Niña events may be attributed to less/more seawater transport driven by anomalously weak/strong north winds and local anomalously high/low sea level pressure. Wind-driven coastal current is the predominant factor. It generated coastal seawater volume transport along a 160 km wide cross section to decrease by 21.07% in a typical El Niño period (January 2010) and increase by 44.03% in a typical La Niña period (January 2011) as compared to an ENSO neutral situation (January 2013). Results of sea level rise and its potential mechanism provide insight for disaster protection during extreme El Niño/La Niña events.

  2. Preliminary assessment of the potential for mangrove oyster cultivation in Piraquê-açu river estuary (Aracruz, ES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Alvarenga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available At Piraquê-açu river estuary, Aracruz, ES, the technical viability of Crassostrea rhizophorae cultivation was determined through monthly measures in shell length and weight. Seeds of C. rhizophorae were put in cages and suspended in rafts. Increase in height and weight (flesh and dry of the oysters was measured. During ten months (July/98 to May/99, oyster shell reached an average of 37.6 mm in shell height and 3.0 g in flesh weight (the whole animal. High mortality rates were registered and could be related to the high salinity water and to high predation observed, especially by flatworms Stylochophana divae and snails Cymatium parthenopeum, as well as fouling organisms such as barnacles, Serpulidae polychaetes and seed of the same species.No estuário do Rio Piraquê-açu, município de Aracruz, ES, foi avaliada a viabilidade técnica da implantação do cultivo de ostras Crassostrea rhizophorae em lanternas suspensas numa balsa de cultivo, através da estimativa de crescimento e ganho de peso fresco e seco das ostras. Verificou-se que, durante os dez meses de cultivo (junho/98 a maio/99, as ostras atingiram, em média, 37,6 mm de altura e 3,0 g no peso total. Foi registrada uma alta taxa de mortalidade, que poderia ser atribuída aos altos valores de salinidade na água e também aos predadores observados como planárias Stylochoplana divae e gastrópodos Cymatium parthenopeum, além de incrustantes como cracas, poliquetos Serpulidae e principalmente sementes da própria ostra.

  3. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in outmigrant juvenile Chinook salmon from the lower Columbia River and Estuary and Puget Sound, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Catherine A; Anulacion, Bernadita F; Bolton, Jennie L; Boyd, Daryle; Olson, O Paul; Sol, Sean Y; Ylitalo, Gina M; Johnson, Lyndal L

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies have examined the presence, distribution, and concentrations of toxic contaminants in two major waterways in the Pacific Northwest: the lower Columbia River and Estuary (LCR&E) and Puget Sound, Washington. However, those studies have not reported on the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in juvenile Chinook salmon (Onchorynchus tshawytscha). Populations of Chinook salmon from the LCR&E and Puget Sound are declining, and some stocks are currently listed as "threatened" under the Endangered Species Act. Bioaccumulation of contaminants, including PBDEs, by juvenile Chinook salmon in the LCR&E and Puget Sound is of concern due to the potential toxicity of the contaminants and associated sublethal effects in fish. In this article, we present the concentrations of PBDEs measured in gutted bodies and stomach contents of outmigrant juvenile Chinook salmon collected at six sites in the LCR&E and four sites in Puget Sound. For comparison, we also analyzed gutted bodies of juvenile Chinook salmon from eight hatcheries in the LCR&E as well as samples of the hatchery fish feeds. The mean summation SigmaPBDE concentrations measured in bodies of juvenile Chinook salmon from the different sites ranged from 350 to 2800 ng/g lipid weight, whereas those in stomach contents ranged from less than the quantitation limit (salmon samples collected from the LCR&E and Puget Sound. These results show that outmigrant juvenile Chinook salmon in the LCR&E and Puget Sound have been exposed to PBDEs in the environment and that these chemicals are bioaccumulating in their tissues; thus, the potential effects of PBDEs on these salmon should be further investigated.

  4. Responses of summer phytoplankton community to drastic environmental changes in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary during the past 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhibing; Liu, Jingjing; Chen, Jianfang; Chen, Quanzhen; Yan, Xiaojun; Xuan, Jiliang; Zeng, Jiangning

    2014-05-01

    The phytoplankton community in the Changjiang Estuary is subject to intensive physical and chemical stresses because of human- and climate-driven changes. We obtained historical data on summer phytoplankton communities from 1959 to 2009 to explore responses to long-term environmental changes. The nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and ratios (N/P and N/Si) increased because of persistent riverine loading, but silicon (Si) levels remained constant. Climatic changes and extensive water diversions and withdrawals (sediment retention) resulted in a series of physical alterations, including increased temperature, turbidity reduction, and river plume shrinkage. These changes induced a dramatic increase in microalgal biomass (cell density and chlorophyll a) with a decreasing diatom-dinoflagellate ratio, and exacerbated harmful algal blooms. In the past dominant net-collected species were usually chain-forming diatoms; however, more recently, large dinoflagellates and filamentous cyanobacteria dominate. This was not consistent with information from water samples (co-dominated by small dinoflagellates), because of the loss of solitary species collected using a 76-μm net. The dominant species shifted from temperate-subtropical/eurythermal to subtropical-tropical/eurythermal taxa in the warmer water caused by global warming and hydrographic changes. There was also an increased dominance of euryhaline/high-salinity species due to increase in Kuroshio transport and the northward Taiwan Warm Current and reduction in Changjiang Diluted Water. All these changes in phytoplankton communities appear to be closely related to an increase in anthropogenic activities and climatic changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of fishing resources by women in the Mamanguape River Estuary, Paraíba state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S.P. Rocha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the appropriation and use of fishing resources by women residing near the Mamanguape River Estuary (MRE, Paraíba state, Brazil. Were used combinations of qualitative (interviews and direct observations and quantitative methods (use value and corrected principal use concordance. Thirty women were interviewed and reported the use of 41 species (30 fish, 8 crustaceans, and 3 mollusks, mainly for local consumption and sale. The species with the highest use value were Genidens genidens (0.7, Callinectes exasperatus (0.73 and Anomalocardia brasiliana (0.46. The diversity of resources exploited demonstrates the importance of the mangrove ecosystem to MRE families, and the data gathered can serve as a basis for formulating public policies to promote the equal participation of women in fishing and environmental conservation.Nós analisamos a apropriação e o uso dos recursos pesqueiros pelas mulheres que moram no Estuário do Rio Mamanguape, Estado da Paraíba, Brasil. Foi usada uma combinação de métodos qualitativos (entrevistas e observações diretas e quantitativos (valor de uso e concordância de uso principal corrigido. Foram entrevistadas 30 mulheres e registrado o uso de 41 espécies (peixes - 30, crustáceos - 08 e moluscos - 03, principalmente para consumo local e venda. As espécies com maior valor de uso foram Genidens genidens (0,7, Callinectes exasperatus (0,73 e Anomalocardia brasiliana (0,46. A diversidade de recursos explorados demonstra a importância do manguezal para as famílias do ERM, e os dados coletados podem servir de base para a formulação de políticas públicas que promovam a participação igualitária de mulheres na pesca, e na conservação ambiental.

  6. [Diurnal variations of greenhouse gas fluxes at the water-air interface of aquaculture ponds in the Min River estuary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Tong, Chuan; He, Qing-Hua; Huang, Jia-Fang

    2012-12-01

    Wetland reclamation and aquaculture is one of the main disturbance types in coastal wetlands. Diurnal variations of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at the water-air interface were determined using a floating chambers + gas chromatography method in a shrimp pond, and a mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp in October in the Shanyutan Wetland of the Min River estuary, southeast China. Meanwhile, the meteorological indicators in ground surface and physical, chemical and biological indicators of surface water were also measured. CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at the water-air interface all demonstrated distinct diurnal variations. Both shrimp pond and mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp functioned as a sink of CO2 [the diurnal averaged CO2 fluxes were -48.79 and -105.25 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively], and a source of CH4 [the diurnal averaged CH4 fluxes were 1.00 and 5.74 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively]; the diurnal averaged CO2 and CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the mixed culture of fish and shrimp pond were higher than that of the shrimp pond. Greenhouse gas fluxes at the water-air interface from the aquaculture ponds were influenced by many factors. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the concentration of Chlorophyll was the major factor affecting the CO2 fluxes, and the concentrations of SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) were the major factors affecting the CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the shrimp pond; whereas water temperature and Chlorophyll were the major factors affecting the CO2 fluxes, and dissolved oxygen, PO4(3-) and pH were the major factors affecting the CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp.

  7. Migrational Characteristics, Biological Observations, and Relative Survival of Juvenile Salmonids Entering the Columbia River Estuary, 1966-1983, 1985 Final Report of Research.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawley, Earl M.

    1986-04-01

    Natural runs of salmonids in the Columbia River basin have decreased as a result of hydroelectric-dam development, poor land- and forest-management, and over-fishing. This has necessitated increased salmon culture to assure adequate numbers of returning adults. Hatchery procedures and facilities are continually being modified to improve both the efficiency of production and the quality of juveniles produced. Initial efforts to evaluate changes in hatchery procedures were dependent upon adult contributions to the fishery and returns to the hatchery. Procedures were developed for sampling juvenile salmon and steelhead entering the Columbia River estuary and ocean plume. The sampling of hatchery fish at the terminus of their freshwater migration assisted in evaluating hatchery production techniques and identifying migrational or behavioral characteristics that influence survival to and through the estuary. The sampling program attempted to estimate survival of different stocks and define various aspects of migratory behavior in a large river, with flows during the spring freshet from 4 to 17 thousand cubic meters per second (m/sup 3//second).

  8. Environmental evolution records reflected by radionuclides in the sediment of coastal wetlands: A case study in the Yellow River Estuary wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qidong; Song, Jinming; Li, Xuegang; Yuan, Huamao; Li, Ning; Cao, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Vertical profiles of environmental radionuclides (210Pb, 137Cs, 238U, 232Th, 226Ra and 40K) in a sediment core (Y1) of the Yellow River Estuary wetland were investigated to assess whether environmental evolutions in the coastal wetland could be recorded by the distributions of radionuclides. Based on 210Pb and 137Cs dating, the average sedimentation rate of core Y1 was estimated to be 1.0 cm y-1. Vertical distributions of natural radionuclides (238U, 232Th, 226Ra and 40K) changed dramatically, reflecting great changes in sediment input. Concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra and 40K all had significant positive relationships with organic matter and clay content, but their distributions were determined by different factors. Factor analysis showed that 238U was determined by the river sediment input while 226Ra was mainly affected by the seawater erosion. Environmental changes such as river channel migrations and sediment discharge variations could always cause changes in the concentrations of radionuclides. High concentrations of 238U and 226Ra were consistent with high accretion rate. Frequent seawater intrusion decreased the concentration of 226Ra significantly. The value of 238U/226Ra tended to be higher when the sedimentation rate was low and tide intrusion was frequent. In summary, environmental evolutions in the estuary coastal wetland could be recorded by the vertical profiles of natural radionuclides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Using Fluorescence to Determine the Fate and Bio-reactivity of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Nitrogen in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounshell, A.; Peierls, B. L.; Paerl, H. W.; Osburn, C. L.; Abare, B.

    2016-02-01

    Both terrestrial and autochthonous organic matter in estuarine ecosystems have received increased attention as potential substrates for microbial metabolism and nutrient sources for supporting phytoplankton production, particularly as nitrogen (N) sources in these N-sensitive systems. The fate and bio-reactivity of organic matter within the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA was examined during nutrient addition bioassays in summer and fall 2014 and summer 2015. In addition to inorganic nutrient additions, the tested terrestrial organic matter sources included river dissolved organic matter, poultry litter extract, and wastewater treatment effluent. Using excitation emission matrices (EEMs) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), identified fluorescent signatures for both dissolved and particulate organic matter were used as a proxy for organic nitrogen. Separate PARAFAC models based on particulate plus dissolved and dissolved organic matter only were generated using bioassay samples. Components identified in each model showed similarities to modeled components previously generated from in situ Neuse River Estuary samples, although some components were unique indicating potential differences in production and degradation pathways in the experimental system. By correlating the modeled fluorescent signatures with other biogeochemical parameters, including phytoplankton production and biomass, the role of organic matter, specifically organic N, in sustaining primary production and nutrient cycling was explored. Preliminary results indicate in situ autochthonous production of organic matter fluorescence due to both phytoplankton and bacterial production and potential biologic degradation of several fluorescent components identified by PARAFAC. The hypothesized results have important implications for managing organic matter (specifically organic N) loading to N-sensitive estuaries downstream from watersheds undergoing rapid agricultural and urban expansion.

  10. Hong Kong at the Pearl River Estuary: A hotspot of microplastic pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Lincoln; Cheung, P K

    2015-10-15

    Large plastic (>5mm) and microplastic (0.315-5mm) debris were collected from 25 beaches along the Hong Kong coastline. More than 90% consisted of microplastics. Among the three groups of microplastic debris, expanded polystyrene (EPS) represented 92%, fragments represented 5%, and pellets represented 3%. The mean microplastic abundance for Hong Kong was 5595items/m(2). This number is higher than international averages, indicating that Hong Kong is a hotspot of marine plastic pollution. Microplastic abundance was significantly higher on the west coast than on the east coast, indicating that the Pearl River, which is west of Hong Kong, may be a potential source of plastic debris. The amounts of large plastic and microplastic debris of the same types (EPS and fragments) were positively correlated, suggesting that the fragmentation of large plastic material may increase the quantity of beach microplastic debris. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Seasonal and spatial variations in rare earth elements and yttrium of dissolved load in the middle, lower reaches and estuary of the Minjiang River, southeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuxu; Gao, Aiguo; Lin, Jianjie; Jian, Xing; Yang, Yufeng; Zhang, Yanpo; Hou, Yuting; Gong, Songbai

    2017-09-01

    With the aim of elucidating the spatial and seasonal behaviors of rare earth elements (REEs), we investigated the dissolved REE concentrations of surface water collected during four seasons from middle, lower reaches and estuary of the Minjiang River, southeastern China. The results display that the REE abundances in Minjiang River, ranging from 3.3-785.9 ng/L, were higher than those of many of the major global rivers. The total REE concentrations (ΣREE) were seasonally variable, averaging in 5 937.30, 863.79, 825.65 and 1 065.75 ng/L during second highest flow (SHF), normal flow (NF), low flow (LF) and high flow (HF) season, respectively. The R (L/M) and R (H/M) ratios reveal the spatial and temporal variations of REE patterns, and particularly vary apparently in the maximum turbidity zone and estuary. REE patterns of dissolved loads are characterized by progressing weaker LREEs-enrichment and stronger HREEs-enrichment downstream from middle reaches to estuary during all four seasons. Comparing with NF and LF seasons, in which REE patterns are relatively flat, samples of SHF season have more LREE-enriched and HREE-depleted patterns that close to parent rocks, while samples of HF season are more LREEs-depleted and HREE-enriched. REE fractionations from the middle to lower reaches are stronger in the SHF and HF seasons than those in NF and LF seasons. Generally, spatial and seasonal variations in REE abundance and pattern are presumably due to several factors, such as chemical weathering, mixture with rainfall and groundwater, estuarine mixing, runoff, biological production and mountain river characters, such as strong hydrodynamic forces and steep slopes. The highest Gd/Gd* always occurs at north ports during all four seasons, where most of the large hospitals are located. This suggests Gd anomalies are depended on the density of modern medical facilities. Y/Ho ratios fluctuate and positively correlate to salinity in estuary, probably because of the geochemical

  12. Influence of filtration and glucose amendment on bacterial growth rate at different tidal conditions in the Minho Estuary River (NW Portugal)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anne, I.; Fidalgo, M. L.; Thosthrup, L.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterioplankton abundance, biomass and growth rates were studied in the Minho Estuary River (NW Portugal). The influence of tidal conditions, glucose amendment, and the filtration process on total bacterial abundance, total and faecal coliforms, as well as faecal streptococci, were evaluated....... In contrast, a significant decrease of bacterial indicators of faecal pollution at high tide was probably the result of various causes, such as the decrease of continental and agriculturalland mn-off effect by dilution, aml/or increase in the abundance of potential specific predators. Thus, drastic changes...

  13. Soil organic matter and soil acidity in Mangrove areas in the river Paraiba Estuary, Cabedelo, Paraiba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Wilma Vasconcelos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove ecosystems are of great environmental significance, because of their fragility and role in feeding and breeding various animal species. In northeastern Brazil, the disorderly occupation of estuarine areas and the urban sprawl have led to a considerable loss of the original area occupied by mangroves. In the municipality of Cabedelo, State of Paraíba, there are about 4,900 ha of remnant mangrove areas in the estuarine complex of the Paraíba River. However, information about the attributes of mangrove soils at this location is quite scarce. The aim of this study was to quantify the soil organic matter and soil acidity in mangroves located in the estuary of the Paraíba River, State of Paraíba, Brazil, in order to increase the database of soil attributes in this region. The study area is in local influence of the Restinga de Cabedelo National Forest (Flona, an environmental conservation unit of the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation. For the choice of sampling points, we considered an area that receives direct influence of the eviction of domestic and industrial effluents. The soil of the study area is an “Organossolo Háplico” in Brazilian Soil Classification (Histosol, and was sampled at four point sites: one upstream of the effluent discharge (P1, one in the watercourse receiving effluent water (P2, one downstream of the effluent discharge (P3 and another near Flona (P4, at 0-20 and 20-40 cm, in four replications in time (28/08/2012 in the morning and afternoon, and 21/01/2013 in the morning and afternoon. Potential acidity, pH and soil organic matter (SOM were determined. No significant differences were detected in the potential acidity of the four collection sites, which ranged from 0.38 to 0.45 cmolc dm-3. Soil pH was greatest at point P4 (7.0 and lowest at point P1 (5.8. The SOM was highest at point P1 (86.4 % and lowest at P2 (77.9 %. The attributes related to soil acidity were not sensitive to indicate

  14. [Biodiversity of the aquatic invertebrates of the eastern part of the Bay and the Estuary of the Seine River: the CISA database, two centuries of observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruellet, Thierry; Dauvin, Jean-Claude

    2008-06-01

    An inventory of all aquatic invertebrates of the Estuary and the eastern part of the Bay of Seine (Normandy, France) was performed and integrated in a free-of-charge georeferenced database named CISA (Catalogue of the Invertebrates in Seine-Aval, e.g., the downstream part of the Seine from the Poses dam to the sea). One thousand four hundred eighty-five taxa of aquatic invertebrates, out of which 5% were never identified at the species level, were recorded. This inventory has been analyzed in comparison with observation efforts carried out in this zone since two centuries, by distinguishing the first inventories of the end of the 19th century, the publications of the regional naturalist societies, the scientific publications, and the grey literature, such as the scientific reports and the university works with limited diffusion. It appears that the regional naturalist societies have played an essential role for the knowledge of the biological diversity before World War II; since then, reports and university works mention approximately half of the new species for the region. Less than one quarter of these descriptions was thus the subject of a publication without restricted diffusion. Biological diversity was thus underestimated for a long time for the eastern part of the Bay and the Estuary of the Seine River. These data show that the distribution of invertebrate species in the estuary of the Seine follows a two-ecocline model.

  15. Strontium isotope record of seasonal scale variations in sediment sources and accumulation in low-energy, subtidal areas of the lower Hudson River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.P.; Bullen, T.D.; Brabander, D.J.; Olsen, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Strontium isotope (87Sr/86Sr) profiles in sediment cores collected from two subtidal harbor slips in the lower Hudson River estuary in October 2001 exhibit regular patterns of variability with depth. Using additional evidence from sediment Ca/Sr ratios, 137Cs activity and Al, carbonate (CaCO3), and organic carbon (OCsed) concentration profiles, it can be shown that the observed variability reflects differences in the relative input and trapping of fine-grained sediment from seaward sources vs. landward sources linked to seasonal-scale changes in freshwater flow. During high flow conditions, the geochemical data indicate that most of the fine-grained sediments trapped in the estuary are newly eroded basin materials. During lower (base) flow conditions, a higher fraction of mature materials from seaward sources with higher carbonate content is trapped in the lower estuary. Results show that high-resolution, multi-geochemical tracer approaches utilizing strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) can distinguish sediment sources and constrain seasonal scale variations in sediment trapping and accumulation in dynamic estuarine environments. Low-energy, subtidal areas such as those in this study are important sinks for metastable, short-to-medium time scale sediment accumulation. These results also show that these same areas can serve as natural recorders of physical, chemical, and biological processes that affect particle and particle-associated material dynamics over seasonal-to-yearly time scales. ?? 2009.

  16. Crims Island-Restoration and monitoring of juvenile salmon rearing habitat in the Columbia River Estuary, Oregon, 2004-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Craig A.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    2011-01-01

    Under the 2004 Biological Opinion for operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System released by the National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) were directed to restore more than 4,047 hectares (10,000 acres) of tidal marsh in the Columbia River estuary by 2010. Restoration of Crims Island near Longview, Washington, restored 38.1 hectares of marsh and swamp in the tidal freshwater portion of the lower Columbia River. The goal of the restoration was to improve habitat for juveniles of Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed salmon stocks and ESA-listed Columbian white-tailed deer. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) monitored and evaluated the fisheries and aquatic resources at Crims Island in 2004 prior to restoration (pre-restoration), which began in August 2004, and then post-restoration from 2006 to 2009. This report summarizes pre- and post-restoration monitoring data used by the USGS to evaluate project success. We evaluated project success by examining the interaction between juvenile salmon and a suite of broader ecological measures including sediments, plants, and invertebrates and their response to large-scale habitat alteration. The restoration action at Crims Island from August 2004 to September 2005 was to excavate a 0.6-meter layer of soil and dig channels in the interior of the island to remove reed canary grass and increase habitat area and tidal exchange. The excavation created 34.4 hectares of tidal emergent marsh where none previously existed and 3.7 hectares of intertidal and subtidal channels. Cattle that had grazed the island for more than 50 years were relocated. Soil excavated from the site was deposited in upland areas next to the tidal marsh to establish an upland forest. Excavation deepened and widened an existing T-shaped channel to increase tidal flow to the interior of the island. The western arm of the existing 'T

  17. Foraminifera in surface sediments of Mandovi River Estuary: Indicators for mining pollution and high sea stand in Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Panchang, R.; Banerjee, P.

    Foraminiferal characteristics of 11 surface sediment samples collected from the Mandovi estuary during 2001 have been compared with similar data based on samples collected during 1994. The study reveals drastic fall in total foraminiferal number...

  18. Preliminary results on the influence of river discharges on biogeochemical processes in Godavari estuary and Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.

    ) flushing of the estuary, (b) temporal variability in mixing processes, (c) discharge of nutrients, (d) evolution of biological productivity patterns, and (e) associated biogeochemical processes in mind, we have planned and carrying out systematic studies...

  19. Geomorphic habitat units derived from 2009 aerial imagery and elevation data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Estuary geomorphic units delineated at a scale of 1:1500 using a combination of (a) 11 September 2009 1 meter resolution NAIP aerial imagery; and (b)...

  20. Early migration and estuary stopover of introduced chinook salmon population in the Lapataia River Basin, southern Tierra del Fuego Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalde, T.; Fernández, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Established populations of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have recently been reported in South America, at both Atlantic and Pacific basins. Several studies have evaluated different aspects of their life histories; however, little is known about the use of the estuaries by the juveniles of these populations. We examined spawning time, seaward migration timing, growth rate, scale patterns, diet, and geometric morphometric, contrasting the early life history during freshwater and estuary residence of a chinook population established in Lapataia Basin. Fall run spawning took place in March-April and the parr emerged in September. Two distinct seaward migration patterns were identified from sein net fishing records: one population segment migrating earlier to the estuary in October and a second group migrating later in February. The growth rate of fish captured at the estuary was significantly higher than the fish captured in freshwater. In addition, higher scale intercirculi distances were observed in estuary fish showing differences in growth rate. The feeding habitat in fish captured in both environments changed through time from bottom feeding to surface feeding and from significant diet overlap to no overlap. The morphology of the fish captured at the estuary was associated with the elongation of the caudal peduncle and a decrease in the condition factor index, both changes related to smolt transformation. The earlier migration and the higher growth rate of juveniles in the estuary together with fish of 1 + yo captured in this environment reveal that the estuary of Lapataia Basin is not only a stopover for the chinook salmon, but also a key habitat to reside and feed previous to the final seaward migration.

  1. Hazard Assessment from Storm Tides and Rainfall on a Tidal River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, P.; Conticello, F.; Cioffi, F.; Hall, T.; Georgas, N.; Lall, U.; Blumberg, A.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on methods and results for a model-based flood hazard assessment we have conducted for the Hudson River from New York City to Troy/Albany at the head of tide. Our recent work showed that neglecting freshwater flows leads to underestimation of peak water levels at up-river sites and neglecting stratification (typical with two-dimensional modeling) leads to underestimation all along the Hudson. As a result, we use a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model and merge streamflows and storm tides from tropical and extratropical cyclones (TCs, ETCs), as well as wet extratropical cyclone (WETC) floods (e.g. freshets, rain-on-snow events). We validate the modeled flood levels and quantify error with comparisons to 76 historical events. A Bayesian statistical method is developed for tropical cyclone streamflows using historical data and consisting in the evaluation of (1) the peak discharge and its pdf as a function of TC characteristics, and (2) the temporal trend of the hydrograph as a function of temporal evolution of the cyclone track, its intensity and the response characteristics of the specific basin. A k-nearest-neighbors method is employed to determine the hydrograph shape. Out of sample validation tests demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. Thus, the combined effects of storm surge and runoff produced by tropical cyclones hitting the New York area can be included in flood hazard assessment. Results for the upper Hudson (Albany) suggest a dominance of WETCs, for the lower Hudson (at New York Harbor) a case where ETCs are dominant for shorter return periods and TCs are more important for longer return periods (over 150 years), and for the middle-Hudson (Poughkeepsie) a mix of all three flood events types is important. However, a possible low-bias for TC flood levels is inferred from a lower importance in the assessment results, versus historical event top-20 lists, and this will be further evaluated as these preliminary methods and results are

  2. Modeling ecosystem processes with variable freshwater inflow to the Caloosahatchee River Estuary, southwest Florida. II. Nutrient loading, submarine light, and seagrasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzelli, Christopher; Doering, Peter; Wan, Yongshan; Sun, Detong

    2014-12-01

    Short- and long-term changes in estuarine biogeochemical and biological attributes are consequences of variations in both the magnitude and composition of freshwater inputs. A common conceptualization of estuaries depicts nutrient loading from coastal watersheds as the stressor that promotes algal biomass, decreases submarine light penetration, and degrades seagrass habitats. Freshwater inflow depresses salinity while simultaneously introducing colored dissolved organic matter (color or CDOM) which greatly reduces estuarine light penetration. This is especially true for sub-tropical estuaries. This study applied a model of the Caloosahatchee River Estuary (CRE) in southwest Florida to explore the relationships between freshwater inflow, nutrient loading, submarine light, and seagrass survival. In two independent model series, the loading of dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus (DIN and DIP) was reduced by 10%, 20%, 30%, and 50% relative to the base model case from 2002 to 2009 (2922 days). While external nutrient loads were reduced by lowering inflow (Q0) in the first series (Q0 series), reductions were accomplished by decreasing the incoming concentrations of DIN and DIP in the second series (NP Series). The model also was used to explore the partitioning of submarine light extinction due to chlorophyll a, CDOM, and turbidity. Results suggested that attempting to control nutrient loading by decreasing freshwater inflow could have minor effects on water column concentrations but greatly influence submarine light and seagrass biomass. This is because of the relative importance of Q0 to salinity and submarine light. In general, light penetration and seagrass biomass decreased with increased inflow and CDOM. Increased chlorophyll a did account for more submarine light extinction in the lower estuary. The model output was used to help identify desirable levels of inflow, nutrient loading, water quality, salinity, and submarine light for seagrass in the lower CRE

  3. Estuaries 1

    OpenAIRE

    Battey, B.

    2016-01-01

    'Estuaries 1' can be viewed at https://vimeo.com/202629040 'Estuaries 1' is the first of the Estuaries series of audiovisual compositions, which explore the expressive potentials of the author's Variable-Coupled Map Networks and OptiNelder methods for generative music and image. It evokes an 'unstable stasis' through processes that are always on the edge of destabilisation.

  4. Estuaries 2

    OpenAIRE

    Battey, B.

    2017-01-01

    'Estuaries 2' is the second of the author's Estuaries series of audiovisual compositions, which explore the expressive potential of the authors Variable-Coupled Map Networks and OptiNelder methods for generative music and images. 'Estuaries 2' focuses on dialog between grid-based logic and all-over textures with random distributions,

  5. Living in an estuary: Commerson's dolphin (Cephalorhynchus commersonii (Lacépède, 1804, habitat use and behavioural pattern at the Santa Cruz River, Patagonia, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Loizaga de Castro

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Commerson's dolphins, Cephalorhynchus commersonii, suffer bycatch in fisheries and are target of dolphin-watching activities along Patagonia. Here we described dolphins' habitat use and behavioural pattern at the estuary of Santa Cruz River. Behavioural observations were made from vantage points using a spotting scope. Boat surveys were conducted randomly from Puerto Santa Cruz to the mouth of the river to analyze the habitat use. The survey area was divided into 1 km² cells and characterized with depth and benthic slope. The described behaviours for the Commerson's dolphin were: travelling, slow travelling, milling, resting, socializing, stationary swimming and diving. A new behavioural context was assigned to diving, a behaviour that showed a high frequency during downing tide, suggesting a benthic foraging strategy. Additionally, we found a strong influence of the tide on Commerson's dolphin behaviour. Habitat use models indicated that dolphins prefer shallow water inside the estuary. The knowledge of the behavioural patterns and the habitat use of these endemic species, in this unexplored area, provide tools for management and conservation purposes.

  6. Model Behavior and Sensitivity in an Application of the Cohesive Bed Component of the Community Sediment Transport Modeling System for the York River Estuary, VA, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey A. Fall

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Community Sediment Transport Modeling System (CSTMS cohesive bed sub-model that accounts for erosion, deposition, consolidation, and swelling was implemented in a three-dimensional domain to represent the York River estuary, Virginia. The objectives of this paper are to (1 describe the application of the three-dimensional hydrodynamic York Cohesive Bed Model, (2 compare calculations to observations, and (3 investigate sensitivities of the cohesive bed sub-model to user-defined parameters. Model results for summer 2007 showed good agreement with tidal-phase averaged estimates of sediment concentration, bed stress, and current velocity derived from Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV field measurements. An important step in implementing the cohesive bed model was specification of both the initial and equilibrium critical shear stress profiles, in addition to choosing other parameters like the consolidation and swelling timescales. This model promises to be a useful tool for investigating the fundamental controls on bed erodibility and settling velocity in the York River, a classical muddy estuary, provided that appropriate data exists to inform the choice of model parameters.

  7. Model behavior and sensitivity in an application of the cohesive bed component of the community sediment transport modeling system for the York River estuary, VA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Kelsey A.; Harris, Courtney K.; Friedrichs, Carl T.; Rinehimer, J. Paul; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    The Community Sediment Transport Modeling System (CSTMS) cohesive bed sub-model that accounts for erosion, deposition, consolidation, and swelling was implemented in a three-dimensional domain to represent the York River estuary, Virginia. The objectives of this paper are to (1) describe the application of the three-dimensional hydrodynamic York Cohesive Bed Model, (2) compare calculations to observations, and (3) investigate sensitivities of the cohesive bed sub-model to user-defined parameters. Model results for summer 2007 showed good agreement with tidal-phase averaged estimates of sediment concentration, bed stress, and current velocity derived from Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) field measurements. An important step in implementing the cohesive bed model was specification of both the initial and equilibrium critical shear stress profiles, in addition to choosing other parameters like the consolidation and swelling timescales. This model promises to be a useful tool for investigating the fundamental controls on bed erodibility and settling velocity in the York River, a classical muddy estuary, provided that appropriate data exists to inform the choice of model parameters.

  8. Resolving the complex relationship between harmful algal blooms and environmental factors in the coastal waters adjacent to the Changjiang River estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng-Xi; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2017-02-01

    The sea area adjacent to the Changjiang River estuary is the most notable region for harmful algal blooms (HABs(1)) in China as both diatom and dinoflagellate blooms have been recorded in this region. Affected by the Changjiang diluted water (CDW(2)) and currents from the open ocean (i.e., Taiwan warm current, TWC(3)), the environmental conditions in the coastal waters adjacent to the Changjiang River estuary are quite complex. To obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms of HABs in this region, analyses based on field investigation data collected by the National Basic Research Priority Program (CEOHAB I(4)) were performed using principle component analysis (PCA(5)), multiple regression analysis (MRA(6)) and path analysis (PA(7)). The results suggested that phosphate and silicate are the major factors that directly affect the diatom bloom, while dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN(8)), temperature and turbidity are the factors that influence the dinoflagellate bloom. CDW and the TWC have different roles in affecting the two types of algal blooms. CDW, which has a high concentration of nitrate and silicate, is essential for the diatom bloom, while the intrusion of the TWC (mainly Kuroshio subsurface water that is rich in phosphate at the bottom) is critical for the maintenance of the dinoflagellate bloom. The results of this study offer a better understanding of the mechanisms of HABs in the East China Sea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Reservoir impacts downstream in highly regulated river basins: the Ebro delta and the Guadalquivir estuary in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Polo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation by reservoirs affects both the freshwater regime and the sediment delivery at the area downstream, and may have a significant impact on water quality in the final transitional water bodies. Spain is one the countries with more water storage capacity by reservoirs in the world. Dense reservoir networks can be found in most of the hydrographic basins, especially in the central and southern regions. The spatial redistribution of the seasonal and annual water storage in reservoirs for irrigation and urban supply, mainly, has resulted in significant changes of water flow and sediment load regimes, together with a fostered development of soil and water uses, with environmental impacts downstream and higher vulnerability of these areas to the sea level rise and drought occurrence. This work shows these effects in the Guadalquivir and the Ebro River basins, two of the largest regulated areas in Spain. The results show a 71 % decrease of the annual freshwater input to the Guadalquivir River estuary during 1930–2014, an increase of 420 % of the irrigated area upstream the estuary, and suspended sediment loads up to 1000 % the initial levels. In the Ebro River delta, the annual water yield has decreased over a 30 % but, on the contrary, the big reservoirs are located in the main stream, and the sediment load has decreased a 99 %, resulting in a delta coastal regression up to 10 m per year and the massive presence of macrophytes in the lower river. Adaptive actions proposed to face these impacts in a sea level rise scenario are also analyzed.

  10. Trace element contamination in the Guadalquivir River Estuary ten years after the Aznalcóllar mine spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero, Victoria; Arias, Alberto M; Blasco, Julián

    2014-09-15

    Sediments, clams Scrobicularia plana and worms Hediste diversicolor from the Guadalquivir estuary were collected ten years after the Aznalcóllar mine spill and analyzed for metals. Significant seasonal and spatial effects were detected for most elements, so data from different sampling periods and locations were treated separately. Overall, the most polluted sites were found upstream, although Zn and Cu tended to accumulate at the estuary mouth. A significant decline of Zn in sediments and clams was observed compared to levels reported following the spill, so the estuarine ecosystem has recovered. However, the concentrations of some elements in S. plana were still higher than those of heavily contaminated regions. In this mollusk, Pb and As levels were higher in 2008 than in previous years, suggesting a new source entering into the estuary. Metals in sediments presented low bioavailability for biota, so other sources must account for the concentrations observed in these species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Elemental (C/N ratios) and Isotope (δ13CTOC, δ15NTN) Compositions of Surface Sediments from the Barrier Islands in the Nakdong River Estuary, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Woo, Han Jun; Jeong, Kap-Sik; Kang, Jeongwon; Choi, Jae Ung; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2017-04-01

    The Nakdong River Estuary (NRE) in South Korea is a typical, artificially-manipulated estuary and blocked by two large dam. The Noksan Dam, built in 1934, blocks the flow of the West Nakdong River, and the NRE Dam was completed between 1983 and 1987 to regulate the flow of the East Nakdong River (called the Eulsuk River locally). For the past half century, several huge industrial complexes have been developed in the reclaimed land near the NRE. In the estuary, the hydraulic circulation has been markedly modified caused by the changes in the river discharge and geomorphic configuration of such as the formation of a series of barrier islands, the two large dams resulting from the artificial control of the natural river flow and upstream intrusion of saltwater by the operation of the two large dams. Consequently, the saltwater wedge that once reached approximately 40 km upstream is now blocked at the dam, considerably reducing the tidal prism. The estuary is typified by barrier-lagoon system with various subenvironments and microtidal with a 1.5 m tidal range. We investigated the elemental (C/N ratios) and isotopic (δ13CTOC, δ15NTN) compositions of organic matters in various composition in the surface sediments in the NRE. In May 2015, 90 surface sediment samples were collected on and around three islands in the NRE. The mean grain size of the barrier island system in the NRE ranged from 1.1 to 8.9 Φ (average 3.9 Φ) in mean grain size, and they were composed of various sediment types, including muddy Sand (S), sandy Mud (sM), and Mud (M). A useful application of the C/N ratios is as a proxy for assessment of organic matter source change, related to the sediment origins terrestrial or marine. The C/N ratios (average, 5.88) imply that the organic matter in the study area was of marine origins, as indicated by the lower ratios between 4 and 10. The isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter (δ13CTOC, δ15NTN) indicated the deposition of algae-derived organic

  12. Levels of C{sub 10}-C{sub 13} polychloro-n-alkanes in marine mammals from the Arctic and the St. Lawrence River estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomy, G.T.; Muir, D.C.G.; Stern, G.A.; Westmore, J.B.

    2000-05-01

    Marine mammals from various regions of the Arctic and the St. Lawrence River estuary were examined for the first time for levels of C{sub 10}--C{sub 13} polychloro-n-alkanes (sPCAs). Respective mean total sPCA concentrations in the blubber of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from Saqqaq and Nuussuaq, western Greenland, were 0.23 {+-} 0.02 (n = 2) and 0.164 {+-} 0.06 {micro}g/g (n = 2), similar to that in beluga from the Mackenzie Delta in the western Canadian Arctic 0.21 {+-} 0.08 {micro}g/g (m = 3). sPCAs levels were higher in beluga blubber from the St. Lawrence River (0.37 to 1.4 {micro}g/g). Mean sPCA concentrations in the blubber samples from walruses (Odobenus rosmarus) (Thule, northwest Greenland) and ringed seal (Phoca hispida) (Eureka, southwest Ellesmere Island) were 0.43 {+-} 0.06 (n = 2) and 0.53 {+-} 0.2 {micro}g/g (n = 6), respectively. Relative to commercial sPCA formulations, samples from the Arctic marine mammals showed a predominance of the shorter chain length lower percent chlorinated PCA congeners, the more volatile components of industrial formulations. This observation is consistent with long-range atmospheric transport of sPCAs to this region. The profiles of the belugas from the St. Lawrence River estuary, however, had higher proportions of the less volatile sPCA congeners, implying that contamination to this region is probably from local sources.

  13. Dynamics of marsh-mangrove ecotone since the mid-Holocene: A palynological study of mangrove encroachment and sea level rise in the Shark River Estuary, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiang; Liu, Kam-Biu

    2017-01-01

    Sea level rise and the associated inland shift of the marsh-mangrove ecotone in south Florida have raised many scientific and management concerns in recent years. Holocene paleoecological records can provide an important baseline to shed light on the long-term dynamics of vegetation changes across this ecotone in the past, which is needed to predict the future. In this study, we present palynological, X-ray fluorescence, and loss-on ignition data from four sedimentary cores recovered from a 20-km marine-to-freshwater transect along the Shark River Estuary, southwest Everglades, to document the patterns and processes of coastal vegetation changes in response to sea level rise since the mid-Holocene. Our record indicates that freshwater marsh progressively replaced marl prairies at the Shark River Estuary between 5700 and 4400 cal yr BP. As marine transgression continued, marine influence reached the threshold necessary for mangroves to establish at the current mouth of the Shark River Slough at 3800 cal yr BP. During the next 3000 years, although sea level rise in the Western North Atlantic slowed down to 0.4 mm/yr, a spatial and temporal gradient was evident as the marsh-mangrove ecotone shifted inland by 20 km from 3800 to 800 cal yr BP, accompanied by a gradual landward replacement of freshwater marsh by mangrove forest. If sea level continues to rise at 2.33 mm/yr in the 21st century in south Florida, it is possible that marine influence will reach the threshold for mangroves to establish in the central Everglades, and we could expect a much more aggressive mangrove encroachment toward the northern and interior parts of south Florida in the next few centuries.

  14. Geomorphic habitat units derived from 2014 aerial imagery and elevation data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Estuary geomorphic units delineated at a scale of 1:1500 using a combination of (a) 28 August 2014 0.15 meter resolution NPS Elwha PlaneCam aerial imagery; and (b)...

  15. Geomorphic habitat units derived from 2013 aerial imagery and elevation data for the Elwha River estuary, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Estuary geomorphic units delineated at a scale of 1:1500 using a combination of (a) 26 August 2013 0.15 meter resolution NPS Elwha PlaneCam aerial imagery; and (b)...

  16. Sex in the Suwannee, the secretive love life of Gulf Sturgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulak, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Mid-February in the Gulf of Mexico and a timeless ritual is about to repeat itself for perhaps the millionth time. Some mysterious signal, possibly increasing day length, flips an internal switch, feeding stops, and the homeward migration begins for the Gulf Sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi). From far flung places along the Gulf Coast, Gulf Sturgeons start heading back to their natal rivers – they know the way instinctively. Maybe they seek out the special chemical taste of their home river, imprinted at hatching. Or perhaps the ultrasensitive electric organs decorating the underside of the snout can follow the map of the earth’s magnetic field. Either way, time to make a beeline for the welcoming waters of the Suwannee River, or maybe the Apalachicola, Choctawhatchee, or one of four other spawning rivers. Some of the adults are on a special mission – time to spawn, time to perpetuate the species. Mature males form the first wave in this homebound marathon, eager to get to the spawning grounds, eager to be the first to greet ready females with a series of sharp clicking sounds. Only spawning once each three years, females laden with large black eggs demure, taking their time, arriving in mid to late March, a month behind the early males. But most sturgeons, juveniles and immature adults not ready to spawn, are simply heading home. Not prompted by the spawning urge, they are just following the ancient annual cycle of intense winter feeding in the Gulf, followed by several months of fasting and R&R in the river.

  17. Temporal and spatial variations of abundance of phycocyanin- and phycoerythrin-rich Synechococcus in Pearl River Estuary and adjacent coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Chai, Chao; Wang, Jifang; Zhang, Ling; Cen, Jingyi; Lu, Songhui

    2016-10-01

    Three surveys were carried out in Pearl River Estuary and adjacent coastal area in May, August, and November, 2013, to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of abundance of phycoerythrin-rich Synechococcus (PE-rich SYN) and phycocyanin-rich Synechococcus (PC-rich SYN). The effects of environmental factors on the alternation of the different Synechococcus groups were also elucidated. PE-rich SYN was detected in three surveys, whereas PC-rich SYN was detected in May and August, but not in November. The highest abundances of PE-rich SYN and PC-rich SYN were recorded in August and May, with mean values of 74.17×103 and 189.92×103 cells mL-1, respectively. From May to November, the relative abundance of PE-rich SYN increased, whereas that of PC-rich SYN declined. PE-rich and PC-rich SYN presented similar horizontal distributions with high abundance in the southern estuary in May, and in the western estuary in August. The abundances of PE-rich and PC-rich SYN were high at 27-32°C and salinity of 10-20. PC-rich SYN was not detected at < 24°C, and PC:PE-rich SYN decreased in abundance with salinity increase. When less than 20 mg L-1, suspended particulate matter (SPM) was helpful for Synechococcus growth. PE-rich SYN decreased in abundance when the concentration of dissolved inorganic nitrogen increased in May and November, and the concentration of phosphate increased in November. However, PC-rich SYN abundance and nutrients showed no correlation. Principal component analysis and regression analysis indicated that PE-rich SYN significantly correlated with the principal components that were affected by environmental factors.

  18. Agricultural Chemical Concentrations and Loads in Rivers Draining the Central Valley, California, to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary: Before and During an Extended Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Drought or near drought conditions have occurred in California since 2012. Although some parts of the State received near normal precipitation in water year 2016, other locations were still below average. Extended drought can impact aquatic organisms in a variety of ways because of decreased flows and elevated water temperature. However, lower precipitation and availability of irrigation water may limit subsequent runoff, resulting in reduced concentrations and loads of certain environmental toxicants, such as pesticides and ammonia, thereby limiting their toxic effects. In this study, funded by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Program, the occurrence of 227 pesticides and degradation products, and nutrients was assessed before and during this current drought in the two largest rivers draining to the San Francisco Bay: the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. The watersheds of both rivers include substantial agricultural and urban land use. Herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, and ammonia were detected throughout the study (2010 to 2016) and models of daily concentration using the seasonal wave model (rloadest) were formulated to assess the amount of time that concentrations may have exceeded benchmark levels known to be toxic to aquatic organisms. Frequently detected pesticides included the fungicide azoxystrobin, herbicides or their degradation products such as diuron, glyphosate, and metolachlor, and insecticides such as imidacloprid. Compounds that are transported primarily by surface runoff generally showed decreasing concentrations as the drought progressed, especially in the San Joaquin River. Compounds mainly transported by groundwater, as indicated by seasonal concentration profiles, had more stable concentrations in the rivers. Mass loads to the Bay all decreased, as expected, because of the lower river discharge. When compared to aquatic-life benchmarks, modeled concentrations indicated that individual compounds were not contributing to

  19. Estuarine and Tidal Freshwater Habitat Cover Types Along the Lower Columbia River Estuary Determined from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garono, Ralph; Robinson, Rob

    2003-10-01

    Developing an understanding of the distribution and changes in estuarine and tidal floodplain ecosystems is critical to the management of biological resources in the lower Columbia River. Columbia River plants, fish, and wildlife require specific physicochemical and ecological conditions to sustain their populations. As habitats are degraded or lost, this capability is altered, often irretrievably; those species that cannot adapt are lost from the ecosystem. The Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) completed a comprehensive ecosystem protection and enhancement plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary in 1999 (Jerrick, 1999). The plan identified habitat loss and modification as a critical threat to the integrity of the lower Columbia River ecosystem and called for a habitat inventory as a key first step in its long term restoration efforts. In 2000, the Estuary Partnership initiated a multiphase project to produce a spatial data set describing the current location and distribution of estuarine and tidal freshwater habitat cover types along the lower Columbia River from the river mouth to the Bonneville Dam using a consistent methodology and data sources (Fig. 1). The first phase of the project was the development of a broadbrush description of the estuarine and tidal freshwater habitat cover classes for the entire study area ({approx}146 river miles) using Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite imagery. Phase II of the project entailed analysis of the classified satellite imagery from Phase I. Analysis of change in landcover and a summary of the spatial relationships between cover types are part of Phase II. Phase III of the project included the classification of the high resolution hyperspectral imagery collected in 2000 and 2001 for key focal areas within the larger study area. Finally, Phase IV consists of this final report that presents results from refining the Landsat ETM+ classification and provides recommendations for future actions

  20. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Evaluating Wetland Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary using Hydroacoustic Telemetry Arrays to Estimate Movement, Survival, and Residence Times of Juvenile Salmonids, Volume XXII (22).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Russell W.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-08-01

    Wetlands in the Columbia River estuary are actively being restored by reconnecting these habitats to the estuary, making more wetland habitats available to rearing and migrating juvenile salmon. Concurrently, thousands of acoustically tagged juvenile salmonids are released into the Columbia River to estimate their survival as they migrate through the estuary. Here, we develop a release-recapture model that makes use of these tagged fish to measure the success of wetland restoration projects in terms of their contribution to populations of juvenile salmon. Specifically, our model estimates the fraction of the population that enter the wetland, survival within the wetland, and the mean residence time of fish within the wetland. Furthermore, survival in mainstem Columbia River downstream of the wetland can be compared between fish that remained the mainstem and entered the wetland. These conditional survival estimates provide a means of testing whether the wetland improves the subsequent survival of juvenile salmon by fostering growth or improving their condition. Implementing such a study requires little additional cost because it takes advantage of fish already released to estimate survival through the estuary. Thus, such a study extracts the maximum information at minimum cost from research projects that typically cost millions of dollars annually.

  1. Improvement of the sediment ecosystem following diversion of an intertidal sewage outfall at the Fraser river estuary, Canada, with emphasis on Corophium salmonis (Amphipoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvai, J L; Levings, C D; Harrison, P J; Neill, W E

    2002-06-01

    Primary treated sewage effluent from the city of Vancouver, Canada was deposited directly onto the intertidal ecosystem of Sturgeon bank, Fraser river estuary between 1962 and 1988. In response to the degraded sediment conditions an azoic zone developed near the discharge outfall. Effluent discharges into the intertidal zone were almost completely stopped in 1988 with the construction of a submerged outfall. Our studies, conducted between 1994 and 1996, showed considerable improvement in the environment of the mudflat ecosystem, including increased dissolved oxygen, decreased sediment chlorophyll, decreased organic material in the sediment, reduced heavy metals in surficial sediment and increased grain size. The amphipod Corophium salmonis, important in the food web for juvenile salmon and other fish species, recolonized the previously azoic location. At reference stations, C. salmonis density was similar to that observed in previous surveys two decades earlier. Our data strongly suggest that improvement or sediment conditions near the former sewage outfall was a major factor enabling colonization by C. salmonis.

  2. Hermaphroditism among dioecious Tagelus plebeius (Lightfoot, 1786) (Mollusca, Psammobiidae) and Iphigenia brasiliana (Lamarck, 1818) (Mollusca, Donacidae) on the Cachoeira River estuary, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceuta, L O; Boehs, G; Santos, J J B

    2010-02-01

    The samples of Tagelus plebeius and Iphigenia brasiliana were manually collected on the Cachoeira River estuary region (Ilhéus, BA, Brazil) between August 2005 and August 2006, with a periodicity of 15 days, with 20 animals collected/sampled, performing 500 samples from each species. The animals were measured, eviscerated and kept in solution of Davidson and after 24-30 hours, they were transferred to ethanol 70%. The material was processed for routine histology, with paraffin embedding, obtaining 7 microm thick slices, stained with Harris hematoxilin and Eosin (HE). By light microscopy analysis, 2 cases of hermaphroditism (0.4%) in T. plebeius samples and one case (0.2%) in I. brasiliana were registered with predominance of female over male follicles.

  3. Assessment of heavy metal pollution in wetland soils from the young and old reclaimed regions in the Pearl River Estuary, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Xiao, Rong; Cui, Baoshan; Zhang, Kejiang; Wang, Qinggai; Liu, Xinhui; Gao, Haifeng; Huang, Laibin

    2011-03-01

    Soils were sampled in three types of wetlands from the young (A) and old (B) reclaimed regions of the Pearl River Estuary. They were analyzed for total concentrations of heavy metals to investigate their distributions and pollution levels in both regions. Results showed that most heavy metals in ditch and riparian wetlands did not significantly differ from those in reclaimed wetlands in A region, while significantly lower for Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in reclaimed wetlands in B region, suggesting higher effects of long-term reclamation. Iron, Cr and Cu were identified as metal pollutants of primary concern and had higher contributions to the total toxic units compared to other metals. Almost all metals exceeded their lowest effect levels and Fe and Cr even exceeded the severe effect levels. Multivariate analysis shows that Fe and Mn are controlled by parent rocks and other metals mainly originate from anthropogenic source. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Total and labile metals in surface sediments of the tropical river-estuary system of Marabasco (Pacific coast of Mexico): Influence of an iron mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmolejo-Rodríguez, Ana Judith; Prego, Ricardo; Meyer-Willerer, Alejandro; Shumilin, Evgueni; Cobelo-García, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Marabasco is a tropical river-estuary system comprising the Marabasco river and the Barra de Navidad Lagoon. The river is impacted by the Peña Colorada iron mine, which produces 3.5 million tons of pellets per year. Thirteen surface sediment samples were collected in May 2005 (dry season) in order to establish background levels of Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the system and to ascertain the potential mobility of metals in the sediments. Analyses were carried out in the fraction finer than 63 microm, and labile metals extracted according the BCR procedure. Certified reference materials were used for validation of methods. Total concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were in the range of 0.05-0.34, 6-95, 0.7-31, 9-26, 2-18, and 53-179 mgkg(-1), respectively; Al and Fe ranges of 24-127, and 26-69 mgg(-1) correspondingly. Cadmium was found to be significantly labile in the sediments (20-100%), followed by Co (0-35%), Ni (3-16%) and Zn (0-25%), whereas the labile fraction for Cu, Fe and Pb was almost negligible (<4%). According with the total metal concentrations, background levels and normalised enrichment factors (NEF) of the metals studied, the impact of the Peña Colorada iron mine on the Marabasco system is lower than expected when compared with other similar World systems influenced by mining activities.

  5. Influence of the Pearl River estuary and vertical mixing in Victoria Harbor on water quality in relation to eutrophication impacts in Hong Kong waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kedong; Harrison, Paul J

    2007-06-01

    This study presents water quality parameters such as nutrients, phytoplankton biomass and dissolved oxygen based on 11 years of water quality data in Victoria Harbor and examined how the Pearl River estuary discharge in summer and year round sewage discharge influenced these parameters. Nutrients in Victoria Harbor were strongly influenced by both the Pearl River and sewage effluent, as indicated by the high NO(3) inputs from the Pearl River in summer and higher NH(4) and PO(4) in Victoria Harbor than both its sides. N:P ratios were low in the dry season, but increased to >16:1 in the wet season, suggesting that P is potentially the most limiting nutrient in this area during the critical period in the summer. Although there were generally high nutrients, the phytoplankton biomass was not as high as one would expect in Victoria Harbor. In fact, there were high concentrations of chl near the bottom well below the photic zone. Salinity near the bottom was lower in Victoria Harbor than at the two entrances to Victoria Harbor, suggesting strong vertical mixing within Victoria Harbor. Therefore, strong vertical mixing and horizontal advection appear to play an important role in significantly reducing eutrophication impacts in Victoria Harbor. Consequently, dissolved oxygen near the bottom was low in summer, but only occasionally dipped to 2 mgL(-1) despite the high organic loading from sewage effluent.

  6. Total and labile metals in surface sediments of the tropical river-estuary system of Marabasco (Pacific coast of Mexico): Influence of an iron mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmolejo-Rodriguez, Ana Judith [Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas, (IPN) La Paz, B.C.S. (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas, (CSIC), Vigo (Spain)], E-mail: amarmole@ipn.mx; Prego, Ricardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas, (CSIC), Vigo (Spain); Meyer-Willerer, Alejandro [Centro Universitario de Investigaciones Oceanologicas, Universidad de Colima, Col. (Mexico); Shumilin, Evgueni [Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias Marinas, (IPN) La Paz, B.C.S. (Mexico); Cobelo-Garcia, Antonio [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas, (CSIC), Vigo (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Marabasco is a tropical river-estuary system comprising the Marabasco river and the Barra de Navidad Lagoon. The river is impacted by the Pena Colorada iron mine, which produces 3.5 million tons of pellets per year. Thirteen surface sediment samples were collected in May 2005 (dry season) in order to establish background levels of Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the system and to ascertain the potential mobility of metals in the sediments. Analyses were carried out in the fraction finer than 63 {mu}m, and labile metals extracted according the BCR procedure. Certified reference materials were used for validation of methods. Total concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were in the range of 0.05-0.34, 6-95, 0.7-31, 9-26, 2-18, and 53-179 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively; Al and Fe ranges of 24-127, and 26-69 mg g{sup -1} correspondingly. Cadmium was found to be significantly labile in the sediments (20-100%), followed by Co (0-35%), Ni (3-16%) and Zn (0-25%), whereas the labile fraction for Cu, Fe and Pb was almost negligible (<4%). According with the total metal concentrations, background levels and normalised enrichment factors (NEF) of the metals studied, the impact of the Pena Colorada iron mine on the Marabasco system is lower than expected when compared with other similar World systems influenced by mining activities.

  7. Influences of hydrological regime on heavy metal and salt ion concentrations in intertidal sediment from Chongming Dongtan, Changjiang River estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiale; Gao, Xiaojiang; Yang, Jin

    2017-11-01

    The tidal flat along the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary has long been reclaimed for the agricultural purposes, with the prevailing hydrological conditions during such pedogenic transformations being of great importance to their successful development. In this study, samples of surface sediment from Chongming Dongtan, situated at the mouth of the Changjiang River estuary, were collected and analyzed in order to understand how hydrological management can influence the concentrations of heavy metals and salt ions in pore water, and chemical fractionation of heavy metals during the reclamation process. We performed a series of experiments that simulated three different hydrological regimes: permanent flooding (R1), alternative five-day periods of wetting and drying (R2), continuous field capacity (R3). Our results exhibited good Pearson correlations coefficients between heavy metals and salt ions in the pore water for both R1 and R2. In particular, the concentrations of salt ions in the pore water decreased in all three regimes, but showed the biggest decline in R2. With this R2 experiment, the periodic concentration patterns in the pore water varied for Fe and Mn, but not for Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn. Neither the fractionation of Ni nor the residual fractions of any metals changed significantly in any regime. In R1, the reducible fractions of heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb) in the sediment decreased, while the acid extractable fractions increased. In R2, the acid extractable and the reducible fractions of Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb both decreased, as did the oxidizable fraction of Cu. These data suggest that an alternating hydrological regime can reduce both salinity and the availability of heavy metals in sediments.

  8. Variation of Archaeal Populations Along a Salinity Gradient in the Pearl River Estuary, China: Implications for Synergy Between Different Metabolic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.

    2016-02-01

    Marine archaea mainly include marine group I (MGI) that function as chemolithoautotrophs growing on ammonia and marine group II (MGII) that live heterotrophically. In this study, we quantified the abundance of MGI (represented by archaeal amoA gene) and MGII (16S rRNA gene) using qPCR in the water column of different salinities (A: 0.8‰; B: 18.1‰; C: 23.9‰: D: 31‰) in the Pearl River Estuary over a 12-month period. The results showed that the abundance of MG II in site C (8.5±10.1×107 copies/L) was significantly higher than the other three sites (A: 3.5±8.8×105 copies/L; B: 2.7±4.5×107 copies/L; D: 2.2±4.4×107 copies/L) in all seasons, indicating the perennial blooming of MGII that might be due to the optimal combination of available organic carbon and salinity at this site. We also observed that the correlation between MGI and MGII became better toward the marine water and was significant at site D (R2: A, 0.06; B, 0.1; C, 0.24; D, 0.64), indicating the potential functional relationship between them with increasing salinity. This allows us to hypothesize that the growth of MGI in the coastal site is more dependent on release of ammonia from organic matter degradation by MGII and other heterotrophic organisms. The Pearl River Estuary may be an ideal environment for testing this hypothesis, which may provide insight into the mechanisms of carbon cycle performed by different archaea in continental margin systems.

  9. Estimating bankfull discharge and depth in ungauged estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gisen, J.I.A.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to measure river discharge accurately in an estuary, and particularly, in the region where the tidal flow dominates over the river discharge. River discharge is important for the morphology and hydrodynamics of estuaries as it influences the salt intrusion process, tidal dynamics,

  10. Potential bioavailability assessment, source apportionment and ecological risk of heavy metals in the sediment of Brisbane River estuary, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duodu, Godfred Odame; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2017-04-15

    A weak acid extraction was used to mobilize the loosely bound metals in estuary sediment samples. More than 30% of Ag, As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Hg, Mn Ni, Pb and Zn were leached from the sediment showing that these metals are significantly present in the bioavailable form. PCA/APCS identified three sources of the metals, namely: lithogenic accounting for 72%, shipping related contributing 15% and traffic related representing 13% of the total load. Application of pollution index (PI) and modified pollution index (MPI) revealed that the sediment range from unpolluted to heavily polluted while ecological risk index (RI) classifies the sediment as posing low ecological risk modified ecological risk index (MRI) suggests considerable to very high ecological risk. To provide holistic insights into the ecological risks posed by metals, enrichment factor, MPI and MRI are recommended for the assessment of sediment in complex environments such as estuaries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Oceanographic data collected from Hammond Tide Gage by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2005-06-24 to 2013-02-08 (NCEI Accession 0162194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162194 contains navigational and physical data collected at Hammond Tide Gage, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary - Washington/Oregon....

  12. Oceanographic data collected from North Channel Bottom Node for ETM Cruise by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2012-04-28 to 2012-05-17 (NCEI Accession 0162178)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162178 contains navigational and physical data collected at North Channel Bottom Node for ETM Cruise, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary -...

  13. Oceanographic data collected from SATURN-09 by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2014-09-08 to 2016-06-10 (NCEI Accession 0162185)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162185 contains biological, chemical and physical data collected at SATURN-09, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary - Washington/Oregon....

  14. Oceanographic data collected from SATURN-07 by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2012-05-03 to 2017-01-24 (NCEI Accession 0162184)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162184 contains biological, chemical and physical data collected at SATURN-07, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary - Washington/Oregon....

  15. Oceanographic data collected from SATURN-10 by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2015-09-01 to 2016-12-16 (NCEI Accession 0162186)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162186 contains biological, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected at SATURN-10, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary -...

  16. Reconnaissance of chemical and physical characteristics of selected bottom sediments of the Caloosahatchee River and estuary, tributaries, and contiguous bays, Lee County, Florida, July 20-30, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Mario; Marot, M.E.; Holmes, C.W.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes a reconnaissance study, conducted July 20-30, 1998, of chemical and physical characteristics of recently deposited bottom sediments in the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary. Recently deposited sediments were identified using an isotopic chronometer, Beryllium-7 (7Be), a short-lived radioisotope. Fifty-nine sites were sampled in an area that encompasses the Caloosahatchee River (River) about three miles upstream from the Franklin Lock (S-79), the entire tidally affected length of the river (estuary), and the contiguous water bodies of Matlacha Pass, San Carlos Bay, Estero Bay, Tarpon Bay, and Pine Island Sound in Lee County, Florida. Bottom sediments were sampled for 7Be at 59 sites. From the results of the 7Be analysis, 30 sites were selected for physical and chemical analysis. Sediments were analyzed for particle size, total organic carbon (TOC), trace elements, and toxic organic compounds, using semiquantitative methods for trace elements and organic compounds. The semiquantitative scans of trace elements indicated that cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations, when normalized to aluminum, were above the natural background range at 24 of 30 sites. Particle size and TOC were used to characterize sediment deposition patterns and organic content. Pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (CaPAHs) were determined at 30 sites using immunoassay analysis. The semiquantitative immunoassay analyses of toxic organic compounds indicated that all of the samples contained DDT, cyclodienes as chlordane (pesticides), and CaPAHs. PCBs were not detected. Based on analyses of the 30 sites, sediments at 10 of these sites were analyzed for selected trace elements and toxic organic compounds, including pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs, using quantitative laboratory procedures. No arsenic or cadmium was detected. Zinc was detected at two sites with concentrations greater than the lower limit of the range of

  17. Maintaining the ecological flows of estuaries: a critical reflection on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maintaining the ecological flows of estuaries: a critical reflection on the application and interpretation of the relevant legal framework through the lens of the Klein River Estuary. ... These estuaries provide numerous environmental goods and services to the species situated within and adjacent to them. In an effort to improve ...

  18. Food web structure in three contrasting estuaries determined using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Food web structure in three contrasting estuaries determined using stable isotope (δ 13 C) analysis. ... African Journal of Aquatic Science ... Food web structure in three contrasting estuaries, the freshwater-deprived Kariega, the freshwater-dominated Great Fish River and the temporarily open/closed Kasouga estuary, along ...

  19. Organic matter processing in tidal estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Herman, P.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Processing of organic matter in tidal estuaries modifies its transfer from the river to the sea. We examined the distribution and the elemental and isotopic composition of organic matter in nine tidal estuaries along the Atlantic coast of Europe (Elbe, Ems, Thames, Rhine, Scheldt, Loire, Gironde,

  20. Trapping of sediment in tidal estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernetsky, A.

    2012-01-01

    An estuary is an ideal habitat for various aquatic species. At the same time, estuaries and adjacent rivers are used as fast navigation routes between the coastal and inland territories. The fast industrial development and the subsequent growth of cities and trade have led to large-scale

  1. Water Resource Inventory and Assessment: Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge Dixie and Levy Counties, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Water Resource Inventory and Assessment (WRIA) report for Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge describes current hydrologic information relevant to the...

  2. Water quality of the tidal Potomac River and Estuary; hydrologic data report, 1981 water year, with a section on collection and analysis of chlorophyll-a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Stephen F.; Coupe, Richard H.; Woodward, Joan C.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains data on the physical and chemical properties measured in the Tidal Potomac River and Estuary during the 1981 water year. Data were collected at least weekly at five stations, and periodically at 15 stations and at two other stations near the mouth of the Potomac River in Chesapeake Bay. Each of the five stations represent a cross section at which the transport of selected dissolved and suspended materials can be computed. The remaining 17 stations are locations at which data were collected for special studies of selected phenomena, such as salt water migration and dissolved oxygen dynamics. Samples were routinely analyzed for chlorophyll-a, nitrogen, pheophytin, phosphorus, silica and suspended sediment. Additional samples were analyzed for adenosine triphosphate, algal growth potential, alkalinity, calcium, chloride, dissolved-solids residue, fluoride, iron, manganese, magnesium, nitrifying bacteria, organic carbon, potassium, seston, sodium, and sulfate. In addition, in-situ measurements of dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, pH, temperature, solar radiation, and secchi disk transparency were made. (USGS)

  3. Application of the Geophysical Scale Multi-Block Transport Modeling System to Hydrodynamic Forcing of Dredged Material Placement Sediment Transport within the James River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. C.; Hayter, E. J.; Pruhs, R.; Luong, P.; Lackey, T. C.

    2016-12-01

    The geophysical scale circulation of the Mid Atlantic Bight and hydrologic inputs from adjacent Chesapeake Bay watersheds and tributaries influences the hydrodynamics and transport of the James River estuary. Both barotropic and baroclinic transport govern the hydrodynamics of this partially stratified estuary. Modeling the placement of dredged sediment requires accommodating this wide spectrum of atmospheric and hydrodynamic scales. The Geophysical Scale Multi-Block (GSMB) Transport Modeling System is a collection of multiple well established and USACE approved process models. Taking advantage of the parallel computing capability of multi-block modeling, we performed one year three-dimensional modeling of hydrodynamics in supporting simulation of dredged sediment placements transport and morphology changes. Model forcing includes spatially and temporally varying meteorological conditions and hydrological inputs from the watershed. Surface heat flux estimates were derived from the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). The open water boundary condition for water level was obtained from an ADCIRC model application of the U. S. East Coast. Temperature-salinity boundary conditions were obtained from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) long-term monitoring stations database. Simulated water levels were calibrated and verified by comparison with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tide gage locations. A harmonic analysis of the modeled tides was performed and compared with NOAA tide prediction data. In addition, project specific circulation was verified using US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) drogue data. Salinity and temperature transport was verified at seven CBP long term monitoring stations along the navigation channel. Simulation and analysis of model results suggest that GSMB is capable of resolving the long duration, multi-scale processes inherent to practical engineering problems such as dredged material

  4. Sediment transport processes in the Pearl River Estuary as revealed by grain-size end-member modeling and sediment trend analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Li, Tuan-Jie

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of grain-size distribution enables us to decipher sediment transport processes and understand the causal relations between dynamic processes and grain-size distributions. In the present study, grain sizes were measured from surface sediments collected in the Pearl River Estuary and its adjacent coastal areas. End-member modeling analysis attempts to unmix the grain sizes into geologically meaningful populations. Six grain-size end-members were identified. Their dominant modes are 0 Φ, 1.5 Φ, 2.75 Φ, 4.5 Φ, 7 Φ, and 8 Φ, corresponding to coarse sand, medium sand, fine sand, very coarse silt, silt, and clay, respectively. The spatial distributions of the six end-members are influenced by sediment transport and depositional processes. The two coarsest end-members (coarse sand and medium sand) may reflect relict sediments deposited during the last glacial period. The fine sand end-member would be difficult to transport under fair weather conditions, and likely indicates storm deposits. The three remaining fine-grained end-members (very coarse silt, silt, and clay) are recognized as suspended particles transported by saltwater intrusion via the flood tidal current, the Guangdong Coastal Current, and riverine outflow. The grain-size trend analysis shows distinct transport patterns for the three fine-grained end-members. The landward transport of the very coarse silt end-member occurs in the eastern part of the estuary, the seaward transport of the silt end-member occurs in the western part, and the east-west transport of the clay end-member occurs in the coastal areas. The results show that grain-size end-member modeling analysis in combination with sediment trend analysis help to better understand sediment transport patterns and the associated transport mechanisms.

  5. Abundance, distribution and bioavailability of major and trace elements in surface sediments from the Cai River estuary and Nha Trang Bay (South China Sea, Vietnam)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukina, S. E.; Lobus, N. V.; Peresypkin, V. I.; Dara, O. M.; Smurov, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Major (Si, Al, Fe, Ti, Mg, Ca, Na, K, S, P), minor (Mn) and trace (Li, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Ag, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Pb, Bi and U) elements, their chemical forms and the mineral composition, organic matter (TOC) and carbonates (TIC) in surface sediments from the Cai River estuary and Nha Trang Bay were first determined along the salinity gradient. The abundance and ratio of major and trace elements in surface sediments are discussed in relation to the mineralogy, grain size, depositional conditions, reference background and SQG values. Most trace-element contents are at natural levels and are derived from the composition of rocks and soils in the watershed. A severe enrichment of Ag is most likely derived from metal-rich detrital heavy minerals such as Ag-sulfosalts. Along the salinity gradient, several zones of metal enrichment occur in surface sediments because of the geochemical fractionation of the riverine material. The parts of actually and potentially bioavailable forms (isolated by four single chemical reagent extractions) are most elevated for Mn and Pb (up to 36% and 32% of total content, respectively). The possible anthropogenic input of Pb in the region requires further study. Overall, the most bioavailable parts of trace elements are associated with easily soluble amorphous Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides. The sediments are primarily enriched with bioavailable metal forms in the riverine part of the estuary. Natural (such as turbidities) and human-generated (such as urban and industrial activities) pressures are shown to influence the abundance and speciation of potential contaminants and therefore change their bioavailability in this estuarine system.

  6. Plutonium, cesium and uranium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, H. J.; Trier, R. M.; Olsen, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co determined by gamma spectrometry and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Measurable amounts of reactor-derived /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co are found in nearly al sediment samples containing appreciable /sup 137/Cs between 15 km upstream of Indian Point and the downstream extent of our sampling about 70 km south of the reactor. Fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu reaching the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the systems by particle deposition, while 70 to 90% of the /sup 137/Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported to the coastal waters in solution. Activity levels of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in New York harbor sediments indicate a significant source in addition to suspended particles carried down the Hudson. The most likely cause appears to be transport into the estuary of particles from offshore waters having higher specific activities of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu. Measurements of fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion may indeed be a critical factor in regulating plutonium solubility and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility.

  7. Nutrient characteristics in the Yangtze River Estuary and the adjacent East China Sea before and after impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Chao; Yu, Zhiming; Shen, Zhiliang; Song, Xiuxian; Cao, Xihua; Yao, Yun

    2009-08-01

    From November 2002 to 2006, five cruises were undertaken in the Yangtze River Estuary and the adjacent East China Sea to compare the nutrient concentrations, ratios and potential nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth before and after impoundment (June 2003) of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD). Concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and total nitrogen (TN) exhibited an increasing trend from 2002 to 2006. In contrast, total phosphorus (TP) concentration exhibited a decreasing trend. The mean concentrations of DIN, SRP, and TN in the total study area increased from 21.4 microM, 0.9 microM, and 41.8 microM in 2002 to 37.5 microM, 1.3 microM, and 82.2 microM in 2006, respectively, while TP decreased from 2.1 microM to 1.7 microM. The concentration of dissolved reactive silica (DRSi) had no major fluctuations and the differences were not significant. The mean concentration of DRSi in the total study area ranged from 52.5 to 92.3 microM. The Si:N ratio decreased significantly from 2.7 in 2002 to 1.3 in 2006, while TN:TP ratio increased from 22.1 to 80.3. The area of potential P limitation of phytoplankton growth expanded after 2003 and potential Si limitation appeared in 2005 and 2006. Potential P limitation mainly occurred in an area of salinity less than 30 after 2003, while potential Si limitation occurred where the salinity was greater than 30. By comparison with historical data, the concentrations of nitrate and SRP in this upper estuary during November 1980-2006 increased obviously after impoundment of TGD but DRSi decreased. Meanwhile, the ratios of N:P, Si:N and Si:P decreased obviously.