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Sample records for sutcuimam university school

  1. Interaction university and school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gionara Tauchen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the interaction between universities and middle schools is fundamental for organization and the qualification of the education system, we conducted a qualitative study on twenty public municipal schools of Rio Grande, RS, designed to investigate and understand the effectiveness of university activities (teaching, research and extension in regard to the promotion and strengthening of the interactions between these institutions. We highlight the activities related to Pibid, the Education Observatory, extension, supervised internships, and to undergraduate and postgraduate research. From comprehensions about these activities, we discuss the interaction between school and university.

  2. Water Recycling in Schools & Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeten, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Consider the waste streams generated in schools and universities. So what is in the typical used water generated in schools and universities? It is typically about 99 percent water, with the remaining 1 percent mainly made up of organic compounds. Used water contains nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous. When one judges it on its quality, it…

  3. 3 Copperbelt University, School

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-08-02

    Aug 2, 2016 ... The aim of this study was to assess the quality of groundwater for human ... Key Words: Groundwater, ambia, rural areas, water quality, Mbala district ...... Freshwater Quality Studies and. Monitoring Programmes. University of Gothenburg (2010). Zambia Environmental and Climate. Change Policy Brief.

  4. Educational Vouchers for Universal Pre-Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Henry M.; Schwartz, Heather L.

    2007-01-01

    This article considers two issues regarding preschool education. First, it provides a brief set of arguments for government funding of universal, pre-school education. Second, it explores the applicability of a voucher plan using a regulated market approach for the funding of universal, pre-school education. Four criteria are used to assess the…

  5. Hawthorne Elementary School: The University Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazee, Bruce M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes positive results coming from Trinity University's active support of educational reform efforts at Hawthorne Elementary School (Houston, Texas). Trinity's teacher education agenda focused on preparing teachers for the real world of the elementary school and pursuing a teacher-selected school reform project. (GR)

  6. Cases in Partnership between Independent Schools and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnan, Vincent W.

    2016-01-01

    This study provides an in-depth look at six unique models of partnership between independent schools and a nearby college/university. The six cases include the University School of Nashville and Vanderbilt University; the Lab School and University of Chicago; the School at Columbia and Columbia University; the Boston University Academy and Boston…

  7. Strengthening the School-University Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Andrea; Toth, Zsuzsa N.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a practicum at the English Language and Literature Department at the Teacher Training College of Eotvos Lorand University in Budapest. Seeks to improve both the department's relationship with the school-based mentors and the connection between the methodology seminars and actual teaching practice. Notes changes made have generated…

  8. 2016 Joint Universities Accelerator School (JUAS) - Registrations

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The registrations for the 2016 session of the Joint Universities Accelerator School (JUAS) are now open.   Applications are welcome from second-year Master and PhD and for physicists wishing to further their knowledge in this particular field. The deadline for submission of the full application form is 30 October 2015.

  9. 2017 Joint Universities Accelerator School (JUAS) - Registrations

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The registrations for the 2017 session of the Joint Universities Accelerator School (JUAS) are now open.   Applications are welcome from staff, fellows and post-graduate students wishing to further their knowledge in the field. The deadline for submission of the full application form is 16 October 2016.

  10. University-School Partnerships: An Organizational Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard V.

    Sixteen goal-like statements were developed around P. Reed's contention that university-public school partnerships promote interdependence between groups, a balanced exchange of valued commodities, shared decision making, adaptations to inherent barriers, and an enabling support structure. The questionnaire was pilot tested with members of other…

  11. CONSTRUCTIVE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT SCHOOL-UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Petrovna Shatalova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study the key components of the development of constructive thinking of students on the basis of model building constructive educational environment school-University. It was conducted from a position of constructive approach in education, as a process of systemic-structural methodology of cognitive and creative activity of the student, promotes development and formation of various constructive qualities of the individual. The functions of constructive educational environment school-University aimed at developing constructive thinking of students, defined by its structural components and connections, shows the consistency of self-development of constructive thinking and job satisfaction the development of constructive skills. The findings reveal innovative possibilities of cooperation of schools and universities in the design and functioning model of constructive educatio-nal space that contributes to the development of constructive thinking of all its stakeholders.Purpose: measuring the effectiveness of the model constructive educational environment school-University aimed at the development of students.Methodology: the Programme of research included: (1 diagnosis of the development level of constructive thinking on the questionnaire developed in the context of the constructive theory of education, (2 augmented and revised by the author the diagnosis of satisfaction and importance model of constructive educational environment school-University by the method of G.A. Gagarin, as well as theoretical modeling, method of involved observation, formal teaching method.Results. The article introduces the concept of «constructive learning environments», which are considered in relation to the organization and conduct of joint activities of teachers, teachers and students. The authors give a theoretical comparative analysis of scientific works of colleagues in the context of the problem. Offer a brief

  12. School-University Partnership: Perceptions of the Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Carol; Wilson, Jennifer; Elias, Martille

    2009-01-01

    We investigated how and to what extent a school-university partnership might influence the teachers and the teaching in one school, Parkland. We interviewed 23 novice and veteran teachers, the principals, and the university liaison. The data suggest that the university structures (i.e., the practicum, the student teaching internship, the Senior…

  13. Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and Midwifery. Education in ... 1 University of Rwanda, College of medicine and health sciences Kabgayi school of Nursing and Midwifery,. 2&4 University of ... Lack of knowledge and access to current clinical practice guidelines were identified as barriers to integration.

  14. American School & University Architectural Portfolio 2000 Awards: Landscape Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School & University, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents photographs and basic information on architectural design, costs, square footage, and principle designers of the award winning school landscaping projects that competed in the American School & University Architectural Portfolio 2000. (GR)

  15. Transition to University Life: Insights from High School and University Female Students in Wolaita Zone, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuo, Mary; Edda, Medhanit

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to get an insight about how high school female students perceive the transition to university life, and to understand the transition experience of university female students in the first semester. An exploratory study design was used where 166 high school female students and 88 first year university female students…

  16. Supporting School Responsiveness to Immigrant Families and Children: A University-School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogge, Stephen G.; Martinez-Alba, Gilda; Cruzado-Guerrero, Judith

    2017-01-01

    A partnership between a university program and an urban public school was created to help the school respond to the significant increase in the school's population of immigrant, English language learners. School staff and university faculty established an agenda to learn about local immigrant families, improve communications with the families, and…

  17. School and Student Classifications for Universe Data Files. Improving Universe Data on Schools and School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittebols, James H.

    Recommendations designed to assist states in the creation of meaningful definitions of types of schools and students for use in the Council of Chief State School Officers' Education Data Improvement Project are presented. The Project's goals are to promote and facilitate the reform and refinement of the National Center for Education Statistics'…

  18. University-school partnerships for social justice in mathematics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    My purpose in this paper is to situate a university-school mathematics and science education partnership within a social justice perspective in education. The focus of the systemic intervention endeavour was school-based teacher professional development in which university-based facilitators embarked on class visits with ...

  19. Development of Universal Values in School Management Scale (UVISMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagir, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    Current study aims to develop a scale to identify the universal values of school administrators in school management. In order to develop the scale, academic resources were reviewed and a 40-item draft data collection instrument was created by taking the views and suggestions of 5 school administrators, 5 academicians and 5 education inspectors…

  20. Students' transition from school to university: Possibilities for a pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research reported in this article aimed at developing a framework for a holistic and integrated pre-university intervention. In this sense it is foreseen that universities might play an increasingly important role at school level to prepare prospective students more effectively for university studies and thus facilitate a smoother ...

  1. Open Universities: You do not need a high school diploma to get into university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo RICCI

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I hope to empower students by exposing the myth that a high school diploma is a necessary first step to getting into a post secondary institution. In what follows, I will be sharing a brief history of open universities, give an example of an open university in a specific context and celebrate its policies, and continue to challenge some more myths about the importance of a high school diploma for success in post secondary schooling . .

  2. Universities Reaching Outwards: Science Education Partnerships with Urban School Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandifer, Cody

    2013-03-01

    The goals of this talk are to: (1) describe how universities, physics departments, and individual faculty can partner with urban school systems to benefit K-16 students, teacher education programs, and university instructors, (2) summarize research on effective university-school system education partnerships, and (3) offer advice and share lessons learned so that university partners can avoid common pitfalls and maximize the potential for collaborative success. Possible areas of university-school collaboration include resident teachers, curricular review, early teaching experiences, demo sharing sessions, ongoing professional development, on- and off-campus science outreach, RET programs, science education resource centers, and others. University-school educational partnerships offer numerous benefits but can be challenging to implement and maintain. Research shows that most successful partnerships possess the following characteristics: mutual self-interest, participant commitment, mutual trust and respect, shared decision-making, information sharing, and ongoing evaluation. K-16 course and curriculum redesign is a specific issue that has its own unique set of contextual factors that impact the project's chance at success, including available materials, administrative support, formative assessments, pilot-testing and instructor feedback, and ongoing professional development. I have learned a number of lessons in own science education collaborations with the Baltimore City Public School System, which is an urban school system with 200 schools, 84,000 students, and 10,700 teachers and administrators. These lessons pertain to: communication, administrative power, and the structure of the school system; relevant contextual factors in the university and K-12 schools; and good old-fashioned common sense.Specific advice on K-16 science education partnerships will be provided to help universities increase student and instructor satisfaction with their physics and teacher

  3. University-Affiliated Lab Schools: A Collaborative Partnership Between the University of Pittsburgh's Falk School and the State University of Malang Lab Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Rachmajanti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on contemporary discussions about university-affiliated lab schools and their growing international networks. Topics include university-affiliated lab schools, the State University of Malang-University of Pittsburgh partnership created by a consortium of rectors in Indonesia, and the growing importance of international professional development networks for university-affiliated lab schools. The instructional leadership side of the partnership has shared ways: (a to design a better aligned curriculum; (b to make learning activities more active and student-oriented; (c to trigger creativity, critical thinking, and independence; (d to practice ongoing assessment; and (e to enrich the cultural repertoire of students. The institutional management side has focused greater attention on: professionalism in management; use of technology; human resources issues of recruitment, induction, and continuing professional development; and more innovative, balanced, transparent and sustainable funding sources. The following recommendations are made. First, fostering international partnerships is a good way for already strong schools to make continuous improvements in both instruction and institutional leadership. Second, partnership sustainability is paramount, especially during transitions in senior university management. Careful and thoughtful construction of the universities’ core memorandum of understanding is time well spent because it becomes embedded in institutional policy.

  4. Abstract: Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and Midwifery Education in Rwanda. Patricia Moreland, Isabelle Soule, Linda Vanhook, Linda Baxter, Claire McKinley Yoder, Michael V Relf ...

  5. Research as Relationship: Ethics and School-University Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vare, Jonatha W.

    This paper illustrates a researcher/teacher's "situated," (using the workplace as a cultural context) and "gendered" (following the female's subjective preference for context and relationship) understanding of ethics and school-university collaboration. It discusses two ethical issues that arise when school and university…

  6. Academic Performance, School Desertion and Emotional Paradigm in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Emma Rosa Cruz; Barrientos, Laura Gática; Castro, Patricia Eugenia García; García, Jesús Hernández

    2010-01-01

    The present work aims to describe academic performance, school desertion and the emotional paradigm of the university students of the accounting school of the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (FCPBUAP). We have found that low academic performance is related to students' economic deficiency, which affects their concentration on their…

  7. Need Assessment on Jimma University Community Schools (JUCS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Need Assessment on Jimma University Community Schools (JUCS): Focused on the Elementary and High Schools. ... Major problems like, quality of education affected by staff quality, dissatisfaction and evacuation, shortage of teaching facilities such as text books , laboratories and equipment, library and pedagogical ...

  8. Tanzanian High School students' attitude towards five University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the attitude of high school students majoring in Physics, Chemistry and Biology (PCB) towards Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Veterinary Medicine and Nursing as professions at university. Design: A cross sectional study of a representative sample of high school students using a pretested attitudinal ...

  9. Cyber High School Students' Transition to a Traditional University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracey, Dorothy M.

    2010-01-01

    This mixed-method study identifies cyber high school graduates' perceptions of the effect of a cyber high school education on successful transition to a traditional university. The study examined students' perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages their cyber education experience contributed to their academic and social transition to…

  10. MANAGEMENT TEAM CHARACTERISTICS: EVIDENCE FROM UNIVERSITY GOVERNANCE AND SCHOOL PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiang-Tsai Chiang; Mei-Chih Lin

    2013-01-01

    The paper examines cognition from the viewpoint of internal management teams of private universities against satisfaction with school performance, applying the SEM model. Empirical results show that the board’s operational effectiveness and attendance rate for internal important meetings held on campus have a significantly positive relationship with implementing effectiveness and satisfaction with school administrative performance. The satisfaction with school administrative performance and...

  11. Towards functional school libraries : supporting library assistants in under-resourced schools through a university-community-school partnership

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bitso, Constance; Silbert, Patti

    2015-01-01

    ...-community-school partnership. The Cascading Support Model was conceptualised as a community of practice between the University of Cape Town's Schools Improvement Initiative, UCT's Library and Information Studies Centre...

  12. Learning from Lorreltag: An Urban, Community-School-University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrizio, Kami M.

    2013-01-01

    This case explores the first two years of the Lorreltag Partnership Initiative (LPI), an urban, community-5 school-university partnership. It provides a history of the community and elucidates key factors influencing partnership development. The case relies on the perspectives of a community leader, a university faculty member, a new principal,…

  13. Co-Constructing Community, School, University Partnerships for Urban School Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillenwaters, Jamila Najah

    2009-01-01

    University-school-community partnerships represent a collaborative model of urban educational reformation inclusive of all the organizations that impact urban education. Co-constructed relationships among communities, schools, and universities have the potential for redistributing hierarchical power, thereby enabling all partners to contribute to…

  14. General view of university students “Marmara University Vocational School of Health Services Case”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akyurt Nuran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the attitude towards the socio-economic conditions and demographic characteristics and the university life of medical students. To determine the students’ sociodemographic characteristics “Personal Information Form” was used developed by researchers according to literature. The form contains expressions of the students such as the economic situation, future concerns, finding a job, university life, social & recreational activities, build up relationships with people and parents education level. Target group of the study were 349 students from Marmara University Vocational School of health. The environment of the survey was limited to the students studying in all programs at Marmara University Vocational School of Health. The research was carried out with students at Marmara University Vocational School of Health in the fall semester of 2014-2015.

  15. Particle Physics: From School to University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Roger

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the teaching of particle physics as part of the A-level physics course in British secondary schools. Utilizes the quark model of hadrons and the conceptual kinematics of particle collisions, as examples, to demonstrate practical instructional possibilities in relation to student expectations. (JJK)

  16. Teacher Leadership in University-School Collaboration for School Improvement (USCSI) on the Chinese Mainland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Wei; Lo, Leslie Nai-Kwai; Chiu, Chi-Shing

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a qualitative study on teacher leadership in the context of university-school collaboration for school improvement (USCSI) on the Chinese Mainland. Through the lens of structuration theory, it explores the process of teacher leaders exercising their power in a USCSI project. During the school improvement…

  17. Mutual Benefits of University Athletes Mentoring Elementary Students: Evaluating a University-School District Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahill, Stephanie A.; Norman, Krystal; Tomaschek, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    This study examined a university-school district partnership intended to increase fourth grade students' awareness of college opportunities and to increase university student-athletes' understanding of the needs in the local community. A mixed methods design was used to evaluate whether the partnership met goals for the fourth grade students, the…

  18. How Juries Assess Universal Design in Norwegian Architectural School Competitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Leif D

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how architectural school competition juries assess Universal Design. The method used is a case study of 18 recent architectural school competitions in Norway. The results show that most competition briefs ask for Universal Designed buildings. In 8 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is mentioned as an assessment criterion. In 11 of the 18 cases, Universal Design is commented on by the juries in the jury reports, but only in 3 of the cases, do the juries assess this aspect consistently on every competition project. The overall impression is that some amount of uncertainty looms concerning how Universal Design should be assessed in the competition stage. Based on the findings, future juries should concentrate on orientation and overview prior to technicalities and details.

  19. High school achievement as a predictor for university performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshkani Z

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The high-school grade point average ( GPA-H and university entrance examination can predict the university achievement and Purpose. To examine the predictive value of GPA-H for GPA-U Methods: In this cross sectional study, the subjects were 240 medical students at basic science phase of their medical education. Data were collected by a questionnaire, consisting of questions measuring factual background variable and 10 Llikert-type questions measuring attitude. The multiple regression analysis was used. Results: The analysis showed that student GPA were a better predictor for educational achievement of medical students than rank on university entrance exam and students with high GPA have not been on probation at all. Also parent's education and occupation influence the students' attitudes toward their medical study. Conclusion: High-school GPA is a predictor for university GPA .This may warrant further investigation into criteria of medical university entrance exam. Keywords: UNIVERSITY ACHIEVEMENT, HIGH-SCHOOL GPA, UNIVERSITY SUCCESS, PREDICTOR

  20. Fish Philosophy and School Culture: A School and University Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardieck, Sherrie; Bussan, Beth; Bond, Ann; Greer, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    In the fall of 2004, an early childhood education center in the Midwest experienced a period of transition resulting from a significant turnover in administration and staff. Seeking strategies to improve and sustain a positive school culture, a newly formed Leadership Team looked to the business community for improvement strategies. The Team…

  1. Utilizing the school health index to build collaboration between a university and an urban school district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James; Fryer, Craig S; Reed, Ernestine A; Thomas, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Insufficient attention has been paid to the process of conducting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's School Health Index (SHI) to promote collaboration between universities and urban school districts when developing adolescent health promotion initiatives. This article provides an overview of the real-world contextual challenges and opportunities this type of collaboration can pose. The SHI and selected collaboration principles were used to facilitate partnership and increase stakeholder buy-in, which led to developing and implementing an 8-year health promotion campaign. The focus on planning brought together key stakeholders to allow for health promotion programming to take place, despite the competing demands on the schools. The SHI allowed for input from stakeholders to develop campaign activities and inform school- and district-wide policy. Universities and school districts desiring to develop and implement school-based, adolescent health promotion programs should (1) identify the hierarchical structure of the school district, (2) establish credibility for the program and the university staff, (3) emphasize the benefits to all partners, (4) maintain a cooperative partnership with teachers and administrators, (5) appreciate the need for planning, and (6) provide as many resources as possible to aid an already overburdened school system. Promoting healthy behaviors among students is an important part of the fundamental mission of schools. The significance of collaboration using the SHI, with direct input from students, teachers, administrators, and university partners, is critical in the development of institutional support for implementation of adolescent health promotion initiatives. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  2. Language Schools of MGIMO-University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Gladkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1943, when the Department of International Relations at MSU was established to develop one year later into the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO, the first task of the faculty was to teach future diplomats of foreign languages, which they for the most part simply did not know. Of course, in the midst of World War II, the most important foreign language seemed to be German. But the question was in providing for language support for the system of world diplomacy of the Soviet state. And pretty soon it became clear that proficiency in two foreign languages was the main advantage of MGIMO graduates over graduates of all other national universities. The language study at MGIMO is of applied nature: while studying languages students at the same time receive other professions - a diplomat, an economist, a lawyer, a journalist. Studying a language of profession became an academic niche of MGIMO. That is why today MGIMO entered the Guinness Book of Records for the number of foreign languages studied: 53 in 2014.

  3. Constructing a mutually empowering university: funder and school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article indicates challenges of facilitating the undertaking of action research by schools and discusses how these were managed. It concludes by mentioning the limitations and strengths of the project and reiterates the role which universities could play in promoting community service through action or similar research.

  4. School counsellors' roles in the implementation of universal basic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Universal Basic Education (UBE) scheme, which came into existence in September 1999, was lauded by the Federal Government of Nigeria as a preferred programme of Nigeria's basic education service. It is expected to provide full and compulsory education from primary one all through to junior secondary school 3 ...

  5. Notes on a School-University Consortium for Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Benjamin

    The levers or mechanisms by which reform in teacher education can be attained come from five sources: the school, the community, government agencies, the university, and professional associations. Examination of the pertinent policies and practices of these five components suggests that levers for change in teacher education may be defined as…

  6. School of Studies in Chemistry, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VEGETABLE SAMPLES. Manas Kanti Deb*, Manisha Thakur and Pushpa Khande. School of Studies in Chemistry, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University Raipur-492 010 (C. G.), ... (Jena, Germany) spectrophotometer fitted with EK-5 unit and matched quartz cells of 1-cm path length was used for all absorbance measurements.

  7. Mardela Middle and High School and Salisbury University PDS Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siers, Ron, Jr.; Elburn, Sara; Gasior, Paul; Briggs, Rick; Ramey, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Salisbury University (SU) has been preparing teachers since 1925 and has earned a stellar reputation in teacher preparation, especially through its work with PDS. In 2009, SU was honored with the NAPDS "Spirit of Partnership" award for its contributions to the annual national conference. SU and Worcester County Public Schools earned the…

  8. Selection of School Counselor Candidates: Future Directions at Two Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Carolyn B.; Hanson, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Two universities that are working to prepare school counselors have changed their recruitment and selection procedures to attract increased numbers of candidates who can be optimally trained to fulfill the requirements. Describes criteria and procedures used to select graduate students who have the greatest promise of becoming leaders, advocates,…

  9. Enhancing Thinking Skills with School-University Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, William D.; Kolter, Gerald E.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a collaborative Purdue University and Twin Lakes School Corporation (Indiana) project to specify and demonstrate research-based instructional models facilitating the development of students' higher thinking skills. The project has developed a special site where student teachers can observe and practice teaching these skills. Includes 10…

  10. Walking the Walk: School/University Collaboration in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Curt; Camilli, Valerie; Piazza, Jenny

    This paper analyzes the failure of a professional development school (PDS) initiative undertaken by a university department of education by using eight points from John P. Kotter's book "Leading Change," which describes conditions in business that prevent change and points to some necessary conditions for change to occur. The eight points and…

  11. University/School District Collaboration Changes a Kindergarten Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer-Vida, Louisa; Levitt, Roberta; Kelly, Susan P.

    2012-01-01

    On their way to a state English board meeting, Susan Kelly, a curriculum director, and Louisa Kramer-Vida, a university professor, used their travel time as an opportunity to converse about pedagogy (McAdamis 2010). Specifically, they reflected about enhancing K-12 writing in a suburban, middle class school district. "We need to introduce a…

  12. Developing Leadership Literacy: A University-School District Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Patricia J.; Purvey, Diane; Churchley, John; Handford, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    This project analyzes a long-standing school district-based leadership development program in British Columbia, Canada, and its transition to a partnership with the local university in which the students receive credit toward a graduate degree. The intent of this study was to explore the change process in leadership development from a school…

  13. Universal Design for Learning and School Libraries: A Logical Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David E.

    2017-01-01

    This article will explore the basic tenets of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in relation to collaborative curriculum development and implementation; provide a case study examination of UDL principles in action; and suggest school library curricular activities that provide opportunities for multiple means of representation, action, and…

  14. Student Perspectives on Equation: The Transition from School to University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, David; Thomas, Michael O. J.

    2008-01-01

    It has been recognised that many student perspectives on equations and their use of the equals sign have not mirrored those that mathematicians would like to see in tertiary students. This paper tracks transition of understanding of the equals sign by comparing secondary school students' thinking with that of first year university students. We…

  15. Moral education and citizenship education at pre-university schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, H.; Veugelers, W.; de Kat, E.; Oser, F.; Veugelers, W.

    2008-01-01

    This survey investigates the objectives, practical application and learning outcomes of moral education at three pre-university (VWO) schools with differing views on citizenship. We explore teachers’ and students’ pedagogical, socialpolitical and moral development objectives, and how they deal with

  16. Race, Bullying, and Public Perceptions of School and University Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Walter W; Pickett, Justin T; Mancini, Christina; McDougle, Robyn Diehl; Rissler, Grant; Cleary, Hayley

    2017-10-01

    Bullying and school crime are important social problems that are receiving increased attention by scholars and policy makers. However, several critical questions remain unaddressed. First, does the public perceive bullying as a serious problem and judge schools-primary, secondary, and postsecondary-as safe or unsafe? Second, does the public use a "bullying lens" to judge school safety-that is, do citizens understand bullying as a serious threat to students' well-being? Third, are there racial differences in these perceptions? Prior research identifies racial differences in the prevalence of bullying, as well as in students' views of school safety and citizens' fear of crime. Similar racial gaps may characterize public perceptions of bullying and school safety. This study begins to illuminate answers to these questions by analyzing data from a representative sample of Virginians. Multivariate regression analyses produce several notable findings. First, we find that members of the public believe bullying in schools is an increasingly serious problem, and their perceptions of bullying influence their judgments of whether schools and colleges/universities are safe. Second, Black members of the public are more likely than persons from other racial and ethnic backgrounds to perceive that bullying is increasing and is a serious problem in schools, and, in turn, to judge that schools and universities are less safe. Our results indicate that members of the public see bullying as a principal threat to student safety. They suggest there is a strong reservoir of public support for antibullying initiatives and, more broadly, efforts to increase student safety.

  17. Managing curriculum transformation within strict university governance structures: an example from Damascus University Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayyal, Mohammad; Gibbs, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    As the world of medical education moves forward, it becomes increasingly clear that the transformative process is not as easy a process for all. Across the globe, there appears to be many barriers that obstruct or threaten innovation and change, most of which cause almost insurmountable problems to many schools. If transformative education is to result in an equitable raising of standards across such an unlevel playing field, schools have to find ways in overcoming these barriers. One seemingly common barrier to development occurs when medical schools are trapped within strict University governance structures; rules and regulations which are frequently inappropriate and obstructive to the transformation that must occur in today's medical educational paradigm. The Faculty of Medicine at Damascus University, one of the oldest and foremost medical schools in the Middle East, is one such school where rigid rules and regulations and traditional values are obstructing transformative change. This paper describes the problems, which the authors believe to be common to many, and explores how attempts have been made to overcome them and move the school into the twenty-first century. It is the ultimate purpose of this paper to raise awareness of the issue, share the lessons learned in order to assist others who are experiencing similar problems and possibly create opportunities for dialogue between schools.

  18. The Recruitment Organization of the Business Schools in Italian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitnitskiy Maksim V.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at studying the practice of Italian universities in the sphere of organizing recruitment at business schools. The article considers specifics of Italian business schools, which consist of their wide division by specialization and of flexible approaches to attracting students. The basic criteria for admission and training in Italian business schools have been generalized. Recommendations for Ukraine have been elaborated in view of the following needs: involving in the teaching process the practitioners, known in the world for their efficiency in the business sphere; balancing the price for providing educational services, developing flexible payment schedules, and setting up a discount system as well as scholarship programs for students with high learning results; revising curricula in line with the requirements of modern business environment; providing employment and career statistics for business school graduates; systematically improving the quality of education and concentrating on the efficiency indicators of a program for students, etc.

  19. University education of pedagogues meeting demands of school practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Aleksandra K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available University education is met with new demands for different models of work which will more successfully prepare students for societal challenges, a higher quality of involvement in school practice, and a constant personal adaptability. The duty of university education is to meet the needs of society by constantly raising the level and quality of its curricula and thus influence the quality of candidate preparation which is needed for the work environment. However, the quality of education of future candidates should be monitored through the school practice; therefore, university teaching models need to rely on strengths and weakness observed in practice as well as on legislative guidelines which regulate the work of school pedagogues. The goal of this research is focused on the examination of attitudes of pedagogy specalists and pedagogy students, as well as on differences in opinion on the influence of initial education on the application of theoretical knowledge and the development of skills which are related to concrete tasks in school practice. The obtained results showed that there are statistically significant differences between opinions of students and pedagogues when it comes to certain items: participating in and making institution's annual work plan; preparing yearly and monthly pedagogue work plans; forming classes; monitoring of educational work; providing support for teachers in working with students who need additional support.

  20. [Issues related to national university medical schools: focusing on the low wages of university hospital physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamuku, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    University hospitals, bringing together the three divisions of education, research, and clinical medicine, could be said to represent the pinnacle of medicine. However, when compared with physicians working at public and private hospitals, physicians working at university hospitals and medical schools face extremely poor conditions. This is because physicians at national university hospitals are considered to be "educators." Meanwhile, even after the privatization of national hospitals, physicians working for these institutions continue to be perceived as "medical practitioners." A situation may arise in which physicians working at university hospitals-performing top-level medical work while also being involved with university and postgraduate education, as well as research-might leave their posts because they are unable to live on their current salaries, especially in comparison with physicians working at national hospitals, who focus solely on medical care. This situation would be a great loss for Japan. This potential loss can be prevented by amending the classification of physicians at national university hospitals from "educators" to "medical practitioners." In order to accomplish this, the Japan Medical Association, upon increasing its membership and achieving growth, should act as a mediator in negotiations between national university hospitals, medical schools, and the government.

  1. University-Level Research Projects for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to provide an opportunity for high school students to participate in university-level research projects. In this case, students from Pinkerton Academy (Derry, New Hampshire) were invited to participate in efforts to catalog data from the COMPTEL experiment on NASA's Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). These activities were part of a senior level honors course at Pinkerton. Although the success of this particular program was rather limited, we feel that the general concept is a sound one. In principle, the concept of partnerships between local schools and university researchers is one that could be especially attractive to soft money researchers. Programs can be carefully designed to benefit both the students and the research program.

  2. Secondary school students' engagement profiles and their relationship with academic adjustment and achievement in university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, Els C.M.; Jansen, Ellen P.W.A.; van de Grift, Wim J.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to distinguish secondary school students according to characteristics that contribute to success in university represents important knowledge in the research areas of university preparedness and student success in higher education. This study identified five secondary school student

  3. An examination of university-school partnerships in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Mutemeri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine university-school partnerships in the process of teacher education. The research question that guided the study was how teacher educators partner with schools in teacher training. A qualitative study was preferred because the aim was to gather information and opinions on how teacher educators trained student teachers as well as to provide a forum for pre-service student teachers to air their views about how they were trained. Twenty- six lecturers and nine student focus groups, purposively sampled, participated in the study. An interview was used for data collection and Holliday's thematic approach was used to analyse the data. The research revealed that there was a weak partnership between teacher education and schools. The study recommends the creation of third spaces in teacher education which involve an "equal and more dialectical relationship between academic and practitioner knowledge" in support of student teachers' learning.

  4. The University of Zambia School Teaching Experience: Is It Effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Chomba Manchishi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching practice exercises serve the purpose of orienting the teacher into real classroom situations where the novice puts his or her skills into practice. Education students at the University of Zambia (UNZA go through the school teaching experience after their third year of study. This comes after they have arguably completed enough content and methodology courses to teach. The purpose of this study was to establish the effectiveness of the UNZA school teaching experience. The research instruments used were interview guides, observation checklists, and focus group discussions. The respondents included 80 serving teachers, 80 student teachers, and 10 head teachers drawn from 10 high schools in the Lusaka District. In addition, 10 lecturers from UNZA were also sampled. The findings revealed that the design and delivery of the UNZA student teaching experience was not effective.

  5. Smoking at school: views of Turkish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Nazmiye; Erdogan, Irfan

    2009-01-01

    The recent interest in cigarette smoking among university students has brought attention to problems concerning opinions, attitudes, prevention, health education, policy formulation and implementation. This survey research tested five hypotheses on the views of college students about smoking in school hallways and cafeteria, compliance with anti smoking laws, considering cigarette smoking as an expression of freedom of choice, teachers' smoking in classrooms and in their offices, and school administration's policy on enforcing the law. Hypothesized differences between students' views on the issues according to gender, smoking status and years at school were investigated. Data were obtained from 3,659 students attending six universities in Ankara, Turkey. The study findings provided support for all the hypothesized differences (except a single issue). Males and females differed significantly on all the issues studied. The majority of nonsmoking students have anti-smoking views in regards of the studied issues as compared to regular and occasional smokers. Smokers and nonsmokers markedly disagree on banning cigarette smoking in the cafeteria and hallways. However, the majority of students are against teachers' smoking in classrooms and in their offices with the doors open. Although most students want a smoke free environment, there is no active-anti smoking policy on smoking by universities. Findings point out the need for campus-wide effective smoking prevention programs, as well as cessation programs and services for the students.

  6. Sleep disorders in high school and pre-university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia R.S. Rocha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a period in which youngsters have to make choices such as applying for university. The selection process is competitive, and it brings distress and anxiety, risk factors for the appearance of sleep disorders. OBJECTIVE: To verify the occurrence of sleep disorders in third-year high school and pre-university students. METHOD: This cross-sectional descriptive study comprised a sample of 529 students (M=241, F=288 from three public schools, four private schools and two pre-university courses - a middle-class neighborhood in the city of São Paulo - aged between 16 and 19 years old. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI - a standardized questionnaire. RESULTS: The participants (52.9% took about 30 minutes to fall asleep, with an average of 306.4 minutes asleep, moderate daytime sleepiness (n=243, 45.9% and indisposition (n=402, 75.9% to develop the activities. The scores (M and F were similar regarding problems that affect sleep. CONCLUSION: The investigated population showed sleep disorders and poor sleep quality.

  7. Edinburgh University, Schools and the Civil Service in the Early Twentieth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert David

    2013-01-01

    This article is a case study of the relation between urban schooling and university education, using two main sources. Data on the schools attended by history students at Edinburgh University between 1899 and 1933 illustrate the diversity and social ranking of schools in the city. New higher grade schools had a key role in increasing access to…

  8. The Evolving Roles of Faculty Learning Communities: A University/High School Literacy Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetton, Tamara L.; Cancienne, Mary Beth; Greever, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    This article is a descriptive account of a professional learning community established among university professors, university teacher candidates, a school district instructional supervisor, the high school principal, a high school literacy coordinator, and teachers of a Mid-Atlantic high school in the United States. This learning community…

  9. Implementing Innovative Feedback Approaches in English as a Foreign Language Contexts through University-School Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Icy

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a university-school collaboration project that investigates six English as a foreign language (EFL) teachers' attempts to change conventional feedback approaches in three secondary schools of Hong Kong, indicating the benefits university-school collaboration can reap for both teacher educators and school teachers.

  10. University-Partnered New School Designs: Fertile Ground for Research-Practice Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartz, Karen Hunter; Weinstein, Rhona S.; Kaufman, Gail; Levine, Harold; Mehan, Hugh; Pollock, Mica; Priselac, Jody Z.; Worrell, Frank C.

    2017-01-01

    This commentary suggests that new school design is a fertile policy context for advancing research-practice partnerships. The authors represent four public universities that have created new school designs in partnership with urban school districts. Unlike the laboratory schools of previous generations, these university-partnered public schools…

  11. “Our job is to deliver a good secondary school student, not a good university student.” Secondary school teachers’ beliefs and practices regarding university preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, Els; Jansen, Ellen

    This study investigated secondary school teachers’ beliefs and practices regarding university preparation by interviewing 50 teachers. Teachers most often mentioned study skills as important aspect of university readiness. Although most teachers believed their role involved contributing to

  12. The Graduate School of Climate Sciences, University of Bern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L.

    2012-04-01

    The Graduate School of Climate Sciences, University of Bern, offers a specialised M.Sc. and a Ph.D. study programme in climate sciences. The graduate school has a highly interdisciplinary profile involving not only natural sciences, but also humanities/history, economics and law. The ten participating institutes with a total of 45 academics provide expertise in long-term climate variability, climate modelling, climate reconstruction, predictability of the future climate and extreme events, the impact of climate change on ecosystems and climate risks for society and economy. The graduate school is fully compliant with the Bologna Accords and collaborates closely with the sister institution C2SM at ETH Zurich by, e.g., jointly organised lectures. There are currently 23 master and 37 doctoral students in the programme. These originate from the University of Bern (28 %), from other Swiss universities (30 %) and from foreign universities (42 %). Comprehensive information about the Graduate School of Climate Sciences is available at http://www.climatestudies.unibe.ch . The M.Sc. in Climate Sciences programme (120 ECTS credits) is designed to attract students from all disciplines in natural sciences and offers them a tailor-made curriculum to reach their career aspirations. The students make their own course selection according to their profile envisaged (specialised versus broad education) and ideally already guided by a job perspective. Selecting the courses and the topic of the master thesis they specialise in one of five fields: climate and earth system science; atmospheric science; economics; economic, social and environmental history; statistics. Several courses are organised jointly with public authorities and the private industry, e.g. from experts working in the insurance business, in weather forecasting or in environmental pollution control. This provides the students hands-on experience and contacts to future employers. The master thesis (60 ECTS) involves the

  13. Trinity mysteries: university, elite schooling and sport in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Gerry P T

    2010-01-01

    The development of sport in Ireland was, contrary to some arguments, highly influenced by English examples and Anglo-Irish institutions. Trinity College and prestigious Irish schools did have an impact, as did the number of Irish students sent to England for public school or university education. Athleticism was evident in Ireland as it was in England. Although the development of soccer did follow a slightly different trajectory from other sports, as was also the case in both England and Scotland, this does not mean that it departed from this broad evolutionary model of Irish sport. Yet this was Ireland: and Ireland was different. As opposition to British rule intensified, forms of sporting participation took on more and more of a national symbolism. The outcome was the emergence of a very potent form of athleticism: an Irish athleticism for an Irish people.

  14. Smoking at School: Views of Turkish University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmiye Erdogan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent interest in cigarette smoking among university students has brought attention to problems concerning opinions, attitudes, prevention, health education, policy formulation and implementation. This survey research tested five hypotheses on the views of college students about smoking in school hallways and cafeteria, compliance with anti smoking laws, considering cigarette smoking as an expression of freedom of choice, teachers’ smoking in classrooms and in their offices, and school administration’s policy on enforcing the law. Hypothesized differences between students’ views on the issues according to gender, smoking status and years at school were investigated. Data were obtained from 3,659 students attending six universities in Ankara, Turkey. The study findings provided support for all the hypothesized differences (except a single issue. Males and females differed significantly on all the issues studied. The majority of nonsmoking students have anti-smoking views in regards of the studied issues as compared to regular and occasional smokers. Smokers and nonsmokers markedly disagree on banning cigarette smoking in the cafeteria and hallways. However, the majority of students are against teachers’ smoking in classrooms and in their offices with the doors open. Although most students want a smoke free environment, there is no active-anti smoking policy on smoking by universities. Findings point out the need for campus-wide effective smoking prevention programs, as well as cessation programs and services for the students.

  15. University teacher education and the pop-up art school

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, Christine; Williamson, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Genesis\\ud Johnson (2010, p.26) argues that most ideas ‘do not happen in a flash’ but rather form as a result of the ‘adjacent possible’, a term coined to describe the notion that ideas are only ‘built out of a collection of existing parts’ at a certain time. The Pop-Up Art Schools (PUAS) at the University of Huddersfield, the focus of this chapter, resulted from an eclectic collection of temporary and alternative cultural, social and retail events at a particular time. Pop-up shops began ope...

  16. Educational Effect of Career Education : Educational articulation between High School Education and University Education

    OpenAIRE

    山田, 裕司

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses current and forthcoming career education in the light of educational considerations, such as the current university and high school cooperation project, as well as the educational effect of university education for career service. This study builds on the questionnaire ("High School Students Career survey") by "Kyushu University Open Campus" (Quniv-OC). First, I briefly describe the transition from high school to university (or junior college, occupational society). Secon...

  17. [Physical anthropology studies at Keijo Imperial University Medical School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ock-Joo

    2008-12-01

    Medical research during the Japanese Colonial Period became systematic and active after the Keijo Imperial University Medical School was established in 1926. Various kinds of research were conducted there including pharmacological, physiological, pathological and parasitological research. The Keijo Imperial University was give a mission to study about Korea. Urgent topics for medical research included control of infectious diseases, hygiene and environmental health that might have affected colonizing bodies of the Japanese as well as the colonized. The bodies of Koreans had been studied by Japanese even before the establishment of the University. The Keijo Imperial University research team, however, organized several field studies for physical anthropology and blood typing research at the national scale to get representative sampling of the people from its north to its south of the Korean peninsula. In the filed, they relied upon the local police and administrative power to gather reluctant women and men to measure them in a great detail. The physical anthropology and blood typing research by the Japanese researchers was related to their eagerness to place Korean people in the geography of the races in the world. Using racial index R.I.(= (A%+AB%)/(B%+AB%)), the Japanese researchers put Koreans as a race between the Mongolian and the Japanese. The preoccupation with constitution and race also pervasively affected the medical practice: race (Japanese, Korean, or Japanese living in Korea) must be written in every kind of medical chart as a default. After the breakout of Chinese-Japanese War in 1937, the Keijo Imperial University researchers extended its physical anthropology field study to Manchuria and China to get data on physics of the people in 1940. The Japanese government and research foundations financially well supported the Keijo Imperial University researchers and the field studies for physical anthropology in Korea, Manchuria and China. The physical

  18. THE VIEW OF INTERNS IN THE UNIVERSITY AND SCHOOL RELATIONSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia do Carmo Rosa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work is a clipping of the master dissertation entitled “Internships in the formation process of geography teachers: university and school relationship”. When considering the formation process of geography teachers, the internship is a curricular component that enhances the university and school relationship, even knowing of the existing gaps for an effective inter-institutional approach. For this reason, first, the text has a brief summary of the research conducted presenting its study matter, objectives, research subjects and methodology. Following, the vision of the interns of the Supervised Internship in Geography of UEG in the context of the university-school relationship will be presented. For this, five illustrative indicators are used to show the view of the research subjects in relations to the internship. Namely, the motivations for carrying out the internship; the difficulties encountered; overcoming such difficulties; and the importance of the internship in the university and school relationship. However, it was possible to establish the view of interns about the internship when approaching each indicator, as they brought many elements/factors for discussion, with the aim to reflect about how the internships have been made effective in this institution, pointing limits and possibilities in the university and school relationship. O presente trabalho trata-se de um recorte da dissertação de mestrado intitulada “O Estágio na Formação do Professor de Geografia: relação universidade e escola”. Ao considerar o processo de formação do professor de Geografia, o estágio é um componente curricular potencializador da relação universidade e escola, mesmo sabendo das lacunas existentes para uma efetiva aproximação interinstitucional. Por esse motivo, primeiramente, o texto faz-se uma breve síntese da pesquisa realizada apresentando seu objeto de estudo, objetivos, sujeitos da pesquisa e metodologia. Na sequ

  19. 20 CFR 404.1028 - Student working for a school, college, or university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1028 Student working for a school, college, or university. (a) For... by, or in connection with, the school, college, or university. (c) Whether you are a student for... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Student working for a school, college, or...

  20. Collaboration and Inquiry: Cornell University Partnerships with Rural School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, K. A.

    2003-12-01

    Cornell University's location provides valuable opportunities for university-community collaboration. Schools in the area tend to be rural, with limited access to resources. Two projects in place at Cornell provide opportunities for collaboration between graduate students and local K-12 schools. These programs yield benefits for K-12 students by exposing them to resources (and expertise) otherwise unavailable to them; for K-12 teachers, by providing access to knowledge and resources brought to them by the graduate students; and for the graduate students who participate in the program, by giving them opportunities to teach and design curricula. The two programs provide options for outreach that fit many schedules, teaching goals, and interests. The Graduate Student School Outreach Program (GSSOP) is open to all graduate students and local K-12 teachers. Students and teachers often participate for several years in a row. Graduate students prepare a 6-8 session "mini-course" in an area of their interest, and they are matched to local teachers with similar interests or needs. Graduate student participants are required to submit a final formatted curriculum for the lessons that they have taught, and these curricula are made available to the public on the GSSOP web site. GSSOP is currently in its twelfth year as a student-coordinated program, and its funding comes primarily from Cornell's Public Service Center and alumni donations. The Cornell Science Inquiry Partnership (CSIP) provides an opportunity for graduate students in the sciences to participate in longer-term collaborations with regional schools. CSIP is administered under the National Science Foundation GK12 initiative and is currently in its fourth year. CSIP fellows make a year-long commitment to teaching and outreach and receive a full fellowship. Fellows may work with several middle- or high-school teachers over the course of the year, and they may teach many lessons over different time scales. As in GSSOP

  1. 78 FR 8499 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Private School Universe Survey 2013-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Private School Universe Survey 2013-16 AGENCY... Universe Survey 2013-16. OMB Control Number: 1850-0641. Type of Review: a revision of an existing...: 6,410. Abstract: The Private School Universe Survey (PSS) is the NCES collection of basic data from...

  2. University-Urban High School Partnership: Math and Science Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ndunda, mutindi; Van Sickle, Meta; Perry, Lindsay; Capelloni, Alison

    2017-01-01

    This study focused on science and math professional learning communities (PLCs) that were implemented through a university-urban high school partnership. These PLCs were part of mandated school-wide, content-based PLCs implemented as part of the reform efforts initiated in an urban school to address the school's failure to meet Adequate Yearly…

  3. Linking Curriculum and Learning to Facilities: Arizona State University's GK-12 Sustainable Schools Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, Monica M.; Pollari, Lynette; Frisk, Erin; Wood, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Arizona State University's "Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools program" brings together graduate students, sustainability researchers, high school teachers and students, and school or district administrators in a project designed to address the challenge of becoming a "sustainable school." Funded by the National…

  4. Measurement Invariance of an Instrument Assessing Sustainability of School-Based Universal Behavior Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Sterett H.; McIntosh, Kent; Strickland-Cohen, M. Kathleen; Horner, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the extent to which the School-Wide Universal Behavior Sustainability Index: School Teams (SUBSIST; McIntosh, Doolittle, Vincent, Horner, & Ervin, 2009), a measure of school and district contextual factors that promote the sustainability of school practices, demonstrated measurement invariance across…

  5. Teens, Power Tools, and Green Schools: Education for Sustainability through a University Environmental Design Program and Middle School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the role of green schools in promoting education for sustainability by reflecting on a university-middle school partnership focused on sustainable design. Undergraduates and middle school students met weekly for a semester to learn about sustainability through simple design projects and activities that focused on…

  6. University Students from Single-Sex and Coeducational High Schools: Differences in Majors and Attitudes at a Catholic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiak, Christie P.; Buchanan, James P.; Hosey, Megan; Smith, Allison

    2007-01-01

    We conducted an archival study at a coeducational Catholic university to test the proposition that single-sex secondary education predicts lasting differences in college majors. Men from single-sex schools were more likely to both declare and graduate in gender-neutral majors than those from coeducational schools. Women from single-sex schools…

  7. Historical trajectory of nursing school at Technical University of Babahoyo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecibel Vera Marquez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Bachelors of the province of the Rivers, to study the careers of health had to travel to other sectors of the country, and before this necessity the Technical University of Babahoyo opened academic spaces in formation in areas of the health creating the School of Nursing with the The mission of training nurses that meet the needs of the population is in the hospital or community, and thus contribute to the improvement of the quality of life of the population of Rio de Janeiro, acting under the ethical and moral principles that society demands. This remembrance describes its historical trajectory, and its spaces of institutional growth, as well as the population coverage, being one of the races with greater demand in the university, the statistical data delivered by the Center of Leveling and Admission of the UTB, shows a Historical evolution of the UTB academic offer of the ENES processes of September 2013 and March 2015, the nursing career is among the first five races most offered among the four periods (Equipo de Apoyo y Seguimiento Acad´emico, 2015. In this way the Nursing career of the Faculty of Health Sciences, has become a space of knowledge and lucubraci´on inspired by the desire to overcome and the permanent work of a practice that strengthens the knowledge, skills and skills that Consolidate the competencies of the nurse profile.

  8. Parents Influencing Secondary Students' University Aspirations: A Multilevel Approach Using School-SES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stuart; Vernon, Lynette; Seddon, Sarah; Andrews, Yolanda; Wang, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Students' university aspirational capacity and expectancies are key factors in predicting future university participation. Aspirations and expectations to attend university are strongly influenced by parent educational socialisation and school culture. This study investigates associations between students' university discussions with parents and…

  9. university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Universities occupy a special place in the city’s life, the place where centuries-old traditions of the past meet the future. Universities keep their ancestral roots stretching back into the Middle Ages. University rooms and laboratories are the places where the future of science and society is built and discussed.The oldest Siberian University located in Tomsk was included in the City Charter as a city-forming enterprise. Other Siberian cities have not yet come to such deep comprehension of the role of universities. But who can doubt the significance and beneficence of this role?A complex and debatable process of reformation of the Russian higher education has been going on for several decades. Many things are perceived painfully. Irkutsk has been a student city for a long time and ranked second in the percentage of students among citizens. But recently we have lost Irkutsk High Military Aviation Engineering School, nearly lost the MIA High School. Pedagogical University has lost its status of university, and then its independence. Linguistic University has turned into a branch of Moscow University…Besides, external threats still exist and even grow. The lands and the buildings of universities are of keen interest among big businessmen, speculators and developers… Isn’t it the reason why the ideas to evacuate universities to suburban campuses arise increasingly frequently?What is the impact of dislocation of universities out of the city historical center? Does it make the city poorer and older? Or safer and more manageable? As usual, we tried to show the challenge and diversity of the main topic of the issue.

  10. 75 FR 10199 - Schools and Libraries Universal Service Support Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... forth certain conditions regarding other uses of school facilities that choose to allow the community to... funded services at a school facility is limited to non-operating hours, such as after school hours or... unused during evenings, weekends, school holidays, and summer breaks. Second, many people lack access or...

  11. Iterative and Event-Based Frameworks for University and School District Technology Professional Development Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Joseph; Dickerson, Jeremy; Weaver, Carmen; Josey, Fair

    2016-01-01

    Forming technology partnerships between universities and public schools in an era of competition and economic difficulty is a challenge. However, when these partnerships are formed and sustained, the benefits for both are extremely valuable. For a university instructional technology graduate program and school partnership to be successful, the…

  12. Trailblazing Partnerships: Professional Development Schools in Partnership with Emporia State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jill; Schwerdtfeger, Sara; Roop, Teddy; Long, Jennie L.

    2016-01-01

    Emporia State University is committed to preparing future elementary education teachers through the collaborative efforts and ongoing reflective practice between the university and school districts. The Professional Development School is the vehicle behind the structured involvement in the process of immersing student-teacher in a clinical model…

  13. The Transformation of a Private University's School of Nursing, 1999-2009: An Historical Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selick, Sandra A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the transformation of the School of Nursing at a private university in a Middle Atlantic state during the years 1999 to 2009. The secondary purpose of this study was to determine the leadership style of the Director of the School of Nursing at this private university in a Middle Atlantic state that led this…

  14. Leading and Learning in Schools and Universities: Losses and Gains 1968-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores important points of similarity and difference between schools and universities on three dimensions: (1) the working life and goals of participants in schools and universities; (2) the leadership and organisation of the institutions; and (3) the curriculum, teaching and learning that takes place. The aim is to discover by…

  15. The Effect of Quality of School Life on Sense of Happiness: A Study on University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökler, Riza; Gürgan, Ugur; Tastan, Nuray

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between quality of school life and happiness among university students. For this purpose, 326 students from five different faculties in Çankiri Karatekin University participated in the study. Participants filled in the "scale for quality of school life" and "scale for Oxford happiness-Compact…

  16. High School and University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Biotechnology: A Turkish Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usak, Muhammet; Erdogan, Mehmet; Prokop, Pavol; Ozel, Murat

    2009-01-01

    Biotechnology has a considerable importance in Turkish biology curriculum. This study was designed to explore or indicate Turkish high school and university students' knowledge and attitudes toward biotechnology. A total number of 352 high school and 276 university students were invited to the study. The Biotechnology Knowledge Questionnaire (BKQ)…

  17. The Role of High-School Duration for University Students' Motivation, Abilities and Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tobias; Thomsen, Stephan L.

    2018-01-01

    We study the effects of learning intensity and duration of high school on students' motivation, abilities and achievements at university. The empirical analysis is based on primary panel data from an education reform in the German state of Saxony-Anhalt that reduced university preparatory schooling from 13 to 12 years but left the curriculum…

  18. The Transition from School to the University under Restricted Entry: A Greek Tracer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, George; Psacharopoulos, George

    1987-01-01

    A study that examined patterns of access to Greek universities among 500 high school graduates found a strong but unsatisfied demand for higher education, high preparatory school costs for families, and inequity in the distribution of available university places. (Author/MSE)

  19. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  20. Talk about a Racial Eclipse: Narratives of Institutional Evasion in an Urban School-University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps Moultrie, Jada; Magee, Paula A.; Paredes Scribner, Samantha M.

    2017-01-01

    During a student teaching experience, teacher education candidates affiliated with an urban School of Education school-university partnership witnessed a disturbing interaction between an early career White male teacher and a first-grade Black male student at an assigned elementary school. The subsequent interactions among the teacher, principal,…

  1. How is the approach to teaching at secondary school related to first-year university achievement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torenbeek, Marjolein; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

    2011-01-01

    The study presented here is an elaboration on recent educational effectiveness research focusing on long-term school effects. Central in this study is the approach to teaching at secondary schools and its relation to student perception of the fit between school and university and 1st-year academic

  2. The Place of School Libraries in the Universal Basic Education (UBE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigated the position of school libraries in the Universal Basic Education (UBE) programme policy of the Federal Government of Nigeria. Relevant studies were reviewed and school library standards discussed. The review shows that school library system in Nigeria was abysmally poor. The paper ...

  3. A National Assessment of Colleges and University School Health Education Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Christine M.; Price, James H.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Dake, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Across the United States, school health education programs provide a wide variety of knowledge and skills to their students. There are currently no guidelines for school health methods courses. Methods: Using a 2-wave mailing followed by a third wave e-mail reminder, a final population of 226 university school health methods…

  4. The Effects of a School-University Collaborative Change Project on Teacher Behaviors: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, James T.; Ambrose, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a school-university collaboration gave them the opportunity for school-based restructuring, inner-city elementary teachers pursued new teaching practices; assumed responsibility for professional development; examined their practice and supported it with documentation; developed direction and commitment to mutually determined school goals; and…

  5. The early years of coeducation at the Yale University School of Medicine.

    OpenAIRE

    Baserga, S J

    1980-01-01

    The Yale School of Medicine began accepting women as candidates for the degree of medicine in the fall of 1916. This decision was consistent with the trend in medical education at the time. While Yale was not the first prestigious Eastern medical school to admit women, joining Johns Hopkins (1893) and the University of Pennsylvania (1914), it was not one of the last. Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons admitted women a year later, but Harvard Medical School held out until 1...

  6. Analysis of the tobacco and alcohol use by high school and university students

    OpenAIRE

    Dušková, Vendula

    2010-01-01

    Dušková Vendula. Analysis of the tobacco and alcohol use by high school and university students. Diploma thesis. Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové. Pharmacy Background: The main objective is mapping of high schools and universities students experience with smoking and alcohol consumption. Inherent part of objectives is perception of possible risks associated with the use of licit addictive drugs. Thesis may be helpful for realization of current situation seri...

  7. Indiana Wesleyan University SPS Physics Outreach to Rural Middle School and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, Joshua; Rose, Heath; Burchell, Robert; Ramos, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    The Society of Physics Students chapter at Indiana Wesleyan University is unusual in that it has no physics major, only physics minors. Yet while just over a year old, IWU-SPS has been active in performing physics outreach to middle school and high school students, and the rural community of Grant County. Our year-old SPS chapter consists of majors from Chemistry, Nursing, Biology, Exercise Science, Computer Science, Psychology, Pastoral Studies, and Science Education, who share a common interest in physics and service to the community. IWU currently has a physics minor and is currently working to build a physics major program. Despite the intrinsic challenges, our multi-disciplinary group has been successful at using physics demonstration equipment and hands-on activities and their universal appeal to raise the interest in physics in Grant County. We report our experience, challenges, and successes with physics outreach. We describe in detail our two-pronged approach: raising the level of physics appreciation among the IWU student community and among pre-college students in a rural community of Indiana. Acknowledgements: We acknowledge the support of the Society of Physics Students through a Marsh White Outreach Award and a Blake Lilly Prize.

  8. Measuring University Students' Perceived Self-Efficacy in Science Communication in Middle and High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shaohui; Liu, Xiufeng; Gardella, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Service learning typically involves university students in teaching and learning activities for middle and high school students, however, measurement of university students' self-efficacy in science communication is still lacking. In this study, an instrument to measure university students' perceived self-efficacy in communicating science to…

  9. Revisiting Public School/University Partnerships for Formal Leadership Development: A Brief 30-Year Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David C.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the Kansas State University Chair of the Department of Educational Leadership reviews the strong history of his department's university and public school partnerships and the impact these partnerships have had on leadership preparation programs. Almost 30 years ago, Kansas State University foresaw the power of partnerships with…

  10. Astronomy in the early years of elementary education: a partnership between university and school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barai, A.; Carvalho Neto, J. T.; Garrido, D.; Ityanagui, G.; Navi, M.

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the interaction and partnership experience between a school and one of the Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar)campi, both located in Araras, SP, aiming to teach and promote astronomy and astronautics knowledge among students of the first five years of Elementary Education. This initiative made use of Brazilian Olympiad of Astronomy and Astronautics as a motivating event for the theme exploration. The actions were divided into two fronts: an improvement course for the school teachers conducted by university professors and lectures for students by UFSCar students under the guidance of university teachers and the school coordinators. By the observed results, we noticed the importance of narrowing the distance school-university, promoting learning for both institutions and helping to raise the level of education from elementary school to college.

  11. School age experiences of university students for transition towards higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran Yousuf

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to examine the school age experiences of university students, specifically the roles their school teachers, parents, and they themselves played in their preparation for higher education. One thousand students from twenty universities were randomly selected. Data collected through developed questionnaire was tabulated, analysed and discussed. Chi Square was applied to determine whether the observed frequencies were significantly different from the expected frequencies. Main conclusions of study were that the students negated the role of school teachers, student self, peers and school environment with the preparation skills needed for university level work, while only parents’ role was found significant in preparing students for higher education. Keywords: School Age, Role of teachers, Role of Parents, Role of Peers, Role of School Environment, Transition to Higher Education.

  12. How to identify students for school-based depression intervention: can school record review be substituted for universal depression screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Elena S; Vander Stoep, Ann; Herting, Jerald R; Grupp, Katherine; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2013-02-01

    Early identification and intervention are critical for reducing the adverse effects of depression on academic and occupational performance. Cost-effective approaches are needed for identifying adolescents at high depression risk. This study evaluated the utility of school record review versus universal school-based depression screening for determining eligibility for an indicated depression intervention program implemented in the middle school setting. Algorithms derived from grades, attendance, suspensions, and basic demographic information were evaluated with regard to their ability to predict students' depression screening scores. The school information-based algorithms proved poor proxies for individual students' depression screening results. However, school records showed promise for identifying low, medium, and high-yield subgroups on the basis of which efficient screening targeting decisions could be made. Study results will help to guide school nurses who coordinate indicated depression intervention programs in school settings as they evaluate options of approaches for determining which students are eligible for participation. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Analysing Teacher Professional Development through Professional Dialogue: An Investigation into a University-School Partnership Project on Enquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, May M. H.; So, Winnie W. M.

    2012-01-01

    Although extensive research has been carried out on university-school partnerships, there is a lack of evidence and discussion about how universities or external parties may promote professional development through professional dialogue in schools. Based on a two-year university-school partnership project on enquiry learning, this study aims at…

  14. Comparative Analysis of the Special Talent Exams at School of Physcial Education and Sport of Two Universities in Different Countries: Gazi University and Pekin University Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M i h r i a y MUSA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze comparatively the students participated in special talent exams made for entering physical education programmes by universities and key criterions of selection in Turkey and China such as School of Pyhsical Education and Sport of Gazi University and Pekin University. The po licies and acceptance conditions of students, schooling goals and conditions, content of the physical fitness - testings, departments, pointing scoring system and national athletes regulation in China is investigated and evaluated by comparing them with Turk ey’s current situation. In this study screening model was used and data of research w ere obtained from web resources and Special Talent Exams Guide. It is pointed out that methods have differences in terms of special talent exams and schooling goals and co nditions between Turkey and China. At the end of the study some suggestions are offered.

  15. Assessing the Transition between School and University: Differences in Assessment between A Level and University in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frances; Child, Simon; Suto, Irenka

    2017-01-01

    High stakes assessments are commonly used at the end of secondary school to select students for higher education. However, growing concerns about the preparedness of new undergraduates for university study have led to an increased focus on the form of assessments used at upper secondary level. This study compared the structure and format of…

  16. Bildung - Then and Now in Danish High School and University Teaching and How to Integrate Bildung into Modern University Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mogens Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    I the article the classical concept of Bildung as introduced by Humboldt and Kant is discussed and it is shown what impact Bildung has had in Danish high school and university teaching since 1800. Furthermore it is shown how Bildung in a new version, strictly connected to philosophy of science...

  17. School results and access test results as indicators of first-year performance at university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bothma

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The goals set by the National Plan for Higher Education, the fact that many schools are still severely disadvantaged as well as far-reaching changes in the school system demand that South African universities urgently reconsider their admission procedures. Redesigning admission procedures calls for a thorough understanding of the interrelationships between school marks, results in existing access tests and first-year university performance. These interrelationships were statistically investigated in the case of the 1999, 2000 and 2001 intake groups, who were compelled to write access tests before being admitted to Stellenbosch University. The results of this investigation confirm an alarming degree of unpreparedness among many prospective students regarding what is expected of them at university. This is aggravated by school marks creating a totally unrealistic expectation of performance in the first year at university. It is emphasised that schools and authorities dealing with admission of prospective students at universities should be cognisant of the findings reported here. Furthermore, the statistical analyses demonstrate several novel techniques for investigating the interrelationship between school marks, access test results and university performance.

  18. School Feeding as Strategy for Implementing Universal Basic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Basic education is conceived within the context of the global vision of education for all (EFA), which aims at mobilizing society to a part of the effort to eradicate illiteracy. But more children of school going age are still outside the classroom in Cross River State. This study focused on the use of School Feeding Programme as ...

  19. Teaching Chronobiology and Sleep Habits in School and University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Carolina V. M.; Sousa, Ivanise; Paul, Ketema; MacLeish, Marlene Y.; Mondejar, Ma Teresa; Sarabia, Juan Antonio; Rol, M. Angeles; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Early morning school schedules are in the opposite direction to the sleep-wake cycle in adolescence and early adulthood. This conflict leads to sleep deprivation and irregular patterns whose consequences are scarcely explored. This article discusses the effects of three educational experiences with high school students, parents, teachers, and…

  20. The Business Agenda for School Reform: A Parallel Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelberg, Denise

    2007-01-01

    Criticism of the public schools has been unrelenting since "A Nation at Risk" was published in 1983. From that pivotal moment to the present the business community has played a crucial role in setting the parameters of the critique of the schools and shaping the reform agendas that have been proposed and implemented. However, this author has found…

  1. The Role of Teacher Empowerment and Teacher Accountability in School-University Partnerships and Action Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lauren Segedin

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale educational reform is occurring in Canada, the USA and the UK. Different strategies for change have resulted, including the school-university partnership and teacher-led action research...

  2. Developing Leadership Capacity in English Secondary Schools and Universities: Global Positioning and Local Mediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Mike; Deem, Rosemary; O'Reilly, Dermot; Tomlinson, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Government responses to globalisation include developing educational leaders as reformers for workforce competitiveness in the knowledge economy. Qualitative research tracked interventions involving national leadership development bodies to acculturate leaders in secondary schools and universities. Acculturating leaders as reformers was mediated…

  3. [Efforts of gender equality at Kinki University School of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Katsuichi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, medical doctors are in short supply in many university hospitals. Retirement of female doctor after delivery is one of the reasons. Although they want to return to work after giving birth, they quit unavoidable because the working conditions do not match. Then, Kinki university hospital established the "provisions for special work arrangements". This work arrangement is the wage less, but the working hours is less than the regular. This work arrangement increased returner to the university hospital after delivery.

  4. The definition emphatic skills of the students attending Physical Education and Sport School of Kocaeli University

    OpenAIRE

    Korkmaz Yiğiter; Hakan Kolayiş; Özlem Yenigün; Yavuz Taşkıran

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the emphatic skills of the students according to their programs at the Physical Education and Sports school of Kocaeli University. For that purpose, 240 students whose ages were :22.70±2.19 years from programs of Physical Education and Sports Teachers, Coaching, Management of sports, Recreation, at the Physical Education and Sports School of Kocaeli University participated in the this study voluntarily. Emphatic skill scale developed by Dökme...

  5. A comparison of the technique of the football quarterback pass between high school and university athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffan, Adam; Alexander, Marion J L; Peeler, Jason

    2017-07-28

    The purpose of the study was to compare the most effective joint movements, segment velocities and body positions to perform the fastest and most accurate pass of high school and university football quarterbacks. Secondary purposes were to develop a quarterback throwing test to assess skill level, to determine which kinematic variables were different between high school and university athletes as well as to determine which variables were significant predictors of quarterback throwing test performance. Ten high school and ten university athletes were filmed for the study, performing nine passes at a target and two passes for maximum distance. Thirty variables were measured using Dartfish Team Pro 4.5.2 video analysis system, and Microsoft Excel was used for statistical analysis. University athletes scored slightly higher than the high school athletes on the throwing test, however this result was not statistically significant. Correlation analysis and forward stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed on both the high school players and the university players in order to determine which variables were significant predictors of throwing test score. Ball velocity was determined to have the strongest predictive effect on throwing test score (r = 0.900) for the high school athletes, however, position of the back foot at release was also determined to be important (r = 0.661) for the university group. Several significant differences in throwing technique between groups were noted during the pass, however, body position at release showed the greatest differences between the two groups. High school players could benefit from more complete weight transfer and decreased throw time to increase throwing test score. University athletes could benefit from increased throw time and greater range of motion in external shoulder rotation and trunk rotation to increase their throwing test score. Coaches and practitioners will be able to use the findings of this research to

  6. Safe school task force: University-community partnership to promote student development and a safer school environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Corey; Chung-Do, Jane; Ongalibang, Ophelia

    2008-01-01

    The Asian/Pacific Islander Youth Violence Prevention Center (APIYVPC) focuses its youth violence prevention efforts on community mobilization by partnering with Kailua High School and other local community groups. This paper describes the development and activities of the Safe School Task Force (SSTF) and the lessons learned. In response to concerns of school, community members, and students, the SSTF was organized to promote student leadership in raising awareness about problems related to violence. Collaboration among the school, community, and the university places students in leadership roles to reduce school violence and enhances their self-efficacy to improve their school environment. To increase SSTF effectiveness, more attention must be paid to student recruitment, consistent community partnerships, and gaining teacher buy-in. This partnership may be useful in multicultural communities to provide students the opportunities to learn about violence prevention strategies, community mobilization, and leadership skills.

  7. school counsellors' roles in the implementation of universal basic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth

    Faculty of Education. Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria oyaziwoaluede@yahoo.com. Abstract. The Universal Basic Education (UBE) scheme, which came into existence in. September 1999, was lauded by the Federal Government of Nigeria as a preferred programme of Nigeria's basic education service.

  8. Universal Access to Preschool Education: Approaches to Integrating Preschool with School in Rural and Remote Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the government of South Australia responded to Federal agreements aimed at universal access to preschool education for children in the year before starting formal schooling by introducing a trial designed to "integrate" preschool children into first year of school programmes in rural and remote areas of the state. This paper…

  9. The Ideal, Real and Surreal in School-University Partnerships: Reflections of a Boundary Spanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Dannelle D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role of boundary spanners, who facilitate the development of school/university partnerships. After describing the ideal partnership, offers examples of real issues that emerge when building partnerships and analyzes the surreal aspects of boundary spanning. Concludes with specific suggestions for developing school/university…

  10. A Survey of Graduates of the University of Tennessee School of Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairston, Creasie Finney, Ed.

    Findings are reported of a survey of the University of Tennessee School of Social Work (UTSSW) alumni conducted during 1978, which sought to identify ways to improve the school's graduate program, to strengthen its ability to serve its graduates, and to develop further knowledge in the area of social work manpower. The first paper, "A…

  11. Teacher Professional Development through a School-University Partnership. What Role Does Teacher Identity Play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, John

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the continuing professional development of one group of secondary school English language teachers who participated in a school-university partnership in Hong Kong. Grounded in a framework of teacher identity and using in-depth interviews conducted over the entire 12 month period of the partnership, the study explores the…

  12. School District and University Leadership Development Collaborations: How Do Three Partnerships Line up with Best Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Zollie, Jr.; Shetley, Pamela R.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the application of Whitaker, King, and Vogel's (2004) best practices for the implementation of partnerships regarding school leadership preparation programs in 3 school district-university collaboratives located in urban settings with large minority student populations. The 3 partnerships studied include the Nashville…

  13. University Clinics as Field Placements in School Psychology Training: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N.; Benson, A. Jerry

    Although many school psychology programs use university-based clinics as field placements for school psychology students, there is little information in the literature on how these clinics are organized, administered, and funded or on the nature, duration, and sequencing of clinic field experiences. A national telephone survey of 71 directors of…

  14. A Reverse Science Fair That Connects High School Students with University Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernoff, Brian; Aldous, Amanda R.; Wasio, Natalie A.; Kritzer, Joshua A.; Sykes, E. Charles H.; O'Hagan, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Many university science outreach programs involve presentations of research projects to high school students. These presentations often focus more on exciting scientific content and less on fostering direct relationships between high school students and scientists. Such interactions are important for sustaining student interest in science…

  15. Prevention of Anxiety Symptoms in Children: Results from a Universal School-Based Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Conradt, Judith; Sasagawa, Satoko; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a universal school-based cognitive behavior prevention program (the FRIENDS program) for childhood anxiety. Participants were 638 children, ages 9 to 12 years, from 14 schools in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. All the children completed standardized measures of anxiety and depression, social and…

  16. A Cooperative University-High School Modern Physics Laboratory Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austen, David; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Described is an extracurricular program for high school students in which they visited a college physics laboratory facility and participated in laboratory activities. Discussed are the planning, student experiences, and results. (CW)

  17. Workshops on photonics and optoinformatics for school students at ITMO University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Natalia; Ismagilov, Azat; Kuzmina, Tatiana; Kozlov, Sergei

    2017-08-01

    The program of workshops on photonics and optoinformatics was created at Department of Photonics and Optical Information Technologies in ITMO University by specialists in scientific and educational areas. These workshops are carried out for students of the best schools of Saint-Petersburg specialized in physics and mathematics, such as Gubernatorial Lyceum and Presidential Lyceum, and best schools of Russia. Every year about 500 of school students come to our workshops, including Annual summer educational practice.

  18. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE SCHOOLS AS A FORM OF SCHOOL-UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIP IN TEACHER EDUCATION: TOWARDS A SOCIAL JUSTICE AGENDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Robinson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years into democracy, South Africa is still struggling to improve the quality of its education system. The identification of schools that can work closely with universities to mentor student teachers has been suggested as one way in which teacher education can contribute to an improved education system. The article outlines research that was conducted to establish the conditions for the establishment of Professional Practice schools, seen as schools that, regardless of resource level, would offer excellent support to student teachers on Teaching Practice. Drawing on activity theory as well as Fraser’s (2008 three dimensional theory of justice, the paper explores the challenges and possibilities of such school-university partnerships as a form of social justice in South Africa. Vision, agency, shared expertise, material conditions and institutional capacity are argued to be key factors of a system-wide approach to enhancing teacher education in the country.

  19. "Adelante en Utah": Dilemmas of Leadership and College Access in a University-School-Community Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Enrique, Jr.; Pérez-Torres, Judith C.; Oliva, Nereida

    2013-01-01

    This case study discusses some of the issues that "Adelante," a 6-year university-school-community partnership, continues to encounter in addressing college access and parent and community leadership in a community of color. It provides the sociopolitical context as well as a description of the university and community partners that make…

  20. Social Pedagogy and Bullying in Schools: The Views of University Students in England, Greece and Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriacou, Chris; Mylonakou-Keke, Iro; Stephens, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which a social pedagogic perspective is evident in the views of bullying in schools held by a sample of university students in England, Greece and Norway studying in the area of the education, care and welfare of children. A total of 469 university students completed a questionnaire in which they were asked to…

  1. Clinical Experiences in Educational Administration: A University Collaborates with Local School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Jo Ann

    1991-01-01

    The Cooperative Educational Administration Internship Program at the University of New Mexico has received remarkable support from cooperating school districts, participating interns, mentoring site administrators, and the university's education faculty. Because its primary financing depends on program participants, the Danforth Foundation program…

  2. The Role of High School History Teachers on University Students' Attitudes toward History Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Meliha

    2017-01-01

    This study is a qualitative case study aimed at revealing the roles of high school history teachers on university students' attitudes towards history courses. The study group consists of 30 teacher candidates studying in the department of social sciences and mathematics teaching of a faculty of education at a university in the Western Black Sea.…

  3. Navigating the Challenges Arising from University-School Collaborative Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Rui; Mak, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence showing the benefits language teachers can reap from university-school collaborative action research (CAR), scant attention has been given to how university researchers collaborate with language teachers, what challenges they might encounter, and how they navigate such challenges in CAR. To fill the gap, this study…

  4. The Relationship between Instructors' Professional Competencies and University Students' School Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the relationship between university students' school engagement and instructors' professional competencies. The study group consisted of 314 students from the Faculty of Art at Çankiri Karatekin University. The participants filled in the Scale for Professional Competence of Instructor (SPCI) and the Scale for…

  5. Building Bridges between Knowledge and Practice: A University-School District Leadership Preparation Program Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzo, Karen L.; Myran, Steve; Clayton, Jennifer K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a Year 1 account of a partnership between a university and rural school district focusing specifically on how the project has helped to bridge the theory to practice divide and strengthen university-district ties. Design/methodology/approach: A design-based research paradigm was utilized to…

  6. University-School Partnerships for Clinical Experiences: Design, Implementation, Assessment, and Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, Thillainatarajan; Holland, Glenda; Clark, Leonard; Heyning, Katharina; Wishart, William; Flowers-Gibson, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    University teacher education programs establish partnerships with P-12 schools, in part to place their teacher education candidates in a learning environment that allows candidates to work with a diverse population of learners. The purpose of this study was to examine three universities in regard to the partnerships utilized for field and clinical…

  7. An investigation of project work implementation in a university EFL preparatory school setting

    OpenAIRE

    Keleş, Selda Akkaş

    2007-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Teaching English as a Foreign Language, Bilkent University, 2007. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2007. Includes bibliographical references leaves 118-121. This study is aimed at investigating the effectiveness of an existing project work program through the perceptions of the teachers and the students in the preparatory classes at Muğla University School of Foreign Languages (MU SFL). In this study, the actual implementation procedure was...

  8. Gently, gently: A school-university participatory research partnership in a post-disaster setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Mutch

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2010/2011, the city of Christchurch and the surrounding district of Canterbury in New Zealand suffered a series of devastating earthquakes. A study led by The University of Auckland and co-funded by UNESCO followed schools as they came to terms with these events and began to rebuild their lives. The process to recruit and engage schools was slow and respectful as we built trust with first one school, then another. We offered a facilitative and participatory process where each school could choose how they wanted to proceed, who they wanted to involve and what they wanted the outcome to be. We engaged the students in various activities (narratives, video-making and arts-based activities to help them process the events and move forward. The outcomes included a community mosaic, an illustrated book and video documentaries. This article charts the evolving partnerships between university researchers, school principals, teachers, students and parents. The lessons learned about successful school-university partnerships are summarised under dispositional, relational and situational factors. Keywords: School-university partnership; participatory research; disaster settings; children and young people

  9. University Science Partnerships: What Happens to STEM Interest and Confidence in Middle School and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent R. Genareo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increased demand for qualified students interested in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM has created a push for greater and more authentic exposure to STEM topics among K-12 students. University science partnerships have been shown to be effective at increasing high school students’ interest and confidence in STEM fields. However, little research to date has explored the effects of these partnerships on students beyond the initial program. This study explored STEM interest and confidence in 322 middle school students involved in a GK-12 program before and immediately after the program, then followed up with the students again in high school. Results indicated that students experienced slight losses in areas of STEM interest and confidence during the program, but greater, significant losses occurred after middle school. Male and female students, however, demonstrated a narrowing STEM aspiration gender gap by high school. Implications for university partnership programs are discussed.

  10. Academic Performance, School Desertion And Emotional Paradigm In University Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sosa, Emma Rosa Cruz; Barrientos, Laura Gatica; Castro, Patricia Eugenia Garcia; Garcia, Jesus Hernandez

    2010-01-01

    ... neither personal nor academic needs (books, materials, computer). Other factors which affect academic performance and school desertion are: pregnancy, depression, family disintegration, stress, distrust, lack of communication, addiction, domestic violence, lack of respect, lack of communication, etc. therefore it is very common for students to be sad, unmotiva...

  11. tanzanian high school students' attitude towards five university

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... Objective: To determine the attitude of high school students majoring in Physics, Chemistry and Biology (PCB) towards ... class, education and employment status of father and mother as background variables, and questions on the .... explored factors influencing career choice among potential applicants for ...

  12. Schooling Effects on Degree Performance: A Comparison of the Predictive Validity of Aptitude Testing and Secondary School Grades at Oxford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogg, Tom; Zimdars, Anna; Heath, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the cause of school type effects upon gaining a first class degree at Oxford University, whereby for a given level of secondary school performance, private school students perform less well at degree level. We compare the predictive power of an aptitude test and secondary school grades (GCSEs) for final examination…

  13. Professional Practice Schools as a Form of School-University Partnership in Teacher Education: Towards a Social Justice Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years into democracy, South Africa is still struggling to improve the quality of its education system. The identification of schools that can work closely with universities to mentor student teachers has been suggested as one way in which teacher education can contribute to an improved education system. The article outlines research that…

  14. Effects on Coping Skills and Anxiety of a Universal School-Based Mental Health Intervention Delivered in Scottish Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sabrina; Woolfson, Lisa Marks; Durkin, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common in children and may signal risk of depression, social, or academic difficulties. This study evaluated the effects of a universal mental health promotion intervention delivered in primary schools. Three hundred and seventeen 9- to 10-year-olds were randomly allocated by class group to intervention conditions…

  15. Universal Emotional Health Screening at the Middle School Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoep, Ann Vander; McCauley, Elizabeth; Thompson, Kelly A.; Herting, Jerald R.; Kuo, Elena S.; Stewart, David G.; Anderson, Cheryl A.; Kushner, Siri

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of the Developmental Pathways Screening Program (DPSP) and an evaluation of program feasibility, acceptability, and yield. Using the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ) and externalizing questions from the Youth Self Report (YSR; Achenbach, 2001), universal classroom-based emotional health screening was…

  16. Study Aid for University Education 1977/78 School Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Luis Cordero; Jares, Jose Luis Diaz

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the types of financial aid available to students in universities in Spain, in 1977/78. A major problem is that aid did not take into account wages lost as a result of having to forego gainful employment. Presents tabular data on recipients, provinces in which study was undertaken, subjects of study, and types of assistance. (DB)

  17. Senior Lecturer, School of Law, University of the Witwatersrand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article emphasises the uncertainty in the relationship between a student undergoing practical training and his/her lecturer or university, if the student should ... The Occupational Health and Safety Act requires employers to assure that the workplace is a safe environment for employees, with the minimum risks involved.

  18. Hospitality Major Vocational High School Students' Expectations on University Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ya-Ting; Yang, Cheng-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Hospitality is not a new industry in Asia, but high quality hospitality industry has become more and more important in the trend of questing service-based economy and the increasing number of tourists in Asia. Thus there are more universities opened hospitality degree programs in Asia, Taiwan is no exception. In this context, why high school…

  19. School Administrators Strategies for Combating Corruption in Universities in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiyai, Romina Ifeoma

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine corruption in universities with the aim of finding out the types/forms, causes, effects and measures for combating the menace. Four research questions guided the investigation. The study is a survey research, ex-post facto in nature. A sample of 780 comprising of students, academic staff and administrative…

  20. Type of High School Predicts Academic Performance at University Better than Individual Differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Banai

    Full Text Available Psychological correlates of academic performance have always been of high relevance to psychological research. The relation between psychometric intelligence and academic performance is one of the most consistent and well-established findings in psychology. It is hypothesized that intelligence puts a limit on what an individual can learn or achieve. Moreover, a growing body of literature indicates a relationship between personality traits and academic performance. This relationship helps us to better understand how an individual will learn or achieve their goals. The aim of this study is to further investigate the relationship between psychological correlates of academic performance by exploring the potentially moderating role of prior education. The participants in this study differed in the type of high school they attended. They went either to gymnasium, a general education type of high school that prepares students specifically for university studies, or to vocational school, which prepares students both for the labour market and for further studies. In this study, we used archival data of psychological testing during career guidance in the final year of high school, and information about the university graduation of those who received guidance. The psychological measures included intelligence, personality and general knowledge. The results show that gymnasium students had greater chances of performing well at university, and that this relationship exceeds the contribution of intelligence and personality traits to university graduation. Moreover, psychological measures did not interact with type of high school, which indicates that students from different school types do not profit from certain individual characteristics.

  1. Type of High School Predicts Academic Performance at University Better than Individual Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banai, Benjamin; Perin, Višnja

    2016-01-01

    Psychological correlates of academic performance have always been of high relevance to psychological research. The relation between psychometric intelligence and academic performance is one of the most consistent and well-established findings in psychology. It is hypothesized that intelligence puts a limit on what an individual can learn or achieve. Moreover, a growing body of literature indicates a relationship between personality traits and academic performance. This relationship helps us to better understand how an individual will learn or achieve their goals. The aim of this study is to further investigate the relationship between psychological correlates of academic performance by exploring the potentially moderating role of prior education. The participants in this study differed in the type of high school they attended. They went either to gymnasium, a general education type of high school that prepares students specifically for university studies, or to vocational school, which prepares students both for the labour market and for further studies. In this study, we used archival data of psychological testing during career guidance in the final year of high school, and information about the university graduation of those who received guidance. The psychological measures included intelligence, personality and general knowledge. The results show that gymnasium students had greater chances of performing well at university, and that this relationship exceeds the contribution of intelligence and personality traits to university graduation. Moreover, psychological measures did not interact with type of high school, which indicates that students from different school types do not profit from certain individual characteristics.

  2. Type of High School Predicts Academic Performance at University Better than Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Psychological correlates of academic performance have always been of high relevance to psychological research. The relation between psychometric intelligence and academic performance is one of the most consistent and well-established findings in psychology. It is hypothesized that intelligence puts a limit on what an individual can learn or achieve. Moreover, a growing body of literature indicates a relationship between personality traits and academic performance. This relationship helps us to better understand how an individual will learn or achieve their goals. The aim of this study is to further investigate the relationship between psychological correlates of academic performance by exploring the potentially moderating role of prior education. The participants in this study differed in the type of high school they attended. They went either to gymnasium, a general education type of high school that prepares students specifically for university studies, or to vocational school, which prepares students both for the labour market and for further studies. In this study, we used archival data of psychological testing during career guidance in the final year of high school, and information about the university graduation of those who received guidance. The psychological measures included intelligence, personality and general knowledge. The results show that gymnasium students had greater chances of performing well at university, and that this relationship exceeds the contribution of intelligence and personality traits to university graduation. Moreover, psychological measures did not interact with type of high school, which indicates that students from different school types do not profit from certain individual characteristics. PMID:27695073

  3. Investigation on the governance model and effect of medical schools merged with comprehensive universities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ge; Luo, Li

    2013-08-01

    This investigation analyzes the management of medical schools merged with comprehensive universities through internet search and research review to reveal management model and effect of the merger. The conclusion is safely reached that governance models are divided into two different patterns: centralized management and decentralized management. Eight universities, representing the two models, were selected and evaluated comprehensively. Among them, the universities that carried out decentralized management have greater development after the merger based on a quality comparison concerning freshmen, faculty, teaching, and research between the two patterns. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University.

  4. High School Students' perception of University Students as STEM representatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Eva Lykkegaard

    2012-01-01

    The Danish government has an ambition to recruit more high school students into STEM educations (science, technology, engineering and/or mathematics). The students’ choice of further education is based on the people and jobs they have knowledge of. Therefore, to recruit more students into STEM......’ potential identities. It shows that the students preferred STEM representatives resembled themselves in some aspects (primarily social and health aspects) and fit their perceptions of a typical person working in STEM in other aspects (knowledge seeking, hard-working etc.)....

  5. The main problem solving differences between high school and university in mathematical beliefs and professional behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akhlaghi Garmjani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Teaching science and math has been underdeveloped in nurturing the talents and motivations of young people who are in search of professions in these fields. Identifying and strengthening the students' problem solving beliefs and behaviors, can be a great help to those involved in teaching mathematics. This study investigates on the university and high school students, teachers and professors' problem solving beliefs and behaviors. Considering the research method, this study is a field research in which questionnaire is used. Participants in this research were senior high school and university students, math teachers and math professors. Data collection method for beliefs and behavior variables was via the use of a questionnaire. The Mann-Whitney test results showed that problem solving in high school and university was different and the main difference was in mathematical professional beliefs and behaviors.

  6. Comparative Analysis of English Language Student’s School Paths at a Mexico University

    OpenAIRE

    Octaviano García Robelo; Jorge Hernández Marquez; Ileana Casasola Pérez

    2017-01-01

    Seven factors related to academic paths of students of the Bachelor of English Language of a public university in Mexico are investigated. With a non-experimental descriptive design, a Likert scale was applied to evaluate the college students’ perception of these factors. A comparative analysis between three types of school paths was performed. It was found that students with irregular school paths show higher academic difficulties by internal and external problems, such as difficulties in th...

  7. A Community?School District?University Partnership for Assessing Physical Activity of Tweens

    OpenAIRE

    McDermott, Robert J.; Nickelson, Jen; Baldwin, Julie A.; Bryant, Carol A; Alfonso, Moya; Phillips, Leah M.; DeBate, Rita D.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Obesity among youth is related to a decline in physical activity, and data on physical activity levels among children in elementary and middle schools are limited. Methods We leveraged a community?school district?university partnership in Sarasota County, Florida, in May of 2005 to assess physical activity levels among tweens (youth aged 9-13 years) and to measure the relationship between tweens' awareness of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's VERB program and parti...

  8. Les Houches 1999 Summer School, Session 71 : The Primordial Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Schäffer, R; Silk, J; David, F

    2000-01-01

    This book reviews the interconnection of cosmology and particle physics over the last decade. It provides introductory courses in supersymmetry, superstring and M-theory, responding to an increasing interest to evaluate the cosmological consequences of these theories. Based on a series of extended courses providing an introduction to the physics of the very early universe, in the light of the most recent advances in our understanding of the fundamental interactions, it reviews all the classical issues (inflation, primordial fluctuations, dark matter, baryogenesis), but also introduces the most

  9. The perspective of university students on the school as a promoter of health and healthy lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Leiva Olivencia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthy Education is a basic dimension in the 21st-century scholar functions. In this paper is shown the more highlighted outcomes from a research about understanding attitudes and perceptions from university students about the role of the school for boosting a healthy style of life. An ad-hoc questionnaire was applied to 115 students from the Faculty of Education of the University of Málaga. The main conclusion is student have a very positive image about the Education for Health, and its inclusion in the curriculum. However, they are critics about a real engagement from schools for developing healthy habits.

  10. University-Supervised Chair Work as a Form of School and Pedagogical University Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekaleva, Nadezhda V.; Duka, Natalia A.; Drobotenko, Julia B.; Makarova, Natalia S.; Solovev, Dmitrii N.; Soloveva, Tatiana O.; Fetter, Inna V.

    2016-01-01

    The main tendencies of pedagogical education are discussed in the article. Modern tendencies and qualifying norms to the future teacher make the opportunities for strengthening of practical orientation of higher education. The key types of university-supervised chair (unilateral and bilateral cooperation) are considered and their work is…

  11. Effect of University Entrance Exam on Gifted High School Students’ Motivation Scrutinized: An Iranian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kazemi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Passing University Entrance Exams (UEE successfully has long been a major concern for Iranian high school students. High Schools for the Gifted admit highly intelligent and hardworking students, who reportedly form a remarkable proportion of students admitted in best universities of Iran, through hard entrance exams. This study aimed to investigate attitudes of students educating in High Schools for the Gifted towards learning English, their dominant motivation type (instrumental or integrative, and the likely effect Iranian University Entrance Exam has on their motivation.  For the purpose of this investigation, 166 male and female participants educating in the four grades of high school were selected through Stratified Random Sampling Method from both boys’ and girls’ High Schools for the Gifted. A 26-item questioner previously developed by the researchers, investigating the participants’ attitudes towards English learning, their dominant motivation type, and the likely effect of Iranian UEE on their motivation was administered to them. Descriptive statistics and the analysis of variance were used to analyze the data, and the results revealed that all participants educating in the four grades of high school showed positive attitudes towards English learning, and that 1st and 2nd grade subjects were both instrumentally and integratively motivated, whereas 3rd and 4th graders were instrumentally motivated. The degree of subjects’ concern about the Iranian UEE significantly affected their motivational orientations and prioritization.

  12. University discourse and the function of supervised stage in clinic-school: contributions from psychoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Zétola Lustoza

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of Psychoanalysis at the university is questionable because there is a tension between the rules that governs the university discourse and analytic discourse. The article intends to point out some limits and possibilities of working with Psychoanalysis at the university. Initially features two discourses based on Lacanian theory. Following, it investigates the valuation model used in universities as a contemporary version of university discourse. In this model, the issues of subjectivity are silenced in favor of valuing quantity of knowledge. Finally, the article elects supervised stage as a privileged moment of the transmission of Psychoanalysis at the university. Despite the difficulties, we conclude that clinical experience acquired at clinical-school has a positive function because it requires that the intern be responsible for his/her practice.

  13. High School Students' Perception of University Students as STEM Representatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Eva Lykkegaard

    The Danish government has an ambition to recruit more high school students into STEM edu-cations (science, technology, engineering and/or mathematics). The students’ choice of further education is based on the people and jobs they have knowledge of. Therefore, to recruit more students into STEM......’ potential identities. It shows that the students preferred STEM representatives resembled themselves in some aspects (primarily social and health aspects) and fit their perceptions of a typical person working in STEM in other aspects (knowledge seeking, hard-working etc.). At least two different......’s potential identity, others will do so only after prolonged contact, while others again will be able to influence the students potential identity and thus educational choices after just a brief meeting....

  14. GEOGRAPHY UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ AWARENESS OF THEIR OWN LEARNING PROCESS DURING THE 2013 NEUBRANDENBURGURG INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OANA-RAMONA ILOVAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We presented research on Romanian students’ educational process during an international interdisciplinary summer school that took place in 2013, in northern Germany, focusing on regions in transition. We questioned our 12 Romanian students about their expectations and needs of formation related to the summer school activities and we received their answers in the form of learning journals as part of their portfolios. We presented the results of our research as an answer to the question on the efficiency and benefit that summer school activities could bring to Geography university students’ education and we concluded that learning journals were efficient educational tools.

  15. Community Learning and University Policy: An Inner-City University Goes Back to School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Axworthy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available For at least a decade now, the University of Winnipeg (U of W, an urban institution on Treaty One land in the heart of the Métis Nation, has challenged existing academic models and practices, and has incorporated strategies that address the social divide between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in order to more effectively serve the learning needs of its surrounding community. This article demonstrates how an inner-city university has used internal policies and programs to help support the self-determination of Indigenous peoples. Six community learning initiatives were recently evaluated for impact. This article will provide an overview of the positive outcomes of these learning initiatives on a community of underrepresented learners.

  16. A national assessment of colleges and university school health education methods courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Christine M; Price, James H; Telljohann, Susan K; Dake, Joseph A

    2015-04-01

    Across the United States, school health education programs provide a wide variety of knowledge and skills to their students. There are currently no guidelines for school health methods courses. Using a 2-wave mailing followed by a third wave e-mail reminder, a final population of 226 university school health methods instructors at school health preparation programs were surveyed. A total of 138 completed surveys (61%) were returned. The topics taught in school health education methods courses emphasized the most included aligning objectives, instruction, and assessment (79%); development of lesson plans (73%); teaching methods that engage learners (72%); and application of the National Health Education Standards and performance indicators (69%). The content taught and how the instructors assessed their students differed statistically by 1 or more of the following: whether they had a health education degree, had experience teaching in the public schools, and if their program was accredited. This study provides information regarding what school health methods instructors across the United States are teaching in their classes. Using this information as a baseline can serve as a guide for preservice faculty teaching a school health methods course. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  17. A Portrait of School Leadership at Senshu University Matsudo Junior and Senior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Travis Todd

    2014-01-01

    As an important symbolic figure and embodiment of the traditions and character of the school, the position of principal in Japan is crucial. Yet societal pressures and an undefined job description are serving to increase pressures of the position. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine school administrative leadership at a private…

  18. The "schola medica salernitana": the forerunner of the modern university medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Divitiis, Enrico; Cappabianca, Paolo; de Divitiis, Oreste

    2004-10-01

    The schola medica salernitana is considered the oldest medical school of modern civilization. Salerno's long medical tradition began during the Greco-Roman period in a Greek colony named Elea, where Parmenides decided to found a medical school. The fame of the school became more and more important during the 10th century, and it was best known in the 11th century. In the middle of 12th century, the school was at its apogee, and Salerno provided a notable contribution to the formulation of a medical curriculum for medieval universities. The most famous work of the Salernitan School was the Regimen Sanitatis Saleritanum, a Latin poem of rational, dietetic, and hygienic precepts, many of them still valid today. The school also produced a physician's reference book, with advice on how to treat a patient, a sort of code of conduct to help the physician to respect the patient and his or her relatives. The first science-based surgery appeared on the scene of the discredited medieval practice in Salerno, thanks to Roger of Salerno and his fellows. He wrote a book on surgery, called Rogerina or Post Mundi Fabricam, in which surgery from head to toe is described, with surprising originality. The important contribution to the School of Salerno made by women as female practitioners is outlined, and among them, Trotula de Ruggiero was the most renowned. The period when the School of Salerno, universally recognized as the forerunner of the modern universities, became a government academy was when Frederick II reigned over the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, as Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire.

  19. High school and university students’ opinions about politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sólyom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a part of a larger thesis, which compares two groups’ relations to politics, based on empirical sources. The main question, which can be answered only partly in this paper is, what are the particularities of the political culture of the studied populations?Results of study support that in several questions differences based on age – education level – locality proved to be stronger than ethnical ones, but the second type of differences are also significant i.e. in perceiving a few social gaps, trust in international institutions etc. Social background seems to play a sporadic role in shaping opinions about politics. Diffuse support for democracy is completed with weaker specific support. Romanian university students seem to have the most positive attitude toward direction and advances of Romanian democracy. Trust in institutions and perception of governments’ performance is connected, as a recent empirical study also confirmed based on the results of EVS and WVS of the last two decades (Tufiș 2010. Relations among the studied elements of political culture indicate that new directions and methods would be needed in order to find empirically supported explanations. Students develop/form their opinions about politics probably more based on the attitudes brought from socialization agents, than on their own information and experience.

  20. An Analysis of Vibrato among High School and University Violin and Cello Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geringer, John M.; Allen, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate vibrato performance of university student and high school string players. Forty violinists and cellists performed an eight-measure passage both with and without vibrato. Analyses indicated that the mean rate of vibrato was approximately 5.5 Hz, with no significant differences between instruments or…

  1. University of Chicago School Mathematics Project 6-12 Curriculum. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "University of Chicago School Mathematics Project ("UCSMP") 6-12 Curriculum" is a series of yearlong courses--(1) Transition Mathematics; (2) Algebra; (3) Geometry; (4) Advanced Algebra; (5) Functions, Statistics, and Trigonometry; and (6) Precalculus and Discrete Mathematics--emphasizing problem solving, real-world applications, and the use…

  2. Foundations of geometry for university students and high-school students

    OpenAIRE

    Sharipov, Ruslan

    2007-01-01

    This book is a textbook for the course of foundations of geometry. It is addressed to mathematics students in Universities and to High School students for deeper learning the elementary geometry. It can also be used in mathematics coteries and self-education groups.

  3. Community building of (student) teachers and a teacher educator in a school-university partnership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandyck, I.J.J.; van Graaff, R.; Pilot, A.; Beishuizen, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    School-university partnerships (SUPs) are considered a way of improving teacher education. For the successful implementation of such partnerships, cooperation between the different stakeholders is of crucial importance. Therefore, most partnerships are organised in short- and long-term teams, which

  4. Understanding the Transition from School to University in Music and Music Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterson, Julia; Russ, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the transition from school to university in Music and Music Technology, continuing the discussion of transitional issues which began in Volume 2 of "Arts and Humanities in Higher Education". The focus of the article is a survey of undergraduates, examining areas that were key to their first experience of studying…

  5. Offering an Anatomy and Physiology Course through a High School-University Partnership: The Minnesota Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Murray; Mattheis, Allison; Loyle, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a one-semester anatomy and physiology course that is currently offered through the concurrent enrollment program at the University of Minnesota. The article explains how high school teachers are prepared to teach the course and describes efforts to promote program quality, student inquiry, and experiential learning.…

  6. The Implementation of an Individualized Curriculum in Periodontology at the Temple University School of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkin, Leslie M.; And Others

    An individualized, self-paced curriculum at Temple University Dental School is being used to break the lock-step pattern of the lecture-oriented system and to help students reach the clinical learning environment more quickly. Freshmen begin work in periodontology with 12 programed lessons studied in a Learning Resources Center open 75 hours a…

  7. An upcoming program for medical humanities education in Fudan University's School of Basic Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Cheng, Xunjia

    2017-05-23

    Ideal medical care requires professional skills as well as appropriate communication skills. However, traditional medical education in medical schools mostly emphasizes the former. To remedy this situation, medical humanities education will be incorporated into education for medical students at Fudan University. Comprehensive medical education that includes both medical skills and humanities may greatly improve medical care.

  8. Comparative Analysis of English Language Student's School Paths at a Mexico University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelo, Octaviano García; Marquez, Jorge Hernández; Pérez, Ileana Casasola

    2017-01-01

    Seven factors related to academic paths of students of the Bachelor of English Language of a public university in Mexico are investigated. With a non-experimental descriptive design, a Likert scale was applied to evaluate the college students' perception of these factors. A comparative analysis between three types of school paths was performed. It…

  9. Making the Case for Exploratory World Language Instruction in Catholic Elementary Schools through University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Brigid M.; Howard, Eric D.

    2017-01-01

    As a result of a university partnership, elementary students at two midwest Catholic elementary schools have been provided with exploratory world language instruction (FLEX) from pre-service teachers. To investigate students' attitudes and learning of Spanish, researchers interviewed second and fourth graders. The students' parents and pre-service…

  10. Why Do Secondary School Chemistry Teachers Engage in Long-Term Outreach Partnership with a University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, S. R.; Harrison, T. G.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of outreach with secondary school pupils has been researched the reasons teachers engage or the impacts on the teachers engaging in long-term relationships with a university department have not. Detailed interviews with chemistry teachers associated with outreach at Bristol ChemLabS have revealed many reasons for prolonged…

  11. Does the High School Geography Experience Influence Enrollment in University Geography Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydon, Joseph; McLaughlin, Christina; Wilson, Heather

    2017-01-01

    The literature suggests that owing to profound difficulties with high school geography curricula, teachers play a vital role in stimulating student interest and in providing a platform for continuation in the study of geography at university. Yet, with little empirical evidence offered in support, it is unclear why students select geography at…

  12. Research in the School of Languages and Linguistics at Griffith University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton-Smith, Ben; Walkinshaw, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Griffith University is set across five campuses in south-east Queensland, Australia, and has a student population of 43,000. The School of Languages and Linguistics (LAL) offers programs in linguistics, international English, Chinese, Italian, Japanese and Spanish, as well as English language enhancement courses. Research strands reflect the…

  13. Promoting Environmental Citizenship and Corporate Social Responsibility through a School/Industry/University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbels, Susan; Evans, Stewart M.; Delany, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    A partnership was formed between King Edward VI School Morpeth (UK) and the pharmaceutical company Merck, Sharp and Dohme within the programme of "Joint Responsibility" operated by the Dove Marine Laboratory (Newcastle University, UK). Pupils surveyed an ecologically important coastal area in northeast England and made 15 recommendations…

  14. Adoptable Copyright Policy: Copyright Policy and Manuals Designed for Adoption by Schools, Colleges & Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlcek, Charles W.

    This book was written to help educational institutions and their faculty and students meet the responsibilities of U.S. copyright law. Part I is a model board policy written for large or small school district or college and university boards. The policy can be modified to meet specific needs. Part II contains the details and procedures applying to…

  15. Correlation among High School Senior Students' Test Anxiety, Academic Performance and Points of University Entrance Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Hakan; Alci, Bulent; Aydin, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Test anxiety seems like a benign problem to some people, but it can be potentially serious when it leads to high levels of distress and academic failure. The aim of this study is to define the correlation among high school senior students' test anxiety, academic performance (GPA) and points of university entrance exam (UEE). The study group of…

  16. Investigating the Medical Study of Overseas Students at Jinan University Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-ya; Wang, Guang; Cheng, Xin; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-01-01

    A great number of overseas students have studied medicine at Jinan University Medical School over the past decade. Statistics from the past ten years show that these students' test scores on diagnosis and medicine I & II are lower than those of their classmates from mainland China. To address the underlying causes of this phenomenon, we…

  17. Epidemiology and Herd Health Training in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archbald, L. F.; Hagstad, H. V.

    1978-01-01

    At Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, training in preventive medicine is incorporated into all four years of the curriculum. The curriculum is described with focus on the fourth year practical course that involves problem solving, using various herds in the area. (JMD)

  18. The Self-Perceptions of Young Men as Singers in Singaporean Pre-University Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Patrick K.; Tan, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    The persistence of young men in choral singing activity has been widely studied in North America, with emerging parallel research in Europe (Freer, 2013; Harrison & Welch, 2012). There has been little such research in Asia. This study, of 12 young men enrolled in Singapore's pre-university schools, collected both written narratives and drawn…

  19. Students' Viewpoint of Computer Game for Training in Indonesian Universities and High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudin, Didin; Hasegawa, Shinobu; Kamaludin, Apep

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the survey--conducted in Indonesian universities (UNIV) and high schools (HS)--whose concern is to examine preferences and influences of computer game for training. Comparing the students' viewpoint between both educational levels could determine which educational level would satisfy the need of MAGNITUDE--mobile serious game…

  20. Food Safety Education for Students and Workers in School Gardens and University Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzubak, John; Shaw, Angela; Strohbehn, Catherine; Naeve, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The number of school gardens and university farms is increasing in the United States. Produce grown in these venues is often sampled in the classroom or incorporated into the food chain. Food safety education for students and workers is needed to ensure that produce is safe. Two 1-hr food safety curricula were developed to inform K-12 students and…

  1. Naval Postgraduate School inducts SEAL, industry mogul into University Hall of Fame

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) welcomed its two newest inductees into the university's prestigious Hall of Fame during a ceremony in Herrmann Hall, Nov. 30. Interim President Rear Admiral Jan Tighe presided over the event, enshrining retired Adm. Eric Olson and retired Marine Corps Col. Walt Havenstein as the latest graduates to receive the distriguished honor.

  2. "Approaches to the Teaching of Special Relativity Theory in High School and University Textbooks of Argentina"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriassecq, Irene; Greca, Ileana Maria

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we presented an analysis of the representation of the special relativity theory (SRT) in the most used texts in high school, Polimodal level and university level in the teaching in the Argentine Republic, from a historic, epistemological and didactic perspective. The results show that none of the analyzed texts would allow a…

  3. Homophobic Bullying in Nigerian Schools: The Experiences of LGBT University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanlawon, Kehinde

    2017-01-01

    There is a dearth of research on homophobic bullying in Nigerian schools. Using data from 14 in-depth interviews and public media sources that were analyzed thematically, this formative research examined homophobic bullying using Nigerian universities as a case study to bring attention to the need for policies and interventions to make schools…

  4. University-School Collaboration as a Tool for Promoting Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers' Professional Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Hulya; Tunc Pekkan, Zelha

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss pre-service mathematics teachers' professional gains from a university-school collaboration where they were given opportunity to observe two teacher educators' instructional practices in a 6th grade classroom, interact with students in one-to-one fashion and reflect on the teacher educators' and their own practices. Three…

  5. Predictors of Academic Procrastination and University Life Satisfaction among Turkish Sport Schools Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocal, Kubilay

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of burnout, academic self-efficacy and academic success in predicting procrastination and university life satisfaction among sports schools students. The study sample comprised of 224 participants aged from 18 to 30 years with a mean age of 21.71 (SD = 1.94) who were attending various departments…

  6. Mind the Gap: Prospects for Easing the Transition from High School to University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Alan

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the author's experiences in terms of on-going research and development of programs dealing with understanding and facilitating the transition of students to university from high school. A system that requires students to perform daredevil acts of courage leaping across great chasms has design flaws. It is my sense that the…

  7. Inquiry into Partnered Student Teaching in an Urban School-University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs, Andrea J.; Corrieri, Caitlin; Fryer, Lindsay; Genovese, Elizabeth; Panaro, Ryan; Sohn, Christen

    2009-01-01

    School-university partnerships are promising collaborations for better preparing qualified and competent teachers for the realities of today's diverse American classrooms. Research has been conducted on many aspects of partnerships, but few studies have focused on partnered student teaching placements. In this article, a professor and five of her…

  8. The London Geography Alliance: Re-Connecting the School Subject with the University Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Alex; Hawley, Duncan; Willy, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    The London Geography Alliance was established to provide a network of subject-based support to primary and secondary schools, by linking teachers and university lecturers. Workshops and fieldwork were conducted over a 17-month period to address different aspects of the geography curriculum. The effects of the project were evaluated using…

  9. Examining Boundary-Spanning Leadership in University-School-Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the characteristics and influences of boundary-spanning leadership in university-school-community partnership contexts. To gain a clear understanding of the diffuse literature in this area, over 60 related articles and books were reviewed; common themes were identified; and emergent connections were drawn. The most common…

  10. Comparative Attitudes of University Students and School Teachers on the Use and Legalization of Marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Madanjit K.

    1977-01-01

    Explored use of marijuana and attitudes toward its legalization among university students and school teachers in Alberta. Students had more permissive attitudes toward marijuana use and its legalization as compared to teachers. Significant relationships were found between drug use and age and legalization of marijuana and sex and religiosity.…

  11. Comparing Curriculum-Based Measures and Extant Datasets for Universal Screening in Middle School Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Nathan A.

    2017-01-01

    As a school-wide framework, Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS) relies on the prevention and early identification of students at risk of academic failure. Approaches to early identification of students in need of support include the administration of universal screening assessments and the analysis of existing student data such as attendance,…

  12. Factors Influencing Success in a School-University-Industry Partnership for Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Richard J.

    A three-year partnership between the University of Massachusetts (Amherst), a group of school systems, the Massachusetts High Technology Corporation, and Digital Equipment Corporation achieved the goal of recruiting outstanding BA and BS graduates, with majors in math or science, into teacher education and teaching. The success of the…

  13. Offering an anatomy and physiology course through a high school-university partnership: the Minnesota model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Murray; Mattheis, Allison; Loyle, Anne

    2013-06-01

    This article describes a one-semester anatomy and physiology course that is currently offered through the concurrent enrollment program at the University of Minnesota. The article explains how high school teachers are prepared to teach the course and describes efforts to promote program quality, student inquiry, and experiential learning. Recommendations are made for anatomy and physiology instructors who are involved in similar endeavors.

  14. Surveying Turkish high school and university student attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving

    CERN Document Server

    Balta, Nuri; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Student attitudes and approaches to problem solving can impact how well they learn physics. Prior research in the US using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and astronomy courses and physics experts in terms of their attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving. Here we discuss the validation, administration and analysis of data for the Turkish version of the AAPS survey for high school and university students in Turkey. After the validation and administration of the Turkish version of the survey, the analysis of the data was conducted by grouping the data by grade level, school type, and gender. While there are no statistically significant differences between the averages of various groups on the survey, overall, the university students in Turkey were more expert-like than vocational high school students. On an item by item basis, there are statistically differences between the average...

  15. School Climate in the Engineering and Architecture Campus of a Mexican Public University: Students’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Sandoval-Caraveo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to identify the school climate that prevails in the students of the faculty of Engineering and Architecture in a Mexican public University. This study was conducted in response to a need to take care of the recommendations of the agencies evaluating the educational programs. It was done with a quantitative approach, of a descriptive and correlational type with non-experimental transactional design. The studied dimensions of the school climate were: organization structure, functionality, pedagogical practices, climate between peer interaction and satisfaction. The data were collected using a Likert scale questionnaire, with a reliability of .880 of Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient and validity through confirmatory factorial analysis. The results obtained from the descriptive statistics pointed the favorable school climate in peer interaction and pedagogical practices. Organizational structure, however, was the lowest rated classroom climate dimension. ANOVA results showed significant statistical differences between the school climate and educational programs, the years that the students have remained in the university, the age and the school cycle. Pearson’s correlation analysis revealed weak and negative correlation between school climate and student age.

  16. The early years of coeducation at the Yale University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baserga, S J

    1980-01-01

    The Yale School of Medicine began accepting women as candidates for the degree of medicine in the fall of 1916. This decision was consistent with the trend in medical education at the time. While Yale was not the first prestigious Eastern medical school to admit women, joining Johns Hopkins (1893) and the University of Pennsylvania (1914), it was not one of the last. Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons admitted women a year later, but Harvard Medical School held out until 1945. The years 1916--1920 saw the number of women enrolled in medical school almost double. Yale's decision to admit women seems to have been made with little resistance from the faculty. The final decision was made through the encouragement and financial help of Henry Farnam, a professor of economics at Yale, who agreed to pay for the women's bathrooms. His daughter, Louise, was in the first class of women. At graduation she was awarded the highest scholastic honors, the Campbell Gold Prize. From Yale she travelled to the Yale-sponsored medical school in Changsha, China, where she became the first female faculty member, a position she held for twelve years. The impressions of Ella Clay Wakeman Calhoun, the only woman to graduate in the second class of women, are presented here. Since 1916 the Yale School of Medicine has undergone extensive physical and philosophical changes, developments in which women have participated.

  17. The Role of Teacher Empowerment and Teacher Accountability in School-University Partnerships and Action Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Segedin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale educational reform is occurring in Canada, the USA and the UK. Different strategies for change have resulted, including the school-university partnership and teacher-led action research.  While this partnership and professional development method is perceived as a way to empower teachers it also appears to be riddled with issues of accountability. This study investigates the impact of participation in a school-university partnership, using action research as the professional development method for school improvement, on teaching professionals' sense of accountability and empowerment.  The findings from this study showed that these projects were organized from the top-down and teachers felt accountable to the government, their peers, their students, the School Board, the school community, and the project funding body.  However, teachers also were found to be empowered as they experienced shared decision making, teacher autonomy, professional growth, and school change.  This suggests that the relationship between accountability and empowerment is not a simple one.  

  18. SCHOOL, UNIVERSITY AND EDUCATIONAL ACCESSIBILITY: DISCUSSING EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS WITH HIGH SKILLS/GIFTEDNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Gomes Camargo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thinking about educational accessibility in academic research constitutes a necessity in view of the reality of education today and investigations unexplored, such as the relation between the high skills/giftedness -AH/SD-, researchin university and educational accessibility. This paper aims to discuss the dialogue between school and university research regarding the accessibility of students with AH/SD, seeking to highlight some actions related to a research project of theUniversidade Federal de Santa Maria/RS. The discussion in this article is guided in a qualitative perspective, is the main theoretical support studies of Manzini (2005 and Freitas and Pérez (2010. Among the main considerations, it follows that: shared responsibility between school and university, through action research projects, contributes significantly to the establishment of educational accessibility for students with AH/SD.

  19. 78 FR 23877 - Schools and Libraries Universal Service Support Mechanism and A National Broadband Plan for Our...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ..., cell phone or tablet, is ancillary to the eligible service it is paired with? Because their prices can... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Schools and Libraries Universal Service Support Mechanism and A National Broadband... schools and libraries universal service support program (E-rate program) requirements for bundling devices...

  20. Examining the Process of University-School-Community Collaboration in an Irish Sports Studies and Physical Education Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Susan

    2015-01-01

    University-school-community collaborations are little documented despite being advocated across third-level institutes. Researchers identify the need for quality university-school-community collaborations to tackle a host of social inequalities while also addressing innovative approaches to teaching and learning. This study involved the…

  1. Exploring knowledge processes based on teacher research in a school-university research network of a master's program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof dr Theo Bergen; prof dr Douwe Beijaard; dr Frank Cornelissen; Dr. Jacqueline van Swet

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of five participants in a school-university research network in a Dutch master's program. Outcomes indicate that use of existing network structures in master's programs is complex, but could be a promising avenue for creating succesful school-university

  2. University of Washington Mobile Planetarium: Bringing HST Science to Seattle Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailey, Justin; Fraiser, O.; Rosenfield, P.; Byler, E.; Wisniewski, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Digital planetariums are becoming mainstays of astronomy education as projection technology prices fall and planetarium software becomes more powerful and more freely available. In 2010, the University of Washington upgraded their star-ball projector to a digital system that is powered by Microsoft Research’s WorldWide Telescope. To increase the number of underserved elementary and high school students the UW Astronomy department reaches, we obtained an HST education and public outreach grant to create lesson content, offset transportation costs to visit the UW planetarium for Seattle Public School students, and purchase a mobile planetarium to bring to public schools. We present a pilot program to test and evaluate the efficacy of the mobile planetarium in a high school setting.

  3. Academic Leaderships Views of School Psychology and Black Students: The Case of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeks, Amirah; Graves, Scott L., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand academic leadership's views of the field of school psychology. This is the first study that has attempted to incorporate the views of historically Black college and university (HBCU) Psychology Department Chairs' regarding the field of school psychology and the potential development of school psychology…

  4. Children's perceived benefits and barriers in relation to eating breakfast in schools with or without Universal School Breakfast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddan, Jodi; Wahlstrom, Kyla; Reicks, Marla

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare perceived benefits and barriers related to breakfast consumption and concerns about weight among children in schools with or without a Universal School Breakfast Program (USBP). Teacher-administered survey at the end of a 3-year pilot program. Fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade students in six USBP pilot schools (n = 827) and four control schools (n = 615). Control and pilot sites were matched by geographic location and socioeconomic status of students. Response rates were > 70%. Perceptions of benefits and barriers related to breakfast consumption and weight-related concerns. Chi-square tests were used to assess statistical differences in categorical responses to survey items. The majority of students perceived that eating breakfast provides benefits of increased energy and ability to pay attention in school. Commonly held perceptions of barriers to eating breakfast were lack of time and not being hungry in the morning. Compared with children in non-USBP schools, those in the USBP schools were less likely to wish they were thinner, to go on a diet, or skip breakfast because it might make them fat and more likely to believe that eating breakfast will give them energy and help them pay attention. Based on the results of this study, nutrition educators may find it helpful to develop educational materials and programs based on the reciprocal determinism construct of Social Learning Theory to promote breakfast consumption. The focus should be on practical strategies to address barriers and encourage behavioral changes for both children and their parents.

  5. Healthy Schools-Healthy Kids: a controlled evaluation of a comprehensive universal eating disorder prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Gail; Tweed, Stacey; Blackmore, Elizabeth

    2007-06-01

    This study was a controlled evaluation of a comprehensive school-based universal prevention program involving male and female students, parents, teachers, school administrators and local public health professionals. A total of 982 male and female Grades 6 and 7 middle school students (and 91 teachers/school administrators) completed self-report surveys at baseline on measures of body satisfaction, internalization of media ideals, size acceptance, disordered eating, weight-based teasing, weight loss and muscle-gaining behaviours, and perceptions of school climate (teachers only). Eighty-four percent of the students repeated the surveys immediately following the 8-month school-wide intervention and 71% again 6 months later. Repeated measures ANCOVAs revealed that participation in the Healthy Schools-Healthy Kids (HS-HK) program had a positive influence by reducing the internalization of media ideals among male and female students and by reducing disordered eating among female students. The program was also associated with reductions in weight-loss behaviours among the students, although this effect was lost by the 6-month follow-up. When the intervention students were sub-divided into low versus high-risk groups, the high-risk group appeared to benefit most from the intervention with significant reductions in internalization of media ideals, greater body satisfaction, and reduced disordered eating over time. There were no intervention effects for teachers. Challenges of engaging teachers in prevention are discussed.

  6. Social Support Network for the Elderly Attending the Open University Program for Senior Citizens at the School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Marisa Accioly; Ordonez, Tiago Nascimento; Lima-Silva, Thais Bento; Torres, Maria Juliana; de Barros, Thabata Cruz; Cachioni, Meire

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the social support network of older adults enrolled in the Open University for Senior Citizens at the School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of Sao Paulo. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 117 elderly or older adults, mostly female (78%), married (53%), retired (82%), and aged on average…

  7. College and university planning for pandemic influenza: a survey of Philadelphia schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Chernak, Esther; Alles, Steven; Links, Jonathan

    2007-09-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the current state of college and university planning for pandemic influenza and to inform guidance for these institutions. The Philadelphia Department of Public Health developed an interview guide based on CDC guidance and conducted in-depth structured interviews with college and university pandemic planners in Philadelphia. Thirteen of 14 schools contacted participated in interviews. Six schools, or slightly fewer than half, reported having a draft pandemic influenza plan. Schools noted barriers such as insufficient information and financial resources and institutional support. They reported that they lacked concrete policy recommendations suited to different types of institutions (e.g., small colleges) and lacked the political will to tackle a hypothetical threat. Schools requested further guidance on triggers for campus closure, materials to stockpile, and policies for refunding tuition and adjusting credits for missed coursework. School pandemic planning is in its early stages. Local government can provide recommendations as to the appropriate level of planning detail, disseminate examples of best practices planning, and continue to emphasize the importance of all-hazards approaches to emergency planning.

  8. University-School Collaborative Networks: A Strategy to Improve the Professional Skills of Future Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Mérida Serrano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experiment in teaching innovation developed at the University of Cordoba's Faculty of Education (Spain, in the second year of the Infant Education Teacher Training course, within the subject of general didactics. The innovative approach taken focused on setting up a collaborative network between infants' schools and the university. Taking Project Work as the central axis, a learning network has been built with the participation of sixteen Infant Education teachers, three hundred twenty children from this stage, seven university teachers, eighty-five trainee teachers, and two Infant Education advisers from a continuing professional development centre for teachers. The theoretical foundations that support this experiment are described along with their different stages, evaluating the benefits of each of them in facilitating the acquisition of professional competences among university students.

  9. Neuroscience Workshops for Fifth-Grade School Children by Undergraduate Students: A University-School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Judith G.; Feldman, Marissa; Lin, Edward; Mahoney, Margaret; Sjoblom, Chelsea

    2006-01-01

    The National Science Education Standards recommend that science be taught using inquiry-based approaches. Inspired by the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, we examined whether undergraduate students could learn how to conduct field research by teaching elementary school children basic neuroscience concepts in interactive workshops. In an…

  10. Crisscrossing the University and Public School Contexts as Professional Development School Boundary Spanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many, Joyce E.; Fisher, Teresa R.; Ogletree, Susan; Taylor, Dee

    2012-01-01

    Professional development schools (PDSs) consist of collaborations across institutions whose missions, organizational structures, and cultures are distinct and which, in some ways, may conflict (Sandholtz & Finan, 1998). Due to differing emphases across contexts, PDS partners may encounter hidden barriers and mismatched perspectives (Stevens,…

  11. Adjustment Experiences of African American Graduates of Historically Black Colleges or Universities Attending Graduate School at a Southern Predominantly White University

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Quentin Renard

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the adjustment experiences of African American graduates of historically Black colleges or universities (HBCUs) attending graduate school at a Southern predominantly White university (PWU). A discussion of narratives and themes across participants provided information about the adjustment experiences of African American graduate students who transitioned from a university community where the student population was predominantly African American to one ...

  12. Universal free school breakfast: a qualitative process evaluation according to the perspectives of senior stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Harvey-Golding

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the provision of school breakfast has increased significantly in the UK. However, there is an absence of knowledge regarding senior stakeholder views on the processes and potential outcomes on different groups, within the communities served by school breakfast programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the views and experiences of senior level stakeholders and thereby provide an original qualitative contribution to the research. A sample of senior level stakeholders were recruited, including senior officers, directors and elected members, from within a Local Authority (LA involved in the leadership, implementation and delivery of a council-wide universal free school breakfast (USFB program, and from the senior staff body of mainstream primary and special schools, participating in the program. A grounded theory analysis of the data collected identified issues encountered in the implementation and delivery, and views on the funding and future of a USFB program, in addition to perceived outcomes of children, parents, families, schools and the wider community. The results refer to both positive and negative issues and implications associated with the program, according to the perspectives of senior level stakeholders. Perceived positive outcomes included benefits to children, families, schools and the community. For instance, alleviating hunger, improving health outcomes, and conferring financial benefits, with the potential to cumulate in overall improvements in educational, social and behavioral outcomes. Reported negative implications included the absence of an effective communication strategy in implementing the USFB program; in addition to concerns about the impacts of ‘double-breakfasting’ on obesity levels among children, particularly in less deprived communities. Findings were validated using theoretical sampling and saturation, triangulation methods, member checks, and inter-rater reliability measures. In

  13. Scientific production of Vice Chancellors for Research in Peruvian universities with a medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Añazco, Percy; Valenzuela-Rodríguez, Germán; Pacheco-Mendoza, Josmel; Málaga, Germán

    2017-10-19

    To determine the scientific production of Research Vice-chancellors at Peruvian universities that have medical schools, as well as their academic degrees as an indirect way to evaluate their suitability for the position they hold. We searched all Peruvian universities that register medical schools. Of these, the scientific production of the universities registered in SCOPUS was identified in September of the 2016. The scientific production of the vice chancellors of investigation of these faculties of medicine was determined through the search of its scientific publications registered in SCOPUS and those reported in the National Registry of Researchers in Science and Technology. Academic degrees were obtained from the database of the National Superintendence of Higher University Education. The sample included 28 research vice chancellors. Only 4/28 had any publications. The average number of articles published by the vice chancellors of research was 1.71, the number of citations 23.1 on average and the H index 0.64. Besides, 22 Vice-chancellors of research had the degree of doctor, four had the degree of bachelor and two the degree of master. The scientific production of research vice chancellors is poor. The required academic grade requirement for the position is not met in all cases. It is likely that, having no research experience, his leadership in directing a university's research policies may be questioned.

  14. Quality Assessment Survey at the School of Civil Engineering at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    As part of an improved quality assessment procedure at the School of Civil Engineering at Aalborg University, an online survey has been undertaken among all students. Due to external requirements and a wish for more structured feedback, an online questionnaire was presented to all students under...... the study board of civil engineering. The questionnaire was jointly developed for all study boards at Aalborg University. The questionnaire forms an investigation of students' satisfaction and evaluation of the overall structure of the education including self-reported performance assessment. The paper...

  15. ELWIRA "Plants, wood, steel, concrete - a lifecycle as construction materials": University meets school - science meets high school education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss-Sieberth, Alexandra; Strauss, Alfred; Kalny, Gerda; Rauch, Hans Peter; Loiskandl, Willibald

    2016-04-01

    The research project "Plants, wood, steel, concrete - a lifecycle as construction materials" (ELWIRA) is in the framework of the Sparkling Science programme performed by the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences together with the Billroth Gymnasium in Vienna. The targets of a Sparkling Science project are twofold (a) research and scientific activities should already be transferred in the education methods of schools in order to fascinate high school students for scientific methods and to spark young people's interest in research, and (b) exciting research questions not solved and innovative findings should be addressed. The high school students work together with the scientists on their existing research questions improve the school's profile and the high school student knowledge in the investigated Sparkling Science topic and can lead to a more diverse viewing by the involvement of the high school students. In the project ELWIRA scientists collaborate with the school to quantify and evaluate the properties of classical building materials like concrete and natural materials like plants and woodlogs in terms of their life cycle through the use of different laboratory and field methods. The collaboration with the high school students is structured in workshops, laboratory work and fieldworks. For an efficient coordination/communication, learning and research progress new advanced electronic media like "Moodle classes/courses" have been used and utilized by the high school students with great interest. The Moodle classes are of high importance in the knowledge transfer in the dialogue with the high school students. The research project is structured into four main areas associated with the efficiencies of building materials: (a) the aesthetic feeling of people in terms of the appearance of materials and associated structures will be evaluated by means of jointly developed and collected questionnaires. The analysis, interpretation and evaluation are carried

  16. Comparative Analysis of English Language Student’s School Paths at a Mexico University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octaviano García Robelo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Seven factors related to academic paths of students of the Bachelor of English Language of a public university in Mexico are investigated. With a non-experimental descriptive design, a Likert scale was applied to evaluate the college students’ perception of these factors. A comparative analysis between three types of school paths was performed. It was found that students with irregular school paths show higher academic difficulties by internal and external problems, such as difficulties in their study habits, problems with their teachers, personal problems and economic problems. Most students reported having difficulties with management of stress, among other important results. This research provides useful information to improve teaching practices, curriculum and mentoring. Psychological and external problems were identified as factors that can be integrated into programs of prevention or intervention, to help improve the education of students and increase terminal efficiency in this university.

  17. Gender Differences in Introductory University Physics Performance: The Influence of High School Physics Preparation and Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra

    2006-12-01

    The attrition of females studying physics after high school has been a continuing concern for the physics education community. If females are well prepared, feel confident, and do well in introductory college physics, they may be inclined to study physics further. This quantitative study uses HLM to identify factors from high school physics preparation (content, pedagogy, and assessment) and the affective domain that predict female and male performance in introductory college physics. The study includes controls for student demographic and academic background characteristics, and the final dataset consists of 1973 surveys from 54 introductory college physics classes. The results highlight high school physics and affective experiences that differentially predict female and male performance. These experiences include: learning requirements, computer graphing/analysis, long written problems, everyday world examples, community projects cumulative tests/quizzes, father's encouragement, family's belief that science leads to a better career, and the length of time students believe that high school physics would help in university physics. There were also experiences that similarly predict female and male performance. The results paint a dynamic picture of the factors from high school physics and the affective domain that influence the future physics performance of females and males. The implication is that there are many aspects to the teaching of physics in high school that, although widely used and thought to be effective, need reform in their implementation in order to be fully beneficial to females and/or males in college.

  18. Gender differences in introductory university physics performance: The influence of high school physics preparation and affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra Sana

    The attrition of females studying physics after high school is a concern to the science education community. Most undergraduate science programs require introductory physics coursework. Thus, success in introductory physics is necessary for students to progress to higher levels of science study. Success also influences attitudes; if females are well-prepared, feel confident, and do well in introductory physics, they may be inclined to study physics further. This quantitative study using multilevel modeling focused on determining factors from high school physics preparation (content, pedagogy, and assessment) and the affective domain that influenced female and male performance in introductory university physics. The study controlled for some university/course level characteristics as well as student demographic and academic background characteristics. The data consisted of 1973 surveys from 54 introductory physics courses within 35 universities across the US. The results highlight high school physics and affective experiences that differentially influenced female and male performance. These experiences include: learning requirements, computer graphing/analysis, long written problems, everyday world examples, community projects, cumulative tests/quizzes, father's encouragement, family's belief that science leads to a better career, and the length of time students believed that high school physics would help in university physics. There were also experiences that had a similar influence on female and male performance. Positively related to performance were: covering fewer topics for longer periods of time, the history of physics as a recurring topic, physics-related videos, and test/quiz questions that involved calculations and/or were drawn from standardized tests. Negatively related to performance were: student-designed projects, reading/discussing labs the day before performing them, microcomputer based laboratories, discussion after demonstrations, and family

  19. Outbound student exchange from Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, School of Maritime Management, Rauma

    OpenAIRE

    Vuorre, Mikko

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to promote outbound student exchange from Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, School of Maritime Management, Rauma (SAMK MeRa). SAMK international student mobility requirements have not on several occasions been met at SAMK MeRa. There has also been a need to inform the students about the possibility to attend student exchange and to raise discussion on student exchange in general. The problems to be solved were: how to inform students about the possibilit...

  20. A Research of nasal methicillin resistant/sensitive Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    2Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health, Kahramanmaras Sutcuimam University, Kahramanmaras, Turkey ... Staphylococcus aureus and pharyngeal beta-haemolytic ..... for other surgical staff) in the surgery clinic personnel.

  1. Classroom management at the university level: lessons from a former high school earth science teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, C.

    2009-12-01

    Just a few days before my career as a fledgling science teacher began in a large public high school in New York City, a mentor suggested I might get some ideas about how to run a classroom from a book called The First Days Of School by Harry Wong. Although the book seemed to concentrate more on elementary students, I found that many of the principles in the book worked well for high school students. Even as I have begun to teach at the university level, many of Wong’s themes have persisted in my teaching style. Wong’s central thesis is that for learning to occur, a teacher must create the proper environment. In education jargon, a good climate for learning is generated via classroom management, an array of methods used by elementary and secondary school teachers to provide structure and routine to a class period via a seamless flow of complementary activities. Many college professors would likely consider classroom management to be chiefly a set of rules to maintain discipline and order among an otherwise unruly herd of schoolchildren, and therefore not a useful concept for mature university students. However, classroom management is much deeper than mere rules for behavior; it is an approach to instructional design that considers the classroom experience holistically. A typical professorial management style is to lecture for an hour or so and ask students to demonstrate learning via examinations several times in a semester. In contrast, a good high school teacher will manage a class from bell-to-bell to create a natural order and flow to a given lesson. In this presentation, I will argue for an approach to college lesson design similar to the classroom management style commonly employed by high school and elementary school teachers. I will suggest some simple, practical techniques learned during my high school experience that work just as well in college: warm-up and practice problems, time management, group activities, bulletin boards, learning environment

  2. A Summer at the University: A twenty five years experience with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, Nelson

    2014-03-01

    After running a summer school for enthusiastic high school students for 25 years, we reached the point where three of my colleagues at the physics department, are exstudents from two physics courses offered (more than ten years ago) within our program. There are also graduates in some others Faculties in different universities. Here we would like to describe the evolution of this project since its beginning, with 60 students in an introductory physics class to the 3000 now attending (January 2014) the around 60 courses offered in almost all areas of knowledge, from theater to Biotechnology. Lately, as we became aware of the relevance of teaching sciences to young kids in elementary school, we started a winter section addressing this group of students. The courses are mainly a hands on experience. In this talk we will comment about our learning experience working on this kind of projects and our projections for the future. Partial travel support from Escuela de Verano.

  3. Differentiating the Underrepresented: Physics Opportunities for Bronx High School Students in a University Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Angela M.

    2010-10-01

    Urban students often have limited opportunities to study physics in high school; many schools, particularly in high poverty areas, do not have the resources and capital to provide physics courses for those who wish to enroll. The Bronx Institute at Lehman College has initiated several programs for Black and Latino youth to enroll in physics classes and progress to college-level physics while still in high school. Students with promise from the surrounding community have been recruited to participate in afterschool and summer classes, taught by university faculty. Examples of student reflections illustrate the collective impact of high expectations, access to rigorous physics study, and a communal, supportive learning environment. Initial experiences with the first two cohorts will be shared, along with curriculum plans for a comprehensive physics sequence to prepare students for admission to competitive colleges and participation in future STEM study and careers.

  4. Trainee primary-school teachers’ perceptions on CLIL instruction and assessment in universities: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Victoria Guadamillas Gómez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available CLIL is an important approach in training future Primary School Teachers since bilingual programs developed at schools in Spain require not only professionals with proficientSecond Language (L2 levels, but also future teachers who are versed in the main methodological principles for CLIL. Firstly, this case study reviews the legislation for bilingual programs in Spain. Secondly, it describes teacher training through a CLIL course within the Faculty of Education at the University of Castilla-La Mancha, focussing on the methodology and evaluation procedures followed in the course. Thirdly, this paperrefersto the method performed to evaluate students’ perceptions ofthe CLIL training and assessment process. Finally, it shows the results from the study and some conclusionsrelated to the assessment and instruction process for the implementation of the CLIL approach in Primary School Teaching Undergraduate Programs.

  5. Keynote Speech: 90th Anniversary Symposium Indiana University School of Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Cuomo

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available In celebration of 90 years of social work education at Indiana University, the School of Social Work sponsored an Anniversary Symposium on April 12, 2002. Andrew Cuomo, former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and current candidate for New York State Governor, delivered the keynote address. In his address,Mr. Cuomo recognized the history and growth of Indiana University School of Social Work from its origin in 1911 to its current status as a state-wide, multi-campus enterprise. He discussed the formation of Project Help (Housing Enterprise for the Less Privileged and shared some of his experiences as Secretary of HUD. He also explored several contemporary social, political, and philosophical issues, including the potential long-term effects of the tragic events of September 11, 2001. Introduced by Ms. Jane Schlegel, M.S.W., Chair of the Indiana University School of Social Work Campaign Committee, Mr. Cuomo interspersed his prepared remarks with spontaneous reflections.His comments are presented here in unedited fashion.

  6. Risk Factors of Narcotic and Psychoactive Drugs Use among University and High School Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kashi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Today use of different banned substances such as narcotic, psychoactive and energetic drugs are social problem that has created worry in different levels of human societies. The aim of present study was examined the prevalence of use of narcotic and psychoactive drugs among high school and university students also identifying of risk factors associated with the use of this materials. Method: The population of this descriptive survey study was all students of high school and university of Khodabandeh city. By cluster random sampling 580 students of high school and university selected and questionnaires distributed among them. After eliminating incomplete questionnaires 480 students remained as research sample. Results: In consideration of selected sample the most important reasons of using of narcotics are: enjoying and curiosity, exposed to bad environment like addicted friends and families, joblessness, economic problems, lack of information and loss of affection. Conclusion: The analysis of the results indicated the high prevalence of narcotic and drugs use and necessity of codification of preventive programs for these people.

  7. [Prevalence and risk factors of social anxiety disorder in high schools and universities in Chengdu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rong; Wu, Wel-li; Hu, Jun-mei; Qiu, Chang-jian; Wang, Qiang; Wei, Geng; Sun, Jin-hua; Yang, Chuang; Song, Ping; Ye, An-hong; Zhang, Wei

    2006-07-01

    To explore the prevalence and risk factors of social anxiety disorder (SAD) in high schools and universities in Chengdu. 2279 students in Chengdu sampled by optimum distributing delaminating grouping method were interviewed one-to-one by the trained psychiatrists according to SCID. Both the cooperated SAD patients (n=156) and the normal counterparts (NC, n=156) in the 2279 students completed Egma Minnen av Bardndosnauppforstran (EMBU), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Form Y), Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (FNE) and Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ). There were 179 SAD patients, 88 female ones and 91 male ones, in the 2279 students of the high schools and universities in Chengdu. Statistical analysis reveals that the SAD patients differ from the NC in seven aspects, i.e. growing circumstances (P = 0.049), family economical status(P = 0.000), family history of psychiatric disorder, scales of EMBU,STAI, FNE and DSQ. The total prevalence of SAD in the students of high schools and universities in Chengdu was 8.15%, the female prevalence 8.35%, and the male prevalence 7.62%. The possible risk factors were: growing up in the countryside, low family economic state, parental rearing pattern being deficient in emotional warmth, understanding, trust and encouragement but excessive in refuse, denial and overprotection, having anxiety trait, feeling fear of negative evaluation, more likely to use neurotic and immature defense mechanism while less likely to use mature defense mechanism, having positive family mental disorder history.

  8. Case study: the Stanford University School of Medicine and its teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Philip A

    2008-09-01

    There is wide variation in the governance and organization of academic health centers (AHCs), often prompted by or associated with changes in leadership. Changes at AHCs are influenced by institutional priorities, economic factors, competing needs, and the personality and performance of leaders. No organizational model has uniform applicability, and it is important for each AHC to learn what works or does not on the basis of its experiences. This case study of the Stanford University School of Medicine and its teaching hospitals--which constitute Stanford's AHC, the Stanford University Medical Center--reflects responses to the consequences of a failed merger of the teaching hospitals and related clinical enterprises with those of the University of California-San Francisco School of Medicine that required a new definition of institutional priorities and directions. These were shaped by a strategic plan that helped define goals and objectives in education, research, patient care, and the necessary financial and administrative underpinnings needed. A governance model was created that made the medical school and its two major affiliated teaching hospitals partners; this arrangement requires collaboration and coordination that is highly dependent on the shared objectives of the institutional leaders involved. The case study provides the background factors and issues that led to these changes, how they were envisioned and implemented, the current status and challenges, and some lessons learned. Although the current model is working, future changes may be needed to respond to internal and external forces and changes in leadership.

  9. Linking University Students’ Willingness to Learn to Their Recollections of Motivation at Secondary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gorges

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of recollected school-based motivation on university students’ willingness to use new learning opportunities. Following Eccles’ expectancy-value theory, willingness to learn was conceptualized as task value, which has been found to predict task choice in previous empirical studies. Based on three motivational theories, we suggest two broad motivational dimensions for an economic description of motivational orientations, inward and outward, that should differentially predict the formation of task value. German university students (N = 1580 were asked about their task value for receiving their instructions in English as a foreign language at university and, retrospectively, their motivation in English language class at secondary school. Principal components analysis and confirmatory factor analyses of motivational variables yielded a two-factor solution supporting the differentiation between inward and outward motivational orientation. Inward motivational orientation at school was positively linked to students’ task value in adulthood, even if the individual’s self-concept of ability was controlled. The effects of outward motivation were rather small and tended to be counterproductive. Our findings suggest a complex interplay between past and present motivation and self-concept of ability underlying one’s willingness to learn and to participate in education.

  10. Transformational Partnerships and Learning: broadening the experiences for a community organization, school and university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette Long

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Partnerships between community organizations, schools and universities are becoming more widespread as education faculties seek to broaden the experiences of their preservice teachers (Kruger, Davies, Eckersley, Newell& Cherednichenko, 2009. The following paper reports on one such endeavour where a small group of six preservice teachers, drawn from teaching programs that included secondary, primary and primary/early childhood, were immersed in a primary/secondary rural school in Sola, on the remote island of Vanua Lava, located in the northern province of Vanuatu. Whilst international practicums are not new, what is unique within this endeavour was the nature of the partnership that included the Vanuatu Ministry of Education, the Australian Catholic University (ACU and Rotary Australia World Community Service (RAWCS. Each partner had a layer of active participants represented by Arep Secondary School, the School of Education (ACU, NSW, and the Rotary Club of Winston Hills.  The partnership was therefore able to provide both strategic and practical support to the ongoing project, creating layers of engagement and participation for the various groups.  This partnership was transformational as it was based upon genuine engagement with a focus on common goals and mutual benefits, built on relationships established over many years, which is different to other types of partnerships that often seek to obtain only individual organizational goals rather that mutual goals or shared purposes (Brown et al., 2006.

  11. School background and university selection: ranking performance as an inclusion factor to higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos René Rodríguez Garcés

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Using databases of Admission to Higher Education in Chile in 2013, the behavior of components that have school career (NEM and Ranking and PSU scores (Mathematics and Language is analyzed based variables segmentation of socio applicants. But both factors in theory be aligned with the curriculum, scores report a reduced correlation between them. The aim is to explore and analyze the distribution of the scores obtained by the candidates in various selection factors based on their socioeconomic and educational characteristics, and the impact of incorporating the Ranking of Scores on diversification and inclusion of the population students annually participates in the selection process. School career components, especially Ranking establishing the relative position within their respective student accommodation have less biased and with a higher concentration toward higher scores compared to the PSU component distributions, and show less influenced by variables sociofamiliar or economic. Ranking as an expression of good school performance, effort and dedication to study by the student, compensates for unwanted selection bias doing more inclusive university choice, whose effects on the modification of the student profile selected will depend on the valuation assigned the university institution to the school career the detriment of traditional PSU component.

  12. SCHOOL OBSERVATION AS ONE OF THE ASSESSMENTS FOR ENGLISH EDUCATION DEPARTMENT STUDENTS OF MURIA KUDUS UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atik Rokhayani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, learning requires students to develop their knowledge through critical thinking. Knowledge is not just receiving the information but also interpreting the information. It requires new learning goals change the relationship between assessment and instruction. So, the lecturers need to assess the students’ ability to comprehend the materials. In addition, the lecturers have to take an active role about the purpose of the assessment and the content that is being assessed. There are many kinds of assessments used by the lecturers given to their students. For example: asking the students to do the discussion, test, questioning, observation etc. School observation tends to be familiar for the students of English Education Department of Muria Kudus University since by doing the observation they can face the real school condition. The students can observe the English teaching and learning process in the classroom. This paper focuses in AMEL (Approaches and Methods in English Language class. It discusses the application of school observation as one of the authentic assessment for English Education Department students of Muria Kudus University through exploring the approaches and methods used by Junior High School teachers in Kudus. In the end of the observation, the students have to report the discussion in form of poster presentation.

  13. Education and training in dental schools in Spain, Sevilla University experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, J. C.; Carrera, F.; Gomez, A.; Luis, J.; Rodriguez, M.; Herrador, M.

    2003-07-01

    The ICRP, in its publication 73 entitled Radiological Protection and Safety in Medicine states (paragraph 128) that one important need is to provide adequate resources for the education and training in radiological protection for future professional and technical staff in medical practice. The training programme should include initial training for all incoming staff and regular updating retraining. The European Directive 97/743/EURATOM on Medical Exposure (MED) lays down requirements for education and training. The document RP 116 published by the European commission give guidelines on Education and Training in Radiation Protection and in its paragraph 51 establish that Members States shall encourage the introduction of a course on radiation protection in the basic curriculum of medical and dental schools according to the EC Medical Exposure Directive (MED). In the Spanish legislation RD 815/2001 referred to the medical exposures, it is encourage the need for the introduction of Radiological Protection courses in Medicine and Dental schools with the objective of patient protection. In this study it has been analysed the actual situation of the education and training in Radiation Protection in Dental Schools in Spain. In addition it is described the experience of the University of Sevilla. The results of the study shows that only 4 from 9 dental schools have disciplines of Radiation Protection in its curriculum. In one of them the course is mandatory and has a content of 2 credits (20 hours). In the rest of dental schools the discipline has an optional character with an average of 4 credits. The discipline of Radiation Protection of the curriculum of Dental School at Sevilla university has 4 credits and it is configured as a course with the necessary requirements from the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council to obtain the Radiological Accreditation of Responsible of Dental Radiodiagnostic Installations. This diploma is given once the students have finished the Bachelor

  14. Community-university partnership: key elements for improving field teaching in medical schools in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoat, Luu N; Wright, E P

    2008-01-01

    Medical education in many countries includes periods that students spend in the community. In Vietnam, a move towards more community-oriented teaching has increased the need for rural community-based education for medical students during recent years. At the same time, new policies and social changes have created difficulties for community-based education. The eight main medical schools have worked together since 1999 to improve their curriculum, including sharing and adopting new approaches in their field teaching programs. To establish more systematic, integrated and participatory field teaching in rural communities in the curricula of eight medical schools, based on community-university partnerships. Eight medical schools together analyzed their field teaching programs and identified issues still needing attention. A pilot intervention explored how to involve community and local health staff actively in field teaching programs. From the results of the workshop and the pilot intervention, plans were made for sets of activities to improve weaknesses. Feedback and evaluation surveys among local health staff and students who participated in field training were performed after 3 years' intervention, to check the appropriateness of the field teaching programs and methods. All eight schools had made improvements in selected aspects of their community-based education programs. There was still considerable variation in the programs but all were more systematic and better integrated into the revised curriculum. Stakeholders' concerns and interests related to field teaching were analyzed and taken into consideration when they were involved in field teaching. The community-university partnership has become a key element for field teaching in these medical schools. In the new social context of Vietnam, along with more community-based education periods, more active participation of all stakeholders is increasingly necessary to work towards more effective community

  15. Effects of university affiliation and "school spirit" on color preferences: Berkeley versus Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Karen B; Poggesi, Rosa M; Palmer, Stephen E

    2011-06-01

    The ecological valence theory (EVT) posits that preference for a color is determined by people's average affective response to everything associated with it (Palmer & Schloss, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107, 8877-8882, 2010). The EVT thus implies the existence of sociocultural effects: Color preference should increase with positive feelings (or decrease with negative feelings) toward an institution strongly associated with a color. We tested this prediction by measuring undergraduates' color preferences at two rival universities, Berkeley and Stanford, to determine whether students liked their university's colors better than their rivals did. Students not only preferred their own colors more than their rivals did, but the degree of their preference increased with self-rated positive affect ("school spirit") for their university. These results support the EVT's claim that color preference is caused by learned affective responses to associated objects and institutions, because it is unlikely that students choose their university or develop their degree of school spirit on the basis of preexisting color preferences.

  16. Paired peer review of university classroom teaching in a school of nursing and midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul N; Parker, Steve; Smigiel, Heather

    2012-08-01

    Peer review of university classroom teaching can increase the quality of teaching but is not universally practiced in Australian universities. To report an evaluation of paired peer-review process using both paper and web based teaching evaluation tools. Twenty university teachers in one metropolitan Australian School of Nursing and Midwifery were randomly paired and then randomly assigned to a paper based or web-based peer review tool. Each teacher reviewed each other's classroom teaching as part of a peer review program. The participants then completed an 18 question survey evaluating the peer review tool and paired evaluation process. Responses were analyzed using frequencies and percentages. Regardless of the tool used, participants found this process of peer review positive (75%), collegial (78%), supportive (61%) and non-threatening (71%). Participants reported that the peer review will improve their own classroom delivery (61%), teaching evaluation (61%) and planning (53%). The web-based tool was found to be easier to use and allowed more space than the paper-based tool. Implementation of a web-based paired peer review system can be a positive method of peer review of university classroom teaching. Pairing of teachers to review each other's classroom teaching is a promising strategy and has the potential to improve teaching in teaching universities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Documentation to the NCES Common Core of Data Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe Survey: School Year 2010-11. Version Provisional 2a. NCES 2012-338rev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaton, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe file includes data for the following variables: NCES school ID number, state school ID number, name of the school, name of the agency that operates the school, mailing address, physical location address, phone number, school type, operational status, locale code, latitude, longitude, county number,…

  18. Effectiveness of Social skills training on decreasing the likelihood of Tehran Pre- university school girls’ addiction

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    lida kakia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The age structure of population in our country has been exposed priority to preventive strategy to narcotic substances. The purpose of present research is to survey the effectiveness of social skills training on decreasing the likelihood of school girls’ addiction in pre-university schools of Tehran city. Materials and Methods:For collecting research data related to effectiveness of social skills training on addiction decrease among school girls, in pretest stage, 300 girls were selected by random simple sampling method in Tehran city. Then in post-test stage in each one of the control and experimental groups, 15 students attended in order to gather information from independent T-test to determie significance of difference between means and F-test to compare scores. Results: Analysis of data showed significant difference between the results of the two tests in both groups of control and experimental and also showed that social skills training can cause decrease in the likelihood of school girls’ addiction, preparation to addiction, and decrease in the youth’s confession to it . Discussion: Social skill training courses to campaign against youth's inclination to narcotic drugs must fulfill the requirements set by referent groups such as consultants, school teachers, and social planners. In addition, this method can be used as a contrastive approach for cooperative learning in youth education

  19. A community-school district-university partnership for assessing physical activity of tweens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Robert J; Nickelson, Jen; Baldwin, Julie A; Bryant, Carol A; Alfonso, Moya; Phillips, Leah M; DeBate, Rita D

    2009-01-01

    Obesity among youth is related to a decline in physical activity, and data on physical activity levels among children in elementary and middle schools are limited. We leveraged a community-school district-university partnership in Sarasota County, Florida, in May of 2005 to assess physical activity levels among tweens (youth aged 9-13 years) and to measure the relationship between tweens' awareness of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's VERB program and participation in physical activity, using a minimally obtrusive survey. After surveying participating schools (4 elementary schools and 3 middle schools), we obtained 1,407 responses from children in grades 5 through 7. In all, 83.1% of students met the federal recommendation for daily participation in vigorous-intensity physical activity (VPA), and 58.6% had tried a new game or sport within the previous 2 months. Mean number of days in the previous week engaging in VPA was significantly higher (P sport daily (r = .369, P marketing campaign promoting physical activity and participation in new games and sports. Although participation in VPA was high, girls reported significantly fewer days spent engaged in VPA than did boys. We found a modest association between engaging in VPA and having active friends. Capitalizing on leadership from multiple community-based organizations to monitor youth physical activity may inspire implementation of strategies for motivating youth to try new games and sports that they can sustain through the adolescent years and beyond.

  20. Benefits, Challenges, Characteristics and Instructional Approaches in an El Sistema Inspired After-School String Program Developed as a University-School Partnership in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Michael; Provenzano, Anthony M.; Spencer, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the benefits, challenges, program characteristics and instructional approaches of an El Sistema inspired (ESI) after-school string program developed as a university-school partnership. Case study methodology was used to examine the program. Fifth-grade students received 75 minutes of after-school…

  1. Surveying Turkish high school and university students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Nuri; Mason, Andrew J.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-06-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving can impact how well they learn physics and how successful they are in solving physics problems. Prior research in the U.S. using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and astronomy courses and physics experts in terms of their attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving. Here we discuss the validation, administration, and analysis of data for the Turkish version of the AAPS survey for high school and university students in Turkey. After the validation and administration of the Turkish version of the survey, the analysis of the data was conducted by grouping the data by grade level, school type, and gender. While there are no statistically significant differences between the averages of various groups on the survey, overall, the university students in Turkey were more expertlike than vocational high school students. On an item by item basis, there are statistically differences between the averages of the groups on many items. For example, on average, the university students demonstrated less expertlike attitudes about the role of equations and formulas in problem solving, in solving difficult problems, and in knowing when the solution is not correct, whereas they displayed more expertlike attitudes and approaches on items related to metacognition in physics problem solving. A principal component analysis on the data yields item clusters into which the student responses on various survey items can be grouped. A comparison of the responses of the Turkish and American university students enrolled in algebra-based introductory physics courses shows that on more than half of the items, the responses of these two groups were statistically significantly different, with the U.S. students on average responding to the items in a more expertlike manner.

  2. Surveying Turkish high school and university students’ attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Balta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Students’ attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving can impact how well they learn physics and how successful they are in solving physics problems. Prior research in the U.S. using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and astronomy courses and physics experts in terms of their attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving. Here we discuss the validation, administration, and analysis of data for the Turkish version of the AAPS survey for high school and university students in Turkey. After the validation and administration of the Turkish version of the survey, the analysis of the data was conducted by grouping the data by grade level, school type, and gender. While there are no statistically significant differences between the averages of various groups on the survey, overall, the university students in Turkey were more expertlike than vocational high school students. On an item by item basis, there are statistically differences between the averages of the groups on many items. For example, on average, the university students demonstrated less expertlike attitudes about the role of equations and formulas in problem solving, in solving difficult problems, and in knowing when the solution is not correct, whereas they displayed more expertlike attitudes and approaches on items related to metacognition in physics problem solving. A principal component analysis on the data yields item clusters into which the student responses on various survey items can be grouped. A comparison of the responses of the Turkish and American university students enrolled in algebra-based introductory physics courses shows that on more than half of the items, the responses of these two groups were statistically significantly different, with the U.S. students on average responding to the items in a more expertlike manner.

  3. The Role of the University Tutor in School-Based Work in Primary Schools in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ievers, Michael; Wylie, Ken; Gray, Colette; Ni Aingleis, Bernadette; Cummins, Brian

    2013-01-01

    There has been much international debate on the role of the university tutor in the supervision of student teachers during school-based work. This study focuses upon the Irish context, where there has been little research. It involves a comparative study of the views and attitudes of university staff, student teachers and class teachers from the…

  4. University of the seas, 15 years of oceanographic schools on board of the Marion Dufresne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaize, Bruno; Deverchere, Jacques; Leau, Hélène; Graindorge, David

    2015-04-01

    Since the first University at Sea, proposed by two French Universities (Brest and Bordeaux) in 1999, the R/V Marion Dufresne, in collaboration with the French Polar institute (IPEV), has welcome 12 oceanographic schools. The main objective of this educational and scientific program is to stimulate the potential interest of highly graduated students in scientific fields dealing with oceanography, and to broaden exchanges with foreign universities, strengthening a pool of excellence at a high international scientific level. It is a unique opportunity for the students to discover and to be involved in the work in progress of collecting scientific data on board of a ship, and to attend international research courses given by scientists involved in the cruise program. They also experience the final task of the scientific work by presenting their own training results, making posters on board, and writing a cruise report. For some University at Sea, students had also updated a daily journal, available on internet, hosted by the main institutions involved (as IPEV or EPOC, Bordeaux University). All this work is done in English, a common language to all the participants. An overview of these 15 years background experience will be presented, underlying the financial supports used, the logistic on board, as well as all the benefits acquiered by all former students, now in permanent positions in different international institutions.

  5. Evolution of traditional university business school into market-oriented knowledge provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Jurše

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available By accession to the European Union (EU transition countries from Central and Eastern Europe (CEE entered a dynamic period of comprehensive change in their national societal context. Part of that changing context is the Bologna Process, by which higher education will be increasingly integrated into a unified European cross-border higher education area. Proposed harmonization of higher education structures is viewed as one of the key pillars in transforming Europe into a knowledge-driven society with more competitive businesses and higher education. In the process of dynamic transition of CEE countries university business schools are also confronted with a variety of external challenges, particularly with increased competitive pressure evolving from a globalization of knowledge production and business education which affect their future prosperity in the emerging European Higher Education Area. In the article we critically evaluate key strategic developments in a broader business education context from a perspective of their implications for the university business schools in transition countries in their effort to accomplish a proper strategic adjustment to changes in society. On the basis of comprehensive analysis of relevant institutional context, we present the conceptual framework for a strategic alignment of business schools with a changing European higher education reality.

  6. Prevalence of pain and its association with transportation of school supplies in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windsor Ramos da Silva Júnior,

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of pain and its association with the transportation of school supplies among university students. It was a cross-sectional study with 373 university students between February and September 2012 in which sociodemographic and academic data, as well as those regarding the transportation of school supplies and the presence of pain were collected through a semi-structured interview. Further analysis of anthropometric data was conducted and the volumes transported were weighted. Data were analyzed using the SPSS 17.0®software using the model of Hierarchical Binary Logistic Regression, Backward LR method, in which the power of influence of predictor variables was tested in the presence of musculoskeletal pain. Prevalence of pain of 82.8%, with overall average of 5.21 points on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS for pain assessment was found. Among women, the influence of the relative weight of volumes on the presence of pain was 45.1% higher than among men (PR = 0.689, CI 95% = 0.503 to 0.942 for each 1% increment. The transport time, in turn, increased by 22.9% the likelihood of occurrence of pain, every 15 minutes (PR = 1.229, CI 95% = 1.090 to 1.386. A high prevalence of pain related to the transportation of school supplies was observed, as well as the influence of predictor variables such as relative weight and transport time, especially in females.

  7. Habits of Mind: Forging University-School Partnerships to Bring a High-Quality Enrichment Curriculum to English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, Amy Cournoyer; Chase, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Educational partnerships between urban school districts and institutions of higher education provide a powerful means for enhancing student achievement and cultivating college-going cultures. This article describes how Boston University and the Malden, Massachusetts, school district worked with the community to support English learners and develop…

  8. Participatory Action Research (PAR) as Democratic Disruption: New Public Management and Educational Research in Schools and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Pro-market and business approaches to management in the public sector (new public management--NPM) have created an audit culture in schools driven by top-down, high stakes accountability, and the fetishization of data. Within this context, authentic, qualitative, and democratic forms of inquiry, both in universities and schools, become easily…

  9. An Ontological and Epistemological Analysis of the Presentation of the First Law of Thermodynamics in School and University Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, Joaquin Castillo; Rojas, Rocio Ogaz; Merino, Cristian; Quiroz, Waldo

    2016-01-01

    Considering the relevance of thermodynamics to the scientific discipline of chemistry and the curriculum of the Western school system, the philosophical system of Mario Bunge, particularly his ontology and epistemology, is used herein to analyze the presentation of the first law of thermodynamics in 15 school and university textbooks. The…

  10. Collaboration between the University Pre-Service Teacher Education Program and the Local Elementary School on English Remedial Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chin-Wen

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed 24 pre-service elementary school English teachers' design and delivery of remedial education to the fifth and sixth graders in the collaboration between the university pre-service teacher education program and the local elementary school in a city in northwest Taiwan. The pre-service teachers were encouraged by the elementary…

  11. Enhancing School-Based Mental Health Services with a Preventive and Promotive Approach to Universal Screening for Complete Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdy, Erin; Furlong, Michael; Raines, Tara C.; Bovery, Bibliana; Kauffman, Beth; Kamphaus, Randy W.; Dever, Bridget V.; Price, Martin; Murdock, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Universal screening for complete mental health is proposed as a key step in service delivery reform to move school-based psychological services from the back of the service delivery system to the front, which will increase emphasis on prevention, early intervention, and promotion. A sample of 2,240 high school students participated in a schoolwide…

  12. High Rates of Depressive Symptoms among Senior High School Students Preparing for National University Entrance Examination in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ibrahim; Ergene, Tuncay; Munir, Kerim

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms among senior high school students preparing national university entrance examination (OSS) in Turkey. The authors conducted a survey during the second term of students' senior year at high school, a time when they were exposed to a stressful standardized…

  13. Implementing an Alcohol and Other Drug Use Prevention Program Using University-High School Partnerships: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, Jeffrey J.; Orsini, Muhsin Michael; Wyrick, David L.; Fearnow-Kenney, Melodie; Wagoner, Kimberly G.; Caldwell, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Background: School-based alcohol and other drug use prevention remains an important national strategy. Collaborative partnerships between universities and high schools have the potential to enhance prevention programming; however, there are challenges to sustaining such partnerships. Purpose: The purpose of this commentary is to underscore…

  14. Modeling the Impact of School-based Universal Depression Screening on Additional Service Capacity Needs: A System Dynamics Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lyon, Aaron R.; Maras, Melissa A.; Pate, Christina M.; Igusa, Takeru; Stoep, Ann Vander

    2016-01-01

    Although it is widely known that the occurrence of depression increases over the course of adolescence, symptoms of mood disorders frequently go undetected. While schools are viable settings for conducting universal screening to systematically identify students in need of services for common health conditions, particularly those that adversely affect school performance, few school districts routinely screen their students for depression. Among the most commonly referenced barriers are concern...

  15. The Opinions of Academicians from a Foundation University on School, Education and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burçak Ceren AKPINAR

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to examine the strengths and weaknesses of the relationship between education and society facts in relation to the cultural, economic and spatial discrepancies based on the views of academicians. The research questions were determined as: (i Is there a relationship between the concepts of education and community and parent’s economic power? (ii Is there a relationship between education and community concepts and cultural differences of individuals? (iii Is there a relationship between education and community concepts and spatial differences? The design of the study was qualitative ‘case study’. The study was conducted with the participation of eight academics working in various departments at the faculty of education at a foundation university. Semi-structured interviews were made with academicians in the study group. Data were analyzed with descriptive analysis technique. This research mostly focused on the relationship among the economic, social, cultural and spatial factors and the education concept. As a result, it was revealed that (i the children of families in higher income groups studied at top schools whereas the children of families in lower income groups studied at schools in disadvantaged areas, (ii these two groups displayed differences related to finding employment after their graduation (iii schools could lead to dissociation among students though generally having a unifying function. (iv schools brought about social rupture as much as they enabled social integration.

  16. Case Study of a School-Based Universal Dating Violence Prevention Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Cascardi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of universal dating violence prevention programs has rapidly expanded in the past two decades. Many programs demonstrate change in attitudes supportive of dating violence, and a few show evidence of behavior change; however, detailed analysis of process and fidelity of program implementation is generally neglected. An important goal of prevention research is to identify successful initiatives that can be replicated and disseminated in the field. The purpose of the current case study is to document the implementation process of a middle school–based dating violence prevention curriculum in economically disadvantaged urban neighborhoods. Particular attention is given to the school context, such as the process of school and teacher recruitment, the program model, and classroom implementation of the dating violence prevention program in four areas: teacher training, student outcomes, program fidelity, and student engagement. Nine health and physical education teachers from six urban middle schools participated. Results describe effective strategies to secure school participation and engagement, and provide evidence regarding methods to train health and physical education teachers in low-income, urban neighborhoods. Furthermore, classroom observations demonstrate that teachers successfully implemented the five-lesson curriculum, which resulted in positive student outcomes to prevent dating violence. This case study represents an important step in deepening our understanding of the mechanisms of program delivery.

  17. Education Status of Oral Genetics at the Fourth Military Medical University and other Chinese Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan Li; Wang, Chang Ning; Fan, Zhi Peng; Jiao, Yang; Duan, Xiao Hong

    To investigate the current state of genetics education at the Fourth Military Medical University (FMMU) and compare it with other dental schools of China. Detailed information about the history and current education status of Oral Genetics in the FMMU were collected and questionnaires were completed to acquire the feedback of twenty-seven students on the course. In the other thirty-five dental schools including the capitals of twenty-five provinces and four municipalities in China, information about the oral genetic course were collected by a telephone survey. The contents of survey included whether or not the Oral Genetic course is offered and some basic information about the curriculum (such as the content, hours, teachers' background and teaching methods). Among a total of thirty-six dental schools investigated, six of them (16.7%) offered the Oral Genetic course or related lectures/seminars. The length and contents of the curriculum vary among these schools. The FMMU offered the oral genetic curriculum both to undergraduates and graduated students. Their teachers had a broad range of backgrounds, such as dentistry, biology, genetics, and biochemistry. The students considered the Oral Genetics course to be helpful for their future professional careers. Genetic education in dentistry in China is still at a preliminary stage. More effort must be paid to spread the knowledge of Oral Genetics in China. In addition, domestic and international communications and networks for Oral Genetics should be set up in the near future.

  18. Physical fitness during medical school: a 4-year study at the Uniformed Services University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Mark B; Cochran, Christopher; Hall, Jennifer M; Olsen, Cara

    2012-01-01

    Medical school is stressful. Students commonly exhibit changes in dietary and physical activity patterns in response. We tracked measurements of physical fitness over 4 years in a cohort of students at the Uniformed Services University. Validated measures for specific components of physical fitness were measured in 170 students (94% of the Class of 2011) over the course of 4 years. Measurements included: (1) height and weight (body composition), (2) timed push-ups and sit-ups (muscular endurance), and (3) timed run (aerobic endurance). These measurements are part of annual physical readiness testing required for active duty service in the US military. Muscular endurance and aerobic capacity declined significantly over the 4 years of medical school. Changes in physical fitness were most pronounced during the preclinical years. There were inconsistent changes in body composition among students in the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Composite fitness scores declined significantly in Army and Navy students but not in the Air Force. Individual levels of physical fitness decline during medical school. Declines are most notable during the preclinical years. To promote student wellness, medical schools should incorporate student wellness activities as a routine part of the curriculum.

  19. Designing Hub-and-Spoke School Bus Transportation Network: A Case Study of Wonkwang University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Hyuk Kim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a case study of hub-and-spoke school bus transportation network design. The case study here utilizes a mathematical model that is the P-median optimization model to determine optimal hub locations. The P-median problem is a combinatorial optimization problem that includes many binary variables and constraints. The selected objective of the model is to minimize the total travel time satisfying other operational constraints. To elevate usability of decision making in the future, we implement the simulation model through the template model in spreadsheet platform. The developed model is used as a future reference to find operational directions of school bus managing policy and also tested on the case of Wonkwang University.

  20. Schoolboys of Noble Boarding School at the Moscow University in 1792

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feofanov Aleksandr

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present article the number, social status and career achievements of pupils of the Noble Boarding School at the Moscow University is to be reconstructed on the basis of 1792 list. Despite the fact of the “noble” name of the Boarding School that had been indeed intended for the nobility, from the general list is not all that clear that every student was a member of high aristocracy. Although some certain percent of pure aristocrats had been involved without a doubt. The new source could also clarify information on education of the generals of 1812 year. The author concludes that the heuristic capabilities of this document require the use of new sources, including archival, with the task of creation of synthetic knowledge.

  1. Post-operative complications following dental extractions at the School of Dentistry, University of Otago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Darryl C; Al-Hassiny, Haidar H; Ain, Adrian B; Broadbent, Jonathan M

    2014-06-01

    To determine the frequency and correlates associations of post-extraction complications at a dental school. Retrospective review of patient records. Exodontia clinic at the School of Dentistry, University of Otago, Dunedin. Provider characteristics, patient demographic characteristics, patient medical history, teeth extracted and occurrence of postoperative complications. Of the 598 extractions (540 routine and 58 surgical) which were undertaken in the audit period, 74 (12.4%) resulted in post-operative complications. Dry socket and post-operative pain were the major complications. A higher complication rate was found among patients treated by fourth-year undergraduate students than among those treated by more senior students or staff. Post-operative complications were not significantly associated with patients' ethnicity or medical history. The rate of postoperative complications at the Univeristy of Otago's Faculty of Dentistry is consistent with reports in existing literature and inversely associated with operators' experience.

  2. Getting universal primary tobacco use prevention into priority area schools: a media literacy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Melinda C; Zwarun, Lara; Fehrmann Warren, Victoria

    2011-11-01

    The impact of any prevention intervention depends on its ability to influence health risks and behavior change and the extent to which the target audience has access to and participates in the program. In this article, the authors make the case that media literacy-based tobacco prevention education can be integrated into the middle school curriculum in a way that delivers on both counts. They describe Missouri's successful development and dissemination of the Youth Empowerment in Action! Tobacco Education, Advocacy, and Media curriculum to schools serving populations that are most vulnerable to tobacco-related health disparities. They make three recommendations to support health program developers' efforts to motivate and prepare teachers to implement and sustain universal tobacco prevention education in areas of highest need.

  3. The School of Public Health at the University of Chile: Origins, Evolution, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Pino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the support of and in accordance with the model of the Rockefeller Foundation, the School of Public Health of the University of Chile was established in 1943 as a training center for public health institution administrators. From the beginning its academic leaders also took the lead in the country’s health institutions, allowing the increasing knowledge of public health to be brought directly into practice con­currently with training. The military coup of 1973 halted this cycle and broke and destroyed the links between the school and national governance and policymaking; despite this, the university continued to consolidate its role as the major training institution for public health professionals. During that time the Master’s Programs in Public Health and in Biostatistics were launched, attracting students throughout the country and Latin America, but very few professors had adequate research training. Only in 2000, a decade after the return to democracy, a strategic plan was implemented to renew the School of Public Health (SPH and reshape it for the new public health scenario in Chile. Since then efforts have been made to bring research skills up to date through PhD training and sending young professors to study abroad. Also, a PhD program was created in the SPH in 2003, and graduates are being rapidly hired in universities and the Health Ministry. The recovery of at least part of a leading role of the public health agenda should be based on the capacity to generate relevant new knowledge and advocate for its implementation.

  4. Radon measurement laboratories. An educational experience based on school and university cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cicco, F.; Balzano, E.; Limata, B. N.; Masullo, M. R.; Quarto, M.; Roca, V.; Sabbarese, C.; Pugliese, M.

    2017-11-01

    There is a growing interest in engaging students and the general public about the meaning and objectives of doing science. When it is possible students can learn by actively engaging in the practices of science, conducting investigations, sharing ideas with their peers, teachers and scientists, learning to work with measuring apparatuses, to acquire and process data and use models so as to interpret phenomena. This is a process that requires a gradual collective growth. Schools and universities can both benefit from this cooperation. This paper presents activities of a project focusing on the radon survey in high schools. The ENVIRAD (environmental radioactivity) educational project involved about 2500 students and some tens of teachers in measurements while using solid state nuclear track detectors. This experience began about 15 years ago and is still carried out by various national projects managed by the same research group. The measurements and data analysis have been done in school laboratories and in the university radioactivity laboratory. Several hundred students were also involved in the transduction and signal processing. In some cases, pupils have also been involved in citizen awareness and the dissemination of this experience has kicked off a follow-up project explicitly addressed to citizens. The project has led to the opportunity to learn science through a real physics experiment. The students’ enthusiasm allowed the collection of a relevant amount of data which benefitted both the regional survey on radon and the improvement of nuclear physics teaching at school. Through the project activities it was possible to recognize the interdisciplinary connections among different scientific disciplines connected to radioactivity.

  5. Utilizing a School-University Collaborative Partnership to Design, Present, and Support Pre-K-12 Coursework on Differentiated Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Differentiated instruction should be evident in every classroom; however, it is particularly critical in Professional Development Schools (PDS) that have the dual focus of instruction for both Pre-K-12 students and university students completing their final internship experience. In this article, the author illustrates a university and school…

  6. Collaborative Action Research between Schools, a Continuing Professional Development Centre for Teachers and the University: A Case Study in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Alfaya, Maria Elena; Olivares García, Maria Ángeles; Mérida Serrano, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative action research project developed over the course of the 2011/12 academic year in the Faculty of Education at Cordoba University (Spain). The RIECU school-continuing professional development centre for teachers-university learning network is part of this research process. The aim is to create and consolidate…

  7. Journal publications from Zagreb University Medical School in 1995-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, Jelka; Bozikov, Jadranka

    2003-12-01

    To analyze a five-year publication output of the Zagreb University Medical School in scientific journals, especially in the journals covered by the Current Contents (CC), bibliographic database of the Institute for Scientific Information. Medical School of the Zagreb University is organized in 10 preclinical, 6 public health, and 17 clinical departments, with 359 faculty members. Research activity is important for the academic promotion, with the number of publications (especially in journals covered by CC) and their impact as a key element. Bibliographic data on the published papers by the authors affiliated to the Zagreb University Medical School in the 1995-1999 period were searched in the CC and Biomedicina Croatica databases, according to the official faculty name list. The collected data were classified into three groups according to the source journals: papers published in international journals covered by the CC, Croatian journals covered by the CC, and Croatian journals not covered by the CC. The publication production was measured on individual and departmental levels by using two counting schemes: a) full publication to each author/department; and b) an equal fraction of a publication (1/n) to each author/department. In the 1995-1999 period, the faculty published 578 papers in the journals covered by the CC, 22.6% of them in the subset of Croatian journals. The differences among departments were considerable, with publishing activity per faculty member varying from 0.25 to 6.23 papers in CC journals and from 0.0 to 15.8 in Croatian non-CC journals. Preclinical departments published significantly less in the Croatian journals indexed in the CC then public health and clinical departments. There was a high variance in the number of publications on the individual level, with the 15.4% of the faculty in the professor rank and 45% in the assistant rank who did not publish a single paper in journals covered by the CC in the analyzed period. On the contrary, 10

  8. (School of Electrical Engineering of Purdue University): Annual research summary, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This document summarizes the research activities within the School of Electrical Engineering of Purdue University. It is intended as a reference document for colleagues, prospective graduate students and organizations interested in electrical engineering research. The research activities of Part I are organized according to ten areas. The first eight of these are areas in which the Purdue Electrical Engineering graduate program is divided for administrative purposes. The ten areas are: automatic controls; electromagnetic fields; bioengineering; energy source and systems; circuit theory; solid state devices and materials; communications and signal processing; engineering education; and computer engineering.

  9. 50(th) Anniversary of the Central Dental Library of School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borić, Vesna

    2014-12-01

    Libraries have an exceptional place in the history, culture, education and scientific life of a nation. They collect all aspects of our linguistics and literacy, all out theoretical assumptions as well as all the results of experience and practice. The importance of a library is not mirrored only in the national and historical role and heritage, but in a more permanent, informational role, since a modern library must, above all, be an effective information system. Since a library of a university operates as a part of its matrix, it is easily shadowed by other forms of educational and scientific infrastructure. 50(th) anniversary of the Central Dental Library of the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb is an excellent opportunity to make a call to the institution and public to its unique and irreplaceable role.

  10. Development of the competency-based medical curriculum for the new Augsburg University Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtl, Anja; Berberat, Pascal; Fischer, Martin R; Forst, Helmuth; Grützner, Stefanie; Händl, Thomas; Joachimski, Felix; Linné, Renate; Märkl, Bruno; Naumann, Markus; Putz, Reinhard; Schneider, Werner; Schöler, Claus; Wehler, Markus; Hoffmann, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Aim: With the resolution from April 28, 2014, the Bavarian state government in Germany decided to found a new medical school at Augsburg University, thereby requiring the development of a competency-based medical curriculum. Methods: Two interdisciplinary groups developed a spiral curriculum (following Harden) employing the model of Thumser-Dauth & Öchsner. The curriculum focuses on specifically defined competencies: medical expertise, independent scientific reasoning, argumentation and scholarship, as well as communication skills. Results: The spiral curriculum was developed as a hybrid curriculum. Its modular structure incorporates the mandatory subjects required by the German regulations for medical licensure (Approbationsordnung) into organ- and system-centered blocks which are integrated both horizontally and vertically. Basic preclinical sciences are covered in the blocks "Movement," "Balance" and "Contact." The clinical sciences are organized according to six pillars (conservative medicine, surgical medicine, men's-women's-children's medicine, the senses, the nervous system and the mind, and general medicine) which students revisit three times each over the course of the program. A longitudinal clinical course incorporates interdisciplinary education. A particular focus is on scientific education encompassing a longitudinal course in the sciences (including interdisciplinary classes with other university departments), block practicums, and two scientific projects. Conclusion: It is not only the degree of integration und intensity of the Augsburg University undergraduate medical degree program, but also its targeted advancement of academic, social and communication skills that have not yet been realized to such an extent elsewhere in Germany. On July 8, 2016, the German Council of Science and Humanities unanimously gave this concept a positive evaluation. Future research will examine and evaluate the Augsburg medical curriculum and the impact of the new

  11. Movement and physical demands of school and university rugby union match-play in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Dale; Weaving, Daniel; Phibbs, Padraic; Darrall-Jones, Joshua; Roe, Gregory; Weakley, Jonathon; Hendricks, Sharief; Till, Kevin; Jones, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Background In England, rugby union is a popular sport and is widely played within schools. Despite the large participation numbers, the movement and physical demands of the sport and how they progress by age have not been explored. Method Ninety-six male rugby union players wore microtechnology devices during six rugby union matches within the education pathway to investigate the movement and physical demands of match-play. To quantify the positional differences and progression by age, data were obtained for participants at the under 16 (U16) (n=31 participants), under 18 (U18) (n=34 participants) and university (n=31 participants) levels. Players were further divided in forwards and backs. Data were analysed using magnitude-based inferences. Results For the movement demands, U16 total distance and ‘striding’ was likely higher for forwards than backs, whereas at U18, unclear differences were observed and from university players the inverse was observed (very likely). In all age groups sprint distance was likely to very likely greater for backs than forwards. Forwards had greater physical demands than backs at all age groups. For consecutive age groups, U16 had a likely higher relative distance than U18, and U18 had a likely lower relative distance than university players. Physical demands were similar across age groups for forwards, and greater for backs at older age groups. Conclusion The movement and physical demands of rugby union players participating in schools (U16 and U18), may not be as expected, however, the findings from university players show a similar pattern to the senior game. PMID:28879027

  12. Movement and physical demands of school and university rugby union match-play in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Dale; Weaving, Daniel; Phibbs, Padraic; Darrall-Jones, Joshua; Roe, Gregory; Weakley, Jonathon; Hendricks, Sharief; Till, Kevin; Jones, Ben

    2016-01-01

    In England, rugby union is a popular sport and is widely played within schools. Despite the large participation numbers, the movement and physical demands of the sport and how they progress by age have not been explored. Ninety-six male rugby union players wore microtechnology devices during six rugby union matches within the education pathway to investigate the movement and physical demands of match-play. To quantify the positional differences and progression by age, data were obtained for participants at the under 16 (U16) (n=31 participants), under 18 (U18) (n=34 participants) and university (n=31 participants) levels. Players were further divided in forwards and backs. Data were analysed using magnitude-based inferences. For the movement demands, U16 total distance and 'striding' was likely higher for forwards than backs, whereas at U18, unclear differences were observed and from university players the inverse was observed (very likely). In all age groups sprint distance was likely to very likely greater for backs than forwards. Forwards had greater physical demands than backs at all age groups. For consecutive age groups, U16 had a likely higher relative distance than U18, and U18 had a likely lower relative distance than university players. Physical demands were similar across age groups for forwards, and greater for backs at older age groups. The movement and physical demands of rugby union players participating in schools (U16 and U18), may not be as expected, however, the findings from university players show a similar pattern to the senior game.

  13. Development of the competency-based medical curriculum for the new Augsburg University Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Härtl, Anja

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: With the resolution from April 28, 2014, the Bavarian state government in Germany decided to found a new medical school at Augsburg University, thereby requiring the development of a competency-based medical curriculum.Methods: Two interdisciplinary groups developed a spiral curriculum (following Harden employing the model of Thumser-Dauth & Öchsner. The curriculum focuses on specifically defined competencies: medical expertise, independent scientific reasoning, argumentation and scholarship, as well as communication skills.Results: The spiral curriculum was developed as a hybrid curriculum. Its modular structure incorporates the mandatory subjects required by the German regulations for medical licensure (Approbationsordnung into organ- and system-centered blocks which are integrated both horizontally and vertically. Basic preclinical sciences are covered in the blocks “Movement,” “Balance” and “Contact.” The clinical sciences are organized according to six pillars (conservative medicine, surgical medicine, men’s-women’s-children’s medicine, the senses, the nervous system and the mind, and general medicine which students revisit three times each over the course of the program. A longitudinal clinical course incorporates interdisciplinary education. A particular focus is on scientific education encompassing a longitudinal course in the sciences (including interdisciplinary classes with other university departments, block practicums, and two scientific projects.Conclusion: It is not only the degree of integration und intensity of the Augsburg University undergraduate medical degree program, but also its targeted advancement of academic, social and communication skills that have not yet been realized to such an extent elsewhere in Germany. On July 8, 2016, the German Council of Science and Humanities unanimously gave this concept a positive evaluation. Future research will examine and evaluate the Augsburg medical curriculum

  14. The J-School Debate: Is the Timing Finally Right for University Journalism Programs and the Rest of the University Community to Work Together?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Liberal arts universities are under mounting pressure to maintain their position of relevance in an increasingly technological and economically competitive world, while professional journalism is steadily losing ground to social media. This essay argues that a new partnership between journalism schools and the academic community would be…

  15. Course diversity within South Australian secondary schools as a factor of successful transition and retention within Australian universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Wright

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available There has long been a disparity in the provision of curriculum within Australian secondary schools. This study aims to evaluate whether diversity within schools alters students’ university experiences. While much of the existing literature focuses on each aspect individually, this paper attempts to clarify a link between these factors by focussing on the transition process. A theoretical analysis of key concepts surrounding a web of inter-related issues, including student satisfaction, interest and motivation frames the quantitative data collection. The methodology employed consists of analysing a balanced sample of South Australian secondary schools, from an array of different locations, SES groupings and sizes, and an acknowledgement of previous studies into the first year experience within Australian Universities. The findings suggest that there is a disparity between learning areas in school curricula and an inherent link has been established with issues such as student attrition and dissatisfaction in universities.

  16. Baylor College of Medicine's support of Tulane University School of Medicine following Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Nancy S

    2007-08-01

    The authors describe how Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), with three other Texas medical schools, "adopted" virtually all the 620 medical students and 526 house officers of Tulane University School of Medicine and continued their education for eight months after most of New Orleans, including Tulane, was flooded on August 29, 2005, after Hurricane Katrina. Soon after, BCM's president asked all senior staff to take whatever actions were necessary to sustain Tulane, and on September 7, leaders from BCM and three other Texas medical schools met to plan the relocation of Tulane's students and programs. The authors explain how problems were overcome (e.g., locating the scattered Tulane students and staff, finding them lodging, obtaining their records, and providing financial aid and counseling), and how high-quality educational experiences were maintained for both Tulane's and BCM's students and residents while assisting Tulane's faculty in numerous ways, helping Tulane plan the enrollment of its following year's students, and undergoing Liaison Committee for Medical Education and Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education site visits to BCM. After the BCM-Tulane experience, BCM developed a disaster-management plan (available online) that could help other schools as they plan for disasters. The authors also offer lessons learned in the areas of communication, cooperation, curriculum, collaboration, contact with accrediting bodies, and compassion. They close by stating that when BCM faculty are asked "how could you take Tulane's medical school in?" their response is, "how could we not?" They continue: "In medical education, a frequent discussion is how to teach humanism and professionalism; we teach it best by modeling it."

  17. An investigation for attitudes of pre-service teachers who enter the university by aptitude examinations towards school experience course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feryal BEYKAL ORHUN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the attitudes of pre-service teachers who enter to university by aptitude examination towards school experience course. Research was conducted with pre-service teachers who attended school experience course from the department of music teaching (n=34, art teaching (n=67 and physical teaching (n=42. In the study, whether the attitude scale scores of students differ or not by several variables were investigated. T-test and one way ANOVA techniques were used to analysis the data. According to analysis results, it can be said that the students’ attitudes towards school experience was positive in general. Furthermore, although there was no significant differences between the attitude scores according to gender, age, type of high school which they have graduated and gap between the high school and university in each department, higher attitude scores by some variables were emerged.

  18. How does the grade obtained at school for English and Mathematics affect the probability of graduation at a university?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Murray

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Over half of all students enrolling at a particular university in KwaZulu-Natal fail to complete a degree. This article is wanting to determine to what extent the marks they obtain for English and Mathematics at school impact on their probability of graduation at this university. In addressing this problem, other student specific factors associated with their gender, race and the type of school they have attended need also to be properly accounted for. To provide answers for this study, the performance of 24 392 students enrolling at the university over the period 2004 to 2012 was followed until they graduated or dropped out from their studies. A structural equation model was fitted because it allows one to separate a direct effect from that of an indirect effect. Gender, race and school background were found to be very significant with males, Black Africans and students coming from a less privileged school background having a smaller probability associated with eventually graduating from this university. Males tend to perform better than females in Mathematics, with females performing better males in English. More importantly, however, a single percentage point increase in one’s mark for English increases the probability associated with graduating from this university far more than would be the case if their Mathematics mark were to increase by a single percentage point. In the light of these mediated results, perhaps this university should be directing their efforts more towards improving the English (rather than mathematical literacy of students entering the university.

  19. Mind the gap between high school and university! A field qualitative survey at the National University of Caaguazú (Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siri A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Anna Siri,1,2  Nicola Luigi Bragazzi,1–3 Hicham Khabbache,4 María Maddalena Spandonari,5 Luis Alberto Cáceres,5 1Department of Mathematics (DIMA, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; 2UNESCO CHAIR “Anthropology of Health – Biosphere and Healing System”, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; 3Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; 4Faculty of Literature and Humanistic Studies, Sais, Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University, Fez, Morocco; 5Administrative Direction, Universidad Nacional de Caaguazú, Coronel Oviedo, Paraguay Abstract: Paraguay has eight public universities and 45 private universities. The National University of Caaguazú (Universidad Nacional de Caaguazú or UNCA, with its main campus located in Coronel Oviedo, is one of the most recently founded public universities, being established in 2007. The UNCA has launched a project aiming at exploring the potentiality of its educational system, as well as its gaps. In particular, the UNCA wants to assess the effectiveness of preparatory courses for preparing students for admission to the degree course in medicine (Cursos Probatorios de Ingreso or CPI, in order to identify the main strong and weak points of the system, the popularity and usefulness of CPI as perceived by the students, the students’ and teachers’ opinions regarding the limits of school, and their suggestions. This paper is based on a field survey and highlights the care that must be taken in order to develop conditions respectful of the wellbeing of those participating in the educational context. Keywords: university students, school-university transition, social inclusion, drop-out, preparatory courses

  20. An international exploratory study about the gap between school and university on science education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Siqueira Harres

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports exploratory results of an international research whose main objective was to analyze, in a multicultural perspective, the gap between academic research and science teaching. The research involved subjects from six countries: Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Spain, Italy and Israel. In large-scale, 1819 teachers answered a questionnaire with open and closed questions. In small-scale, 157 subjects participated in interviews and focus groups, including teachers, school administrators, policy makers and researchers. The analysis of collected data in the different contexts is presented in the following categories: perceptions of science education, evaluation of public policies, school organization, gender issues, teaching practice, and interaction between research and teaching practice. For overall results, common instruments were used for data collection and quantitative and qualitative methodologies in all countries. Analysis shows that in all countries some categories results are very similar, as for example, the fact that teaching emphasis has a prevalent traditional approach. In other categories, such as cultural education policy and structural issues, the results vary according the context. Finally, we discuss how these similarities and differences can help to bridge the gap between school and university.

  1. A Comprehensive Evaluation of a Universal School-Based Depression Prevention Program for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomyn, Justin D; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Richardson, Ben; Colla, Lucia

    2016-11-01

    The present study proposes and demonstrates a comprehensive framework for evaluation of a universal school-based depression prevention program. Efficacy was evaluated by considering the impact of continuous versus categorical approaches to operationalizing outcome, the effect of the intervention on key change agent variables, and moderation of intervention effects by student symptom severity at baseline. Participants 252 adolescent boys and girls (60 % male), aged 13 to 17 years (M = 13.62 years, SD = 0.60 years) from four schools in the state of Victoria, Australia, who were allocated by school into a waitlist = control (n = 88) or a CBT-based intervention (n = 164) group. The intervention involved six 45-min weekly sessions run during wellbeing classes. While the intervention and control groups did not differ in average improvement in symptoms by post-intervention, further analyses showed that responsiveness was highly variable within the intervention, and those with elevated depressive symptoms benefitted most. The proposed change agents of self-esteem, resilience, body image satisfaction, and perceived social support did not uniquely predict change in depressive symptoms but collectively accounted for substantial variance in this change process. Collectively, this framework provided insights into aspects of the intervention that worked and highlighted areas for improvement, thus providing clear direction for future research.

  2. Is our medical school socially accountable? The case of Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Somaya; Ghaly, Mona; Boelen, Charles

    2015-04-01

    Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University (FOM/SCU) was established as community oriented school with innovative educational strategies. Social accountability represents the commitment of the medical school towards the community it serves. To assess FOM/SCU compliance to social accountability using the "Conceptualization, Production, Usability" (CPU) model. FOM/SCU's practice was reviewed against CPU model parameters. CPU consists of three domains, 11 sections and 31 parameters. Data were collected through unstructured interviews with the main stakeholders and documents review since 2005 to 2013. FOM/SCU shows general compliance to the three domains of the CPU. Very good compliance was shown to the "P" domain of the model through FOM/SCU's innovative educational system, students and faculty members. More work is needed on the "C" and "U" domains. FOM/SCU complies with many parameters of the CPU model; however, more work should be accomplished to comply with some items in the C and U domains so that FOM/SCU can be recognized as a proactive socially accountable school.

  3. Suicidal Ideation in University Students: Prevalence and Association With School and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelino Pereira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSuicidal ideation is often an indicator of mental health problems and a major risk factor for suicide. This study aims to present the prevalence of suicidal ideation and compare students of a Portuguese university by school and gender. A total of 366 individuals from four schools completed the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire (cut-off point ≥ 41 is significant and specific questions about lifetime and past week suicidal ideation. Frequency analysis and chi-square tests were performed. The lifetime, past year and past week prevalence of suicidal ideation was 12.6%, 10.7% and 10.7%, respectively. A higher percentage of suicidal ideators were attending the School of Human and Social Sciences, and were of the female gender. However, these variables are not significantly associated with suicidal ideation. The results obtained emphasize the need for more research and the importance of taking special precautions to help students to deal with their personal and professional contingency challenges.

  4. School pupils and university students surveyed for drinking beverages containing caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górnicka, Magdalena; Pierzynowska, Jolanta; Kaniewska, Ewelina; Kossakowska, Katarzyna; Woźniak, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine is a commonly found ingredient in many beverages. Its main dietary source is coffee, cola drinks and in recent years, energy drinks. To compare the consumption of drinks containing caffeine (coffee, colas and energy drinks) and the reasons and circumstances under which they were drunk by middle school (junior high school) pupils and university students. Surveyed subjects were 90 middle school pupils from Warsaw and Kutno together with 100 students attending the Warsaw University of Life Sciences (SGGW). A questionnaire, designed by the authors, was used to determine the amounts, frequency and the reasons or circumstances in which coffee, colas and energy drinks were consumed. Statistics used, consisted of the Mann-Whitney U and Chi-square (chi2) tests, with significance taken as alpha Coffee was however drunk twice less by pupils compared to students, whilst similar amounts of energy drinks were consumed by both groups; respectively 48% and 53%. Gender differences were observed for the energy drinks with young men drinking the most. Coffee and energy drink consumption also rose with age by respectively 39% and 57%. The mean caffeine intake in pupils and students were respectively estimated to be 141 and 163 mg/day(d). The reasons why these beverages were drunk varied, from drinking coffee to keeping awake and drinking cola because of its good taste. Pupils also drank energy drinks due to its taste but students because of improved mental performance and in staying awake. Drinking caffeine containing drinks by adolescents can be very variable and comes from many different sources. Thus, its intakes may be very high and so require monitoring, particularly for the youngest. Further observational studies are needed to assess the consumption of energy drinks in relation to physical activity.

  5. The pipeline of physiology courses in community colleges: to university, medical school, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Jenny; Pape-Lindstrom, Pamela

    2016-12-01

    Community colleges are significant in the landscape of undergraduate STEM (science technology, engineering, and mathematics) education (9), including biology, premedical, and other preprofessional education. Thirty percent of first-year medical school students in 2012 attended a community college. Students attend at different times in high school, their first 2 yr of college, and postbaccalaureate. The community college pathway is particularly important for traditionally underrepresented groups. Premedical students who first attend community college are more likely to practice in underserved communities (2). For many students, community colleges have significant advantages over 4-yr institutions. Pragmatically, they are local, affordable, and flexible, which accommodates students' work and family commitments. Academically, community colleges offer teaching faculty, smaller class sizes, and accessible learning support systems. Community colleges are fertile ground for universities and medical schools to recruit diverse students and support faculty. Community college students and faculty face several challenges (6, 8). There are limited interactions between 2- and 4-yr institutions, and the ease of transfer processes varies. In addition, faculty who study and work to improve the physiology education experience often encounter obstacles. Here, we describe barriers and detail existing resources and opportunities useful in navigating challenges. We invite physiology educators from 2- and 4-yr institutions to engage in sharing resources and facilitating physiology education improvement across institutions. Given the need for STEM majors and health care professionals, 4-yr colleges and universities will continue to benefit from students who take introductory biology, physiology, and anatomy and physiology courses at community colleges. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  6. Digital media promoting new approaches to subject specific didactics in visual arts education in primary school, high school, teacher education and university education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Kirsten

    Digital media promoting new approaches to subject specific didactics in visual arts education in primary school, high school, teacher education and university education The symposium addresses current developments in visual arts education based on empirical projects from different levels of the e......Digital media promoting new approaches to subject specific didactics in visual arts education in primary school, high school, teacher education and university education The symposium addresses current developments in visual arts education based on empirical projects from different levels......, social aesthetics, community art and co-creation all represent an approach to art production and appreciation where content, media and visual expressions unfold in societal, digital, collaborative, and transgressive constellations involving the art maker and audiences in social and relational projects...

  7. Implementing Coping Power Adapted as a Universal Prevention Program in Italian Primary Schools: a Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Pietro; Bertacchi, Iacopo; Giuli, Consuelo; Nocentini, Annalaura; Lochman, John E

    2016-09-24

    Behavioral problems in schools can cause serious harm to the emotional and social well-being of students and limit their ability to achieve their full academic potential. A prior pilot study on the universal application of Coping Power showed a significant decrease in the hyperactivity behaviors of five classes. The next step was to test whether Coping Power Universal could be successfully implemented by teachers in a variety of Italian schools. The sample involved 40 third- and fourth-grade classes (901 students) from public schools located in three Italian cities. Twenty classes were randomly assigned to Coping Power Universal, and 20 classes were randomly assigned to the control group, which received the strictly standard academic curriculum of Italian elementary schools. At each assessment period, the teachers completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. The findings showed a significant reduction in hyperactive and inattention behaviors and conduct problems and emotional symptoms in the intervention classes compared with the control classes. This study suggests that Coping Power model can be delivered in school settings at both universal and targeted prevention levels and that in this multi-tiered prevention model, teachers can learn a set of intervention skills which can be delivered with flexibility, thus reducing some of the complexity and costs of schools using multiple interventions.

  8. [Clinical pharmacy practice education in master's course of Meijo University in affiliation with medical school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuba, Kazuhisa

    2009-08-01

    In 2003, Meijo University has developed a new program to train students in master's degree in the field of clinical practice. This new curriculum has three big pillars of educational goal: Problem-Based Learning (PBL), communication skill and clinical pharmacy practice training. Before exposing students to clinical training, they must learn first how to solve various patients' problems through PBL and enhance their communication skill. To provide a clinical environment, education and training, the Faculty of Pharmacy cooperated with the School of Medicine of Fujita Health University. Master's students together with other members of the healthcare team observe patient's disease state and most especially monitor pharmacotherapy. At first, students will be trained for a month at the pharmacy division and experience one week-nursing job. Next, they will be trained at the clinical divisions such as General Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Respiratory Medicine, Hematology, Chemotherapy, Gastroenterological Surgery, Psychiatry, and Emergency Unit. Students rotate three-month training on four clinical divisions during one year. The head physicians of the medical department hold concurrent post as professors and share responsibility with the pharmacy faculty in training the students. To have its venue where students, faculty and physicians conduct their discussion on clinical cases, a pharmacy satellite seminar class room was set up at Fujita Health University hospital. Through this, pharmacy students and faculty had more opportunities to exchange knowledge on medicine and pharmacy. Master's students are expected to acquire professionalism, ethical knowledge and pharmaceutical care skills through the clinical pharmacy practice program.

  9. Attitudes of Students of Differenet Schools of University of Zagreb on Tooth Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diklić, Dinka; Sever, Eva Klarić; Galić, Nada; Spajić, Jelena; Prskalo, Katica

    2016-12-01

    To compare the awareness that students from four different faculties within the University of Zagreb have of oral health and tooth bleaching procedure. The study included 158 subjects (both male and female) - 38 students from the School of Dental Medicine and 40 students from each of the following faculties: the School of Medicine, the Faculty of Economics and the Faculty of Civil Engineering. The respondents were asked to fill out the survey with multiple choices by marking the answers they considered correct. Only 12% of the respondents followed the information on oral health. More than two thirds of all subjects brush their teeth twice a day, but there were no statistically significant differences between the subjects with respect to college or gender. More than half of the participants (55%) were satisfied, and 12% were completely satisfied with their dental appearance. About 80% of the respondents were aware of differences between teeth bleaching and teeth polishing procedures, with greater prevalence among Dental Medicine and Medicine students. 80% of all subjects would go to a dental office if they decided to whiten their teeth while less than a half (46%) of all the subjects believed that a tooth bleaching has some adverse side-effects. There is a difference in knowledge on oral hygiene and tooth bleaching between the students from the School of Dental Medicine, the School of Medicine, the Faculty of Economics and those from the Faculty of Civil Engineering. Dental students have the best knowledge on tooth bleaching and oral health, which was in accordance with their educational guidance and level of education.

  10. Geographical tourism research and education at the Jagiellonian University School of Tourism in Poland (1936-1939)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowski, Antoni; Sołjan, Izabela; Bilska-Wodecka, Elżbieta; Liro, Justyna

    2016-11-01

    The beginning of the twentieth century was a time of intensive development of geographical research on tourism, as well as the establishment of tourism research centers in many European countries. The Jagiellonian University School of Tourism played an important role in the development of tourism geography and education, spatial and regional planning, and personnel training for tourism developing in the 1930s in Poland. Tourism education in the school was characterized by a modern curriculum and forms of teaching, including fieldwork, focusing on developing practical skills, and linking research topics with the teaching process. The school conducted extensive research, publishing and documentary activities. The achievements of the Jagiellonian University School of Tourism helped raise awareness in society of the importance of tourism in the socio-economic development of regions and cities. This article presents the history of the Jagiellonian University School of Tourism and highlights its role in the development of tourism research and education in Europe. The school is mentioned among the pioneering centers of tourism, i.e., Robert Glucksmann's Tourism Research Institute at the Berlin School of Commerce, Walter Hunziker's and Kurt Krapf's tourism seminar in St. Gallen, and Raoul Blanchard's Institute of Alpine Geography in Grenoble.

  11. The Dalton School: The Transformation of a Progressive School. Volume 34 in American University Studies, Series XIV, Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semel, Susan F.

    The Dalton School, an independent, progressive school on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, was founded in 1919 by Helen Parkhurst. She established a child-centered school that attempted to incorporate the concept of a democratic community within the boundaries of an educational program. The school's innovative program became known as the Dalton…

  12. Mind the gap between high school and university! A field qualitative survey at the National University of Caaguazú (Paraguay).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Anna; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Khabbache, Hicham; Spandonari, María Maddalena; Cáceres, Luis Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Paraguay has eight public universities and 45 private universities. The National University of Caaguazú (Universidad Nacional de Caaguazú or UNCA), with its main campus located in Coronel Oviedo, is one of the most recently founded public universities, being established in 2007. The UNCA has launched a project aiming at exploring the potentiality of its educational system, as well as its gaps. In particular, the UNCA wants to assess the effectiveness of preparatory courses for preparing students for admission to the degree course in medicine (Cursos Probatorios de Ingreso or CPI), in order to identify the main strong and weak points of the system, the popularity and usefulness of CPI as perceived by the students, the students' and teachers' opinions regarding the limits of school, and their suggestions. This paper is based on a field survey and highlights the care that must be taken in order to develop conditions respectful of the wellbeing of those participating in the educational context.

  13. Not just for poor kids: The impact of universal free school breakfast on meal participation and student outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leos-Urbel, Jacob; Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Weinstein, Meryle; Corcoran, Sean

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of the implementation of a universal free school breakfast policy on meals program participation, attendance, and academic achievement. In 2003, New York City made school breakfast free for all students regardless of income, while increasing the price of lunch for those ineligible for meal subsidies. Using a difference-indifference estimation strategy, we derive plausibly causal estimates of the policy’s impact by exploiting within and between group variation in school meal pricing before and after the policy change. Our estimates suggest that the policy resulted in small increases in breakfast participation both for students who experienced a decrease in the price of breakfast and for free-lunch eligible students who experienced no price change. The latter suggests that universal provision may alter behavior through mechanisms other than price, highlighting the potential merits of universal provision over targeted services. We find limited evidence of policy impacts on academic outcomes. PMID:24465073

  14. Technology at Washington University School of Medicine Library: BACS, PHILSOM, and OCTANET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, S; Johnson, M F; Kelly, E A

    1983-07-01

    A brief overview of the Bibliographic Access and Control System developed by the Washington University School of Medicine Library is presented. Because the system has been described in two previous reports, this paper focuses on its relationship to other automated programs (i.e., PHILSOM and OCTANET), education of users, evaluation of the system, and outreach to the medical center. In operation for more than two years, BACS represents the computerization of much of the managerial and operational functions of the library, and marks the completion of stage 1 of the three stages of library evolution described in the AAMC report Academic Information in the Academic Health Sciences Center: Roles for the Library in Information Management.

  15. Reconceptualizing the relationship between universities and schools: a dialectic and polysemic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, Gene; Siry, Christina

    2010-09-01

    This review essay adds to the conversation to which Allison Skerrett and Hannah Sevian contribute in their article, Identity and biography as mediators of science and mathematics faculty's involvement in K- 12 service. Here we address the need to reconceptualize faculty service in public schools and traditional notions of scholarship. We discuss the importance of transforming university structures that envision service as less important than "scholarship" and "teaching" while mediating hierarchical ideas of what "service" entails. We share a dialectical view of social life and an ethical stance that values polysemy and polyphony both in research and in our daily interactions. Here we employ a dialectical lens that seeks multiple perspectives as we engage in a dialogue about these issues.

  16. Practice effects reveal visuomotor vulnerability in school and university rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth-Edwards, Ann B; Radloff, Sarah E; Whitefield-Alexander, Victoria J; Smith, Ian P; Horsman, Mark

    2014-02-01

    This article reports on three pre- versus post-season prospective studies in which male university and high school contact sport players predominantly of Rugby Union (hereafter rugby) were compared with age, education, and IQ equivalent non-contact sport controls on the ImPACT (Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) test. All analyses revealed a relative absence of practice effects on the Visual Motor Speed (VMS) composite for contact sport groups compared with controls. The VMS data for rugby players from each study were pooled and subjected to additional analysis (Rugby, n = 145; Controls, n = 106). Controls revealed significant improvement over the season (p rugby players whose performance remained the same (interaction effect, p = .028). It is apparent that practice effects have diagnostic potential in this context, implicating vulnerability on speeded visuomotor processing in association with participation in rugby. Pointers for further research and concussion management in the individual case are explored.

  17. Involving High School Students in Computational Physics University Research: Theory Calculations of Toluene Adsorbed on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Jonas; Husmark, Teodor; Mathiesen, Christoffer; Sepahvand, Benjamin; Borck, Øyvind; Gunnarsson, Linda; Lydmark, Pär; Schröder, Elsebeth

    2016-01-01

    To increase public awareness of theoretical materials physics, a small group of high school students is invited to participate actively in a current research projects at Chalmers University of Technology. The Chalmers research group explores methods for filtrating hazardous and otherwise unwanted molecules from drinking water, for example by adsorption in active carbon filters. In this project, the students use graphene as an idealized model for active carbon, and estimate the energy of adsorption of the methylbenzene toluene on graphene with the help of the atomic-scale calculational method density functional theory. In this process the students develop an insight into applied quantum physics, a topic usually not taught at this educational level, and gain some experience with a couple of state-of-the-art calculational tools in materials research.

  18. Between School and University: dinosaurs and little notebooks towards an embodied dramaturgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This six-hand written paper insists on the non-dichotomy between body and mind, action and thought, objectivity and subjectivity, in order to reach the fertile adult-child relationships within fictionality. It supports the practice of theater teaching both at the university and at school, in the key of an embodied dramaturgy: a writing mode and usage of the dramaturgical text in which corporeality is central. Presenting more questions than answering them, it searches for a dramaturgical work that narrates, dialogues, and proposes performativity and changes in the worlds-of-life of teachers in Undergraduate Theater Teachers Education as well as in the worlds-of-life of their prospective students, Brazilian children and teenagers.

  19. Generation Y: Online Shopping Behaviour of the Secondary School and University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Krbová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of primary research which was focused on specifics of online shopping in the segment of secondary school and university students. This segment is a part of one generational cohort – Generation Y which has its own specifics and characteristics. The main objective is to describe some aspects of shopping orientations of this segment, especially in the online environment. The research results show that young Generation Y individuals prefer online sources of information, mainly price comparison website Heureka.cz and online shop websites. The significant others (family, friends, etc. are the third most used source of information and the first personal one. When they choose online retailer they mostly take notice of the quality of information about products and the reviews of former customers and online shop comments. As the best benefit online shop can offer they regard short time benefits as a free delivery and a gift to an order.

  20. Involving high school students in computational physics university research: Theory calculations of toluene adsorbed on graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Ericsson, Jonas; Mathiesen, Christoffer; Sepahvand, Benjamin; Borck, Øyvind; Gunnarsson, Linda; Lydmark, Pär; Schröder, Elsebeth

    2016-01-01

    To increase public awareness of theoretical materials physics, a small group of high school students is invited to participate actively in a current research projects at Chalmers University of Technology. The Chalmers research group explores methods for filtrating hazardous and otherwise unwanted molecules from drinking water, for example by adsorption in active carbon filters. In this project, the students use graphene as an idealized model for active carbon, and estimate the energy of adsorption of the methylbenzene toluene on graphene with the help of the atomic-scale calculational method density functional theory. In this process the students develop an insight into applied quantum physics, a topic usually not taught at this educational level, and gain some experience with a couple of state-of-the-art calculational tools in materials research.

  1. The BRIDGE project: bridging the gap between university and schools. Being Responsive to Individual Differences in General Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, K; Hewitt, M; Danforth, S

    1997-01-01

    BRIDGE (Being Responsive to Individual Differences in General Education) is a partnership between university faculty and two elementary schools, focusing on the collaborative practices and programs in general and special education. University faculty have adopted new roles as facilitators, rather than "experts," in working side by side with teachers seeking to increase their sense of professional efficacy. Teachers at the two sites collaborate with university faculty and each other in acquiring new information and practices within four initiative areas. The four initiatives, designed generally to support professional development toward meeting the needs of struggling students, are (a) collaboration between special and general education, (b) family liaisons, (c) teacher research, and (d) teacher education. University student teachers at these two schools receive their clinical education in settings ripe with teacher inquiry, collaboration, and ongoing development of new and creative strategies.

  2. Education in family medicine at the University of Mostar School of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edita Černi Obrdalj

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Department of Family medicine has been formed in academic year2002/2003, few years later after the foundation of the School of Medicine University of Mostar. The formal members of department areprofessor and assistants who lecture and lead seminars. In addition,physicians in rural practices contribute to teaching of family medicine. Clinical teaching of family medicine at Mostar School of Medicine is organized in the summer semester of sixth year of the study. It lasts six weeks and contains lectures, seminars and practices. Every student has right and obligation to evaluate educational process at the end of the course in a form of questionnaire and essay. Family medicine continuously receives high marks by students, especially practices. Evaluation of teaching by students is good way of giving feedback about teaching. We believe that student opinion can revise and improve teaching practice. Our good experience and good marks may prompt the changing our educational curriculum to include family medicine at each study year of medical program.

  3. Prevention of anxiety symptoms in children: results from a universal school-based trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essau, Cecilia A; Conradt, Judith; Sasagawa, Satoko; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2012-06-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a universal school-based cognitive behavior prevention program (the FRIENDS program) for childhood anxiety. Participants were 638 children, ages 9 to 12 years, from 14 schools in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. All the children completed standardized measures of anxiety and depression, social and adaptive functioning, coping strategies, social skills, and perfectionism before and after the 10-week FRIENDS program and at two follow-up assessments (6 and 12 months) or wait period. Children who participated in the FRIENDS program exhibited significantly fewer anxiety and depressive symptoms, and lower perfectionism scores than children in the control group at 12-month follow-up. Younger children (9-10-year-olds) displayed treatment gains immediately after the intervention, whereas older children (11-12-year-olds) showed anxiety reduction only at 6- and 12-month follow-up. Perfectionism and avoidant coping acted as mediators of pre- to postintervention changes in anxiety scores. This study provides empirical evidence for the utility of the FRIENDS program in reducing anxiety and depressive symptoms among German children. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Implementation and evaluation of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine leadership program for women faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Rachel B; González-Fernández, Marlís; Bodurtha, Joann; Skarupski, Kimberly A; Fivush, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Women continue to be underrepresented in top leadership roles in academic medicine. Leadership training programs for women are designed to enhance women's leadership skills and confidence and increase overall leadership diversity. The authors present a description and evaluation of a longitudinal, cohort-based, experiential leadership program for women faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. We compared pre- and post-program self-assessed ratings of 11 leadership skills and specific negotiation behaviors from 3 cohorts of leadership program participants (n=134) from 2010 to 2013. Women reported significant improvements in skills across 11 domains with the exceptions of 2 domains, Public Speaking and Working in Teams, both of which received high scores in the pre-program assessment. The greatest improvement in rankings occurred within the domain of negotiation skills. Although women reported an increase in their negotiation skills, we were not able to demonstrate an increase in the number of times that women negotiated for salary, space, or promotion following participation in the program. The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Leadership Program for Women Faculty has demonstrable value for the professional development of participants and addresses institutional strategies to enhance leadership diversity and the advancement of women.

  5. Building learning communities: evolution of the colleges at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Amy; Cutrer, William; Moutsios, Sandi; Heavrin, Benjamin; Pilla, Michael; Eichbaum, Quentin; Rodgers, Scott

    2013-09-01

    Learning communities, which are an emerging trend in medical education, create a foundation for professional and academic development through the establishment of longitudinal relationships between students and faculty. In this article, the authors describe the robust learning community system at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, which encompasses wellness, career planning, professional development, and academics.The Vanderbilt Advisory Colleges Program introduced in 2006 initially focused on two goals: promoting wellness and providing career advising. In the 2011-2012 academic year, the focus of the colleges expanded to incorporate an enhanced level of personal career advising and an academic component. In the four-year College Colloquium course, faculty selected as college mentors teach the medical humanities and lead sessions dedicated to student professional development in the areas of leadership, research, and service-learning. This academic and professional development program builds on the existing strengths of the colleges and has transformed the colleges into learning communities.The authors reflect on lessons learned and discuss future plans. They report that internal data and data from the Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Graduation Questionnaire support consistently high and increasing satisfaction among Vanderbilt medical students, across the metrics of personal counseling, faculty mentoring, and career planning.

  6. Leadership lessons from curricular change at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeser, Helen; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Irby, David M

    2007-04-01

    After successive Liaison Committee on Medical Education accreditation reports that criticized the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine for lack of instructional innovation and curriculum oversight, the dean issued a mandate for curriculum reform in 1997. Could a medical school that prided itself on innovation in research and health care do the same in education? The authors describe their five-phase curriculum change process and correlate this to an eight-step leadership model. The first phase of curricular change is to establish a compelling need for change; it requires leaders to create a sense of urgency and build a guiding coalition to achieve action. The second phase of curriculum reform is to envision a bold new curriculum; leaders must develop such a vision and communicate it broadly. The third phase is to design curriculum and obtain the necessary approvals; this requires leaders to empower broad-based action and generate short-term wins. In the fourth phase, specific courses are developed for the new curriculum, and leaders continue to empower broad-based action, generate short-term wins, consolidate gains, and produce more change. During the fifth phase of implementation and evaluation, leaders need to further consolidate gains, produce more change, and anchor new approaches in the institution. Arising from this experience and the correlation of curricular change phases with leadership steps, the authors identify 27 specific leadership strategies they employed in their curricular reform process.

  7. Perceptions of Ghanaian medical students completing a clinical elective at the University of Michigan Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, Nauzley C; Danso-Bamfo, Sandra; Moyer, Cheryl A; Danso, Kwabena A; Mäkiharju, Heather; Donkor, Peter; Johnson, Timothy R B; Kolars, Joseph C

    2014-07-01

    International medical electives typically represent a unidirectional flow of students from economically advantaged countries in the global "North" to resource-poor nations in the global "South." Little is known about the impact of bilateral exchanges on students from less affluent nations. Since 2007, students from the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) and medical schools in Ghana have engaged in a bilateral clinical exchange program. A 45-item online survey was distributed to all 73 Ghanaian medical students who had rotated at UMMS from 2008 to 2010 to assess perspectives on the value and impact of their participation. Incoming Ghanaian students outnumbered outgoing UMMS students 73 to 33 during the study period. Of eligible Ghanaian students, 70% (51/73) participated in the survey, with 40 of 51 providing valid data on at least 50% of questions. Ninety-seven percent (37/38) reported that the UMMS rotation was valuable to their medical training, 90% (35/39) reported changes in how they approach patient care, and 77% (24/31) reported feeling better equipped to serve patients in their home community. Eighty-five percent of students (28/33) felt more inclined to pursue training opportunities outside of their home country after their rotation at UMMS. More studies are needed to determine the feasibility of bidirectional exchanges as well as the short-term and long-term impact of rotations on students from underresourced settings and their hosts in more resource-rich environments.

  8. Establishing a multidisciplinary PBL curriculum in the School of Stomatology at Wuhan University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Tai, Baojun; Huang, Cui; Bian, Zhuan; Shang, Zhenjun; Wang, Qian; Song, Guangtai

    2008-05-01

    This article describes how a multidisciplinary problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum was established at the School of Stomatology at Wuhan University (WHUSS) in China for preclinical education in a seven-year dental school program. Based on positive feedback from a modified PBL program implemented in one discipline, a multidisciplinary PBL curriculum was established. PBL training for facilitators and students, development of resource materials, curriculum design, and case writing were done in a manner that is consistent with the characteristics and learning style preferences of Chinese dental students. About 80 percent of the lectures were kept in the new PBL program. The multidisciplinary PBL curriculum has been successful in helping dental students mentally construct an understanding of the interrelationship between dental knowledge and basic science concepts. The experience at WHUSS indicates that there are clear benefits for students in the PBL format. A benefit to faculty is that PBL tutorial facilitators were partly liberated from their traditional roles and developed additional skills for facilitating. However, conflict arises when PBL-trained students encounter the traditional exam-centered education system.

  9. Development of a web geoservices platform for School of Environmental Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kerala, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satheendran, S.; John, C. M.; Fasalul, F. K.; Aanisa, K. M.

    2014-11-01

    Web geoservices is the obvious graduation of Geographic Information System in a distributed environment through a simple browser. It enables organizations to share domain-specific rich and dynamic spatial information over the web. The present study attempted to design and develop a web enabled GIS application for the School of Environmental Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala, India to publish various geographical databases to the public through its website. The development of this project is based upon the open source tools and techniques. The output portal site is platform independent. The premier webgis frame work `Geomoose' is utilized. Apache server is used as the Web Server and the UMN Map Server is used as the map server for this project. It provides various customised tools to query the geographical database in different ways and search for various facilities in the geographical area like banks, attractive places, hospitals, hotels etc. The portal site was tested with the output geographical database of 2 projects of the School such as 1) the Tourism Information System for the Malabar region of Kerala State consisting of 5 northern districts 2) the geoenvironmental appraisal of the Athirappilly Hydroelectric Project covering the entire Chalakkudy river basin.

  10. A Demographic Exploration of Whole Body Donors at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzejewski, Breanna; Ritter, Dale

    2016-02-01

    To examine and characterize the occupational histories of individuals who donated their whole bodies to the Anatomical Gift Program at Warren Alpert Medical School (AMS) from the academic years 2003-2004 to 2013-2014. A retrospective chart review of 491 individuals who donated their whole bodies to Alpert Medical School was conducted upon IRB approval from Brown University. Demographic, social, and occupational histories were abstracted for analysis and review. There were no interventions. Descriptive statistics, Student T-test and Difference in Proportions Test were used to characterize information abstracted from donor applications to the Anatomical Gift Program. From academic years 2003-2004 to 2013-2014, 491 individuals donated their bodies to the Anatomical Gift Program. Donors were split equally by gender (female = 52%; male = 48%). The median age of donors was 82 years; the vast majority self-identified as white (98%). The majority of donors came from occupations involved with industry (23%) or office work, hospitality and retail (24%). Of the 491 body donors, 2 were physicians (0.4%). Our data demonstrate that in the past decade, physicians have made few contributions to AMS. This remains in concert with current literature showing a lack of physician whole body donors. Future research must explore physician attitudes towards whole body donation.

  11. Improving tobacco dependence education among the Loma Linda University School of Dentistry faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Margie R; Baba, Nadim Z

    2011-06-01

    Tobacco-related health problems are among the most preventable forms of illness. By assuming proactive tobacco use counseling roles, dental professionals can help reduce the number of people who use tobacco. Minimum standards for intervention by dental care providers were established more than a decade ago by the American Dental Association and the American Dental Hygienists' Association. The goal of Loma Linda University School of Dentistry in its tobacco-cessation efforts is to move beyond those standards towards more effective interventions. The school conducted a study to determine the formal education of the faculty, evaluate the current state of tobacco dependence education (TDE) delivered to students, identify topics that dental faculty members wanted to further their education, promote tobacco dependence education among the dental faculty, and enhance teaching moments on the clinic floor. A fifty-seven question survey was e-mailed to all faculty members with >0.4 FTE (full-time equivalent) during the 2007-08 school year. The response rate was 80 percent (101 out of 126). The results revealed that faculty members have limited formal training; however, 73.1 percent agreed that TDE would be beneficial to them. They also believed that, upon graduation, dental professionals should be able to perform at least a ten-minute moderate intervention program and discuss options for tobacco dependence treatments with patients. This project was designed to establish a 2008-09 baseline of TDE clinical practices, knowledge, and attitudes and to assess the effects of faculty development, curricular didactic, and clinical changes.

  12. Documentation to the NCES Common Core of Data Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe Survey: School Year 2011-12. Provisional Version 1a. NCES 2014-100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaton, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The documentation for this provisional version 1a file of the National Center for Education Statistics' (NCES) Common Core of Data (CCD) Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe Survey for SY 2011-12, contains a brief description of the data collection, along with information required to understand and access the data file. The SY 2011-12…

  13. Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

  14. Internationalising university schools of nursing in South Africa through a Community of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, L R; Middleton, L

    2011-03-01

    International nursing experiences in higher education have traditionally enabled and continue to enable nurses to appreciate '...the richness of the nursing mosaic...and the realities of nursing in many different cultural contexts'. This article describes a case study of the Collaboration for Higher Education of Nurses and Midwives in Africa in terms of its success in internationalising the nursing schools involved. Different types of international contact have led to a limited pattern of internationalization in the universities of Southern Africa, which often places African academics in a secondary or dependent position. Opportunities for truly equal international partnerships have been limited. A qualitative analysis of the views of participants from the consortium of universities was carried out based on the conceptual framework of communities of practice. An effective community of practice had been established, focused on the major knowledge domain of nursing and midwifery in Africa, and sharing the perception that their work was empowering and collaborative. The community had established its own ways of working, and articulated major institutional and individual benefits. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  15. A Biomechanical Comparison of the Long Snap in Football Between High School and University Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizewski, Michael G; Alexander, Marion J L

    2015-08-01

    Limited previous research was located that examined the technique of the long snap in football. The purpose of the study was to compare the joint movements, joint velocities, and body positions used to perform fast and accurate long snaps in high school (HS) and university (UNI) athletes. Ten HS and 10 UNI subjects were recruited for filming, each performing 10 snaps at a target with the fastest and most accurate trial being selected for subject analysis. Eighty-three variables were measured using Dartfish Team Pro 4.5.2 video analysis software, with statistical analysis performed using Microsoft Excel and SPSS 16.0. Several significant comparisons to long snapping technique between groups were noted during analysis; however, the body position and movement variables at release showed the greatest number of significant differences. The UNI athletes demonstrated significantly higher release velocity and left elbow extension velocity, with significantly lower release height and release angle than the HS group. Total snap time (release time + total flight time) was determined to have the strongest correlation to release velocity for the HS group (r = -0.915) and UNI group (r = -0.918). The study suggests HS long snappers may benefit from less elbow flexion and more knee flexion in the backswing (set position) to increase release velocity. University long snappers may benefit from increased left elbow extension range of motion during force production and decreased shoulder flexion at critical instant to increase long snap release velocity.

  16. Evaluation and development of digital competence in future primary school teachers at the University of Murcia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Gutiérrez Porlán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of a study carried out in the academic year 2014-2015 at the faculty of Education of the University of Murcia with first year degree students in Primary Education studying Research and ICT. The study started with the application of the DIGCOM questionnaire to analyze the digital competences of 134 students. The questionnaire served as an initial task to help students reflect on their digital competences. The subject was developed around tasks which adopted a transversal approach and used the nature of the contents itself to direct and improve students’ digital competencies. Finally, the initial questionnaire was reformulated and run in order to ascertain the students’ self-perception of their improvement in these competencies through the tasks they had performed. Below we present the tasks carried out, the organization of each subject and the most relevant data regarding the self-perception of digital competencies of the future primary school teachers enrolled at the University of Murcia. The data reveal, on the one hand, that the students participating consider themselves to be competent in the most basic aspects of digital competencies and, on the other, their perception that the work done in the subject has helped them quite a lot in improving their competencies.

  17. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  18. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  19. The High School Physics Curriculum and the University of North Dakota Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolby, C.; Hardersen, P.

    2013-04-01

    As astronomy is a subject largely absent in the secondary classroom for many reasons, the research presented here attempts to make astronomy education an option for high school students across the state of North Dakota. Through implementation of a two-week astronomy course at Grand Forks Central High School (GFCHS), two class periods totaling nineteen physics students (fourteen in the first class period and five in the second class period) were given the opportunity to learn material that would have otherwise been unavailable to them. Four of these students were female and fifteen of these students were male. During ten class periods from April 16, 2012 through April 27, 2012, instruction included presentation of basic astronomy concepts and observational techniques as well as student participation in demonstrations and activities regarding the course content. Students were given the option to visit the University of North Dakota (UND) Observatory the evening of April 20, 2012 for a public “star party” where they received a tour of the university's telescopes and other research equipment. During class time on April 25, 2012, students took a field trip to the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences to tour both Aviation and Space Studies facilities at UND. The lesson plan for the course also included a group project utilizing the telescopes at the UND Observatory for remote observing to complete research on the astrometry of an asteroid. Students were given a pre-test at the start of the two-week course, daily exit surveys at the end of each class period, and a post-test at the end of the two-week course. These assessments were used to evaluate student enjoyment, progress, and overall perception of the astronomy course. This research identified common misconceptions in astronomy held by the learners as well as the most effective teaching methods. It was found that this course was overall successful in promoting the students' learning of astronomy in a short

  20. Intervention Research Productivity from 2005 to 2014: Faculty and University Representation in School Psychology Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor; Umaña, Ileana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify authors and training programs making the most frequent contributions to intervention research published in six school psychology journals ("School Psychology Review," "School Psychology Quarterly," "Journal of School Psychology," "Psychology in the Schools,"…

  1. A Comparative Study of Piano Curricula in Egypt and the USA (with Specific Reference to the School of Music at the University of Illinois)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Sahar Abdel Moneim Hanafy

    2010-01-01

    This research draws a comparison between the School of Music at the University of Illinois, USA and the Faculty of Music Education at Helwan University in Cairo, Egypt (the researcher's academic appointment is at Menofia University, but she teaches on the faculty of Helwan University). The research answers two important questions: (1) What…

  2. Elements for successful collaboration between K-8 school, community agency, and university partners: the lead peace partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, Linda M; Sieving, Renee E; Ericson, Annie; Russ, Pamela; Cavender, Laura; Bonine, Mark

    2010-10-01

    Researchers, schools, and community organizations are increasingly interested in forming partnerships to improve health and learning outcomes for adolescents. School-based service learning programs with young adolescents have been shown to improve students' health and educational outcomes. Quality school-based service learning practice requires partnerships that are collaborative, mutually beneficial, and address community needs. This article examines core elements of a community-school-university partnership engaged in implementing and evaluating Lead Peace, a service learning program for urban middle school youth. The partnership was assessed through (1) semistructured group interviews with program facilitators at each school at the end of the 2006 to 2007 and 2007 to 2008 school years; (2) key informant interviews with school administrators; and (3) participant observations of partnership meetings. Qualitative analysis was conducted to identify common and emerging themes that contribute to the success of the Lead Peace partnership. Ten themes were identified as keys to the success of the Lead Peace partnership: (1) communication; (2) shared decision making; (3) shared resources; (4) expertise and credibility; (5) sufficient time to develop and maintain relationships; (6) champions and patron saints; (7) being present; (8) flexibility; (9) a shared youth development orientation; and (10) recognition of other partners' priorities. Partnerships that are essential to quality service learning practice require deliberate planning and ongoing attention. Elements of the successful Lead Peace partnership may be useful for other collaborators to consider. © 2010, American School Health Association.

  3. The analysis of the physical education teacher candidates’ attitudes towards school experience course: the case of Batman University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enes IŞIKGÖZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to analyse the attitudes of the physical education teacher candidates towards ‘Teacher Classroom Practice’ course present in programs for training teachers for sport high schools and for teachers of physical education. Material and Methods: The study group of this research was compiled of 60 students from 2015-2016 school year in Batman University, Physical Education and Sport High school Physical Education Department and Department for Sport High school Teachers, which attended the course “Teacher Classroom Practice”. The results of the research were collected with “Course for Teacher Classroom Practice Attitude Scale”. Besides descriptive statistics used for the analysis, Mann Whitney U test was used for the comparison between the results of different groups. Results: According to the results of the study, even though physical education teacher candidates’ attitudes towards the course showed positive results, an inconsistence was observed between the high school and practice school results. It was also observed that there are no significantly different reactions to the attitude of teacher candidates according to the gender or schools that participated the study. In the light of these results. Conclusion: It is observed that the general attitude levels of pre-service physical education teachers towards the school experience course are positively high. This is an expected and desired result in terms of showing that school experience course is a very important course in providing experience and chance of observing the profession of teaching beforehand in field.

  4. James Cook University's rurally orientated medical school selection process: quality graduates and positive workforce outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Robin A; Woolley, Torres; Sen Gupta, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    The regionally based James Cook University (JCU) College of Medicine and Dentistry aims to meet its mission to address the health needs of the region by using a selection policy favouring rural origin applicants and providing students with early and repeated exposure to rural experiences during training. This study seeks to determine if the JCU medical school's policy of preferentially selecting rural and remote background students is associated with differing patterns of undergraduate performance or graduate practice location. Data at application to medical school and during the undergraduate years was retrieved from administrative databases held by the university and the medical school. Postgraduate location data were obtained either from personal contact via email, telephone or Facebook or electronically from the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Authority website. Practice location was described across Australian Standard Geographical Classification Remoteness Area (ASGC-RA) categories, with 1 being a major city and 5 being a very remote location. The 856 Australian-based students accepted into the JCU medical program between 2000 and 2008 came from all geographical regions across Australia: 20% metropolitan (ASGC-RA 1), 20% inner regional (ASGC-RA 2), 56% outer regional (ASGC-RA 3), and 5% from remote or very remote locations (ASGC-RA 4 and 5). Having a rural or remote hometown at application (ASGC-RA 3-5) was significantly associated with a lower tertiary entrance score (pacademic achievement across years 1 to 3 (p=0.002, p=0.005 and p=0.025, respectively). Graduates having either a rural or a remote home town at application were more likely to practise in rural (RA 3-5) towns than graduates from metropolitan/inner regional centre across all postgraduate years. For example, the prevalence odds ratios (POR) for graduates practising in a rural town at postgraduate year 1 (PGY 1) having either a rural or remote hometown were 2.6 and 1.8, respectively

  5. A university system's approach to enhancing the educational mission of health science schools and institutions: the University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buja, L. Maximilian; Cox, Susan M.; Lieberman, Steven A.; MacClements, Jonathan; Williams, Janet F.; Esterl, Robert M.; Shine, Kenneth I.

    2013-01-01

    Background The academy movement developed in the United States as an important approach to enhance the educational mission and facilitate the recognition and work of educators at medical schools and health science institutions. Objectives Academies initially formed at individual medical schools. Educators and leaders in The University of Texas System (the UT System, UTS) recognized the academy movement as a means both to address special challenges and pursue opportunities for advancing the educational mission of academic health sciences institutions. Methods The UTS academy process was started by the appointment of a Chancellor's Health Fellow for Education in 2004. Subsequently, the University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education (UTAHSE) was formed by bringing together esteemed faculty educators from the six UTS health science institutions. Results Currently, the UTAHSE has 132 voting members who were selected through a rigorous, system-wide peer review and who represent multiple professional backgrounds and all six campuses. With support from the UTS, the UTAHSE has developed and sustained an annual Innovations in Health Science Education conference, a small grants program and an Innovations in Health Science Education Award, among other UTS health science educational activities. The UTAHSE represents one university system's innovative approach to enhancing its educational mission through multi- and interdisciplinary as well as inter-institutional collaboration. Conclusions The UTAHSE is presented as a model for the development of other consortia-type academies that could involve several components of a university system or coalitions of several institutions. PMID:23490406

  6. Two Studies of Pitch in String Instrument Vibrato: Perception and Pitch Matching Responses of University and High School String Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geringer, John M.; MacLeod, Rebecca B.; Ellis, Julia C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated pitch perception of string vibrato tones among string players in two separate studies. In both studies we used tones of acoustic instruments (violin and cello) as stimuli. In the first, we asked 192 high school and university string players to listen to a series of tonal pairs: one tone of each pair was performed with vibrato and…

  7. Employment of College Graduates in the Era of Universalized Higher Education: A Comparative Study by School Type and Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching-Pao, Chuang; Joanne, Hu J. H.

    2012-01-01

    The employment performance (including salaries, relevant to studies and job satisfaction) of college graduates from different school types and disciplines after the universalization of higher education in Taiwan was examined and a comparative analysis was conducted in this article. The findings were as follows: 1) "Medicine and health"…

  8. "Epistemic Chaos": The Recontextualisation of Undergraduate Curriculum Design and Pedagogic Practice in a New University Business School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Norman

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on a qualitative case study of undergraduate curriculum design and pedagogic practice in the new University Business School (UBS). Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with 24 academics from across a range of business sub-disciplines together with an extensive documentary review of materials relating to two…

  9. Blended Learning and Curriculum Renewal across Three Medical Schools: The Rheumatology Module at the University of Otago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbings, Simon; Bagheri, Nasser; Perrie, Kellie; Blyth, Phil; McDonald, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    In response to the challenges created by the implementation of a new medical school curriculum at the University of Otago in 2008, we aimed to develop a blended learning course for teaching rheumatology within the existing musculoskeletal course. We developed a multimedia online learning resource structured to support class based problem-based…

  10. Dialoguing, Cultural Capital, and Student Engagement: Toward a Hip Hop Pedagogy in the High School and University Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Louie F.

    2009-01-01

    Hip hop culture is typically excluded from conventional educational spaces within the U.S. Drawing on the experiences of an educator who works with urban high school students and university level pre- and in-service educators, this article examines the role of hip hop culture for student engagement in two settings--an alternative high school…

  11. Psychological wellbeing and self-esteem in students across the transition between secondary school and university: A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinauskas Romualdas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal study investigated the psychological wellbeing and self-esteem of students during the transition between secondary school and university. The sample comprised 197 students (82 male; 115 female. The mean age of the students at the start of the study was 18.54 years (SD = 0.78. Students completed measures of psychological wellbeing (Ryff Psychological Wellbeing Scale and self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale during their final year of secondary school and again at the start of their university studies. Repeated measures (RM multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA was used to investigate how transition status and gender affected aspects of psychological wellbeing and self-esteem. Multivariate analysis showed main effect of the transition from school to university on psychological wellbeing and self-esteem. Univariate analysis indicated that psychological wellbeing was higher at the start of university studies than during the final year of secondary school, but failed to confirm the effect of the transition on self-esteem. Gender by transition status interactions for two psychological wellbeing dimensions (autonomy and purpose in life were found.

  12. Correlating Student Interest and High School Preparation with Learning and Performance in an Introductory University Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Jason J.?B.; Harrison, David M.; Meyertholen, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the correlation of student performance in a large first year university physics course with their reasons for taking the course and whether or not the student took a senior-level high school physics course. Performance was measured both by the Force Concept Inventory and by the grade on the final examination. Students who took the…

  13. Predicting College Math Success: Do High School Performance and Gender Matter? Evidence from Sultan Qaboos University in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. Mazharul; Al-Ghassani, Asma

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of students of college of Science of Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) in Calculus I course, and examine the predictive validity of student's high school performance and gender for Calculus I success. The data for the study was extracted from students' database maintained by the Deanship of…

  14. An Investigation of Pre-Service Teachers' Learning in Physical Education Teacher Education: Schools and University in Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Frank; Waring, Michael

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the role of school and university partnership teams in the professional development of physical education (PE) pre-service teachers (PSTs) during their one year Postgraduate Certificate in Education course in England. The paper focuses on the key influences and processes that impacted on PST subject knowledge development. An…

  15. The new and improved learning community at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine resembles that at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Rosalyn W; Barker, Allison R; Shochet, Robert B; Wright, Scott M

    2007-05-01

    In July 2005, a learning community was created at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM) to foster camaraderie, networking, advising, mentoring, professionalism, clinical skills, and scholarship--The Colleges. The cultural and structural changes that emerged with the creation of this program have resulted in JHUSOM bearing a resemblance to J. K. Rowling's fictional Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. This manuscript will describe the similarities between these two revered schools, and highlight the innovations and improvements made to JHUSOM's learning environment. The intense, stressful, and lengthy professional training required to achieve competency in the practice of medicine and in the practice of witchcraft (albeit fictional) have meaningful parallels. The supportive learning environment at these two schools should afford the next generation of graduates to have an even more enriching experience than those who have come before them.

  16. Assessment of Morphological Variations and its Specific Location on the Surface of Adult Human Liver in Ethiopian Cadavers University of Gondar, Bahir Dar University, Addis Ababa University, St. Paulos Medical School and Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsegaye Mehare

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver is the second largest organ next to skin and located in right hypochondrium, epigastrium and may extend to left hypochondrium in upper abdominal cavity. It accounts 2% to 3% of total body weight of individual. Land marking for interpreting different diagnostic image and localizing lesions in the liver is commonly done by major fissures. Sound knowledge about different morphological variations which are found on the surface of liver is mandatory to have safe surgical outcome. Segments of liver were extensively researched but there are only few studies dealt with the surface variation of the liver. Therefore, this study aims to assess morphological variations and its specific location on the surface of adult human liver in Ethiopian cadaver. Methodology: Institutional based cross sectional descriptive study design was conducted in 33 formalin fixed Ethiopian cadaveric livers in the Anatomy department of University of Gondar, Bahir Dar University, Addis Ababa University, St. Paulos Medical School and Hawassa University. Results: 45.45% of the liver was normal but 54.55% showed one or more variations. Additional fissures and very small left lobe with deep costal impressions were seen 27.27% and 21.21% cases respectively. Pons hepatis connecting left lobe with quadrate lobe and very deep renal impression with corset constriction were noted in 9.09% cases each. Additional lobes and absence of quadrate lobes were found in 6.06% cases each. Conclusion and Recommendation: Morphological variations on the liver surface were accessory fissure, very small left lobe with deep costal impressions, pons hepatis, shape variation and absence of quadrate lobe. The most common one among the variations was accessory fissure on the visceral and diaphragmatic surface.

  17. 'It's just so much waste.' A qualitative investigation of food waste in a universal free School Breakfast Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondin, Stacy A; Djang, Holly Carmichael; Metayer, Nesly; Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Economos, Christina D

    2015-06-01

    To understand stakeholders' perspectives on food waste in a universal free School Breakfast Program implementing a Breakfast in the Classroom model. Semi-structured focus groups and interviews were conducted with school district stakeholders. Inductive methods were used to code resulting transcripts, from which themes were identified. The analysis provides a thematic analysis of stakeholders' perspectives on food waste in the School Breakfast Program. Ten elementary schools in a large urban school district implementing a universal free Breakfast in the Classroom model of the US national School Breakfast Program. Elementary-school students (n 85), parents (n 86), teachers (n 44), cafeteria managers (n 10) and school principals (n 10). Stakeholders perceived food waste as a problem and expressed concern regarding the amount of food wasted. Explanations reported for food waste included food-related (palatability and accessibility), child-related (taste preferences and satiation) and programme-related (duration, food service policies, and coordination) factors. Milk and fruit were perceived as foods particularly susceptible to waste. Several food waste mitigation strategies were identified by participants: saving food for later, actively encouraging children's consumption, assisting children with foods during mealtime, increasing staff support, serving smaller portion sizes, and composting and donating uneaten food. Stakeholders recognized food waste as a problem, reported myriad contributing factors, and have considered and employed multiple and diverse mitigation strategies. Changes to the menu and/or implementation logistics, as well as efforts to use leftover food productively, may be possible strategies of reducing waste and improving the School Breakfast Program's economic, environmental and nutritional impact.

  18. Elements related to attrition of women faculty at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Pooja

    Recent studies have shown that the number of women faculty in academic medicine is much lesser than the number of women that are graduating from medical schools. Many academic institutes face the challenge of retaining talented faculty and this attrition from academic medicine prevents career advancement of women faculty. This case study attempts to identify some of the reasons for dissatisfaction that may be related to the attrition of women medical faculty at the University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine. Data was collected using a job satisfaction survey, which consisted of various constructs that are part of a faculty's job and proxy measures to gather the faculty's intent to leave their current position at the University of Pittsburgh or academic medicine in general. The survey results showed that although women faculty were satisfied with their job at the University of Pittsburgh, there are some important factors that influenced their decision of potentially dropping out. The main reasons cited by the women faculty were related to funding pressures, work-life balance, mentoring of junior faculty and the amount of time spent on clinical responsibilities. The analysis of proxy measures showed that if women faculty decided to leave University of Pittsburgh, it would most probably be due to better opportunity elsewhere followed by pressure to get funding. The results of this study aim to provide the School of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh with information related to attrition of its women faculty and provide suggestions for implications for policy to retain their women faculty.

  19. Modeling the Impact of School-Based Universal Depression Screening on Additional Service Capacity Needs: A System Dynamics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Aaron R; Maras, Melissa A; Pate, Christina M; Igusa, Takeru; Vander Stoep, Ann

    2016-03-01

    Although it is widely known that the occurrence of depression increases over the course of adolescence, symptoms of mood disorders frequently go undetected. While schools are viable settings for conducting universal screening to systematically identify students in need of services for common health conditions, particularly those that adversely affect school performance, few school districts routinely screen their students for depression. Among the most commonly referenced barriers are concerns that the number of students identified may exceed schools' service delivery capacities, but few studies have evaluated this concern systematically. System dynamics (SD) modeling may prove a useful approach for answering questions of this sort. The goal of the current paper is therefore to demonstrate how SD modeling can be applied to inform implementation decisions in communities. In our demonstration, we used SD modeling to estimate the additional service demand generated by universal depression screening in a typical high school. We then simulated the effects of implementing "compensatory approaches" designed to address anticipated increases in service need through (1) the allocation of additional staff time and (2) improvements in the effectiveness of mental health interventions. Results support the ability of screening to facilitate more rapid entry into services and suggest that improving the effectiveness of mental health services for students with depression via the implementation of an evidence-based treatment protocol may have a limited impact on overall recovery rates and service availability. In our example, the SD approach proved useful in informing systems' decision-making about the adoption of a new school mental health service.

  20. Global Systems Science and Hands-On Universe Course Materials for High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A.

    2011-09-01

    The University of California Berkeley's Lawrence Hall of Science has a project called Global Systems Science (GSS). GSS produced a set of course materials for high school science education that includes reading materials, investigations, and software for analyzing satellite images of Earth focusing on Earth systems as well as societal issues that require interdisciplinary science for full understanding. The software has general application in analysis of any digital images for a variety of purposes. NSF and NASA funding have contributed to the development of GSS. The current NASA-funded project of GSS is Lifelines for High School Climate Change Education (LHSCCE), which aims to establish professional learning communities (PLCs) to share curriculum resources and best practices for teaching about climate change in grades 9-12. The project explores ideal ways for teachers to meet either in-person or using simple yet effective distance-communication techniques (tele-meetings), depending on local preferences. Skills promoted include: how to set up a website to share resources; initiating tele-meetings with any available mechanism (webinars, Skype, telecons, moodles, social network tools, etc.); and easy ways of documenting and archiving presentations made at meetings. Twenty teacher leaders are forming the PLCs in their regions or districts. This is a national effort in which teachers share ideas, strategies, and resources aimed at making science education relevant to societal issues, improve students' understanding of climate change issues, and contribute to possible solutions. Although the binding theme is climate change, the application is to a wide variety of courses: Earth science, environmental science, biology, physics, and chemistry. Moreover, the PLCs formed can last as long as the members find it useful and can deal with any topics of interest, even if they are only distantly related to climate change.

  1. University-affiliated schools as sites for research learning in pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors propose that the single component of these schools, which has historically distinguished them from schools for work integrated learning (WIL), is that they are also research spaces and have retained some of the 'lab' character of earlier schools, such as the one established by John Dewey. In such schools, the ...

  2. The School Museum as a Catalyst for a Renewal of the Teaching of History of Education. Practices and Experiences from the University of Macerata, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the educational activities that, since its establishment, the Museum of the School of the University of Macerata has developed with particular attention to university and school students. As a result of a fruitful synthesis of the most recent trends in History of Education, Heritage Education and finally in History Teaching,…

  3. Classroom Management Instruction in the Context of a School-University Partnership: A Case Study of Team-Based Curriculum Deliberation, Design, and Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbert, Belinda

    2008-01-01

    This case study explored a process of team-based curriculum deliberation, design, and delivery, used to teach a classroom management course in the context of a school university partnership. A team of university and school-based teacher educators negotiated how best to prepare preservice teachers with effective classroom management knowledge and…

  4. A Collaboration Between University and High School in Preparing Physics Teachers: Chicago State University's Teacher Immersion Institutea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabella, Mel S.; Van Duzor, Andrea G.; Passehl, Jennie; Weisenburger, Kara

    2012-05-01

    Because of the diverse character of colleges and universities throughout the United States, it is naive to believe that a one-size-fits-all model of teacher preparation aligns with specific resources and student population needs. Exploring innovative models that challenge traditional programs is now being encouraged by organizations such as the American Association of Physics Teachers and the American Physical Society. Chicago State University (CSU) is now exploring exciting changes to its physics teacher preparation program by utilizing the expertise of Chicago Area teachers and early teaching experiences for students interested in, but not yet committed to, the physics teaching profession.

  5. Strengthening the ties between university and school - Bilingual geography is the future for our multifarious subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnikel, F.

    2003-04-01

    between university and school, since it enables future students to comprehend the character of geography and the aspects of its underlying diversity, and it, consequently, improves the students' ability to understand and solve geographical problems of the future.

  6. A pilot study of an online universal school-based intervention to prevent alcohol and cannabis use in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Nicola C; Conrod, Patricia J; Rodriguez, Daniel M; Teesson, Maree

    2014-05-19

    The online universal Climate Schools intervention has been found to be effective in reducing the use of alcohol and cannabis among Australian adolescents. The aim of the current study was to examine the feasibility of implementing this prevention programme in the UK. A pilot study examining the feasibility of the Climate Schools programme in the UK was conducted with teachers and students from Year 9 classes at two secondary schools in southeast London. Teachers were asked to implement the evidence-based Climate Schools programme over the school year with their students. The intervention consisted of two modules (each with six lessons) delivered approximately 6 months apart. Following completion of the intervention, students and teachers were asked to evaluate the programme. 11 teachers and 222 students from two secondary schools evaluated the programme. Overall, the evaluations were extremely positive. Specifically, 85% of students said the information on alcohol and cannabis and how to stay safe was easy to understand, 84% said it was easy to learn and 80% said the online cartoon-based format was an enjoyable way to learn health theory topics. All teachers said the students were able to recall the information taught, 82% said the computer component was easy to implement and all teachers said the teacher's manual was easy to use to prepare class activities. Importantly, 82% of teachers said it was likely that they would use the programme in the future and recommend it to others. The Internet-based universal Climate Schools prevention programme to be both feasible and acceptable to students and teachers in the UK. A full evaluation trial of the intervention is now required to examine its effectiveness in reducing alcohol and cannabis use among adolescents in the UK before implementation in the UK school system. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Selected Statistics from the Public Elementary and Secondary Education Universe: School Year 2013-14. First Look. NCES 2015-151

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glander, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) First Look report introduces new data for the universe of public elementary and secondary schools and agencies in the United States in school year (SY) 2013-14. Specifically, this report includes statistics that describe: (1) the numbers and types of public elementary and secondary schools and…

  8. Selected Statistics from the Public Elementary and Secondary Education Universe: School Year 2012-13. First Look. NCES 2014-098

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaton, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) First Look report introduces new data for the universe of public elementary and secondary schools and agencies in the United States in school year (SY) 2012-13. Specifically, this report includes statistics that describe: (1) the numbers and types of public elementary and secondary schools and…

  9. Institutional leadership and faculty response: fostering professionalism at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserstein, Alan G; Brennan, Patrick J; Rubenstein, Arthur H

    2007-11-01

    Fostering professionalism requires institutional leadership and faculty buy-in. At the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, policies and educational programs were developed to enhance professionalism in three areas: conduct of clinical trials, relations with pharmaceutical manufacturers, and the clinical and teaching environment. Responsible conduct of clinical trials has been addressed with mandatory online education and certification for clinical investigators, but some still fail to recognize conflicts of interest. Activity of pharmaceutical representatives has been strictly regulated, meals and gifts from pharmaceutical companies prohibited, and the role of the pharmaceutical industry in the formulary process and in continuing medical education curtailed. Some faculty members have resented such restrictions, particularly in regard to their opportunity to give paid lectures. Professionalism in the clinical and teaching environment has been addressed with interdisciplinary rounding, experiential learning for medical students and residents in small groups, increased recognition of role models of professionalism, and active management of disruptive physicians. Leadership has been exerted through policy development, open communications, and moral suasion and example. Faculty members have expressed both their support and their reservations. Development of communication strategies continues, including town hall meetings, small groups and critical incident narratives, and individual feedback. The understanding and endorsement of faculty, staff, and trainees are an essential element of the professionalism effort.

  10. [Testing the probability of a model to predict suicide risk in high school and university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Nesrin Hisli; Batigün, Ayşegül Durak

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of a model proposed by Batigün and Sahin regarding suicide probability. The sample was composed of 2343 students aged 15-25 years that were attending various high schools and universities. According to the proposed model, 2 risk groups were formed from this sample, according to their scores on the investigation variables (those that simultaneously received high scores 1 standard deviation above the mean on the Problem Solving Inventory, Multidimensional Anger Scale, and Impulsivity Scale). Two other risk groups were formed according to the criteria variable scores (suicide probability scores 1 standard deviation above and below the mean). A series of analyses were conducted to investigate the similarity between the model risk groups and criteria risk groups. The results reveal that the model had a 43.3% success rate for predicting those with high suicide probability, while the false negative rate was 0%. Discriminant analysis showed that the model correctly discriminated 90.2% of those with low suicide probability and 87.3% of those with high suicide probability. The results support the validity of the proposed model for selecting individuals with high suicide probability. In addition, the model can be used to offer these individuals certain preventive measures, such as problem solving, communication skills, and anger management training.

  11. Students' perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P Ravi; Dubey, Arun K; Balasubramanium, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    The learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine (XUSOM), Aruba has not been previously studied. Hence, the present study was carried out using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) to obtain student perceptions about the learning environment and compare the same among different subgroups of respondents. The questionnaire was administered to undergraduate medical students in their first to fifth semester during the first two weeks of June 2013. The students' perceptions were evaluated by noting their degree of agreement with a set of 50 statements using a Likert-type scale. The mean overall score and the scores of subcategory were calculated and compared among different respondents (Pperception of teaching/learning was 31.99±6.23 (maximum score, 48), while the score for students' perceptions of teachers was 30.05±5.54 (maximum score, 44). The mean±SD scores for students' academic self-perception, students' perception of the atmosphere, and students' social self-perception were 21.88±5.11 (maximum score, 32), 30.92±8.59 (maximum score, 48), and 16.96±4.71 (maximum score, 28), respectively. There were no differences in scores according to the respondents' personal characteristics. The student responses about the learning environment at the institution were positive. We plan to obtain regular student feedback as the curriculum becomes progressively more student-centered and integrated.

  12. The new curriculum for family medicine at the University of Split, School of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivančica Pavličević

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available According to the new curriculum at the University of Split School ofMedicine for the 2010/2011 academic year, the Department of FamilyMedicine based its teaching on its own expert and research work. Theadequacy of the communication with the patient, his or her familyand the social environment, as well as the concept of evidence-basedmedicine (EBM have been defined as the foundation of expert andresearch work in family medicine. In accordance with this strategy,the members of the Department are involved in conducting journalclubs, Cochrane systematic reviews, research into the health of families where the father is absent working abroad (there are many such families with emigrant fathers in the region, and some are working on developing student letters to patients as an instrument for encouraging communication and empathy. The proportion of theoreticalclasses was reduced to provide more time for practice-based classes for students. The Work Diary was also introduced, as well as the student letter to the patient, practice of clinical skills and objective, structured, clinical examination (OSCE. The assessment of students is performed in four parts: the grade given by the student’s practice supervisor, the grade for student letters to patients, the OSCE exam grade and the written exam grade. Students achieved, on average, very high grades. The Department is also involved in the course on clinical and social skills to first and second year students, taking on the task of introducing students to patients and their surroundings.

  13. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers.

  14. Can we make Schools and Universities smarter with the Internet of Things?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Kiryakova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Schools and universities stand up to the challenge the Internet of Things, which has the potential to significantly change teaching and learning. The learning and administrative processes and the relationships between all participants in education may benefit from the Internet of Things since the linked physical devices ensure connectivity of people and ensure their activity. The implementation of the Internet of Things in education, unlike other spheres, has a very important and difficult task. The Internet of Thing has to guarantee the creation of an environment that supports the acquisition of knowledge in a new, natural and effective way, consistent with the new realities and learners’ expectations. The questions of how and in what direction the Internet of Things will lead to changes in educational activities and processes have many answers and need discussions and debates. The objective of the current work is to answer these questions by presenting the concept the Internet of Things and consider its possible applications in education.

  15. Failure of the merger of the Mount Sinai and New York University hospitals and medical schools: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastor, John A

    2010-12-01

    This is the first of two articles in this issue of Academic Medicine that, together, report the author's findings from his study of the attempts by the leaders of Mount Sinai and New York University (NYU) academic health centers in New York City to merge their medical schools and hospitals, and the failure of those attempts. The contemporary and predicted effects of managed care, capitation, and the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 were major factors stimulating this and other mergers at academic health centers. The hospital executives and board members also anticipated saving significant amounts of money by consolidating back-office functions and clinical services. The leadership at Mount Sinai were the most enthusiastic proponents of the merger. At NYU, many trustees feared that their hospital, which was generating a surplus when the merger was being planned, and its medical school, which operated at a deficit and was dependent on hospital earnings, would, in time, drain the university's endowment if the merger took place. Accordingly, some of the leading trustees favored separating its hospital and medical school from the university and consigning them to a new company with Mount Sinai. Influential members of the NYU faculty strongly opposed this. The attempt to create a merged entity of the hospitals and medical schools failed after several frustrating months of interinstitutional negotiations. The trustees and executives then attempted to develop a merger of only the hospitals; that process is described in the companion article in this issue of Academic Medicine.

  16. Systematic review of universal resilience interventions targeting child and adolescent mental health in the school setting: review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dray, Julia; Bowman, Jenny; Wolfenden, Luke; Campbell, Elizabeth; Freund, Megan; Hodder, Rebecca; Wiggers, John

    2015-12-29

    The mental health of children and adolescents is a key area of health concern internationally. Previous empirical studies suggest that resilience may act as a protective mechanism towards the development of mental health problems. Resilience refers to the ability to employ a collection of protective factors to return to or maintain positive mental health following disadvantage or adversity. Schools represent a potential setting within which protective factors of all children and adolescents may be fostered through resilience-focussed interventions. Despite this potential, limited research has investigated the effectiveness of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions on mental health outcomes in children and adolescents. The objective of the present review is to assess the effects of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions, relative to a comparison group, on mental health outcomes in children and adolescents. Eligible studies will be randomised (including cluster-randomised) controlled trials of universal interventions explicitly described as resilience-focussed or comprising strategies to strengthen a minimum of three internal protective factors, targeting children aged 5 to 18 years, implemented within schools, and reporting a mental health outcome. Screening for studies will be conducted across six electronic databases: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), Excerpta Medica database (EMBASE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Two reviewers will retrieve eligible articles, assess risk of bias, and extract data. Where studies are sufficiently homogenous and reported outcomes are amenable for pooled synthesis, meta-analysis will be performed. Narrative description will be used to synthesise trial outcome data where data cannot be combined or heterogeneity exists. This review will aid in building an evidence

  17. Expectations Compared of First-Year Students in Pre-School and Primary School Education Degrees at the University of Burgos in Relation to Characteristics and Practices in University Teaching most Desired

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime IBÁÑEZ QUINTANA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this work is to detect and analyse the desired characteristics and teaching practices that first year students will be taught in different subjects, comparing Pre-school with Primary Education degree at Burgos University. For that purpose, we have analysed data obtained from 120 surveys (60 others the Pre-school degree and 60 from the Primary Education degree, the surveys are based on the five basic aspects that we consider fundamental of a university education: personal and professional characteristics, evaluation, tutorial, information and communications technology (ICT and methodologies of education/learning. The results show that the student body values more the professional characteristics of its teaching staff than the personal ones; and the image transmitted by the teaching staff that uses ICT is always positive, creating a favourable opinion of his teaching, and the student body reaches to consider that ICTs are indispensable to nowadays education.

  18. A comprehensive approach to enhancing sexual health education in the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsberg, S A; Malemud, C J; Novak, T; Cole-Kelly, K; Wile, M Z; Spanos, P; Nosek, T M

    2003-10-01

    We report on the Sexual Health Curriculum Enhancement project at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Using a US dollars 100000 grant from Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, Inc., we have developed and are in the process of implementing a comprehensive, cross-disciplinary and innovative curriculum that is based on three primary objectives for teaching sexual health: attitude change, behavior change, and knowledge acquisition. Five general strategies to incorporate specific sexual health content into the medical school curriculum have been implemented: (1). Faculty Development; (2). Additional Didactics; (3). Cased-Based Learning; (4). Testing and Assessment; and (5). Electronic (Computer/Web-Based Enhancements).

  19. Long-Run Benefits from Universal High-Quality Pre-Schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauchmüller, Robert; Gørtz, Mette; Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz

    of staff with a pedagogic education, and a higher share of teachers with non-Danish ethnic background lead to significant improvements in children’s test results in Danish at the end of the 9th grade. Boys benefit more from pre-school quality than girls. We address possible selectivity by using......This paper investigates the role of pre-school quality for children’s cognitive development at the end of elementary schooling (age 16). We use a unique dataset based on Danish admini-strative registers where pre-school children are linked to their pre-school and its pre-school teachers. Based...... on this, we generate five main quality indicators of pre-schools. Child out-comes are language test scores from final (9th grade) elementary school exams. Controlling for child background factors, we find that a higher number of staff members per child, a higher share of male staff, a higher share...

  20. Utilizing the School Health Index to Foster University and Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kristi McClary

    2010-01-01

    A Coordinated School Health Program maximizes a school's positive interaction among health education, physical education, health services, nutrition services, counseling/psychological/social services, health school environment, health promotion for staff, and family and community involvement. The purpose of this semester project is for…

  1. "I'm Not a Bystander": Developing Teacher Leadership in a Rural School-University Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eargle, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Rural teachers need ongoing, flexible professional development designed to encourage collaboration and curriculum development. Furthermore, rural school reform requires successful collaborations between schools and colleges to create leaders within schools. Therefore, this case study is a program review that investigates how social studies…

  2. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Dublin City University Business School

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    DCU Business School is one of Ireland`s foremost research active Business Schools. Offering cutting edge education at undergraduate, masters and doctoral level, DCU Business School has earned a reputation for working closely with science and industry producing graduates who have experienced work life and are ready to collaborate with others in pursuit of innovation and technical advancement.

  3. Consistency Rules: A Critical Exploration of a Universal Principle of School Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Decoteau; Clough, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    The current study explores the principle of "consistency" and its relevance in the discipline cultures of three middle and two high schools in a Midwest US school district. We explore how educators (1) evoke consistency as a necessity for school discipline and (2) attempt to be consistent in practice to develop disciplined students,…

  4. School Centres for Teaching Excellence (SCTE): understanding new directions for schools and universities in Health and Physical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper critically analyzes a community collaborative approach for implementing Health and Physical Education (HPE) lessons within Gippsland primary schools (Victoria, Australia). The rural community collaborations reflected upon are embedded within the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEECD) ‘School Centres for Teaching Excellence’ (SCTE) initiative and are timely with the current curriculum reform in Health and Physical Education. The purpose of this pap...

  5. [The School of Medical Sciences of the University of Santiago de Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardones Restat, F

    1997-07-01

    The Medical Sciences School of the University of Santiago de Chile, is an institution inserted in the occidental culture and therefore on its conceptions and traditions. It subscribes the Principles defined in the Universal Declaration of the Human Rights of the United Nations and especially the importance of the human person, as an entity irrepetible, different to others. The human rights are over the institutions, the society and the laws of science. The Faculty considers the family as the cell or natural and fundamental element for the development of the human being in the society. It defines its historic mission as the search of the truth and the achievement of a society in pro of the welfare and health of the people in a frame of excellence, justice, humanism, efficiency and participation. As an expression of the cultural patrimony it should create and transfer knowledge. As guarantor of the ethical principles it should protect the dignity that emanates from the transcendent nature of the person and its moral principles and therefore its right to life, justice, freedom, equality, health, education, and happiness. As a paradigm of progress it must be involved in modernization and should impulse the development. As an entity committed with Society it should participate in the search of solutions for politics and programs looking for a higher level of life and a better model of health. The profile of our graduated students will identify them due to their profound spirit of welfare of the person, his family, his community, ethical sense, solidarity, justness and humanity, their orientation to the community and the environment with a solid professional formation in the strategy of Primary Health Care. They will provide education in health for the whole family in order to improve a better way of life. They will be trained to detect and solve the risks of individual, communities and environment. Research is also a priority of the Faculty in order to contribute to

  6. The summer school students’ viewpoints about important factors in learning, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEILA BAZRAFCAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The main goal of education is learning and change in behavior which has been revolutionized in the 21st century due to the rapid and widespread changes in science. The traditional approach to education does no longer meet the learners’ needs, necessitating new changes in educational curricula. This study was designed to determine the factors influencing learning in the 21st century and find out the students’ viewpoints on this issue. Methods: This is a descriptive study aiming at determining the students’ views on new approaches to learning in the 21st century. To do so, a researcher-made questionnaire was designed. It contained 30 questions in 3 sections including demographic data, background questions and two open questions about their suggestions and criticisms. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire was pilot-tested and measured, which proved to be describable. 150 students participating in university summer schools in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were enrolled. The questionnaires were sent to the students in person and through electronic mails. The students were asked to return the completed questionnaires to the given email address. The data were analyzed in SPSS, version 14, using descriptive statistics of frequency, mean, percentage and standard deviation and t-test. P<0. 05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: 150 questionnaires were appropriately filled out and given to the researchers. The results indicated that, according to the students, 6 factors including the use of computer in teaching, enhancement of virtual learning, the use of mobile in relations, enjoyment of electronic learning contexts, the learning focus on attitudes and the facilitating role of the lectures were the most influential factors in learning. On the other hand, the government’s responsibility and responsiveness, creativity and risk taking, increase in the social relationship among the learners, focus on

  7. Health rights knowledge among medical school students at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amoudi, Samia M; Al-Harbi, Abdullah A; Al-Sayegh, Nasser Y; Eldeek, Basem S; Kafy, Souzan M; Al-Ahwal, Mahmoud S; Bondagji, Nabeel S

    2017-01-01

    Health care is a basic human right, and Saudi Arabia affirms these rights for all its citizens. To assess the knowledge of medical students regarding health rights in Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional study was conducted at King Abdulaziz University (KAU) from September 2015 through November 2015. A questionnaire written in English collected demographic data and included questions about reproductive health care and health rights of women and patients with cancer, senility, or special needs. Of the 267 participants, 184 (68.9%) were female, and 252 (94.4%) were Saudi. Regarding consent, 87 (32.6%) and 113 (42.3%) participants believed a female patient required the consent of a male guardian to receive medical treatment or surgery, respectively, in Saudi Arabia, and only 106 (39.7%) knew that a female patient could provide consent for a caesarean section. Sixty-six (24.7%) believed that abortion is never allowed in Islam. Only 93 (34.8%) were aware that acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients had health rights, about half (144, 53.9%) knew that cancer patients have a right to full information, and most (181, 67.8%) believed that a patient had the right to withhold health information from his/her family. Approximately half were aware that cancer patients have the right to free medical treatment (138, 51.7%) or that health rights applied to special needs patients (137, 51.3%) and senile patients (122, 45.7%). The knowledge of KAU medical students regarding health rights of certain patient populations highlights the importance of health rights education in medical school.

  8. Health rights knowledge among medical school students at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia M Al-Amoudi

    Full Text Available Health care is a basic human right, and Saudi Arabia affirms these rights for all its citizens.To assess the knowledge of medical students regarding health rights in Saudi Arabia.This cross-sectional study was conducted at King Abdulaziz University (KAU from September 2015 through November 2015. A questionnaire written in English collected demographic data and included questions about reproductive health care and health rights of women and patients with cancer, senility, or special needs.Of the 267 participants, 184 (68.9% were female, and 252 (94.4% were Saudi. Regarding consent, 87 (32.6% and 113 (42.3% participants believed a female patient required the consent of a male guardian to receive medical treatment or surgery, respectively, in Saudi Arabia, and only 106 (39.7% knew that a female patient could provide consent for a caesarean section. Sixty-six (24.7% believed that abortion is never allowed in Islam. Only 93 (34.8% were aware that acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients had health rights, about half (144, 53.9% knew that cancer patients have a right to full information, and most (181, 67.8% believed that a patient had the right to withhold health information from his/her family. Approximately half were aware that cancer patients have the right to free medical treatment (138, 51.7% or that health rights applied to special needs patients (137, 51.3% and senile patients (122, 45.7%.The knowledge of KAU medical students regarding health rights of certain patient populations highlights the importance of health rights education in medical school.

  9. [Doctors specialty training in obstetrics and gynecology at university medical schools: 2012-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventruba, P; Feyereisl, J; Janda, P; Kučera, E; Martan, A; Novotný, Z; Pilka, R; Rob, L; Rokyta, Z; Spaček, J; Tošner, J

    2013-11-01

    The paper addresses transfer of doctors specialty training from the national Institute of postgraduate medical education (IPVZ) to University Medical Schools (UMS) with the special focus to Obstetrics and Gynecology (OG). The National Specialty Board (NSB) has been established. NSB tasks include definition of inclusion criteria and process of specialty choice at UMS. In OG specialty there are defined mid-term and final postgraduate training courses and other requirements for final specialty exam (FSE) - in particular trainees scientific work and surgery done with the supervision of NTB member. The system of FSE, its content, application, reimbursement and mechanisms are described in details. In the whole country in 2012 there have been done 864 FSE in all basic medical specialties, which took place at seven UMS. Autumn semester terms has been utilized significantly more than spring terms (57% vs. 43%). There have been differences in the numbers of specialties and also numbers of candidates in each specialty among different UMS. In total 94% of applicants succeed in the FSE. In 2012 within OG specialty training there has been held 56 FSE - 24 exams on five UMS in spring term and 32 (57%) exams only on two UMS in autumn term. In the spring 2013 FSE were organized on 1st LF UK in Prague with 23 applicants, from which 22 successfully passed. During autumn 2013 the FSE in OG will be held on LF UP in Olomouc with 44 applicants for final postgraduate training course and 39 candidates for FSE. Within OG specialty the transfer of doctors specialty training from IPVZ to UMS has been successfully managed. The NSB in OG specialty closely cooperates with past IPVZ and the Accreditation Commission of the Czech Ministry of Health. Thus continuity, quality and continuous enhancement of specialty training program in OG in Czech Republic is assured.

  10. Analysis of the study skills of undergraduate pharmacy students of the University of Zambia School of Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Chinyere Ezeala; Nalucha Siyanga

    2015-01-01

    It aimed to compare the study skills of two groups of undergraduate pharmacy students in the School of Medicine, University of Zambia using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire (SSAQ), with the goal of analysing students’ study skills and identifying factors that affect study skills. A questionnaire was distributed to 67 participants from both programs using stratified random sampling. Completed questionnaires were rated according to participants study skill. The total scores and scores ...

  11. [HPV prophylactic vaccine coverage in France: Results of a survey among high school and university students in Marseilles' area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiani, L; Bremond, A; Mortier, I; Lecuyer, M; Boubli, L; Carcopino, X

    2012-04-01

    To assess HPV prophylactic vaccine coverage among French high school and university students as well as their level of education about this vaccine. An anonymous survey was conducted among 2500 high school and university students from the area of Marseilles, France, from December 2009 to April 2010. A total of 2018 questionnaires were collected (80.7% participation rate). Mean age of participants was 20 years (range, 15-45 years). Only 671 (35.4%) participants reported having been vaccinated against HPV, of whom 510 (73.4%) had completed the three injections scheme. Practice of cytological cervical cancer screening was not significantly influenced by vaccination status. Thus, 578 (45.2%) participants who had not been vaccinated already had had a cervical cytology performed, versus 295 (43.3%) vaccinated ones (P=0.445). Among those not being vaccinated, 671 (49.8%) fulfilled criteria for a catch-up vaccination, of whom only 325 (48.4%) agreed for such a catch-up. Main reasons given for refusal for a catch-up vaccination were the lack of information about HPV vaccine and fear of side effects. In total, 1722 (90%) considered themselves as educated about the HPV vaccine. Source of education was attributed to doctors and media by 54.4% and 53.7% of participants, respectively. Educational role attributed to school and university was poor (3.4%). Despite apparent satisfactory level of education, HPV prophylactic vaccine coverage among high school and university students appears to be insufficient. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Importance of the Hungarian phytosociological school established at the University of Debrecen in development of current field botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhidi, A; Salamon-Albert, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The paper gives a short panoramic historical survey about the main activities of the Hungarian phytosociology, their chief protagonists, the fundamental role of professor Rezső Soó in the creation and development of the phytosociological school of Debrecen established by him in the Botanical Department of the University of Debrecen, which is celebrating the 80 anniversary of its existence and has played a determinant role in the Hungarian botany.

  13. The efficacy of treatment performed for temporomandibular joint patients at dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahebi Majid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Temporomandibular joint disorders are common problems among patients referring to dental schools and clinics. However appropriate treatment modalities are performed for the TMD patients in dental school, the results and success rate of these treatments are not studied distinctly. The aims of this study was to determine the treatment performed for temporomandibular patients at the TMJ department of Tehran University dental school in 2010-11 .   Materials and Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional trial, 85 TMD patients treated at the TMJ department of Tehran University dental school were examined at least 3 months after the treatments. The patients demographic data ,TMD signs and symptoms and the improvements occurred in TMD disorder were determined (complete, partial and no improvement. The patients satisfaction regarding the treatment results were investigated and data were analyzed regarding the presence of different TMD signs and symptoms before and after the treatment using Mann-Whitney U test .   Results: TMJ pain (35 cases, 42.2%, click (33 cases, 39.8% and muscle tenderness (26 cases, 31.3% were the most prevalent obtained signs and symptoms. The mean age of the patients were 32.3 years old while females were the predominant group (72 cases vs.11 one. 44 individuals (53.0% were treated by splint, 11 ones (13.3% with anterior repositioning splint and 17 individuals (92.5% were managed by physiotherapy plus splint. 65 patients (87.3% were satisfied with the results and 16 ones (19.3% were not. After the treatment, patients with TMJ pain (P0.05 .   Conclusion: The results showed that the treatments presented for the TMD patients at Tehran University dental school were successful and most patients received satisfactory treatment.

  14. Failure of the merger of the Mount Sinai and New York University hospitals and medical schools: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastor, John A

    2010-12-01

    This is the second of two articles in this issue of Academic Medicine that, together, report the author's findings from his study of the attempt by the leaders of Mount Sinai and New York University (NYU) medical centers in New York City to merge their medical schools and hospitals, and the failure of those attempts. After the unsuccessful effort of the trustees to merge the medical schools and hospitals--see the first article--the two institutions successfully created Mount Sinai NYU Health, a new company of the Mount Sinai and NYU hospitals in New York City. Members of the NYU faculty, worried that the new attempt would also include the medical schools, sued their university to prevent the merger. Although they lost the suit, the NYU medical school remained within the university as they had wanted. The hospital merger, like the more comprehensive hospital/medical school merger that failed, was favored by most of the trustees and executives at Mount Sinai. Although supported by many of the NYU trustees, both mergers were strongly opposed by some of the leadership and many of the faculty at the NYU medical center.The hospital merger came into effect in July 1998, but three years later, administration of the hospitals had returned to the separate campuses. In 2008, the merger was officially terminated. Although several of the back-office functions combined, no clinical programs did, as was also the case in other mergers of teaching hospitals. The author concludes with an analysis of why this merger failed while a few others succeeded.

  15. Toward Food System Sustainability through School Food System Change: Think&EatGreen@School and the Making of a Community-University Research Alliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Harlap

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the theoretical and conceptual framework and the research and practice model of Think&EatGreen@School, a community-based action research project aiming to foster food citizenship in the City of Vancouver and to develop a model of sustainable institutional food systems in public schools. The authors argue that educational and policy interventions at the school and school board level can drive the goals of food system sustainability, food security, and food sovereignty. The complex relationship between food systems, climate change and environmental degradation require that international initiatives promoting sustainability be vigorously complemented by local multi-stakeholder efforts to preserve or restore the capacity to produce food in a durable manner. As a step towards making the City of Vancouver green, we are currently involved in attempts to transform the food system of the local schools by mobilizing the energy of a transdisciplinary research team of twelve university researchers, over 300 undergraduate and graduate students, and twenty community-based researchers and organizations working on food, public health, environmental and sustainability education.

  16. Between school and university: The study of the historical scientific instruments collection of the Liceo Maffei in Verona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, F.

    2017-03-01

    Since 2014 the Museum of the History of Physics of the University of Padua has been working on the study and valorisation of the collection of historical scientific instruments kept at the high school "Scipione Maffei" in Verona, one of the oldest high schools in Italy. The Cabinet of Physics of "Liceo Maffei", founded in 1802, currently consists of about 550 instruments, acquired until the 1960s. Besides the Museum's staff, the project has involved two physics teachers and a group of students, who participated in different phases of the work on the collection. This article intends to present the collection, the project, and the results achieved so far. We also aim at highlighting the potentialities and possible future developments of the project, a project which can become a model for other schools.

  17. The Influence of University Coursework on Pre-service Middle and High School Teachers' Experiences with Multicultural Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Geeta

    2009-08-01

    The study explored the influence of university-based teacher education courses on pre-service middle and high school teachers’ experiences with multicultural themes in a secondary science alternative certification program. Eight participants ( N = 8), six women and two men, volunteered to be a part of the study that took place over a period of four semesters. Qualitative data was collected, coded and analyzed to make meaning of the participants’ experiences. Data comprised of participants’ reflective journals, personal and group interviews, and classroom observations done in middle school practicum and high school student teaching placements. The findings indicated that while the participants became more familiar with the themes of multicultural education, many did not demonstrate fluency with these themes and struggled with balancing their responsibilities as a science teacher and a culturally competent teacher.

  18. Evaluation of a school-based programme of universal eating disorders prevention: is it more effective in girls at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich, R M; Portell, M; Peláez-Fernández, M A

    2010-01-01

    There is currently controversy surrounding the effectiveness of universal versus selective prevention in eating disorders (ED). The present study aims at evaluating the effectiveness of universal school-based ED prevention administered to female secondary school students (n = 349). Students received either the full prevention programme (learning basic concepts of nutrition, criticism of aesthetic models of beauty emphasising extreme thinness, media literacy (ML)), a partial version of the programme (without nutritional education), or no prevention programme. Students were also classified on the presence or absence of distinct risk factors for ED: Early menarche, overweight, dieting, negative attitudes to food and perceived pressure to be thin. Pre-test data were collected 1 week prior to implementation of the prevention programme, and post-test data were collected on the last day of the programme. Results suggested that both the full and partial prevention programmes reduced perceived pressure to be thin and improved eating attitudes and knowledge of nutrition in all the participants (regardless of risk); however, greater effect sizes were found among particular high-risk groups (early menarche, overweight and highly influenced by aesthetic models of beauty emphasising extreme thinness). School-based programmes of universal intervention may have an important role to play in the prevention of ED.

  19. Competition preparation guideline in undergraduate program of information system school of Industrial Engineering Telkom University based on knowledge conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, F. R.; Soesanto, R. P.; Kurniawati, A.; Kurniawan, M. T.

    2017-12-01

    The role of higher education in the development of science and technology is not only from the contribution of the high-quality alumni but also from the research and relevant competition with the needs of development in such a country. In a competition, the student can improve their soft skill and academic skill such as analytical and critical thinking, communication skills and mental. The number of relevant competition by students is also included in accreditation clause, therefore student involvement in competition is seen as important for the undergraduate program in University. The most problem in university is the high turnover from the student. Bachelor program in Indonesia usually takes 4 years to complete, and the high turnover causes the student come and go as they are a graduate from the institution without preserving the knowledge and experience from the competition to other students. This research aims to develop a guidance for competition preparation in the university by using knowledge conversion. The object of this research is an information system undergraduate program in the school of industrial engineering Telkom University. The best practice selection is done by using factor rating method. Delphi method is used to identify the criteria, and AHP method is used to calculate the weight of each criterion. From the factor rating result it is known that from 3 respondent, best practice from respondent A (7.321) is used for preparing the programming competition in an undergraduate program of information system in the school of industrial engineering Telkom University. FGD is done to disseminate the selected best practice into the process stakeholder which is head of the student affair of the school of industrial engineering, students, and laboratory assistants. Future research can be done to create more comprehensive criteria for selecting the best practice.

  20. A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF MANAGERIAL SKILLS COMPETENCIES OF SECONDARY SCHOOL HEADS TRAINED THROUGH DISTANCE MODE OF ALLAMA IQBAL OPEN UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad AKHLAQ

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The premise of this article is to analyze the managerial skills competencies of secondary schools heads trained through distance mode of education in Pakistan. For this purpose a sample 300 secondary school teachers and 100 secondary schools head-teachers trained through distance mode and working in the Federal Government Educational Institutions (FGEI functioning under the administration of Pakistan army. The objectives of the study were: 1 to describe the M.Ed programme of AIOU, 2 to identify the managerial skills competencies of secondary school heads trained through Allama Iqbal Open University, 3 to find-out the managerial problems faced by the secondary school heads of FGEI, 4 to suggest some further suggestion to improve the managerial skills competencies of working heads of FGEI. The study focused the following categories of skills, Ø interpersonal communication skills, Ø planning skills, Ø collaboration/ teamwork skills, (iv proficiency skills, Ø organizational skills, Ø feedback skills, Ø basic technology knowledge, and Ø technology access knowledge. Major recommendations of the study were: 1 the scheme of study of M.Ed of Allama Iqbal Open University program be change as per need of administrator and it should focus be on management and administration, 2 For better performance of heads, an induction course covering all the managerial skills relevant to the job principal-sip should be arranged after each term and to be continue through out the service, 3 the present scheme of study of M.Ed program focus on teaching methodology, one additional semester be included that should cover the management courses and ,4 as the present study was delimited to the Federal Governmental Educational Institutions to analyze the managerial skills competencies of working heads of secondary schools. One logical avenue for future is to replicate this study on the whole the country to generalize the results.

  1. [80 years' of internal medicine education at the medical school of the university in Belgrade (1922-2002)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micić, Jovan; Micić, Dragan

    2003-01-01

    ORGANISATION OF TEACHING INTERNAL MEDICINE: The Department for Internal Medicine and Internal Clinics were founded in spring 1922. Dr. Radenko Stankovic and Dr. Dimitrije Antic were appointed as part-time Professors, while Dr. Aleksandar Ignjatovski, a former Full-time Professor of the Warsaw University, was appointed as professor under contract. A year later, Dr. Aleksandar Radosavljevic was appointed as Part-time Professor. In the General State Hospital and Military Hospital, certain wards were turned into clinics. II and III Internal Clinics were situated in the barracks, while the Propedeutic and I Internal Clinics were located in the Military Hospital. Upon the construction of the buildings of the Internal Clinic and General State Hospital, the Propedeutic and I Internal Clinics were permanently placed in the new building, and II and III Internal Clinics in the General State Hospital. Teaching of Internal Medicine started 31 October 1922. Dr. R. Stanko vic delivered a lecture in Propedeutics for students of the fifth term. This date marks the beginning of teaching internal medicine at the newly established School of Medicine, University of Belgrade. Dr. A. Ignjatovski started lecturing Internal medicine 23 March 1923, whereas Dr. D. Antic and and Dr. A. Radosavljevic also delivered lectures in the areas of Internal Medicine within their professional scope. At the beginning, the clinics belonged to the General State Hospital. It was impossible to teach successfully in hospital, therefore upon the professors' request, the clinics were separated and thus became the institutions belonging to the School of Medicine-educational institutions, while hospitals were health institutions. The rule was 'one professor--one clinic'. After the Second World War, teaching Internal Medicine was begun in demolished buildings in very difficult financial circumstances. The Propedeutic Internal clinic was renamed IV Internal Clinic, which continued dealing predominantly with

  2. ‘One Medicine - One Health’ at the School of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania - the first 125 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Hendricks, VMD, PhD

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet, in partnership with other veterinary schools and health professions, is positioned well to advance an international ‘One Medicine - One Health’ initiative. Founded in 1884 by the University's Medical Faculty, the School has been a leader in moulding the education and practice of veterinary medicine in the nation and the world. Successfully integrating biomedical research into all aspects of veterinary medical education, the School has made significant contributions to basic and clinical research by exemplifying ‘One Medicine’. In looking to the future, Penn Vet will embrace the broader ‘One Health’ mission as well.

  3. Nottingham Trent University and Makerere University School of Public Health partnership: experiences of co-learning and supporting the healthcare system in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musoke, David; Gibson, Linda; Mukama, Trasias; Khalil, Yesmean; Ssempebwa, John C

    2016-03-28

    Partnerships between developed and developing country institutions are increasingly becoming important in addressing contemporary global health challenges faced by health systems. Inter-university health collaboration such as the Nottingham Trent University (UK) and Makerere University School of Public Health (Uganda) partnership provide opportunities for working together in training, research and service delivery while strengthening health systems. This paper shares the experiences, achievements and opportunities of this partnership in co-learning and supporting the health system in Uganda. This includes a project being implemented to strengthen the training, supervision and motivation of community health workers in rural Uganda. Training and research are a key focus of the partnership and have involved both staff and students of both institutions including guest lectures, seminars and conference presentations. The partnership's collaboration with stakeholders such as the Ministry of Health (Uganda) and local health authorities has ensured participation necessary in supporting implementation of sustainable interventions. The partnership uses several channels such as email, telephone, Skype, Dropbox and WhatsApp which have been useful in maintaining constant and effective communication. The challenges faced by the partnership include lack of funding to support student mobility, and varying academic schedules of the two institutions. The experiences and prospects of this growing partnership can inform other collaborations in similar settings.

  4. Educating consent? A conversation with Noam Chomsky on the university and business school education

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, P; Oswick, C.

    2014-01-01

    In what follows, we present a conversation with Professor Noam Chomsky on the topic of whether the business school might be a site for progressive political change. The conversation covers a number of key issues related to pedagogy, corporate social responsibility and working conditions in the contemporary business school. We hope the conversion will contribute to the ongoing discussion about the role of the business school in neoliberal societies.

  5. A state university's model program to increase the number of its disadvantaged students who matriculate into health professions schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C L

    1996-10-01

    Health professions schools often provide support for minority and disadvantaged students in high school or in a single college summer program. However, long-term support for students during their undergraduate years is also crucial. Since 1990, San Diego State University (SDSU), a large urban public university, has implemented the Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) to increase the number of the university's disadvantaged students (most of whom are from minority groups) who matriculate into medical, dental, veterinary, and physician assistant schools. The program's 11 components, each dedicated to some form of educational intervention and support, emphasize developing students' collaborative learning skills, fostering their pride in accomplishment, and helping them achieve positive self-images and self-confidence; these goals are linked with building students' analytical and problem-solving skills. Weekly journals kept by students' mentors serve as an "early warning system" for "bad" feelings, attitudes, and behaviors that reflect students' personal problems and correlate with lower grades, and help the program staff work intensively with students immediately, before problems become severe. The SDSU's HCOP increased the number of disadvantaged (mostly minority) students staying in the prehealth career path (not counting those in the schools of nursing and public health) from 70 in 1989 to 360 in 1995. In 1992 through 1994, the students who had completed the HCOP's Summer Academic Program (to help them bridge into a science curriculum) had pass rates for entry-level math, writing competency, and math placement that were consistently higher than the rates for other SDSU students. The overall grade-point average of HCOP students in the spring of 1995 (3.05) was significantly higher than the overall GPA of all minority students in prehealth training before the HCOP began (2.59 in 1988). The number of SDSU's minority students accepted by health professions schools

  6. Computer literacy and attitudes of dental students and staff at the University of the West Indies Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W; Bedayse, S; Lalwah, S L; Paryag, A

    2009-08-01

    The University of the West Indies (UWI) Dental School is planning to implement computer-based information systems to manage student and patient data. In order to measure the acceptance of the proposed implementation and to determine the degree of training that would be required, a survey was undertaken of the computer literacy and attitude of all staff and students. Data were collected via 230 questionnaires from all staff and students. A 78% response rate was obtained. The computer literacy of the majority of respondents was ranked as 'more than adequate' compared to other European Dental Schools. Respondents computer literacy scores than older age groups (P computer, or were members of online social networking sites had significantly higher computer literacy scores than those who did not (P computer literacy should be a part of every modern undergraduate curriculum; that computer assisted learning applications and web-based learning activity could effectively supplement the traditional undergraduate curriculum and that a suitable information system would improve the efficiency in the school's management of students, teaching and clinics. The implementation of a computer-based information system is likely to have widespread acceptance among students and staff at the UWI Dental School. The computer literacy of the students and staff are on par with those of schools in the US and Europe.

  7. Exploring Milk and Yogurt Selection in an Urban Universal School Breakfast Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. Elizabeth; Kwon, Sockju

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore milk and yogurt selection among students participating in a School Breakfast Program. Methods: Researchers observed breakfast selection of milk, juice and yogurt in six elementary and four secondary schools. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression to…

  8. English Communication Skills: How Are They Taught at Schools and Universities in Oman?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahrooqi, Rahma

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate, from a student perspective, how English communication skills are taught in Oman's schools and higher education institutions. Previous research has documented the lack of communicative ability in English among school and higher education graduates in Oman (Al-Issa, 2007; Moody, 2009). However, the reasons…

  9. School Sector and Socioeconomic Inequalities in University Entrance in Australia: The Role of the Stratified Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Gary N.

    2010-01-01

    One of the more persuasive arguments for school sector differences in students' educational performance is the role of the senior school curriculum, which is stratified, socially selective, and has an important bearing on educational outcomes. In addition, the stratified curriculum may also contribute to socioeconomic inequalities in education by…

  10. Implementation of multiple intelligences theory in the English language course syllabus at the University of Nis Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakić-Mirić, Natasa

    2010-01-01

    Theory of multiple intelligences (MI) is considered an innovation in learning the English language because it helps students develop all eight intelligences that, on the other hand, represent ways people understand the world around them, solve problems and learn. They are: verbal/linguistic, logical/mathematical, visual/spatial, bodily/kinaesthetic, musical/rhythmic, interpersonal, intrapersonal and naturalist. Also, by focusing on the problem-solving activities, teachers, by implementing theory of multiple intelligences, encourage students not only to build their existing language knowledge but also learn new content and skills. The objective of this study has been to determine the importance of implementation of the theory of multiple intelligences in the English language course syllabus at the University of Nis Medical School. Ways in which the theory of multiple intelligences has been implemented in the English language course syllabus particularly in one lecture for junior year students of pharmacy in the University of Nis Medical School. The English language final exam results from February 2009 when compared with the final exam results from June 2007 prior to the implementation of MI theory showed the following: out of 80 junior year students of pharmacy, 40 obtained grade 10 (outstanding), 16 obtained grade 9 (excellent), 11 obtained grade 8 (very good), 4 obtained grade 7 (good) and 9 obtained grade 6 (pass). No student failed. The implementation of the theory of multiple intelligences in the English language course syllabus at the University of Nis Medical School has had a positive impact on learning the English language and has increased students' interest in language learning. Genarally speaking, this theory offers better understanding of students' intelligence and greater appreciation of their strengths. It provides numerous opportunities for students to use and develop all eight intelligences not just the few they excel in prior to enrolling in a

  11. INVESTIGATION OF LEISURE ACTIVITY ASSESSMENT MODES OF THE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS STUDYING AT SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayri AKYÜZ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine leisure activi ty assessment modes of the university students studying at Bartın University School of Physical Education a nd Sport . The universe of the study was composed of 405 university students attending to School of Physical Education a nd Sport , and 291 of them were chosen randomly as the sample group who participated to the survey voluntarily. Questionnaire form was used as data collection tool. Collected data were analyzed with SPSS 15.0 statistical software package , frequency (f and percentage (% distributions were interpreted presented in tables. According to analysis results, 43% of students who participated in the study have 3 - 4 hours leisure time and 33 % of students 5 - 6 hours leisure time. In addition, it was observed that families provide d adequate support for students about leisure. Moreover, a large majority of students found that leisure activities are educational and useful. 53.3% of students defined as leisure time left over from the work they have to do. Furthermore a ccording to the majority students , sports provides a regular life to people. The activities in students leisure time respectively shaped 1. listening to music, 2. sports bringing active participation, 3 . going to cinema and theater, 4. watchi ng TV, 5. monitoring sports competitions . As a result, it has been identified that social activities of the department they study are inadequate and they did not adequately use school facilities , even though a majority of students have sufficient time to join in an activity.

  12. A university--school collaboration to enhance healthy choices among children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Balcazar, Yolanda; Kouba, Joanne; Jones, Lindsay M; Lukyanova, Valentina V

    2014-01-01

    One factor contributing to the childhood obesity epidemic is easy access to foods with high fat content available in public schools. After several years of advocacy efforts conducted by a city-wide coalition, the public schools system in an urban Midwestern city introduced fresh salad bars for lunch in three schools. Researchers have argued, however, that the introduction of salad bars in schools, without nutrition education, is not enough to produce changes in eating patterns. In this study, researchers used a target and control school to evaluate the impact of a 5-month nutrition education program. The results indicated that once the nutrition education program was implemented, the number of children consuming salad entrees and salad items doubled and quadrupled respectively, and knowledge about fruits and vegetables increased. Implications for community researchers interested in addressing childhood obesity are discussed.

  13. A randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a universal school-based depression prevention program 'Op Volle Kracht' in the Netherlands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tak, Yuli R; Van Zundert, Rinka Mp; Kuijpers, Rowella Cwm; Van Vlokhoven, Boukje S; Rensink, Hettie Fw; Engels, Rutger Cme

    2012-01-01

    .... A universal school-based depression prevention program Op Volle Kracht (OVK) was developed, based on the Penn Resiliency Program, aimed at preventing the increase of depressive symptoms during adolescence and enhancing positive development...

  14. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL) of the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), University of Rhode Island is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  15. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The University of Hawaii at Manoa, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples...

  16. [Designing and Operating a Comprehensive Mental Health Management System to Support Faculty at a University That Contains a Medical School and University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Chiaki

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, healthcare professionals and healthcare workers typically practice a culture of self-assessment when it comes to managing their own health. Even where this background leads to instances of mental health disorders or other serious problems within a given organization, such cases are customarily addressed by the psychiatrists or psychiatric departments of the facilities affected. Organized occupational mental health initiatives for professionals and workers within the healthcare system are extremely rare across Japan, and there is little recognition of the need for such initiatives even among those most directly affected. The author has some experience designing and operating a comprehensive health management system to support students and faculty at a university in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area that contains a medical school and university hospital. At this university, various mental health-related problems were routinely being allowed to develop into serious cases, while the fundamental reforms required by the health management center and the mental health management scheme organized through the center had come to represent a challenge for the entire university. From this initial situation, we undertook several successive initiatives, including raising the number of staff in the health management center and its affiliated organizations, revising and drafting new health management rules and regulations, launching an employment support and management system, implementing screenings to identify people with mental ill-health, revamping and expanding a counselling response system, instituting regular collaboration meetings with academic affairs staff, and launching educational and awareness-raising activities. This resulted in the possibility of intervention in all cases of mental health crisis, such as suicidal ideation. We counted more than 2,400 consultations (cumulative total number; more than half of consultations was from the medical school, postgraduate

  17. [Projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Shingo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iseki, Hiroshi; Harada, Hiroshi Kasanuki Noboru; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Kitamori, Takehiko; Tei, Yuichi; Nakaoka, Ryusuke; Haishima, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Division of Medical Devices has been conducting the projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo. The TWIns has been studying to aim at establishment of preclinical evaluation methods by "Engineering Based Medicine", and established Regulatory Science Institute for Medical Devices. School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo has been studying to aim at establishment of assessment methodology for innovative minimally invasive therapeutic devices, materials, and nanobio diagnostic devices. This report reviews the exchanges of personnel, the implement systems and the research progress of these projects.

  18. Study, measurement and reduction of the radon concentration in the University School of Technical Architecture of the University of Coruña

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Otero-Pazos

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A study of radon concentration has been carried out at the University of A Coruña’s Technical Architecture School. For that purpose, soil and construction materials, as well as building location have been analyzed. After that, measurements have been performed in order to find out radon concentrations. Two techniques have been used to make that enquiry for both short term and long term measurements: for short term, measurements were made using an on-site ionization chamber detector, while, for long term, trace detectors have been employed. Due to the results, and according with the Spanish Law (Spanish Official Bulletin – Boletín Oficial del Estado, of December 21, 2011, IS-33 Instruction, corrective works have taken place (cracks sealing, installation of a forced ventilation system in order to diminish the high radon concentrations. After works, new measurements proved that radon concentration values lowered about 50 % and 90 %.

  19. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine: status of the Federal Medical School after 25 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J W; Harmon, S; Stavish, P J

    1998-05-01

    In its first 25 years, the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) has become a quality institution of medical education that provides a steady flow of career physicians for the military. It compares favorably with U.S. medical school averages in all aspects of undergraduate medical education: faculty, teaching facilities, matriculants, curriculum, student performance, and cost. USUHS provides excellent medical education and adds unique preparation for uniformed public service. It also provides military-specific graduate education, graduate medical education, continuing health education, medical research, clinical services, consultation, public service, and ties with international military, medical, and research institutions.

  20. Exploring the Concern about Food Allergies among Secondary School and University Students in Ontario, Canada: A Descriptive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon E. Majowicz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to explore the perceived risk of food allergies among students in Ontario, Canada. We analyzed blinding questions (“I am concerned about food allergies”; “food allergies are currently a big threat to my health” from three existing food safety surveys, given to high school and university undergraduate students (n=3,451 circa February 2015, using descriptive analysis, and explored how concern related to demographics and self-reported cooking ability using linear regression. Overall, high school students were neutral in their concern, although Food and Nutrition students specifically were significantly less concerned (p=0.002 than high school students overall. University undergraduates were moderately unconcerned about food allergies. Concern was highest in younger students, decreasing between 13 and 18 years of age and plateauing between 19 and 23 years. Among students aged 13–18 years, concern was higher among those who worked or volunteered in a daycare and who had previously taken a food preparation course. Among students aged 19–23 years, concern was higher among females and those with less advanced cooking abilities. Concern was significantly correlated with perceiving food allergies as a personal threat. This study offers a first exploration of perceived risk of food allergies among this demographic and can guide future, more rigorous assessments.

  1. New paradigm in training of undergraduate clinical skills: the NEPTUNE-CS project at the Split University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Vladimir J; Hozo, Izet; Rakic, Mladen; Jukic, Marko; Tomic, Snjezana; Kokic, Slaven; Ljutic, Dragan; Druzijanic, Nikica; Grkovic, Ivica; Simunovic, Filip; Marasovic, Dujomir

    2010-10-01

    Clinical skills' training is arguably the weakest point in medical schools' curriculum. This study briefly describes how we at the Split University School of Medicine cope with this problem. We consider that, over the last decades, a considerable advancement in teaching methodologies, tools, and assessment of students has been made. However, there are many unresolved issues, most notably: (i) the institutional value system, impeding the motivation of the teaching staff; (ii) lack of a strong mentoring system; (iii) organization, timing, and placement of training in the curriculum; (iv) lack of publications pertinent to training; and (v) unwillingness of patients to participate in student training. To improve the existing training models we suggest increased institutional awareness of obstacles, as well as willingness to develop mechanisms for increasing the motivation of faculty. It is necessary to introduce changes in the structure and timing of training and to complement it with a catalog, practicum, and portfolio of clinical skills. At Split University School of Medicine, we developed a new paradigm aimed to improve the teaching of clinical skills called "Neptune-CSS," which stands for New Paradigm in Training of Undergraduate Clinical Skills in Split.

  2. From the Secondary School to the Technical University, Or One Difficult Year for the First-Year Students [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dishlieva

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The transition from the secondary school to the university has been always a problem period, linked to the various changes and difficulties for the most first year students in different universities. Lack of experience of self-training and weak knowledge base and skills of the students on one hand, and the higher level of mathematics and new organization of the teaching process on the other hand, provoke serious difficulties. Some of the prospective students do not know what they really know and what they need to know. It is not clear why they should learn exactly these math topics and they do not know how to learn what they should know. The present paper attempts to clarify the key problems and their possible reasons and sources in the learning and teaching process. A set of measures is identified that would contribute to overcoming the difficulties during this transitional for the students period. The results are based on the review of foreign experience and as well as the Bulgarian one demonstrated by extensive interviews with lecturers in mathematics of three technical universities. We believe that this situation is similar (maybe with minor differences and additions in almost all tertiary schools where mathematics is learned as a basic subject.

  3. Wisconsin Women, Graduate School, and the Professions. University Women: A Series of Essays, Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Marian J., Ed.; Roberts, Audrey J., Ed.

    This volume of essays examines the role of women in the development of public higher education at the University of Wisconsin and Wisconsin State Universities. Part 1, "Turn of the Century Beginnings," contains an essay by Jean Droste titled "Vocational Aspirations and Job Realities." Part 2 focuses on women in the professional…

  4. History of neurosciences at the School of Medical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Badrisyah; Sayuti, Sani; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2007-02-01

    Universiti Sains Malaysia is the only institution in Malaysia which incorporates all fields of the neurosciences under one roof. The integration of basic and clinical neurosciences has made it possible for this institution to become an excellent academic and research centre. This article describes the history, academic contributions and scientific progress of neurosciences at Universiti Sains Malaysia.

  5. Rural Students in a Chinese Top-Tier University: Family Background, School Effects, and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postiglione, Gerard A.; Ailei, Xie; Jung, Jisun; Yanbi, Hong

    2017-01-01

    New preferential policies in China promise to increase the number of rural students entering top-tier universities, where there is a wider path to a higher social status. While a substantial body of literature has investigated rural students' trajectories to university, there is a dearth of systematic empirical studies on the academic success of…

  6. A Review of School-University Partnerships for Successful New Teacher Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    The first few years of teaching are a critical time in the development of expert teaching. However, many universities are missing valuable opportunities to foster diversity and critical thinking by participating in the professional development of new teachers. This literature review explores research into how universities have attempted to support…

  7. How Public Universities Close Budget Gaps Matters for States. Schools in Crisis: Making Ends Meet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinne, Alicia; Roza, Marguerite; Murphy, Patrick; Gross, Betheny

    2012-01-01

    When the Great Recession took its toll on state budgets, public universities felt the pain. Many public universities attempted to offset reductions in state funds by raising tuition, shifting admission spots to more out-of-state students, and, in some cases, increasing enrollment. For a given budget gap, these three strategies should be weighted…

  8. Growing PreK-12 Educators through a Partnership of School Districts and a Regional University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Brenda A.; Kirk, Jeffrey L.; Eddings, Bobbie J.; Farris, L. Ann

    2013-01-01

    In central Texas and regions across the country, community leaders are calling for university-community engagement, including development of structures for community-based research and service learning. Including the community in decision making regarding continuing professional education serves as a link between universities such as Texas A&M…

  9. University-School-Community Partnership as Vehicle for Leadership, Service, and Change: A Critical Brokerage Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopson, Rodney; Miller, Peter; Lovelace, Temple S.

    2016-01-01

    Using a critical brokerage perspective to advance theoretical insights in the development of a community university partnership and understanding of the organizational embeddedness of a community empowerment agency in Pittsburgh, PA, USA, this article suggests that partnerships between American universities and communities are perfect vehicles for…

  10. Supporting the Development of Science Communication Skills in STEM University Students: Understanding Their Learning Experiences as They Work in Middle and High School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Brooke L.; Liu, Xiufeng; Gardella, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the roles that 52 university Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) students play in an Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Partnership that connects several middle schools, high schools, institutions of higher learning, businesses, and community institutions. It also examines the support these students…

  11. It's a Knuckleball: A Critical Case Study of a Collaborative between a University and the "Real World" of School Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyprès, Autumn Tooms

    2014-01-01

    This is a look at the political games within games that are enmeshed in a high-profile, heavily funded, politically charged collaborative focused on preparing new school leaders between a large prestigious university and a circle of school leaders and policymakers. This case specifically considers how power and money corrupt the original vision…

  12. Selected Statistics from the Public Elementary and Secondary Education Universe: School Year 2014-15. First Look. NCES 2016-076

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glander, Mark

    2016-01-01

    This National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) "First Look" report introduces new data for the universe of public elementary and secondary schools and agencies in the United States in school year (SY) 2014-15. Specifically, this report includes statistics that describe: (1) the numbers and types of public elementary and secondary…

  13. A Four-Year Survey of DePaul University's School of Education Master Degree Graduates from 1966 through 1969. First Interim Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, B. Everard

    This study identified the characteristics of 456 of the 524 students who were granted a master's degree by the School of Education of De Paul University from 1966 through 1969 in one of the following 9 areas: business education; curriculum directorship; elementary education; guidance and counseling; reading; school administration; and secondary…

  14. Society Girl, Sob Sister, Journalism Educator: Mary Paxton Keeley, the First Woman Graduate of the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Barbara

    Based on an examination of well-kept primary source material, this paper presents a personal and professional history of Mary Paxton Keeley, the first woman graduate of one of the first journalism schools in the United States, the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri. Starting with her early years, the paper explains that Keeley was…

  15. The effects of a multiyear universal social-emotional learning program: The role of student and school characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    This article examines the impact of a universal social-emotional learning program, the Fast Track PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies) curriculum and teacher consultation, embedded within the Fast Track selective prevention model. The longitudinal analysis involved 2,937 children of multiple ethnicities who remained in the same intervention or control schools for Grades 1, 2, and 3. The study involved a clustered randomized controlled trial involving sets of schools randomized within 3 U.S. locations. Measures assessed teacher and peer reports of aggression, hyperactive-disruptive behaviors, and social competence. Beginning in first grade and through 3 successive years, teachers received training and support and implemented the PATHS curriculum in their classrooms. The study examined the main effects of intervention as well as how outcomes were affected by characteristics of the child (baseline level of problem behavior, gender) and by the school environment (student poverty). Modest positive effects of sustained program exposure included reduced aggression and increased prosocial behavior (according to both teacher and peer report) and improved academic engagement (according to teacher report). Peer report effects were moderated by gender, with significant effects only for boys. Most intervention effects were moderated by school environment, with effects stronger in less disadvantaged schools, and effects on aggression were larger in students who showed higher baseline levels of aggression. A major implication of the findings is that well-implemented multiyear social-emotional learning programs can have significant and meaningful preventive effects on the population-level rates of aggression, social competence, and academic engagement in the elementary school years. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Pathways of influence in out-of-school time: a community-university partnership to develop ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donna J; Roebuck, James C; Betts, Sherry C; Stuart, Marta E

    2005-01-01

    If we wish to incorporate parents and community members as full partners in building character among youth, then the activities and programs in which youth participate during their out-of-school time are potentially important venues. This chapter describes how numerous agencies in a single community partnered with a university, with the help of the cooperative extension agent, to collect local data on how adolescents used out-of-school time, what they thought about right and wrong, and how well their own behavior comported with their understandings of what was right. Results indicated that surveyed youth characterized themselves as thinking more than acting in ethical ways. For instance, nearly half acknowledged having cheated on a test at least once in the past six months, although the vast majority thought that cheating was wrong. The three pathways the community identified for reaching youth were (1) extracurricular activities at school such as sports, yearbook, and pep club; (2) organized nonschool pursuits such as music, dance, hiking, and biking; and (3) religious activities. They found that nearly 90 percent of high school-aged respondents participated in one or another of these venues.

  17. Development of global health education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: a student-driven initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dane Moran

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Global health is increasingly present in the formal educational curricula of medical schools across North America. In 2008, students at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM perceived a lack of structured global health education in the existing curriculum and began working with the administration to enhance global health learning opportunities, particularly in resource-poor settings. Key events in the development of global health education have included the introduction of a global health intersession mandatory for all first-year students; required pre-departure ethics training for students before all international electives; and the development of a clinical global health elective (Global Health Leadership Program, GHLP. The main challenges to improving global health education for medical students have included securing funding, obtaining institutional support, and developing an interprofessional program that benefits from the resources of the Schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing. Strategies used included objectively demonstrating the need for and barriers to more structured global health experiences; obtaining guidance and modifying existing resources from other institutions and relevant educational websites; and harnessing institution-specific strengths including the large Johns Hopkins global research footprint and existing interprofessional collaborations across the three schools. The Johns Hopkins experience demonstrates that with a supportive administration, students can play an important and effective role in improving global health educational opportunities. The strategies we used may be informative for other students and educators looking to implement global health programs at their own institutions.

  18. Curricular and extracurricular activities of medical students during war, Zagreb University School of Medicine, 1991-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluncić, V; Pulanić, D; Prka, M; Marusíc, A; Marusíc, M

    2001-01-01

    War, as a major human disaster, affects many aspects of life, including medical education. This report describes curricular and extracurricular activities of the students at the Zagreb University School of Medicine during the wars in Croatia and neighboring Bosnia and Herzegovina. Although condensed versions of the curricula were prepared in case of a major breakdown in civilian life, the school maintained the continuity and quality of its curriculum throughout the war. Students engaged in extracurricular activities related to medical aspects of the war, including organization of resuscitation and first aid courses, collecting medical documentation on war victims, humanitarian help to refugees, and peace-promoting activities. Some students joined mobile surgical teams on the battlefronts. After army service, most of them returned to the school and successfully continued with their studies. The school also accepted guest-students from other new states emerged from former Yugoslavia. The authors found that the students' engagement in extracurricular activities related to medicine was enormously beneficial both to the psychological well-being of the students and to the region's peace-building efforts.

  19. A Prospective Epidemiological Study of Injuries in Japanese National Tournament-Level Badminton Players From Junior High School to University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Eiji; Yatsunami, Mitsunobu; Kurabayashi, Jun; Teruya, Koji; Sekine, Yasuhiro; Endo, Tatsuaki; Nishida, Ryuichiro; Takano, Nao; Sato, Seiko; Jae Kyung, Han

    2016-03-01

    Injury prevention programs have recently been created for various sports. However, a longitudinal study on badminton injuries, as assessed by a team's dedicated medical staff, at the gymnasium has not been performed. We aimed to perform the first such study to measure the injury incidence, severity and type as the first step in creating a badminton injury prevention program. A prospective, longitudinal survey was conducted between April 2012 and March 2013 with 133 national tournament-level badminton players from junior high school to university in Japan with the teams' physical therapists at the gymnasium. Injury incidence was measured as the injury rate (IR) for every 1,000 hour (1000 hour) and IR for every 1,000 athlete exposures (1000 AE). Severity was classified in 5 levels by the number of days the athlete was absent from practice or matches. Injury types were categorized as trauma or overuse. Practice (IR) (1,000 hour) was significantly higher in female players than in male players; the rates increased with increasing age. IR (1,000 AE) was significantly higher in matches than in practice in both sexes of all ages, except for female junior high school students and injuries were most frequent for high school students in matches. The majority of the injuries were slight (83.8%); overuse injuries occurred approximately 3 times more than trauma. This is the first study in which medical staff assessed injuries in badminton, providing value through benchmark data. Injury prevention programs are particularly necessary for female university students in practice and high school students in matches.

  20. Reconstructing Equality on New Political Ground: The Politics of Representation in the Charter School Debate at the University of California, San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Lisa; Mehan, Hugh

    2003-01-01

    Attacks on the legitimacy of affirmative action pose new challenges for public universities committed to creating a diverse student population without considering race or ethnicity as factors in admissions. On the basis of a case study of the controversy surrounding the building of a charter school at the University of California, San Diego, in…

  1. A Pre-Post Evaluation of OpenMinds: a Sustainable, Peer-Led Mental Health Literacy Programme in Universities and Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Praveetha; Annis, Jennifer; Sharpe, Helen; Newman, Robbie; Main, Dominic; Ragunathan, Thivvia; Parkes, Mary; Clarke, Kelly

    2017-11-01

    Engaging young people in the design and delivery of mental health education could lead to more effective interventions; however, few of these interventions have been evaluated. This study aimed to gain preliminary evidence with regards to the efficacy and acceptability of OpenMinds: a peer-designed and facilitated mental health literacy programme for university and secondary school students. The programme involves a structured programme of education and training for university medical students, who then deliver workshops in secondary schools. Pre- and post-surveys were completed by 234 school students who received two workshops and 40 university medical students who completed the OpenMinds programme and delivered the workshops. The main outcomes in both groups were components of mental health literacy (non-stigmatising attitudes, knowledge, social distance and helping attitudes). Perceived teaching efficacy and interest in mental health careers (university medical students) and workshop acceptability (school students) were also examined. University and school student participation in OpenMinds was associated with significant improvements in three of four mental health literacy elements in both samples. Knowledge and attitudes improved in both samples, social distance improved only in the university sample and knowledge of helping behaviours increased in the school sample. University students' perceived teaching efficacy improved but there was no change in their reported interest in pursuing psychiatry in their career. Acceptability was high; over 70% of the school students agreed that they enjoyed the workshops and liked being taught by a university student. This study provides preliminary evidence for the acceptability and efficacy of OpenMinds as a sustainable peer-led model of mental health education for young people. The OpenMinds programme is ready for efficacy testing in a randomised trial.

  2. AN INFLUENCE OF THE PROGRAM OF THE UNIVERSAL SPORTS SCHOOL DUBROVNIK ON THE MOTOR ABILITIES DEVELOPMENT OF SIXTH YEAR CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đivo Ban

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to establish the effects of the diverse kinesiology program on the motor abilities development on a random sample of an unselected population of six-year old boys and girls, i.e. 34 regular attendants of the Universal Sports School Dubrovnik, within the period of 8 months (initial and final state. The variable sample consisted of 8 motor ability evaluation tests. Seriously changes positively established of tests of explosive and repetitive strength, coordination and frequency of movement hand.

  3. How Are Colleges and Universities Preparing Reading Specialist Candidates for Leadership Positions in the Schools?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shelley B Wepner; Diana J Quatroche

    2011-01-01

      This article reports on the results of 11 interviews conducted as a follow-up to a survey that examined the perceptions of university faculty regarding the importance of graduate programs preparing...

  4. A Collaborative improvement model of supervision developed for the Bilkent University School of English Language

    OpenAIRE

    Başaran, Oya

    1990-01-01

    Ankara : The Faculty of Letters and the Institute of Economics and Social Sciences of Bilkent University, 1990. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1990. Includes bibliographical references leaves 66-68. All English as a Foreign Language (EEL) teachers, regardless of being native or non-native speakers of English, can benefit from instructional supervision to improve theii* instructional planning, their teaching performance and their means of assessing student lea...

  5. Effects of Niko Niko Room's educational support on university students and school children : Re-analysis of survey data from the first semester of 2008

    OpenAIRE

    児玉, 真樹子; 岡, 直樹; 小島, 奈々恵; 深田, 博己

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of Niko Niko Room's educational support of the first semester of 2008 were re-analyzed, using the results of factor analysis reported by Kojima et al.(in press). Data of 23 university students, 13 school children, and 13 guardians were used for the analysis. The results showed the following. 1) Effects on university students: University students tended to think that the factors of "assessment" and "relationship between children and students" of students' abi...

  6. Perception of School and University Students of Ideal Teacher Behaviours (II). Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciascai, Liliana; Vlad, Iulia-Elena

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation is to describe the portrait and the teaching behaviours of the ideal teacher. For the inquiry, a number of 76 subjects (high school and faculty students) answered a 40 items questionnaire based on literature. Results evidencing the behaviours of the teacher are presented, emphasizing few significant opinion…

  7. Evaluating Pedagogy and Practice of Universal Design for Learning in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Canter, Lora Lee; King, Laura H.; Williams, Jennifer B.; Metcalf, Debbie; Rhys Myrick Potts, Katheryne

    2017-01-01

    How can education change to meet the demands of effectively educating an increasingly diverse student population with the skills, knowledge, and abilities they need to be productive and successful citizens in the 21st century? One possible solution is to create classrooms, teachers, and schools that embrace the progressive and inclusive practices…

  8. Real and Virtual Robotics in Mathematics Education at the School-University Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Peter; Haapasalo, Lenni

    2012-01-01

    LOGO and turtle graphics were an influential movement in primary school mathematics education in the 1980s and 1990s. Since then, technology has moved forward, both in terms of its sophistication and pedagogical potential; and learner experiences, preferences and ways of thinking have changed dramatically. Based on the authors' previous work and a…

  9. School Psychology: How Universal Are Ethical Principles Approved by International Associations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifor, Jean L.

    2004-01-01

    Globalization is a dominant issue in all aspects of business and professional activities in the 21st Century. The International School Psychology Association and the International Test Commission have adopted ethics and competency guidelines to raise the standards of practice for their members. Other international organizations are doing likewise.…

  10. A Research Collaboration between a Catholic University School of Nursing and Healthcare System: Process and Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Jane M.; Gonzales, Lucia; Aube, Patti; Connelly, Cynthia D.

    2013-01-01

    Collaborations between diverse Catholic organizations will be important in fulfilling the goals contained in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2010 document, "The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health." This article describes a qualitative research study examining the partnership between a graduate-level school of nursing in…

  11. A University Laboratory for Schools--A New Meeting Place for Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K. E.

    2008-01-01

    Stockholm House of Science, focusing on astronomy, biotechnology and physics for students and teachers at school, is based on the proven concept of Stockholm Science Laboratory, which was mainly devoted to physics. The House of Science has become a popular and important resource and meeting place for teachers and students, stimulating interest in…

  12. Core Principles and Test Item Development for Advanced High School and Introductory University Level Food Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing-Kean, Claudine A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Programs supported by the Carl D. Perkins Act of 2006 are required to operate under the state or national content standards, and are expected to carry out evaluation procedures that address accountability. The Indiana high school course, "Advanced Life Science: Foods" ("ALS: Foods") operates under the auspices of the Perkins…

  13. Bullying: University Students Bring a Moral Perspective to Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Mary A.

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of bullying and cyber-bullying in younger age groups has led to the inclusion of bullying in school-level curricula to address the seriousness of this issue and the prevention of these types of behavior. Higher education in its philosophy curricula can play a significant role in this regard as well. Proposed in this paper is an…

  14. Comparison of Economic Benefits of University and Vocational High School Education among Different Majors in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydede, Yigit; Orbay, Benan Zeki

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a better understanding about the labour market dynamics behind the unparalleled demand in higher education and dragging growth rates in vocational high school (VHS) education in Turkey. While estimating labour market outcomes of fields of study has been the subject of many studies in the West, such studies are lacking in…

  15. Court Cases Involving Schools and Universities under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Vincent H.

    2009-01-01

    Educational institutions are required either by law or by necessity to maintain records on students. Prior to the passage of the "Buckley Amendment," more commonly known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), K-12 and postsecondary school officials maintained, used, and shared records according to their own discretion.…

  16. The Uneven Implementation of Universal School Policies: Maternal Education and Florida's Mandatory Grade Retention Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LiCalsi, Christina; Ozek, Umut; Figlio, David

    2016-01-01

    Research consistently demonstrates a strong, positive relationship between parents' socioeconomic status and children's educational achievement. This achievement gap is already present when children enter school in kindergarten and, despite the numerous policies aimed at leveling the educational playing field for disadvantaged students, it does…

  17. Evaluating the Impact of Career Management Skills Module and Internship Programme within a University Business School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Antony Richard; Hooley, Tristram

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of an intervention on business school graduates' employability comprising of a curriculum-based career management skills (CMS) module and an industrial placement year. The study uses data from the destinations of leavers of higher education survey to examine the employability of different groups within the cohort…

  18. University-affiliated schools as sites for research learning in pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    successful Finnish teacher education system, in which research is highly valued as a requisite part of a teaching qualification. The ... integrated learning (WIL), is that they are also research spaces and have retained some of the 'lab' character of earlier schools, such as ..... into only four categories in what grounded theory.

  19. School-University-Community Collaboration: Building Bridges at the Water's Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillon, Gwendolyn Thompson

    2017-01-01

    Students learn best when their out-of-school literacy experiences are incorporated into daily classroom instruction. Teachers who participate in community-based initiatives, develop relationships and acquire knowledge and skills needed for this type of instructional practice. They get to know students, families, and community cultural brokers who…

  20. Does Homeschooling or Private Schooling Promote Political Intolerance? Evidence from a Christian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Political tolerance is the willingness to extend civil liberties to people who hold views with which one disagrees. Some have claimed that private schooling and homeschooling are institutions that propagate political intolerance by fostering separatism and an unwillingness to consider alternative viewpoints. I empirically test this claim by…

  1. Making the Case for Universal School-Based Mental Health Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Neil; Wigelsworth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mental health difficulties affect 1 in 10 children and adolescents, and up to half of adult cases begin during the school years. The individual and societal impacts of such difficulties are huge, and include poorer quality of life, lost economic productivity, destabilisation of communities, and high rates of health, education and social care…

  2. Effectiveness of the universal prevention program 'Healthy School and Drugs': Study protocol of a randomized clustered trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malmberg Monique

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance use is highly prevalent among Dutch adolescents. The Healthy School and Drugs program is a nationally implemented school-based prevention program aimed at reducing early and excessive substance use among adolescents. Although the program's effectiveness was tested in a quasi-experimental design before, many program changes were made afterwards. The present study, therefore, aims to test the effects of this widely used, renewed universal prevention program. Methods/Design A randomized clustered trial will be conducted among 3,784 adolescents of 23 secondary schools in The Netherlands. The trial has three conditions; two intervention conditions (i.e., e-learning and integral and a control condition. The e-learning condition consists of three digital learning modules (i.e., about alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana that are sequentially offered over the course of three school years (i.e., grade 1, grade 2, and grade 3. The integral condition consists of parental participation in a parental meeting on substance use, regulation of substance use, and monitoring and counseling of students' substance use at school, over and above the three digital modules. The control condition is characterized as business as usual. Participating schools were randomly assigned to either an intervention or control condition. Participants filled out a digital questionnaire at baseline and will fill out the same questionnaire three more times at follow-up measurements (8, 20, and 32 months after baseline. Outcome variables included in the questionnaire are the percentage of binge drinking (more than five drinks per occasion, the average weekly number of drinks, and the percentage of adolescents who ever drunk a glass of alcohol and the percentage of adolescents who ever smoked a cigarette or a joint respectively for tobacco and marijuana. Discussion This study protocol describes the design of a randomized clustered trial that evaluates the

  3. Systematic Review of Universal Resilience-Focused Interventions Targeting Child and Adolescent Mental Health in the School Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dray, Julia; Bowman, Jenny; Campbell, Elizabeth; Freund, Megan; Wolfenden, Luke; Hodder, Rebecca K; McElwaine, Kathleen; Tremain, Danika; Bartlem, Kate; Bailey, Jacqueline; Small, Tameka; Palazzi, Kerrin; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Wiggers, John

    2017-10-01

    To examine the effect of universal, school-based, resilience-focused interventions on mental health problems in children and adolescents. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of universal, school-based interventions that included strategies to strengthen a minimum of 3 internal resilience protective factors, and included an outcome measure of mental health problems in children and adolescents aged 5 to 18 years. Six databases were searched from 1995 to 2015. Results were pooled in meta-analyses by mental health outcome (anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, hyperactivity, conduct problems, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and general psychological distress), for all trials (5-18 years). Subgroup analyses were conducted by age (child: 5-10 years; adolescent: 11-18 years), length of follow-up (short: post-≤12 months; long: >12 months), and gender (narrative). A total of 57 included trials were identified from 5,984 records, with 49 contributing to meta-analyses. For all trials, resilience-focused interventions were effective relative to a control in reducing 4 of 7 outcomes: depressive symptoms, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and general psychological distress. For child trials (meta-analyses for 6 outcomes), interventions were effective for anxiety symptoms and general psychological distress. For adolescent trials (meta-analyses for 5 outcomes), interventions were effective for internalizing problems. For short-term follow-up, interventions were effective for 2 of 7 outcomes: depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. For long-term follow-up (meta-analyses for 5 outcomes), interventions were effective for internalizing problems. The findings may suggest most promise for using universal resilience-focused interventions at least for short-term reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms for children and adolescents, particularly if a cognitive-behavioral therapy-based approach is used. The limited number of

  4. The relationship between the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center--a profile in synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Arthur S; Detre, Thomas P; McDonald, Margaret C; Roth, Loren H; Huber, George A; Brignano, Mary Germann; Danoff, Sandra N; Farner, David M; Masnick, Jeffrey L; Romoff, Jeffrey A

    2008-09-01

    In the synergistic evolution of their research, educational, and clinical programs, the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) School of Medicine (SOM) and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) have followed one core principle: What is good for one is good for both. The collaboration is underpinned by UPMC's commitment to its community mission, including support for the academic and research objectives of the SOM. UPMC's conceptual origin was fostered by its experience with Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic in the 1970s. Over time, UPMC acquired other hospitals through merger and negotiation and, by 2008, had grown into a $7 billion global health enterprise. From the outset, the senior leaders of both UPMC and Pitt committed to collaborative decision making on all key issues. Under this coordinated decision-making model, UPMC oversees all clinical activity, including that from a consolidated physicians' practice plan. Pitt remains the guardian of all academic priorities, particularly faculty-based research. UPMC's steady financial success underpins the model. A series of interrelated agreements formally defines the relationship between Pitt and UPMC, including shared board seats and UPMC's committed ongoing financial support of the SOM. In addition, the two institutions have jointly made research growth a priority. The payoff from this dynamic has been a steadily growing Pitt research portfolio; enhanced growth, visibility, and stature for UPMC, the SOM, and Pitt as a whole; and the sustained success of UPMC's clinical enterprise, which now has an international scope. Given the current stagnation in the National Institutes of Health budget, the Pitt-UPMC experience may be instructive to other academic health centers.

  5. Collaboration Platforms in China for Translational and Clinical Research: The Partnership Between Peking University Health Science Center and the University of Michigan Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolars, Joseph C; Fang, Weigang; Zheng, Kai; Huang, Amy Y; Sun, Qiudan; Wang, Yanfang; Woolliscroft, James O; Ke, Yang

    2017-03-01

    Clinical and translational research is increasing in China, attracting faculty-to-faculty collaborations between U.S. and Chinese researchers. However, examples of successful institution-to-institution collaborations to facilitate this research are limited. The authors describe a partnership between Peking University Health Science Center (PUHSC) and the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) designed to enable faculty-initiated joint translational and clinical research projects. In 2009, UMMS leadership identified PUHSC as the most appropriate institutional partner, and the Joint Institute for Translational and Clinical Research was established in 2010. Each contributed $7 million for joint research projects in areas of mutual interest. A shared governance structure, four thematic programs (pulmonary, cardiovascular, liver, and renal diseases), three joint research-enabling cores, and processes for awarding funding have been established along with methods for collaborating and mechanisms to share data and biomaterials. As of November 2015, 52 joint faculty proposals have been submitted, and 25 have been funded. These projects have involved more than 100,000 patients in the United States and China and have generated 13 peer-reviewed publications. Pilot data have been leveraged to secure $3.3 million of U.S. extramural funding. Faculty and trainee exchanges take place regularly (including an annual symposium), and mechanisms exist to link faculty seeking collaborations. Critical determinants of success include having co-ownership at all levels with coinvestment of resources. Each institution is committed to continuing its support with a repeat $7 million investment. Next steps include initiating studies in new clinical areas and pursuing large clinical intervention trials.

  6. Prevalence of smoking and related risk factors among Physical Education and Sports School students at Istanbul University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulus, Tümer; Yurtseven, Eray; Donuk, Bilge

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate smoking prevalence and factors associated with smoking among students at the Physical Education and Sports School of Istanbul University. A cross-sectional study was performed on total of 373 students who have been continuing their education at the school from February to March 2011. A total of 166 responders were male (44.5%) and 207 responders were female (55.5%) out of 373 participants. Of the 373 students, 94 (25.2%) were current smokers and the average age for beginning smoking was 18.03 ± 2.6 (min: 12-max: 30). In this study, we found that the smoking prevalence associated with some variables such as age place of residence, mother's education, father's education, cigarette or tobacco use in the living place, knowledge status of students about their teacher's smoking habits and alcohol consumption (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that the students, who will train the sportspeople of the future, and should be considered a role model of healthy behavior in society. Consequently, we believe that sports school students should take an active role in providing health education programs to increase their awareness about the detrimental effects of smoking and to extensively quit smoking in public.

  7. Prevalence of Smoking and Related Risk Factors among Physical Education and Sports School Students at Istanbul University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulus, Tümer; Yurtseven, Eray; Donuk, Bilge

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate smoking prevalence and factors associated with smoking among students at the Physical Education and Sports School of Istanbul University. A cross-sectional study was performed on total of 373 students who have been continuing their education at the school from February to March 2011. A total of 166 responders were male (44.5%) and 207 responders were female (55.5%) out of 373 participants. Of the 373 students, 94 (25.2%) were current smokers and the average age for beginning smoking was 18.03 ± 2.6 (min: 12–max: 30). In this study, we found that the smoking prevalence associated with some variables such as age place of residence, mother’s education, father’s education, cigarette or tobacco use in the living place, knowledge status of students about their teacher’s smoking habits and alcohol consumption (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that the students, who will train the sportspeople of the future, and should be considered a role model of healthy behavior in society. Consequently, we believe that sports school students should take an active role in providing health education programs to increase their awareness about the detrimental effects of smoking and to extensively quit smoking in public. PMID:22690155

  8. Biomedical learning experiences for middle school girls sponsored by the Kansas State University Student Chapter of the IEEE EMBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Lucinda; Griffith, Connor; Young, Ethan; Sullivan, Adriann; Schuler, Jeff; Arnold-Christian, Susan; Warren, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Learning experiences for middle school girls are an effective means to steer young women toward secondary engineering curricula that they might not have otherwise considered. Sponsorship of such experiences by a collegiate student group is worthwhile, as it gives the group common purpose and places college students in a position to mentor these young women. This paper addresses learning experiences in different areas of bio-medical engineering offered to middle school girls in November 2008 via a day-long workshop entitled "Engineering The Body." The Kansas State University (KSU) Student Chapter of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) worked with the KSU Women in Engineering and Science Program (WESP) to design and sponsor these experiences, which addressed the areas of joint mechanics, electrocardiograms, membrane transport, computer mouse design, and audio filters for cochlear implants. Fifty five middle-school girls participated in this event, affirming the notion that biomedical engineering appeals to young women and that early education and recruitment efforts have the potential to expand the biomedical engineering talent pool.

  9. Collaboration and Community Building in Summer Undergraduate Research Programs in the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevle, R. J.; Watson Nelson, T.; Harris, J. M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    In 2012, the School of Earth Sciences (SES) at Stanford University sponsored two summer undergraduate research programs. Here we describe these programs and efforts to build a cohesive research cohort among the programs' diverse participants. The two programs, the Stanford School of Earth Sciences Undergraduate Research (SESUR) Program and Stanford School of Earth Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research in Geoscience and Engineering (SURGE) Program, serve different undergraduate populations and have somewhat different objectives, but both provide students with opportunities to work on strongly mentored yet individualized research projects. In addition to research, enrichment activities co-sponsored by both programs support the development of community within the combined SES summer undergraduate research cohort. Over the course of 6 to 9 months, the SESUR Program engages Stanford undergraduates, primarily rising sophomores and juniors, with opportunities to deeply explore Earth sciences research while learning about diverse areas of inquiry within SES. Now in its eleventh year, the SESUR experience incorporates the breadth of the scientific endeavor: finding an advisor, proposal writing, obtaining funding, conducting research, and presenting results. Goals of the SESUR program include (1) providing a challenging and rewarding research experience for undergraduates who wish to explore the Earth sciences; (2) fostering interdisciplinary study in the Earth sciences among the undergraduate population; and (3) encouraging students to major or minor in the Earth sciences and/or to complete advanced undergraduate research in one of the departments or programs within SES. The SURGE Program, now in its second year, draws high performing students, primarily rising juniors and seniors, from 14 colleges and universities nationwide, including Stanford. Seventy percent of SURGE students are from racial/ethnic backgrounds underrepresented in STEM fields, and approximately one

  10. Impact of the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine's Boiler Vet Camp on participants' knowledge of veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, James L; Amass, Sandra F; Warren, Joshua D

    2011-04-01

    To assess whether Boiler Vet Camp, a 7-day residential summer camp for students entering eighth or ninth grade in the fall, would increase participants' understanding of career options in the veterinary profession, increase understanding of the science of veterinary medicine, or increase the number of students stating that they intended to apply to the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine. Survey. 48 individuals attending the 2009 Boiler Vet Camp. Information on participant demographics was obtained from camp applications. A questionnaire was administered on the first and sixth days of camp, and results were analyzed to identify changes in responses over time. More campers correctly answered questions designed to evaluate knowledge of the veterinary profession and 10 of 12 questions designed to evaluate specific knowledge of the science of veterinary medicine on day 6, compared with day 1. Remarkable differences were not observed among gender or race-ethnicity groups for these questions. There was no significant difference between percentages of campers who stated that they would apply to Purdue before and after camp. Significantly more Caucasian campers stated they would apply to Purdue on both day 1 and day 6, compared with campers from under-represented minority groups. Results indicated that the Boiler Vet Camp accomplished 2 of its 3 planned objectives, suggesting that such camps can be successfully used to increase knowledge of the veterinary profession among middle school students. Reasons for the low percentage of participants from underrepresented minorities who indicated they would apply to the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine require further exploration.

  11. Universal School-Based Implementation of Screening Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment to Reduce and Prevent Alcohol, Marijuana, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use: Process and Feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Maslowsky

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT is an evidence-based approach to reducing substance use in adolescents. An emerging literature shows the promise of school-based SBIRT. However, most school-based SBIRT has only targeted substance-using adolescents and used school-based health clinics, which most schools lack. This project aimed to describe the following: a model for implementing universal SBIRT in high schools without school-based clinics, reasons students most commonly endorsed for reducing or avoiding substance use, students’ perceptions of SBIRT, and students’ intentions to change substance use or remain abstinent following SBIRT. Participants were N = 2513, 9th to 10th grade students in 10 high schools. Students rated SBIRT positively and indicated substantial intentions to reduce or delay substance use following SBIRT. Results support SBIRT’s potential to delay substance use among current abstainers in addition to reducing substance use among current users. This project demonstrates SBIRT’s feasibility as a universal method in high schools without in-school clinics.

  12. The Effect of Secondary School Study Skills Preparation on First-Year University Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Suhre, Cor J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Although many studies have revealed the importance of study skills for students' first-year performance and college retention, the extent of the impact of study skills preparation on students' academic achievement is less clear. This paper explores the impact of pre-university study skills preparation on students' first-year study experiences,…

  13. Secondary School Science Predictors of Academic Performance in University Bioscience Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rod; Brown, Elizabeth; Ward, Alex

    2009-01-01

    In 2009 the Faculty of Health Sciences at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia is introducing a common first year for 11 different undergraduate courses in the faculty. Current prerequisite science entry requirements vary with course and range from none to at least two science or mathematics subjects and from [approximately]50 to 99 in…

  14. Students' Attitudes and Motivation for Learning English at Dokuz Eylul University School of Foreign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Kadim

    2014-01-01

    Attitudes and motivation are two of the key factors in second language learning since positive attitudes and high levels of motivation are considered as the predictors of a successful learning process. This study aims to reveal the relation between university preparatory students' attitudes towards learning English and their language learning…

  15. Tutorship and Academic Trajectories in School: Comparative Study in Two Public Universities in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Emma Leticia Canales; Robelo, Octaviano García

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the results of research on modalities of mentoring in the area of social sciences at two Mexican universities and their relationship with the academic trajectories of their students. The analysis focuses on the need to identify influences of different mentoring forms on students' academic performance. The theoretical…

  16. Mitigating the Mathematical Knowledge Gap between High School and First Year University Chemical Engineering Mathematics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basitere, Moses; Ivala, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a study carried out at a University of Technology, South Africa, aimed at identifying the existence of the mathematical knowledge gap and evaluating the intervention designed to bridge the knowledge gap amongst students studying first year mathematics at the Chemical Engineering Extended Curriculum Program (ECP). In this…

  17. The effect of secondary school study skills preparation on first-year university achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Suhre, Cor J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Although many studies have revealed the importance of study skills for students' first-year performance and college retention, the extent of the impact of study skills preparation on students' academic achievement is less clear. This paper explores the impact of pre-university study skills

  18. Evaluation and Development of Digital Competence in Future Primary School Teachers at the University of Murcia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Porlán, Isabel; Serrano Sánchez, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study carried out in the academic year 2014-2015 at the faculty of Education of the University of Murcia with first year degree students in Primary Education studying Research and ICT. The study started with the application of the DIGCOM questionnaire to analyze the digital competences of 134 students. The…

  19. Images of Science Linked to Labwork: A Survey of Secondary School and University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sere, Marie-Genevieve; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Manuel; Gallegos, Jose A.; Gonzalez-Garcia, Francisco; De Manuel, Esteban; Perales, F. Javier; Leach, John

    2001-01-01

    Presents findings of the images of science drawn upon in laboratory work by upper secondary and university students in academic streams with a science focus. Questions required students to comment on laboratory investigations carried out by research scientists or science students. Shows that students' reasoning has an epistemological and an…

  20. "Doing School" Right: How University Students from Diverse Backgrounds Construct Their Academic Literacies and Academic Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor Sarver, Whitney Ann

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the academic lives of three multilingual undergraduate student writers in order to better understand how they have constructed their academic literacies and academic identities since taking the required English courses at a mid-sized state university. Within the overarching discussions of academic discourse and the idea of…

  1. University ESL Teachers' Socialization in School Workplace toward Teaching Culturally Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiang-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Employing interpretive theory, this study investigated 331 university ESL teachers' socialization in language programs for international students. Looking beyond teacher preparatory education, in-service teachers' workplace experiences are essential to study because experience is instrumental in the shaping of belief systems (Wu and Shaffer,…

  2. 75 FR 39940 - Notice of Debarment; Schools and Libraries Universal Service Support Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ..., Department of Justice (via e-mail) Kristy Carroll, Esq., Universal Service Administrative Company (via e-mail... Bureau, Room 4-C330, with a copy to Michele Levy Berlove, Acting Assistant Chief, Investigations and... Communications Commission, 445 12th Street, S.W., Room 4-C330, Washington, DC 20554, with a copy to Michele Levy...

  3. 75 FR 39943 - Notice of Debarment; Schools and Libraries Universal Service Support Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ...), Kristy Carroll, Esq., Universal Service Administrative Company (via e-mail) April 7, 2010 DA 10-585 VIA..., Investigations and Hearings Division, Enforcement Bureau, Room 4-C330, with a copy to Michele Levy Berlove... a copy to Michele Levy Berlove, Acting Assistant Chief, Investigations and Hearings Division...

  4. EnvironMentors: Mentoring At-Risk High School Students through University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Melissa H.; Baustian, Melissa M.; Saari, Courtney R.; Welsh, Susan; D'Elia, Christopher F.; Powers, Joseph E.; Gaston, Suzan; Francis, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Informal place-based environmental education is a proven approach for increasing environmental awareness for students in urban cities. This article describes and qualitatively evaluates the first two academic years of the EnvironMentors program at Louisiana State University (LSU-EM), which is part of a national network of EnvironMentors programs.…

  5. How Are Colleges and Universities Preparing Reading Specialist Candidates for Leadership Positions in the Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wepner, Shelley B.; Quatroche, Diana J.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the results of 11 interviews conducted as a follow-up to a survey that examined the perceptions of university faculty regarding the importance of graduate programs preparing reading specialists for leadership roles. The results of the interviews indicate that programs require a leadership course that has reading specialist…

  6. Particles and the universe from the Ionian school to the Higgs boson and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Narison, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to present the history and developments of particle physics from the introduction of the notion of particles by the Ionian school until the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC in 2012 and discuss the future developments of the field. The evolution of accelerators where different particles have been discovered is reviewed and details about the CERN accelerators are presented. A short presentation of some features of astrophysics and its connection to particle physics is also included.

  7. The Naval Postgraduate School : The Nation's Premier National Security Research University [video

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    “The best and brightest military officers from the United States and around the world come to the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, to work with world class faculty on real military and defense problems. At NPS, they gain both the intellectual know how and the practical skills for improving defense technologies, systems and programs.” -- President George H.W. Bush

  8. University Programme Preferences of High School Science Students in Singapore and Reasons that Matter in their Preferences: A Rasch analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oon, Pey-Tee; Subramaniam, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored an under-researched area in science education-the university programmes preferred by high school students who take physical science subjects and the reasons that matter in their preferences. A total of 1,071 upper secondary and pre-university students in Singapore, who take physical science subjects among their range of subjects, participated in this study. A survey method was adopted and the Rasch model was used to analyse the data. Overall, Business Studies was ranked as the predominant choice; nonetheless, scientific programmes such as Science, Engineering, and Mathematics are generally still well liked by the students. When gender differences were examined, we found that students largely followed gender-typical programme preferences, in which males tend to incline towards Engineering while females tend to incline towards Arts and Social Sciences. Students prefer a university programme based on their individual interest and ability, with career aspiration and remuneration coming next. Interestingly, females place greater emphasis on career aspiration than males. Some implications of the study are discussed.

  9. Preventing youth violence and delinquency through a universal school-based prevention approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botvin, Gilbert J; Griffin, Kenneth W; Nichols, Tracy Diaz

    2006-12-01

    Violence is an important public health problem among adolescents in the United States. Substance use and violence tend to co-occur among adolescents and appear to have similar etiologies. The present study examined the extent to which a comprehensive prevention approach targeting an array of individual-level risk and protective factors and previously found effective in preventing tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use is capable of decreasing violence and delinquency. Schools (N=41) were randomly assigned to intervention and control conditions. Participants in the 20 intervention schools received the Life Skills Training prevention program including material focusing on violence and the media, anger management, and conflict resolution skills. Survey data were collected from 4,858 sixth grade students prior to the intervention and three months later after the intervention. Findings showed significant reductions in violence and delinquency for intervention participants relative to controls. Stronger prevention effects were found for students who received at least half of the preventive intervention. These effects include less verbal and physical aggression, fighting, and delinquency. The results of this study indicate that a school-based prevention approach previously found to prevent tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use can also prevent violence and delinquency.

  10. Accreditation in a sub Saharan medical school: a case study at Makerere University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galukande, Moses; Opio, Kenneth; Nakasujja, Noeline; Buwembo, William; Kijjambu, Stephen C; Dharamsi, Shafik; Luboga, Sam; Sewankambo, Nelson K; Woollard, Robert

    2013-05-24

    Of more than the 2,323 recognized and operating medical schools in 177 countries (world wide) not all are subjected to external evaluation and accreditation procedures. Quality Assurance in medical education is part of a medical school's ethical responsibility and social accountability. Pushing this agenda in the midst of resource limitation, numerous competing interests and an already overwhelmed workforce were some of the challenges faced but it is a critical element of our medical profession's social contract. This analysis paper highlights the process of standard defining for Medical Education in a typically low resourced sub Saharan medial school environment. The World Federation for Medical Education template was used as an operating point to define standards. A wide range of stakeholders participated and meaningfully contributed in several consensus meetings. Effective participatory techniques were used for the information gathering process and analysis. Standards with a clear intent to enhance education were set through consensus. A cyclic process of continually measuring, judging and improving all standards was agreed and defined. Examples of the domains tackled are stated. Our efforts are good for our patients, our communities and for the future of health care in Uganda and the East African region.

  11. BiOutils: an interface to connect university laboratories with microbiology classes in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Massimo; Zuchuat, Sandrine; Weber, Aurélia; Ducret, Verena; Linder, Patrick; Perron, Karl

    2015-10-01

    The contribution of microbiology to the scientific advances of modern experimental biology has very often made the difference. Despite this, its role as an independent discipline has slowly started to fade away. This situation has been worsening due to (i) a marginal role of microbiology in academic curricula and (ii) a low or misplaced interest by the public at large towards this field of study. In order to counter this phenomenon, microbiology researchers and passionate scientists have made several efforts to engage and inform the broad public and academic policymakers about the importance of microbiology as an independent discipline. One of the approaches used in this direction is to support the teaching of microbiology in schools. BiOutils, a science communication platform based within a microbiology lab, has been committed to this goal since its creation in 2007. In this article, we describe how the platform is able to work in synergy with school teachers, providing engaging activities that can be performed in schools' classrooms. Our aim is to provide a perspective on how every microbiology lab with little costs and efforts can support the teaching of a discipline that will remain independent thanks to the fascination that they will be able to transmit. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved.

  12. The New Aphrodite school on Disasters Food and Poverty organized by CIMA Research Foundation and University of Genova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, G.

    2009-04-01

    CIMA is a Research Foundation which aim is to advance science and engineering in environmentally related fields, focusing on public health and safety, civil protection and the preservation of terrestrial and water-related ecosystems. This aim is accomplished through scientific research, technology transfer and high level training services. Here we present the "New Aphrodite school on Disasters Food and Poverty" jointly managed by CIMA Foundation, and the University of Genova. The school is organized to provide to international students, professionals and government officials, mainly from poor or developing countries, formation for the management, prediction and prevention of natural and man made disasters. The expertise of the teachers, mainly CIMA's researchers, comes from a long term support of CIMA Foundation to the Italian Civil Protection in developing the advanced national system for risk prediction, prevention and management. The school is organized in two levels. The first level includes an international master of science degree in "Environmental Engineering: Sustainable Development and Risk Management", which classes are given in English, and a master for professional and government officials in "Disasters, food and poverty". The second level includes an international Ph.D. programme in "Information sciences and technologies for system monitoring and environmental risk management". Short training courses for international government official are periodically organized. At present the school is organizing short courses for officials of Civil Protections of Venezuela, Barbados and Mozambique. The philosophy underlying the teaching activities is to promote a multi-disciplinary approach to disaster mitigation, prevention and prediction. Special focus is on the potential of high-tech low-cost technologies for rapid communication and disaster monitoring, such as satellite based technologies. Such technologies are seen as the best way to support the development

  13. A Study of Teacher Stereotypes: How Do Tuition-Free Teacher Candidates and General Undergraduates Think about Middle School and University Teachers in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Youxia; Zhao, Yufang; Peng, Chunhua; Chen, Youguo

    2017-01-01

    A tuition-free teacher candidate is an undergraduate who receives tuition-free teacher education and must work as a teacher in a middle school after their graduation. Tuition-free candidates are of the focus of many researchers; however, no study reports how tuition-free teacher candidates think about teachers. The present study explored stereotypes about middle school and university teachers held by teacher candidates. Specifically, we looked for the differences between the stereotypes held by the teacher candidates and general undergraduates. This study attempted to provide a potential tool to predict the actual willingness of teacher candidates to work as middle school teachers. University and middle school teachers were evaluated using descriptive phrases or words on a five-point Likert scale by 116 tuition-free teacher candidates and 155 general undergraduates. Exploratory factor analyses revealed a three-factor stereotype model including occupational cognition, occupational personality, and occupational emotion. Compared with general undergraduates, teacher candidates held more positive occupational personality and emotions toward middle school teachers; they held more negative occupational emotions toward university teachers. Further, the undergraduates' willingness to be middle school teachers positively correlated with positive occupational emotions and negatively correlated with negative occupational personality and emotions toward middle school teachers. This supported previous studies that individuals' professional willingness were influenced by their stereotypes about professions.

  14. A Study of Teacher Stereotypes: How Do Tuition-Free Teacher Candidates and General Undergraduates Think about Middle School and University Teachers in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Youxia; Zhao, Yufang; Peng, Chunhua; Chen, Youguo

    2017-01-01

    A tuition-free teacher candidate is an undergraduate who receives tuition-free teacher education and must work as a teacher in a middle school after their graduation. Tuition-free candidates are of the focus of many researchers; however, no study reports how tuition-free teacher candidates think about teachers. The present study explored stereotypes about middle school and university teachers held by teacher candidates. Specifically, we looked for the differences between the stereotypes held by the teacher candidates and general undergraduates. This study attempted to provide a potential tool to predict the actual willingness of teacher candidates to work as middle school teachers. University and middle school teachers were evaluated using descriptive phrases or words on a five-point Likert scale by 116 tuition-free teacher candidates and 155 general undergraduates. Exploratory factor analyses revealed a three-factor stereotype model including occupational cognition, occupational personality, and occupational emotion. Compared with general undergraduates, teacher candidates held more positive occupational personality and emotions toward middle school teachers; they held more negative occupational emotions toward university teachers. Further, the undergraduates' willingness to be middle school teachers positively correlated with positive occupational emotions and negatively correlated with negative occupational personality and emotions toward middle school teachers. This supported previous studies that individuals' professional willingness were influenced by their stereotypes about professions. PMID:28469587

  15. Factors affecting the scholastic achievement of Prince of Songkla University students from private schools with Islam instruction in the three southern border provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidchanok Churngchow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study the factors affecting the scholastic achievement of Prince of Songkla University (PSU students who came from private schools with Islam instruction in the three southern border provinces as well as an approach for quality development for the students of the above-mentioned schools toward a higher level of university scholastic achievement. The sample consisted of 918 students who had completed upper secondary education from the private schools with Islam instruction and six administrators of the schools as stated who rendered data by interview. From the discriminant analysis, only one discriminant variate best capable of discriminating university scholastic achievement was labeled as “reinforcement teaching”, which bore a high level of correlation to remedial-teaching and O-Net scores variables. From interviews with school administrators, the schools needed the government to render more support in the matter of scholarships and to provide for academic development in the form of academic coaching or participation in academic workshops under the care of teachers with area expertise. The research suggested: the government should subsidize all secular fields as well as the field of religion, and the Ministry of Education should render additional academic support by the provision of expert teachers for extra teaching in the form of reinforcement teaching or academic coaching, particularly for small schools.

  16. Racial discrimination: experiences of black medical school alumni at the University of Cape Town, 1945 - 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, A M; Ahmed, N; London, L

    2012-05-23

    Reflecting on its role during apartheid, the University of Cape Town (UCT) Faculty of Health Sciences undertook a study to explore the experiences of black alumni who trained in the period 1945 - 1994. Seventy-five black alumni were selected through purposive and snowball recruitment, resulting in 52 face-to-face and 23 telephonic or postal interviews. Experiences of racial discrimination were widely reported and respondents believed the quality of their training was adversely affected. Until 1985, black students were required to sign a declaration agreeing to excuse themselves from classes where white patients were present. Black students were denied access to white patients in wards, and the university admitted that it could not guarantee their clinical training. Tutorial groups were racially segregated. Black students were also excluded from university facilities, events and extramural activities. Themes that emerged were: lack of social contact with white staff and students during training, belief that white staff members actively or tacitly upheld discriminatory regulations, and resistance by black students. Efforts of some white staff to resist discrimination were acknowledged. Racism was entrenched explicitly and implicitly. Perceptions of the attitudes of white staff to apartheid legislation on the part of black alumni were diverse, ranging from claims of active support for racial discrimination to recognition of attempts to resist racist rules. These findings provided the basis for faculty transformation initiatives based on human rights, respect for human dignity and non-discrimination.

  17. Development and implementation of an emergency medicine graduate training program at Addis Ababa University School of Medicine: challenges and successes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklu, Sisay; Azazh, Aklilu; Seyoum, Nebyou; Woldetsadik, Assefu; Tupesis, Janis P; Wubben, Ryan; Hunchak, Cheryl; Meshkat, Nazanin; Tefera, Girma; Maskalyk, James

    2014-07-01

    Ethiopians experience high rates of acute illness and injury that have been sub-optimally addressed by the existing health care system. High rates of patient morbidity and mortality prompted the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) and the Addis Ababa University School of Medicine (AAU-SM) to prioritize the establishment of emergency medicine (EM) as a medical specialty in Ethiopia to meet this acute health system need. To review the EM residency training program developed and implemented at AAU-SM in partnership with the University of Wisconsin (UW), the University of Toronto (UT) and University of Cape Town (UCT) and to evaluate the progress and challenges to date. An EM Task Force (EMTF) at AAU-SM developed a context-specific three-year graduate EM curriculum with UW input. This curriculum has been co-implemented by faculty teachers from AAU-SM, UT and UW. The curriculum together with all documents (written, audio, video) are reviewed and used as a resource for this article. Seventeen residents are currently in full-time training. Five residents research projects are finalized and 100% of residents passed their year-end exams. A novel graduate EM training program has been successfully developed and implemented at AAU-SM. Interim results suggest that this curriculum and tri-institutional collaboration has been successful in addressing the emergency health needs of Ethiopians and bolstering the expertise of Ethiopian physicians. This program, at the forefront of EM education in Africa, may serve as an effective model for future EM training development throughout Africa.

  18. Prevalence of the colonization of Helicobacter pylori among students of the school of dentistry, University of Granada, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Casas, Violeta; Liébana-Cabanillas, Francisco; Arias-Moliz, María-Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background The oral cavity is a reservoir for Helicobacter pylori, and occupations that involve close contact with it, like Dentistry, could entail a higher risk of colonization. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the length of stay at the School of Dentistry of the University of Granada could influence colonization by H. pylori, and to furthermore correlate colonization by H. pylori, with the state of oral health and oral hygiene habits. Material and Methods The study groups were: Group 1, 35 students of Odontology in their first year of studies; Group 2, the same 35 students when they were in their fifth academic year; Group 3, 35 students from University study programs unrelated with Health and of the same age as the group 2 students. All underwent H. pylori, colonization determinations by means of the urea breath test (UBT), stool antigen test and a serological test. Also studied were the variables plaque index, gingival index and the number of times teeth were brushed per day. The Student t test was used for comparisons among the three studied groups. The Chi-squared test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used to determine any connection between colonization by H. pylori, and the variables studied. Results Comparisons between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 2 and 3 showed significant differences regarding colonization by H. pylori, plaque index, gingival bleeding index and tooth brushing. A positive correlation was found between being colonized by H. pylori, and having a gingival index higher than 10% and tooth brushing once a day or less, in all the studied groups. Conclusions Colonization by H. pylori, among Dentistry students at the University of Granada decreased over a four-year time period at the University. Factors related with better oral health, such as a lower gingival index and more frequent tooth brushings, would explain these results. Key words:Dental students, Helicobacter pylori, serological test, stool antigen test, urea breath

  19. A University--School Partnership to Examine the Adoption and Implementation of the Ohio Community Collaboration Model in One Urban School District: A Mixed-Method Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Butcher, Dawn; Iachini, Aidyn L.; Ball, Annahita; Barke, Susan; Martin, Lloyd D.

    2016-01-01

    School improvement models are expanding to incorporate priorities around positive youth development, safe and supportive school climates, school mental health, and school-family community partnerships. A partnership was formed between researchers and district/school leaders to examine the 3-year adoption and implementation of 1 such exemplary…

  20. Evaluating health literacy of Kerman Medical University, School of Public Health students about recycling solid waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Majid; Khanjani, Narges; Saber, Maryam; Fard, Narges Kargar

    2012-01-01

    Background: The increasing trend in waste production and its improper disposal in the environment have led to mismanagement of national resources and hazards to the natural environment. Therefore, the recycling of solid waste can help prevent economic and bio-environmental disasters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the health literacy of the students of the Kerman Public Health School about the management and recycling of solid waste. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study and the target population was all of the students of the Kerman Public Health School (421 students) in five fields. A questionnaire including demographic and health literacy questions was distributed among the students. Results: The male students answered the questions significantly more than female students (Peducation, the family income, and number of people in the family had no significant effect on health literacy. All students believed recycling is important and more than 50% had acquired their knowledge from their academics. Conclusion: This survey showed that although students in health-related fields confirm the necessity of recycling solid waste, they still need more education in health literacy as they are supposed to be the promoters of public health in the society in the near future. PMID:23555126