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Sample records for sustained pain-free response

  1. Fixed-dose Sumatriptan/Naproxen Sodium Compared with each Monotherapy Utilizing the Novel Composite Endpoint of Sustained Pain-free/no Adverse Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Stephen; White, Jonathan; Lener, Shelly E; McDonald, Susan A

    2009-05-01

    A novel composite endpoint, sustained pain-free/no adverse events, was recently proposed as a more rigorous means of capturing in a single measure the attributes of migraine pharmacotherapy that patients consider most important: rapid and sustained pain-free response with no side-effects. Using pooled data from two replicate randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled studies, this post hoc analysis compared the fixed-dose combination tablet sumatriptan/naproxen sodium (n = 726) with sumatriptan monotherapy (n = 723), naproxen sodium monotherapy (n = 720), and placebo (n = 742) with respect to sustained pain-free/no adverse events and closely related composite measures. Sustained pain-free/no adverse events was defined as having both a sustained pain-free response from 2 through 24 hours post-dose with no use of rescue medication and having no adverse events within up to 5 days after dosing with study medication. The percentage of patients with sustained pain-free/no adverse events was 16% with sumatriptan/naproxen sodium compared with 11%, 9% and 7% for sumatriptan, naproxen sodium and placebo, respectively (ppain-free/no adverse events within 1 day; (2) sustained pain-free/no drug-related adverse events within up to 5 days; (3) sustained pain-free/no drug-related adverse events within 1 day; (4) sustained pain relief/no adverse events within up to 5 days; and (5) sustained pain relief/no adverse events within 1 day. The results demonstrate the superiority of sumatriptan/naproxen sodium to sumatriptan monotherapy, naproxen sodium monotherapy and placebo with respect to the rigorous and clinically relevant endpoint of sustained pain-free/no adverse events and reinforce the usefulness of utilizing this new composite endpoint.

  2. Identification of negative predictors of pain-free response to triptans: analysis of the eletriptan database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, H-C; Dodick, D W; Goadsby, P J; Lipton, R B; Almas, M; Parsons, B

    2008-01-01

    Thirty to forty percent of migraineurs do not respond to any given triptan treatment. We identified clinical variables that significantly predict therapeutic non-response and evaluated the efficacy of eletriptan (20, 40 and 80 mg) and sumatriptan (100 mg) vs. placebo in a subgroup of patients with all predictor variables. First-attack data were pooled from 10 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled migraine trials (n = 8473). Multivariate regression analyses identified three significant baseline predictors of failure to achieve 2-h pain-free response: severe headache pain, presence of photophobia/phonophobia and presence of nausea. Time of dosing following headache onset did not influence 2-h pain-free response. Among patients with all three risk factors (n = 2010; 24% of total sample), 2-h pain-free response was significantly higher in patients receiving all three doses of eletriptan or sumatriptan vs. placebo (all P < 0.01). Thus, eletriptan and sumatriptan are efficacious in difficult-to-treat patients at high risk for non-response to triptans.

  3. RGS9-2 Modulates Responses to Oxycodone in Pain-Free and Chronic Pain States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, Sevasti; Cogliani, Valeria; Manouras, Lefteris; Anderson, Ethan M; Mitsi, Vasiliki; Avrampou, Kleopatra; Carr, Fiona B; Zachariou, Venetia

    2017-06-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 9-2 (RGS9-2) is a striatal-enriched signal-transduction modulator known to have a critical role in the development of addiction-related behaviors following exposure to psychostimulants or opioids. RGS9-2 controls the function of several G-protein-coupled receptors, including dopamine receptor and mu opioid receptor (MOR). We previously showed that RGS9-2 complexes negatively control morphine analgesia, and promote the development of morphine tolerance. In contrast, RGS9-2 positively modulates the actions of other opioid analgesics, such as fentanyl and methadone. Here we investigate the role of RGS9-2 in regulating responses to oxycodone, an MOR agonist prescribed for the treatment of severe pain conditions that has addictive properties. Using mice lacking the Rgs9 gene (RGS9KO), we demonstrate that RGS9-2 positively regulates the rewarding effects of oxycodone in pain-free states, and in a model of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, although RGS9-2 does not affect the analgesic efficacy of oxycodone or the expression of physical withdrawal, it opposes the development of oxycodone tolerance, in both acute pain and chronic neuropathic pain models. Taken together, these data provide new information on the signal-transduction mechanisms that modulate the rewarding and analgesic actions of oxycodone.

  4. Fear avoidance beliefs in back pain-free subjects are reflected by amygdala-cingulate responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Michael L; Stämpfli, Phillipp; Vrana, Andrea; Humphreys, Barry K; Seifritz, Erich; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    In most individuals suffering from chronic low back pain, psychosocial factors, specifically fear avoidance beliefs (FABs), play central roles in the absence of identifiable organic pathology. On a neurobiological level, encouraging research has shown brain system correlates of somatic and psychological factors during the transition from (sub) acute to chronic low back pain. The characterization of brain imaging signatures in pain-free individuals before any injury will be of high importance regarding the identification of relevant networks for low back pain (LBP) vulnerability. Fear-avoidance beliefs serve as strong predictors of disability and chronification in LBP and current research indicates that back pain related FABs already exist in the general and pain-free population. Therefore, we aimed at investigating possible differential neural functioning between high- and low fear-avoidant individuals in the general population using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results revealed that pain-free individuals without a history of chronic pain episodes could be differentiated in amygdala activity and connectivity to the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex by their level of back pain related FABs. These results shed new light on brain networks underlying psychological factors that may become relevant for enhanced disability in a future LBP episode.

  5. Sustainable responsibilities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2015-01-01

    This working paper analyzes the conceptions of corporate responsibility for sustainable development in EU policies on CSR. The notion of corporate responsibility has until recently been limited to economical and legal responsibilities. Based on this narrow conception of corporate responsibility.......e. a combination of destruction and construction, this chapter will deconstruct conceptions of responsibility for sustainable development in these EU documents on CSR. A deconstructive conceptual analysis involves destructing dominant interpretations of a text and allowing for constructions of alternative...... such as sustainability actually means, but on what the concept says and does not say. A deconstructive analysis of EU policies on CSR, then, pinpoints that such policies are sites of conceptual struggles. This kind of analysis is suitable for studying conceptions of corporate responsibility for sustainable development...

  6. Experimental pain sensitivity in women with temporomandibular disorders and pain-free controls: the relationship to orofacial muscular contraction and cardiovascular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Christine; Vassend, Olav; Knardahl, Stein

    2008-05-01

    Chronic pain may result both from a generalized hypersensitivity to acute pain, suggestive of central sensitization processes, and dysfunction of the endogenous pain regulatory system. One purpose of this study was to compare experimental pain sensitivity at several anatomic sites in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients and pain-free controls during baseline and after standardized mechanical load of the orofacial region. A second purpose was to compare the pain-modulating effects of cardiovascular responses in TMD patients and pain-free controls. Experimental pain was induced by electrocutaneous stimulation of the dorsal left hand and pressure algometry at the right masseter muscle and the sternum. The pain sensitivity of the orofacial region was manipulated by isometric contraction of the masseter muscles. Elevations of mean arterial pressure and heart rate were induced by a simulated job interview. At baseline, the TMD patients exhibited a significantly higher electrocutaneous pain threshold. Relative to the healthy controls, the TMD patients reported increased electrocutaneous and pressure pain sensitivity after isometric contraction of the orofacial region. In addition, there were correlations between mean arterial pressure and pain sensitivity in the TMD group only. Significant increases in generalized pain sensitivity occurred in the TMD group, but not in the control group, after isometric contraction of the orofacial muscles, suggestive of a central sensitization process in TMD. Moreover, only in the TMD group there were significant associations between cardiovascular responsesand pain sensitivity, challenging previous assumptions of this relationship occurring mainly in pain-free individuals.

  7. The immediate cardiovascular response to joint mobilization of the neck - A randomized, placebo-controlled trial in pain-free adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Emmanuel Y; Oh, Cheongeun; Wong, Michael S; Grimes, Jason K; Barton, Erica M; Ali, Muhammad I; Cameron, David

    2017-04-01

    Some normotensive patients can have a spike in resting systolic blood pressure (SBP) in response to acute neck pain. Applying the typical dosage of mobilization may potentially result in a sympatho-excitatory response, further increasing resting SBP. Therefore, there is a need to explore other dosage regimens that could result in a decrease in SBP. To compare the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) response of pain-free, normotensive adults when receiving unilateral posterior-to-anterior mobilization (PA) applied to the neck versus its corresponding placebo (PA-P). Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial. 44 (18 females) healthy, pain-free participants (mean age, 23.8 ± 3.04 years) were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 received a PA-P in which light touch was applied to the right 6th cervical vertebra. Group 2 received a PA to the same location. BP and HR were measured prior to, during, and after the application of PA or PA-P. A mixed-effect model of repeated measure analysis was used for statistical analysis. During-intervention, the PA group had a significant reduction in SBP, while the placebo group had an increase in SBP. The change in SBP during-intervention was significantly different between the PA and the placebo group (p-value = 0.003). There were no significant between-group differences found for HR and diastolic BP (DBP). The overall group-by-time interaction was statistically significant for SBP (p-value = 0.01). When compared to placebo, the dosage of applied PA resulted in a small, short-lived drop in SBP not exceeding the minimal detectable change. Trial registered at Germanctr.de (DRKS00005095). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Active self-correction of spinal posture in pain-free women in response to the command "straighten your back".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczyk-Pawelec, Katarzyna; Sipko, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    Evidence is limited regarding the regional changes in spinal posture after self-correction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether active self-correction improved standing and sitting spinal posture. Photogrammetry was used to assess regional spinal curvatures and vertical global spine orientation (GSO) in 42 asymptotic women aged 20-24 years. Upper thoracic spine angle and GSO increased in response to self-correction, while the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral angles decreased. Self-correction in the standing position resulted in decreased inclination of the upper thoracic and thoracolumbar spinal angles. Correction of sitting posture reduced the angle of the upper thoracic spine and GSO. The effects of active self-correction on spinal curvature and GSO were different for the standing versus sitting position; the greatest effects of active correction were noted in the thoracic spine. Balanced and lordotic postures were most prevalent in the habitual and actively self-corrected standing positions, whereas the kyphotic posture was most prevalent in the habitual sitting position, indicative that self-correction back posture in the standing position could be an important health-related daily activity, especially during prolonged sitting.

  9. Outcome for headache and pain-free nonresponders to treatment of the first attack: a pooled post-hoc analysis of four randomized trials of eletriptan 40 mg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Steve H; Tepper, Stewart J; Schweizer, Edward; Almas, Mary; Ramos, Elodie

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate, in first attack eletriptan headache and pain-free nonresponders, the efficacy of treating a second and third attack with the same dose of eletriptan 40 mg (ELE-40). Data were pooled from four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple attack studies of eletriptan in the treatment of migraine. The first-attack eletriptan headache (HNR) and pain-free (PFNR) nonresponder samples consisted of patients who did not achieve headache or pain-free responses at two hours, or sustained headache or pain-free responses at 24 hours. The efficacy of the same dose of eletriptan (vs placebo; PBO) in treating the second and third attacks was evaluated using a logistic regression model. Among Attack 1 eletriptan HNRs, treatment with ELE-40 (vs PBO) was associated with significantly higher two-hour headache response and pain-free rates, respectively, on both Attack 2 (48.8% vs 20.2%; 17.0% vs 3.9%; P  pain-free rates at 24 hours were also observed on both Attack 2 and Attack 3. The results of this pooled analysis suggest that patients who have HNR or PFNR to an initial dose of eletriptan may respond when a second and third attack is treated with the same dose.

  10. Patterns of pain-free response in 497 cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia treated with Gamma Knife surgery and followed up for least 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleasca, Constantin; Carron, Romain; Resseguier, Noémie; Donnet, Anne; Roussel, Philippe; Gaudart, Jean; Levivier, Marc; Régis, Jean

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study was to establish whether clear patterns of initial pain freedom could be identified when treating patients with classic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) by using Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). The authors compared hypesthesia and pain recurrence rates to see if statistically significant differences could be found. Between July 1992 and November 2010, 737 patients presenting with TN underwent GKS and prospective evaluation at Timone University Hospital in Marseille, France. In this study the authors analyzed the cases of 497 of these patients, who participated in follow-up longer than 1 year, did not have megadolichobasilar artery- or multiple sclerosis-related TN, and underwent GKS only once; in other words, the focus was on cases of classic TN with a single radiosurgical treatment. Radiosurgery was performed with a Leksell Gamma Knife (model B, C, or Perfexion) using both MR and CT imaging targeting. A single 4-mm isocenter was positioned in the cisternal portion of the trigeminal nerve at a median distance of 7.8 mm (range 4.5-14 mm) anterior to the emergence of the nerve. A median maximum dose of 85 Gy (range 70-90 Gy) was delivered. Using empirical methods and assisted by a chart with clear cut-off periods of pain free distribution, the authors were able to divide patients who experienced freedom from pain into 3 separate groups: patients who became pain free within the first 48 hours post-GKS; those who became pain free between 48 hours and 30 days post-GKS; and those who became pain free more than 30 days after GKS. The median age in the 497 patients was 68.3 years (range 28.1-93.2 years). The median follow-up period was 43.75 months (range 12-174.41 months). Four hundred fifty-four patients (91.34%) were initially pain free within a median time of 10 days (range 1-459 days) after GKS. One hundred sixty-nine patients (37.2%) became pain free within the first 48 hours (Group PF(≤ 48 hours)), 194 patients (42.8%) between posttreatment Day 3 and

  11. Editorial. Sustainability: A social responsability

    OpenAIRE

    Palmero Iglesias, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Editorial nº2_1 Palmero Iglesias, L. (2017). Editorial. Sustainability: A social responsability. VITRUVIO - International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability. (1):vii-viii. doi:10.4995/vitruvio-ijats.2017.7650. vii viii 1 2

  12. Responsible marketing for sustainable tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Vaso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The biggest challenge associated with the concept of sustainable tourism is its operationalisation and perception as a process to be applied through development plans, projects and ongoing activities of tour operators. The traditional approach to marketing, focused on a limited idea of maximising profit businesses, was not able to respond to a number of social and environmental requirements imposed by the concept of sustainable development. This paper discusses the ways in which marketing could play a more important role in the sustainable development of tourism. This refers to the determination of consumer needs and preferences, the formation of certain products and pricing, product information and advertising to consumers of their benefits in a sustainable manner, as well as adequate distribution channels used by businesses to deliver products to consumers. Environmental and social marketing are now being confirmed as important elements of a much broader marketing perspective. In order to develop tourism with sustainable outcomes, responsible marketing can be crucial. The concept of marketing mix for sustainable tourism was used as a starting point to explore the specific role of responsible marketing in tourism.

  13. Corporate Social Responsibility for Sustainability

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    Wojciech Przychodzeń

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to is to provide insights on implementing corporate social responsibility for sustainability (CSRS concept and show how it differs from basic corporate social responsibility (CSR. Methodology: The paper discusses major issues with references to existing literature and real business cases from S&P500 consumer discretionary sector. Findings: The main fi nding of this paper is that CSRS could provide the company with a competitive advantage as a growing number of consumers become more sustainable conscious. It could also help to overcome the increasing consumers’ skepticism towards corporate social responsibility practices. Finally, it can also be seen as a step forward in defi ning what types of corporate activities are associated with desirable social and environmental gains. Research limitations: Our sample was restricted to the U.S. fi rms from the consumer discretionary sector. Therefore, conclusions should not be generalized to other markets. Our study is based on the analysis of environmental and social responsibility statements and assumes that they accurately represent corporate commitment in majority of the cases. Practical implications: CSRS offers corporations the opportunity to use their unique skills, culture, values, resources, and management capabilities to lead social progress by making sustainability part of its internal corporate logic. Originality: The paper raises the importance of the different conditions necessary for making sustainable development concept an important part of corporate strategy.

  14. Persistent sensory dysfunction in pain-free herniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, E K; Kehlet, H; Aasvang, E K

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent post-herniotomy pain may be a neuropathic pain state based on the finding of a persistent sensory dysfunction. However, detailed information on the normal distribution of sensory function in pain-free post-herniotomy patients hinders identification of exact pathogenic...... mechanisms. Therefore, we aimed to establish normative data on sensory function in pain-free patients >1 year after a groin herniotomy. METHODS: Sensory thresholds were assessed in 40 pain-free patients by a standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST). Secondary endpoints included comparison of sensory......%) but with a low pain intensity. CONCLUSION: Persistent sensory dysfunction is common in pain-free post-herniotomy patients. Future studies of sensory function in persistent post-herniotomy pain should compare the findings to the present data in order to characterize individual patients and potentially identify...

  15. Partiality of Responsibility: Ethics in Sustainability Consulting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Earhart, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Sustainability, Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) are both highly normative fields of professional practice, framed by various narratives: capitalist versus environmentalist, waste versus respect for the planet, consumerism versus responsibility;

  16. Auditory sustained field responses to periodic noise

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    Keceli Sumru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Auditory sustained responses have been recently suggested to reflect neural processing of speech sounds in the auditory cortex. As periodic fluctuations below the pitch range are important for speech perception, it is necessary to investigate how low frequency periodic sounds are processed in the human auditory cortex. Auditory sustained responses have been shown to be sensitive to temporal regularity but the relationship between the amplitudes of auditory evoked sustained responses and the repetitive rates of auditory inputs remains elusive. As the temporal and spectral features of sounds enhance different components of sustained responses, previous studies with click trains and vowel stimuli presented diverging results. In order to investigate the effect of repetition rate on cortical responses, we analyzed the auditory sustained fields evoked by periodic and aperiodic noises using magnetoencephalography. Results Sustained fields were elicited by white noise and repeating frozen noise stimuli with repetition rates of 5-, 10-, 50-, 200- and 500 Hz. The sustained field amplitudes were significantly larger for all the periodic stimuli than for white noise. Although the sustained field amplitudes showed a rising and falling pattern within the repetition rate range, the response amplitudes to 5 Hz repetition rate were significantly larger than to 500 Hz. Conclusions The enhanced sustained field responses to periodic noises show that cortical sensitivity to periodic sounds is maintained for a wide range of repetition rates. Persistence of periodicity sensitivity below the pitch range suggests that in addition to processing the fundamental frequency of voice, sustained field generators can also resolve low frequency temporal modulations in speech envelope.

  17. Responsible and sustainable business in the context of sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Săvoiu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Businesses in the contemporary world, detached from the classic entrepreneurial paradigm in keeping with which a business appears, grows and matures, are undergoing a process of adjustment to the new concept of sustainability, focusing on reconciling global, regional, national and local economic development and the quality of the environment. The practical organization of a responsible and sustainable business, the results of which are ever new products and services, which creates new jobs, and contributes, by aggregating systematically, to assessing new macroeconomic results, from GDP or NDP to import and export, and especially to sustainable economic development, requires the presence of both the three classical factors, i.e., capital, labour and location (land, and the other three essential new factors, which are called technology, information and the specific skills of the business owner, or simply of the entrepreneur.

  18. Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert; Freeman, R. Edward; Hockerts, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Scandinavia is routinely cited as a global leader in corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability. In this article, we explore the foundation for this claim while also exploring potential contributing factors. We consider the deep-seated traditions of stakeholder engagement across...... this may entail. In sum, we depict the state of the art in CSR and sustainability in Scandinavia. We intend for this to serve as a basis to help establish a globally recognized research paradigm dedicated to considering CSR and sustainability in a Scandinavian context....

  19. Heart rate variability modulation after manipulation in pain-free patients vs patients in pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Richard A; Boucher, Jean P; Comtois, Alain S

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate variability (HRV) in the presence or the absence of pain in the lower back, while receiving one chiropractic treatment at L5 from either a manually assisted mechanical force (Activator) or a traditional diversified technique spinal manipulation. A total of 51 participants were randomly assigned to a control (n = 11), 2 treatment, or 2 sham groups (n = 10 per group). Participants underwent an 8-minute acclimatizing period. The HRV tachygram (RR interval) data were recorded directly into a Suunto watch (model T6; FitzWright Company Ltd, Langley, British Columbia, Canada). We analyzed the 5-minute pretreatment and posttreatment intervals. The spectral analysis of the tachygram was performed with Kubios software. All groups decreased in value except the control group that reacted in the opposite direction, when comparing the pretests and posttests for the high-frequency component. The very low frequency increased in all groups except the control group. The low frequency decreased in all groups except the sham pain-free group. The low frequency-high frequency ratio decreased in the treatment pain group by 0.46 and in the sham pain-free group by 0.26. The low frequency-high frequency ratio increase was 0.13 for the sham pain group, 0.04 for the control group, and 0.34 for the treatment pain-free group. The mean RR increased by 11.89 milliseconds in the sham pain-free group, 18.65 milliseconds in the treatment pain group, and 13.14 milliseconds in the control group. The mean RR decreased in the treatment pain-free group by 1.75 milliseconds and by 0.01 milliseconds in the sham pain group. Adjusting the lumbar vertebrae affected the lumbar parasympathetic nervous system output for this group of participants. Adaptation in the parasympathetic output, reflected by changes in high frequency, low frequency, and very low frequency, may be independent of type of adjustment. Therefore, the group differences found in the

  20. Neutral lumbar spine sitting posture in pain-free subjects

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, Kieran; O'Dea, Patrick; Dankaerts, Wim; O'Sullivan, Peter; Clifford, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Sitting is a common aggravating factor in low back pain (LBP), and re-education of sitting posture is a common aspect of LBP management. However, there is debate regarding what is an optimal sitting posture. This pilot study had 2 aims; to investigate whether pain-free subjects can be reliably positioned in a neutral sitting posture (slight lumbar lordosis and relaxed thorax); and to compare perceptions of neutral sitting posture to habitual sitting posture (HSP). The lower lumbar spine HSP o...

  1. Role of intraseptal anesthesia for pain-free dental treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Gazal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain control during the dental procedure is essentials and challenging. A complete efficacious pulp anesthesia has not been attained yet. The regional anesthesia such as inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB only does not guarantee the effective anesthesia with patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis. This main aim of this review was to discuss various aspects of intraseptal dental anesthesia and its role significance in pain-free treatment in the dental office. In addition, reasons of failure and limitations of this technique have been highlighted. Literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published in English language in last 30 years. Search words such as dental anesthesia, pain control, intraseptal, and nerve block were entered using a web of knowledge and Google scholar databases. Various dental local anesthesia techniques were reviewed. A combination of block anesthesia, buccal infiltration and intraligamentary injection resulted in deep anesthesia (P = 0.003, and higher success rate compared to IANB. For pain-free management of conditions such as irreversible pulpitis, buccal infiltration (4% articaine, and intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine are better than intraligamentary and IANB injections. Similarly, nerve block is not always effective for pain-free root canal treatment hence, needing supplemental anesthesia. Intraseptal anesthesia is an efficient and effective technique that can be used in maxillary and mandibular adult dentition. This technique is also beneficial when used in conjunction to the regional block or local dental anesthesia.

  2. Neutral lumbar spine sitting posture in pain-free subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Kieran; O'Dea, Patrick; Dankaerts, Wim; O'Sullivan, Peter; Clifford, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2010-12-01

    Sitting is a common aggravating factor in low back pain (LBP), and re-education of sitting posture is a common aspect of LBP management. However, there is debate regarding what is an optimal sitting posture. This pilot study had 2 aims; to investigate whether pain-free subjects can be reliably positioned in a neutral sitting posture (slight lumbar lordosis and relaxed thorax); and to compare perceptions of neutral sitting posture to habitual sitting posture (HSP). The lower lumbar spine HSP of seventeen pain-free subjects was initially recorded. Subjects then assumed their own subjectively perceived ideal posture (SPIP). Finally, 2 testers independently positioned the subjects into a tester perceived neutral posture (TPNP). The inter-tester reliability of positioning in TPNP was very good (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.91, mean difference = 3% of range of motion). A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that HSP was significantly more flexed than both SPIP and TPNP (p 0.05). HSP was more kyphotic than all other postures. This study suggests that pain-free subjects can be reliably positioned in a neutral lumbar sitting posture. Further investigation into the role of neutral sitting posture in LBP subjects is warranted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Persistent sensory dysfunction in pain-free herniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasvang, E K; Kehlet, H

    2010-03-01

    Persistent post-herniotomy pain may be a neuropathic pain state based on the finding of a persistent sensory dysfunction. However, detailed information on the normal distribution of sensory function in pain-free post-herniotomy patients hinders identification of exact pathogenic mechanisms. Therefore, we aimed to establish normative data on sensory function in pain-free patients >1 year after a groin herniotomy. Sensory thresholds were assessed in 40 pain-free patients by a standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST). Secondary endpoints included comparison of sensory function between the operated and the naïve side, and correlation between sensory function modalities. QST showed that on the operated side, thermal data were normally distributed, but mechanical pressure and pinch thresholds were normalized only after log-transformation, and cold pain and pressure tolerance could not be normalized. Comparison of QST results revealed significant (Ppain-free post-herniotomy patients. Future studies of sensory function in persistent post-herniotomy pain should compare the findings to the present data in order to characterize individual patients and potentially identify subgroups, which may aid in allocation of patients to pharmacological or surgical treatment.

  4. Role of intraseptal anesthesia for pain-free dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazal, G; Fareed, W M; Zafar, M S

    2016-01-01

    Pain control during the dental procedure is essentials and challenging. A complete efficacious pulp anesthesia has not been attained yet. The regional anesthesia such as inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) only does not guarantee the effective anesthesia with patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis. This main aim of this review was to discuss various aspects of intraseptal dental anesthesia and its role significance in pain-free treatment in the dental office. In addition, reasons of failure and limitations of this technique have been highlighted. Literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published in English language in last 30 years. Search words such as dental anesthesia, pain control, intraseptal, and nerve block were entered using a web of knowledge and Google scholar databases. Various dental local anesthesia techniques were reviewed. A combination of block anesthesia, buccal infiltration and intraligamentary injection resulted in deep anesthesia (P = 0.003), and higher success rate compared to IANB. For pain-free management of conditions such as irreversible pulpitis, buccal infiltration (4% articaine), and intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine) are better than intraligamentary and IANB injections. Similarly, nerve block is not always effective for pain-free root canal treatment hence, needing supplemental anesthesia. Intraseptal anesthesia is an efficient and effective technique that can be used in maxillary and mandibular adult dentition. This technique is also beneficial when used in conjunction to the regional block or local dental anesthesia.

  5. Blood pressure and heart rate response to posteriorly directed pressure applied to the cervical spine in young, pain-free individuals: a randomized, repeated-measures, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Emmanuel; Wong, Michael; Williams, Haddie; Mache, Kyle

    2014-08-01

    Randomized clinical trial. Objectives To compare the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) response of healthy volunteers to posteriorly directed (anterior-to-posterior [AP]) pressure applied to the cervical spine versus placebo. Manual therapists employ cervical spine AP mobilizations for various cervical-shoulder pain conditions. However, there is a paucity of literature describing the procedure, cardiovascular response, and safety profile. Thirty-nine (25 female) healthy participants (mean ± SD age, 24.7 ± 1.9 years) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 received a placebo, consisting of light touch applied to the right C6 costal process. Group 2 received AP pressure at the same location. Blood pressure and HR were measured prior to, during, and after the application of AP pressure. One-way analysis of variance and paired-difference statistics were used for data analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between groups for mean systolic BP, mean diastolic BP, and mean HR (P >.05) for all time points. Within-group comparisons indicated statistically significant differences between baseline and post-AP pressure HR (-2.8 bpm; 95% confidence interval: -4.6, -1.1) and between baseline and post-AP pressure systolic BP (-2.4 mmHg; 95% confidence interval: -3.7, -1.0) in the AP group, and between baseline and postplacebo systolic BP (-2.6 mmHg; 95% confidence interval: -4.2, -1.0) in the placebo group. No participants reported any adverse reactions or side effects within 24 hours of testing. AP pressure caused a statistically significant physiologic response that resulted in a minor drop in HR (without causing asystole or vasodepression) after the procedure, whereas this cardiovascular change did not occur for those in the placebo group. Within both groups, there was a small but statistically significant reduction in systolic BP following the procedure.

  6. Motor control patterns during an active straight leg raise in pain-free subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beales, Darren John; O'Sullivan, Peter Bruce; Briffa, N Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Repeated measures. To investigate motor control (MC) patterns of normal subjects during the low level physical load of the active straight leg raise (ASLR). Aberrant MC patterns, as observed with the ASLR test, are considered to be a mechanism for ongoing pain and disability in subjects with chronic musculoskeletal pelvic girdle pain. These patterns may not only affect the provision of lumbopelvic stability, but also respiration and the control of continence. Greater understanding of MC patterns in pain-free subjects may improve the management of pelvic girdle pain. METHODS.: Fourteen pain-free nulliparous women were examined during the ASLR. Electromyography of the anterior abdominal wall, right chest wall and the anterior scaleni, intraabdominal pressure (IAP), intrathoracic pressure (ITP), respiratory rate, pelvic floor kinematics, and downward leg pressure of the nonlifted leg were compared between a left and right ASLR. There was greater activation of obliquus internus abdominis and obliquus externus abdominis on the side of the ASLR. The predominant pattern of activation for the chest wall was tonic activation during an ipsilateral ASLR, and phasic respiratory activation lifting the contralateral leg. Respiratory fluctuation of both IAP and ITP did not differ lifting either leg. The baseline shifts of these pressure variables in response to the physical demand of lifting the leg was also the same either side. There was no difference in respiratory rate, pelvic floor kinematics, or downward leg pressure. Pain-free subjects demonstrate a predominant pattern of greater ipsilateral tonic activation of the abdominal wall and chest wall on the side of the ASLR. This was achieved with minimal apparent disruption to IAP and ITP. The findings of this study demonstrate the plastic nature of the abdominal cylinder and the flexibility of the neuromuscular system in controlling load transference during an ASLR.

  7. Sustainable Enterprise Excellence and the Continuously Relevant and Responsible Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Bøllingtoft, Anne; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær

    2013-01-01

    issues surrounding enterprise innovation and sustainability efforts and capabilities. Innovation and sustainability of the necessary trajectory, scale, and velocity are strategically integrated to deliver what we refer to as innovating sustainability. This provides an accelerated means path toward...... sustainable enterprise excellence, and hence toward the asymptotic aspiration of being a continuously relevant and responsible organization. Introduced are the concepts of innovating sustainability, sustainable enterprise excellence (SEE), and continuously relevant and responsible organizations (CRRO)....

  8. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND ECOLOGICAL RESPONSIBILITY OF BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Krykun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Today sustainable development is a widely used term, which has been increasingly influential in recent years. Debates about sustainability no longer consider sustainability solely as an environmental concern, but also incorporate economic and social dimensions. However, while a social and economic dimensions of sustainable development are widely discussed, environmental degradation becomes more and more crucial each year and is likely to reduce human well-being all across the world within the next few decades. The purpose of the paper is to analyse ecological ‘pillar’ of sustainable development, its historical background, main steps towards implementation of ‘new global environmental rules for society. Methodology. The paper is based on statistical information from public sources, reports of different international organizations and institutions, which are used to stress and underline main crucial points of research. Results of the survey show, that environmental quality, economic development and social well-being are interdependent and the main aim of international institutions, independent countries, businesses and society is to achieve environmentally sustainable development. Environmental issues make strong impact on modern economy. Responsible global strategy of development provides the whole society with rules, how ‘wise’ technological changes and economic policy can make industrial production processes less polluting and less resource intensive but yet more productive and profitable. Practical implications. Strategy of sustainable development and it’s three basic dimensions have found practical implication in one complex model, which illustrates the level of development of each country – the Human Development Index, which is focusing on three basic dimensions of human development: life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling and expected years of schooling and gross national income per capita. Another data, which is

  9. Changes in pain-free walking based on time in accommodating pain-free exercise therapy for peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Coleen Archer; Carmeli, Eli; Barak, Sharon; Stopka, Christine Boyd

    2009-03-01

    Symptoms of intermittent claudication (IC) can be relieved by lifestyle modification, medications, and walking exercises. The intensity of the walking exercise is still debatable. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of accommodating pain-free walking exercise therapy program length on pain-free walking. A descriptive, longitudinal study with repeated measures of exercise capacity was conducted. An IC questionnaire was administered to assess IC signs, symptoms, and lifestyle. Walking was performed on a treadmill for 30 to 50 minutes below the participant's individualized walking pain threshold. The study included patients diagnosed with IC due to peripheral arterial disease. All participants were randomly assigned to three groups. Group A (n = 28) participated in the walking program for 2-9 weeks, group B (n = 30) for 10-14 weeks, and group C (n = 26) for 15-94 weeks. The main outcome measure of the study was to determine changes in exercise capacity: walking distance (miles), walking duration (minutes), and walking speed (mph). Group A increased the amount of distance, duration, and speed walked from pretest to posttest by 80% (P < .001), 27% (P < .001), and 37% (P < .001), respectively. Group B increased the amount of distance, duration, and speed walked from pretest to posttest by 122% (P < .001), 56% (P < .001), and 43% (P < .001), respectively. Group C increased the amount of distance, duration, and speed walked from pretest to posttest by 26% (P = .002), 22% (P = .002), and 5% (P = .541) respectively. We reached the conclusion that a walking program of 10-14 weeks is optimal for achieving the best improvements in walking distance, duration, and speed.

  10. Central pain processing in "drug-naïve" pain-free patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessitore, Alessandro; Russo, Antonio; De Micco, Rosa; Fratello, Michele; Caiazzo, Giuseppina; Giordano, Alfonso; Cirillo, Mario; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Esposito, Fabrizio

    2018-02-01

    Despite its clinical relevance, the pathophysiology of pain in Parkinson's disease (PD) is still largely unknown, and both central and peripheral mechanisms have been invoked. To investigate whether central pain processing is altered in "drug-naive" pain-free PD (dnPD) patients. Using event-related functional MRI (fMRI), functional response to forearm heat stimulation (FHS) at two different intensities (41°C and 53°C) was investigated in 20 pain-free dnPD patients, compared with 18 healthy controls (HCs). Secondary analyses were performed to evaluate associations between BOLD signal changes and PD clinical features and behavioral responses. During low-innocuous FHS (41°C), no activation differences were found between dnPD patients and HCs. During high-noxious FHS (53°C) a significantly increased activation in the left somatosensory cortex, left cerebellum, and right low pons was observed in dnPD patients compared to HCs. In the latter experimental condition, fMRI BOLD signal changes in the right low pons (p < .0001; R = -0.8) and in the cerebellum (p = .004; R = -0.7) were negatively correlated with pain intensity ratings only in dnPD patients. No statistically significant difference in experimental pain perception was detected between dnPD patients and HCs. Our findings suggest that a functional remodulation of pain processing pathways occurs even in the absence of clinically overt pain symptoms in dnPD patients. These mechanisms may eventually become dysfunctional over time, contributing to the emergence of pain symptoms in more advanced PD stages. The comprehension of pain-related mechanisms may improve the clinical approach and therapeutic management of this disabling nonmotor symptom. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Various Strategies for Pain-Free Root Canal Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parirokh, Masoud; V. Abbott, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Achieving successful anesthesia and performing pain-free root canal treatment are important aims in dentistry. This is not always achievable and therefore, practitioners are constantly seeking newer techniques, equipments, and anesthetic solutions for this very purpose. The aim of this review is to introduce strategies to achieve profound anesthesia particularly in difficult cases. Materials and Methods: A review of the literature was performed by electronic and hand searching methods for anesthetic agents, techniques, and equipment. The highest level of evidence based investigations with rigorous methods and materials were selected for discussion. Results: Numerous studies investigated to pain management during root canal treatment; however, there is still no single technique that will predictably provide profound pulp anesthesia. One of the most challenging issues in endodontic practice is achieving a profound anesthesia for teeth with irreversible pulpitis especially in mandibular posterior region. Conclusion: According to most investigations, achieving a successful anesthesia is not always possible with a single technique and practitioners should be aware of all possible alternatives for profound anesthesia. PMID:24396370

  12. Various strategies for pain-free root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parirokh, Masoud; V Abbott, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Achieving successful anesthesia and performing pain-free root canal treatment are important aims in dentistry. This is not always achievable and therefore, practitioners are constantly seeking newer techniques, equipments, and anesthetic solutions for this very purpose. The aim of this review is to introduce strategies to achieve profound anesthesia particularly in difficult cases. A review of the literature was performed by electronic and hand searching methods for anesthetic agents, techniques, and equipment. The highest level of evidence based investigations with rigorous methods and materials were selected for discussion. Numerous studies investigated to pain management during root canal treatment; however, there is still no single technique that will predictably provide profound pulp anesthesia. One of the most challenging issues in endodontic practice is achieving a profound anesthesia for teeth with irreversible pulpitis especially in mandibular posterior region. According to most investigations, achieving a successful anesthesia is not always possible with a single technique and practitioners should be aware of all possible alternatives for profound anesthesia.

  13. Social responsibility and corporate sustainability factors in Mexico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fernando Lámbarry

    2016-01-01

    .... However, corporate responsibility and sustainability are increasingly common among businessmen, so that literature has emerged on various approaches to this type of case identifying the factors...

  14. The pain-free ward: myth or reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Neil S

    2012-06-01

    Over the last 25 years, pediatric care has changed dramatically with increased survival after premature birth, more complex care, better outcomes, and reduced mortality. There is a better understanding of how pain pathways and receptor systems develop and also how to assess pain at different stages of development. The myth that children do not feel pain has been comprehensively dispelled. Safe analgesic dose regimens for neonates, infants, and children have been developed based upon a better understanding of developmental pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. It is a myth that pain in children cannot be prevented or treated safely and effectively because of the risks of adverse effects and addiction. Large-scale prospective audits have clarified the safety profile and risk-benefit balance for different techniques. There is now a substantial evidence base supporting many techniques of postoperative and procedural pain management for all age-groups of children. Guidelines based upon systematic review of this evidence have been published and updated, but the real challenge is in implementation of accurate pain assessment and safe, effective pain management comprehensively to all children whatever the procedure, clinical setting, developmental stage of the child, or comorbidities. In developed countries, these are core topics in the education of all doctors and nurses who care for children, and they are integrated into clinical practice by acute pediatric pain teams for most hospitals. However, it is disappointing that many country's healthcare systems do not give pediatric pain management a priority and in many parts of the world there are no analgesics available. So pain-free healthcare is sadly lacking in many hospitals. My hope is that the current knowledge can be used more effectively to relieve the unnecessary suffering of children in the 21st century. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Attention and Working Memory in Female Adolescents With Chronic Pain and Pain-free Female Adolescents: A Preliminary Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifflin, Katherine; Chorney, Jill; Dick, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Adolescents with chronic pain often report inattention and poor memory. There has been little research on cognitive function in this population. The goal of this preliminary pilot study was to examine differences in cognitive function between adolescents with chronic pain to pain-free adolescents. All participants completed baseline assessments of pain, school absences, depression, anxiety, and sleep habits. Standardized neurocognitive tests were used to examine cognitive function with a focus on working memory and attention. Recruitment from the chronic pain clinic resulted in a female sample of 13 individuals (largely reflective of the clinical population). Pain-free age-matched and sex-matched individuals (n=12) were therefore also recruited as controls. Individuals with chronic pain had significantly lower working memory scores than controls. Differences were found between groups on the most difficult selective attention task and not on tests of sustained attention, divided attention, or attentional switching. In a stepwise regression with baseline characteristics entered in the first step, pain accounted for approximately 15% of the variance in working memory and medication score counted for 49% of the variance. This pilot study is the first study to examine differences in working memory and attention between participants with chronic pain and pain-free adolescents. Our findings suggest that chronic pain may negatively affect adolescents' working memory function and highlights the risk for cognitive difficulties and problems with educational progression in addition to negative health and social effects associated with chronic pain. The study provides a starting point for more research and has the potential to direct better identification and treatment of these cognitive deficits.

  16. Hospitableness and sustainable development: New responsibilities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [CC BY 4.0] (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0). Introduction. Within the hospitality industry, as in other industries, attention is given to environmental sustainability. Unfortunately, however, most hospitality companies are lagging behind in the process of becoming more sustainable (van Rheede & Blomme, 2012a).

  17. Practices of corporate social responsibility and sustainable systems work in Peruvian companies issuing sustainability reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Angela Prialé

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Through a literature review, this exploratory study seeks to determine whether the practices related to its colaborators, who report as part of its action responsible Peruvian companies issuing sustainability reports can be considered sustainable management practices of human resources. To this end, it was used the approach of sustainable work systems as a general approach. It was found that some of the practices of responsible management of human resources that implement the analyzed companies address the human dimensions of sustainability, although not all dimensions are considered equally or similar depth.

  18. Responsible Purchasing Network - Sustainable Purchasing Guidance Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help you find the resource that is right for your organization, EPA conducted a scan of the landscape and developed summary profiles of some of the leading sources of sustainable purchasing guidance around the globe.

  19. Education as a response to sustainability issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrien Van Poeck

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the field of environmental education and education for sustainable development, there is a lively discussion about the paradox between acknowledging pluralism and taking into account urgent sustainability concerns. With this article, we aim at nurturing this debate theoretically and empirically. We draw on concepts of Latour and Marres that allow an analysis of educational practices that strive to take into account a multiplicity of views, values, interests and knowledge claims without resorting to an ‘anything goes’ relativism vis-à-vis the far-reaching implications of sustainability issues. We present an analysis of a guided tour of a CSA farm (Community Supported Agriculture and articulate how the care for a sustainability issue can incite an interesting educational dynamic (understood as ‘education as a respons’e that emerges as a derivative of ‘mastery’.

  20. Consumer Sustainability and Responsibility: Beyond Green and Ethical Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Hosta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Most literature regarding sustainable behavior is based on the assumption that the reduction of consumption is inherently positive (mainly in the form of positive environmental consequences and based on ethical considerations. However, the issue of the social consequences of this reduction and self-interested intentions in consumption is not generally open to debate. This paper aims to identify dimensions of sustainable and responsible consumer behavior, distinguish between the two concepts, and present consumer obstacles to acting responsibly in all aspects that a sustainability agenda would suggest. Design/Methodology/Approach – The paper includes a literature review, proposes a framework of responsible and sustainable consumption (RSCB, and offers a set of propositions to achieve responsible and sustainable consumption. Insights from personal interviews with consumers are added for the sake of additional understanding of the concepts presented. Findings and implications – Through the RSCB framework, we show the potential trade-off decisions consumers have to make in order to implement sustainability and responsibility issues in everyday consumer decision processes. Struggles between doing what is good for them and what is good for the environment and society could be a reason why consumers have difficulties achieving responsible and sustainable consumption. Limitations – Qualitative study based on a small sample of personal interviews does not allow for generalizations. Originality – A research gap in understanding the dimensions of sustainable and responsible consumer actions in terms of their emphasis (environmental and social and intentions (self-interest and other-interest is addressed. By understanding those two dimensions of behavior, managers and consumers can resolve consumer sustainability and responsibility dilemmas that arise from a one-dimensional view in order to move sustainability research and practice

  1. Sustainable Logistics Responses to a Global Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Bretzke, Wolf-Rüdiger

    2013-01-01

    Currently the notion of "sustainability" is used in an inflationary manner. Therefore the authors start with a definition which is stable to serve as an anchor for further research as well as for discussions among scientists, managers and politicians, ideally across different disciplines. The character of this book is purely conceptual. The argumentation is based on comparison of new and demanding requisites with existing models (process and network architectures in the field of logistics). Formerly neglected impacts on the environment will be included. Main features of a new approach will be developed which are capable to avoid these impacts and to align logistics with the requirements of sustainability. In order to make logistics sustainable large parts will have to be reinvented. The focus needs to be on decoupling transportation activities from economic growth rates.

  2. Hospitableness and sustainable development: New responsibilities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How does the current paradigm of the host-guest relationship cause the hospitality industry to lag behind in sustainable development? Hospitality is often defined as “a feeling of being welcome”. It is about “welcoming the stranger: a person who comes today and stays tomorrow”, or “a stranger who is treated like a god”.

  3. Sustainable Development and Corporate Social Responsibility: Linking Goals to Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radostina Bakardjieva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate social responsibility (CSR is the core of sustainable development of companies. On one hand, the corporate social responsibility of companies is a prerequisite for sustainable business, on the other - sustainable development sets specific requirements for the development of businesses in the context of increasing requirements to the degree of quality and reliability of financial information. In recent years, sustainable development has become a strategic issue for companies and this trend applies to Bulgarian companies too. Development of non-financial reporting is a very dynamic process, whose peak is the establishment of an integrated system of accountability. Current paper makes analyses of advantages of CSR linking it to the implementation of sustainable development goals through the integrated reporting following the requirements of the standards of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI.

  4. Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability in Danish Public Procurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrecka, Marta

    2017-01-01

    . Secondly, as Denmark has been known as a pioneer in sustainable development, including implementation of it in public purchasing this article focuses on recent developments in the areas of CSR and sustainable public procurement in Denmark, and analyses relevant Danish Public Procurement Complaints Board......The new EU Procurement Directives reinforced the importance of sustainable development by facilitating the strategic use of public procurement to achieve broader societal goals and as such offer significant new opportunities for sustainable public procurement. The task of today is to better...... understand the continuously developing concepts of SPP, as well as to identify the drivers and barriers that promote or hinder its further implementation. This article firstly deals with the relationship between the concepts of sustainability, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and public procurement...

  5. Sustainable and responsible supply chain governance: challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boström, M.; Jönsson, A.M.; Lockie, S.; Mol, A.P.J.; Oosterveer, P.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the Special Volume on sustainable and responsible supply chain governance. As globalized supply chains cross multiple regulatory borders, the firms involved in these chains come under increasing pressure from consumers, NGOs and governments to accept responsibility for social

  6. What does sustainability mean in the HIV and AIDS response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberth, Gemma; Whiteside, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Immense progress has been made in the fight against HIV and AIDS. Achieving and exceeding the AIDS targets for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) was accomplished, in large part, due to an unprecedented financial investment from the international community. Following an $800 million dip in donor disbursements in 2010, the discourse has since shifted to the need for greater sustainability of funding. But what does sustainability mean? Current efforts focus heavily on fiscal imperatives such as increasing domestic funding. This is important - needs are increasing at a faster rate than donor funding, especially with increased treatment coverage. The problem is that measures of financial sustainability tell very little about the actual sustainability of specific programmes, disease trajectories or enabling environments. Recognising that current definitions of sustainability lack clarity and depth, we offer a new six-tenet conceptualisation of what sustainability means in the HIV and AIDS response: (1) financial, (2) epidemiological, (3) political, (4) structural, (5) programmatic, and (6) human rights. Based on these, we examine examples of donor transitions for their approach to sustainability, including PEPFAR in South Africa, the Global Fund in Eastern Europe, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in India (Avahan). We conclude that sustainability must be understood within a broader framework beyond funding stability. We also recommend that certain interventions, such as programming for key populations, may have to continue to receive external support even if affected countries can afford to pay.

  7. Corporate Social Responsibility And Sustainability In Romanian Commercial Banks

    OpenAIRE

    Vasile Cocris; Andra Lavinia Nichitean

    2010-01-01

    The research paper aims to underline the importance of civic behavior in business and bank’s role in the implementation of sound principles of corporate social responsibility. The authors analyzed terms such as corporate social responsibility, sustainable development, fi-nancial stability and the relationship between them, in order to explain their impact on the proper function of world economy. The authors provided a synthesis of corporate social responsibility principles and codes of con-du...

  8. Value Creation in the Context of Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šmida Ľubomír

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Under the influence of the new rules of the economy and the society, companies are achieving a notional line of a necessary change in the approach to creating new value, wealth. Implementation of changes in the system of wealth creation requires a review of existing assumptions of unlimited growth of the global economy and wealth creation in the environment accepting economic interests, society and the environment as a holistic unit. The main purpose of this paper is the clarification of a new requirements for business, presentation of the questionnaire survey Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility and inform on value creation in the context of Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility.

  9. Value Creation in the Context of Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmida, Ľubomír; Sakál, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Under the influence of the new rules of the economy and the society, companies are achieving a notional line of a necessary change in the approach to creating new value, wealth. Implementation of changes in the system of wealth creation requires a review of existing assumptions of unlimited growth of the global economy and wealth creation in the environment accepting economic interests, society and the environment as a holistic unit. The main purpose of this paper is the clarification of a new requirements for business, presentation of the questionnaire survey Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility and inform on value creation in the context of Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility.

  10. SUSTAINABILITY AS A STRATEGY OF RESPONSIBLE AND COMPETITIVE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Vargas-Hernández

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze a competitiveness strategy based on sustainability to lead the way to a model of responsible and competitive development. The analysis takes as its starting point the assumption that the maturity of a sustainable business strategy positively affects competitiveness. The used method is the critical analysis. Among other results of this analysis concludes that the current business strategy seeks a system ecologically appropriate, economically viable and socially fair to reach sustainable equilibrium. This strategy based on sustainability must be promoted by the institutions and strengthened by the capabilities and resources that each company counts on to develop advantages to foster the overall development and achieve the maximization of benefits from the tangible and intangible perspectives

  11. Analysis of meaningful conditioned pain modulation effect in a pain-free adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, David; Gibson, William; Moss, Penny; Munyard, Kylie; Mamotte, Cyril; Wright, Anthony

    2014-11-01

    Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) encompasses the effects of inhibitory and facilitatory pain modulatory systems and is inefficient in some chronic pain states. A proportion of healthy subjects also exhibit little or no CPM, perhaps suggesting that inherent factors such as gender or genetics may be influential. However, there is no consensus on how best to determine a meaningful CPM effect. This study aimed to determine the proportion of pain-free subjects exhibiting a meaningful CPM effect. Analyses of associations between 5HTTLPR (serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region) polymorphisms on the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), gender, and CPM effect were also carried out. A total of 125 healthy subjects (47 male; 78 female) underwent pressure pain threshold testing before, during, and after a cold pressor conditioning stimulus. A buccal cell sample was collected for analysis of 5HTTLPR genotype. Meaningful CPM effect was determined as an increase in pressure pain threshold values from baseline greater than the inherent error of measurement, calculated as 5.3%. During the conditioning stimulus, 116 subjects (92.8%) exhibited a CPM effect whereas 9 did not. CPM effect did not differ significantly between genders or between 5HTTLPR genotypes. This provides a clear basis on which to determine the proportion of patients with a chronic pain disorder that exhibit a meaningful CPM effect. This study proposes a method for calculating meaningful CPM effect and reports the proportion and magnitude of effect elicited in a large sample. Associations between CPM, gender, and genotype were also analyzed. Clarification of normal CPM response may help to elucidate the mechanisms driving CPM inefficiency in chronic pain. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Collaborative Programme in Sustainability and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albareda Tiana, Silvia; Alférez Villarreal, Azul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to collect methodological strategies used in the training of future teachers to develop competences in sustainability and social responsibility (SSR). The proposal in this paper is to show how students learn and develop competences by performing practical activities and through a collaborative experience,…

  13. Lesion Neuroanatomy of the Sustained Attention to Response Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenberghs, Pascal; Gillebert, Celine R.; Schoofs, Hanne; Dupont, Patrick; Peeters, Ronald; Vandenberghe, Rik

    2009-01-01

    The Sustained Attention to Response task is a classical neuropsychological test that has been used by many centres to characterize the attentional deficits in traumatic brain injury, ADHD, autism and other disorders. During the SART a random series of digits 1-9 is presented repeatedly and subjects have to respond to each digit (go trial) except…

  14. Sustainable Urban Development Calls for Responsibility through Life Cycle Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miro Ristimäki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urban development bestows a great opportunity to increase sustainability in the built environment as cities are responsible for the majority of environmental impacts. However, the urban development process is fragmented and sub-optimization leads to unsustainable life cycle outcomes. The purpose of this study is to examine the urban development process from a life cycle perspective and identify how different actors understand life cycle management. By utilizing an inductive qualitative research design, 38 in-depth thematic interviews were conducted within the Finnish urban development industry including a case study and independent interviews from different phases of the urban development life cycle. The theoretical perspective is a combination of the ecosystem construct and life cycle management. Results show that there is no clear responsible actor for life cycle management in urban development. All actors claim that there is value to be added, mostly in economic, but also environmental and social terms. This study reveals that investors should be the responsible actor in the urban development process. By claiming responsibility and focusing on life cycle leadership we can improve sustainability in urban development, and respond to the urban sustainability challenge, thus improving the quality of life and welfare in our urban society.

  15. Academic-community partnerships for sustainable preparedness and response systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Alexander; O'Neal, Patrick; Prescott, John; Stanley, Joan; Herrmann, Jack; Dunlop, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Academic institutions possess tremendous resources that could be important for community disaster response and preparedness activities. In-depth exploration of the role of academic institutions in community disaster response has elicited information about particular academic resources leveraged for and essential to community preparedness and response; factors that contribute to the decision-making process for partner engagement; and facilitators of and barriers to sustainable collaborations from the perspectives of academic institutions, public health and emergency management agencies, and national association and agency leaders. The Academic-Community Partnership Project of the Emory University Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center in collaboration with the Association of Schools of Public Health convened an invitational summit which included leadership from the National Association of County and City Health Officials, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Directors of Public Health Preparedness, Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, CDC Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Association of Schools of Public Health, Association of American Medical Colleges, Association of Academic Health Centers, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and American Association of Poison Control Centers. From this convention, emerged recommendations for building and sustaining academic-public health-community collaborations for preparedness locally and regionally.

  16. Sustainability Ethics Emergency and Media Responsibility in the Consumption Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Bianchi de Araujo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it is discussed the sustainable development and the importance of the environmental cause, in order to create models of development that consider the sustainability and environmental preservation for the future generations. The participation of all society is essential in this debate. The establishment of new habits that do not compromise the subsistence and the conscience of the real self-destruction possibility must be studied and analysed; they consist in challenging intentions, which detach the relevance and the moral duty of the media to restore a new ethics and a new way to understand the reality, as well as to divulge the impact of this different perception in the human life. Therefore occurs the requirement of a responsible compromise relating to the development, by way of understanding the biosphere as the social life basis, considering that, in these ecosystems, the human being is only one of the many species that live in an interdependence relationship.

  17. Efficient Customer Selection for Sustainable Demand Response in Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zois, Vasileios; Frincu, Marc; Chelmis, Charalambos; Saeed, Muhammad Rizwan; Prasanna, Viktor K.

    2014-11-03

    Regulating the power consumption to avoid peaks in demand is a common practice. Demand Response(DR) is being used by utility providers to minimize costs or ensure system reliability. Although it has been used extensively there is a shortage of solutions dealing with dynamic DR. Past attempts focus on minimizing the load demand without considering the sustainability of the reduced energy. In this paper an efficient algorithm is presented which solves the problem of dynamic DR scheduling. Data from the USC campus micro grid were used to evaluate the efficiency as well as the robustness of the proposed solution. The targeted energy reduction is achieved with a maximum average approximation error of ≈ 0.7%. Sustainability of the reduced energy is achieved with respect to the optimal available solution providing a maximum average error less than 0.6%. It is also shown that a solution is provided with a low computational cost fulfilling the requirements of dynamic DR.

  18. Head posture and neck pain of chronic nontraumatic origin: a comparison between patients and pain-free persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anabela G; Punt, T David; Sharples, Paul; Vilas-Boas, João P; Johnson, Mark I

    2009-04-01

    To compare standing head posture measurements between patients with nontraumatic neck pain (NP) and pain-free individuals. Single-blind (assessor) cross-sectional study. Hospital and general community. Consecutive patients (n=40) with chronic nontraumatic NP and age- and sex-matched pain-free participants (n=40). Not applicable. Three angular measurements: the angle between C7, the tragus of the ear, and the horizontal; the angle between the tragus of the ear, the eye, and the horizontal; and the angle between the inferior margins of the right and the left ear and the horizontal were calculated through the digitization of video images. NP patients were found to have a significantly smaller angle between C7, the tragus, and the horizontal, resulting in a more forward head posture than pain-free participants (NP, mean +/- SD, 45.4 degrees +/-6.8 degrees ; pain-free, mean +/- SD, 48.6 degrees +/-7.1 degrees ; P50y) revealed an interaction, with a statistically significant difference in head posture for younger participants with NP compared with younger pain-free participants (NP, mean +/- SD, 46.1 degrees +/-6.7 degrees ; pain-free, mean +/- SD, 51.8 degrees +/-5.9 degrees ; Ppain-free, mean +/- SD, 45.1 degrees +/-6.7 degrees ; P>.05; CI for the difference between groups, -4.9 degrees -4.2 degrees ). No other differences were found between patients and pain-free participants. Younger patients with chronic nontraumatic NP were shown to have a more forward head posture in standing than matched pain-free participants. However, the difference, although statistically significant, was perhaps too small to be clinically meaningful.

  19. SUSTAINABILITY AND COMPANY’S CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY NEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONICA VIOLETA ACHIM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The company is a living organism, is an entity and its analysis should be made taking into account the whole system. The company is a dynamic environment, which has as a mainly aims to add value for all participants in the economic life. In the organizations, the achievement of the concept of sustainable development is achieved through the concept of societal responsibility of the organizations. For this scope we need to use the term introduced by Elkington namely “The Triple Bottom Line” which involve economic prosperity, environmental compliance and improve social cohesion. [11]. So, “The Triple Bottom Line” can be defined as an approach for measuring the overall performance of an organization according to its triple contribution to the three aspects mentioned above. The new conceptual framework change radically the final aim of a company because it is not anymore maximizing the value of shares held by shareholders, but it is maximizing value for all stakeholders, where shareholders are just another category of stakeholders. Sustainable development and globalization require new performance standards that exceed the economic field, for both national company and international ones. As a consequence, these standards must be integrated into the company's development strategy, to ensure sustainability of activities carried, by the harmonization of economic, social and environmental objectives.

  20. Sustainable Eco Coastal Development Through Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmanissazly, Arsi; Mursito Ardy, Yong; Abdullah

    2017-02-01

    Besides technical problems the company’s operational constraints that may effect high deficiency for the company is the company - community conflicts. Company - community conflict can also arise depends on the geographic conditions and characteristics of the community itself. Some studies has show that coastal community have higher level of social risk when compared to non-coastal community. Also, the coastal community ussually only rely on what sea provides as their main livelihood. Because of the level of education still contemtible the community couldn’t optimized the potential of their own area. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) har emerged as an important approach for addressing the social and environmental impact of company activities. Through CSR program, PT Pertamina EP Asset 3 Tambun Field (PEP) try to form value integration by utilizing resources from the community and the company by making sustainable eco - coastal living in Desa Tambaksari, Karawang, one of PEP working area. Using sustainable livelihood approach begin with compiling data by doing social mapping PEP has initiate the area to becoming Fish Processing Industry Centre. By implementing PDCA in every steps of the program, PEP has multiplied some other programs such as Organic Fish Feed Processing, Seaweed Farming and Waste Bank for Green Coastal Village. These program is PEP’s effort to create a sustainability environment by enhancing the community’s potentials as well as resolving social problems around Tambaksari. The most important result besides getting our license to operate from the community, is the community itself can grow into an eco coastal sustainable system.

  1. Startle modulation by heat pain with varying threat levels in chronic pain patients and pain-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn-Hofmann, C; Wolf, D; Wolff, S; Heesen, M; Knippenberg-Bigge, K; Lang, P M; Lautenbacher, S

    2017-01-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that affective responses to pain are changed in chronic pain. The investigation of startle responses to pain might contribute to clarifying whether such alterations also expand to motivational defensive reactions. We aimed at comparing startle responses to tonic heat pain with high threat (HT) or low threat (LT) in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain and controls. As pain-related anxiety and catastrophizing are typically elevated in chronic pain, we expected to find stronger startle responses in patients specifically under experimental HT. Patients with chronic musculoskeletal, preferentially, back pain (N = 19) and matched pain-free controls (N = 19) underwent two pain-related threat conditions (high and low) in balanced order. Only, in the HT condition, 50% of the trials were announced to include a short further noxious temperature increase at the end. Startle responses to loud tones were always assessed prior to a potential temperature increase in the phase of anticipation and were recorded by surface electromyogram. Surprisingly, we observed no differences in startle responses and ratings of emotional and pain responses between patients and controls despite significantly higher pain-related anxiety and catastrophizing in the patients. Overall, startle was potentiated in the HT condition, but only in participants who started with this condition. Our results suggest that, in general, patients with pain are not more responsive emotionally to experimental threat manipulations despite elevated pain anxiety and catastrophizing. Instead, exaggerated responses in patients might be triggered only by individual concerns relating to pain, which are not sufficiently mirrored by our threat paradigm.

  2. Clarification of developing and established clinical allodynia and pain-free outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Stephen H; McGinnis, Judy E; McDonald, Susan A

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether clinical indicators of cutaneous allodynia predict the success of migraine therapy with sumatriptan using a brief questionnaire. Using quantitative sensory testing (QST) recent studies demonstrate that the presence of cutaneous allodynia, a clinical manifestation of central sensitization, can be detrimental to the success of migraine therapy with sumatriptan. QST is costly and requires much time, therefore it is not feasible to use in clinical practice. In this prospective study, migraineurs completed a questionnaire about their skin sensitivity during migraine. Each migraineur treated 2 migraine headaches with sumatriptan (100 mg): 1 headache at the earliest sign of migraine pain (mild, within 1 hour of onset) and 1 headache at least 4 hours after the onset of pain while moderate or severe. Thirty-six migraine headaches were evaluated in 18 migraineurs. A total of 44% of the headaches were not associated with allodynia at any time. Irrespective of allodynic status, headaches were more likely to become pain-free with early versus late treatment (2 hours; 78% vs. 33%, respectively). Headaches were equally likely to become pain-free when allodynia was reported before treatment but not 2 and 4 hours after treatment (2 hours; 67 vs. 63%, respectively, 4 hours 80 vs. 81%, respectively). However, no headaches were pain-free when allodynia was reported at 2 and 4 hours after treatment. Headaches without allodynia were aborted when treated early or late, and headaches with allodynia were aborted only when allodynia was not present after treatment. These findings suggest that different mechanisms account for allodynia before and after treatment; a developing phase in which central sensitization depends on incoming pain signals from the peripheral nociceptors and an established phase in which the sensitization becomes independent of the pain signals that come from the dura.

  3. Serum MicroRNA Signatures in Migraineurs During Attacks and in Pain-Free Periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Hjalte H; Duroux, Meg; Gazerani, Parisa

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as important biomarkers and modulators of pathophysiological processes including oncogenesis and neurodegeneration. MicroRNAs are found to be involved in the generation and maintenance of pain in animal models of inflammation and neuropathic pain. Recently, microRNA dysregulation has been reported in patients with painful conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome and fibromyalgia. The aim of this study was to assess whether serum microRNA alterations occur during migraine attacks and whether migraine manifests in chronic serum microRNA aberrations. Two cohorts of 24 migraineurs, and age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. High-content serum microRNA (miRNA) arrays were used to assess the serum microRNA profiles of migraineurs during attacks and pain-free periods in comparison with healthy controls. Of the 372 assessed microRNAs, 32 or ≈ 8% were found to be differentially expressed and 4 of these--miR-34a-5p, 29c-5p, -382-5p, and -26b-3p--were selected for further investigation. Migraine attacks were associated with an acute upregulation in miR-34a-5p and miR-382-5p expression. Interestingly, miR-382-5p not only exhibited an upregulation during attack but also proved to be a biomarker for migraine when comparing migraineurs in pain-free periods to the healthy control group (p = pain-free periods. This finding sheds light on the potential role of microRNAs in the pathophysiology of migraine and adds a new approach towards potential identification of much sought-after serum biomarkers of migraine.

  4. Beliefs about the causes and consequences of pain in patients with chronic inflammatory or noninflammatory low back pain and in pain-free individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Tim John; Gupta, Rajiva; Zhang, Weiya; Walsh, David Andrew

    2008-04-20

    Case control study including 2 groups of patients with low back pain (LBP, inflammatory and noninflammatory) and a pain-free community control group. We explored whether pain beliefs differ between patients with chronic LBP attributed to inflammatory or noninflammatory medical diagnoses, and between patients with chronic LBP and pain-free controls. Beliefs strongly influence patients' engagement in and response to treatments for chronic LBP. It is unclear, however, whether unhelpful beliefs held by patients with chronic LBP are predominantly associated with diagnosis, or with other aspects of the patient's pain experience. Patients and controls completed the pain beliefs questionnaire addressing beliefs about the causes and consequences of pain. Patients also completed questionnaires addressing catastrophizing (Coping Strategies Questionnaire), physical disability and bodily pain (SF-36 Health Survey), and psychological distress (Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Short Form and Cognitive Depression Index). Variance analysis and chi2 test were used as appropriate, adjusting for effects of covariates and multiple comparisons. Linear regression and logistic regression were used to adjust for confounding factors. Patients with noninflammatory LBP more strongly endorsed organic pain beliefs (e.g., that pain necessarily indicates damage), and catastrophizing (e.g., that the pain is never going to get better), than did patients with inflammatory LBP (P pain-free controls (P < 0.05). Endorsement of organic pain beliefs was associated with catastrophizing. Organic pain beliefs are associated with increased catastrophizing in patients with chronic LBP, and addressing these beliefs may help patients to manage their pain and disability. Meanings attributed to inflammatory and noninflammatory diagnostic labels may contribute to the different pain beliefs held by different patient groups.

  5. Panoramic findings in 34-year-old subjects with facial pain and pain-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huumonen, S; Sipilä, K; Zitting, P; Raustia, A M

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare panoramic radiographic findings between subjects with reported facial pain and pain-free controls in a population-based sample of 34-year olds. The study was a part of a comprehensive medical survey including subjects born in the year 1966 in Northern Finland. A sub-sample of the cohort was formed based on the question concerning facial pain. A panoramic radiograph was taken of 48 subjects with facial pain and 47 pain-free controls. Pathological findings in the dentition, jaws, maxillary sinuses and temporomandibular joints (TMJs) were compared between the groups. The majority of the subjects in both groups did not have pathological findings. Compared with controls, the subjects with facial pain did not show significantly more pathological findings in the teeth, periodontium, maxillary sinuses, TMJs or in the other areas. Radiographic panoramic findings had no association with reported facial pain in the population-based sample of young adults, and have little impact on the diagnosis of facial pain.

  6. Electrodermal activity at acupuncture points differentiates patients with current pain from pain-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Linda; Linden, Wolfgang; Marshall, Candace

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated whether electrodermal resistance at acupuncture points (AP) systematically varies as a function of pain. The study was conceived as a proof-of-principle study in support of research on acupuncture and other complementary medicine approaches. Specifically, this study investigates whether or not electrodermal activity systematically differentiates arthritis patients with current pain from pain-free controls. Participants with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 32) and a typical pain level of at least 3 (on a 0-10 scale) were compared with case controls (n = 28) who had no medical diagnosis and were pain free. Electrodermal resistance at AP was measured with a commercial ohmmeter and compared to heart rate, blood pressure, and ratings on the Pain Catastrophization Scale and the McGill Melzack Pain Questionnaire. There were consistent differences between the experimental group and the control group on all markers of pain. Similarly, there were significant group differences and some trends for electrodermal activity at the AP labeled 'bladder,' 'gall bladder,' and 'small intestine.' It is concluded that the concept of electrodermal resistance at AP possesses criterion validity for distinguishing pain from a no pain state. This research provides support for the usefulness of measuring electrodermal activity when testing energy-based models of disease, and can be seen as a bridge between Western and Chinese medicine.

  7. Red blood cell deformability in patients with claudication after pain-free treadmill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Piotr; Spodaryk, Krzysztof; Cencora, Andrzej; Mika, Anna

    2006-07-01

    To assess the effect of pain-free treadmill training on red blood cell deformability and walking distance in patients with claudication. Randomized-controlled trial of exercise training. Patients were recruited from the primary care, vascular outpatient clinic. A total of 60 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (stage II according to Leriche-Fontaine) were randomized into the treadmill program or a control group. Fifty-five patients completed the study (27 in the exercising group and 28 in the control group). Patients in the exercising group were walking on the treadmill 3 times a week for 3 months. Each session consisted of 1 hour repetitive walking [performed to 85% of the pain-free walking time (PFWT)] was supervised by a qualified physiotherapist. Changes in erythrocyte deformability and treadmill walking performance (PFWT, maximal walking time) were assessed in both groups before the study and after 3 months. After 3 months of treadmill training, red blood cell deformability in the exercising group significantly increased (Ppain-free treadmill training is associated with a significant increase in red cell deformability in patients with claudication.

  8. Training induces scapular dyskinesis in pain-free competitive swimmers: a reliability and observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Pernille H; Bak, Klaus; Jensen, Susanne; Welter, Ulrik

    2011-03-01

    Scapular dyskinesis is a major etiological factor in overhead athletes' shoulder problems. Our hypotheses were to evaluate if (1) visual observation of scapular dyskinesis during scaption has substantial interobserver reliability, and (2) scapular dyskinesis may be induced by swim training in pain-free swimmers. A reliability and observational study. Bachelor project at a college institution and at a private sports orthopedic hospital. Seventy-eight competitive swimmers with no history of shoulder pain were included in the study. Fourteen swimmers were evaluated regarding reliability. Inclusion criteria were competitive swimmers with high training volume who previously had no shoulder pain. Observations of scapular dyskinesis (yes/no) during simple scaption. The interobserver reliability of scaption and wall push-up was evaluated in 14 swimmers using kappa analysis. Prevalence of scapular dyskinesis at 4 time intervals during a swim training session. The scaption test resulted in a weighted kappa value of 0.75. Scapular dyskinesis was seen in 29 shoulders (37%) after the first time interval, in another 24 (cumulated prevalence 68%) after one-half of the training session, and in an additional 4 swimmers (cumulated prevalence 73%) after three-quarters of the training session. During the last quarter of the training session, another 7 swimmers had dyskinesis, resulting in a cumulated prevalence of 82%. The prevalence of abnormal scapular kinesis during a normal training session is high in previously pain-free swimmers. The prevalence increases with more training and occurs early during the training session.

  9. Impact of corporate social responsibility on sustainable enterprise development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danubianu Mirela

    2017-06-01

    Top management endorsement and nomination of a complex CSR teamDeveloping formal company CSR policy documentsSelecting and engaging the company’s stakeholders as early as possible.Building a Project Advisory Board – useful in every modern managerial tool application should guide the progress toward CSR.An external facilitator would help solve internal conflicts.An audit of what CSR represents for the Company, what are the CSR options, e.g., promoting a “green company” profile, what would be the best impact of philanthropy and community volunteering, etc.Generate a CSR portfolio of actions, setting deadlines, responsibilities and allocating resources, establishing communication, reporting, monitoring and corrective proceduresupgrading the sustainable enterprise strategy.

  10. Pressure and cold pain threshold reference values in a large, young adult, pain-free population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Robert; Smith, Anne Julia; O'Sullivan, Peter Bruce; Slater, Helen; Sterling, Michele; McVeigh, Joanne Alexandra; Straker, Leon Melville

    2016-10-01

    Currently there is a lack of large population studies that have investigated pain sensitivity distributions in healthy pain free people. The aims of this study were: (1) to provide sex-specific reference values of pressure and cold pain thresholds in young pain-free adults; (2) to examine the association of potential correlates of pain sensitivity with pain threshold values. This study investigated sex specific pressure and cold pain threshold estimates for young pain free adults aged 21-24 years. A cross-sectional design was utilised using participants (n=617) from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study at the 22-year follow-up. The association of site, sex, height, weight, smoking, health related quality of life, psychological measures and activity with pain threshold values was examined. Pressure pain threshold (lumbar spine, tibialis anterior, neck and dorsal wrist) and cold pain threshold (dorsal wrist) were assessed using standardised quantitative sensory testing protocols. Reference values for pressure pain threshold (four body sites) stratified by sex and site, and cold pain threshold (dorsal wrist) stratified by sex are provided. Statistically significant, independent correlates of increased pressure pain sensitivity measures were site (neck, dorsal wrist), sex (female), higher waist-hip ratio and poorer mental health. Statistically significant, independent correlates of increased cold pain sensitivity measures were, sex (female), poorer mental health and smoking. These data provide the most comprehensive and robust sex specific reference values for pressure pain threshold specific to four body sites and cold pain threshold at the dorsal wrist for young adults aged 21-24 years. Establishing normative values in this young age group is important given that the transition from adolescence to adulthood is a critical temporal period during which trajectories for persistent pain can be established. These data will provide an important research

  11. The effect of pain-free treadmill training on fibrinogen, haematocrit, and lipid profile in patients with claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Piotr; Wilk, Boguslaw; Mika, Anna; Marchewka, Anna; Nizankowski, Rafał

    2011-10-01

    To assess the effect of pain-free treadmill training on changes of plasma fibrinogen, haematocrit, lipid profile, and walking ability in patients with claudication. Randomized control trial. Sixty-eight patients with peripheral obstructive arterial disease and intermittent claudication (Fontaine stage II) were randomly assigned into the treadmill training (repetitive intervals to onset of claudication pain, three times a week) or a control group (no change in physical activity) over 3 months. Both groups performed treadmill test to assess pain-free walking time (PFWT) and maximal walking time (MWT) and had blood analyses [for haematocrit, fibrinogen, triglycerides, and cholesterol: total, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)] done at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks of the study. Total and LDL cholesterol levels in the training group decreased (p pain-free treadmill training parallels with progressive normalization of lipid profiles in patients with claudication.

  12. Effect of pain-free range exercise on shoulder pain and range of motion in an amateur skier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] This study prescribed pain-free range exercises for a female amateur skier who complained of limitations in her shoulder range of motion, and pain caused by protective spasms; the tester evaluated the effects of such exercise on pain. [Subject and Methods] A 23-year-old female who complained of pain of 3 weeks in duration in the right glenohumoral and scapulothoracic joints was enrolled. [Results] After pain-free range exercises, the visual analog pain score was 2 and the shoulder flexion and abduction angles improved compared to the initial values. [Conclusion] Thus, this study suggests muscle-strengthening exercises within the pain-free range, rather than simple pain treatments, as therapy for acute muscle injuries in skiers.

  13. Risk for five forms of suicidality in acute pain patients and chronic pain patients vs pain-free community controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbain, David A; Bruns, Daniel; Disorbio, John Mark; Lewis, John E

    2009-09-01

    . The objective of this study was to determine the risk for five forms of suicidality in rehabilitation acute pain patients (APPs) and rehabilitation chronic pain patients (CPPs) vs pain-free community controls. The Battery for Health Improvement 2 was developed utilizing a healthy (pain-free) community sample (N = 1,478), a community patient sample (N = 158), and a rehabilitation patient sample (N = 777). These groups were asked five suicidality questions relating to history of wanting to die, wanting to die because of pain, recent frequent suicide ideation, having a suicide plan, and history of suicide attempt. Of the rehabilitation patients, 326 were identified as being APPs, 341 as being CPPs, and 110 as having no pain. The risk for affirming each of the five suicidality questions was calculated for rehabilitation APPs, rehabilitation CPPs, and rehabilitation patients without pain utilizing the healthy pain-free community sample as the reference group. In addition, risk was calculated for various subgroups of rehabilitation patients: those with worker's compensation status, with litigation status, and with personal injury status. There are a variety of settings. In rehabilitation CPPs the risk for suicidality was greater than community pain-free controls for three suicidality questions: history of wanting to die, recent frequent suicide ideation, and having a suicide plan. Worker's compensation status, litigation status, and personal injury status appeared to increase risk for affirmation of some types of suicidality in CPPs. Rehabilitation APPs were at greater risk for all five suicidality items than the community pain-free controls. Rehabilitation CPPs are at greater risk for some forms of suicidality than community pain-free controls. This risk is increased by variables such as worker's compensation status, litigation status, and personal injury status. However, it is yet unclear if these variables actually predict suicidality as this requires further

  14. Sustainable palm oil as a public responsibility? : On the governance capacity of Indonesian standard for sustainable palm oil (ISPO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidayat, Nia; Offermans, Astrid; Glasbergen, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    This paper is motivated by the observation that Southern governments start to take responsibility for a more sustainable production of agricultural commodities as a response to earlier private initiatives by businesses and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Indonesia is one of the leading

  15. Sustainability as an object of corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Marí Farinós

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We can observe that in the last few years companies and organizations of any nature have begun to show an increasing interest in establishing sustainable relationships with the environment by bridging those groups that are impacted or that impact on their activities, . In this context, the social responsibility report emerges as a management tool that allows companies to be accountable to society and its groups and measure, their environmental, financial and social actions. The Triple Bottom Line, triple accountability or triple counting of results, should be understood as the methodology to measure and report the performance of organizations contrasted with environmental, economic and social parameters. In addition, it allows companies to surpass accountability solely for their economic value as it used to be in the past, and also to consider the social and environmental value they add or destroy. Concern about these social and environmental issues generates a demand for information, which, in turn, leads to the need to have a document that collects the information demanded by society and that should be offered by the Companies, what is known as Social Responsibility. It is the American companies that originally, already in the late sixties and early seventies, found themselves in need of having to offer information regarding their social responsibility. This information was collected in what, we might conclude, is the first social balances, which were addressed mainly to groups outside the company itself, especially to consumers, since in the United States it was this collective that showed a greater concern about the issue.

  16. Site-specific mesenchymal control of inflammatory pain to yeast challenge in vulvodynia-afflicted and pain-free women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, David C; Falsetta, Megan L; Woeller, Collynn F; Pollock, Stephen J; Song, Kunchang; Bonham, Adrienne; Haidaris, Constantine G; Stodgell, Chris J; Messing, Susan P; Iadarola, Michael; Phipps, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Fibroblast strains were derived from 2 regions of the lower genital tract of localized provoked vulvodynia (LPV) cases and pain-free controls. Sixteen strains were derived from 4 cases and 4 controls, age and race matched, after presampling mechanical pain threshold assessments. Strains were challenged with 6 separate stimuli: live yeast species (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae), yeast extract (zymosan), or inactive vehicle. Production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were proinflammatory response measures. Highest IL-6 and PGE2 occurred with vestibular strains after C albicans, C glabrata, and zymosan challenges, resulting in the ability to significantly predict IL-6 and PGE2 production by genital tract location. After C albicans and C glabrata challenge of all 16 fibroblast strains, adjusting for dual sampling of subjects, PGE2 and IL-6 production significantly predicted the presampling pain threshold from the genital tract site of sampling. At the same location of pain assessment and fibroblast sampling, in situ immunohistochemical (IHC)(+) fibroblasts for IL-6 and Cox-2 were quantified microscopically. The correlation between IL-6 production and IL-6 IHC(+) was statistically significant; however, biological significance is unknown because of the small number of IHC(+) IL-6 fibroblasts identified. A low fibroblast IL-6 IHC(+) count may result from most IL-6 produced by fibroblasts existing in a secreted extracellular state. Enhanced, site-specific, innate immune responsiveness to yeast pathogens by fibroblasts may be an early step in LPV pathogenesis. Fibroblast strain testing may offer an attractive and objective marker of LPV pathology in women with vulvodynia of inflammatory origin.

  17. Industry specific sustainability benchmarks: an ECSF pilot bridging corporate sustainability with social responsible investments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woerd, K.F.; van den Brink, T.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the state of the art with respect to sustainability reporting, its linkages with the corporations, internal measurement and monitoring systems and their combined impact on the quality of contemporary sustainability benchmarks, developed by SRI analysts and so-called rating

  18. Sustaining Health Care Interventions to Achieve Quality Care: What We Can Learn From Rapid Response Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolldorf, Deonni P

    Rapid response team (RRT) adoption and implementation are associated with improved quality of care of patients who experience an unanticipated medical emergency. The sustainability of RRTs is vital to achieve long-term benefits of these teams for patients, staff, and hospitals. Factors required to achieve RRT sustainability remain unclear. This study examined the relationship between sustainability elements and RRT sustainability in hospitals that have previously implemented RRTs.

  19. Association between physical activity and pain processing in adults with chronic low back pain compared to pain-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Lindsay C; George, Steven Z; Simon, Corey B

    2017-01-01

    Pain sensitivity has been negatively associated with physical activity levels. Few studies have examined associations between experimentally induced pain sensitivity and physical activity in adults with chronic low back pain and pain-free controls. The objective of this study was to examine associations between physical activity levels and how an individual processes pain using experimentally induced pain stimuli. Seventy subjects (CLBP = 49; mean age = 46.8 ± 14.9; Pain-free = 21; mean age = 45.3 ± 18.2, n of females = 46) participated. A self-report questionnaire derived from the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was used to calculate an activity level index. Pain sensitivity was assessed via quantitative sensory testing (QST) at the right lower extremity. Moderate (U = 688, ppain-free vs. individuals with CLBP. Activity level was not associated with pain sensitivity (Pain-free: R2 = 0.02, p> 0.05; CLBP: R2 = 0.01, p> 0.05). Both moderate (R2 = 0.49, ppain-free individuals. Findings suggest that physical activity influences pain modulation amongst pain-free individuals, however no relationship exists once CLBP is present. However, future investigation will elucidate the extent to which physical activity level either prevents CLBP or is effective in alleviating CLBP.

  20. The reliability of one vs. three trials of pain-free grip strength in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Donna; Jerosch-Herold, Christina; Hickson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Measurement Reliability. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of one vs. the mean of three trials of pain-free grip strength in participants with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The study used was a repeated-measures, crossover design. Pain-free grip strength was measured with the Biometric E-Link Evaluation System V900S (Unit 25, Nine Mile Point Ind. Est., Gwent UK NP11 7HZ), pain levels recorded before and after grip tests with visual analog scale. High levels of test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient≥0.91) were found for both one trial and the mean of three trials of pain-free grip strength testing. Median values of grip strength for both methods produced comparable results. Clinically small but statistically significant increases in pain (p≤0.01) were found. One trial of pain-free grip strength is reliable and may save valuable clinical time while reducing the assessment burden placed on patients with RA. N/A. Copyright © 2010 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sustainability Management in Agribusiness: Challenges, Concepts, Responsibilities and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Friedrich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea of sustainable management has recently gained growing attention in the agribusiness sector. This is mainly due to a widespread discontent with the industrialization of agricultural production and food processing and growing public pressure on agribusiness firms to implement more sustainable management practices. In this paper we present the results of an explorative empirical study of sustainability management in German agribusiness firms. The study shows that agribusiness firms have developed a broad understanding of sustainability management and perceive a multi-facetted spectrum of societal demands they have to meet. The most important arguments for implementing more sustainable management practices are that companies have to make sure that they are trusted by society in the long run and that the perception of a company by external stakeholders has become more and more important. The companies surveyed know quite a number of sustainability programmes and standards, but the number of companies that actually participate in these initiatives is much smaller. Nonetheless, the majority of the respondents feels that their company is more successful with regard to sustainability management than industry average.

  2. A Pain-free Lancet with a Small Needle for Glucose Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    A new lancet with an extremely small needle (0.15 mm diameter and 0.75 mm length) mounted on a small pedestal was tested in diabetic patients for blood glucose measurement in a randomized clinical study. A total of 37 diabetic patients were enrolled for the study. A pain scale categorized from 0 to 3 was created to measure the intensity of puncture pain which was explained to patients before testing. The patients' fingers were punctured with their own old style lancets at least 1 hour before the punctures by the new lancets, and puncture pains recorded according to the pain scale. All patients tested with the new lancet reported no pain and recorded the puncture pain as scale 0. Among the total 37 patients tested with their old style lancets, 2 patients (5.40%) reported no pain and recorded the pain as scale 0, thirteen patients (35.14%) recorded as scale 1, 16 patients (43.24%) as scale 2, and 6 patients (16.22%) as scale 3. The average pain scale of the patients who used old style lancets was 1.702 with the standard error 0.133. The chi-square goodness-of-fit test shows that the proportion of the pain scales comes from the claimed distribution with unequal frequencies, and chi-square tests for independence indicate that neither sex nor age of the sample patients is related to the pain scales.The paired t-test to test the existence of any difference in pain levels between the new lancet and the old style lancet showed; t = 1.702/0.133 = 12.796 with p-value Pain-free needle puncture was achieved by limiting the puncture depth to less than 0.75 mm with a thin needle with a 0.15 mm diameter. By allowing patients to see the new lancets before testing, psychological pain anticipation was minimized as the very thin and short needle is visually less intimidating. With a pain free puncture, better compliance and improved subsequent glucose levels may be achieved.

  3. Sustainable bonuses: Sign of corporate responsibility or window dressing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; Perego, P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a strong plea for integrating sustainability goals into traditional corporate bonus schemes, a comprehensive implementation of these systems has been lacking until recently. This article explores four illustrative cases from the Netherlands, where several multinationals started to pioneer

  4. Relationship between blood- and cerebrospinal fluid-bound neurotransmitter concentrations and conditioned pain modulation in pain-free and chronic pain subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Alexandre J; Beaudet, Nicolas; Daigle, Kathya; Sabbagh, Robert; Sansoucy, Yanick; Marchand, Serge; Sarret, Philippe; Goffaux, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Descending pain inhibition is an endogenous pain control system thought to depend partially on the activation of bulbospinal monoaminergic pathways. Deficits in descending pain inhibition have been reported in numerous human chronic pain conditions, but there is currently no consensus regarding the neurochemical correlates responsible for this deficit. The aims of this study were to 1) assess the efficacy of descending pain inhibition in pain-free and chronic pain subjects, 2) screen for changes in centrally (ie, cerebrospinal fluid) and peripherally (ie, plasma) acting monoamine concentrations, and 3) explore the relationship between descending pain inhibition and monoamine neurotransmitter concentrations. Our results clearly show a deficit in pain inhibition, along with lower plasma norepinephrine and metanephrine concentrations in chronic pain subjects, compared to pain-free subjects. No differences were found in cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitter concentrations. Finally, our results revealed a positive relationship between blood-bound norepinephrine and metanephrine concentrations and the efficacy of descending pain inhibition. Thus, basal monoamine levels in blood were related to descending pain inhibition. This finding supports the emerging idea that individual differences in descending pain inhibition may be linked to individual differences in peripheral processes, such as monoamines release in blood, which are possibly related to cardiovascular control. This article presents psychophysical and neurochemical findings that indicate that the latent potential of descending pain inhibitory responses is associated with differential activity in peripheral processes governed by monoamine neurotransmitter release, bringing insights into the relationship between descending pain inhibition and cardiovascular control in humans. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Knee muscle forces during walking and running in patellofemoral pain patients and pain-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besier, Thor F; Fredericson, Michael; Gold, Garry E; Beaupré, Gary S; Delp, Scott L

    2009-05-11

    One proposed mechanism of patellofemoral pain, increased stress in the joint, is dependent on forces generated by the quadriceps muscles. Describing causal relationships between muscle forces, tissue stresses, and pain is difficult due to the inability to directly measure these variables in vivo. The purpose of this study was to estimate quadriceps forces during walking and running in a group of male and female patients with patellofemoral pain (n = 27, 16 female; 11 male) and compare these to pain-free controls (n = 16, 8 female; 8 male). Subjects walked and ran at self-selected speeds in a gait laboratory. Lower limb kinematics and electromyography (EMG) data were input to an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model of the knee, which was scaled and calibrated to each individual to estimate forces in 10 muscles surrounding the joint. Compared to controls, the patellofemoral pain group had greater co-contraction of quadriceps and hamstrings (p = 0.025) and greater normalized muscle forces during walking, even though the net knee moment was similar between groups. Muscle forces during running were similar between groups, but the net knee extension moment was less in the patellofemoral pain group compared to controls. Females displayed 30-50% greater normalized hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle forces during both walking and running compared to males (ppain-free subjects. The muscle force data are available as supplementary material.

  6. Does the Pain-free hospital certification improve the management of pain following hernioplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smietańska, Irmina; Adrian, Elżbieta; Smietański, Maciej; Kitowski, Józef

    2010-01-01

    Postoperative pain still poses a serious problem for 80% of patients undergoing surgery. We assessed the effects of the implementation of standards of postoperative analgesia, according to the guidelines of the "Pain-free hospital" project, and PROSPECT group recommendations, in the daily practice of a general surgical hospital ward. One hundred adult patients, scheduled for elective inguinal or umbilical hernia surgery, were included in the study and allocated to two groups, to receive analgesics on demand (control), or postoperative analgesia according to the introduced programs. The number of additional interventions and patients' satisfaction were chosen as primary end points to assess the clinical value of the introduced standards. Additionally, the type and dose of analgesics, and duration of hospital stay were noted. One additional intervention (2%) was required in the treated group, and 9 (18%) - in the control group (p=0.023). In the treated group, the patient satisfaction (0 to 10) score was rated 9 by 39 patients (78%) and 10 by 11 patients (22%). The duration of hospitalisation was similar in both groups. We confirmed the success of introducing the standards of pain treatment into the daily practice of a surgical ward.

  7. The effect of resisted inspiration during an active straight leg raise in pain-free subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beales, Darren John; O'Sullivan, Peter Bruce; Briffa, N Kathryn

    2010-04-01

    Alterations of respiratory patterns have been observed in pelvic girdle pain subjects during the active straight leg raise (ASLR). This study investigated how pain-free subjects coordinate motor control during an ASLR when this task is complicated by the addition of a respiratory challenge. Trunk muscle activation, intra-abdominal pressure, intra-thoracic pressure, pelvic floor motion, downward pressure of the non-lifted leg and respiratory rate were compared between resting supine, ASLR, breathing with inspiratory resistance (IR) and ASLR+IR. Subjects responded to ASLR+IR with an increase in the motor activation in the abdominal wall and chest wall compared to when ASLR and IR were performed in isolation. Activation of obliquus internus abdominis was greater on the side of the leg lift during the ASLR+IR, in comparison to symmetrical activation observed in the other abdominal wall muscles. The incremental increase of motor activity was associated with greater intra-abdominal pressure baseline shift when lifting the leg during ASLR+IR compared to ASLR. Individual variation was apparent in the form of the motor control patterns, mostly reflected in variable respiratory activation of the abdominal wall. The findings highlight the flexibility of the neuromuscular system in adapting to simultaneous respiratory and stability demands. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Health services research project "action alliance pain-free city Münster" : Objectives and methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterbrink, J; Ewers, A; Nestler, N; Pogatzki-Zahn, E; Bauer, Z; Gnass, I; Sirsch, E; Krüger, C; Mitterlehner, B; Kutschar, P; Hemling, S; Fischer, B; Marschall, U; Aschauer, W; Weichbold, M; van Aken, H

    2010-12-01

    Inadequate pain care in health care facilities is still a major concern. Due to structural and organizational shortcomings the potential of modern analgesia is far from being exhausted. The project "Action Alliance Pain-free City Münster" is designed to analyze the multiprofessional pain management in health care facilities in the model City of Münster in an epidemiologic study and aims to optimize pain management in accordance with nursing standards and medical guidelines. Hospitals, nursing homes, outpatient nursing services, hospices and pain care centers will be examined. After an analysis of the current state on the basis of a pre-test, the necessary optimization measures will be developed and implemented. Subsequently, the pain management will be reevaluated in a post-test. In partly still unexplored health care areas of Germany, epidemiologic data will be generated, barriers to the implementation of standards and guidelines revealed and measures of improvements developed and tested. In addition, interface problems between the evaluated sectors will be identified. In this article the objective and the methods of the project are described.

  9. Pain-free treadmill exercise for patients with intermittent claudication: Are there gender differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipnarine, Krishna; Barak, Sharon; Martinez, Coleen A; Carmeli, Eliezer; Stopka, Christine B

    2016-06-01

    Intermittent claudication, a common symptom of peripheral arterial disease, results in insufficient blood flow and oxygen supply to lower extremity muscles. Compared to men, women with peripheral arterial disease have a higher rate of mobility loss with peripheral arterial disease due to poorer lower extremity functioning. This study evaluates the effect of supervised pain-free treadmill exercise on improving performance in women with intermittent claudication due to peripheral arterial disease in comparison to men. A total of 26 participants (women, n = 9, 34.62%; mean age = 67.58 ± 5.59 years; averaging 23.46 ± 3.91 visits and 10.46 ± 0.99 weeks in the program) diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease, with symptoms of intermittent claudication, partook in a 45 min treadmill walk, twice per week, below the participant's minimal pain threshold. Female participants' change scores showed 752%, 278% and 115% improvement in mean walking distance, duration and rate, respectively. Men improved 334%, 149% and 80%, respectively. Significant differences (p  0.80). Our results suggest that women reap similar benefits from this low-intensity treadmill program in comparison to men. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Chasing Responsible Sourcing: The case of UK retailers and sustainable seafood

    OpenAIRE

    Chironna, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Responsible Sourcing is gaining growing importance for companies willing to demonstrate responsibility and commitment to sustainable practices. Sourcing is a key element of supply chain management and by adopting responsible sourcing practices, companies can greatly contribute to the sustainability of their entire supply chains. Being close to both customers and suppliers, retailers hold a particularly influential position in the supply chain and their sourcing choices can play a key role for...

  11. Reseña: Critical Studies on Corporate Responsibility, Governance and Sustainability, Vol. 4 y 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Zicari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Irresponsibility: A Challenging Concept. Series: Critical Studies on Corporate Responsibility, Governance and Sustainability, Vol. 4. Ralph Tench, William Sun and Brian Jones, 2012, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 315 pages. Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility Perspectives and Practice. Series: Critical Studies on Corporate Responsibility, Governance and Sustainability, Vol. 6. Ralph Tench, William Sun and Brian Jones, 2014, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 456 pages

  12. Knowledge, responsibility and ethics of sustainability in view of the global change

    OpenAIRE

    Ayestarán, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the interrelationship among scientificknowledge, ethical debates and the question of responsibility through sustainability thinking. In a globalising world which appears to be establishing itself, sustainability should form the basis for achieving a new ethics, shared on both a local and global scale. The sustainability culture should become an integral part in this process, in which the rights of future generations, of non-human species and global shared resources are t...

  13. Sustainable occupational responses to climate change through lifestyle choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Clare; Kroksmark, Ulla

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Occupational therapists and occupational scientists are increasingly aware of the relationship between occupation and global climate change, with some working to raise awareness of the issues and others proposing that an occupational perspective can make a valuable contribution to understanding and addressing the issues. In this discussion paper the United Nations Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles ( 1 ), which reports young adults' beliefs about everyday occupations that have a substantial impact on the environment (food, housekeeping, and transportation) is introduced. The authors argue that the survey findings are a valuable resource for occupational therapists who are concerned about global climate change and work with young adults (age 18-35), providing valuable insights into their concerns and preferences in relation to sustainability. To illustrate the insights contained in the reports, findings from four countries are presented: New Zealand and Sweden, the authors' countries of origin, and the Philippines and Lebanon which have people living in New Zealand and Sweden. Application to individual and community-based interventions to promote more sustainable lifestyles is suggested, along with studies to examine the perspectives of young adults with a disability, as their concerns and sustainability preferences might differ due to the barriers that limit their participation in educational and vocational occupations.

  14. Responsible and Sustainable Tourism : Strengthening Small-Scale ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Women in the developing world continue to face obstacles that limit their ability to establish careers and become leaders in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics ... Itzama Project : Sustainable Indigenous Development based on the Ethnobotanical Garden and Traditional Medicine Concept.

  15. Reference values of mechanical and thermal pain tests in a pain-free population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neziri, Alban Y; Scaramozzino, Pasquale; Andersen, Ole K; Dickenson, Anthony H; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Curatolo, Michele

    2011-04-01

    Quantitative sensory tests are widely used in human research to evaluate the effect of analgesics and explore altered pain mechanisms, such as central sensitization. In order to apply these tests in clinical practice, knowledge of reference values is essential. The aim of this study was to determine the reference values of pain thresholds for mechanical and thermal stimuli, as well as withdrawal time for the cold pressor test in 300 pain-free subjects. Pain detection and pain tolerance thresholds to pressure, heat and cold were determined at three body sites: (1) lower back, (2) suprascapular region and (3) second toe (for pressure) or the lateral aspect of the leg (for heat and cold). The influences of gender, age, height, weight, body-mass index (BMI), body side of testing, depression, anxiety, catastrophizing and parameters of Short-Form 36 (SF-36) were analyzed by multiple regressions. Quantile regressions were performed to define the 5th, 10th and 25th percentiles as reference values for pain hypersensitivity and the 75th, 90th and 95th percentiles as reference values for pain hyposensitivity. Gender, age and/or the interaction of age with gender were the only variables that consistently affected the pain measures. Women were more pain sensitive than men. However, the influence of gender decreased with increasing age. In conclusion, normative values of parameters related to pressure, heat and cold pain stimuli were determined. Reference values have to be stratified by body region, gender and age. The determination of these reference values will now allow the clinical application of the tests for detecting abnormal pain reactions in individual patients. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nocturnal heart rate variability is lower in temporomandibular disorder patients than in healthy, pain-free individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze-Nliam, Chete M; Quartana, Phillip J; Quain, Angela M; Smith, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether patients with a painful myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD) have diminished nocturnal heart rate variability (HRV), a marker of autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction, relative to healthy, pain-free controls. Participants with myofascial TMD and healthy, pain-free volunteers underwent nocturnal polysomnography studies during which HRV indices were measured. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine whether TMD status exerted unique effects on HRV. Ninety-five participants (n = 37 TMD; n = 58 controls) were included in the analyses. The TMD group had a lower standard deviation of R-R intervals (89.81 ± 23.54 ms versus 107.93 ± 34.42 ms, P ⋜ .01), a lower root mean squared successive difference (RMSSD) of R-R intervals (54.78 ± 27.37 ms versus 81.88 ± 46.43 ms, P pain-free controls. Further research should focus on processes that address this ANS imbalance, which may potentially lead to effective therapeutic interventions.

  17. Reactivity in pain-free subjects and a clinical pain population: evaluation of the Kohn Reactivity Scale-dutch Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuijzen, Dieuwke S; Noordermeer, Siri D S; van Wijck, Albert J M; Snijders, Tom J; Geenen, Rinie

    2013-07-01

    Patients with pain are more reactive to various types of sensations, not limited to pain alone. A potential useful instrument to assess reactivity is the Kohn Reactivity Scale (KRS). This study examines the psychometric characteristics of the KRS-Dutch version and its ability to differentiate between subjects with and without pain. Internal consistency, convergent validity, and test-retest reliability of the Dutch translation of the KRS were assessed in 321 pain-free control subjects and different subgroups of this sample. Subsequently, reactivity scores were compared between the pain-free subjects and 291 pain patients who were referred to a pain clinic for treatment. Reliability analyses indicated good internal consistency (α ≥ 0.77) and high test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation = 0.95) of the KRS in the control subjects. Validity analyses yielded positive correlations of the KRS with related constructs like pain vigilance and awareness (r = 0.37), symptom severity (r = 0.29), and the personality characteristic neuroticism (r = 0.20). Pain patients had overall significantly higher KRS scores than the pain-free subjects indicating increased reactivity, particularly for the patients with medically unexplained pain. These findings indicate that the KRS is a useful instrument to screen for reactivity in pain patients, which may be of particular relevance for those suffering from medically unexplained pain. © 2012 The Authors Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  18. Structure of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in pain and pain-free patients scheduled for major surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagé, Gabrielle M; Kleiman, Valery; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Katz, Joel

    2009-09-01

    Factor-analytic studies of the structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms have yielded inconsistent results. One of the reasons for the inconsistency may be that PTSD is highly comorbid with other disorders; the observed factor structure might depend on the particular comorbid disorder. One such disorder is chronic pain. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether PTSD symptom structure differs between pain and pain-free patients scheduled to undergo major surgery. Four hundred and forty-seven patients who were approached 7 to 10 days prior to scheduled surgery completed the PTSD Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C) Version and the Current Pain and Pain History Questionnaire; the latter was used to divide patients into pain (N = 175) and pain-free (N = 272) groups. Results showed that in pain-free patients, PTSD symptoms were best expressed as 2 symptom clusters (re-experiencing/avoidance; emotional numbing/hyperarousal) accounting for 52.4% of the variance. In pain patients, PTSD symptoms were best expressed as a single symptom cluster accounting for 51.1% of the variance. These results suggest different interrelationships among PTSD symptoms in these 2 populations. Results reflect the need for (1) controlling for pain in studies looking at PTSD-symptom expression and (2) further research on PTSD-symptom expression in pain populations. These results may have important implications for research on the comorbidity between PTSD and chronic pain, as well as for treatment of PTSD symptoms in patients presenting with pain problems.

  19. Sustainability as the basic principle of responsible budgetary policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Viktorovich Galukhin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The author touches upon rather critical issues of management of the regional budget system sustainability. The prospect to studying this issue is confirmed at the highest level – by the RF President. The article indicates that the main components of the budgets financial sustainability concept are the following: the territory’s self-sufficiency (independence, its solvency, income and expenditure balance. The swot analysis of the public finances state in the Northwestern Federal District regions has revealed lowering independence of the territories, debt burden deterioration in the post-crisis period and the unsolved problem of income and expenses imbalance. The study shows the territories’ capacity constraints to find additional financial resources, although the anti-crisis instruments of the budget process (regional reserve funds are not used in full measure. The analysis has resulted in the development of directions to stimulate the regional budget system sustainability, such as the modernization model of fiscal federalism, strengthening and development of tax potential, improving the budget expenditures efficiency and encouraging the use of regional reserve funds potential. According to the author, the timeliness of these measures is to be achieved through continuous financial situation monitoring in the RF subjects

  20. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE, SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY A SURVEY OF WATER USE IN INDUSTRY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DOINA PRODAN PALADE; LEON DUMITRU DANIEL

    2015-01-01

    ...’ corporate governance and social responsibility. The work aims to highlight some of the main issues regarding the sustainable use of water, as a finite and vulnerable resource, essential element for life and environment...

  1. When not every response to climate change is a good one: identifying principles for sustainable adaptation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Eriksen, S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available ; third, integrate local knowledge into adaptation responses; and fourth, consider potential feedbacks between local and global processes. We argue that fundamental societal transformations are required in order to achieve sustainable development pathways...

  2. Influential Factors and Strategy of Sustainable Product Development under Corporate Social Responsibility in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Che Tu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to adopt the perspective of corporate social responsibility (CSR to explore the intention of sustainable product development in Taiwan, as well as leading to the creation of influential factors that affect corporate sustainable product development intention. In this research, the induction analysis was conducted to understand the implementation of sustainable product development, and this was supplemented with questionnaire surveys and in-depth interviews to evaluate developmental intention. In addition, principal component analysis was used for factor analysis and content analysis in the 6 W expression method, leading to the creation of the influential factors. The research results have demonstrated that the factors affecting the intention of corporate sustainable product development include having a sustainable design and a development purpose, a corporate development purpose, sustainable development concepts, a sustainable design value, a sustainability concept, and a manufacturing process quality. For sustainable product development, corporate social responsibility needs to be most concerned with the added value of products, regulation requirements, and accommodation of the industrial chain, costs, and quality.

  3. Corporate social responsibility as a factor of sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    N. Suprun

    2009-01-01

    The author investigates the bases of corporate social responsibility as a factor of balanced socio-economic development and increase in competitiveness of the business and social sectors. The article provides analysis of the tendencies of the formation of corporate social responsibility in the world business practice and defines priorities of the development of corporate social responsibility in Ukraine.

  4. Sustainable Marketing - a new Era in the Responsible Marketing Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marek Seretny; Aleksandra Seretny

    2012-01-01

    ... processes - the responsibility which rests upon them in the face of rapid social change worldwide through increasing global economic turbulence, a continuously widening gap between rich and poor...

  5. Blood glucose self-monitoring from abdominal skin: a precise and virtually pain-free method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, A; Thiessen, E; Kaufmann, N; Plaschke, A; Egberts, E H

    2002-06-01

    For many diabetic patients, years of blood glucose self-monitoring (SM) with readings taken several times daily is an inevitable aspect of insulin therapy. We investigated whether SM from abdominal skin might be an alternative to the established fingertip method. A total of 63 diabetic patients and 16 nondiabetic volunteers determined their blood glucose in parallel in capillary blood from the tip of the finger and from abdominal skin 5 times daily on 5 successive days. The blood samples were collected from the two test regions using lancing devices, and the SM determinations were all done with a meter. Consecutive specific enzymatic glucose determinations in blood from the fingertip served as the reference method. The results of the SM from abdominal skin, a method perceived as virtually painless, were in close correlation with the control laboratory determinations and with SM from the finger (Pearson's r, 0.94 and 0.95). The comparison of SM method for abdomen vs. finger laboratory control gave a linear regression equation of y=8.35+0.94x (r=0.94). Error grid analysis revealed: range A, 93.6%; range B, 5.4%; range C, 0.05%; range D, 1.0%; and range E, 0%. Bland and Altman analysis yielded the mean of the differences, 0.2 mg/dl; 2 SD, 32 mg/dl; minimum, -162 mg/dl; maximum, 148 mg/dl. Laboratory glucose determinations in capillary blood from the fingertip and from abdominal skin led in 99.7% of the cases to concordant therapeutic decisions in the diabetics; the sample material was therefore equivalent. The practical aspects (afterbleeding, number of punctures, test strip consumption) of SM from the two regions showed no essential differences. However, only 22% of the diabetic patients investigated continued to perform SM from abdominal skin on a longer basis. In a further 5 adipose diabetic patients (BMI, 32 kg/M2), SM from abdominal skin was not practicable, as there was insufficient blood to collect. SM from abdomal skin is a simple, virtually pain-free and

  6. Sustainable Development and Corporate Social Responsibility in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Industries in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyewole Simon Oginni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Present technological innovations and social organizations continue to impose risks and limitations on the efficient performance of the biosphere. Human activities have increasingly short-lived sustainable natural endowments, to the extent that, the multiplier effects have ripples beyond the traditional benefits of economic production and consumption. Therefore, this study addressed practical concerns on how industries in Sub-Saharan Africa promote sustainable development in their corporate social responsibility models, using industries in Cameroon as a case study; it examined economic, social, and environmental components of sustainable development and corporate social responsibility (CSR. Our sample consists of 335 business enterprises from the last Censure Survey of Enterprises in Cameroon. The study adopted a systematic analysis through the Adjusted Residual Test, and the Phi and Cramer’s V tests. Findings revealed that industries in Cameroon prioritize environmental and social dimensions over economic dimensions. However, a few large enterprises implement a broad CSR that promotes sustainable business practices, whereas smaller ones do not; industries in Cameroon implement environmental dimensions of CSR as a safe buffer and a social dimension as philanthropy. Hence, there is no concrete evidence that industries promote sustainable development via CSR in Cameroon. The implementation of a sustainable business model is a precondition for promoting sustainable development via CSR. Industries should realize the concrete value in implementing a sustainable business model that helps to adjust to the complex and increasingly changing business environment.

  7. Challenges, responses and partnership for achieving sustainable tourism and heritage preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksin Marija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of globalization has created the situation where the expectations of tourists are the same both with respect to the quality of services in all destinations and with respect to the authencity based on local attractions and experiences, which should be unique and different for each destination. The key element in maintaining destination attractiveness is the protection and presentation of natural and cultural heritage and its sustainable utilization for tourism development. The sustainability concept is of equal importance for long-term tourism development, destination competitiveness and heritage protection. The paper deals with the main challenges to achieving sustainable tourism and points to some key responses to them. Participation, cooperation and partnership should be a vital prerequisite for the implementation and performance of sustainable tourism and heritage protection. This attitude has been tested on several examples of good practice in heritage protection and the sustainable development of tourism destinations in Serbia. .

  8. Environmentally Responsible Trade and Its Importance for Sustainable Forestry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Maxymets

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the environmental component of trade, primarily foreign trade, which concerns the interests of many countries. It examines the reciprocal influence of foreign trade and the environment. The author defines environmentally responsible trade and formulates its main principles. She examines the development of trade in forest products globally and in Ukraine and evaluates the impact of different trade restrictions on the condition of forests and the forestry industry. Indicators of the efficiency of foreign trade from the economic and environmental perspectives are proposed. Underlining the need for enterprises to switch over to environmentally responsible trade, the author proposes instruments to achieve this end.

  9. Effect of Sustained Maternal Responsivity on Later Vocabulary Development in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Nancy; Warren, Steven F.; Fleming, Kandace; Keller, Juliana; Sterling, Audra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This research explored whether sustained maternal responsivity (a parent-child interaction style characterized by warmth, nurturance, and stability as well as specific behaviors, such as contingent positive responses to child initiations) was a significant variable predicting vocabulary development of children with fragile X syndrome…

  10. FREEDOM CHOICE OF THE ROMANIAN ENTERPRISES TO CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY & SUSTAINABILITY COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucretia Mariana Constantinescu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The declared aim of this paper is to be an attempt to analyze the opinions regarding the corporate sustainability and responsibility that’s providing to formulate a combination of diagnosis and prognosis, assessing the past and present conditions of corporate responsibility and the way ahead by the investors of the Romanian economy during the last economic recession crisis years.

  11. Neural correlates of fear of movement in patients with chronic low back pain versus pain-free individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lukas Meier

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fear of movement (FOM can be acquired by a direct aversive experience such as pain or by social learning through observation and instruction. Excessive FOM results in heightened disability and is an obstacle for recovery from acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain (cLBP. FOM has further been identified as a significant explanatory factor in the Fear Avoidance (FA model of cLBP that describes how individuals experiencing acute back pain may become trapped into a vicious circle of chronic disability and suffering. Despite a wealth of evidence emphasizing the importance of FOM in cLBP, to date, no related neural correlates in patients were found and this therefore has initiated a debate about the precise contribution of fear in the FA model. In the current fMRI study, we applied a novel approach encompassing 1 video clips of potentially harmful activities for the back as FOM inducing stimuli and 2 the assessment of FOM in both, cLBP patients (N = 20 and age- and gender-matched pain-free subjects (N = 20. Derived from the FA model, we hypothesized that FOM differentially affects brain regions involved in fear processing in patients with cLBP compared to pain-free individuals due to the recurrent pain and subsequent avoidance behaviour. The results of the whole brain voxel-wise regression analysis revealed that 1 FOM positively correlated with brain activity in fear-related brain regions such as the amygdala and the insula and 2 Differential effects of FOM between patients with cLBP and pain-free subjects were found in the extended amygdala and in its connectivity to the anterior insula. Current findings support the FOM component of the FA model in cLBP.

  12. Neural Correlates of Fear of Movement in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain vs. Pain-Free Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Michael L; Stämpfli, Philipp; Vrana, Andrea; Humphreys, Barry K; Seifritz, Erich; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Fear of movement (FOM) can be acquired by a direct aversive experience such as pain or by social learning through observation and instruction. Excessive FOM results in heightened disability and is an obstacle for recovery from acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain (cLBP). FOM has further been identified as a significant explanatory factor in the Fear Avoidance (FA) model of cLBP that describes how individuals experiencing acute back pain may become trapped into a vicious circle of chronic disability and suffering. Despite a wealth of evidence emphasizing the importance of FOM in cLBP, to date, no related neural correlates in patients were found and this therefore has initiated a debate about the precise contribution of fear in the FA model. In the current fMRI study, we applied a novel approach encompassing: (1) video clips of potentially harmful activities for the back as FOM inducing stimuli; and (2) the assessment of FOM in both, cLBP patients (N = 20) and age- and gender-matched pain-free subjects (N = 20). Derived from the FA model, we hypothesized that FOM differentially affects brain regions involved in fear processing in patients with cLBP compared to pain-free individuals due to the recurrent pain and subsequent avoidance behavior. The results of the whole brain voxel-wise regression analysis revealed that: (1) FOM positively correlated with brain activity in fear-related brain regions such as the amygdala and the insula; and (2) differential effects of FOM between patients with cLBP and pain-free subjects were found in the extended amygdala and in its connectivity to the anterior insula. Current findings support the FOM component of the FA model in cLBP.

  13. Effects of interferential therapy parameter combinations upon experimentally induced pain in pain-free participants: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounavi, Myrto D; Chesterton, Linda S; Sim, Julius

    2012-07-01

    Little evidence exists regarding parameter selection for hypoalgesia using interferential therapy (IFT). This study investigated segmental and extrasegmental hypoalgesic effects of different IFT parameter combinations upon experimentally induced pressure pain threshold (PPT) in pain-free volunteers. The participants were randomly assigned to 6 groups: control, placebo, bipolar constant amplitude modulation frequency (AMF), bipolar sweep AMF, quadripolar constant AMF, and quadripolar sweep AMF. The study was conducted in a university laboratory. One hundred eighty adults who were healthy and pain-free participated in the study. Interferential therapy was delivered to all groups at high, to-tolerance intensity and at high AMF. Stimulation to the dominant forearm was delivered for 30 minutes, with monitoring for a further 30 minutes. Pain pressure threshold was measured at the area of first dorsal interosseous muscle of the dominant and nondominant hands (segmental measurements) and over the tibialis anterior muscle (extrasegmental measurement) at baseline and at 10-minute intervals using a pressure algometer. Square root transformed PPT data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. There was a significant change in PPT over time, but no significant between-subjects difference in segmental or extrasegmental PPT between any of the IFT groups and the placebo or control group. Thus, IFT delivered in any of these parameter combinations did not significantly affect the PPT of pain-free participants compared with the control or placebo group. Success of blinding was not evaluated. This study showed that IFT delivered at high, to-tolerance intensity and high AMF does not produce significant segmental and extrasegmental hypoalgesic effects on PPT in participants who were healthy compared with a control or placebo group. Further research is warranted to investigate the hypoalgesic effect of different IFT parameter combinations and to explain its possible

  14. Eco-innovation, Responsible Leadership and Organizational Change for Corporate Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorel Mihai Paraschiv

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Creating a sustainable development strategy is essential for organizations that seek to reduce risks associated with tightening legislation, increased energy prices and natural resources and growing customer demands. Sustainability requires the full integration of social and environmental aspects into the vision, culture and operations of an organization, a profound process of organizational change being essential. The purpose of this paper is to present the main drivers of corporate sustainability, illustrating – after a thorough literature review – the link between the following elements: corporate sustainability – a necessity in the current global context; eco-innovation – as a way to implement sustainability in an organization; responsible leadership – as the art of building and maintaining strong and moral relationships with all stakeholders; organizational culture and organizational change – the basic elements through which organizations continuously renew their processes and products, adapting them to the new context. Furthermore, the paper provides an overview of organizations active in Romania in terms of sustainability practices, in general, and the ecological component of sustainable development, in particular, by presenting the results of an exploratory questionnaire-based research. The research reflects the importance of visionary management in adopting and implementing sustainability in the responding organizations.

  15. Critical Sustainability: Setting the Limits to Growth and Responsibility in Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarkko Saarinen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea of sustainable development has been discussed in tourism research for almost a quarter of a century. During that time, sustainability has become an important policy framework for tourism and regional developers guiding their planning and development thinking. Sustainability has also emerged academically as an important field of research with an emphasis on defining the limits to growth and responsibilities in tourism. However, while there are urgent needs to incorporate sustainability into tourism, there is also a growing amount of frustration among scholars on the conceptual nature of sustainability and how tourism as a private-driven economic activity relates to the ideals of sustainable development. This has created an increasing need to understand and potentially reframe the concept. The purpose of this paper is to overview the conceptual dimensions of sustainable tourism and discuss some of the main sources of frustration. Based on this, it is concluded that while a conceptual plurality seems to be unavoidable, there is a need to re-frame i.e., rescale and decentralize tourism in policy frameworks and practices aiming towards sustainability.

  16. How and When Retailers’ Sustainability Efforts Translate into Positive Consumer Responses: The Interplay Between Personal and Social Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofenk, D.; Birgelen, M.J.H. van; Bloemer, J.M.M.; Semeijn, J.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to address how (through which mechanisms) and when (under which conditions) retailers’ sustainability efforts translate into positive consumer responses. Hypotheses are developed and tested through a scenario-based experiment among 672 consumers. Retailers’ assortment sustainability

  17. SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY - A VIABLE INSTRUMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY IN SOUTH WEST OLTENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPA OANA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper emphasizes the need for the tourism sector to adopt a policy of social responsibility for building sustainable development, necessary for the socio-economic recovery of Romania. The study includes a sample of 68 hotels in the five counties of South West Oltenia Region. Data for the research was collected by accessing the official websites for each hotel in order to analyze the degree of implementation of social responsibility on the basis of ten variables, required to achieve a sustainable tourism. The findings reveal a lack of transparency and involvement in social responsibility of the hotel industry in South West Oltenia. Research has shown that accomodation and tourism sector in the region analyzed is far from reaching the international standards, so the adoption of recommendations on best practices would be an important step forward for enhancing sustainable tourism in Romania.

  18. Sustainable Entrepreneurship Orientation: A Reflection on Status-Quo Research on Factors Facilitating Responsible Managerial Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Kraus

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With the global financial system having undergone vast changes since the financial crisis of 2007, scientific research concerning the investor’s point of view on sustainable investments has drastically increased. However, there remains a lack of research focused on the entrepreneur’s angle regarding sustainable oriented investments. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of sustainable financial markets by bringing together entrepreneurial and financial research. This paper provides a structured literature review, based on which the authors identify three relevant levels that they believe have an effect on the successful implementation of managerial sustainable practices; these are the individual, the firm, and the contextual levels. The results show that on the individual level sustainable entrepreneurs tend to derive their will to act more sustainably from their personal values or traits. On the organizational level, though, it can be concluded that an small and medium sized enterprise’s internal culture and the reconfiguration of resources are critical determinants for adopting a sustainable entrepreneurial orientation. Finally, on the contextual level, researchers have focused on a better understanding of how entrepreneurs can help society and the environment through sustainable entrepreneurship, and how they can act as role models or change agents in light of the fact that the choice of investing or financing based on sustainability is still in its infancy. By providing an overview on facilitating factors for responsible managerial practices on the entrepreneur’s side, this research contributes to a better understanding for both theory and practice on how sustainable practices can be implemented and facilitated.

  19. Sustainable Ergonomic Program - Basic Condition for Implementation of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marková, Petra; Beňo, Rastislav; Hatiar, Karol

    2012-12-01

    Gradually increasing pressure on companies to start to behave socially responsible is a response to social, environmental and economic requirements. The society faces a period of changes that have occurred since the beginning of the crisis and revealing weaknesses in the economy. We become witnesses of rapid changes and challenges posed by globalization, lack of resources, demographic structure and innovation. Objective necessity becomes a corporate social responsibility (CSR) already at the companies’ level, which is supported by the approach of the EU institutions and the Slovak Republic. One of the possible appliance through which we can contribute to the sustainability of CSR are sustainable ergonomic programs. When we want to talk about sustainable ergonomic program is important to focus on three key areas. The first area is the Impact of technic and technology to employees at work, the second area is the Importance and impact of socially responsible HR in ergonomics and last area is the Creation of the work environment in relation to environmental sustainability. Ergonomic programs sustainability requires to apply appropriate methods for evaluation of their cost benefit and health effect.

  20. Effect of sustained maternal responsivity on later vocabulary development in children with fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Nancy; Warren, Steven F; Fleming, Kandace; Keller, Juliana; Sterling, Audra

    2014-02-01

    This research explored whether sustained maternal responsivity (a parent–child interaction style characterized by warmth, nurturance, and stability as well as specific behaviors, such as contingent positive responses to child initiations) was a significant variable predicting vocabulary development of children with fragile X syndrome through age 9 years. Fifty-five mother–child dyads were followed longitudinally when children were between 2 and 10 years of age. Measures of maternal responsivity and child vocabulary were obtained at regular intervals starting at age 2.9 years. Sustained responsivity was indicated by the average responsivity measured over Observations 2–5. Responsivity at the 1st time period, autism symptoms, and cognitive development were used as control variables. After controlling for development and autism symptoms, the authors found significant effects for sustained responsivity on receptive vocabulary, expressive vocabulary, and the rate of different words children produced through age 9. Maternal responsivity, which is typically a variable of interest during early childhood, continues to be a significant variable, predicting vocabulary development through the middle childhood period. Thus, responsivity is a potential target for language interventions through this age period.

  1. The effect of sustained maternal responsivity on later vocabulary development in children with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Nancy; Warren, Steven F.; Fleming, Kandace; Keller, Juliana; Sterling, Audra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The research question addressed was whether sustained maternal responsivity (a parent-child interaction style characterized by warmth, nurturance and stability as well as specific behaviors such as contingent positive responses to child initiations) was a significant variable predicting vocabulary development of children with FXS through age 9 years. Method Fifty-five mother-child dyads were followed longitudinally when children were between 2 and 10 years of age. Measures of maternal responsivity and child vocabulary were obtained at regular intervals starting at age 2.9 years. Sustained responsivity was indicated by the average responsivity measured over observations 2–5. Responsivity at the first time period, autism symptoms, and cognitive development were used as control variables. Results After controlling for development and autism symptoms, we found significant effects for sustained responsivity on receptive vocabulary, expressive vocabulary, and the rate of different words children produced through age 9. Conclusions Maternal responsivity, which is typically a variable of interest during early childhood, continues to be a significant variable, predicting vocabulary development through the middle childhood period. Thus, responsivity is a potential target for language interventions through this age period. PMID:24023370

  2. Movement of the human foot in 100 pain free individuals aged 18-45: implications for understanding normal foot function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nester, Christopher J; Jarvis, Hannah L; Jones, Richard K; Bowden, Peter D; Liu, Anmin

    2014-01-01

    Understanding motion in the normal healthy foot is a prerequisite for understanding the effects of pathology and thereafter setting targets for interventions. Quality foot kinematic data from healthy feet will also assist the development of high quality and research based clinical models of foot biomechanics. To address gaps in the current literature we aimed to describe 3D foot kinematics using a 5 segment foot model in a population of 100 pain free individuals. Kinematics of the leg, calcaneus, midfoot, medial and lateral forefoot and hallux were measured in 100 self reported healthy and pain free individuals during walking. Descriptive statistics were used to characterise foot movements. Contributions from different foot segments to the total motion in each plane were also derived to explore functional roles of different parts of the foot. Foot segments demonstrated greatest motion in the sagittal plane, but large ranges of movement in all planes. All foot segments demonstrated movement throughout gait, though least motion was observed between the midfoot and calcaneus. There was inconsistent evidence of movement coupling between joints. There were clear differences in motion data compared to foot segment models reported in the literature. The data reveal the foot is a multiarticular structure, movements are complex, show incomplete evidence of coupling, and vary person to person. The data provide a useful reference data set against which future experimental data can be compared and may provide the basis for conceptual models of foot function based on data rather than anecdotal observations.

  3. Sensory hyperalgesia is characteristic of nonspecific arm pain: a comparison with cervical radiculopathy and pain-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Niamh; Hall, Toby; Doody, Catherine

    2013-11-01

    Nonspecific arm pain (NSAP) is a common clinical entity, the pathophysiological mechanisms of which are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate sensory profiles in individuals with nonspecific arm pain compared with cervical radiculopathy and pain-free controls. Forty office workers with NSAP, 17 people with cervical radiculopathy, and 40 pain-free controls were assessed by means of quantitative sensory testing (thermal and vibration detection thresholds; thermal and pressure pain thresholds), tests for neural tissue sensitivity, and questionnaires. Between-group comparisons were conducted using Kruskal-Wallis tests. An exploratory factor analysis was used to determine characteristic features in NSAP. Both patient groups demonstrated cold and pressure pain sensitivity (P<0.003; P<0.05) and neural tissue sensitivity (P<0.001). The NSAP group also demonstrated heat pain sensitivity (P<0.001). Both patient groups demonstrated hypoaesthesia to vibration thresholds (P<0.05), whereas thermal hypoaesthesia was only evident in the cervical radiculopathy group (P<0.05). Exploratory factor analysis revealed pressure and thermal pain sensitivity as the key characteristics of this NSAP group. Sensory profiles in NSAP and cervical radiculopathy differ. NSAP is characterized by widespread sensitivity to thermal and pressure pain in the absence of thermal hypoaesthesia, whereas cervical radiculopathy is characterized by the presence of thermal and vibratory hypoaesthesia as well as more localized cold and pressure pain sensitivity. The identification of widespread sensory hypersensitivity in NSAP has important implications for clinical decision making.

  4. Cortical plasticity between the pain and pain-free phases in patients with episodic tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; He, Yuan; Xia, Lei; Guo, Li-Li; Zheng, Jin-Long

    2016-12-01

    State-related brain structural alterations in patients with episodic tension-type headache (ETTH) are unclear. We aimed to conduct a longitudinal study to explore dynamic gray matter (GM) changes between the pain and pain-free phases in ETTH. We recruited 40 treatment-naïve ETTH patients and 40 healthy controls. All participants underwent brain structural scans on a 3.0-T MRI system. ETTH patients were scanned in and out of pain phases. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was used to determine the differences in regional gray matter density (GMD) between groups. Additional regression analysis was used to identify any associations between regional GMD and clinical symptoms. ETTH patients exhibited reduced GMD in the bilateral primary somatosensory cortex, and increased GMD in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and anterior insula for the in pain phase compared with the out of pain phase. The out of pain phase of ETTH patients exhibited no regions with higher or lower GMD compared with healthy controls. GMD in the left ACC and left anterior insula was negatively correlated with headache days. GMD in the left ACC was negatively correlated with anxiety and depressive symptoms in ETTH patients. This is the first study to demonstrate dynamic and reversible GMD changes between the pain and pain-free phases in ETTH patients. However, this balance might be disrupted by increased headache days and progressive anxiety and depressive symptoms.

  5. Sustainable Development Commission response to the review of Food Standard Agency’s advice on fish consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission

    2009-01-01

    The Sustainable Development Commission's response to the Food Standards Agency's review of its advice on fish consumption uses sustainable development as a lens through which to examine how the Agency can align its advice on fish consumption for health with evidence on sustainable sourcing. Publisher PDF

  6. Social Responsibility as a Means for the Sustainable Development in the Lower Danube River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzvetelin Gueorguiev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development of the world and the EU in particular is a priority outlined in a number of strategic documents. Social responsibility is an important topic covered by standards such as SA 8000:2001 and ISO 26000:2010. This paper presents a case study of the practical implementation of corporate social responsibility activities in a Bulgarian company. Several key initiatives have been undertaken to prove the company‘s commitment to all interested parties including local communities as well. Social responsibility is where the interests and benefits for all stakeholders meet, namely employers, employees, contractors, academics, authorities and society as a whole. This paper presents a critical and original point of view on the advantages of using standards for social responsibility as a means for sustainable development.

  7. When Legitimacy Shapes Environmentally Responsible Behaviors: Considering Exposure to University Sustainability Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Lesley; Hegtvedt, Karen A.; Johnson, Cathryn; Parris, Christie L.; Subramanyam, Shruthi

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how perceptions of the legitimacy of university sustainability efforts--support by the administration (authorization) or from students' peers (endorsement)--as well as the physical context in which students live, matter in shaping students' environmentally responsible behaviors (ERBs). Using survey data collected from…

  8. Corporate social responsibility in China: an analysis of domestic and foreign retailers' sustainability dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; Hong, P.; van Dolen, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade, a sizeable body of literature has built up on the concept and characteristics of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Western countries, where it has also been referred to as sustainability. More recently, attention has grown for CSR in emerging countries. Remarkably, China

  9. European pension funds and sustainable development : On trade-offs between finance and responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sievanen, Riikka; Rita, Hannu; Scholtens, Lambertus

    2017-01-01

    Pension funds try to account for sustainable development in their operations. This mainly translates in responsible investing. We investigate how this interacts with the financial objectives. We use a survey among more than 250 pension funds based in 15 European countries. Multinomial logistic

  10. Counteracting Educational Injustice with Applied Critical Leadership: Culturally Responsive Practices Promoting Sustainable Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Lorri J.; Santamaría, Andrés P.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution considers educational leadership practice to promote and sustain diversity. Comparative case studies are presented featuring educational leaders in the United States and New Zealand who counter injustice in their practice. The leaders' leadership practices responsive to the diversity presented in their schools offer…

  11. Long term clinical outcome of chronic hepatitis C patients with sustained virological response to interferon monotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Veldt (Bart); S.W. Schalm (Solko); G. Saracco; N. Boyer; C. Camma; A. Bellobuono (Antonio); U. Hopf; I. Castillo; O. Weiland (Ola); F. Nevens (Frederik); B.E. Hansen (Bettina)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The key end point for treatment efficacy in chronic hepatitis C is absence of detectable virus at six months after treatment. However, the incidence of clinical events during long term follow up of patients with sustained virological response is still poorly

  12. Governance through learning: making corporate social responsibility in dutch industry effective from a sustainable development perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, J.M.; Loeber, A.

    2004-01-01

    An increasing number of firms try to implement corporate social responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of sustainable development. This article considers these efforts in the light of the changing relation between the state, society and the corporate sector, as a result of which governance

  13. Incorporating Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability into a Business Course: A Shared Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persons, Obeua

    2012-01-01

    The author discusses how corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability were incorporated into a business course by using 4 assignments, a project with a CSR question, 7 ethics cases, and 17 ethics scenarios tied to a corporate code of ethics. The author also discusses student evaluation of CSR learning experience, strengths and…

  14. Responsible software: A research agenda to help enterprises become more sustainable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espana Cubillo, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412500949; Brinkkemper, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07500707X

    [BACKGROUND] Responsible enterprises are key to reaching a sustainable economy that cares about the people and the planet. Their spectrum is wide and it encompasses, among others, non-profit non-governmental organisations, social economy enterprises and companies with a committed corporate social

  15. European Pension Funds and Sustainable Development : Trade-Offs between Finance and Responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sievanen, Riikka; Rita, Hannu; Scholtens, Lambertus

    2017-01-01

    Pension funds try to account for sustainable development in their operations. This mainly translates in responsible investing. We investigate how this interacts with the financial objectives. We use a survey among more than 250 pension funds based in 15 European countries. Multinomial logistic

  16. A comparison of coping strategies in patients with fibromyalgia, chronic neuropathic pain, and pain-free controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baastrup, Sidsel; Schultz, Rikke; Brødsgaard, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Patients suffering from chronic pain may benefit from learning adaptive coping strategies. Consensus on efficient strategies for this group of patients is, however, lacking, and previous studies have shown inconsistent results. The present study has examined coping strategies in two distinctly...... different groups of chronic pain patients and a group of healthy controls. Thirty neuropathic pain (NP) patients, 28 fibromyalgia (FM) patients, and 26 pain-free healthy controls completed the Coping Strategy Questionnaire (CSQ-48/27) and rated their daily pain. The results showed that FM and NP patients...... did not cope differently with pain. The only difference between the groups was that FM patients felt more in control of their pain than NP patients. Both patient groups used more maladaptive/passive coping strategies, but surprisingly also more adaptive/active coping strategies than healthy controls...

  17. Infection Programs Sustained Lymphoid Stromal Cell Responses and Shapes Lymph Node Remodeling upon Secondary Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L. Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymph nodes (LNs are constructed of intricate networks of endothelial and mesenchymal stromal cells. How these lymphoid stromal cells (LSCs regulate lymphoid tissue remodeling and contribute to immune responses remains poorly understood. We performed a comprehensive functional and transcriptional analysis of LSC responses to skin viral infection and found that LSC subsets responded robustly, with different kinetics for distinct pathogens. Recruitment of cells to inflamed LNs induced LSC expansion, while B cells sustained stromal responses in an antigen-independent manner. Infection induced rapid transcriptional responses in LSCs. This transcriptional program was transient, returning to homeostasis within 1 month of infection, yet expanded fibroblastic reticular cell networks persisted for more than 3 months after infection, and this altered LN composition reduced the magnitude of LSC responses to subsequent heterologous infection. Our results reveal the complexity of LSC responses during infection and suggest that amplified networks of LN stromal cells support successive immune responses.

  18. Increased trunk muscle activity during gait after bilateral experimental pain induction in recurrent low back pain patients during a pain-free period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Sørensen, Brian Østergaard; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    Introduction: Trunk muscle control is consistently altered in persistent low back pain patients during a variety of functions but the effect of experimental pain induction in recurrent low back pain patients during a pain-free period remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate...... activity during swing phases in patients compared with control participants indicated persistent sensorimotor changes in recurrent low back patients during a pain-free period. Acknowledgement: The study was supported by Center for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI, Department of Health Science...

  19. A holistic approach to corporate social responsibility as a prerequisite for sustainable development: Empirical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatanović Dejana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing importance of sustainable development and corporate social responsibility (CSR for contemporary organizations demands appropriate holistic tools. The paper highlights how Soft Systems Methodology (SSM, a relevant holistic, i.e., soft systems approach, supports the conceptualization and management of the complex issues of CSR and sustainable development. The SSM’s key methodological tools are used: rich picture, root definitions, and conceptual models. Empirical research compares a selected sample of enterprises in the automotive industry in the Republic of Serbia, to identify possible systemically desirable and culturally feasible changes to improve their CSR behaviour through promoting their sustainable development. Some limitations of this research and of SSM application are discussed. Combining SSM with some other systems approaches, such as System Dynamics or Critical Systems Heuristics, is recommended for future research.

  20. Linking public sector corporate social responsibility with sustainable development: lessons from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhasis Ray

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Economic think tanks predict India to be the world’s largest economy by 2050. This would require India to accelerate its industrial and infrastructure development. Industrialization based economic development will have a negative impact on the environment and hence sustainable development. Such steps could affect the social and environmental bottom line of the national economy. In recent years, a number of regulatory measures have been proposed by the Indian government to ensure corporate support to the goals of sustainable and inclusive development. The objective of these regulations is to achieve triple bottom line based growth. Notable among them is the mandatory Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR guidelines for public sector undertakings, first issued in April, 2010. I study the possibility and problems created by this effort by analyzing the policy documents and interviewing managers responsible for implementing CSR programmers in Indian public sector. Managers interviewed came from hydropower, coal, power distribution and shipping industries. Based on the study, four areas are identified that requires attention for effective linking between sustainable development and CSR; stakeholder engagement, institutional mechanisms, capacity building and knowledge management. Both government-public sector and public sector-community engagements have to be more streamlined. Institutional mechanisms have to be developed to see that CSR projects are effective and delivering. Importantly, managers at all levels need a better understanding of CSR and sustainable development. Since most projects are in rural areas, understanding of rural issues and sustainability is very important. Finally, such a large scale exercise in CSR should have a knowledge management mechanism to learn from the achievements and mistakes of the early years. I discuss the implication of the findings on India and other emerging economies many of which are struggling to balance

  1. Responsibility and Sustainability in a Food Chain: A Priority Matrix Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Caracciolo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available  This paper shows the results of empirical research conducted to assess the sustainability of a typical food supply chain, suggesting feasible solutions to satisfy inter-dimensional requisites of durable development. The analysis was conducted with reference to the supply chain of the San Marzano tomato (SMZ, a typical local food. The product is endowed with an origin certification label (PDO, meeting demand within high-value market niches. The SMZ is a flagship product in the Italian region of Campania and has benefited from several regionally funded interventions, such as genetic research and support for the application for EU certification of origin. Two key findings emerged from the research. First, the results allowed us to define a Stakeholder Priority and Responsibilities’ Matrix (SPRM, and monitor the sustainability trend of SMZ food supply chains. Second, the consistency between the adoption of quality strategy (brand of origin and sustainable development of the sector was evaluated. Despite its intrinsic characteristics and its organized, well-defined structure, the SMZ food supply chain is unable to address sustainable objectives without considerable public intervention and support. In terms of sustainability, to be able to show desirable food chain characteristics, the existence of a fully collaborative relationship between the actors has to be ascertained. Identifying shared goals is essential to assign and implement coordinated actions, pooling responsibility for product quality into social and environmental dimensions.

  2. Sustained major molecular response on interferon alpha-2b in two patients with polycythemia vera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.S.; Pallisgaard, N.; Andersen, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    chromosome negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders. Reductions in the JAK2 V617F allele burden in patients treated with pegylated interferon alpha-2a (Peg-IFN-2a) have been demonstrated, although follow-up was relatively short. We report here the first profound and sustained molecular responses......Quantitative assessment of the JAK2 V617F allele burden during disease evolution and ongoing myelosuppressive treatment is likely to be implemented in the future clinical setting. Interferon alpha has demonstrated efficacy in treatment of both chronic myeloid leukemia and the Philadelphia...... with a JAK2 V617F allele burden below 1.0% in two patients with polycythemia vera treated with interferon alpha-2b (IFN-2b). Discontinuation of IFN-2b in one of the patients was followed by a sustained long-lasting (12 months of follow-up) major molecular response Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10...

  3. Sustained major molecular response on interferon alpha-2b in two patients with polycythemia vera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Bjerrum, O W; Pallisgaard, N

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the JAK2 V617F allele burden during disease evolution and ongoing myelosuppressive treatment is likely to be implemented in the future clinical setting. Interferon alpha has demonstrated efficacy in treatment of both chronic myeloid leukemia and the Philadelphia...... chromosome negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders. Reductions in the JAK2 V617F allele burden in patients treated with pegylated interferon alpha-2a (Peg-IFN-2a) have been demonstrated, although follow-up was relatively short. We report here the first profound and sustained molecular responses...... with a JAK2 V617F allele burden below 1.0% in two patients with polycythemia vera treated with interferon alpha-2b (IFN-2b). Discontinuation of IFN-2b in one of the patients was followed by a sustained long-lasting (12 months of follow-up) major molecular response....

  4. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AS AN INSTRUMENT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF PRODUCTION ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina GAWEŁ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issue of corporate social responsibility as an instrument of operationalising the paradigm of sustainable development on the microeconomic level in the sector of production enterprises. It presents a genesis and importance of CSR and indicates the most relevant essential instruments of CSR implementation on an enterprise level. The paper also analyses endogenous and exogenous benefits from implementing CSR into the business practice.

  5. Text-speak processing and the sustained attention to response task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, James; Russell, Paul N; Dorahy, Martin J; Neumann, Ewald; Helton, William S

    2012-01-01

    We examined performance in a sustained attention to response task (SART) (Experiment 1) and a more traditionally formatted vigilance task (Experiment 2) using novel word stimuli (text-speak) and normally spelt words. This enabled us to address whether the SART is a better measure of sustained attention or of response strategy, and to investigate the cognitive demands of text-speak processing. In Experiment 1, 72 participants completed a subset (text-speak) and a word SART, as well as a self-reported text experience questionnaire. Those who reported more proficiency and experience with text-speak made more errors on the subset SART, but this appeared to be due to their increase in response speed. This did not occur in the word SART. In Experiment 2, 14 participants completed high No-Go, low-Go (more traditional response format) versions of these tasks to further investigate the cognitive demands of text-speak processing. Response latency increased over periods of watch only for the text-speak task, not for the word task. The results of Experiment 1 support the perspective that the SART is highly sensitive to response strategy, and the results of both experiments together indicate target detection tasks may be a novel way of investigating the cognitive demands of text-speak processing.

  6. Social responsibility, sustainability and micro-enterprises: Contributions made by a micro-enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dos Santos Argueta Lourdes Brazil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the experience of a small environmental consultancy company when adopting the concept of Social Responsibility. The goal is to encourage other businesses to accept the challenge of overcoming social and environmental problems to build sustainable societies. We will show how companies, even small ones, can work with transparency, valuing employees and staff, improving its environment continually, bringing together partners and suppliers, protecting consumers, promoting its community, and committing to the common good. The company mentioned in this article achieved these purposes by building ,social bridges' among institutions of various fields and locations in the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro. Gênesis Environmental Education Centre is a consultancy firm whose mission is to educate about sustainability, through environmental education activities, aimed at various segments of society. It was created in 2005 and is located in Tenente Elias Magalhães street, 140, Colubandê, São Gonçalo, in an area of ecological interest due to the existence of threatened species, the Atlantic forest, streams and a spring. Gênesis Centre is always concerned about environmental issues and, since its implementation, it has conducted activities aimed at schools, businesses, and religious institutions. The main activities are training courses, workshops, development and implementation of projects, environmental education, and nature trails. The Centre promotes education for sustainability through the concept of Social Responsibility, applied as a guiding principle for all activities and networks. The company follows guidelines organized by Ethos Institute regarding Social Responsibility.

  7. Sustained responses for pitch and vowels map to similar sites in human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutschalk, Alexander; Uppenkamp, Stefan

    2011-06-01

    Several studies have shown enhancement of auditory evoked sustained responses for periodic over non-periodic sounds and for vowels over non-vowels. Here, we directly compared pitch and vowels using synthesized speech with a "damped" amplitude modulation. These stimuli were parametrically varied to yield four classes of matched stimuli: (1) periodic vowels (2) non-periodic vowels, (3) periodic non-vowels, and (4) non-periodic non-vowels. 12 listeners were studied with combined MEG and EEG. Sustained responses were reliably enhanced for vowels and periodicity. Dipole source analysis revealed that a vowel contrast (vowel-non-vowel) and the periodicity-pitch contrast (periodic-non-periodic) mapped to the same site in antero-lateral Heschl's gyrus. In contrast, the non-periodic, non-vowel condition mapped to a more medial and posterior site. The sustained enhancement for vowels was significantly more prominent when the vowel identity was varied, compared to a condition where only one vowel was repeated, indicating selective adaptation of the response. These results render it unlikely that there are spatially distinct fields for vowel and pitch processing in the auditory cortex. However, the common processing of vowels and pitch raises the possibility that there is an early speech-specific field in Heschl's gyrus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of a carbon dioxide laser for the measurement of thermal nociceptive thresholds following intramuscular administration of analgesic drugs in pain-free female cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnworth, Mark J; Barrett, Lorelle A; Adams, Nigel J; Beausoleil, Ngaio J; Weidgraaf, Karin; Hekman, Margreet; Chambers, J Paul; Thomas, David G; Waran, Natalie K; Stafford, Kevin J

    2015-11-01

    To assess the potential of a thermal carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to explore antinociception in pain-free cats. Experimental, prospective, blinded, randomized study. Sixty healthy adult female cats with a (mean±standard deviation) weight of 3.3±0.6 kg. Cats were systematically allocated to one of six treatments: saline 0.2 mL per cat; morphine 0.5 mg kg(-1); buprenorphine 20 μg kg(-1); medetomidine 2 μg kg(-1); tramadol 2 mg kg(-1), and ketoprofen 2 mg kg(-1). Latency to respond to thermal stimulation was assessed at baseline and at intervals of 15-30, 30-45, 45-60, 60-75, 90-105 and 120-135 minutes. Thermal thresholds were assessed using time to respond behaviourally to stimulation with a 500 mW CO2 laser. Within-treatment differences in response latency were assessed using Friedman's test. Differences amongst treatments were assessed using independent Kruskal-Wallis tests. Where significant effects were identified, pairwise comparisons were conducted to elucidate the direction of the effect. Cats treated with morphine (χ2=12.90, df=6, p=0.045) and tramadol (χ2=20.28, df=6, p=0.002) showed significant increases in latency to respond. However, subsequent pairwise comparisons indicated that differences in latencies at specific time-points were significant (ppain-free cats after analgesic administration and may provide a simpler alternative to existing systems. Further exploration is required to examine its sensitivity and comparative utility. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  9. Special issue on"social responsibility accounting and reporting in times of ‘sustainability Downturn/crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Correa-ruiz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available At a time when sustainability performance does not seem to match the expectations raised by the sustainable development concept and, moreover, when the economic downturn and crisis could be further eroding social and environmental concerns and values, the notion of sustainability crisis provides an interesting starting point to reflect on the role of Social and Environmental Accounting Research. Lack of humanity and values, short term economic approach, institutional capture and misunderstanding and misuse of democracy, have all served as catalysts of sustainability downturn and crisis. Thus, this editorial attempts to advance public interest accounting by discussing the controversy around Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility, expecting that the constitutive effects of researchers’ words in this special issue and in future research agendas, will result in more transformative power relations able to enhance a healthy democracy inspired by the capacity to do things and to transform individuals’ attitudes and behaviours, as well as the institutional response to the sustainability crisis.

  10. Corporate Social Responsibility as a tool to ensure sustainability and competitiveness of the monotowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sechina Asya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Learning the basics and trends of the development of corporate social responsibility is connected with the need to identify the reasons for its humanization and globalization in today’s business environment. Sustainability and competitiveness is one of the important characteristics of the company today. The characteristic of the Russian practice of corporate social responsibility highlights its features, levels and forms of development. Monotowns are a highly vulnerable category of Russian communities; they are in constant risk due to their specific characteristics and largely the underdeveloped economic base. The problems of monoprofile towns usually do not have simple solutions. They require a comprehensive approach and taking account of the existence and development of each monotown. The article deals with the concept of a monoprofile town, stages of formation and evolution of this phenomenon in the Russian economy. There is the problem of application of corporate social responsibility in the practice of Russian monotowns. There is the characteristic advantage of social responsibility in the monotowns. There is the influence of the organizations activities operating in a monotown on the quality of life of the population. There is the necessity of the use of corporate social responsibility in monotowns to enhance their sustainability and improve competitiveness.

  11. Appeals to consumer responsibility and improving structural conditions as means to promote sustainable consumer behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    for their acts or (b) structural conditions determined by governments? In field experiments with large samples of ordinary consumers, the behavioral effects of perceptions of responsibility/personal moral norms and of altering an important structural condition are quantified by measuring a relevant behavior......-developed public transit service. The results suggest that there is often more to gain from changing structural conditions to be more facilitating for the desired behavior than from a campaign targeting consumer feelings of responsibility.......Environmental policy-makers increasingly emphasize consumers' responsibility for environmental side effects of their acts, but is this justified? This paper investigates which is the most important limiting factor for sustainable consumption: (a) the extent to which consumers assume responsibility...

  12. A Designed Model of Sustainable Competitiveness for Slovak Industrial Companies in the Global Context of Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božiková, Lucia; Šnircová, Jana

    2016-06-01

    In this article we introduce a model of sustainable competitiveness, which we created on the basis of a long term study of literature and analysis. This article is divided into several parts. In the first part, we will introduce the problem of competitiveness and sustainable competitiveness. The second part is focused on the basic aspects for the creation of the model. In the third part the model itself is introduced and also an explanation and description of the mode is given.

  13. Company, Sustainability and Social Responsibility: Origins, Motivations, Critical and Practical Aspects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ribeiro Santiago

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyzes the sustainability and its historical aspects, the emergence of global concern about the subject, with sustainable economic development and its major initiatives, from the effective involvement of the States in the discussions in the search for consensus in the quality of life on the planet, rationality in the exploitation of natural resources and concern for future generations. We research also the context of social responsibility (business, starting at historical aspect to following analyze its interrelationship as an instrument to combat the problem of social inequality and poverty, was discoursing on the possibility of state action while inducing corporate behavior on this theme, describing the concrete experience revealed in the actions of the Federal Public Ministry, through award-winning design that became known as "Green Cities / Meat Legal".

  14. Withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment: criminal responsibility for established medical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ben; Willmott, Lindy; Allen, John

    2010-05-01

    The law recognises the right of a competent adult to refuse medical treatment even if this will lead to death. Guardianship and other legislation also facilitates the making of decisions to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment in certain circumstances. Despite this apparent endorsement that such decisions can be lawful, doubts have been raised in Queensland about whether decisions to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment would contravene the criminal law, and particularly the duty imposed by the Criminal Code (Qld) to provide the "necessaries of life". This article considers this tension in the law and examines various arguments that might allow for such decisions to be made lawfully. It ultimately concludes, however, that criminal responsibility may still arise and so reform is needed.

  15. A comparison of coping strategies in patients with fibromyalgia, chronic neuropathic pain, and pain-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baastrup, Sidsel; Schultz, Rikke; Brødsgaard, Inger; Moore, Rod; Jensen, Troels S; Vase Toft, Lene; Bach, Flemming W; Rosenberg, Raben; Gormsen, Lise

    2016-12-01

    Patients suffering from chronic pain may benefit from learning adaptive coping strategies. Consensus on efficient strategies for this group of patients is, however, lacking, and previous studies have shown inconsistent results. The present study has examined coping strategies in two distinctly different groups of chronic pain patients and a group of healthy controls. Thirty neuropathic pain (NP) patients, 28 fibromyalgia (FM) patients, and 26 pain-free healthy controls completed the Coping Strategy Questionnaire (CSQ-48/27) and rated their daily pain. The results showed that FM and NP patients did not cope differently with pain. The only difference between the groups was that FM patients felt more in control of their pain than NP patients. Both patient groups used more maladaptive/passive coping strategies, but surprisingly also more adaptive/active coping strategies than healthy controls. However, FM patients with high levels of passive strategies felt less in control than FM patients with low levels of passive strategies. This was not seen in NP patients. An important implication for clinical practice is therefore that passive coping strategies should be restructured into active ones, especially for FM patients. Otherwise, the same psychological treatment model can be applied to both groups since they use similar coping styles. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Self-powered microneedle-based biosensors for pain-free high-accuracy measurement of glycaemia in interstitial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strambini, L M; Longo, A; Scarano, S; Prescimone, T; Palchetti, I; Minunni, M; Giannessi, D; Barillaro, G

    2015-04-15

    In this work a novel self-powered microneedle-based transdermal biosensor for pain-free high-accuracy real-time measurement of glycaemia in interstitial fluid (ISF) is reported. The proposed transdermal biosensor makes use of an array of silicon-dioxide hollow microneedles that are about one order of magnitude both smaller (borehole down to 4µm) and more densely-packed (up to 1×10(6)needles/cm(2)) than state-of-the-art microneedles used for biosensing so far. This allows self-powered (i.e. pump-free) uptake of ISF to be carried out with high efficacy and reliability in a few seconds (uptake rate up to 1µl/s) by exploiting capillarity in the microneedles. By coupling the microneedles operating under capillary-action with an enzymatic glucose biosensor integrated on the back-side of the needle-chip, glucose measurements are performed with high accuracy (±20% of the actual glucose level for 96% of measures) and reproducibility (coefficient of variation 8.56%) in real-time (30s) over the range 0-630mg/dl, thus significantly improving microneedle-based biosensor performance with respect to the state-of-the-art. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Isometric strength ratios of the hip musculature in females with patellofemoral pain: a comparison to pain-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Eduardo; Silva, Ana Paula M C C; Sacramento, Sylvio N; Martin, RobRoy L; Fukuda, Thiago Y

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare hip agonist-antagonist isometric strength ratios between females with patellofemoral pain (PFP) syndrome and pain-free control group. One hundred and twenty females between 15 and 40 years of age (control group: n = 60; PFP group: n = 60) participated in the study. Hip adductor, abductor, medial rotator, lateral rotator, flexor, and extensor isometric strength were measured using a hand-held dynamometer. Comparisons in the hip adductor/abductor and medial/lateral rotator and flexor/extensor strength ratios were made between groups using independent t-tests. Group comparisons also were made between the anteromedial hip complex (adductor, medial rotator, and flexor musculature) and posterolateral hip complex (abductor, lateral rotator, and extensor musculature). On average, the hip adductor/abductor isometric strength ratio in the PFP group was 23% higher when compared with the control group (p = 0.01). The anteromedial/posterolateral complex ratio also was significantly higher in the PFP group (average 8%; p = 0.04). No significant group differences were found for the medial/lateral rotator ratio and flexor/extensor strength ratios. The results of this study demonstrate that females with PFP have altered hip strength ratios when compared with asymptomatic controls. These strength imbalances may explain the tendency of females with PFP to demonstrate kinematic tendencies that increase loading on the patellofemoral joint (i.e., dynamic knee valgus).

  18. Sensitivity to Physical Activity Predicts Daily Activity Among Pain-Free Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Leah; Ohlman, Thomas; Naugle, Kelly Marie

    2017-10-04

    Prior research indicates that older adults with knee osteoarthritis have increased sensitivity to physical activity (SPA) and respond to physical activities of stable intensity with increases in pain. Whether SPA is present in healthy older adults without chronic pain and predicts functional outcomes remains relatively unexplored. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of SPA in healthy older adults in response to a standardized walking task, and whether SPA was associated with temporal summation of pain, pain-related fear of movement, and functional outcomes. Fifty-two older adults without chronic pain completed self-reported measures of activity-related pain and physical function, completed the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), underwent quantitative sensory testing to measure temporal summation of heat pain, and wore an accelerometer for one week to measure physical activity behavior. Subjects rated overall bodily discomfort (0-100 scale) prior to and during each minute of the 6MWT. An SPA index was created by subtracting the initial bodily discomfort ratings from the peak ratings. Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated that bodily discomfort significantly increased across the walking task, with approximately 60% of the sample experiencing SPA. Hierarchical regressions indicated that greater SPA was associated with fewer average steps per day and greater activity-related pain. Additionally, analyses revealed that temporal summation of pain and pain-related fear of movement significantly predicted the degree of SPA on the walking task. These findings shed light on potential mechanisms underlying SPA in older adults and suggest that SPA might be a risk factor for reduced physical activity.

  19. Pivotal role of cardiomyocyte TGF-β signaling in the murine pathological response to sustained pressure overload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koitabashi, Norimichi; Danner, Thomas; Zaiman, Ari L.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Rowell, Janelle; Mankowski, Joseph; Zhang, Dou; Nakamura, Taishi; Takimoto, Eiki; Kass, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The cardiac pathological response to sustained pressure overload involves myocyte hypertrophy and dysfunction along with interstitial changes such as fibrosis and reduced capillary density. These changes are orchestrated by mechanical forces and factors secreted between cells. One such secreted

  20. Sustainable Development Commission Scotland response to the Scottish Government 'Consultation on the consenting process for thermal power stations in Scotland'

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission Scotland

    2009-01-01

    This document is the response of the Sustainable Development Commission Scotland to the Scottish Government’s 'Consultation on the consenting process for thermal power stations in Scotland' Publisher PDF

  1. Sustainable Cotton Production in India: A Case Study in Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Takacs, PhD

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cotton is the world’s most widely traded agricultural commodity, but it is also one of the world’s most toxic to grow. In India, the second largest producer of cotton, Zameen Organics Pvt. Ltd. has pioneered a business model of sustainable cotton production that is based on environmental stewardship and concern for the health and equity of farmers engaged in growing cotton. Zameen’s approach to business illustrates the principles of strategic corporate social responsibility, a business approach that leverages a company’s distinctive competencies to address external issues and by which all stakeholders, not just the shareholders, are enriched.

  2. "Omics" of maize stress response for sustainable food production: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fangping; Yang, Le; Tai, Fuju; Hu, Xiuli; Wang, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Maize originated in the highlands of Mexico approximately 8700 years ago and is one of the most commonly grown cereal crops worldwide, followed by wheat and rice. Abiotic stresses (primarily drought, salinity, and high and low temperatures), together with biotic stresses (primarily fungi, viruses, and pests), negatively affect maize growth, development, and eventually production. To understand the response of maize to abiotic and biotic stresses and its mechanism of stress tolerance, high-throughput omics approaches have been used in maize stress studies. Integrated omics approaches are crucial for dissecting the temporal and spatial system-level changes that occur in maize under various stresses. In this comprehensive analysis, we review the primary types of stresses that threaten sustainable maize production; underscore the recent advances in maize stress omics, especially proteomics; and discuss the opportunities, challenges, and future directions of maize stress omics, with a view to sustainable food production. The knowledge gained from studying maize stress omics is instrumental for improving maize to cope with various stresses and to meet the food demands of the exponentially growing global population. Omics systems science offers actionable potential solutions for sustainable food production, and we present maize as a notable case study.

  3. A Designed Model of Sustainable Competitiveness for Slovak Industrial Companies in the Global Context of Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božiková Lucia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce a model of sustainable competitiveness, which we created on the basis of a long term study of literature and analysis. This article is divided into several parts. In the first part, we will introduce the problem of competitiveness and sustainable competitiveness. The second part is focused on the basic aspects for the creation of the model. In the third part the model itself is introduced and also an explanation and description of the mode is given.

  4. Is sustained virological response a marker of treatment efficacy in patients with chronic hepatitis C viral infection with no response or relapse to previous antiviral intervention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi S; Wilson, Edward; Koretz, Ronald L

    2013-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of antiviral interventions in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection use sustained virological response (SVR) as the main outcome. There is sparse information on long-term mortality from RCTs.......Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of antiviral interventions in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection use sustained virological response (SVR) as the main outcome. There is sparse information on long-term mortality from RCTs....

  5. Corporate social responsibility: a real options approach to the challenge of financial sustainability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Teresa Bosch-Badia

    Full Text Available In contemporary complex societies, social values like ethics, corporate social responsibility, and being respectful with the environment, among others, are becoming social requirements. Corporations are expected to fulfill them and, according to empirical evidence, an overwhelming majority aspires to good social valuation. At the same time, the maximization of market share value in the long run continues to be the central corporate goal. Making environmental and social expenses compatible with value creation is a central challenge for corporations since it implies the financial sustainability of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR.The value creation capacity of CSR projects, mainly through innovation, is widely acknowledged in economic literature and corporate practice. This fact arouses the need of having a quantitative framework capable of summarizing the value creation capacity of the variables involved in CSR projects. With this aim we build up a sensitivity analysis of real option ratios that studies and quantifies the value creation capacity of CSR projects connected with innovation. Ratio analysis has the advantage of being scale independent. Hence, it furnishes a homogeneous framework to express the interaction of value creation variables and, thus, supports strategic thinking quantitatively. Often, CSR expenses can be regarded as preliminary projects that create the opportunity to undertake a full future project. For them, we obtain the minimum expectations scenario that makes financially sustainable a preliminary project that can be interpreted as a call option. We propose a classification of CSR projects from the decision analysis perspective following a two-fold approach: Their relationship with value creation and their links with existing corporate activities. This classification of CSR projects aims at contributing to choose the best capital budgeting method to study the financial sustainability of the project and identifying

  6. Corporate social responsibility: a real options approach to the challenge of financial sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Badia, Maria-Teresa; Montllor-Serrats, Joan; Tarrazon-Rodon, Maria-Antonia

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary complex societies, social values like ethics, corporate social responsibility, and being respectful with the environment, among others, are becoming social requirements. Corporations are expected to fulfill them and, according to empirical evidence, an overwhelming majority aspires to good social valuation. At the same time, the maximization of market share value in the long run continues to be the central corporate goal. Making environmental and social expenses compatible with value creation is a central challenge for corporations since it implies the financial sustainability of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The value creation capacity of CSR projects, mainly through innovation, is widely acknowledged in economic literature and corporate practice. This fact arouses the need of having a quantitative framework capable of summarizing the value creation capacity of the variables involved in CSR projects. With this aim we build up a sensitivity analysis of real option ratios that studies and quantifies the value creation capacity of CSR projects connected with innovation. Ratio analysis has the advantage of being scale independent. Hence, it furnishes a homogeneous framework to express the interaction of value creation variables and, thus, supports strategic thinking quantitatively. Often, CSR expenses can be regarded as preliminary projects that create the opportunity to undertake a full future project. For them, we obtain the minimum expectations scenario that makes financially sustainable a preliminary project that can be interpreted as a call option. We propose a classification of CSR projects from the decision analysis perspective following a two-fold approach: Their relationship with value creation and their links with existing corporate activities. This classification of CSR projects aims at contributing to choose the best capital budgeting method to study the financial sustainability of the project and identifying those CSR projects

  7. EFFECTIVENESS OF NEURAL TISSUE MOBILISATION ON PAIN, PAIN FREE PASSIVE SLR RANGE OF MOTION AND FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY IN LOW BACK ACHE SUBJECTS WITH SCIATICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Geethika

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain is a common, benign, and self-limiting disease that affects almost all persons, with a lifetime prevalence of up to 84%. In contrast, sciatica affects only 40 % of all persons in the Western industrialized countries. In sciatica, pain radiates down the legs, below the knee along the distribution of sciatic nerve. Nerve root compression is the most common cause of sciatica. Neuro dynamics or Neural Tissue Mobilization is relatively new approach in treatment of neuro musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of the study to determine the effectiveness of Neural Tissue mobilization on pain, pain free passive SLR ROM &functional disability in LBA subjects with Sciatica. Objective of the study is to study and compare the effectiveness of Neural tissue mobilization in LBA subjects with sciatica in terms of pain, pain free SLR ROM and Oswestry Disability Index. Methods: 30 subjects were selected by simple random sampling and assigned in to Control(n=15 &Experimental group(n=15.The subjects in control group were given conventional physiotherapy and those in Experimental group were given Neural Tissue Mobilization in addition to conventional therapy. All the participants were assessed with VAS, ODI and pain free passive SLR ROM. Results: After the analysis, the results were found to be significant improvement in pain, pain free SLR ROM, ODI in both groups (p< 0.00.But there is a high significance in Experimental group when compared to control group. Conclusion: Results suggest that NEURAL TISSUE MOBILIZATION along with conventional therapy is more effective in reducing pain, decreasing disability and improving SLR ROM.

  8. The influence of changes in trunk and pelvic posture during single leg standing on hip and thigh muscle activation in a pain free population

    OpenAIRE

    Prior, Simon; Mitchell, Tim; Whiteley, Rod; O’Sullivan, Peter; Williams, Benjamin K; Racinais, Sebastien; Farooq, Abdulaziz

    2014-01-01

    Background Thigh muscle injuries commonly occur during single leg loading tasks and patterns of muscle activation are thought to contribute to these injuries. The influence trunk and pelvis posture has on hip and thigh muscle activation during single leg stance is unknown and was investigated in a pain free population to determine if changes in body posture result in consistent patterns of changes in muscle activation. Methods Hip and thigh muscle activation patterns were compared in 22 asymp...

  9. Psychometric Properties of the German Version of the Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire (PVAQ) in Pain-Free Samples and Samples with Acute and Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, M; Capito, E S; Horn-Hofmann, C; Baum, C; Scheel, J; Karmann, A J; Priebe, J A; Lautenbacher, S

    2017-04-01

    The way individuals attend to pain is known to have a considerable impact on the experience and chronification of pain. One method to assess the habitual "attention to pain" is the Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire (PVAQ). With the present study, we aimed to test the psychometric properties of the German version of the PVAQ across pain-free samples and across patients with acute and chronic pain. Two samples of pain-free individuals (student sample (N = 255)/non-student sample (N = 362)) and two clinical pain samples (acute pain patients (N = 105)/chronic pain patients (N = 36)) were included in this cross-sectional evaluation of the German PVAQ. Factor structure was assessed using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Reliability was assessed using internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha). Construct validity was tested by assessing correlations between PVAQ and theoretically related constructs. Exploratory factor analysis (non-student sample) and confirmatory factor analysis (student sample, acute pain patient sample) suggested that a two-factor solution best fitted our data ("attention to pain," "attention to changes in pain"). Internal consistency ranged from acceptable to good in all four samples. As hypothesized, the PVAQ correlated significantly with theoretically related constructs in all four samples, suggesting good construct validity in pain-free individuals and in pain patients. The German PVAQ shows good psychometric properties across samples of pain-free individuals and patients suffering from pain that are comparable to PVAQ versions of other languages. Thus, the German PVAQ seems to be a measure of pain vigilance equally valid as found in other countries.

  10. Role of 'student-to-student local analgesia administration' on undergraduate students' opinions regarding 'pain-free local analgesia technique' in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuscu, O O; Kucuktepe, C; Caglar, E; Cildir, S K; Hacinlioglu, N; Sandallı, N

    2013-08-01

    To examine the role of 'student-to-student local analgesia administration' on undergraduate dental students' opinions regarding pain-free local analgesia techniques in children. Grade 3 (n:29), Grade 4 (n:59) and Grade 5 students (n:28) of Yeditepe University, School of Dentistry, Istanbul, Turkey participated in the study. Informed consent and ethical approval were obtained. Students' opinions were evaluated by means of a short survey administered before and after educational activities. Activities were provided in a didactic manner (theoretical, practical and clinical stages) and lasted for 6 months. Theoretical lectures on 'pain-free local analgesia techniques in children' were given to all classes. In the practical stage, 3rd and 4th grade students were paired and performed infiltration analgesia on each other according to the lectured technique. In the final clinical stage, 4th and 5th grade students were supervised, whilst administering the technique on children during their clinical training. Before the activities, only 40% of students believed in the possibility of pain-free local analgesia in children, whereas after the educational activities, the percentage had risen to 68% (P = 0.0001). A significant difference was observed between the opinions of 4th grade students who attended the practical stage and 5th grade students who did not. The role of 'student-to-student local analgesia administration' was found to be significant in changing undergraduate students' opinions about pain-free dental injections in children. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. SHORT-TERM EFFECTS OF INSTRUMENT-ASSISTED SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION ON PAIN FREE RANGE OF MOTION IN A WEIGHTLIFTER WITH SUBACROMIAL PAIN SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Joseph Paul; Kakar, Rumit Singh; Reynolds, Timothy James

    2017-02-01

    While there is limited evidence supporting the use of soft tissue mobilization techniques for Subacromial Pain Syndrome (SAPS), synonymous with subacromial impingement syndrome, previous studies have reported successful outcomes using soft tissue mobilization as a treatment technique. The purpose of this case report is to document the results of Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM) for the treatment of SAPS. Diagnosis was reached based on the subject's history, tenderness to palpation, and four out of five positive tests in the diagnostic cluster. Treatment consisted of three visits where the IASTM technique was applied to the pectoral muscles as well as periscapular musculature followed by retesting pain-free shoulder flexion active range of motion (AROM) and Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) during active shoulder flexion. Scapulothoracic mobilization and stretching were performed after AROM measurement. The subject reported an NPRS of 0/10 and demonstrated improvements in pain free flexion AROM in each of the three treatment sessions post-IASTM: 85 ° to 181 °, 110 ° to 171 °, and 163 ° to 174 ° with some carryover in pain reduction and pain free AROM to the next treatment. Through three treatments, DASH score improved by 17.34%, Penn Shoulder Score improved 29%, worst NPRS decreased from 4/10 to 0/10, and a GROC score of 6. IASTM may have a beneficial acute effect on pain free shoulder flexion. In conjunction with scapulothoracic mobilizations and stretching, IASTM may improve function, decrease pain, and improve patient satisfaction. While this technique will not ameliorate the underlying pathomechanics contributing to SAPS, it may serve as a valuable tool to restore ROM and decrease pain allowing the patient to reap the full benefits of a multi-modal treatment approach. 5.

  12. Response of Fuel Subsidy Removal as Sustainable Transport Policy (Case Study: Workers in Jakarta Metropolitan Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octaviani Ariyanti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Motorization in urban areas contributes several problems such as congestion, accidents, gas emissions, noises, and infrastructure breakage. Meanwhile, most of the developing countries cannot overcome such growth activities, as well as in Jakarta. By December 2013, Vice Governor of Jakarta proposes fuel subsidy removal policy as one of sustainable transport policy. This study is intended to understand and investigate how fuel subsidy removal policy scenarios (25%, 50%, and 100% in Jakarta affects travelers’ behavior and analyze such policy to support sustainable transport by using qualitative research methodology. Interviews and questionnaires survey is conducted to workers in Jakarta, which includes ranking scale question for traveler response options. The result shows that half of the respondents are not affected and will only respond to fuel price increasing at IDR 31,400 for gasoline price and IDR 26,300 for ADO (Auto Diesel Oil. Moreover, there is a tendency of respondent's to the response by changing their travel mode choices into more fuel efficient private vehicle.

  13. Orientation-specific responses to sustained uniaxial stretching in focal adhesion growth and turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Pasapera, Ana M.; Koretsky, Alan P.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2013-01-01

    Cells are mechanosensitive to extracellular matrix (ECM) deformation, which can be caused by muscle contraction or changes in hydrostatic pressure. Focal adhesions (FAs) mediate the linkage between the cell and the ECM and initiate mechanically stimulated signaling events. We developed a stretching apparatus in which cells grown on fibronectin-coated elastic substrates can be stretched and imaged live to study how FAs dynamically respond to ECM deformation. Human bone osteosarcoma epithelial cell line U2OS was transfected with GFP-paxillin as an FA marker and subjected to sustained uniaxial stretching. Two responses at different timescales were observed: rapid FA growth within seconds after stretching, and delayed FA disassembly and loss of cell polarity that occurred over tens of minutes. Rapid FA growth occurred in all cells; however, delayed responses to stretch occurred in an orientation-specific manner, specifically in cells with their long axes perpendicular to the stretching direction, but not in cells with their long axes parallel to stretch. Pharmacological treatments demonstrated that FA kinase (FAK) promotes but Src inhibits rapid FA growth, whereas FAK, Src, and calpain 2 all contribute to delayed FA disassembly and loss of polarity in cells perpendicular to stretching. Immunostaining for phospho-FAK after stretching revealed that FAK activation was maximal at 5 s after stretching, specifically in FAs oriented perpendicular to stretch. We hypothesize that orientation-specific activation of strain/stress-sensitive proteins in FAs upstream to FAK and Src promote orientation-specific responses in FA growth and disassembly that mediate polarity rearrangement in response to sustained stretch. PMID:23754369

  14. Temporal divergence of changes in pain and pain-free grip strength after manual acupuncture or electroacupuncture: an experimental study in people with lateral epicondylalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jaewon; Bussin, Erin; Scott, Alex

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine, in individuals with lateral epicondylalgia (LE), the acute time course of acupuncture-induced hypoalgesia and change in pain-free grip strength (PFGS). This was an experimental study, conducted at a single research center in Vancouver, BC. Twenty-one participants with unilateral LE lasting more than 6 weeks duration were enrolled. Participants received a single treatment of acupuncture (either electroacupuncture, 10-30 Hz, or manual acupuncture, assigned randomly). The primary outcome measure was pain level (0-10) during tendon loading (while making a fist) immediately after treatment, and over a 72 h follow-up period. Secondary outcome measures included pain-free grip strength (N). There was a small but statistically significant reduction in participants' perceived pain level immediately after acupuncture (mean improvement of 1.2, 95% CI 0.45-1.9). This change in pain was not accompanied by a change in PFGS. No difference was observed between the two types of acupuncture at any time point. The use of acupuncture or electroacupuncture, as administered in the current study, is unlikely to acutely enhance the ability of people with LE to engage in pain-free rehabilitation exercise. Trial registration Registered February 25, 2015. ISRCTN14667535, http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN14667535.

  15. Frequency of daytime tooth clenching episodes in individuals affected by masticatory muscle pain and pain-free controls during standardized ability tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Iacopo; Landino, Donatella; Donnarumma, Valeria; Castroflorio, Tommaso; Lobbezoo, Frank; Michelotti, Ambrosina

    2017-05-01

    Tooth clenching has been suggested to be related to temporomandibular pain. However, the electromyographic characteristics of daytime clenching episodes have been minimally investigated. This study aimed to analyze the frequency, amplitude, and duration of daytime clenching episodes in patients with masticatory muscle pain and pain-free individuals. Fifteen women with masticatory muscles myalgia (MP group, mean ± SD age = 26.4 ± 7.6 years) matched for age to 18 pain-free women (CTR group, mean ± SD age = 25.3 ± 2.8 years) were submitted to three different ability tasks (filling out questionnaires for 40 min, reading for 20 min, and playing a videogame for 20 min). The electromyographic activity periods (AP) of the right masseter greater than 10 % (AP10), 20 % (AP20), and 30 % (AP30) of the maximum voluntary contraction were analyzed. The mean frequencies of AP10, AP20, and AP30 were greater in MP than in CTR individuals (all p pain-free individuals. Clinicians should recognize that the frequency and intensity of daytime clenching are noticeably increased in individuals with masticatory muscle pain in order to better tailor treatment.

  16. Greater rates of cartilage loss in painful knees than in pain-free knees after adjustment for radiographic disease stage: data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Felix; Cotofana, Sebastian; Wirth, Wolfgang; Nevitt, Michael; John, Markus R; Dreher, Donatus; Frobell, Richard

    2011-08-01

    To investigate whether rates of cartilage loss differ in knees with frequent baseline pain versus those without pain, after adjustment for radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) stage. One knee in each of 718 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants was examined: 310 with calculated Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) grade 2, 299 with calculated K/L grade 3, and 109 with calculated K/L grade 4. Twelve-month change in (subregional) cartilage thickness was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Change in cartilage thickness in the central subregion of the weight-bearing medial femoral condyle and ordered value 1 (OV1) were selected as primary end points. Frequent knee symptoms were defined as pain, aching, or stiffness on most days of at least 1 month during the previous year. The mean 12-month rate of change in cartilage thickness in the central subregion of the medial femoral condyle was -12 μm (standardized response mean [SRM] -0.15) in knees without pain (n = 146), -27 μm (SRM -0.25) in those with infrequent pain (n = 255), and -54 μm (SRM -0.32) in those with frequent pain (n = 317). Rates differed significantly between frequently painful knees and pain-free knees after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and calculated K/L grade (P = 0.011, R(2) = 2.6%, partial R(2) for frequent pain = 1.4%). Similar results were found in stratified samples of calculated K/L grade 2/calculated K/L grade 3 knees, and in analyses restricted to knees with consistent pain frequency between baseline and followup. OV1 results showed similar trends but were not significant. Knees with frequent pain display greater rates of medial cartilage loss longitudinally than knees without pain, with or without adjustment or stratification for radiographic disease stage. Enrollment of participants with frequent knee pain in clinical trials can increase the observed rate of structural progression (i.e., cartilage loss) and sensitivity to change. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Durable and sustained immune tolerance to ERT in Pompe disease with entrenched immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Zoheb B; Prater, Sean N; Kobori, Joyce A; Viskochil, David; Bailey, Carrie; Gera, Renuka; Stockton, David W; McIntosh, Paul; Rosenberg, Amy S; Kishnani, Priya S

    2016-07-21

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has prolonged survival and improved clinical outcomes in patients with infantile Pompe disease (IPD), a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder. Yet marked interindividual variability in response to ERT, primarily attributable to the development of antibodies to ERT, remains an ongoing challenge. Immune tolerance to ongoing ERT has yet to be described in the setting of an entrenched immune response. Three infantile Pompe patients who developed high and sustained rhGAA IgG antibody titers (HSAT) and received a bortezomib-based immune tolerance induction (ITI) regimen were included in the study and were followed longitudinally to monitor the long-term safety and efficacy. A trial to taper the ITI protocol was attempted to monitor if true immune tolerance was achieved. Bortezomib-based ITI protocol was safely tolerated and led to a significant decline in rhGAA antibody titers with concomitant sustained clinical improvement. Two of the 3 IPD patients were successfully weaned off all ITI protocol medications and continue to maintain low/no antibody titers. ITI protocol was significantly tapered in the third IPD patient. B cell recovery was observed in all 3 IPD patients. This is the first report to our knowledge on successful induction of long-term immune tolerance in patients with IPD and HSAT refractory to agents such as cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and methotrexate, based on an approach using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. As immune responses limit the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of therapy for many conditions, proteasome inhibitors may have new therapeutic applications. This research was supported by a grant from the Genzyme Corporation, a Sanofi Company (Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA), and in part by the Lysosomal Disease Network, a part of NIH Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN).

  18. PREDICTORS OF SUSTAINED RESPONSE TO INTERFERON-BASED THERAPY IN CHRONIC HEPATITIS B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deian Jelev

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: IFN-based therapy induces long-term remission in ~20% of CHB-patients. Identification of predictors of treatment response can facilitate the clinical decision. Methods: 168 CHB-patients treated with IFN-based therapy were studied. Predictors of end-of-treatment response (ETR and sustained response (SR one-year post therapy were identified by non-parametric chi-square test and correlation analysis. Results: Low baseline HBV DNA (4xULN were independent predictors of ETR. Low viral load was stronger predictor than high ALT level. If both factors coexist the probability of ETR was 92%. In HBeAg-negative subjects SR correlates significantly with age below 40 years, evidence of early viral response at 3rd month, fibrosis stage F<3 (METAVIR and prolongation of treatment duration. HBeAg-seroconversion up to 6-month post-therapy was the strongest predictor of SR in HBeAg-positive patients.Conclusion: More favorable results could be achieved by pretreatment selection according to patients’ age, baseline viral load, ALT and liver fibrosis. Extension of IFN-treatment in responders may enhance the SR rate.

  19. Intensity-dependent EMG response for the biceps brachii during sustained maximal and submaximal isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Joshua C; Beck, Travis W; Ye, Xin; Wages, Nathan P

    2016-09-01

    There have been recent attempts to characterize the mechanisms associated with fatigue-induced task failure. We compared the time to failure and the corresponding changes in the surface electromyogram (EMG) during sustained maximal and submaximal isometric force tasks. EMG activity was measured from the biceps brachii of 18 male participants as they sustained either a maximal or submaximal (60 % MVC) isometric contraction of the dominant elbow flexors until force could not be maintained above 55 % MVC. Intensity-dependent patterns of change were observed for EMG amplitude and mean power frequency (MNF) between the two force tasks. Interestingly, the only significant predictor of failure time was the rate of change in EMG MNF during the submaximal task (r (2) = 0.304). In addition, EMG amplitude at submaximal failure was significantly lower (p EMG response emphasize the basis of neuromuscular fatigue and task dependency. Additionally, our data suggest that the EMG MNF should be used when monitoring the progression of local muscle fatigue.

  20. Policy strategies to address sustainability of Alaskan boreal forests in response to a directionally changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F Stuart; Lovecraft, Amy L; Zavaleta, Erika S; Nelson, Joanna; Robards, Martin D; Kofinas, Gary P; Trainor, Sarah F; Peterson, Garry D; Huntington, Henry P; Naylor, Rosamond L

    2006-11-07

    Human activities are altering many factors that determine the fundamental properties of ecological and social systems. Is sustainability a realistic goal in a world in which many key process controls are directionally changing? To address this issue, we integrate several disparate sources of theory to address sustainability in directionally changing social-ecological systems, apply this framework to climate-warming impacts in Interior Alaska, and describe a suite of policy strategies that emerge from these analyses. Climate warming in Interior Alaska has profoundly affected factors that influence landscape processes (climate regulation and disturbance spread) and natural hazards, but has only indirectly influenced ecosystem goods such as food, water, and wood that receive most management attention. Warming has reduced cultural services provided by ecosystems, leading to some of the few institutional responses that directly address the causes of climate warming, e.g., indigenous initiatives to the Arctic Council. Four broad policy strategies emerge: (i) enhancing human adaptability through learning and innovation in the context of changes occurring at multiple scales; (ii) increasing resilience by strengthening negative (stabilizing) feedbacks that buffer the system from change and increasing options for adaptation through biological, cultural, and economic diversity; (iii) reducing vulnerability by strengthening institutions that link the high-latitude impacts of climate warming to their low-latitude causes; and (iv) facilitating transformation to new, potentially more beneficial states by taking advantage of opportunities created by crisis. Each strategy provides societal benefits, and we suggest that all of them be pursued simultaneously.

  1. [Sustainability and excellence of the Catalan health system. New paradigms, challenges and responses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández i Alegre, Roser; Argenter i Giralt, Miquel; Rodríguez i Guasch, Xavier

    2015-11-01

    The aim of a health system and the priority of any government is to anticipate problems before they appear, provide an innovative response to these new needs and healthcare models, improve access of the general public and patients to health care, especially care for the most vulnerable groups, improve healthcare results and implement the structural reforms necessary to maintain a viable and sustainable quality public healthcare system for everyone. In the current environment, health systems are facing new economic, demographic, care, social, technological and political paradigms to which health policy must respond. Faced with these challenges, health systems, especially in the case of Catalonia, are challenged to take decisions on how best to approach the implementation of structural reform designed to facilitate the necessary economic and fiscal sustainability in the service of fresh and innovative health policies and patient-centred care within a system marked by excellence and equity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Characteristics of Disturbed Sleep in Patients With Fibromyalgia Compared With Insomnia or With Pain-Free Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Bhadra-Brown, Pritha; Pitman, Verne W; Roehrs, Timothy A; Resnick, E Malca

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the differential nature of disturbed sleep in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) reporting sleep difficulties versus patients with primary insomnia (PI) and patients who do not report disturbed sleep (pain-free controls). Patients (FM: n=132; PI: n=109; normals: n=52) were recruited for different studies. FM and PI patients were preselected to meet the sleep disturbance criteria. Patients with sleep or circadian disorders were excluded from all groups. Polysomnography was conducted at screening, during 2 consecutive nights. For this post hoc analysis of polysomnographies, length and frequency (duration, number) of wake and sleep bouts were analyzed, together with traditional sleep measures; a "bout"=consecutive 30-second epochs of sleep or wake. Data are mean±SD. FM and PI patients had decreased total sleep time and slow-wave sleep (SWS), and increased latency to persistent sleep (LPS) and wake time after sleep onset (WASO) versus controls (P<0.05 for each). FM versus PI patients had more SWS (48.1±32.4 vs. 27.2±23.6 min; P<0.0001) and shorter LPS (58.2±29.8 vs. 70.7±31.3 min; P=0.0055), but comparable WASO (107.7±32.8 vs. 108.6±31.5 min). Despite comparable WASO, FM patients had shorter (4.64±2.42 vs. 5.87±3.15 min; P=0.0016) but more frequent wake bouts versus PI patients (41.6±16.7 vs. 35.7±12.6; P=0.0075). Sleep bout duration was similar for FM (9.32±0.35 min) and PI patients (10.1±0.37 min); both populations had shorter sleep bout duration versus controls (15.7±0.7 min; P<0.0001 both). Increased frequency of wake and sleep bouts and decreased wake bout duration, together with decreased LPS and increased SWS, suggests that sleep in FM is characterized by an inability to maintain continuous sleep but a greater sleep drive compared with PI.

  3. Sustained virologic response following HCV eradication in two brothers with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Houlihan, Diarmaid D

    2009-08-21

    X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) is a humoral immunodeficiency syndrome characterized from childhood by the absence of circulating B lymphocytes, absent or reduced levels of serum immunoglobulin and recurrent bacterial infections. For many affected patients, regular treatment with immunoglobulin is life saving. Hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection acquired through contaminated blood products is widely described in this patient cohort. The natural history of HCV infection in patients with XLA tends to follow a more rapid and aggressive course compared to immunocompetent individuals. Furthermore, standard anti-viral therapy appears to be less efficacious in this patient cohort. Here we report the cases of two brothers with XLA who contracted HCV through contaminated blood products. They were treated with a six month course of Interferon alpha-2b and Ribavirin. We report a sustained virologic response five years after completing treatment.

  4. Assessment of soil sealing management responses, strategies, and targets toward ecologically sustainable urban land use management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artmann, Martina

    2014-05-01

    Soil sealing has negative impacts on ecosystem services since urban green and soil get lost. Although there is political commitment to stop further sealing, no reversal of this trend can be observed in Europe. This paper raises the questions (1) which strategies can be regarded as being efficient toward ecologically sustainable management of urban soil sealing and (2) who has competences and should take responsibility to steer soil sealing? The analyses are conducted in Germany. The assessment of strategies is carried out using indicators as part of a content analysis. Legal-planning, informal-planning, economic-fiscal, co-operative, and informational strategies are analyzed. Results show that there is a sufficient basis of strategies to secure urban ecosystem services by protecting urban green and reducing urban gray where microclimate regulation is a main target. However, soil sealing management lacks a spatial strategically overview as well as the consideration of services provided by fertile soils.

  5. When Legitimacy Shapes Environmentally Responsible Behaviors: Considering Exposure to University Sustainability Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Watson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines how perceptions of the legitimacy of university sustainability efforts—support by the administration (authorization or from students’ peers (endorsement—as well as the physical context in which students live, matter in shaping students’ environmentally responsible behaviors (ERBs. Using survey data collected from fourth-year students at a university in the Southeastern US, we employ Seeming Unrelated Regression to analyze the impact of perceived legitimacy and context on recycling and conservation behaviors, controlling for demographic characteristics, pro-environmental attitudes, and environmental identity. Our findings indicate that students’ perceptions of what university administrators support affect the likelihood of students to enact recycling and conservation behaviors, and peer support influences conservation behaviors. This research contributes to the literature on legitimacy by examining how legitimacy processes work in natural, rather than experimental, settings.

  6. Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda: A Commentary on "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Jane

    2013-01-01

    In her commentary of McPhail's 2013 article "Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights and Business Schools' Responsibility to Teach It: Incorporating Human Rights into the Sustainability Agenda," Jane Andrew begins by highlighting a number of McPhail's primary arguments. She points out that McPhail sets out to achieve two things…

  7. Adults with patellofemoral pain do not exhibit manifestations of peripheral and central sensitization when compared to healthy pain-free age and sex matched controls - An assessor blinded cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Rathleff, Camilla Rams; Stephenson, Aoife

    2017-01-01

    to study conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and wide-spread hyperalgesia in adults with PFP. This assessor-blinded cross-sectional study design compared CPM and mechanical pressure pain thresholds (PPT) between 33 adults (23 females) diagnosed with PFP and 32 age and sex matched pain-free controls...... no difference in CPM or PPT between young adults with PFP and age and sex matched pain-free controls....

  8. Tools of Realization of Social Responsibility of Industrial Business for Sustainable Socio-economic Development of Mining Region's Rural Territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurzina, Tatyana; Egorova, Natalia; Zaruba, Natalia; Kosinskij, Peter

    2017-11-01

    Modern conditions of the Russian economy do especially relevant questions of social responsibility of industrial business of the mining region for sustainable social and economic development of rural territories that demands search of the new strategy, tools, ways for positioning and increase in competitiveness of the enterprises, which are carrying out the entrepreneurial activity in this territory. The article opens problems of an influence of the industrial enterprises on the territory of presence, reasons the theoretical base directed to the formation of practical tools (mechanism) providing realization of social responsibility of business for sustainable social and economic development of rural territories of the mining region.

  9. Sustained Magnetic Responses in Temporal Cortex Reflect Instantaneous Significance of Approaching and Receding Sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik R Bach

    Full Text Available Rising sound intensity often signals an approaching sound source and can serve as a powerful warning cue, eliciting phasic attention, perception biases and emotional responses. How the evaluation of approaching sounds unfolds over time remains elusive. Here, we capitalised on the temporal resolution of magnetoencephalograpy (MEG to investigate in humans a dynamic encoding of perceiving approaching and receding sounds. We compared magnetic responses to intensity envelopes of complex sounds to those of white noise sounds, in which intensity change is not perceived as approaching. Sustained magnetic fields over temporal sensors tracked intensity change in complex sounds in an approximately linear fashion, an effect not seen for intensity change in white noise sounds, or for overall intensity. Hence, these fields are likely to track approach/recession, but not the apparent (instantaneous distance of the sound source, or its intensity as such. As a likely source of this activity, the bilateral inferior temporal gyrus and right temporo-parietal junction emerged. Our results indicate that discrete temporal cortical areas parametrically encode behavioural significance in moving sound sources where the signal unfolded in a manner reminiscent of evidence accumulation. This may help an understanding of how acoustic percepts are evaluated as behaviourally relevant, where our results highlight a crucial role of cortical areas.

  10. Sustained negative BOLD response in human fMRI finger tapping task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Liu

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigated the sustained negative blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD response (sNBR using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a finger tapping task. We observed that the sNBR for this task was more extensive than has previously been reported. The cortical regions involved in sNBR are divided into the following three groups: frontal, somatosensory and occipital. By investigating the spatial structure, area, amplitude, and dynamics of the sNBR in comparison with those of its positive BOLD response (PBR counterpart, we made the following observations. First, among the three groups, the somatosensory group contained the greatest number of activated voxels and the fewest deactivated voxels. In addition, the amplitude of the sNBR in this group was the smallest among the three groups. Second, the onset and peak time of the sNBR are both larger than those of the PBR, whereas the falling edge time of the sNBR is less than that of the PBR. Third, the long distance between most sNBR foci and their corresponding PBR foci makes it unlikely that they share the same blood supply artery. Fourth, the couplings between the sNBR and its PBR counterpart are distinct among different regions and thus should be investigated separately. These findings imply that the origin of most sNBR foci in the finger-tapping task is much more likely to be neuronal activity suppression rather than "blood steal."

  11. Initial and sustained brain responses to threat anticipation in blood-injection-injury phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Brinkmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-injection-injury (BII phobia differs from other subtypes of specific phobia in that it is associated with elevated disgust-sensitivity as well as specific autonomic and brain responses during processing of phobia-relevant stimuli. To what extent these features play a role already during threat anticipation is unclear. In the current fMRI experiment, 16 female BII phobics and 16 female healthy controls anticipated the presentation of phobia-specific and neutral pictures. On the behavioral level, anxiety dominated the anticipatory period in BII phobics relative to controls, while both anxiety and disgust were elevated during picture presentation. By applying two different models for the analysis of brain responses to anticipation of phobia-specific versus neutral stimuli, we found initial and sustained increases of activation in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, insula, lateral and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC, thalamus and visual areas, as well as initial activation in the amygdala for BII phobics as compared to healthy controls. These results suggest that BII phobia is characterized by activation of a typical neural defense network during threat anticipation, with anxiety as the predominant emotion.

  12. Initial and sustained brain responses to threat anticipation in blood-injection-injury phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Leonie; Poller, Hendrik; Herrmann, Martin J; Miltner, Wolfgang; Straube, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Blood-injection-injury (BII) phobia differs from other subtypes of specific phobia in that it is associated with elevated disgust-sensitivity as well as specific autonomic and brain responses during processing of phobia-relevant stimuli. To what extent these features play a role already during threat anticipation is unclear. In the current fMRI experiment, 16 female BII phobics and 16 female healthy controls anticipated the presentation of phobia-specific and neutral pictures. On the behavioral level, anxiety dominated the anticipatory period in BII phobics relative to controls, while both anxiety and disgust were elevated during picture presentation. By applying two different models for the analysis of brain responses to anticipation of phobia-specific versus neutral stimuli, we found initial and sustained increases of activation in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), insula, lateral and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), thalamus and visual areas, as well as initial activation in the amygdala for BII phobics as compared to healthy controls. These results suggest that BII phobia is characterized by activation of a typical neural defense network during threat anticipation, with anxiety as the predominant emotion.

  13. Dietary fat induces sustained reward response in the human brain without primary taste cortex discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène eTzieropoulos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To disentangle taste from reward responses in the human gustatory cortex, we combined high density electro-encephalography with a gustometer delivering tastant puffs to the tip of the tongue. Stimuli were pure tastants (salt solutions at two concentrations, caloric emulsions of identical taste (two milk preparations differing in fat content and a mixture of high fat milk with the lowest salt concentration. Early event-related potentials showed a dose-response effect for increased taste intensity, with higher amplitude and shorter latency for high compared to low salt concentration, but not for increased fat content. However, the amplitude and distribution of late potentials were modulated by fat content independently of reported intensity and discrimination. Neural source estimation revealed a sustained activation of reward areas to the two high-fat stimuli. The results suggest calorie detection through specific sensors on the tongue independent of perceived taste. Finally, amplitude variation of the first peak in the event-related potential to the different stimuli correlated with papilla density, suggesting a higher discrimination power for subjects with more fungiform papillae.

  14. Challenges for Sustainable Development and Its Legal Response in China: A Perspective for Social Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianbao Qin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With rapid development since the 1970s, China is entering a period of social transformation, which not only creates favorable conditions for sustainable development but also presents new challenges. The transitional period in China is a stage in which two types of social transformation coexist, the first is the social transformation from agricultural society to industrial society; the second is the transition from industrial society to postindustrial society. In this process of social transformation, new challenges arise for sustainable development in China. In the first layer of social transformation, we respond to the challenges presented by the social transformation through the establishment of basic principles of environmental law, legal enforcement mechanisms, basic legal regimes and so on. In the second layer of social transformation, the advent of a risk society raised new challenges to environmental law, including that of adjusting the function of environmental law, strengthening the precautionary principle, diversification of implementation mechanisms, and development of the preventive function of legal regimes. In order to better respond to these challenges, we should proceed with the following aspects: improve the legal functions of environmental law, including guaranteeing public security, ecological security and the coordination of multiple interests; expand and develop the content of the principle of prevention, and replace the polluter pays principle by the causer responsibility principle; combine administrative measures with economic incentives, and while setting government as the main executive body, effectively operate public participation mechanisms; expand the scope of environmental impact assessment of projects, and establish planning environmental impact assessment, build up and improve information disclosure system, and establish environmental risk assessment system and green tax system.

  15. SHORT‐TERM EFFECTS OF INSTRUMENT‐ASSISTED SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION ON PAIN FREE RANGE OF MOTION IN A WEIGHTLIFTER WITH SUBACROMIAL PAIN SYNDROME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Joseph Paul; Reynolds, Timothy James

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose While there is limited evidence supporting the use of soft tissue mobilization techniques for Subacromial Pain Syndrome (SAPS), synonymous with subacromial impingement syndrome, previous studies have reported successful outcomes using soft tissue mobilization as a treatment technique. The purpose of this case report is to document the results of Instrument‐Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM) for the treatment of SAPS. Case Description Diagnosis was reached based on the subject's history, tenderness to palpation, and four out of five positive tests in the diagnostic cluster. Treatment consisted of three visits where the IASTM technique was applied to the pectoral muscles as well as periscapular musculature followed by retesting pain‐free shoulder flexion active range of motion (AROM) and Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) during active shoulder flexion. Scapulothoracic mobilization and stretching were performed after AROM measurement. Outcomes The subject reported an NPRS of 0/10 and demonstrated improvements in pain free flexion AROM in each of the three treatment sessions post‐IASTM: 85 ° to 181 °, 110 ° to 171 °, and 163 ° to 174 ° with some carryover in pain reduction and pain free AROM to the next treatment. Through three treatments, DASH score improved by 17.34%, Penn Shoulder Score improved 29%, worst NPRS decreased from 4/10 to 0/10, and a GROC score of 6. Discussion IASTM may have a beneficial acute effect on pain free shoulder flexion. In conjunction with scapulothoracic mobilizations and stretching, IASTM may improve function, decrease pain, and improve patient satisfaction. While this technique will not ameliorate the underlying pathomechanics contributing to SAPS, it may serve as a valuable tool to restore ROM and decrease pain allowing the patient to reap the full benefits of a multi‐modal treatment approach. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:28217425

  16. A comparison of lumbopelvic motion patterns and erector spinae behavior between asymptomatic subjects and patients with recurrent low back pain during pain-free periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel; López-Pascual, Juan; Garrido-Jaén, David; García-Mas, Maria Amparo

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the patterns of lumbopelvic motion and erector spinae (ES) activity during trunk flexion-extension movements and to compare these patterns between patients with recurrent low back pain (LBP) in their pain-free periods and matched asymptomatic subjects. Thirty subjects participated (15 patients with disc herniation and recurrent LBP in their pain-free periods and 15 asymptomatic control subjects). A 3-dimensional videophotogrammetric system and surface electromyography (EMG) were used to record the angular displacements of the lumbar spine and hip in the sagittal plane and the EMG activity of the ES during standardized trunk flexion-extension cycles. Variables were maximum ranges of spine and hip flexion; percentages of maximum lumbar and hip flexion at the start and end of ES relaxation; average percentages of EMG activity during flexion, relaxation, and extension; and flexion-extension ratio of myoelectrical activity. Recurrent LBP patients during their pain-free period showed significantly greater ES activation both in flexion and extension, with a higher flexion-extension ratio than controls. Maximum ranges of lumbar and hip flexion showed no differences between controls and patients, although patients spent less time with their lumbar spine maximally flexed. This study showed that reduced maximum ranges of motion and absence of ES flexion-relaxation phenomenon were not useful to identify LBP patients in the absence of acute pain. However, these patients showed subtle alterations of their lumbopelvic motion and ES activity patterns, which may have important clinical implications. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Social responsibility and sustainable development: a strategy to be practice; Responsabilidade social e desenvolvimento sustentavel - estrategias que conduzem a pratica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcia Amaral Estevao dos [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Said, Nagib Albuquerque [Fundacao Gorceix, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This work presents the strategy adopted by the Research and Development Center of PETROBRAS - CENPES to disseminate the culture of social responsibility and sustainable development. It is associated to the strategic objectives of the company and is based on the integration of diagnosis, sensibility and training actions of CENPES manpower. The objective is to promote appropriate postures toward sustainability which will be manifested from individual attitudes in daily actions inside the company - as for instance the responsible consumption of paper and water - until the election of sustainability criteria, with emphasis in the social and environmental variables that will contribute to research and basic engineer projects evaluation. The diagnosis phase considers two fundamental actions: to check the 'state of the art' of the internal culture and to map the several relationship groups or stakeholders. In the sensibility stage, the objective is to offer knowledge and information about the theme using different approaches some times continued, other times segmented, through specific and appropriate media. Finally, the training of the researchers and sustainability concepts promoter and multiplier agents will close the virtuous cycle that will lead to practice the values proposed in the social responsibility and sustainable development agenda. (author)

  18. Prevalence of pain-free weeks in chiropractic subjects with low back pain - a longitudinal study using data gathered with text messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemeunier Nadège

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The use of automated text messages has made it possible to identify different courses of low back pain (LBP, and it has been observed that pain often fluctuates and that absolute recovery is rather rare. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of pain-free weeks and pain-free periods in subjects with non-specific LBP treated by chiropractors, and to compare subjects from two different countries in these aspects. Methods Data were obtained from two practice-based multicentre prospective outcome studies, one Danish and one Swedish, involving subjects being treated by chiropractors for non-specific LBP. Over 18 weeks, subjects answered a weekly automated text message question on the number of days in the past week that they had experienced bothersome LBP, i.e. a number between 0 and 7. The number of weeks in a row without any LBP at all ("zero weeks" as well as the maximum number of zero weeks in a row was determined for each individual. Comparisons were made between the two study samples. Estimates are presented as percentages with 95% confidence intervals. Results In the Danish and the Swedish populations respectively, 93/110 (85% and 233/262 (89% of the subjects were eligible for analysis. In both groups, zero weeks were rather rare and were most commonly (in 40% of the zero weeks reported as a single isolated week. The prevalence of pain free periods, i.e. reporting a maximum of 0, 1 or 2, or 3-6 zero weeks in a row, were similar in the two populations (20-31%. Smaller percentages were reported for ≥ 7 zero weeks in a row. There were no significant differences between the two study groups. Conclusion It was uncommon that chiropractic subjects treated for non-specific LBP experienced an entire week without any LBP at all over 18 weeks. When this occurred, it was most commonly reported for brief periods only. Hence, recovery in the sense that patients become absolutely pain free is rare, even in a primary

  19. Prevalence of pain-free weeks in chiropractic subjects with low back pain - a longitudinal study using data gathered with text messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeunier, Nadège; Kongsted, Alice; Axén, Iben

    2011-12-14

    The use of automated text messages has made it possible to identify different courses of low back pain (LBP), and it has been observed that pain often fluctuates and that absolute recovery is rather rare. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of pain-free weeks and pain-free periods in subjects with non-specific LBP treated by chiropractors, and to compare subjects from two different countries in these aspects. Data were obtained from two practice-based multicentre prospective outcome studies, one Danish and one Swedish, involving subjects being treated by chiropractors for non-specific LBP. Over 18 weeks, subjects answered a weekly automated text message question on the number of days in the past week that they had experienced bothersome LBP, i.e. a number between 0 and 7. The number of weeks in a row without any LBP at all ("zero weeks") as well as the maximum number of zero weeks in a row was determined for each individual. Comparisons were made between the two study samples. Estimates are presented as percentages with 95% confidence intervals. In the Danish and the Swedish populations respectively, 93/110 (85%) and 233/262 (89%) of the subjects were eligible for analysis. In both groups, zero weeks were rather rare and were most commonly (in 40% of the zero weeks) reported as a single isolated week. The prevalence of pain free periods, i.e. reporting a maximum of 0, 1 or 2, or 3-6 zero weeks in a row, were similar in the two populations (20-31%). Smaller percentages were reported for ≥ 7 zero weeks in a row. There were no significant differences between the two study groups. It was uncommon that chiropractic subjects treated for non-specific LBP experienced an entire week without any LBP at all over 18 weeks. When this occurred, it was most commonly reported for brief periods only. Hence, recovery in the sense that patients become absolutely pain free is rare, even in a primary care population.

  20. Blackcurrant Alters Physiological Responses and Femoral Artery Diameter during Sustained Isometric Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew David Cook

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Blackcurrant is rich in anthocyanins that may affect exercise-induced physiological responses. We examined tissue oxygen saturation, muscle activity, cardiovascular responses and femoral artery diameter during a submaximal sustained isometric contraction. In a randomised, double-blind, crossover design, healthy men (n = 13, age: 25 ± 4 years, BMI: 25 ± 3 kg·m−2, mean ± SD ingested New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC extract (600 mg∙day−1 CurraNZ™ or placebo (PL for 7-days separated by 14-days washout. Participants produced isometric maximal voluntary contractions (iMVC and a 120-s 30%iMVC of the quadriceps with electromyography (EMG, near-infrared spectroscopy, hemodynamic and ultrasound recordings. There was no effect of NZBC extract on iMVC (NZBC: 654 ± 73, PL: 650 ± 78 N. During the 30%iMVC with NZBC extract, total peripheral resistance, systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure were lower with increased cardiac output and stroke volume. With NZBC extract, EMG root mean square of the vastus medialis and muscle oxygen saturation were lower with higher total haemoglobin. During the 30%iMVC, femoral artery diameter was increased with NZBC extract at 30 (6.9%, 60 (8.2%, 90 (7.7% and 120 s (6.0%. Intake of NZBC extract for 7-days altered cardiovascular responses, muscle oxygen saturation, muscle activity and femoral artery diameter during a 120-s 30%iMVC of the quadriceps. The present study provides insight into the potential mechanisms for enhanced exercise performance with intake of blackcurrant.

  1. Association between sustained virological response and all-cause mortality among patients with chronic hepatitis C and advanced hepatic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.P. van der Meer (Adriaan); B.J. Veldt (Bart); J.J. Feld (Jordan J.); H. Wedemeyer (Heiner); J.F. Dufour (Jean-François); F. Lammert (Frank); A. Duarte-Rojo (Andres); E.J. Heathcote (Jenny); M.P. Manns (Michael); L. Kuske (Lorenz); S. Zeuzem (Stefan); W.P. Hofmann (Peter); R.J. de Knegt (Robert); B.E. Hansen (Bettina); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2012-01-01

    markdownabstract_Context:_ Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection outcomes include liver failure, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and liver-related death. _Objective:_ To assess the association between sustained virological response (SVR) and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic HCV

  2. The influences of task repetition, napping, time of day, and instruction on the Sustained Attention to Response Task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schie, M.K.M. van; Alblas, E.E.; Thijs, R.D.; Fronczek, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Dijk, J.G. van

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) helps to quantify vigilance impairments. Previous studies, in which five SART sessions on one day were administered, demonstrated worse performance during the first session than during the others. The present study comprises two

  3. Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Sustainability Education in AACSB Undergraduate and Graduate Marketing Curricula: A Benchmark Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Jeananne; Hair, Joseph F., Jr.; Ragland, Charles B.; Schimmel, Kurt E.

    2013-01-01

    AACSB International advocates integration of ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability in all business school disciplines. This study provides an overview of the implementation of these three topics in teaching initiatives and assessment in business schools accredited by AACSB International. Since no comprehensive studies have…

  4. ECO-INNOVATION, RESPONSIBLE LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE FOR CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dorel Mihai Paraschiv; Estera Laura Nemoianu; Claudia Adriana Langa; Tünde Szabó

    2012-01-01

    .... Sustainability requires the full integration of social and environmental aspects into the vision, culture and operations of an organization, a profound process of organizational change being essential...

  5. Special Issue on "Social Responsibility Accounting and Reporting in Times of Sustainability Downturn/Crisis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Correa Ruiz, María del Carmen; Moneva Abadía, José Mariano

    2011-01-01

    ... eroding social and environmental concerns and values, the notion of sustainability crisis provides an interesting starting point to reflect on the role of Social and Environmental Accounting Research...

  6. Responsible tourism: A guide for tourism and sustainability in small-scale fisheries and agri-food

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Adriana; Acott, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Responsible Tourism: a guide for tourism and sustainability in small-scale fisheries and agri-food’ is a product of TourFish, a project funded by the EU INTERREG IVA 2 Seas programme. The aim of TourFish was to explore opportunities for coastal areas through developing responsible tourism that draws together food, small-scale inshore fisheries, regional branding and place-based marketing opportunities.

  7. Sustained response of adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder to FOLFOX plus bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Minyuen; Swan, Niall C; McDermott, Ray S

    2011-05-01

    A 44-year-old patient presented with intermittent macroscopic hematuria on a background of chronic left-sided hydronephrosis and intestinal metaplasia of the bladder. Cystoscopic examination revealed a mass at the dome of the urinary bladder, which was resected. Histopathologic analysis of the specimen confirmed the presence of muscle-invasive adenocarcinoma. Radical cystectomy with curative intent was planned, but review of systems and subsequent CT demonstrated pleural effusion with positive cytology, confirming metastatic disease. Owing to the histologic similarity between this patient's tumor and colorectal cancer, palliative FOLFOX6 (folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin) chemotherapy plus bevacizumab was administered. After 3 months of treatment the patient showed a good response, which was sustained for more than 10 months after diagnosis. However, his disease subsequently relapsed, and the patient died shortly thereafter. Physical examination, cystoscopy, transurethral resection of bladder tissue, CT, histopathologic, cytopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis. Metastatic adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder. 12 cycles of infused and bolus 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX6) plus bevacizumab.

  8. [Contribution of research to the responsible and sustainable development of nanotechnologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavicoli, S; Boccuni, F

    2008-01-01

    The newly-fledged nanotechnologies offer opportunities for social development but uncertainties prevail about their impact on human and environmental health. Right now there is still a huge gap between technological progress and research into the health and safety aspects of nanomaterials. This is clear from the quantity of nano-products already on the market--more than 600--and the public and private funds dedicated to the development of nanotechnologies, which are almost a hundred times those available for research into their effects on health and safety. Estimates have it that by 2014 nanotechnologies will be widely used in our society, and ten million new jobs will be created. Therefore it becomes essential to plan an integrated approach to specific risk analysis at work. The following gaps and needs come to light: limited information; difficulties in relating nanotechnologies and production of nanomaterials to specific areas of application; efforts required to assess the hazards posed by nanomaterials in realistic exposure conditions; ethical issues about nanotechnology in the workplace likely to arise from today's knowledge about the hazards of nanomaterials and the risks they may pose to workers. An integrated approach to research, cooperation and communication strategies is essential if we are to direct our efforts towards responsible and sustainable growth of nanotechnologies.

  9. Financial sustainability of academic health centers: identifying challenges and strategic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Jim P; Li, Tao; Shiyanbola, Oyewale O; Jacobson, Janelle J

    2014-06-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) play a vital role in the health care system. The training of health care personnel and delivery of health care services, especially to the most complex and financially challenged patients, has been a responsibility increasingly shouldered by AHCs over the years. Additionally, AHCs play a significant role in researching and developing new treatment protocols, including discovering and validating new health technologies. However, AHCs face unique financial challenges in fulfilling their social mission in the health care system. Reforms being implemented under the Affordable Care Act and shifting economic patterns are threatening the financial sustainability of AHCs.The authors review challenges facing AHCs, including training new health care professionals with fewer funding resources, disproportionate clinical care of complex and costly patients, charity care to uninsured and underinsured, and reduced research funding opportunities. Then, they provide a review of some potential solutions to these challenges, including new reimbursement methods, improvements in operational efficiency, price regulation, subsidization of education, improved decision making and communication, utilization of industrial management tools, and increasing internal and external cooperation. Devising solutions to the evolving problems of AHCs is crucial to improving health care delivery in the United States. Most likely, a combination of market, government, and system reforms will be needed to improve the viability of AHCs and assist them in fulfilling their social and organizational missions.

  10. Visions for a sustainable world: A conference on science, technology and social responsibility. Conference report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes the organization, activities, and outcomes of Student Pugwash USA`s 1992 International Conference, Visions for a Sustainable World: A Conference on Science, Technology and Social Responsibility. The conference was held June 14--20, 1992 at Emory University, and brought together 94 students and over 65 experts from industry, academe, and government. The conference addressed issues ranging from global environmental cooperation to the social impacts of the Human Genome Project to minority concerns in the sciences. It provided a valuable forum for talented students and professionals to engage in critical dialogue on many interdisciplinary issues at the juncture of science, technology and society. The conference challenged students -- the world`s future scientists, engineers, and political leaders -- to think broadly about global problems and to devise policy options that are viable and innovative. The success of the conference in stimulating interest, understanding, and enthusiasm about interdisciplinary global issues is clearly evident from both the participants` feedback and their continued involvement in Student Pugwash USA programs. Six working groups met each morning. The working group themes included: environmental challenges for developing countries; energy options: their social and environmental impact; health care in developing countries; changing dynamics of peace and global security; educating for the socially responsible use of technology; ethics and the use of genetic information. The conference was specifically designed to include mechanisms for ensuring its long-term impact. Participants were encouraged to focus on their individual role in helping resolve global issues. This was achieved through each participant`s development of a Personal Plan of Action, a plan which mapped out activities the student could undertake after the conference to continue the dialogue and work towards the resolution of global and local problems.

  11. Modern multiple myeloma therapy: deep, sustained treatment response and good clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgren, O; Iskander, K

    2017-04-01

    In the USA at the beginning of this century, the average overall survival in patients with multiple myeloma was about 3 years. Around that time, three drugs (bortezomib, lenalidomide and thalidomide) were introduced for the treatment of multiple myeloma and, in 2012, carfilzomib received accelerated approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Driven by access to better drugs, median overall survival in younger patients (aged 10 years by 2014. The FDA approved 14 new drugs for the treatment of cancer in 2015; four of these were approved for the treatment of myeloma (panobinostat, daratumumab, elotuzumab and ixazomib). In 2015 and 2016, expanded label indications were approved by the FDA for lenalidomide and carfilzomib, respectively. The recent increase in approved, highly effective combination therapies for patients with multiple myeloma has led the way to redefining the goals of therapy. Here, we review and provide a clinical perspective on the treatment goals and management of multiple myeloma in the era of modern therapy. Recent meta-analyses show that minimal residual disease (MRD) negativity is associated with longer progression-free and overall survival in patients with multiple myeloma. With the use of modern combination therapy, large proportions (>60-70%) of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients achieve complete responses and MRD negativity. Modern combination therapies induce rapid, deep and sustainable responses (including MRD negativity), supporting a treatment paradigm shift away from palliative two-drug combinations towards the use of modern, potent, three- or four-drug combination regimens in early lines of therapy. Data support the use of modern therapy upfront rather than reserving it for later stages of the disease. As survival time increases with modern combination therapies, development of early reliable surrogate end-points for survival, such as MRD negativity, are needed for expedited read-out of future randomized clinical

  12. [Lifting capacity with low back pain : Discrepancy between self-rated and real lifting capacity in patients with back pain and pain-free controls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfingsten, M; Wendt, A; Kröner-Herwig, B; Lüder, S; Hildebrandt, J; Petzke, F

    2011-12-01

    The fear-avoidance model implies that in situations with physical demands patients with back pain will overestimate the demand and underestimate their own capacities. A total of 71 patients with back pain and 48 pain-free control subjects carried out a standardized lifting test with a preceding estimation of their lifting capacity. In both groups the self-estimation and real lifting capacity were in concordance for most group members with patients showing less disconcordance than controls. In the control group 35% of the subjects even underestimated their lifting capacity, which was the case in only 14% of the patients. Patients more frequently overestimated their capacity than pain-free controls (14% vs. 2%). Within the patients subgroups could be identified where patients in general either underestimated or overestimated their own capacity. A comparison between the groups demonstrated significant differences in pain intensity, fear avoidance beliefs and effort. As an explanation for these unexpected results it can be hypothesized that in cases of back pain, patients' attention is focused on pain-relevant issues which enables a more realistic estimation of their lifting capacity.

  13. Gestalt Breastfeeding: Helping Mothers and Infants Optimize Positional Stability and Intraoral Breast Tissue Volume for Effective, Pain-Free Milk Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela; Keogh, Renee

    2017-08-01

    In the past decade, biological nurturing and activation of maternal and infant instincts after birth have constituted a major advance in clinical breastfeeding support. Yet, physiologic breastfeeding initiation is not enough to ensure ongoing pain-free and effective breastfeeding for many pairs. Current interventions, including "hands-off" mammalian approaches, do not improve breastfeeding outcomes, including in randomized controlled trials. Back-arching, difficulty latching or staying on the breast, and fussing at the breast are common signs of infant positional instability during breastfeeding. These cues are, however, often misdiagnosed as signs of medical conditions or oral connective tissue abnormalities, and underlying positional instability is not addressed. New clinical approaches are urgently required. This article offers a clinical approach to fit and hold (or latch and positioning)- gestalt breastfeeding, which aims to optimize positional stability and intraoral breast tissue volumes for pain-free effective breastfeeding. The word gestalt (pronounced "ger-shtolt") means a whole that is more than the sum of its parts. Gestalt breastfeeding builds on the theoretical foundations of complexity science, physiologic breastfeeding initiation, and new understandings of the biomechanics of infant suck elucidated in ultrasound studies. It also integrates simple psychological strategies from applied functional contextualism, popularly known as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, empowering women to attend mindfully to breast sensations and their infant's cues. Gestalt breastfeeding can be reproduced for research purposes, including in comparison studies with oral surgery, and has the potential to improve breastfeeding outcomes.

  14. Contributions of mood, pain catastrophizing, and cold hyperalgesia in acute and chronic low back pain: a comparison with pain-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübscher, Markus; Moloney, Niamh; Rebbeck, Trudy; Traeger, Adrian; Refshauge, Kathryn M

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative sensory testing (QST) has been used to elucidate the peripheral and central mechanisms that underlie changes in pain sensitivity associated with low back pain (LBP). However, it remains unclear to what degree peripheral and central changes contribute to the generation and maintenance of LBP. The aim of this study was to compare thermal pain sensitivity, measured using QST, in participants with acute LBP, chronic LBP, and pain-free controls. Participant groups with acute LBP (N=20), chronic LBP (N=30), and pain-free controls (N=30) were assessed by thermal QST. The unique contributions of pain-related psychological and QST variables to predict membership to the acute and chronic pain groups were also determined. We found that participants with chronic LBP demonstrated significantly lower cold pain threshold (CPT) in the primary area of pain (low back) as well as in an area anatomically remote from the primary area of pain (forearm) when compared with controls. Participants with acute LBP did not show significantly elevated pain sensitivity. CPT at the remote site was a significant independent predictor of membership to the chronic pain group, after the adjustment for mood and pain catastrophizing. CPT explained 8% of the total variance of 46% related to group membership. We found evidence for localized and generalized cold hyperalgesia in chronic, but not acute LBP. We might speculate that hyperalgesia develops as a consequence of long-lasting LBP, but prospective studies are needed to confirm this assumption.

  15. Reliability of isometric strength measurements in trunk and neck region: patients with chronic neck pain compared with pain-free persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, Raphael; Friedrich, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Evaluation of reliability of isometric strength measurements in the neck and trunk region and comparison of these measurements between patients with chronic neck pain and pain-free subjects. Nonrandomized controlled trial. Institutional practice. Patients with neck pain (n=53) and pain-free persons (n=42) (mean age ± SD, 49.7±10.74 vs 48.7±12.02; women, 73% vs 71%). Strength of flexion, extension, and lateral flexion in the neck and trunk were measured. Each participant underwent 2 measurement passes on each of 2 examination days; 3 were performed by the same investigator, 1 by a second. Intrarater (short-term and long-term) and interrater reliability, differences in strength between both groups of probands. Reliability in both groups ranged from substantial to almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient: patients, .76-.89; control group, .80-.88). The patients' strength in the neck and trunk was significantly below that of the control group (P<.002). Isometric strength measurement is a reliable and feasible way to estimate the possible benefit of specific strengthening programs. Patients with chronic neck pain showed strength deficits in all measured regions. Copyright © 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. What is the best surface EMG measure of lumbar flexion-relaxation for distinguishing chronic low back pain patients from pain-free controls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neblett, Randy; Brede, Emily; Mayer, Tom G; Gatchel, Robert J

    2013-04-01

    Lumbar flexion-relaxation (FR) is a well-known phenomenon that can reliably be seen in normal subjects but not in most chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. The purpose of this study was to determine which surface electromyographic (SEMG) measures of FR best distinguish CLBP patients from pain-free control subjects. Standing SEMG and lumbar flexion range of motion (ROM) were also evaluated. A cohort of 218 CLBP patients, who were admitted to a functional restoration program, received a standardized SEMG and ROM assessment during standing trunk flexion and reextension. An asymptomatic control group of 30 nonpatients received an identical assessment. Both groups were compared on 8 separate SEMG and 3 flexion ROM measures. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine how well each measure distinguished between the CLBP patients and the pain-free control subjects. All SEMG measures of FR performed acceptably. Between 79% and 82% of patients, and 83% and 100% of controls were correctly classified. Standing SEMG performed less well. Gross flexion ROM was the best single classification measure tested, correctly classifying 88% of patients and 83% of controls. A series of discriminant analyses found that certain combinations of SEMG and ROM performed slightly better than gross ROM alone for correctly classifying the 2 subjects groups. Because all SEMG measures of FR performed acceptably, the determination of which SEMG measure of FR is "best" is largely dependent on one's specific purpose. In addition, ROM measures were found to be important components of the FR assessment.

  17. Three-dimensional localization of abnormal EEG activity in migraine: a low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) study of migraine patients in the pain-free interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Béla; Bánk, József; Piros, Pálma; Bessenyei, Mónika; Veto, Sára; Tóth, Márton; Kondákor, István

    2008-09-01

    Investigating the brain of migraine patients in the pain-free interval may shed light on the basic cerebral abnormality of migraine, in other words, the liability of the brain to generate migraine attacks from time to time. Twenty unmedicated "migraine without aura" patients and a matched group of healthy controls were investigated in this explorative study. 19-channel EEG was recorded against the linked ears reference and was on-line digitized. 60 x 2-s epochs of eyes-closed, waking-relaxed activity were subjected to spectral analysis and a source localization method, low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Absolute power was computed for 19 electrodes and four frequency bands (delta: 1.5-3.5 Hz, theta: 4.0-7.5 Hz, alpha: 8.0-12.5 Hz, beta: 13.0-25.0 Hz). LORETA "activity" (=current source density, ampers/meters squared) was computed for 2394 voxels and the above specified frequency bands. Group comparison was carried out for the specified quantitative EEG variables. Activity in the two groups was compared on a voxel-by-voxel basis for each frequency band. Statistically significant (uncorrected P pain-free interval and might be suitable for planning forthcoming investigations.

  18. Social Responsibility and Sustainability: Multidisciplinary Perspectives through Service Learning. Service Learning for Civic Engagement Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Tracy, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This concluding volume in the series presents the work of faculty who have been moved to make sustainability the focus of their work, and to use service learning as one method of teaching sustainability to their students. The chapters in the opening section of this book-- Environmental Awareness--offer models for opening students to the awareness…

  19. Corporate social responsibility for regional sustainability after mine closure: a case study of mining company in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarif, Andi Erwin; Hatori, Tsuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    Creating a soft-landing path for mine closure is key to the sustainability of the mining region. In this research, we presents a case of mine closure in Soroako, a small mining town in the north-east of South Sulawesi province, in the center of Sulawesi Island in Indonesia. Especially we investigates corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs of a mining company, PT Vale Indonesia Tbk (PTVI), towards a soft-landing of mine closure in this region. The data of the CSR programs are gathered from in-depth interviews, the annual reports and managerial reports. Furthermore we presents an integrated view of CSR to close mining in a sustainable manner. We then evaluate CSR strategies of the company and its performance from this viewpoint. Based on these steps, the way to improve the CSR mine closure scenario for enhancing the regional sustainability is discussed and recommended.

  20. Plasma response to sustainment with imposed-dynamo current drive in HIT-SI and HIT-SI3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, A. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Chandra, R. N.; Morgan, K. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Penna, J. M.; Everson, C. J.; Nelson, B. A.

    2017-07-01

    The helicity injected torus—steady inductive (HIT-SI) program studies efficient, steady-state current drive for magnetic confinement plasmas using a novel experimental method. Stable, high-beta spheromaks have been sustained using steady, inductive current drive. Externally induced loop voltage and magnetic flux are oscillated together so that helicity and power injection are always positive, sustaining the edge plasma current indefinitely. Imposed-dynamo current drive (IDCD) theory further shows that the entire plasma current is sustained. The method is ideal for low aspect ratio, toroidal geometries with closed flux surfaces. Experimental studies of spheromak plasmas sustained with IDCD have shown stable magnetic profiles with evidence of pressure confinement. New measurements show coherent motion of a stable spheromak in response to the imposed perturbations. On the original device two helicity injectors were mounted on either side of the spheromak and the injected mode spectrum was predominantly n  =  1. Coherent, rigid motion indicates that the spheromak is stable and a lack of plasma-generated n  =  1 energy indicates that the maximum q is maintained below 1 during sustainment. Results from the HIT-SI3 device are also presented. Three inductive helicity injectors are mounted on one side of the spheromak flux conserver. Varying the relative injector phasing changes the injected mode spectrum which includes n  =  2, 3, and higher modes.

  1. Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with a Sustained Response to Anti-Hepatitis C Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta D'Ambrosio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a common, life-threatening complication of longstanding infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV, likely a consequence of the direct oncogenic activity of the virus cooperating with liver cell inflammation in transforming the liver into a mitogenic and mutagenic environment. The achievement of a sustained virological response (SVR to interferon-based therapies has been shown to benefit the course of hepatitis C in terms of reduced rates of liver-related complications and mortality from all causes. Interestingly, while achievement of an SVR is associated with a negligible risk of developing clinical decompensation over the years, the risk of HCC is not fully abrogated following HCV clearance, but it remains the dominant complication in all SVR populations. The factors accounting for such a residual risk of HCC in SVR patients are not fully understood, yet the persistence of the subverted architecture of the liver, diabetes and alcohol abuse are likely culprits. In the end, the risk of developing an HCC in SVR patients is attenuated by 75% compared to non-responders or untreated patients, whereas responders who develop an HCC may be stratified in different categories of HCC risk by a score based on the same demographic and liver disease-based variables, such as those that predict liver cancer in viremic patients. All in all, this prevents full understanding of those factors that drive HCC risk once HCV has been eradicated. Here, we critically review current understanding of HCC in SVR patients focusing on factors that predict residual risk of HCC among these patients and providing a glimpse of the expected benefits of new anti-HCV regimens based on direct antiviral agents.

  2. Sustainable Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Ralph P.; Gudmundsson, Henrik; Marsden, Greg

    2014-01-01

    that relate to the construction and maintenance of transportation infrastructure and the operation or use of the different transportation modes. The concept of sustainable transportation emerged in response to these concerns as part of the broader notion of sustainable development. Given the transportation...

  3. Challenges for Sustainable Development and Its Legal Response in China: A Perspective for Social Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tianbao Qin

    2014-01-01

      With rapid development since the 1970s, China is entering a period of social transformation, which not only creates favorable conditions for sustainable development but also presents new challenges...

  4. Consumer response to health and environmental sustainability information regarding seafood consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Silke; Sioen, Isabelle; Marques, António; Verbeke, Wim

    2018-02-01

    Seafood consumption has an impact on both consumers' health and on the marine environment, making the integration of health and sustainability aspects in information and recommendation messages for consumers highly topical. This study presents the results of a consumer study in terms of the impact of exposure to a message about health and sustainability aspects of seafood on 986 participants from Belgium and Portugal. Possible drivers for behavioural change regarding seafood consumption frequency and sustainable seafood buying frequency are studied following exposure to the message. Initial behaviour emerges as the most important factor triggering a change in the intention to consume seafood twice per week and a change in the intention to buy sustainable seafood. A higher health benefit perception resulted in an increased intention to consume seafood twice per week. Attitude towards the message and the option to optimise consumers' choice of seafood species favouring sustainability were significant determinants of change in the intention to buy sustainable seafood. Different stakeholders may take the results of this communication strategy into account and, consequently, contribute to a seafood supply and related communication that supports public health and the marine environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sustainable Food & Sustainable Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Mavis Dora

    2012-01-01

    Cuba today is immersed in a very intense process of perfecting its agricultural production structures with the goal of making them more efficient and sustainable in their economic administration and in their social and environmental management. Agricultural cooperatives in Cuba have the responsibility of producing on 73% of the country's farmland. Their contributions are decisive to developing agricultural production and to ensuring more and better food for the population, in addition to redu...

  6. Sustainability reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.

    2005-01-01

    This article gives an overview of developments in sustainability (also sometimes labelled corporate social responsibility) reporting. The article will first briefly indicate how accountability on social and environmental issues started, already in the 1970s when social reports were published.

  7. Does Sustainability Pay Off for European Listed Real Estate Companies? The Dynamics between Risk and Provision of Responsible Information

    OpenAIRE

    Cajias, Marcelo; Bienert, Sven

    2011-01-01

    We follow the guidelines of the Global Reporting Initiative and the European Public Real Estate Association to investigate the quality of real estate-related sustainability information provided by European listed real estate companies in 13 countries. We find that human resources and stock price volatility play a significant role in the company’s strength with respect to corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities. Business complexity and financial transparency enhance the provision of s...

  8. The Impacts of Social Responsibility and Ownership Structure on Sustainable Financial Development of China’s Energy Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Feng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the analysis, we integrated stakeholder and agency theories to explore the connection between corporate social responsibility (CSR and sustainable financial development by considering the moderating effect of ownership structure. After empirical analysis, we found the following conclusions. First, the short-term and long-term economic performance is positively affected by CSR, which leads to sustainable financial development. Second, ownership circulation has a positive relationship with economic performance in the short run, which short-term profit increases as ownership circulation strengthens. Third, the effect of CSR on short-term economic performance is moderated by ownership structure. Excessive concentrated ownership may lead to decisions that do not satisfy all key stakeholders and may reduce the positive effect of CSR on economic performance. Finally, we suggest that Chinese energy companies should pay more attention to improving corporate social responsibility to maintain good economic performance and develop sustainable competitive advantage. Meanwhile, companies should optimize ownership concentration to avoid weakening the positive effects of social responsibility on short-term economic performance.

  9. Noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y contribute to initial, but not sustained, vasodilatation in response to local skin warming in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Gary J; Sparks, Paul A

    2014-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Previous work has produced the counterintuitive finding that the vasoconstrictor neurotransmitters noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y are involved in vasodilatation. We aimed to discover whether sympathetic neurotransmitters are required for the sustained vasodilatation in response to local skin warming, as has been previously suggested, and to determine whether noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y are 'mediating' the sustained vasodilator response directly or acting to 'prime' (or kick-start) it. What is the main finding and its importance? We have found that noradrenaline and neuropeptide Y are required at the initiation of vasodilatation in response to local skin warming, if a complete vasodilator response is to be achieved; however, they are not required once vasodilatation has begun. In a three-part study, we examined whether noradrenaline, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were involved in the sustained vasodilatation in response to local skin warming. Forearm skin sites were instrumented with intradermal microdialysis fibres, local skin heaters and laser-Doppler flow probes. Local skin temperature (T(loc)) was increased from 34 to 42°C at a rate of 0.5°C (10 s)(-1). Laser-Doppler flow was expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler flow/mean arterial pressure). In part 1, three skin sites were prepared; two were treated with the study vehicle (lactated Ringer solution), while the third site was treated with yohimbine and propranolol to antagonize α- and β-receptors, and 10 min of baseline data were record at a T(loc) of 34°C. Receptor antagonism was confirmed via infusion of clonidine. The T(loc) was increased to 42°C at all sites. Once CVC had stabilized, site 2 was treated with yohimbine and propranolol to examine the effect of adrenergic receptor blockade on sustained vasodilatation of the skin. Receptor antagonism was again confirmed via infusion of clonidine

  10. Circadian rest/activity rhythms in knee osteoarthritis with insomnia: a study of osteoarthritis patients and pain-free controls with insomnia or normal sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spira, Adam P; Runko, Virginia T; Finan, Patrick H; Kaufmann, Christopher N; Bounds, Sara C; Liu, Lianqi; Buenaver, Luis F; McCauley, Lea M; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Smith, Michael T

    2015-03-01

    Aberrant circadian rest/activity rhythms (RARs) may promote poor aging-related health outcomes. Osteoarthritis and chronic insomnia are common age-related conditions, but the circadian RARs of each group have not been well characterized or compared. We evaluated actigraphic RARs in individuals with: (1) knee osteoarthritis (KOA) only; (2) chronic insomnia only; (3) KOA + insomnia; and (4) pain-free good sleepers. Compared to participants with KOA only, those with KOA + insomnia had less robust RARs. There were no differences between other groups. Further research is needed to evaluate whether aberrant RARs contribute to arthritis symptoms and insomnia in KOA, and whether strengthening RARs ameliorates arthritis symptoms.

  11. Safety, efficacy, and performance of new discrimination algorithms to reduce inappropriate and unnecessary shocks: the PainFree SST clinical study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auricchio, Angelo; Meijer, Albert; Kurita, Takashi; Schloss, Edward; Brinkman, Karin; Claessens-van Ooijen, Marieke; Sterns, Laurence

    2011-10-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shock therapy improves survival of patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. The high sensitivity of ICDs to detect tachycardia events is accompanied by reduced specificity resulting in inappropriate and unnecessary shocks. Up to 30% of ICD patients may experience inappropriate shocks, which are most commonly caused by lead noise, oversensing of T-waves, and supraventricular tachycardias. The new Protecta ICD and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices have been designed to minimize inappropriate and unnecessary shocks through novel SmartShock(TM) technology algorithms targeting these causes. The PainFree SST study is a prospective, multicentre clinical trial, which will be conducted in two consecutive phases. Phase I will assess safety and any delay that may arise in ventricular fibrillation (VF) arrhythmia detection time using new algorithms. Phase II will evaluate reduction of inappropriate and unnecessary shocks at 1 year of follow-up. Additional objectives will include Quality of Life, healthcare utilization, safety of extending the ventricular tachyarrhythmia/VF interval detection duration (18 out of 24 vs. 30 out of 40 intervals), and reasons for inappropriate shock. Up to 2000 subjects in 150 centres worldwide will be enrolled with a follow-up of at least 1 year. Subjects enrolled in Phase I will continue in Phase II of the study and data from all enrolled subjects will contribute to the analysis of Phase II objectives. Inappropriate and unnecessary shock delivery remains a significant clinical issue for patients receiving device therapies, which has considerable consequences for patients and the healthcare system. The PainFree SST study will investigate the ability of new algorithms to reduce inappropriate shocks. Results from this study are expected in mid-2013.

  12. Abnormal nociceptive processing occurs centrally and not peripherally in pain-free Parkinson disease patients: A study with laser-evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambito-Marsala, Sandro; Erro, Roberto; Bacchin, Ruggero; Fornasier, Annalisa; Fabris, Federico; Lo Cascio, Cecilia; Ferracci, Franco; Morgante, Francesca; Tinazzi, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Several studies documented abnormal nociceptive processing in PD patients. Pain central pathways are accessible by laser-evoked potentials (LEPs). LEPs recording show a N2/P2 complex mostly generated by the anterior cingulate cortex, preceded by an earlier negative component (N1), originating from the opercular cortex. Previous work demonstrated N2/P2 amplitude reduction in PD patients and suggested a centrally-acting pathomechanism for the genesis of pain. However, since a peripheral deafferentation has been recently demonstrated in PD, it is not clear if such LEP abnormalities reflect a mechanism acting centrally or not. To assess whether abnormalities of nociceptive inputs occur at central and/or peripheral level in pain-free PD patients with hemiparkinson using Nd:YAP LEPs. We recorded scalp Nd:YAP-LEPs to hand stimulation in 13 pain-free patients with unilateral PD and in 13 healthy subjects. Additionally, we collected laser pain-rating in both groups. PD patients and normal subjects showed comparable N1, N2 and P2 latencies. The N2/P2 amplitude was significantly lower in PD patients than in controls, regardless of the clinically affected side, whereas the N1/P1 amplitude was not different. PD patients had higher pain-rating, indicative of hyperalgesia. These findings demonstrate that in the PD patients the abnormal processing of pain stimuli occurs at central rather than peripheral level. The co-existence of hyperalgesia and reduced amplitude of the N2/P2 complex, in spite of a normal N1/P1 component, suggests an imbalance between the medial and lateral pain systems. Such a dissociation might explain the genesis of central pain in PD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Sustained specific and cross-reactive T cell responses to Zika and Dengue viruses NS3 in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Bobby Brooke; Tsai, Wen-Yang; Chang, Charlotte A; Hamel, Donald J; Wang, Wei-Kung; Lu, Yichen; Mboup, Souleymane; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2018-01-10

    Recent studies on the role of T cells in Zika virus (ZIKV) infection have shown that T cell responses to Asian ZIKV infection are important for protection, and that previous Dengue virus (DENV) exposure amplifies the protective T cell response to Asian ZIKV. Human T cell responses to African ZIKV infection, however, remain unexplored. Here, we utilized the modified anthrax toxin delivery system to develop a flavivirus ELISPOT. Using human ZIKV and DENV samples from Senegal, West Africa, our results demonstrate specific and cross-reactive T cell responses to nonstructural protein 3 (NS3). Specifically, we found that T cell responses to NS3 protease are ZIKV and DENV specific, but responses to NS3 helicase are cross-reactive. Sequential sample analyses revealed immune responses sustained many years after infection. These results have important implications for African ZIKV/DENV vaccine development, as well for potential flavivirus diagnostics based on T cell responses.IMPORTANCEThe recent Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic in Latin America and the associated congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome has raised questions as to why we have not recognized these distinct clinical diseases in Africa. The human immunologic response to ZIKV and related flaviviruses in Africa represents a research gap that may potentially shed light on the mechanisms contributing to protection. The goal of our study was to develop an inexpensive assay to detect and characterize the T cell response to African ZIKV and DENV. Our data show long-term specific and cross-reactive human immune responses against African ZIKV and DENV, suggesting the potential usefulness of a diagnostic based on the T cell response. Additionally, we show that prior flavivirus exposure influences the magnitude of the T cell response. The identification of immune responses to African ZIKV and DENV is of relevance to vaccine development. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. T Cell Factor 1-Expressing Memory-like CD8(+) T Cells Sustain the Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzschneider, Daniel T; Charmoy, Mélanie; Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Pousse, Laurène; Ferreira, Daniela Pais; Calderon-Copete, Sandra; Danilo, Maxime; Alfei, Francesca; Hofmann, Maike; Wieland, Dominik; Pradervand, Sylvain; Thimme, Robert; Zehn, Dietmar; Held, Werner

    2016-08-16

    Chronic infections promote the terminal differentiation (or "exhaustion") of T cells and are thought to preclude the formation of memory T cells. In contrast, we discovered a small subpopulation of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells that sustained the T cell response during chronic infections. These cells were defined by, and depended on, the expression of the transcription factor Tcf1. Transcriptome analysis revealed that this population shared key characteristics of central memory cells but lacked an effector signature. Unlike conventional memory cells, Tcf1-expressing T cells displayed hallmarks of an "exhausted" phenotype, including the expression of inhibitory receptors such as PD-1 and Lag-3. This population was crucial for the T cell expansion that occurred in response to inhibitory receptor blockade during chronic infection. These findings identify a memory-like T cell population that sustains T cell responses and is a prime target for therapeutic interventions to improve the immune response in chronic infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Special Issue on "Social Responsibility Accounting and Reporting in Times of ‘Sustainability Downturn/Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Moneva-Abadía

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available At a time when sustainability performance does not seem to match the expectations raised by the sustainable development concept and, moreover, when the economic downturn and crisis could be further eroding social and environmental concerns and values, the notion of sustainability crisis provides an interesting starting point to reflect on the role of Social and Environmental Accounting Research. Lack of humanity and values, short term economic approach, institutional capture and misunderstanding and misuse of democracy, have all served as catalysts of sustainability downturn and crisis. Thus, this editorial attempts to advance public interest accounting by discussing the controversy around Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility, expecting that the constitutive effects of researchers’ words in this special issue and in future research agendas, will result in more transformative power relations able to enhance a healthy democracy inspired by the capacity to do things and to transform individuals’ attitudes and behaviours, as well as the institutional response to the sustainability crisis.En una época en la que el desempeño en materia de sostenibilidad parece no cumplir las expectativas creadas por el concepto de desarrollo sostenible y, en la que además, la recesión y la crisis económica podría estar erosionando aún más los valores y preocupaciones sociales y medioambientales, la noción de crisis de sostenibilidad proporciona un interesante punto de partida para reflexionar sobre el papel de la investigación en Contabilidad Social y Medioambiental. La falta de humanidad y la ausencia de valores, el enfoque económico cortoplacista, la captura institucional y la democracia mal entendida y su uso incorrecto, han servido como catalizadores de la crisis y la recesión de la sostenibilidad. Así, el presente editorial pretende avanzar en la contabilidad como interés general, debatiendo sobre la controversia existente

  16. Supply Chain Response to Institutional Markets’ Demand for Healthy and Sustainable Food Options

    OpenAIRE

    Abate-Kassa, Getachew

    2011-01-01

    Institutional food buyers in the U.S. are increasingly demanding food products that are safe, traceable, healthier, local/regional, or sustainably produced and supplied. These markets consist of schools, universities, hospitals, charities, correction facilities, clubs and other similar organizations that buy goods and services to meet demands of their end-customers (students, patients, prisoners, etc.). These institutions comprise a large portion of the U.S. population. In 2008, the total num...

  17. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Screening Is Indicated Even After Sustained Virological Response: -Moroccan University Hospital Experience-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cherradi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatitis C is the first aetiologic agent for HCC in Morocco. Antiviral treatment reduces the risk of developing HCC in patients with chronic hepatitis C but few cases of HCC have been still reported. We aimed to define population with high risk of HCC occurrence, confirm the protective role of SVR and to identify predictive factors of developing HCC after SVR. We’ll try to present suggestions about screening strategies (indications and interval after antiviral therapy according to level of HCC occurrence risk. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with chronic hepatitis C treated in our department from January 2002 to April 2010. We compare HCV-treated patients with no developed HCC to HCC population using khi-2 and Fisher Exact analysis. Results: 369 patients treated for hepatitis C were considered, and 20 HCC were reported. The risk of HCC occurrence was not significant according to gender and genotypes. Advanced age and severe fibrosis were significant risk factors. HCC was reported in 2.3% of sustained virological responders versus 12.5% of non responders. SVR is a significant protective factor. Conclusion: In our series, 5% of previously treated HCV carriers developed HCC and 2.3% of sustained virological responders developed. Achieving SVR after antiviral therapy is a protective factor. Advanced age (> 50 y. o, severe fibrosis (F>2 and lack of SVR at HCV diagnosis are predictive factors of HCC development in treated patients. Regular bi-annual ultrasonography screening should be indicated necessarily in patients with advanced fibrosis stage (F3- F4 even after SVR, particularly when co-morbid conditions are associated (advanced age, NASH, diabetes mellitus,…. Screening interval in sustained virological responders with reduced fibrosis stage may be reduced to annual surveillance. Establishing guidelines about consensual strategy to survey sustained virological responders is now necessary especially with high rates

  18. Sustainability in global commodity trade: successful responsible entrepreneurship or fallacious market capture?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, W.J.V.

    2011-01-01

    In western countries NGOs have increasingly been pressing spearheaded firms to bring their corporate social responsibility into practice, especially in this international context. In response to this European and American producers and retailers are increasingly applying new forms of cooperation

  19. Are People Responsive to a More Sustainable, Decentralized, and User-Driven Management of Urban Metabolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Chelleri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Smart, green, and resilient city paradigms have been mainly promoted through top-down and technocratic approaches. However, based on the notion to return to “the right to the city”, emerging community-driven initiatives are providing self-managed infrastructures contributing to urban sustainability transitions. This paper explores the relevance of the behavioral aspects of people-centered approaches in dealing with two different facets of urban metabolism: physical infrastructure (involvement with the management of decentralized infrastructures and consumption patterns (involvement in proactive reduction of resources used. In the first case we assessed community perceptions about the roles, benefits, and willingness to proactively engage in the management of decentralized green infrastructures in Bogotá City, Colombia. For the second facet, we measured the effectiveness of change agents in re-shaping energy consumption decisions within urban social networks in South Africa and Saudi Arabia. This paper’s results show that pre-determined and standardized strategies do not guarantee positive, nor homogeneous, results in terms of meeting sustainability targets, or promoting community involvement. Hence, a better integration of people-centered and top-down approaches is needed through context-dependent policies, for enhancing both users’ appreciation of and commitment to urban metabolism participative management.

  20. Variety and sustainability of volcanic lakes: Response to subaqueous thermal activity predicted by a numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Akihiko; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    We use a numerical model to investigate the factors that control the presence or absence of a hot crater lake at an active volcano. We find that given a suitable pair of parameters (e.g., the enthalpy of subaqueous fumaroles and the ratio of mass flux of the fluid input at the lake bottom to lake surface area), hot crater lakes can be sustained on relatively long timescales. Neither a high rate of precipitation nor an impermeable layer beneath the lake bottom are always necessary for long-term sustainability. The two controlling parameters affect various hydrological properties of crater lakes, including temperature, chemical concentrations, and temporal variations in water levels. In the case of low-temperature crater lakes, increases in flux and enthalpy, which are a common precursor to phreatic or phreatomagmatic eruptions, result in an increase in both temperature and water level. In contrast, a decrease in water level accompanied by a rise in temperature occurs at high-temperature lakes. Furthermore, our model suggests that crater geometry is a key control on water temperature. For lakes with a conical topography, a perturbation in the water level due to trivial nonvolcanic activity, such as low levels of precipitation, can cause persistent increases in water temperature and chemical concentrations, and a decrease in the water level, even though subaqueous fumarolic activity does not change. Such changes in hot crater lakes which are not caused by changes in volcanic activity resemble the volcanic unrest that precedes eruptions.

  1. Sustainable Investment. Literature Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weda, J.; Kerste, M.; Rosenboom, N.

    2010-08-15

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), or sustainability at the company level, entails incorporating ecological (environmental stakeholders) and social aspects (stakeholders other than shareholders and environmental stakeholders) when doing business. Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) concerns sustainability at the investment, fund or portfolio level and involves screening the sustainability of companies before investing in them. This report highlights leading literature and empirical findings on 'sustainable investment', amongst others addressing the economic rationale for CSR and SRI. This report is part of a set of SEO-reports on finance and sustainability. The other reports deal with: Financing the Transition to Sustainable Energy; Carbon Trading; Innovations in financing environmental and social sustainability.

  2. Patient Characteristics Associated with HCV Treatment Adherence, Treatment Completion, and Sustained Virologic Response in HIV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C (HCV treatment efficacy among HIV patients is limited by poor treatment adherence and tolerance, but few studies have examined the psychosocial determinants of treatment adherence and outcomes. Methods. Chart abstracted and survey data were collected on 72 HIV patients who had received pegylated interferon and ribavirin to assess correlates of treatment adherence, completion, and sustained virologic response (SVR. Results. Nearly half (46% the sample had active psychiatric problems and 13% had illicit drug use at treatment onset; 28% reported <100% treatment adherence, 38% did not complete treatment (mostly due to virologic nonresponse, and intent to treat SVR rate was 49%. Having a psychiatric diagnosis was associated with nonadherence, while better HCV adherence was associated with both treatment completion and SVR. Conclusions. Good mental health may be an indicator of HCV treatment adherence readiness, which is in turn associated with treatment completion and response, but further research is needed with new HCV treatments emerging.

  3. Comparing Treatment Effect Measurements in Narcolepsy: The Sustained Attention to Response Task, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, Astrid; van Schie, Mojca K M; Lammers, Gert Jan; Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Mayer, Geert; Bassetti, Claudio L; Ding, Claire-Li; Lehert, Philippe; van Dijk, J Gert

    2015-07-01

    To validate the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) as a treatment effect measure in narcolepsy, and to compare the SART with the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Validation of treatment effect measurements within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Ninety-five patients with narcolepsy with or without cataplexy. The RCT comprised a double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter trial comparing the effects of 8-w treatments with pitolisant (BF2.649), modafinil, or placebo (NCT01067222). MWT, ESS, and SART were administered at baseline and after an 8-w treatment period. The severity of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy was also assessed using the Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI-C). The SART, MWT, and ESS all had good reliability, obtained for the SART and MWT using two to three sessions in 1 day. The ability to distinguish responders from nonresponders, classified using the CGI-C score, was high for all measures, with a high performance for the SART (r = 0.61) and the ESS (r = 0.54). The Sustained Attention to Response Task is a valid and easy-to-administer measure to assess treatment effects in narcolepsy, enhanced by combining it with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. Creating Sustainable Competitive Advantage: A Corporate Socialenvironmental Responsibility in the Light of the Resource-Based View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Prazeres Balbino

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available From the perspective of a greater concern with respect to corporate social and environmental aspects viewed in society, the Corporate Social-Environmental Responsibility (CSER is understood as a new management perspective to be used, no longer restricted to meet the aspirations of profit shareholders, but seeks include in your analysis other stakeholders such as society and the environment. According to the Resource-Based View (RBV, the CSER is regarded as an organizational capacity, because it involves a set of resources and depending on how it is integrated with business planning, could be a source of Sustainable Competitive Advantage (SCA. The objective of the study is to analyze the likely social and environmental responsibility as a sustainable competitive advantage for an organization in light of the Resource-Based View . From the discussion held to theoretical essay, we identified some aspects of CSER that can be elevated to the level of a SCA, namely: the generation of a good reputation and organizational image, and corporate citizenship in favor of the practice of CSER. It is appropriate therefore to carry out empirical studies, qualitative and/or quantitative, that can confirm and extend the arguments of this discussion, from the development of constructs, development of measurement instruments and proposing models, on CSER.

  5. Standards of socially responsible management – Impact on sustainable development of the organization, the social and natural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Peršič

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to outline the results of a study on the importance of the introduction/implementation of standards of socially responsible management and their impact on the business performance of organizations as well as to confirm the correlations with the sustainable development of the broader social and natural environment. The research included a population of medium-sized and large organizations (over 50 employees in the fields of marketing services in the Republic of Slovenia. Research results confirmed a direct link of understanding the management standards in organizations with a larger number of employees and the achieved higher income from operations. Research participants are familiar with the requirements of the Quality Management System Standard ISO 9001 and the Environmental Management System Standard ISO 14001, which is particularly significant for older business executives with many years of work experience in the company they run. The hypothesis that the implementation of the principles of social responsibility has a positive impact on sustainable development and the financial indicators of the organization – higher profits, business growth, productivity and cost-effectiveness in operations – has been confirmed.

  6. Women with dysmenorrhoea are hypersensitive to experimentally induced forearm ischaemia during painful menstruation and during the pain-free follicular phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovides, S; Avidon, I; Baker, F C

    2015-07-01

    Monthly primary dysmenorrhoeic pain is associated with increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, particularly in deep tissue. We investigated whether women with dysmenorrhoea, compared with controls, have increased sensitivity to experimentally induced deep-tissue muscle ischaemia in a body area distant from that of referred menstrual pain. The sub-maximal effort tourniquet test was used to induce forearm ischaemia in 11 women with severe dysmenorrhoea and in nine control women both during menstruation and in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Von Frey hair assessments confirmed the presence of experimental ischaemia. Women rated the intensity of menstrual and ischaemic pain on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Women with dysmenorrhoea [mean (SD): 68 (20) mm] reported significantly greater menstrual pain compared with controls [mean (SD): 2 (6) mm; p = 0.0001] during the menstruation phase. They also rated their forearm ischaemic pain as significantly greater than the controls during the menstruation [dysmenorrhoeics vs. controls mean (SD): 58 (19) mm vs. 31 (21) mm, p menstruation phase and pain-free follicular phase. These findings suggest the presence of long-lasting changes in muscle pain sensitivity in women with dysmenorrhoea. Our findings that dysmenorrhoeic women are hyperalgesic to a clinically relevant, deep-muscle ischaemic pain in areas outside of referred menstrual pain confirm other studies showing long-lasting changes in pain sensitivity outside of the painful period during menstruation. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  7. Immediate changes in masticatory mechanosensitivity, mouth opening, and head posture after myofascial techniques in pain-free healthy participants: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Rizo, Alberto Marcos; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Angel; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Piña-Pozo, Fernando; Luque-Carrasco, Antonio; Herrera-Monge, Patricia

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the immediate effects on masticatory muscle mechanosensitivity, maximal vertical mouth opening (VMO), and head posture in pain-free healthy participants after intervention with myofascial treatment in the temporalis and masseter muscles. A randomized, double-blind study was conducted. The sample group included 48 participants (n=48), with a mean age of 21±2.47 years (18-29). Two subgroups were defined: an intervention group (n=24), who underwent a fascial induction protocol in the masseter and temporalis muscles, and a control group (n=24), who underwent a sham (placebo) intervention. The pressure pain threshold in 2 locations in the masseter (M1, M2) and temporalis (T1, T2) muscles, maximal VMO, and head posture, by means of the craniovertebral angle, were all measured. Significant improvements were observed in the intragroup comparison in the intervention group for the craniovertebral angle with the participant in seated (P.05). Myofascial induction techniques in the masseter and temporalis muscles show no significant differences in maximal VMO, in the mechanical sensitivity of the masticatory muscles, and in head posture in comparison with a placebo intervention in which the therapist's hands are placed in the temporomandibular joint region without exerting any therapeutic pressure. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Benefits of low-intensity pain-free treadmill exercise on functional capacity of individuals presenting with intermittent claudication due to peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Sharon; Stopka, Christine Boyd; Archer Martinez, Coleen; Carmeli, Eli

    2009-01-01

    Patients with intermittent claudication due to peripheral arterial disease (PAD) experience muscle aching during walking secondary to ischemia. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of low-intensity pain-free exercise (LIPFE) on functional capacity of individuals with PAD. A total of 12 participants with PAD underwent training on treadmill for 6 weeks, twice a week, for about 45 minutes. Outcome measures included walking distance (WDI), walking duration (WDU), mean walking rate (WR), estimated oxygen consumption (EVO(2)), metabolic equivalent (MET), estimated total energy expenditure (ETEE), and estimated rate of energy expenditure (EREE). Mean improvement of WDI, WDU, and MWR were 104% (an addition of 1.0 km), 55% (an addition of 13.3 minutes), and 41% (0.9 km/h faster), respectively. Mean improvement of EVO(2), MET, ETEE, and EREE, were 20%, 20%, 80%, and 20%, respectively. In conclusion, it appears that LIPFE training is an effective intervention for individuals presenting with PAD.

  9. European Policy for Corporate Social Responsibility: Governance Context, Linkage with Sustainable development and Crisis as a Policy Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taliouris, Evangelos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Political prerequisites for sustainable development (SD in European Union (EU and its member states are environmental innovation as well as transparency, social welfare, good governance and responsible entrepreneurship. The Europe 2020 Strategy and its indicators were a significant step in order EU, its member states and the social stakeholders to deal with crisis negative socioeconomic and environmental outcomes, but also to improve social trust. An important stakeholder towards these is European business sector. Therefore, responsible entrepreneurship via corporate social responsibility (CSR is a policy topic in EU in parallel with other policy topics such as transparency (e.g. non-financial reporting and good governance (e.g. political framework for CSR. The European business community was always a crucial stakeholder for development, but since 2001 CSR is explicitly part of European policy agenda through topics such as public procurement, responsible supply chains, anti-corruption policies, employment generation, reporting and disclosure etc. In EU the applied policy for CSR indicates different approaches and policy tools within the common policy framework and definitions. Moreover, the crisis evolution became an accelerator for CSR policy evolution and convergence between perspectives and member states. The renewed strategy in 2011, the report for CSR public policies in 2014 and the EU steps towards SD Agenda for 2030 in 2015 indicated issues such as corporate citizenship and responsible entrepreneurship as an ongoing policy process that focuses both on EU political convergence at member states level and the European business sector excellence.

  10. Oral Ezatiostat HCl (TLK199) and Myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report of sustained hematologic response following an abbreviated exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quddus, Fahd; Clima, Jessica; Seedham, Helen; Sajjad, Ghulam; Galili, Naomi; Raza, Azra

    2010-04-23

    Treatment options for patients with lower risk non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) who fail erythroid stimulating agents are restricted to one of the hypomethylating drugs with an expected response rate of approximately 50%. Ezatiostat HCl, an agent with the potential for producing multi-lineage responses in this population is currently in clinical investigation phase. This case report describes a 77 year old male who received less than two cycles of therapy with ezatiostat HCl which had to be aborted due to intolerable side effects, but which produced a sustained normalization of all three blood counts. This trilineage response has now lasted for more than a year. Interestingly, the patient began with a del(5q) abnormality and responded briefly to lenalidomide. Upon relapse of the anemia, a bone marrow showed the disappearance of the del(5q) but the appearance of a new clonal abnormality t(2;3). Given that the patient had a complete cytogenetic response to a truncated exposure to lenalidomide followed by a trilineage response to an even briefer course of ezatiostat HCl suggests a potential role for ezatiostat HCl in del(5q) patients who relapse following lenalidomide.

  11. Transcription controls growth, cell kinetics and cholesterol supply to sustain ACTH responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert I; Zhao, Xin; Mullins, Linda J; Mullins, John J; Cairns, Carolynn; Wrobel, Nicola; Dunbar, Donald R; Bailey, Matthew A; Kenyon, Christopher J

    2017-10-01

    Chronic ACTH exposure is associated with adrenal hypertrophy and steroidogenesis. The underlying molecular processes in mice have been analysed by microarray, histological and immunohistochemical techniques. Synacthen infused for 2 weeks markedly increased adrenal mass and plasma corticosterone levels. Microarray analysis found greater than 2-fold changes in expression of 928 genes (P change in cell proliferation. Growth arrest genes, Cdkn1a and Cdkn1c, which are known to be active in hypertrophied cells, were increased >4-fold and cross-sectional area of fasciculata cells was 2-fold greater. In contrast, genes associated with apoptosis (eg Casp12, Clu,) were downregulated and apoptotic cells (Tunel staining) were fewer (P sustained by genes controlling cholesterol supply and adrenal mass. ACTH effects on adrenal morphology and genes controlling cell hypertrophy, proliferation and apoptosis suggest the involvement of different cell types and separate molecular pathways. © 2017 The authors.

  12. Geoengineering Responses to Climate Change Selected Entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Vaughan, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Failure by the international community to make substantive progress in reducing CO2 emissions, coupled with recent evidence of accelerating climate change, has brought increasing urgency to the search for additional remediation approaches.  This book presents a selection of state-of-the-art geoengineering methods for deliberately reducing the effects of anthropogenic climate change, either by actively removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere or by decreasing the amount of sunlight absorbed at the Earth’s surface.  These methods contrast with more conventional mitigation approaches which focus on reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide. Geoengineering technologies could become a key tool to be used in conjunction with emissions reduction to limit the magnitude of climate change.  Featuring authoritative, peer-reviewed entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology, this book presents a wide range of climate change remediation technologies. Examines th...

  13. The empowerment of sustainable design in food packaging as designer responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadi, V.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is emphasized on the empowerment of sustainable design in providing the dual function of a food packaging. Which can extend the life of paper, cardboard, plastic, aluminum foil so as to reduce the contribution of waste on earth. The methodology used in this research is using qualitative research. With the main approach taken on the layout of the packaging design, the approach that relies heavily on the data in the form of packaging design. For the process of observation, the authors should compare with the forms of food packaging designs that are contained in the diversity of food packaging types from products outside Indonesia. The purpose of this study is also intended as a recommendation through observation of data interviews and survey related products. Conclusion through material exploration, packaging structure exploration, efficient exploration of ink usage and packaging usage patterns.

  14. Sustaining soil productivity in response to global climate change: science, policy, and ethics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Norman, John M; Sauer, Thomas J; Siva Kumar, M. V. K

    2011-01-01

    "Sustaning Soil Productivity in Response to Global Climate Change is a two-part text bringing together the latest research in soil science and climatology and the ethical, political and social issues...

  15. Corporate sustainability and responsibility : creating value for business, society and the environment

    OpenAIRE

    Camilleri, Mark Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Today’s corporations are increasingly implementing responsible behaviours as they pursue profit-making activities. A thorough literature review suggests that there is a link between corporate social responsibility (CSR) or corporate social performance (CSP) and financial performance. In addition, there are relevant theoretical underpinnings and empirical studies that have often used other concepts, including corporate citizenship, stakeholder management and business ethics. In this light, thi...

  16. Cognitive Consequences of a Sustained Monocyte Type 1 IFN Response in HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pulliam, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    With successful antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1-infected subjects can achieve undetectable peripheral viral loads and immune homeostasis. However, in a subset of individuals on therapy, peripheral monocytes have a gene expression profile characteristic of a type 1 interferon α (IFN) response. This type 1 IFN response correlates with a number of pathogenic conditions including neural cell injury and in combination with HCV infection, cognitive impairment. Lessons from the non-human primate model...

  17. A sustainable model for training teachers to use pivotal response training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica

    2015-08-01

    The increase in the rate of autism diagnoses has created a growing demand for teachers who are trained to use effective interventions. The train-the-trainer model, which involves training supervisors to train others, may be ideal for providing cost-effective training and ongoing support to teachers. Although research supports interventions, such as pivotal response training, as evidence-based, dissemination to school environments has been problematic. This study assessed the benefits of using the train-the-trainer model to disseminate pivotal response training to school settings. A multiple-baseline design was conducted across three training groups, each consisting of one school staff member (trainer), three special education teachers, and six students. Trainers conducted the teacher-training workshop with high adherence to training protocol and met mastery criteria in their ability to implement pivotal response training, assess implementation of pivotal response training, and provide feedback to teachers. Six of the nine teachers mastered all components of pivotal response training. The remaining three teachers implemented 89% of the pivotal response training components correctly. The majority of trainers and teachers maintained their abilities at follow-up. These results support the use of the train-the-trainer model as an effective method of disseminating evidence-based practices in school settings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Sustainable breeding objectives and possible selection response: Finding the balance between economics and breeders' preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst-Waltl, Birgit; Fuerst, Christian; Obritzhauser, Walter; Egger-Danner, Christa

    2016-12-01

    To optimize breeding objectives of Fleckvieh and Brown Swiss cattle, economic values were re-estimated using updated prices, costs, and population parameters. Subsequently, the expected selection responses for the total merit index (TMI) were calculated using previous and newly derived economic values. The responses were compared for alternative scenarios that consider breeders' preferences. A dairy herd with milk production, bull fattening, and rearing of replacement stock was modeled. The economic value of a trait was derived by calculating the difference in herd profit before and after genetic improvement. Economic values for each trait were derived while keeping all other traits constant. The traits considered were dairy, beef, and fitness traits, the latter including direct health traits. The calculation of the TMI and the expected selection responses was done using selection index methodology with estimated breeding values instead of phenotypic deviations. For the scenario representing the situation up to 2016, all traits included in the TMI were considered with their respective economic values before the update. Selection response was also calculated for newly derived economic values and some alternative scenarios, including the new trait vitality index (subindex comprising stillbirth and rearing losses). For Fleckvieh, the relative economic value for the trait groups milk, beef, and fitness were 38, 16, and 46%, respectively, up to 2016, and 39, 13, and 48%, respectively, for the newly derived economic values. Approximately the same selection response may be expected for the milk trait group, whereas the new weightings resulted in a substantially decreased response in beef traits. Within the fitness block, all traits, with the exception of fertility, showed a positive selection response. For Brown Swiss, the relative economic values for the main trait groups milk, beef, and fitness were 48, 5, and 47% before 2016, respectively, whereas for the newly derived

  19. Transient and sustained components of the sensorimotor BOLD response in fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marxen, Michael; Cassidy, Ryan J.; Dawson, Tara L.; Ross, Bernhard; Graham, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal time courses in functional magnetic resonance imaging are estimated within the framework of general linear modeling by convolving an input function, that represents neural activity, with a canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF). Here we investigate the performance of different neural input functions and latency-optimized HRFs for modeling BOLD signals in response to vibrotactile somatosensory stimuli of variable durations (0.5, 1, 4, 7 s) in 14 young, healthy adults who were required to make button press responses at each stimulus cessation. Informed by electrophysiology and the behavioral task, three nested models with an increasing number of parameters were considered: a boxcar; boxcar and offset transient; and onset transient, boxcar and offset transient (TBT). The TBT model provided the best fit of the group-averaged BOLD time courses based on χ2 and F statistics. Only the TBT model was capable of fitting the bimodal shape of the BOLD response to the 7-s stimulus and the relative peak amplitudes for all stimulus lengths in key somatosensory and motor areas. This suggests that the TBT model provides a more comprehensive description of brain sensorimotor responses in this experiment than provided by the simple boxcar model. Work comparing the activation maps obtained with the TBT model with magnetoencephalography data is under way. PMID:22495237

  20. Influence of Treg cells and HBV genotype on sustained response and drug resistance in the treatment with nucleoside drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y R; Li, B; Wang, C X; Zhou, N; Qi, W; Li, X L; Wu, L Y; Wei, S F; Zhang, Y D

    2017-03-02

    We aimed to investigate the influence of regulatory T cells including CD4+CD25+, CD8+CD28- and hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype on sustained virological response and tolerance of nucleoside drugs. One hundred and thirty-seven patients were enrolled. Lamivudine was administered to 84 patients. Entecavir was administered to the other 53 patients. Before treatment, biochemical tests, HBV DNA load, HBV serum level, HBV genotype, PB CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+CD25+/CD3+, and CD8+CD28-/CD3+ frequencies were measured. Based on HBV DNA loads after 4 weeks of therapy, patients were divided into response group and suboptimal response group. The lamivudine group received treatment continuously, and then patients were categorized into non-resistance group and resistance group. Compared with the suboptimal response and resistance groups for lamivudine, CD4+CD25+/CD3+ levels were higher in the response and non-resistance groups (t=4.372, P=0.046; t=7.262, P=0.017). In the non-resistance group, CD8+CD28-/CD3+ frequency was lower than in the resistance group (t=5.527, P=0.037). Virus load and hepatitis B E antigen (HBeAg)-positive rate were significantly lower than in the response and resistance group (t=2.164, P=0.038; X2=4.239, P=0.040; t=2.015, P=0.044; X2=16.2, P=0.000). Incidence of drug resistance was high in patients with virogene type C. For the virological response to entecavir, CD8+CD28-/CD3+ level was significantly lower than that of the suboptimal response group (t=6.283, P=0.036). Response and suboptimal response groups were compared in CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+CD25+/CD3+ and virus genotype, and differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Baseline regulatory T cells including CD4+CD25+/CD3+ and CD8+CD28-/CD3+ frequencies have a relationship with the incidence of rapid virological response and the resistance to nucleoside drugs. Patients with HBV genotype C receiving lamivudine more often underwent drug resistance. Antiviral efficacy and the resistance to

  1. Influence of Treg cells and HBV genotype on sustained response and drug resistance in the treatment with nucleoside drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.R. Zhang

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the influence of regulatory T cells including CD4+CD25+, CD8+CD28- and hepatitis B virus (HBV genotype on sustained virological response and tolerance of nucleoside drugs. One hundred and thirty-seven patients were enrolled. Lamivudine was administered to 84 patients. Entecavir was administered to the other 53 patients. Before treatment, biochemical tests, HBV DNA load, HBV serum level, HBV genotype, PB CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+CD25+/CD3+, and CD8+CD28-/CD3+ frequencies were measured. Based on HBV DNA loads after 4 weeks of therapy, patients were divided into response group and suboptimal response group. The lamivudine group received treatment continuously, and then patients were categorized into non-resistance group and resistance group. Compared with the suboptimal response and resistance groups for lamivudine, CD4+CD25+/CD3+ levels were higher in the response and non-resistance groups (t=4.372, P=0.046; t=7.262, P=0.017. In the non-resistance group, CD8+CD28-/CD3+ frequency was lower than in the resistance group (t=5.527, P=0.037. Virus load and hepatitis B E antigen (HBeAg-positive rate were significantly lower than in the response and resistance group (t=2.164, P=0.038; X2=4.239, P=0.040; t=2.015, P=0.044; X2=16.2, P=0.000. Incidence of drug resistance was high in patients with virogene type C. For the virological response to entecavir, CD8+CD28-/CD3+ level was significantly lower than that of the suboptimal response group (t=6.283, P=0.036. Response and suboptimal response groups were compared in CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+CD25+/CD3+ and virus genotype, and differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05. Baseline regulatory T cells including CD4+CD25+/CD3+ and CD8+CD28-/CD3+ frequencies have a relationship with the incidence of rapid virological response and the resistance to nucleoside drugs. Patients with HBV genotype C receiving lamivudine more often underwent drug resistance. Antiviral efficacy and the

  2. The Proposal Concept of Development and Implementation in Strategy of Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility in the Context of the HCS Model 3E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakál, Peter; Hrdinová, Gabriela

    2016-06-01

    This article is the result of a conceptual design methodology for the development of a sustainable strategy of sustainable corporate social responsibility (SCSR) in the context of the HCS model 3E formed, as a co-author within the stated grants and dissertation. On the basis of the use of propositional logic, the SCSR procedure is proposed for incorporation into the corporate strategy of sustainable development and the integrated management system (IMS) of the industrial enterprise. The aim of this article is the proposal of the concept of development and implementation strategy of SCSR in the context of the HCS model 3E.

  3. Harnessing a community for sustainable disaster response and recovery: an operational model for integrating nongovernmental organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Joie; Chandra, Anita

    2013-08-01

    Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are important to a community during times of disaster and routine operations. However, their effectiveness is reduced without an operational framework that integrates response and recovery efforts. Without integration, coordination among NGOs is challenging and use of government resources is inefficient. We developed an operational model to specify NGO roles and responsibilities before, during, and after a disaster. We conducted an analysis of peer-reviewed literature, relevant policy, and federal guidance to characterize the capabilities of NGOs, contextual factors that determine their involvement in disaster operations, and key services they provide during disaster response and recovery. We also identified research questions that should be prioritized to improve coordination and communication between NGOs and government. Our review showed that federal policy stresses the importance of partnerships between NGOs and government agencies and among other NGOs. Such partnerships can build deep local networks and broad systems that reach from local communities to the federal government. Understanding what capacities NGOs need and what factors influence their ability to perform during a disaster informs an operational model that could optimize NGO performance. Although the operational model needs to be applied and tested in community planning and disaster response, it holds promise as a unifying framework across new national preparedness and recovery policy, and provides structure to community planning, resource allocation, and metrics on which to evaluate NGO disaster involvement.

  4. Professional Learning Communities: An Effective Mechanism for the Successful Implementation and Sustainability of Response to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschenk, Nancy A.; Fuchs, Wendy W.

    2016-01-01

    Models of response to intervention (RtI) are being widely implemented in schools across the country in order to increase effective teaching and remove barriers to student learning. The implementation of RtI is greatly facilitated when teachers and staff see themselves as a professional learning community (PLC). This article begins with an…

  5. Optimization of sustained-release propranolol dosage form using factorial design and response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yaw-Bin; Tsai, Yi-Hung; Yang, Wan-Chiech; Chang, Jui-Sheng; Wu, Pao-Chu

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop propranolol extended release formulations containing hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC). The results indicate that the drug release from the tablet form containing a high amount of HPMC was incomplete, and avicel addition could increase the release percent at a later stage. In order to readily obtain an optimal formulation, response surface methodology and multiple response optimization utilizing a quadratic polynomial equation was used. The model formulations were prepared according to a factorial design. The effects of causal factors including the HPMC/drug ratio (X1) and avicel level (X2), on drug release were also measured. The drug release percentage at 1.5, 4, 8, 14 and 24 h were the target response and were restricted to not more than 25%, 35-50%, 55-70%, 75-90%, and 95-110%, respectively. The results showed that the optimized formulation provided a dissolution pattern equivalent to the predicted curve, which indicated that the optimal formulation could be obtained using response surface methodology. The mechanism of drug release from HMPC matrices tablets followed quasi-Fickian diffusion.

  6. Overexpectation: Response Loss during Sustained Stimulus Compounding in the Rabbit Nictitating Membrane Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, E. James; White, Natasha E.

    2004-01-01

    Rabbits were given reinforced training of the nictitating membrane (NM) response using separate conditioned stimuli (CSs), which were a tone, light, and/or tactile vibration. Then, two CSs were compounded and given further pairings with the unconditioned stimulus (US). Evidence of both overexpectation and summation effects appeared. That is,…

  7. Sustaining the Dream: A Response to Excessive Positivism in Person-Centered Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Craig A.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to "Excessive Positivism in Person-Centered Planning," by Steve Holburn and Christine D. Cea. The author begins by complementing Holburn and Cea on their courage to voice concerns that perhaps may not appear to be politically correct or perhaps too bold to express in the context of a journal like…

  8. Sustainability reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.

    2005-01-01

    This article gives an overview of developments in sustainability (also sometimes labelled corporate social responsibility) reporting. It The article will first briefly indicate how accountability on social and environmental issues started, already in the 1970s when social reports were published.

  9. HIV treatment as prevention in Jamaica and Barbados: magic bullet or sustainable response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Geoffrey; Barrow, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This discursive article introduces HIV treatment as prevention (TasP) and identifies various models for its extrapolation to wider population levels. Drawing on HIV surveillance data for Jamaica and Barbados, the article identifies significant gaps in HIV response programming in relation to testing, antiretroviral treatment coverage, and treatment adherence, thereby highlighting the disparity between assumptions and prerequisites for TasP success. These gaps are attributable, in large part, to sociocultural impediments and structural barriers, severe resource constraints, declining political will, and the redefinition of HIV as a manageable, chronic health issue. Antiretroviral treatment and TasP can realize success only within a combination prevention frame that addresses structural factors, including stigma and discrimination, gender inequality and gender-based violence, social inequality, and poverty. The remedicalization of the response compromises outcomes and undermines the continued potential of HIV programming as an entry point for the promotion of sexual, health, and human rights. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Sustained antigen availability during germinal center initiation enhances antibody responses to vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myungsun; Pelet, Jeisa M.; Ruda, Vera M.; Foley, Maria H.; Hu, Joyce K.; Kumari, Sudha; Crampton, Jordan; Baldeon, Alexis D.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Crotty, Shane; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2016-01-01

    Natural infections expose the immune system to escalating antigen and inflammation over days to weeks, whereas nonlive vaccines are single bolus events. We explored whether the immune system responds optimally to antigen kinetics most similar to replicating infections, rather than a bolus dose. Using HIV antigens, we found that administering a given total dose of antigen and adjuvant over 1–2 wk through repeated injections or osmotic pumps enhanced humoral responses, with exponentially increasing (exp-inc) dosing profiles eliciting >10-fold increases in antibody production relative to bolus vaccination post prime. Computational modeling of the germinal center response suggested that antigen availability as higher-affinity antibodies evolve enhances antigen capture in lymph nodes. Consistent with these predictions, we found that exp-inc dosing led to prolonged antigen retention in lymph nodes and increased Tfh cell and germinal center B-cell numbers. Thus, regulating the antigen and adjuvant kinetics may enable increased vaccine potency. PMID:27702895

  11. Towards Corporate Sustainability: The Link Between Business Ethics, Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Yazıcı, Selim

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: The root of this study is mostly grounded to an old dilemma between the corporations and the society. The important issue is that, solving this problem requires that, managers should understand the critical factors such as business ethics, corporate governance, and corporate social responsibility and creates solutions by using the outcomes. The aim of this paper is to reframe the discussion and find a link between business ethics, corporate governance and corporate social responsibi...

  12. Structural Response of Fire-Exposed Cross-Laminated Timber Beams under Sustained Loads

    OpenAIRE

    Lineham, Sean A.; Thomson, Daniel; Bartlett, Alastair I.; Bisby, Luke A.; Hadden, Rory M.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a popular construction material for low and medium-rise construction. However an architectural aspiration exists for tall mass timber buildings, and this is currently hindered by knowledge gaps and perceptions regarding the fire behaviour of mass timber buildings. To begin to address some of the important questions regarding the structural response of fire-exposed CLT structures in real fires, this paper presents a series of novel fire tests on CLT beams subjec...

  13. The influence of changes in trunk and pelvic posture during single leg standing on hip and thigh muscle activation in a pain free population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Simon; Mitchell, Tim; Whiteley, Rod; O'Sullivan, Peter; Williams, Benjamin K; Racinais, Sebastien; Farooq, Abdulaziz

    2014-03-27

    Thigh muscle injuries commonly occur during single leg loading tasks and patterns of muscle activation are thought to contribute to these injuries. The influence trunk and pelvis posture has on hip and thigh muscle activation during single leg stance is unknown and was investigated in a pain free population to determine if changes in body posture result in consistent patterns of changes in muscle activation. Hip and thigh muscle activation patterns were compared in 22 asymptomatic, male subjects (20-45 years old) in paired functionally relevant single leg standing test postures: Anterior vs. Posterior Trunk Sway; Anterior vs. Posterior Pelvic Rotation; Left vs. Right Trunk Shift; and Pelvic Drop vs. Raise. Surface EMG was collected from eight hip and thigh muscles calculating Root Mean Square. EMG was normalized to an "upright standing" reference posture. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed along with associated F tests to determine if there were significant differences in muscle activation between paired test postures. In right leg stance, Anterior Trunk Sway (compared to Posterior Sway) increased activity in posterior sagittal plane muscles, with a concurrent deactivation of anterior sagittal plane muscles (p: 0.016 - <0.001). Lateral hip abductor muscles increased activation during Left Trunk Shift (compared to Right) (p :≤ 0.001). Lateral Pelvic Drop (compared to Raise) decreased activity in hip abductors and increased hamstring, adductor longus and vastus lateralis activity (p: 0.037 - <0.001). Changes in both trunk and pelvic posture during single leg stance generally resulted in large, predictable changes in hip and thigh muscle activation in asymptomatic young males. Changes in trunk position in the sagittal plane and pelvis position in the frontal plane had the greatest effect on muscle activation. Investigation of these activation patterns in clinical populations such as hip and thigh muscle injuries may provide important insights into injury

  14. The effectiveness of rehabilitation on pain-free farming in agriculture workers with low back pain in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Shankar; Chhabra, Deepak; Kumari, Nitika

    2016-10-17

    Studies have shown that farming is associated with many agricultural workers experiencing low back pain (LBP). The rehabilitation of these workers should facilitate their functioning, activities and level of participation in an adequate way. The objectives of this study were to identify the health components associated with LBP and to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions in returning agricultural workers with LBP to their vocation using the International Classification of Function (ICF) -based tools. Thirty-one full time agricultural workers from 3 different Indian states were prospectively assessed using the ICF core set for LBP. ICF core sets permitted analysis of limitations of function from both the participant and rehabilitation team's perspectives. Each ICF category was rated using an ICF qualifier. The components identified were linked to the ICF categorical profile and assessment sheet. The clinicians identified the global, service program and cycle goals based on ICF. The participants' functioning was followed over a 4-month period. After intervention, the participants were able to undergo their routine activities without increases in pain. However, on returning to active farming, participants noted few improvements in the components d410 (changing basic body position), d415 (maintaining body position), d430 (lifting and carrying objects), d465 (moving around using equipment), d850 (remunerative employment) and d859 (work and employment, other specified and unspecified). The results of the study conclude that the current interventions for LBP are not effective in returning agriculture workers with LBP in India to pain-free farming. There is an urgent need to individualize the health needs of agriculture workers.

  15. The point-to-point test: A new diagnostic tool for measuring lumbar tactile acuity? Inter and intra-examiner reliability study of pain-free subjects.

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    Adamczyk, Wacław; Sługocka, Anna; Saulicz, Oskar; Saulicz, Edward

    2016-04-01

    A two-point discrimination test (TPD) is commonly used to investigate lumbar tactile acuity. However, low inter-examiner reliability and difficulties in execution significantly limit its application. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare the inter- and intra-examiner reliability of a new approach, the point-to-point test (PTP), with the TPD. Twenty-one pain-free subjects attended the inter-examiner stage of the study. Eighteen of them were further recruited into an intra-examiner (reproducibility and repeatability) reliability study. PTP was performed on the three points plotted at the L3 spinal level. Point '0' overlapped with the L3 spinous process, from which points '1' and '2' were horizontally separated by 5 and 10 cm, respectively. Participants manually indicated a point previously touched by the examiner, while the distance (error) was measured. Reliability was determined with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2,3). The results revealed good and moderate inter- and intra-examiner reliability at point '1' (ICC2,3 = 0.68-0.84) and good reliability at point '2' (ICC2,3 = 0.84-0.86). At point '0', reliability was moderate to poor (ICC2,3 = 0.13-0.63). TPD was characterised by a poor to moderate level of inter- (ICC2,1 = 0.51; ICC2,3 = 0.56) and intra-examiner reliability (ICC(2,1) = 0.50; ICC2,3 = 0.74). Our findings suggest that PTP is more reliable than TPD at two investigated points at the L3 spinal level. However, further research on PTP validity data is strongly warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of iloprost on pain-free walking distance and clinical outcome in patients with severe stage IIb peripheral arterial disease: the FADOI 2bPILOT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Antonino; Di Salvo, Michelangelo; Mazzuca, Salvatore; Valerio, Antonella; Gussoni, Gualberto; Bonizzoni, Erminio; Campanini, Mauro; Vescovo, Giorgio; Nozzoli, Carlo

    2013-11-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) at stage IIb, pain-free walking distance (PFWD) less than 100 m and unsuitable for revascularization have both impaired quality of life and severe clinical outcome. Aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of the prostacyclin analogue iloprost, added to standard therapy, in these patients. Patients were randomized to receive standard medical therapy (Group A) or standard therapy plus iloprost (Group B), for 1 year. Iloprost was administered for 10 days every 3 months. Treadmill test was performed every 3 months, in Group B before starting the 10-day iloprost cycle. Fifty patients in Group A and 51 in Group B were enrolled. Mean baseline and 12-month PFWD values were 75.4 ± 21.3 and 128.9 ± 62.9 for iloprost group and 70.3 ± 21.6 and 99.6 ± 62.6 m for controls. Patients treated with iloprost had significantly higher PFWD at 9 and 12 months. This finding was confirmed after carrying forward the last valid observation (124.7 ± 63.4 vs. 88.4 ± 63.1 m, P < 0.01). Major cardiovascular events occurred in 32.0% and 3.9% of patients in Group A and Group B, respectively (P < 0.001). Five patients in Group A died vs. none in Group B (P = 0.02). No serious unexpected adverse reactions occurred in patients receiving iloprost. Iloprost, added to standard therapy, significantly increases exercise capacity in patients with PAD at severe stage IIb. The percentage of patients who died or experienced major cardiovascular events was significantly lower in patients receiving iloprost. Future studies should focus on the effects of this therapy on clinical outcome. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Abnormal structure and functional connectivity of the anterior insula at pain-free periovulation is associated with perceived pain during menstruation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dun, Wang-Huan; Yang, Jing; Yang, Ling; Ding, Dun; Ma, Xue-Ying; Liang, Feng-Li; von Deneen, Karen M; Ma, Shao-Hui; Xu, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Jixin; Zhang, Ming

    2017-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated the critical role of the insula in pain pathways and its close relation with the perceived intensity of nociceptive stimuli. We aimed to identify the structural and functional characteristics of the insula during periovulatory phase in women with primary dysmenorrhea (PDM), and further investigate its association with the intensity of perceived pain during menstruation. Optimized voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity (FC) analyses were applied by using 3-dimensional T1-weighted and resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 36 patients at the peri-ovulation phase and 29 age-, education-, and gender-matched healthy controls (HC). A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to examine the intensity of the abdominal pain at periovulation and menstruation. In our results, PDM patients had significant higher VAS-rating during menstruaion than periovulation. Compared with the HC, PDM patients had lower gray matter density in the left anterior insula (aINS). Taken the left aINS as a seed region, we further found hypoconnectivity between aINS and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), which showed negative relation with the VAS during menstruation. As the aINS is a key site of the salience network (SN) and the mPFC is a critical region in the default mode network (DMN), it's implicated a trait-related central-alteration that communications between pain attention and perception networks were disrupted without the ongoing menstrual pain. Moreover, result of correlation analysis, at least in part, suggested a possible role of altered FC (pain-free period) in predicting pain perception (menstruation).

  18. Interferon Alpha Induces Sustained Changes in NK Cell Responsiveness to Hepatitis B Viral Load Suppression In Vivo.

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    Upkar S Gill

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are important antiviral effectors, highly enriched in the liver, with the potential to regulate immunopathogenesis in persistent viral infections. Here we examined whether changes in the NK pool are induced when patients with eAg-positive CHB are 'primed' with PegIFNα and importantly, whether these changes are sustained or further modulated long-term after switching to nucleos(tides (sequential NUC therapy, an approach currently tested in the clinic. Longitudinal sampling of a prospectively recruited cohort of patients with eAg+CHB showed that the cumulative expansion of CD56bright NK cells driven by 48-weeks of PegIFNα was maintained at higher than baseline levels throughout the subsequent 9 months of sequential NUCs. Unexpectedly, PegIFNα-expanded NK cells showed further augmentation in their expression of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30 and NKp46 during sequential NUCs. The expansion in proliferating, functional NK cells was more pronounced following sequential NUCs than in comparison cohorts of patients treated with de novo NUCs or PegIFNα only. Reduction in circulating HBsAg concentrations, a key goal in the path towards functional cure of CHB, was only achieved in those patients with enhancement of NK cell IFNγ and cytotoxicity but decrease in their expression of the death ligand TRAIL. In summary, we conclude that PegIFNα priming can expand a population of functional NK cells with an altered responsiveness to subsequent antiviral suppression by NUCs. Patients on sequential NUCs with a distinct NK cell profile show a decline in HBsAg, providing mechanistic insights for the further optimisation of treatment strategies to achieve sustained responses in CHB.

  19. Sustained Complete Response after Maintenance Therapy with Topotecan and Erlotinib for Recurrent Cervical Cancer with Distant Metastases

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    Donato Callegaro-Filho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recurrent cervical cancer is associated with a poor prognosis. Most treatment responses are partial and of short duration. The development of new therapies is vital to improve treatment for recurrent disease. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors may have a role in this setting. Case Description: A 53-year-old woman with stage IB2 squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix was initially treated with chemoradiation. Six months after completing treatment, she developed a recurrence in the common iliac and para-aortic lymph nodes above the previous radiation field and was treated with additional radiation therapy. Two years later, she developed recurrent disease in the left supraclavicular lymph nodes and was treated with chemoradiation followed by 3 cycles of adjuvant cisplatin and topotecan. She had a complete response and was placed on maintenance therapy with topotecan and erlotinib, which was well tolerated and produced minimal side effects. After 20 months of maintenance therapy, it was discontinued given the long interval without evidence of disease. The patient is currently without evidence of disease 5 years after completing the topotecan-erlotinib treatment. Conclusion: We noted a sustained response in a patient with recurrent metastatic cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy, cisplatin, and topotecan followed by maintenance therapy with topotecan and erlotinib. Further evaluation of the role of EGFR inhibitors in this setting should be considered given their favorable toxicity profile and biological relevance.

  20. Sustained stimulation and expansion of Tregs by IL2 control autoimmunity without impairing immune responses to infection, vaccination and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churlaud, Guillaume; Jimenez, Veronica; Ruberte, Jesus; Amadoudji Zin, Martin; Fourcade, Gwladys; Gottrand, Gaelle; Casana, Estefania; Lambrecht, Benedicte; Bellier, Bertrand; Piaggio, Eliane; Bosch, Fatima; Klatzmann, David

    2014-04-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL2) is the key cytokine supporting survival and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs). We recently reported that low-dose IL2 safely expands/stimulates Tregs and improves autoimmune conditions in humans. Further development of IL2 in autoimmune diseases will require chronic IL2 administration, which could affect beneficial effector immune responses regulated by Tregs. We used recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV)-mediated gene transfer to continuously release IL2 in mice and assessed its long-term effects on immune responses. A single rAAV-IL2 injection enabled sustained stimulation and expansion of Tregs without inducing Teff activation and prevented diabetes in NOD mice. After several weeks of IL2 production, mice responded normally to a viral challenge and to vaccination, and had pregnancies with offspring that developed normally. They showed no change in the occurrence and growth of chemically-induced tumors. Altogether, chronic low-dose IL2 treatment does not affect beneficial effector immune responses at doses that prevent autoimmune diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydro/Engineering Geophysical Parameters and Design Response Spectrum for Sustainable Development in Ras Muhammed National Park, Sinai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed H.; Gamal, Mohamed A.

    2016-06-01

    The Egyptian government is preparing a sustainable development master plan for the Ras Muhammed National Park (RMNP), south Sinai. Noteworthy, the scarcity of the freshwater resources and close proximity to the active seismic zones of the Gulf of Aqaba implicate geophysical investigations for the fresh groundwater aquifers and construct a design response spectrum, respectively. Accordingly, 14 VESs, hydro/engineering geophysical analysis, pumping tests, downhole seismic test, a design response spectrum for buildings, and borehole data were carried out in the study area. The unconfined freshwater aquifer was effectively depicted with true resistivities, thickness, and EC ranged from 56 to 135 Ω m, 11 to 112 m, and 1.4 to 7.1 mS/m, respectively. The Northeastern part was characterized by higher aquifer potentiality, where coarser grains size, highest thickness (112 m), high true resistivity (135 Ω m), groundwater flow (0.074 m3/day), tortuosity (1.293-1.312), formation resistivity factor (4.1-4.6), and storativity (0.281-0.276). An increase in pumping rate was accompanied by an increase in well loss, increase in aquifer losses, decrease in well specific capacity, and decrease in well efficiency. Design response spectrum prognosticated the short buildings (<7 floors) in RMNP to be suffering from a high peak horizontal acceleration and shear forces for acceleration between 0.25 and 0.35 g. Therefore, appropriate detailing of shear reinforcement is indispensable to reduce the risk of structural damages at RMNP.

  2. High expression levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor sustain the innate immune responses of neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anina; Weier, Manuela; Sweep, Fred C. G. J.; Le Roy, Didier; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Calandra, Thierry; Giannoni, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The vulnerability to infection of newborns is associated with a limited ability to mount efficient immune responses. High concentrations of adenosine and prostaglandins in the fetal and neonatal circulation hamper the antimicrobial responses of newborn immune cells. However, the existence of mechanisms counterbalancing neonatal immunosuppression has not been investigated. Remarkably, circulating levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory immunoregulatory cytokine expressed constitutively, were 10-fold higher in newborns than in children and adults. Newborn monocytes expressed high levels of MIF and released MIF upon stimulation with Escherichia coli and group B Streptococcus, the leading pathogens of early-onset neonatal sepsis. Inhibition of MIF activity or MIF expression reduced microbial product-induced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases and secretion of cytokines. Recombinant MIF used at newborn, but not adult, concentrations counterregulated adenosine and prostaglandin E2-mediated inhibition of ERK1/2 activation and TNF production in newborn monocytes exposed to E. coli. In agreement with the concept that once infection is established high levels of MIF are detrimental to the host, treatment with a small molecule inhibitor of MIF reduced systemic inflammatory response, bacterial proliferation, and mortality of septic newborn mice. Altogether, these data provide a mechanistic explanation for how newborns may cope with an immunosuppressive environment to maintain a certain threshold of innate defenses. However, the same defense mechanisms may be at the expense of the host in conditions of severe infection, suggesting that MIF could represent a potential attractive target for immune-modulating adjunctive therapies for neonatal sepsis. PMID:26858459

  3. KLHL40-related nemaline myopathy with a sustained, positive response to treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natera-de Benito, D; Nascimento, A; Abicht, A; Ortez, C; Jou, C; Müller, J S; Evangelista, T; Töpf, A; Thompson, R; Jimenez-Mallebrera, C; Colomer, J; Lochmüller, H

    2016-03-01

    Congenital myopathies are a group of inherited muscle disorders characterized by hypotonia, weakness and a non-dystrophic muscle biopsy with the presence of one or more characteristic histological features. Neuromuscular transmission defects have recently been reported in several patients with congenital myopathies (CM). Mutations in KLHL40 are among the most common causes of severe forms of nemaline myopathy. Clinical features of affected individuals include fetal akinesia or hypokinesia, respiratory failure, and swallowing difficulties at birth. Muscle weakness is usually severe and nearly half of the individuals have no spontaneous antigravity movement. The average age of death has been reported to be 5 months in a recent case series. Herein we present a case of a patient with a nemaline myopathy due to KLHL40 mutations (c.604delG, p.Ala202Argfs*56 and c.1513G>C, p.Ala505Pro) with an impressive and prolonged beneficial response to treatment with high-dose pyridostigmine. Myasthenic features or response to ACEI have not previously been reported as a characteristic of nemaline myopathy or KLHL40-related myopathy.

  4. Injectable and Biodegradable pH-Responsive Hydrogels for Localized and Sustained Treatment of Human Fibrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liubing; Gu, Jun; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Zonggang; Lu, Yufeng; Shen, Liqin; Dong, Qirong; Wang, Yangyun

    2015-04-22

    Injectable hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials, and they have been widely used for controlled drug release. This study evaluated an injectable hydrogel formed in situ system by the reaction of a polyethylene glycol derivative with α,β-polyaspartylhydrazide for local cancer chemotherapy. This pH-responsive hydrogel was used to realize a sol-gel phase transition, where the gel remained a free-flowing fluid before injection but spontaneously changed into a semisolid hydrogel just after administration. As indicated by scanning electron microscopy images, the hydrogel exhibited a porous three-dimensional microstructure. The prepared hydrogel was biocompatible and biodegradable and could be utilized as a pH-responsive vector for drug delivery. The therapeutic effect of the hydrogel loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) after intratumoral administration in mice with human fibrosarcoma was evaluated. The inhibition of tumor growth was more obvious in the group treated by the DOX-loaded hydrogel, compared to that treated with the free DOX solution. Hence, this hydrogel with good syringeability and high biodegradability, which focuses on local chemotherapy, may enhance the therapeutic effect on human fibrosarcoma.

  5. Compensatory T cell responses in IRG-deficient mice prevent sustained Chlamydia trachomatis infections.

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    Jörn Coers

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. In women C. trachomatis can establish persistent genital infections that lead to pelvic inflammatory disease and sterility. In contrast to natural infections in humans, experimentally induced infections with C. trachomatis in mice are rapidly cleared. The cytokine interferon-γ (IFNγ plays a critical role in the clearance of C. trachomatis infections in mice. Because IFNγ induces an antimicrobial defense system in mice but not in humans that is composed of a large family of Immunity Related GTPases (IRGs, we questioned whether mice deficient in IRG immunity would develop persistent infections with C. trachomatis as observed in human patients. We found that IRG-deficient Irgm1/m3((-/- mice transiently develop high bacterial burden post intrauterine infection, but subsequently clear the infection more efficiently than wildtype mice. We show that the delayed but highly effective clearance of intrauterine C. trachomatis infections in Irgm1/m3((-/- mice is dependent on an exacerbated CD4(+ T cell response. These findings indicate that the absence of the predominant murine innate effector mechanism restricting C. trachomatis growth inside epithelial cells results in a compensatory adaptive immune response, which is at least in part driven by CD4(+ T cells and prevents the establishment of a persistent infection in mice.

  6. Cognitive consequences of a sustained monocyte type 1 IFN response in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    With successful antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1-infected subjects can achieve undetectable peripheral viral loads and immune homeostasis. However, in a subset of individuals on therapy, peripheral monocytes have a gene expression profile characteristic of a type 1 interferon α (IFN) response. This type 1 IFN response correlates with a number of pathogenic conditions including neural cell injury and in combination with HCV infection, cognitive impairment. Lessons from the non-human primate models of pathogenic and nonpathogenic SIV suggest that returning the initial IFN spike in acute SIV infection to normal allows the immune system to control infection and return to homeostasis. An IFN "alarm" signature, defined as monocyte activation with overexpression of the type1 IFN genes IFI27 and CD169, would be useful for identifying a subset of subjects with HIV-1 infection that could progress to a number of pathologies associated with immune activation including cognitive dysfunction. This strategy is being actively pursued for autoimmune diseases that are characterized by an IFN signature. Therapies to block the IFN signature are under investigation as a means to reset the immune system and in a subset of HIV-1-infected subjects may be an adjuvant to standard antiviral therapy to return cognitive function.

  7. Association between insulin resistance and sustained virologic response in hepatitis C treatment, genotypes 1 versus 2 and 3: systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurito, Marcela Pezzoto; Parise, Edison Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Controversial results have been found in literature for the association between insulin resistance and sustained virologic response to standard chronic hepatitis C treatment. This study aims to provide a systematic literature review with meta-analysis, in order to evaluate if insulin resistance interferes with sustained virologic response in patients infected by the HCV genotype 1 versus HCV genotypes 2 and 3, undergoing treatment with interferon and ribavirin or pegylated interferon and ribavarin. Systematic search was performed on main electronic databases until May 2012. Primary outcome was sustained virologic response, defined as undetectable levels of HCV-RNA six months after the end of treatment. Meta-analytic measure was estimated using Dersimonian and Laird's method, using Stata software. Thirteen studies involving 2238 infected patients were included. There was a statistically significant association between insulin resistance and lower sustained virologic response rate, and this difference occurred in HCV genotype G1 (OR: 2.23; 95% CI: 1.59-3.13) and G2/G3 (OR: 4.45; 95% CI: 1.59-12.49). In addition, a difference was seen in the cut-offs used for defining insulin resistance by Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance. To minimize this limitation, sub-analysis that excluded the studies that did not use 2 as a cut-off value was performed and the results still demonstrated association between insulin resistance and sustained virologic response, for both genotypic groups. This meta-analysis provides evidence that elevated Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance is associated with a lower sustained virologic response rate in patients with hepatitis C treated with interferon and ribavirin or pegylated interferon and ribavarin, regardless of their genotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of the Human Mucosal Response to Cholera Reveals Sustained Activation of Innate Immune Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Daniel L; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Genereux, Diane P; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Ellis, Crystal N; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful I; Haq Alam, Nur; Lazina Hossain, Anik Paul; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M; Charles, Richelle C; Weil, Ana A; LaRocque, Regina C; Calderwood, Stephen B; Ryan, Edward T; Karlsson, Elinor K; Qadri, Firdausi; Harris, Jason B

    2017-11-13

    To better understand the innate immune response to Vibrio cholerae infection, we tracked gene expression in the duodenal mucosa of eleven Bangladeshi adults with cholera, using biopsies obtained immediately after rehydration and at 30 and 180 days later. We identified differentially expressed genes and performed an analysis to predict differentially regulated pathways and upstream regulators. During acute cholera, there was a broad increase in the expression of genes associated with innate immunity, including activation of the NF-κB, MAPK, and TLR-mediated signaling pathways, which unexpectedly persisted even 30 days after infection. Focusing on early differences in gene expression, we identified 37 genes that were differentially expressed on days 2 and 30 across eleven participants. These genes included the endosomal toll like receptor, TLR8, which was expressed in lamina propria cells. Underscoring a potential role for endosomal TLR-mediated signaling in vivo, our pathway analysis found that IRF7 and interferons β1 and α2 were among the top upstream regulators activated during cholera. Among innate immune effectors, we found that DUOX2, an NADPH-oxidase involved in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, was upregulated in intestinal epithelial cells during cholera. Notably, the observed increases in DUOX2 and TLR8 expression were also modeled in vitro when stimulating Caco-2 or THP-1 cells, respectively, with live V. cholerae but not with heat killed organisms or cholera toxin alone. These previously unidentified features of the innate immune response to V. cholerae extend our understanding mucosal immune signaling pathways and effectors activated in vivo following cholera. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Angiotensin II AT1 receptors mediate neuronal sensitization and sustained blood pressure response induced by a single injection of amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, N A; Paz, M C; Caeiro, X; Dadam, F M; Baiardi, G; Perez, M F; Bregonzio, C

    2017-01-06

    A single exposure to amphetamine induces neurochemical sensitization in striatal areas. The neuropeptide angiotensin II, through AT1 receptors (AT1-R) activation, is involved in these responses. However, amphetamine-induced alterations can be extended to extra-striatal areas involved in blood pressure control and their physiological outcomes. Our aim for the present study was to analyze the possible role for AT1-R in these events using a two-injection protocol and to further characterize the proposed AT1-R antagonism protocol. Central effect of orally administered AT1-R blocker (Candesartan, 3mg/kg p.o.×5days) in male Wistar rats was analyzed by spontaneous activity of neurons within locus coeruleus. In another group of animals pretreated with the AT1-R blocker or vehicle, sensitization was achieved by a single administration of amphetamine (5mg/kg i.p. - day 6) followed by a 3-week period off drug. On day 27, after receiving an amphetamine challenge (0.5mg/kg i.p.), we evaluated: (1) the sensitized c-Fos expression in locus coeruleus (LC), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), caudal ventrolateral medulla (A1) and central amygdala (CeAmy); and (2) the blood pressure response. AT1-R blockade decreased LC neurons' spontaneous firing rate. Moreover, sensitized c-Fos immunoreactivity in TH+neurons was found in LC and NTS; and both responses were blunted by the AT1-R blocker pretreatment. Meanwhile, no differences were found neither in CeAmy nor A1. Sensitized blood pressure response was observed as sustained changes in mean arterial pressure and was effectively prevented by AT1-R blockade. Our results extend AT1-R role in amphetamine-induced sensitization over noradrenergic nuclei and their cardiovascular output. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sustained action of developmental ethanol exposure on the cortisol response to stress in zebrafish larvae and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiamonte, Matteo; Brennan, Caroline H; Vinson, Gavin P

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of preventable birth defects, leading to a range of symptoms collectively known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. More moderate levels of prenatal ethanol exposure lead to a range of behavioural deficits including aggression, poor social interaction, poor cognitive performance and increased likelihood of addiction in later life. Current theories suggest that adaptation in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and neuroendocrine systems contributes to mood alterations underlying behavioural deficits and vulnerability to addiction. In using zebrafish (Danio rerio), the aim is to determine whether developmental ethanol exposure provokes changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis (the teleost equivalent of the HPA), as it does in mammalian models, therefore opening the possibilities of using zebrafish to elucidate the mechanisms involved, and to test novel therapeutics to alleviate deleterious symptoms. The results showed that developmental exposure to ambient ethanol, 20mM-50mM 1-9 days post fertilisation, had immediate effects on the HPI, markedly reducing the cortisol response to air exposure stress, as measured by whole body cortisol content. This effect was sustained in adults 6 months later. Morphology, growth and locomotor activity of the animals were unaffected, suggesting a specific action of ethanol on the HPI. In this respect the data are consistent with mammalian results, although they contrast with the higher corticosteroid stress response reported in rats after developmental ethanol exposure. The mechanisms that underlie the specific sensitivity of the HPI to ethanol require elucidation.

  11. Various predictors of sustained virologic response in different age groups of patients with genotype-1 chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yen; Sheen, I-Shyan; Chen, Ji-Yih; Huang, Chang-Wen; Huang, Chien-Hao; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Chen, Wei-Ting

    2013-10-01

    Age is one of the sustained virologic response (SVR) predictors for genotype-1 chronic hepatitis C patients treated with pegylated interferon-α/ribavirin. However, variation of SVR predictors in different age groups was not explored before. We therefore conducted this study for investigating this issue. We retrospectively analyzed 265 genotype-1 chronic hepatitis C patients who received pegylated interferon-α/ribavirin treatment. These patients were divided into 3 age groups. Clinical parameters including the genotype of rs12979860 were analyzed. SVR rate was highest in patients younger than 45 years and lowest in patients older than 65 years even through propensity score matching analysis. As for rapid virologic response (RVR) predictors, genotype of rs12979860 was the predictor for the patients younger than 45 years and patients aged between 45 and 65 years, but no RVR predictor was found for patients older than 65 years. As for the SVR predictors, HbA1c, baseline viral load, and RVR but not genotype of rs12979860 were the predictors in patients younger than 45 years. For patients between 45 and 65 years, the predictors for SVR were liver fibrosis, genotype of rs12979860, and RVR. For patients older than 65 years, RVR was the only predictor for SVR. SVR predictors are various in different age groups. RVR is the SVR predictor for all age groups, but the genotype of rs12979860 is the SVR predictor only for patients with age between 45 and 65 years but not younger or older patients.

  12. Evaluation of superabsorbent linseed-polysaccharides as a novel stimuli-responsive oral sustained release drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseeb, Muhammad Tahir; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Bashir, Sajid; Ashraf, Muhammad Umer; Ahmad, Naveed

    2017-03-01

    Advancement in technology has transformed the conventional dosage forms to intelligent drug delivery systems. Such systems are helpful for targeted and efficient drug delivery with minimum side effects. Drug release from these systems is governed and controlled by external stimuli (pH, enzymes, ions, glucose, etc.). Polymeric biomaterial having stimuli-responsive properties has opened a new area in drug delivery approach. Potential of a polysaccharide (rhamnogalacturonan)-based hydrogel from Linseeds (Linum usitatissimum L.) was investigated as an intelligent drug delivery material. Different concentrations of Linseed hydrogel (LSH) were used to prepare caffeine and diacerein tablets and further investigated for pH and salt solution-responsive swelling, pH-dependent drug release, and release kinetics. Morphology of tablets was observed using SEM. LSH tablets exhibited dynamic swelling-deswelling behavior with tendency to swell at pH 7.4 and in deionized water while deswell at pH 1.2, in normal saline and ethanol. Consequently, pH controlled release of the drugs was observed from tablets with lower release (drug release was greatly influenced by the amount of LSH in the tablets. Drug release from LSH tablets was governed by the non-Fickian diffusion. These finding indicates that LSH holds potential to be developed as sustained release material for tablet.

  13. Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility - An Alternative for a Paradigm Change of Business in the 21St Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdinová, Gabriela; Sakál, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The critical system analysis of the current status of all areas of human activity on the planet Earth (in Europe and the Slovak Republic) convinces us, that this development is unsustainable. Many prominent personalities of scientific, cultural, social and political life stated that our planet Earth and mankind with it, and all that man has created during its existence is only one step finds itself on the brink of disaster and it will turn against man. Many theoretical concepts, based on the historical development and experience notes that this status is natural and inevitable. However, we hold a different opinion. If the man is team, that is declared, it must show (now at the turning point) themselves and future generations, that it thinks with its existence on planet Earth seriously and responsibly. Given by the current global crisis and also our belief that the fundamental problem of humanity is unfair creation and distribution of wealth on planet Earth, we maintain opinion for changing the paradigm of thinking in this area. As the only alternative for solving this problem we see in the application of the concept of sustainable corporate social responsibility. The article presents our idea.

  14. The Effects of Environmental and Social Dimensions of Sustainability in Response to the Economic Crisis of European Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Nevado-Peña

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of sustainable development, which has emerged over the last few decades, has moved away from the global to the local level. The sustainability measurements at the global level use the triple bottom line, considering environmental, economic and social dimensions; however, the limited data available at the local level has driven what little research there is to use these optics when considering cities sustainability. In this paper, we use a sustainability city index based on the intellectual capital approach, which considers the three dimensions for European cities. Concretely, we use the environmental and social dimensions of this city index to analyze the effect of different levels of development in terms of sustainability over the main economic variables with available information. The results highlight the importance of the social and environmental dimensions of sustainability in cities economic recovery and show that cities with best positions in sustainability have better performance in economic terms.

  15. Public Sector Responses to Sustainable Haze Management in Upper Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyut Tiyapairat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on urban haze in Upper Northern Thailand (UNT, where smoke haze often produce impacts on human health, tourism, and transportation. The objective was to better understand how the public sector responded to the haze impacts in policy review interviews and analyses of compiled haze-related data during 2007-2011. Moreover, integration of haze adaptation policy and coherency was also explored. The results revealed that Thailand has mainly implemented three National Haze Action Plans since 1997, together with laws and regulations for haze management. Further examination of haze policy at all levels of governance disclosed only vertical integration, whereas cross-boundary integration was reported only with the data and budget. Practically, manpower and function have not yet brought satisfactory outcomes. Moreover, the extent of state responses has been centralized –not decentralized from their centralized political structure. Low participation of people living in both urban and rural areas and cooperative efforts were identified as the main factors contributing to failures in combating smoke haze. Therefore, individuals are of utmost importance for effective solutions. There is a continuous need for prevention campaigns to enhance local people's understanding and participation as well as local communities' networking for solutions to the haze problem.

  16. Sustained response to combination therapy in a patient with chronic hepatitis C and thrombocytopenia secondary to alpha-interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Sáenz, M; Rojas, M; Piñar, A; Salas, E; Rebollo, J; Carmona, I; Herrerías-Esteban, J M; Herrerías-Gutiérrez, J M

    2000-05-01

    Recent data suggest that hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection may induce a significant autoimmune reaction to platelets, but the mechanism is unknown. Many patients with chronic hepatitis C, in fact, have high levels of platelet-associated immunoglobulin G (PAIgG) and HCV-RNA is present in the platelets of 100% of those patients with thrombocytopenia and high PAIgG levels. Hepatitis C virus infection has been associated with the development of thrombocytopenic purpura, sometimes triggered during interferon (IFN) therapy. In such cases, the treatment of the underlying disease is a difficult problem to solve. We report the case of a patient with chronic hepatitis C, who developed life-threatening thrombocytopenic purpura after a prolonged course of IFN-alpha2b over a 4-year period. Treatment with anti-immunoglobulin gammaglobulin (Polyglobin; Química Farmaceutica Bayer, Barcelona, Spain) had a transient effect on the platelet count, but prolonged therapy with prednisone was necessary for definitive relief of the haematological complication. Two years later, the patient was treated with combined therapy, including ribavirin (1200 mg/day) and IFN-alpha2b (5 mU, t.i.w.) for 12 months. This therapy induced a sustained response, both biochemical and virological, without haematological complications. This observation suggests that ribavirin may be of benefit in the treatment of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic hepatitis C, preventing the harmful effect of IFN-alpha but also allowing both drugs to be combined so as to increase the probability of sustained remission of the liver disease.

  17. Sustained attention in mice: expanding the translational utility of the SAT by incorporating the Michigan Controlled Access Response Port (MICARP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Peters, Megan; Cherian, Ajeesh Koshy; Bradshaw, Marc; Sarter, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Advances in mouse genetic technology have spurred increasing interest in the development of cognitive tasks for mice. Here, we describe and discuss the modifications necessary to adapt a task for the assessment of sustained attention performance for use in mice, including for taxing the top-down control of such performance. The validity of the Sustained Attention Task (SAT), including the distractor version (dSAT), has previously been demonstrated in rats and humans. This task requires moveable or retractable operanda; insertion of operanda into the operant chambers cues animals to respond to a prior signal or non-signal event, reporting either a hit or a miss, or a correct rejection or false alarm, respectively. Retractable levers did not support sufficiently high and stable levels of performance in mice. Given the widespread use of static nose-poke devices for testing operant performance in mice, we therefore designed and fabricated a retractable nose-poke device. As this device extends into chambers, a hole for nose-poking is slowly opened and closed again as the device retracts (termed the "Michigan Controlled Access Response Port", MICARP). Results describe the effects of variation of signal duration and event rate, trial outcome and trial type probability, effects of mice deprivation levels, and the reliability of SAT and dSAT performance. Mice perform the SAT and dSAT at levels comparable to those observed in rats. This task will be of assistance in expanding the translational usefulness of the SAT and dSAT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biological responses of three-dimensional cultured fibroblasts by sustained compressive loading include apoptosis and survival activity.

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    Toshiki Kanazawa

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers are characterized by chronicity, which results in delayed wound healing due to pressure. Early intervention for preventing delayed healing due to pressure requires a prediction method. However, no study has reported the prediction of delayed healing due to pressure. Therefore, this study focused on biological response-based molecular markers for the establishment of an assessment technology to predict delayed healing due to pressure. We tested the hypothesis that sustained compressive loading applied to three dimensional cultured fibroblasts leads to upregulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs, CD44, hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2, and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 along with apoptosis via disruption of adhesion. First, sustained compressive loading was applied to fibroblast-seeded collagen sponges. Following this, collagen sponge samples and culture supernatants were collected for apoptosis and proliferation assays, gene expression analysis, immunocytochemistry, and quantification of secreted substances induced by upregulation of mRNA and protein level. Compared to the control, the compressed samples demonstrated that apoptosis was induced in a time- and load- dependent manner; vinculin and stress fiber were scarce; HSP90α, CD44, HAS2, and COX2 expression was upregulated; and the concentrations of HSP90α, hyaluronan (HA, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 were increased. In addition, the gene expression of antiapoptotic Bcl2 was significantly increased in the compressed samples compared to the control. These results suggest that compressive loading induces not only apoptosis but also survival activity. These observations support that HSP90α, HA, and, PGE2 could be potential molecular markers for prediction of delayed wound healing due to pressure.

  19. Assessing the potential additionality of certification by the Round table on Responsible Soybeans and the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Rachael D.; Carlson, Kimberly M.; Rueda, Ximena; Noojipady, Praveen

    2016-04-01

    Multi-stakeholder roundtables offering certification programs are promising voluntary governance mechanisms to address sustainability issues associated with international agricultural supply chains. Yet, little is known about whether roundtable certifications confer additionality, the benefits of certification beyond what would be expected from policies and practices currently in place. Here, we examine the potential additionality of the Round table on Responsible Soybeans (RTRS) and the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) in mitigating conversion of native vegetation to cropland. We develop a metric of additionality based on business as usual land cover change dynamics and roundtable standard stringency relative to existing policies. We apply this metric to all countries with RTRS (n = 8) and RSPO (n = 12) certified production in 2013-2014, as well as countries that have no certified production but are among the top ten global producers in terms of soy (n = 2) and oil palm (n = 2). We find RSPO and RTRS both have substantially higher levels of stringency than existing national policies except in Brazil and Uruguay. In regions where these certification standards are adopted, the mean estimated rate of tree cover conversion to the target crop is similar for both standards. RTRS has higher mean relative stringency than the RSPO, yet RSPO countries have slightly higher enforcement levels. Therefore, mean potential additionality of RTRS and RSPO is similar across regions. Notably, countries with the highest levels of additionality have some adoption. However, with extremely low adoption rates (0.41% of 2014 global harvested area), RTRS likely has lower impact than RSPO (14%). Like most certification programs, neither roundtable is effectively targeting smallholder producers. To improve natural ecosystem protection, roundtables could target adoption to regions with low levels of environmental governance and high rates of forest-to-cropland conversion.

  20. Sustainability Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichnothe, Heinz

    2017-03-17

    The long-term substitution of fossil resources can only be achieved through a bio-based economy, with biorefineries and bio-based products playing a major role. However, it is important to assess the implications of the transition to a bio-based economy. Life cycle-based sustainability assessment is probably the most suitable approach to quantify impacts and to identify trade-offs at multiple levels. The extended utilisation of biomass can cause land use change and affect food security of the most vulnerable people throughout the world. Although this is mainly a political issue and governments should be responsible, the responsibility is shifted to companies producing biofuels and other bio-based products. Organic wastes and lignocellulosic biomass are considered to be the preferred feedstock for the production of bio-based products. However, it is unlikely that a bio-based economy can rely only on organic wastes and lignocellulosic biomass.It is crucial to identify potential problems related to socio-economic and environmental issues. Currently there are many approaches to the sustainability of bio-based products, both quantitative and qualitative. However, results of different calculation methods are not necessarily comparable and can cause confusion among decision-makers, stakeholders and the public.Hence, a harmonised, globally agreed approach would be the best solution to secure sustainable biomass/biofuels/bio-based chemicals production and trade, and to avoid indirect effects (e.g. indirect land use change). However, there is still a long way to go.Generally, the selection of suitable indicators that serve the purpose of sustainability assessment is very context-specific. Therefore, it is recommended to use a flexible and modular approach that can be adapted to various purposes. A conceptual model for the selection of sustainability indicators is provided that facilitates identifying suitable sustainability indicators based on relevance and significance in a

  1. Sustainable forest management and impacts on forest responses to a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, D. B.; Parker, G.; Riutta, T.; Capretz, R.; Murthy, I.; Haibao, R.; Bebber, D.

    2009-12-01

    Impacts from human activities at varying scales and intensities have a profound influence on forest carbon dynamics in addition to interactions with climate. As such, forest carbon stocks and fluxes are among the least well-defined elements of the global carbon cycle, and great uncertainty remains in predicting the effect of climate change on forest dynamics. In some cases, these management-climate interactions are well known, but often represent a fundamental gap in our understanding of ecosystem responses and are likely to be important in improving modeling of climate change, and in valuing forest carbon. To improve understanding of human induced forest management-climate interactions, a network of permanent study plots has been established in five sites around the world - in the US, UK, Brazil, India and China. The sites are near larger global monitoring (Smithsonian CTFS) plots to facilitate comparisons. At each site, a series of 1-ha plots have been placed in forest stands with differing management regimes and histories. Utilizing citizen scientists from HSBC bank, all trees >5 cm dbh are tagged, mapped, identified to species, and diameter is recorded within each plot. A subset of trees have dendrometer bands attached, to record seasonal growth. Dead wood and litterfall samples are taken, and microclimate is recorded with automatic sensors. Serial measurements will allow correlation of forest dynamics with weather. Although the studies are at an early stage current results indicate above-ground biomass estimates are 102-288 Mg ha-1 for intermediate and mature Liriodendron tulipifera-dominated stands in the US, respectively. In India, mature semi-natural evergreen forests biomass estimates are 192-235 Mg ha-1 while plantation and semi-natural core forests in the UK are estimated at 211-292 Mg ha-1. Successional Atlantic forests in Brazil are estimated to contain 192-235 Mg ha-1. In the US, initial results have demonstrated dramatic differences in microclimate

  2. Partial inhibition of catecholamine activity and enhanced responsiveness to NMDA after sustained administration of vortioxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad; El Mansari, Mostafa; Blier, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Vortioxetine is a multimodal drug that blocks serotonin (5-HT) reuptake and directly modulates 5-HT receptors. The effects of subacute and long-term administration of vortioxetine on various aspects of catecholamine and glutamate systems were investigated using single-unit extracellular recordings and microiontophoresis in the rat brain. The firing rate of dopamine (DA) neurons was significantly decreased (26%) after 14, but not 4 days of vortioxetine administration (vortioxetine-containing chow, 1.8 g/kg vortioxetine). Same 14- and 4-day regimens of vortioxetine decreased the firing activity of norepinephrine (NE) neurons (by 27% and 41%, respectively). For DA and NE neurons, 14-day vortioxetine exposure also decreased the number of bursts per minute, without changing the number of spikes per burst, percentage of spike firing in burst and the number of spontaneously active neurons per track. However, this vortioxetine-induced suppression of DA and NE neuronal activity is less than that obtained in previous studies with the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram. In the CA3 region of the hippocampus, 14 days of vortioxetine exposure did not change the sensitivity of postsynaptic α2-adrenoceptors nor did it increase the tonic activation of α1-and α2-adrenoceptors. Vortioxetine administration for 14 days increased the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-, but not α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-evoked responses of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Taken together, the results of the current study suggest that vortioxetine might produce a lesser inhibition of DA and NE neuronal activity when compared to those induced by escitalopram as reported in previous studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Public Administration, Social Responsibility and Sustainability, the Commitment of Public Education Institutions: Instituto Federal Fluminense Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Grigorio Freitas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available School is part of the community and as such should provide ongoing discussions which are conducive to creating a more just society, striving to provide educational and vocational training in order to educate citizens who are free, able to think critically, and supportive of each other. In pursuit of this objective, education emerges as a springboard for sustainable development with social inclusion, bringing down certain barriers created by the need to meet government targets, and discussing the options associated to local characteristics, empowering people who are looking for a more dignified life.The objectives of this research are to analyse the commitment of public teaching institutions in the area of social development and sustainability; identify the main difficulties of implementing social projects according to federal government guidelines, considering not only the general characteristics, but also those given by local communities; and understand the importance of education for improving communal living conditions, helping strengthen collaboration between communities and schools in tackling these social issues and identifying practices currently adopted. This will be done by reviewing the literature and case studies available, aiming to improve the management of future actions.The method employed to answer the research question included the use of questionnaires and interviews, direct observation by the author, literature review and a study of best practices dentified throughout the research process, the use of the concept of social responsibility and sustainability to analyse public policies focused on education, and the case study of the Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia to improve the handling and understanding of research data.It became apparent that the biggest difficulties encountered in the projects created by the federal government and operated by the Instituto Federal Fluminense had to do with lack of

  4. Interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 in chronic hepatitis C: Correlations with insulin resistance, histological features & sustained virological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Dana; Grigorescu, Mircea Dan; Radu, Corina; Suciu, Alina; Grigorescu, Mircea

    2017-04-01

    One of the multiple factors contributing to virological response in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10). Its level reflects the status of interferon-stimulated genes, which in turn is associated with virological response to antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of serum IP-10 levels on sustained virological response (SVR) and the association of this parameter with insulin resistance (IR) and liver histology. Two hundred and three consecutive biopsy proven CHC patients were included in the study. Serum levels of IP-10 were determined using ELISA method. IR was evaluated by homeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR). Histological features were assessed invasively by liver biopsy and noninvasively using FibroTest, ActiTest and SteatoTest. Predictive factors for SVR and their interrelations were assessed. A cut-off value for IP-10 of 392 pg/ml was obtained to discriminate between responders and non-responders. SVR was obtained in 107 patients (52.70%). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for SVR was 0.875 with a sensitivity of 91.6 per cent, specificity 74.7 per cent, positive predictive value 80.3 per cent and negative predictive value 88.7 per cent. Higher values of IP-10 were associated with increasing stages of fibrosis (P<0.01) and higher grades of inflammation (P=0.02, P=0.07) assessed morphologically and noninvasively through FibroTest and ActiTest. Significant steatosis and IR were also associated with increased levels of IP-10 (P=0.01 and P=0.02). In multivariate analysis, IP-10 levels and fibrosis stages were independently associated with SVR. Our findings showed that the assessment of serum IP-10 level could be a predictive factor for SVR and it was associated with fibrosis, necroinflammatory activity, significant steatosis and IR in patients with chronic HCV infection.

  5. Responses to Environmental & Societal Challenges for our Unstable Earth (RESCUE) foresight initiative - towards a European response to grand challenges in sustainability research and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avril, B.; et al.

    2012-04-01

    The "Responses to Environmental and Societal Challenges for our Unstable Earth" (RESCUE; www.esf.org/rescue) foresight initiative - a joint COST-ESF "Frontiers of Science" initiative - aimed to help Europe address the societal and scientific challenges related to global environmental change and the related resilience issues. In RESCUE, the focus of attention was on people and the goal was to stimulate an integrated, innovative response from natural, social and human sciences. The RESCUE foresight initiative began in September 2009 and has recently been completed. RESCUE had the following key objectives: 1. To propose a strategic process for natural, social and human sciences to improve their ability and capacity to work together to address global environmental change through interdisciplinary synergy and to respond effectively to societal and policy-relevant needs; 2. To articulate new scientific issues related to global environmental change and the related resilience issues, especially those of transdisciplinary nature and of major relevance to society; 3. To explore new approaches towards truly integrated, interdisciplinary science, and to facilitate the 'revolution' in education and capacity building it requires. The work of RESCUE focused on the following themes: · Contributions from social sciences and humanities in developing responses to challenges of the Anthropocene; · Collaboration between the natural, social and human sciences in global environmental change and resilience studies; · Requirements for research methodologies and data; · Education and capacity building - towards a 'revolution'; · The interface between science and policy, communication and outreach. The RESCUE recommendations include the following issues to be addressed by science-funders, science policy-makers, researchers, practitioners, educators and a range of other societal actors: · develop an institutional framework for an open knowledge society, · re-organise research so

  6. Do, but Don't Tell: The Search for Social Responsibility and Sustainability in the Websites of the Top-100 US MBA Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Timothy A.; Fox, Corey J.; Ede, Kenneth F.; Korstad, John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the degree to which business schools, in particular MBA programs, have developed academic programs and centers specifically focused on corporate social responsibility and sustainability (CSRS) and, for those that have, promote them on their Web sites. The instruction of CSRS in institutions of…

  7. Special Issue on "Social Responsibility Accounting and Reporting in Times of ‘Sustainability Downturn/Crisis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    José M. Moneva-Abadía; Carmen Correa-Ruiz

    2011-01-01

    ... eroding social and environmental concerns and values, the notion of sustainability crisis provides an interesting starting point to reflect on the role of Social and Environmental Accounting Research...

  8. Responses of the sustained inward current to autonomic agonists in guinea-pig sino-atrial node pacemaker cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Futoshi; Ding, Wei-Guang; Matsuura, Hiroshi

    2005-03-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to examine the responses of the sustained inward current (I(st)) to beta-adrenergic and muscarinic agonists in guinea-pig sino-atrial (SA) node cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. I(st) was detected as the nicardipine (1 microM)-sensitive inward current at potentials between approximately -80 and +20 mV in the presence of low concentration (0.1 mM) of extracellular Ca2+, where the L-type Ca2+ current (I(Ca,L)) was practically abolished. 2. Beta-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline (ISO) in nanomolar concentrations not only increased the amplitude of I(st) but also shifted the membrane potential producing the peak amplitude (Vpeak) to a negative direction by approximately 15 mV without appreciably affecting potential range for the current activation. The stimulatory effect of ISO was concentration-dependent with an EC50 of 2.26 nM and the maximal effect (96.4+/-22.9% increase, n=6) was obtained at 100 nM ISO, when evaluated by the responses at -50 mV. 3. Bath application of acetylcholine (ACh) significantly inhibited I(st), which had been maximally augmented by 100 nM ISO; this inhibitory effect of ACh was concentration-dependent with an IC50 of 133.9 nM. High concentration (1000 nM) of ACh depressed basal I(st) by 10.5+/-2.0% (n=3). 4. In action potential clamp experiments, I(st) was also detected under control conditions and was markedly potentiated by exposure to ISO. 5. These results strongly suggest that I(st) not only contributes to the spontaneous action potentials of mammalian SA node cells but also plays a substantial role in mediating autonomic regulation of SA node pacemaker activity.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells from osteoporotic patients feature impaired signal transduction but sustained osteoinduction in response to BMP-2 stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prall, Wolf Christian; Haasters, Florian; Heggebö, Jostein; Polzer, Hans; Schwarz, Christina; Gassner, Christoph; Grote, Stefan; Anz, David; Jäger, Marcus; Mutschler, Wolf; Schieker, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    Osteoporotic fractures show reduced callus formation and delayed bone healing. Cellular sources of fracture healing are mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) that differentiate into osteoblasts by stimulation with osteoinductive cytokines, such as BMP-2. We hypothesized that impaired signal transduction and reduced osteogenic differentiation capacity in response to BMP-2 may underlie the delayed fracture healing. Therefore, MSC were isolated from femoral heads of healthy and osteoporotic patients. Grouping was carried out by bone mineral densitometry in an age-matched manner. MSC were stimulated with BMP-2. Signal transduction was assessed by western blotting of pSMAD1/5/8 and pERK1/2 as well as by quantitative RT-PCR of Runx-2, Dlx5, and Osteocalcin. Osteogenic differentiation was assessed by quantifying Alizarin Red staining. Osteoporotic MSC featured an accurate phosphorylation pattern of SMAD1/5/8 but a significantly reduced activation of ERK1/2 by BMP-2 stimulation. Furthermore, osteoporotic MSC showed significantly reduced basal expression levels of Runx-2 and Dlx5. However, Runx-2, Dlx5, and Osteocalcin expression showed adequate up-regulation due to BMP-2 stimulation. The global osteogenic differentiation in standard osteogenic differentiation media was reduced in osteoporotic MSC. Nevertheless, osteoporotic MSC were shown to feature an adequate induction of osteogenic differentiation due to BMP-2 stimulation. Taken together, we here demonstrate osteoporosis associated alterations in BMP-2 signaling but sustained specific osteogenic differentiation capacity in response to BMP-2. Therefore, BMP-2 may represent a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of fractures in osteoporotic patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Scrub-Oak Biomass Stimulation by CO2 Enrichment: Sustained 11 Years But Mediated by Precipitation and Contrasting Species Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, T.; Li, J.; Dijkstra, P.; Anderson, H.; Johnson, D.; Hinkle, R.; Drake, B.

    2007-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems may mitigate rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2) through increased carbon uptake and sequestration in plant biomass. Elevated CO2 commonly produces initial stimulation of photosynthesis and growth, but due primarily to complex interactions with climate related factors (i.e. water, light and nutrients), uncertainty regarding long-term biomass response persists. After 11 years of CO2 enrichment (ambient and ambient + 350 ppm) using open-top chambers, aboveground biomass stimulation was sustained in a Florida scrub-oak ecosystem, yielding a 67% increase at final harvest in June 2007. The scrub oaks Quercus geminata and Quercus myrtifolia represented 85% of total ecosystem aboveground biomass but displayed contrasting responses to elevated CO2. Q. myrtifolia showed consistent increase in shoot biomass over the course of the study (128% stimulation by elevated CO2) while shoot biomass of Q. geminata was not significantly increased (+6% difference between treatments). Both species displayed long-term mean stimulation of net leaf photosynthesis to elevated CO2 under saturated light conditions: stimulation of photosynthesis in Q. myrtifolia was nearly twice that in Q. geminata (63% and 35%, respectively). Over the course of the study, Q. geminata consistently displayed photosynthetic acclimation via reductions in maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax) and maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax) while Q. myrtifolia photosynthesis did not acclimate to elevated CO2. Inter-annual variation in Q. myrtifolia annual biomass increment was correlated with rainfall and elevated CO2 stimulation of absolute biomass accumulation was greatest in wet years. This effect was muted at the ecosystem level because CO2 stimulation of biomass in Q. geminata, which utilizes the water table to a greater extent than Q. myrtifolia, showed no relationship with rainfall. These advantages afforded to Q. myrtifolia by elevated CO2 produced a significant change in

  11. Sustained action of developmental ethanol exposure on the cortisol response to stress in zebrafish larvae and adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Baiamonte

    Full Text Available Ethanol exposure during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of preventable birth defects, leading to a range of symptoms collectively known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. More moderate levels of prenatal ethanol exposure lead to a range of behavioural deficits including aggression, poor social interaction, poor cognitive performance and increased likelihood of addiction in later life. Current theories suggest that adaptation in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and neuroendocrine systems contributes to mood alterations underlying behavioural deficits and vulnerability to addiction. In using zebrafish (Danio rerio, the aim is to determine whether developmental ethanol exposure provokes changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal (HPI axis (the teleost equivalent of the HPA, as it does in mammalian models, therefore opening the possibilities of using zebrafish to elucidate the mechanisms involved, and to test novel therapeutics to alleviate deleterious symptoms.The results showed that developmental exposure to ambient ethanol, 20mM-50mM 1-9 days post fertilisation, had immediate effects on the HPI, markedly reducing the cortisol response to air exposure stress, as measured by whole body cortisol content. This effect was sustained in adults 6 months later. Morphology, growth and locomotor activity of the animals were unaffected, suggesting a specific action of ethanol on the HPI. In this respect the data are consistent with mammalian results, although they contrast with the higher corticosteroid stress response reported in rats after developmental ethanol exposure. The mechanisms that underlie the specific sensitivity of the HPI to ethanol require elucidation.

  12. Predictive Value of PTEN and AR Coexpression of Sustained Responsiveness to Hormonal Therapy in Prostate Cancer—A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha Salama El Sheikh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available One limitation of current biochemical or histologic analysis of advanced prostate cancer (PC; T3/T4 ±Nx Mx is the ability to identify on first diagnostic biopsy patients who will make a durable response to hormone ablation therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value (sustained response to hormonal therapy and clinical outcome (relapse-free and overall survival of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN and the androgen receptor (AR immunoexpression in the presenting biopsy. Analysis was performed on 47 samples (10 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia and 37 hormone-naive PCs. Patients selected represented two stages in the natural history of PC: The “clinical metastatic androgen–responsive” (androgen-dependent PC, ADPC and the “clinical metastatic androgen–resistant” (androgen-independent PC, AIPC. Reduced immunoreactivity (IR of either or both PTEN/AR in the initial hormone-naive PC samples was observed with increased frequency in AIPCs. In the ADPC group, low PTEN and/or AR-IR was associated with a shorter median relapse-free survival, i.e., at 30 months after surgery, the probability of relapse-free survival for high expressors of PTEN and AR was 85.7% (SEM = 9.3 compared with only 16.6% (SEM = 15.2 in low expressors. At 36 months, only 28.5% (SEM = 9.3 of ADPC high expressors had experienced a biochemical relapse compared with 100% of low expressors (hazard ratio, 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 4.7-146.8. Further studies analyzing the coexpression of PTEN and AR should be undertaken to validate this pilot study and the utility of these biomarkers in routine histopathologic workup of patients with PC.

  13. The Association between Organisational Commitment And Corporate Social Responsibility-Environmental Performance Within an Integrated Sustainability Balanced Scorecard Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Rae

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether organisational commitment is associated with organisations‘CSR performance within sustainability aspects of their internal process. A structural equation model (SEM tested two sequential direct associations between: (1 senior management employees‘ affective and continuance organisational commitment and organisations‘ conventional value-creating internal processes; (2 conventional value-creating internal processes and organisations‘ CSR performance within sustainability value-creating internal process. The SEM results show an indirect association between affective commitment and CSR performance within sustainability value-creating internal process, which is mediated by the conventional value-creating internal processes. The findings support an integrated sustainability internal process within a sustainability balanced scorecard (SBSC as depicted in Kaplan and Norton‘s strategy map. Organisations may develop internal processes that promote CSR outcome characteristics when employees possess higher levels of affective organisational commitment. Future research could investigate a broader  range of environmental outcomes within CSR performance.

  14. Does habituation differ in chronic low back pain subjects compared to pain-free controls? A cross-sectional pain rating ERP study reanalyzed with the ERFIA multilevel method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossen, Catherine J; Vossen, Helen G M; Joosten, Engelbert A; van Os, Jim; Lousberg, Richel

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate cortical differences between chronic low back pain (CLBP) subjects and pain-free controls with respect to habituation and processing of stimulus intensity. The use of a novel event-related fixed-interval areas (ERFIA) multilevel technique enables the analysis of event-related electroencephalogram (EEG) of the whole post stimulus range at a single trial level. This technique makes it possible to disentangle the cortical processes of habituation and stimulus intensity.In a cross-sectional study, 78 individuals with CLBP and 85 pain-free controls underwent a rating paradigm of 150 nonpainful and painful somatosensory electrical stimuli. For each trial, the entire epoch was partitioned into 20-ms ERFIAs, which acted as dependent variables in a multilevel analysis. The variability of each consecutive ERFIA period was modeled with a set of predictor variables, including 3 forms of habituation and stimulus intensity.Seventy-six pain-free controls and 65 CLBP subjects were eligible for analysis. CLBP subjects showed a significantly decreased linear habituation at 340 to 460 ms in the midline electrodes and C3 (Ps < .05) and had a significantly more pronounced dishabituation for the regions of 400 to 460 ms and 800 to 820 ms for all electrodes, except for T3 and T4 (Ps < .05). No significant group differences for stimulus intensity processing were observed.In this study, group differences with respect to linear habituation and dishabituation were demonstrated. By means of the ERFIA multilevel technique, habituation effects were found in a broad post stimulus range and were not solely limited to peaks. This study suggests that habituation may be a key mechanism involved in the transition process to chronic pain. Future studies with a longitudinal design are required to solve this issue.

  15. Functional difference between sustained and transient modulations of cognitive control in the simon task: evidence from false alarm responses on no-go trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Shin'ya

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control in response compatibility tasks is modulated by the task context. Two types of contextual modulations have been demonstrated; sustained (block-wise) and transient (trial-by-trial). Recent research suggests that these modulations have different underlying mechanisms. This study presents new evidence supporting this claim by comparing false alarm (FA) responses on no-go trials of the Simon task between the sustained and transient contexts. In Experiment 1, the sustained context was manipulated so that a block included a larger number of incongruent trials. Results showed that participants made more FA responses by the hand opposite to the stimulus location. This suggests a generation of response bias in which the task-irrelevant location information is utilized in a reversed manner (i.e., to respond with the right hand to a stimulus presented on the left side and vice versa). Next, Experiment 2 examined the effect of the transient context and found that overall FA rate was lower when a no-go trial was preceded by an incongruent trial than by a congruent trial, whereas such response bias as that shown in Experiment 1 was not demonstrated. This suggests that the transient conflict context enhances inhibition of the task-irrelevant process but does not make the task-irrelevant information actively usable. Based on these results, we propound two types of cognitive control modulations as adaptive behaviors: response biasing based on utilization of the task-irrelevant information under the sustained conflict context and transient enhancement of inhibition of the task-irrelevant process based on the online conflict monitoring.

  16. Association of sustained virologic response with reduced progression to liver cirrhosis in elderly patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseng CW

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Wei Tseng,1,2 Ting-Tsung Chang,3,4 Shinn-Jia Tzeng,5 Yu-Hsi Hsieh,1,2 Tsung-Hsing Hung,1,2 Hsiang-Ting Huang,6 Shu-Fen Wu,7 Kuo-Chih Tseng1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Dalin Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Chia-Yi, 2School of Medicine, Tzuchi University, Hualien, 3Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, 4Infectious Disease and Signaling Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 5Department of Agronomy, National Chiayi University, 6Department of Nursing, Dalin Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, 7Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan Objective: We studied the effect of sustained virologic response (SVR after treatment with pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN plus ribavirin on the development of liver cirrhosis in elderly patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC. Patients and methods: This retrospective study enrolled 145 elderly CHC patients (aged ≥65 years who were treatment-naïve and were treated with PEG-IFN plus ribavirin for 6 months between January 2005 and December 2011. Abdominal sonography was performed and liver biochemistry was studied at baseline, at the end of treatment, and every 3–6 months thereafter. The development of liver cirrhosis and related complications was evaluated at the follow-ups. The aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index was used as a noninvasive maker for fibrosis. Results: The mean patient age was 69.1±3.3 years, and the average follow-up time was 5.5 years (standard deviation: 2.5 years, range: 1.1–12.3 years. Ninety-five patients (65.5% achieved SVR, and 26 (17.9% discontinued treatment. Twenty-seven patients (18.6% developed liver cirrhosis after treatment. Patients without SVR had significantly greater risk of liver cirrhosis than those with SVR (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.312–8.761, P=0.012. The

  17. Liver-related morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic hepatitis C and cirrhosis with and without sustained virologic response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallager S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sofie Hallager,1 Steen Ladelund,2 Peer Brehm Christensen,3 Mette Kjær,4,5 Birgit Thorup Roege,6 Karin Elmegaard Grønbæk,7 Erika Belard,8 Toke S Barfod,9 Lone Galmstrup Madsen,10 Jan Gerstoft,11 Britta Tarp,12 Henrik Bygum Krarup,13 Nina Weis,1,5 1Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, 2Clinical Research Center, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, 3Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Institute, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, 4Department of Hepatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, 5Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 6Department of Internal Medicine, Kolding Hospital, Kolding, 7Department of Gastroenterology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, 8Department of Gastroenterology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, 9Department of Internal Medicine, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, 10Department of Gastroenterology, Zealand University Hospital, Køge, 11Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, 12Diagnostic Centre, University Research Clinic for Innovative Patient Pathways, Silkeborg Regional Hospital, Silkeborg, 13Section of Molecular Diagnostics, Clinical Biochemistry and Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark Background: Chronic hepatitis C (CHC causes liver cirrhosis in 5%–20% of patients, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to estimate liver-related morbidity and mortality among patients with CHC and cirrhosis in Denmark with and without antiviral treatment and sustained virologic response (SVR. Furthermore we aimed to estimate the rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and decompensation associated with certain prognostic factors.Materials and methods: Patients with CHC and cirrhosis registered in the Danish Database for Hepatitis

  18. Sustainable investment: Literature overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weda, J.; Kerste, M.; Rosenboom, N.

    2010-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), or sustainability at the company level, entails incorporating ecological (environmental stakeholders) and social aspects (stakeholders other than shareholders and environmental stakeholders) when doing business. Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) concerns

  19. The influences of task repetition, napping, time of day, and instruction on the Sustained Attention to Response Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Mojca K M; Alblas, Eva E; Thijs, Roland D; Fronczek, Rolf; Lammers, Gert Jan; van Dijk, J Gert

    2014-01-01

    The Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) helps to quantify vigilance impairments.Previous studies, in which five SART sessions on one day were administered, demonstrated worse performance during the first session than during the others. The present study comprises two experiments to identify a cause of this phenomenon. Experiment 1, counting eighty healthy participants, assessed effects of repetition,napping, and time of day on SART performance through a between-groups design. The SART was performed twice in the morning or twice in the afternoon; half of the participants took a 20-minute nap before the second SART. A strong correlation between error count and reaction time (RT) suggested effects of test instruction. Participants gave equal weight to speed and accuracy in Experiment 1; therefore, results of 20 participants were compared to those of 20 additional participants who were told to prefer accuracy (Experiment 2). The average SART error count in Experiment 1 was 10.1; the median RT was 280 ms. Neither repetition nor napping influenced error count or RT. Time of day did not influence error count, but RT was significantly longer for morning than for afternoon SARTs. The additional participants in Experiment 2 had a 49% lower error count and a 14% higher RT than the participants in Experiment 1. Error counts reduced by 50% from the first to the second session of Experiment 2, irrespective of napping or time of day. Preferring accuracy over speed was associated with a significantly lower error count. The data suggest that a worse performance in the first SART session only occurs when instructing participants to prefer accuracy, which is caused by repetition, not by napping or time of day. We advise that participants are instructed to prefer accuracy over speed when performing the SART and that a full practice session is included.

  20. Complement C3d conjugation to anthrax protective antigen promotes a rapid, sustained, and protective antibody response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi V Kolla

    Full Text Available B. anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax. Pathogenesis is primarily mediated through the exotoxins lethal factor and edema factor, which bind protective antigen (PA to gain entry into the host cell. The current anthrax vaccine (AVA, Biothrax consists of aluminum-adsorbed cell-free filtrates of unencapsulated B. anthracis, wherein PA is thought to be the principle target of neutralization. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the natural adjuvant, C3d, versus alum in eliciting an anti-PA humoral response and found that C3d conjugation to PA and emulsion in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA imparted superior protection from anthrax challenge relative to PA in IFA or PA adsorbed to alum. Relative to alum-PA, immunization of mice with C3d-PA/IFA augmented both the onset and sustained production of PA-specific antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies to the receptor-binding portion (domain 4 of PA. C3d-PA/IFA was efficacious when administered either i.p. or s.c., and in adolescent mice lacking a fully mature B cell compartment. Induction of PA-specific antibodies by C3d-PA/IFA correlated with increased efficiency of germinal center formation and plasma cell generation. Importantly, C3d-PA immunization effectively protected mice from intranasal challenge with B. anthracis spores, and was approximately 10-fold more effective than alum-PA immunization or PA/IFA based on dose challenge. These data suggest that incorporation of C3d as an adjuvant may overcome shortcomings of the currently licensed aluminum-based vaccine, and may confer protection in the early days following acute anthrax exposure.

  1. SUSTAINABLE CORPORATE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DORU CÎRNU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the image of the international business environment has changed significantly. Studies conducted by UNCTAD shows that corporate phenomenon developments in the world economy is growing. Without claiming to present an exhaustive topic so vast we tried to capture some "facets" of sustainable development from the perspective of multinational corporations, given the expansion of these economic entities and strengthening their power in the global economy. We present more negative aspects of the actions of multinational corporations in terms of sustainable development, it is very important to know both sides of the coin, which will not only help transnational giants including release. Based on issues such as corporate social responsibility, environmental pollution and workers' rights, we sought to counter official statements. The conclusion is that these economic entities are real forces that can not be ignored in today's world and the obvious problem of sustainable development can not be addressed independently of the phenomenon, context we also identified some possible solutions to conflict of corporations and essence of the concept of sustainable development.

  2. School Facilities and Sustainability-Related Concepts: A Study of Hellenic Secondary School Principals', Teachers', Pupils' and Parents' Responses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vasiliki Zepatou; Maria Loizidou; Archontoula Chaloulakou; Nicolas Spyrellis

    2016-01-01

    ... and attitudes of pupils, teachers, principals and parents towards sustainable construction and the selection and use of materials in schools that are friendly to the environment and human health...

  3. [SDC] [r]esponse form for the consultation on the review of the 'Strategy for sustainable construction'

    OpenAIRE

    Sustainable Development Commission

    2006-01-01

    Our input into the 'Strategy for sustainable construction' highlights that this an important opportunity for Government to show inspirational leadership through its role as a the UK's largest construction client. Publisher PDF

  4. Formulation development and optimization of sustained release matrix tablet of Itopride HCl by response surface methodology and its evaluation of release kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Anirbandeep; Wong, Tin Wui; Singh, Navjot

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this present investigation was to develop and formulate sustained release (SR) matrix tablets of Itopride HCl, by using different polymer combinations and fillers, to optimize by Central Composite Design response surface methodology for different drug release variables and to evaluate drug release pattern of the optimized product. Sustained release matrix tablets of various combinations were prepared with cellulose-based polymers: hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and polyvinyl pyrolidine (pvp) and lactose as fillers. Study of pre-compression and post-compression parameters facilitated the screening of a formulation with best characteristics that underwent here optimization study by response surface methodology (Central Composite Design). The optimized tablet was further subjected to scanning electron microscopy to reveal its release pattern. The in vitro study revealed that combining of HPMC K100M (24.65 MG) with pvp(20 mg)and use of LACTOSE as filler sustained the action more than 12 h. The developed sustained release matrix tablet of improved efficacy can perform therapeutically better than a conventional tablet.

  5. From sustainable buildings to sustainable business

    OpenAIRE

    Mia Andelin

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) Sustainable Buildings & Climate Initiative reports that buildings are responsible for more than 40 percent of global energy use and over one third of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The construction and real estate sector has the potential to play a significant role in the response to climate change. During the latest years the increase in attention to sustainability and green building by planners, developers, and investors has been remarka...

  6. Enforcing Canada`s pollution laws : The public comes first : The Government response to the third report of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    In its third report, the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development made 24 recommendations with regard to enforcing Canadian pollution prevention laws. The recommendations are wide ranging and cover the enforcement of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, and pollution prevention provisions of the Fisheries Act. This report contains the responses to the recommendations by the federal Minister of the Environment on behalf of the Government of Canada. 8 tabs.

  7. Faktor-Faktor yang Mempengaruhi Pengungkapan Corporate Social Responsibility di dalam Laporan Sustainability (Studi Empiris Pada Perusahaan yang listing di Bursa Efek Indonesia Tahun 2010-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dita Rohmah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to examine the effect of corporate governance, firm size, and profitability to corporate social responsibility disclosure in sustainability report. The mechanism of corporate governance used are independent commissioner, institutional ownership, and foreign ownership.This research is a quantitative study using scientific research in the form of positive economics. The nature and type of this research is descriptive with the method used by literature survey. Data used is secondary data obtained from www.idx.co.id and corporate websites. The analytical method used is multiple linear regression analysis with SPSS version 22. The populations in this study are all companies listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange during the period 2010 until 2013. Samples are taken by purposive sampling method amount 21companies with 4 years observation. Based on the results of multiple regression analysis with a significant level of 5%, the results of this study concluded that: (1 Independent Commissary does not signicantly influence the effect on the disclosure of CSR in the sustainability report with the significant value 0.390 > 0.05. (2 Institutional Ownership has a significant effect on the disclosure of CSR in the sustainability report with the significant value 0.003 < 0.05. (3 Foreign Ownership does not signicantly influence the effect on the disclosure of CSR in the sustainability report with the significant value 0.221 > 0.05. (4 Firm Size has a significant effect on the disclosure of CSR in the sustainability report with the significant value 0.000 < 0.05. (5 Profitability has a significant effect on the disclosure of CSR in the sustainability report with the significant value 0.001< 0.05.DOI: 10.15408/ess.v5i2.2347

  8. Maintenance of Th1 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific responses in individuals with acute HCV who achieve sustained virological clearance after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Dore, Gregory J; Hellard, Margaret; Yeung, Barbara; Rawlinson, William D; White, Peter A; Kaldor, John M; Lloyd, Andrew R; Ffrench, Rosemary A

    2013-11-01

    T-cell responses against hepatitis C are believed to be critical in achieving both natural and treatment-induced clearance. However, rapid clearance of antigen with early treatment of primary infection may result in reduced or poorly sustained cellular immunity. This study longitudinally examined Th1 and Th2 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific cytokine production and T-cell effector function from subjects enrolled in the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C comparing three groups: treatment-induced clearance (sustained virological response [SVR]), treatment non-response, and untreated spontaneous clearance. HCV-specific T-cell responses were characterized by HCV peptide ELISpot, in vitro cytokine production, and T-cell flow cytometry assays. Treated subjects with a sustained virological response (SVR) displayed a better maintenance of HCV-specific Th1 responses compared to treatment non-responders (higher interferon [IFN]-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 magnitude at week 24, broader IFN-γ responses at weeks 24 and 48, P < 0.05) and significantly increased IFN-γ responses between screening and week 48 (magnitude P = 0.026, breadth P = 0.009). Treatment-induced viral clearance was also associated with a trend toward decreased IL-10 responses (screening to week 48, P = 0.070), higher expression of CD45RO (P = 0.042) and CD38 (P = 0.088) on CD4+ T cells, and higher IFN-γR expression (CD56+ IFN-γR+ P = 0.033) compared to treatment non-responders. Untreated subjects with viral clearance also displayed high magnitude and broad HCV-specific IFN-γ and IL-2 responses early in infection; however, IFN-γ responses were not as well maintained compared to treated subjects with a SVR (week 48 magnitude, breadth P = 0.064). Treatment-induced viral clearance of recent HCV infection is associated with maintenance of HCV-specific Th1 responses. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Estimating the clinical and economic benefit associated with incremental improvements in sustained virologic response in chronic hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil McEwan

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the principle causes of chronic liver disease. Successful treatment significantly decreases the risk of hepatic morbidity and mortality. Current standard of care achieves sustained virologic response (SVR rates of 40-80%; however, the HCV therapy landscape is rapidly evolving. The objective of this study was to quantify the clinical and economic benefit associated with increasing levels of SVR.A published Markov model (MONARCH that simulates the natural history of hepatitis C over a lifetime horizon was used. Discounted and non-discounted life-years (LYs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs and cost of complication management were estimated for various plausible SVR rates. To demonstrate the robustness of projections obtained, the model was validated to ten UK-specific HCV studies.QALY estimates ranged from 18.0 years for those treated successfully in fibrosis stage F0 to 7.5 years (discounted for patients in fibrosis stage F4 who remain untreated. Predicted QALY gains per 10% improvement in SVR ranged from 0.23 (F0 to 0.64 (F4 and 0.58 (F0 to 1.35 (F4 in 40 year old patients (discounted and non-discounted results respectively. In those aged 40, projected discounted HCV-related costs are minimised with successful treatment in F0/F1 (at approximately £ 300, increasing to £ 49,300 in F4 patients who remain untreated. Validation of the model to published UK cost-effectiveness studies produce R2 goodness of fit statistics of 0.988, 0.978 and of 0.973 for total costs, QALYs and incremental cost effectiveness ratios, respectively.Projecting the long-term clinical and economic consequences associated with chronic hepatitis C is a necessary requirement for the evaluation of new treatments. The principle analysis demonstrates the significant impact on expected costs, LYs and QALYs associated with increasing SVR. A validation analysis demonstrated the robustness of the results reported.

  10. Sustainable development as a challenge for undergraduate students: the module "Science bears responsibility" in the Leuphana bachelor's programme : commentary on "a case study of teaching social responsibility to doctoral students in the climate sciences".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Gerd

    2013-12-01

    The Leuphana Semester at Leuphana University Lüneburg, together with the module "Science bears responsibility" demonstrate how innovative methods of teaching and learning can be combined with the topic of sustainable development and how new forms of university teaching can be introduced. With regard to module content, it has become apparent that, due to the complexity of the field of sustainability, a single discipline alone is unable to provide analyses and solutions. If teaching in higher education is to adequately deal with this complexity, then it is necessary to develop inter- and transdisciplinary approaches that go beyond a purely specialist orientation.

  11. Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a slow but more sustained chemokine and cytokine response in naive foetal enterocytes compared to commensal Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Louise; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Metzdorff, Stine B

    2010-01-01

    -positive Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, and expression of genes important for immune regulation was measured together with cytokine production. E. coli Nissle and L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced chemokines and cytokines, but with different kinetics, and only E. coli Nissle induced down-regulation of Toll......, are highly responsive to stimulation with gut commensals, with L. acidophilus NCFM inducing a slower, but more sustained response than E. coli Nissle. E. coli may induce intestinal tolerance through very rapid up-regulation of chemokine and cytokine genes and down-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4, while...

  12. Minimal residual disease and normalization of the bone marrow after long-term treatment with alpha-interferon2b in polycythemia vera. A report on molecular response patterns in seven patients in sustained complete hematological remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Møller, Michael Boe; de Stricker, Karin

    2009-01-01

    PV patients with profound molecular responses during and after long-term treatment with alpha-interferon 2b. All patients obtained a major molecular response (MMR). Subsequently all patients discontinued alpha-interferon and sustained complete hematological remission with a follow-up period of median...... of histomorphological bone marrow features of PV. Finally, hematological remissions and major molecular responses can be sustained after discontinuation of long-term treatment with IFN2b....

  13. Prediction for sustained deep molecular response of BCR-ABL1 levels in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Koji; Kantarjian, Hagop; O'Brien, Susan; Ravandi, Farhad; Konopleva, Marina; Borthakur, Gautam; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Wierda, William; Daver, Naval; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Takahashi, Koichi; Jain, Preetesh; Rios, Mary Beth; Pierce, Sherry; Jabbour, Elias; Cortes, Jorge E

    2017-12-20

    The achievement of a sustained deep molecular response is a goal of increasing relevance because it opens the possibility of treatment discontinuation. The objective of this analysis was to develop a prediction model for a sustained molecular response with BCR-ABL1 level <0.0032% on the international scale (MR4.5 ) for at least 2 years according to BCR-ABL1 levels achieved within the first 12 months of therapy. Data for 603 patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase in consecutive prospective clinical trials were analyzed. The best fit average molecular response was defined by robust linear regression models, with which the average molecular levels were defined. The minimum acceptable molecular response was defined by quantile regression for the 95th percentile, with which the worst 5% BCR-ABL1 levels were identified. In 603 patients with a median follow-up of 103 months, 2002 BCR-ABL1-level data points within 1 year of tyrosine kinase inhibitors were identified. The regression equation for the best fit average levels for a sustained MR4.5 was Log10 (PCR) = -0.1424 × (Months) - 0.8668, and the regression equation for minimum acceptable levels was Log10 (PCR) = -0.1403 × (Months) + 0.6142 (where PCR indicates polymerase chain reaction). To achieve a sustained MR4.5 , the best fit average levels were 0.051%, 0.019%, 0.007%, and 0.003% at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, respectively; the minimum acceptable levels were 1.561%, 0.592%, 0.225%, and 0.085% at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, respectively. This model proposes optimal values that predict the highest probability of reaching such a goal. These values can be used to guide therapy when a sustained MR4.5 is the objective. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  14. Clinical effectiveness of kinesiological taping on pain and pain-free shoulder range of motion in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, Hassan; Keshavarz, Roshanak; Arab, Amir Massoud; Ebrahimi, Ismaeil

    2013-12-01

    Kinesiological taping (KT) is commonly used to improve symptoms associated with musculoskeletal disorders. However, review of the literature revealed minimal evidence to support the use of KT in treatment of shoulder disorders and controversy exists regarding the effect of KT in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of KT on pain intensity during movement, pain experienced during the night (nocturnal pain), and pain-free shoulder range of motion (ROM) immediately after taping, after three days and after one week, in patients with SIS. Randomized, Double blinded, Placebo-controlled design. A total of 30 patients with SIS participated in this study. Patients were assigned randomly to a control (N = 15) and an experimental group (N = 15). The patients in the experimental group received a standardized therapeutic KT. The standardized, placebo neutral KT was applied for control group. KT was applied two times with a three day interval, remaining on during the 3 day interval. Both groups followed the same procedures. Pain-free active ROM during shoulder abduction, flexion, and elevation in the scapular plane was measured. Visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain intensity during movement or nocturnal pain and was assessed at baseline, immediately after KT, after three days, and one week after KT. The result of repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant change in pain level during movement, nocturnal pain, and pain-free ROM (p = 0.000) after KT in the experimental group. In the ANCOVA, controlling for pre-test scores, change in pain level at movement (p = 0.009) and nocturnal pain (p = 0.04) immediately after KT was significantly greater in the experimental group than in control group. There was no significant difference in ROM measures (p > 0.05) between groups immediately after KT. No significant differences were found between the two groups in the after one week measurements of pain intensity and

  15. Sustainability at BPA 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-12-01

    BPA’s Sustainability Action Plan is grounded in our commitment to environmental stewardship and Executive Order 13514 that calls on the federal agencies to “lead by example” by setting a 2020 greenhouse gas emissions target, increasing energy efficiency; reducing fleet petroleum consumption; conserving water; reducing waste; supporting sustainable communities; and leveraging federal purchasing power to promoting environmentally responsible products and technologies.

  16. A study of best positive predictors for sustained virologic response to interferon alpha plus ribavirin therapy in naive chronic hepatitis C patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riazuddin Sheikh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine the rate of sustained virological response (SVR and various factors associated with response rates in chronic hepatitis C infected patients treated with interferon alpha and ribavirin combination therapy. Methods A retrospective review of patients data collected at this Centre from 2001 to 2007 was performed. Out of 731 consecutive patients 400 patients that fulfilled the study criteria were evaluated and subsequently treated with a combination of interferon alpha 2b (3 MU subcutaneously three injections weekly and ribavirin (800–1200 mg orally daily. Treatment were administered for either 24 weeks or 48 weeks and patients were followed for an additional 6 months thereafter. End of the treatment response (ETR, SVR and side effects were recorded. Results Out of 400 patients, 394 completed the entire treatment course and six patients discontinued treatment at month 2. Over 67% responded at the end of treatment and 16% suffered relapse. Among all treated patients, 47.6% males and 56.7% females had sustained viral response with a total combined sustained viral response rate of 50.5%. Rapid response was seen in 46.5% patients. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, slow virological responders (adjusted OR 2.6 [95% CI 1.9–3.7], HCV genotype 1&4 (adjusted OR 2.4 [95% CI 1.7–3.5], pre-treatment viral load > 0.2 MIU/mL (adjusted OR 2.2 [95% CI 1.8–4.2], Panjabi ethnic group (adjusted OR 1.6 [95% CI 1.0–3.2] and Age > 40 years (adjusted OR 1.5 [95% CI 0.9–2.4] were independent risk factors for non response. Side effects were usual and tolerable and only 1.5% discontinued the treatment. Conclusion The best positive predictor for SVR in this country are: rapid virologic response, HCV genotype 2 & 3, age

  17. European forum for sustainable development and responsible enterprise; Forum europeen pour le developpement durable et une entreprise respondable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents the intervention of Pascal Colombani, Director of the CEA (Atomic Energy Center), during the european forum on sustainable development in mars 2002. The author defines the part of the nuclear energy in Europe, as a clean energy source in terms of greenhouse effects and in the necessity of fossils resources preservation. The radioactive wastes management and the public anxiety are also discussed. (A.L.B.)

  18. Patients lacking sustainable long-term weight loss after gastric bypass surgery show signs of decreased inhibitory control of prepotent responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pleunie S Hogenkamp

    Full Text Available A considerable number of bariatric patients report poor long-term weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB surgery. One possibility for an underlying cause is an impairment of cognitive control that impedes this patient group's dietary efforts.To investigate if patients having either poor or good weight loss response, ~12 years after RYGB-surgery, differ in their ability to inhibit prepotent responses when processing food cues during attentional operations-as measure of cognitive control.In terms of weight loss following RYGB-surgery, 15 'poor responders' and 15 'good responders', matched for gender, age, education, preoperative body mass index, and years since surgery, were administered two tasks that measure sustained attention and response control: a go/no-go task and a Stroop interference task; both of which are associated with maladaptive eating behaviours.The poor responders (vs. good responders needed significantly more time when conducting a go/no-go task (603±134 vs. 519±44 msec, p = 0.03, but the number of errors did not differ between groups. When conducting a Stroop interference task, poor responders read fewer inks than good responders (68±16 vs. 85±10 words, p = 0.002.Patients lacking sustainable weight loss after RYGB-surgery showed poorer inhibitory control than patients that successfully lost weight. In the authors' view, these results suggest that cognitive behavioral therapies post-RYGB-surgery may represent a promising behavioral adjuvant to achieve sustainable weight loss in patients undergoing this procedure. Future studies should examine whether these control deficits in poor responders are food-specific or not.

  19. Promoting an optimal networking of fishing actors to organize a responsible, optimal and sustainable exploitation of marine resources: the FAROS Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Antelo, L. T.; Ordóñez, Tatiana; Franco-Uría, A.; Gómez-Gesteira, J. L.; Fernández-Cañamero, M. L.; Castro, J.; Bellido, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the aim of promoting the responsible and sustainable management of the European fishing activity, the European Commission took a number of actions oriented to the implementation of “no-discard” and “zero-waste” policies to be followed by the European fishing fleets in the near future. In particular, actions were directed to the development of policies to reduce unwanted by-catches and eliminate discards in European fisheries, as well as to make the best possible use of the captured resourc...

  20. At Home with Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hale, Lara

    2018-01-01

    of default rules in subconscious decision-making, this research finds that, ultimately, awareness drives the demand necessary for the creation of sustainable consumption. Whereas direct appeal to individuals has a disappointing level of influence on sustainability choices, it is understood that green......-fuel-based energy. To act otherwise requires additional effort and is less likely. Motivated by a need to understand how defaults might bridge standards and sustainable consumption, I investigate how organizational processes potentially lead from standardized green default rules to individual awareness that can...... spread and facilitate sustainable consumption. This paper examines the Active House sustainable building demonstrations in Europe in order to understand how (1) communications and market creation and (2) responsible, user-centered experimentation are organized to move from defaults to sustainable...

  1. 36 CFR 219.20 - Ecological sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ecological sustainability... Sustainability § 219.20 Ecological sustainability. To achieve ecological sustainability, the responsible official... diversity and species diversity are components of ecological sustainability. The planning process must...

  2. How transformational learning promotes caring, consultation and creativity, and ultimately contributes to sustainable development: Lessons from the Partnership for Education and Research about Responsible Living (PERL) network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Victoria Wyszynski

    2017-12-01

    Oases of learning which are transformative and lead to significant behavioural change can be found around the globe. Transformational learning has helped learners not only to understand what they have been taught but also to re-conceptualise and re-apply this understanding to their daily lives. Unfortunately, as many global reports indicate, inspirational transformational learning approaches for sustainable development are rare and have yet to become the norm - despite calls for such approaches by several outstanding educators and organisations. This article examines three learning approaches developed by the network of the Partnership for Education and Research about Responsible Living (PERL). These approaches are structured around core elements of transformative learning for sustainable development, yet focus particularly on the ability to care, consult with others and be creative. They seem to depend on the learners' ability to articulate their perceptions of sustainable development in relation to their own values and to identify how these are actualised in their daily life. Together with other core elements of transformative learning, an almost magical (not precisely measurable) synergy then emerges. The intensity of this synergy appears to be directly related to the individual learner's understanding of the contradictions, interlinkages and interdependencies of modern society. The impact of this synergy seems to be concurrent with the extent to which the learner engages in a continual learning process with those with whom he/she has contact. The findings of this study suggest that mainstreaming transformational learning for sustainable development in ways that release the "magic synergy of creative caring" can result in the emergence of individuals who are willing and able to move from "business as usual" towards more socially just, economically equitable, and environmentally sensitive behaviour.

  3. How transformational learning promotes caring, consultation and creativity, and ultimately contributes to sustainable development: Lessons from the Partnership for Education and Research about Responsible Living (PERL) network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Victoria Wyszynski

    2017-11-01

    Oases of learning which are transformative and lead to significant behavioural change can be found around the globe. Transformational learning has helped learners not only to understand what they have been taught but also to re-conceptualise and re-apply this understanding to their daily lives. Unfortunately, as many global reports indicate, inspirational transformational learning approaches for sustainable development are rare and have yet to become the norm - despite calls for such approaches by several outstanding educators and organisations. This article examines three learning approaches developed by the network of the Partnership for Education and Research about Responsible Living (PERL). These approaches are structured around core elements of transformative learning for sustainable development, yet focus particularly on the ability to care, consult with others and be creative. They seem to depend on the learners' ability to articulate their perceptions of sustainable development in relation to their own values and to identify how these are actualised in their daily life. Together with other core elements of transformative learning, an almost magical (not precisely measurable) synergy then emerges. The intensity of this synergy appears to be directly related to the individual learner's understanding of the contradictions, interlinkages and interdependencies of modern society. The impact of this synergy seems to be concurrent with the extent to which the learner engages in a continual learning process with those with whom he/she has contact. The findings of this study suggest that mainstreaming transformational learning for sustainable development in ways that release the "magic synergy of creative caring" can result in the emergence of individuals who are willing and able to move from "business as usual" towards more socially just, economically equitable, and environmentally sensitive behaviour.

  4. Postinduction serum infliximab trough level and decrease of C-reactive protein level are associated with durable sustained response to infliximab: a retrospective analysis of the ACCENT I trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornillie, Freddy; Hanauer, Stephen B; Diamond, Robert H; Wang, Jianping; Tang, Kezhen L; Xu, Zhenhua; Rutgeerts, Paul; Vermeire, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    Background Serum infliximab trough levels correlate with efficacy; dose escalation is often beneficial in patients with Crohn's disease who stop responding to infliximab treatment. Objective To carry out a post hoc analysis of A Crohn's Disease Clinical Trial Evaluating Infliximab in a New Long-term Treatment Regimen I (ACCENT I) to evaluate the association between serum infliximab trough levels and C-reactive protein (CRP) after 14 weeks of induction treatment with durable sustained long-term response (Crohn's Disease Activity Index decrease ≥70 points and reduction ≥25% from baseline). Design ACCENT I was a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled study. Week 14 trough levels and CRP percentage decrease from baseline to week 14 were compared between patients with and without durable sustained response through week 54. Sensitivity and specificity were determined to predict durable sustained response. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves identified optimal cut-off points; logistic regression determined ORs. Results After induction with 5 mg/kg infliximab, 25% (37/147) and 33% (47/144) of patients sustained week 14 response to infliximab 5 or 10 mg/kg, respectively, administered every 8 weeks without dose escalation, through week 54. Median week 14 trough levels of patients with and without durable sustained response to infliximab 5 mg/kg were 4.0 and 1.9 μg/mL, respectively (p=0.0331). Optimal predictors of durable sustained response to maintenance infliximab 5 mg/kg were week 14 trough level ≥3.5 µg/mL and ≥60% CRP decrease (ORs (95% CI), 3.5 (1.1 to 11.4) and 7.3 (1.4 to 36.7)), respectively, in patients with raised baseline CRP (>8.0 mg/L); area under the ROC curve was 0.75 for both predictors. A ≥3.5 µg/mL week 14 infliximab serum level did not predict durable sustained response to 10 mg/kg maintenance infliximab. Conclusions Patients with durable sustained response to maintenance infliximab 5 mg/kg had higher

  5. Sustainable agriculture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lichtfouse, Eric

    2009-01-01

    ... : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 9 Part I CLIMATE CHANGE Soils and Sustainable Agriculture: A Review : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : Rattan Lal 15 Soils and Food Sufficiency...

  6. Clinical outcome of HIV-infected patients with sustained virologic response to antiretroviral therapy: long-term follow-up of a multicenter cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Gutierrez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Limited information exists on long-term prognosis of patients with sustained virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. We aimed to assess predictors of unfavorable clinical outcome in patients who maintain viral suppression with HAART. METHODS: Using data collected from ten clinic-based cohorts in Spain, we selected all antiretroviral-naive adults who initiated HAART and maintained plasma HIV-1 RNA levels <500 copies/mL throughout follow-up. Factors associated with disease progression were determined by Cox proportional-hazards models. RESULTS: Of 2,613 patients who started HAART, 757 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. 61% of them initiated a protease inhibitor-based HAART regimen, 29.7% a nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen, and 7.8% a triple-nucleoside regimen. During 2,556 person-years of follow-up, 22 (2.9% patients died (mortality rate 0.86 per 100 person-years, and 40 (5.3% died or developed a new AIDS-defining event. The most common causes of death were neoplasias and liver failure. Mortality was independently associated with a CD4-T cell response <50 cells/L after 12 months of HAART (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 4.26 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.68-10.83]; P = .002, and age at initiation of HAART (AHR, 1.06 per year; 95% CI, 1.02-1.09; P = .001. Initial antiretroviral regimen chosen was not associated with different risk of clinical progression. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with sustained virologic response on HAART have a low mortality rate over time. Long-term outcome of these patients is driven by immunologic response at the end of the first year of therapy and age at the time of HAART initiation, but not by the initial antiretroviral regimen selected.

  7. Sustainable Marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, three different conceptions of sustainable marketing are discussed and compared. These different conceptions are referred to as social, green, and critical sustainable marketing. Social sustainable marketing follows the logic of demand-driven marketing management and places the

  8. On-treatment HCV RNA as a predictor of sustained virological response in HCV genotype 3-infected patients treated with daclatasvir and sofosbuvir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowdley, Kris V; Nelson, David R; Lalezari, Jacob P; Box, Terry; Gitlin, Norman; Poleynard, Gary; Rabinovitz, Mordechai; Ravendhran, Natarajan; Sheikh, Aasim M; Siddique, Asma; Bhore, Rafia; Noviello, Stephanie; Rana, Khurram

    2016-11-01

    Many currently available direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens are less effective against HCV genotype 3 than against other HCV genotypes. The all-oral, pangenotypic DAA combination of daclatasvir (NS5A inhibitor) + sofosbuvir (nucleotide NS5B inhibitor) was studied in genotype 3-infected treatment-naive and -experienced patients (ALLY-3) who achieved rates of sustained virological response at post-treatment Week 12 (SVR12) of 90 and 86% respectively. In this analysis, we assessed whether on-treatment responses to daclatasvir + sofosbuvir in genotype 3-infected patients could predict treatment outcome. In ALLY-3, treatment-naive and -experienced patients, with or without cirrhosis, were treated with daclatasvir + sofosbuvir for 12 weeks. HCV RNA kinetics and categorical virological responses on treatment were assessed. The proportions of responders and nonresponders by study week, and time to first undetectable HCV RNA, were analysed for utility in predicting treatment outcome. Overall, HCV RNA levels declined rapidly during Week 1 of treatment in both treatment-naive and -experienced cohorts. Although patients with cirrhosis had a slower initial virological response as measured by the proportion of patients with HCV RNA below the lower limit of quantification at Week 1, responses converged thereafter. Positive and negative predictive values calculated for on-treatment responses were generally comparable with the overall SVR12 rate and were therefore limited indicators of outcome. SVR12 rates were not impacted by time to first undetectable HCV RNA. On-treatment responses are not useful predictors of ultimate virological response to the daclatasvir + sofosbuvir regimen. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Intralesional treatment of stage III metastatic melanoma patients with L19-IL2 results in sustained clinical and systemic immunologic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weide, Benjamin; Eigentler, Thomas K; Pflugfelder, Annette; Zelba, Henning; Martens, Alexander; Pawelec, Graham; Giovannoni, Leonardo; Ruffini, Pier Adelchi; Elia, Giuliano; Neri, Dario; Gutzmer, Ralf; Becker, Jürgen C; Garbe, Claus

    2014-07-01

    L19-IL2 is a recombinant protein comprising the cytokine IL2 fused to the single-chain monoclonal antibody L19. In previous studies, intralesional injection with IL2 has shown efficacy for the locoregional treatment of cutaneous/subcutaneous metastases in patients with advanced melanoma. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether (i) intralesional delivery of a targeted form of IL2 would yield similar results, with reduction of injection frequency and treatment duration; and (ii) systemic immune responses were induced by the local treatment. Patients with stage IIIB/IIIC melanoma and cutaneous/subcutaneous injectable metastases received weekly intratumoral injections of L19-IL2 at a maximum dose of 10 MIU/week for 4 consecutive weeks. Tumor response was evaluated 12 weeks after the first treatment. Twenty-four of 25 patients were evaluable for therapy-induced responses. A complete response (CR) by modified immune-related response criteria (irRC) of all treated metastases was achieved in 6 patients (25%), with long-lasting responses in most cases (5 patients for ≥24 months). Objective responses were documented in 53.9% of all index lesions [44.4% CR and 9.5% partial responses (by irRC)], and 36.5% of these remained stable, while 9.5% progressed. Toxicity was comparable with that of free IL2, and no serious adverse events were recorded. A significant temporary increase of peripheral regulatory T cells and natural killer cells, sustained increase of absolute CD4(+) lymphocytes, and decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells were observed upon treatment. Finally, we recorded encouraging data about the progression time to distant metastases and overall survival. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Expression of 5-HT3 receptors and TTX resistant sodium channels (NaV1.8) on muscle nerve fibers in pain-free humans and patients with chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that 5-HT3-antagonists reduce muscle pain, but there are no studies that have investigated the expression of 5-HT3-receptors in human muscles. Also, tetrodotoxin resistant voltage gated sodium-channels (NaV) are involved in peripheral sensitization and found in trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the rat masseter muscle. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of nerve fibers that express 5-HT3A-receptors alone and in combination with NaV1.8 sodium-channels in human muscles and to compare it between healthy pain-free men and women, the pain-free masseter and tibialis anterior muscles, and patients with myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and pain-free controls. Methods Three microbiopsies were obtained from the most bulky part of the tibialis and masseter muscles of seven and six healthy men and seven and six age-matched healthy women, respectively, while traditional open biopsies were obtained from the most painful spot of the masseter of five female patients and from a similar region of the masseter muscle of five healthy, age-matched women. The biopsies were processed by routine immunohistochemical methods. The biopsy sections were incubated with monoclonal antibodies against the specific axonal marker PGP 9.5, and polyclonal antibodies against the 5-HT3A-receptors and NaV1.8 sodium-channels. Results A similar percentage of nerve fibers in the healthy masseter (85.2%) and tibialis (88.7%) muscles expressed 5-HT3A-receptors. The expression of NaV1.8 by 5-HT3A positive nerve fibers associated with connective tissue was significantly higher than nerve fibers associated with myocytes (P < .001). In the patients, significantly more fibers per section were found with an average of 3.8 ± 3 fibers per section in the masseter muscle compared to 2.7 ± 0.2 in the healthy controls (P = .024). Further, the frequency of nerve fibers that co-expressed NaV1.8 and 5-HT3A receptors was significantly

  11. Expression of 5-HT3 receptors and TTX resistant sodium channels (Na(V)1.8) on muscle nerve fibers in pain-free humans and patients with chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christidis, Nikolaos; Kang, Isabell; Cairns, Brian E; Kumar, Ujendra; Dong, Xudong; Rosén, Annika; Kopp, Sigvard; Ernberg, Malin

    2014-09-26

    Previous studies have shown that 5-HT3-antagonists reduce muscle pain, but there are no studies that have investigated the expression of 5-HT3-receptors in human muscles. Also, tetrodotoxin resistant voltage gated sodium-channels (NaV) are involved in peripheral sensitization and found in trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the rat masseter muscle. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of nerve fibers that express 5-HT3A-receptors alone and in combination with NaV1.8 sodium-channels in human muscles and to compare it between healthy pain-free men and women, the pain-free masseter and tibialis anterior muscles, and patients with myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and pain-free controls. Three microbiopsies were obtained from the most bulky part of the tibialis and masseter muscles of seven and six healthy men and seven and six age-matched healthy women, respectively, while traditional open biopsies were obtained from the most painful spot of the masseter of five female patients and from a similar region of the masseter muscle of five healthy, age-matched women. The biopsies were processed by routine immunohistochemical methods. The biopsy sections were incubated with monoclonal antibodies against the specific axonal marker PGP 9.5, and polyclonal antibodies against the 5-HT3A-receptors and NaV1.8 sodium-channels. A similar percentage of nerve fibers in the healthy masseter (85.2%) and tibialis (88.7%) muscles expressed 5-HT3A-receptors. The expression of NaV1.8 by 5-HT3A positive nerve fibers associated with connective tissue was significantly higher than nerve fibers associated with myocytes (P < .001). In the patients, significantly more fibers per section were found with an average of 3.8 ± 3 fibers per section in the masseter muscle compared to 2.7 ± 0.2 in the healthy controls (P = .024). Further, the frequency of nerve fibers that co-expressed NaV1.8 and 5-HT3A receptors was significantly higher in patients (42

  12. From Efficiency to Sustainability. Training responsible engineers in the new educational scene; De la Eficacia a la Sostenibilidad. Formar ingenieros responsables en el nuevo escenario educativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora-Polo, F.; Roman-Suero, S.; Sanchez-Martin, J.

    2010-07-01

    Terms like Sustainable Development and Professional Business Ethics are more and more often used in Engineering professional exercise. The Professional Associations as regulatory organisms of the profession have to take care that the professional activity is made involving no detrimental effect to the natural and social environment, thus meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations. In the article the relevancy of including transversal ethical and social competence in the engineering studies has been highlighted. For this task, the authors describe their experience in the subject of extractive metallurgy, developed in the Industrial Engineering School of Badajoz. Achieving a proper way of approaching these contents requires a very fluid relation university-business activities. In the same way, based on these first studies, inter university and interdisciplinary working networks might be created in order to study the optimal way for developing these competence. (Author) 21 refs.

  13. The Role of Anion Exchanger on Pulmonary Vascular Response to Sustained Alveolar Hypoxia in the Isolated Perfused Rabbit Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Ketabchi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some respiratory diseases may induce alveolar hypoxia thereby hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV. However, the mechanisms of this physiologic phenomenon are not fully understood. This study was the first to investigate the role of anion exchanger in sustained HPV. Methods: Experiments were performed in the isolated perfused rabbit lung. After preparation, the lungs were divided into six groups: two DIDS (4,4-diisothiocyanostilbene 2,2-disulfonic acid, anion exchanger inhibitor-treated [200 µM (n=5 or 400 µM (n=3] hypoxic groups, two HCO3- free hypoxic groups, one control hypoxic group (n=7 and one control normoxic group (n=4. DIDS were added to the perfusate at 10 minutes before starting the experiments. In the HCO3- free groups, HEPES (4-(2-Hydroxyethylpiperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid were added to the perfusate instead of bicarbonate. Furthermore, in the HEPES1 (n=4 and HEPES2 (n=4 groups, the lungs were ventilated with hypoxic gas with or without CO2, respectively. Results: Ventilation of the lungs with hypoxic gas resulted in biphasic HPV, the acute (0-20 minutes and sustained (20-60 minutes phases. No alteration in both phases of HPV was detected by DIDS (200 µM. However, DIDS (400 µM, extended the ascending part of acute HPV until min 24. Both phases of HPV were decreased in the HEPES1 group. However, in the HEPES 2 group, HPV tended to increase during the rising part of the acute phase of HPV. Conclusions: Since DIDS (400 µM extended acute phase of HPV, and HCO3- free perfusate buffer enhanced rising phase of it, therefore it can be suggested that anion exchanger may modulate HPV especially during the acute phase. The abstract of this article was presented as a poster in the congress of European Respiratory Society (ERS on Monday, 08 September 2014, Munich, Germany and was published in the ERJ September 1, 2014 vol. 44 no. Suppl 58 P2343.

  14. Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Caporali

    Full Text Available In the framework of the 16th National Meeting of the Italian Ecological Society (“Global Change, Ecological Diversity and Sustainability”, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, 19-22 September 2006, a symposium was devoted to “Agroecology and Sustainable Development”. A major goal of this symposium was to contribute to keeping the dialogue among the experts of the various disciplines alive. Sustainability of agriculture is a challenge for society world wide. Universities and society as a whole have a responsibility in re-examining current perception of nature, of the world and of human society in the light of natural resources depletion, increasing pollution and social inequalities. The urgency to address sustainability issues is increasingly being reflected in the manner in which institutions of higher education around the world are giving priority to the teaching, research and practice of sustainability. The University of Tuscia is involved in international initiatives concerning teaching and research in Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture.

  15. Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Caporali

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the 16th National Meeting of the Italian Ecological Society (“Global Change, Ecological Diversity and Sustainability”, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, 19-22 September 2006, a symposium was devoted to “Agroecology and Sustainable Development”. A major goal of this symposium was to contribute to keeping the dialogue among the experts of the various disciplines alive. Sustainability of agriculture is a challenge for society world wide. Universities and society as a whole have a responsibility in re-examining current perception of nature, of the world and of human society in the light of natural resources depletion, increasing pollution and social inequalities. The urgency to address sustainability issues is increasingly being reflected in the manner in which institutions of higher education around the world are giving priority to the teaching, research and practice of sustainability. The University of Tuscia is involved in international initiatives concerning teaching and research in Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture.

  16. Effects of bupropion sustained release on task-related EEG alpha activity in smokers: Individual differences in drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Coppens, Ryan P; Rabinovich, Norka E; Gilbert, David G

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying bupropion's efficacy as an antidepressant and a smoking cessation aid are far from being fully characterized. The present study is the first to examine the effects of bupropion on visuospatial task-related parietal EEG alpha power asymmetry-an asymmetry that has previously been found to be associated with severity of depressive symptoms (i.e., the more depressive symptoms, the greater alpha power in the right vs. left parietal area [Henriques & Davidson, 1997; Rabe, Debener, Brocke, & Beauducel, 2005]). Participants, all of whom were smokers and none of whom were clinically depressed, were randomly assigned to the Placebo group (n = 79) or Bupropion group (n = 31) in a double-blind study. EEG during the performance of the visuospatial task was collected before and after 14 days on placebo or bupropion sustained-release capsules. Relative to the Placebo group, the Bupropion group (especially, the Bupropion subgroup who had a positive right versus left parietal alpha power asymmetry at pretreatment) had a reduction in the parietal alpha asymmetry (driven largely by a decrease in right parietal alpha power). These findings support the hypothesis that bupropion can induce changes in parietal EEG asymmetry that have been shown in previous literature to be associated with a reduction in depressive states and traits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Using Social Media for Emergency Response and Urban Sustainability: A Case Study of the 2012 Beijing Rainstorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yandong Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the proliferation of social media, information generated and disseminated from these outlets has become an important part of our everyday lives. For example, this type of information has great potential for effectively distributing political messages, hazard alerts, or messages of other social functions. In this work, we report a case study of the 2012 Beijing Rainstorm to investigate how emergency information was timely distributed using social media during emergency events. We present a classification and location model for social media text streams during emergency events. This model classifies social media text streams based on their topical contents. Integrated with a trend analysis, we show how Sina-Weibo fluctuated during emergency events. Using a spatial statistical analysis method, we found that the distribution patterns of Sina-Weibo were related to the emergency events but varied among different topics. This study helps us to better understand emergency events so that decision-makers can act on emergencies in a timely manner. In addition, this paper presents the tools, methods, and models developed in this study that can be used to work with text streams from social media in the context of disaster management and urban sustainability.

  18. The Engagement Continuum Model Using Corporate Social Responsibility as an Intervention for Sustained Employee Engagement: Research Leading Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Marie Anttonitte; Valentin, Celestino C.; Nafukho, Fredrick Muyia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore implications of motivational potential that are highly correlated to the self-determination theory (SDT) (intrinsic motivating factors), in relation to corporate social responsibility (CSR). This paper specifies key antecedents of engagement within the theoretical framework of the self-determination…

  19. Integration of population genetic structure and plant response to climate change: sustaining genetic resources through evaluation of projected threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce A. Richardson; Marcus V. Warwell; Mee-Sook Kim; Ned B. Klopfenstein; Geral I. McDonald

    2010-01-01

    To assess threats or predict responses to disturbances, or both, it is essential to recognize and characterize the population structures of forest species in relation to changing environments. Appropriate management of these genetic resources in the future will require (1) understanding the existing genetic diversity/variation and population structure of forest trees...

  20. Sustainable Development in China’s Coastal Area: Based on the Driver-Pressure-State-Welfare-Response Framework and the Data Envelopment Analysis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The economic development of China’s coastal areas is being constrained by resources and the environment, with sustainable development being the key to solving these problems. The data envelopment analysis (DEA model is widely used to assess sustainable development. However, indicators used in the DEA model are not selected in a scientific and comprehensive manner, which may lead to unrepresentative results. Here, we use the driver-pressure-state-welfare-response (DPSWR framework to select more scientific and comprehensive indicators for a more accurate analysis of efficiency in China’s coastal area. The results show that the efficiencies of most provinces and cities in China’s coastal area have a stable trend. In the time dimension, efficiency was rising before 2008, after which it decreased. In the spatial dimension, China’s coastal provinces and cities are divided into three categories: high efficiency, low efficiency, and greater changes in efficiency. By combining DPSWR and DEA, we produce reliable values for measuring efficiency, with the benefit of avoiding the incomplete selection of DEA indicators.

  1. Sustainable Enterprise Excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Williams, Joseph; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær

    Sustainable Enterprise Excellence balances complementary and competing interests of key stakeholder segments, including society and the natural environment and increases the likelihood of superior and sustainable competitive positioning and hence long-term enterprise success that is defined...... by continuously relevant and responsible governance, strategy, actions and performance consistent with high-level organizational resilience, robustness and resplendence (R3). This is accomplished through organizational design and function emphasizing innovation, enterprise intelligence & analytics, operational......, supply chain, customer-related, human capital, financial, marketplace, societal, and environmental performance. Sustainable Enterprise Excellence integrates ethical, efficient and effective (E3) enterprise governance with 3E (equity, ecology, economy) Triple Top Line strategy throughout enterprise...

  2. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development....... The tools have been applied in practice in collaboration with 11 small and medium sized companies (SMEs). The study investigates these approaches to further understand how design thinking can contribute to sustainable transition in a business context. The study and the findings are relevant to organizations...... invested in the issue of sustainable business development, in particular the leaders and employees of SMEs, but also to design education seeking new ways to consciously handle and teach the complexity inherent in sustainable transformation. Findings indicate that the SD design thinking approach contributes...

  3. Mind-wandering in younger and older adults: converging evidence from the Sustained Attention to Response Task and reading for comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jonathan D; Balota, David A

    2012-03-01

    One mechanism that has been hypothesized to contribute to older adults' changes in cognitive performance is goal neglect or impairment in maintaining task set across time. Mind-wandering and task-unrelated thought may underlie these potential age-related changes. The present study investigated age-related changes in mind-wandering in three different versions of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART), along with self-reported mind-wandering during a reading for comprehension task. In the SART, both younger and older adults produced similar levels of faster reaction times before No-Go errors of commission, whereas, older adults produced disproportionate post-error slowing. Subjective self-reports of mind-wandering recorded during the SART and the reading task indicated that older adults were less likely to report mind-wandering than younger adults. Discussion focuses on cognitive and motivational mechanisms that may account for older adults' relatively low levels of reported mind-wandering.

  4. Peginterferon alpha-2a is associated with higher sustained virological response than peginterferon alfa-2b in chronic hepatitis C: systematic review of randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awad, Tahany; Thorlund, Kristian; Hauser, Goran

    2010-01-01

    A combination of weekly pegylated interferon (peginterferon) alpha and daily ribavirin represents the standard of care for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C according to current guidelines. It is not established which of the two licensed products (peginterferon alpha-2a or peginterferon alfa-2b...... alfa-2b plus ribavirin. Overall, peginterferon alpha-2a significantly increased the number of patients who achieved a sustained virological response (SVR) versus peginterferon alfa-2b (47% versus 41%; risk ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.19; P = 0.004 [eight trials]). Subgroup analyses......-2a is associated with higher SVR than peginterferon alfa-2b. However, the paucity of evidence on adverse events curbs the decision to definitively recommend one peginterferon over the other, because any potential benefit must outweigh the risk of harm....

  5. Effect of abacavir on sustained virologic response to HCV treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients, Cohere in Eurocoord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Colette; Arends, Joop; Peters, Lars

    2015-01-01

    collaboration. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the impact of abacavir on achieving a sustained virologic response (SVR) to HCV treatment. RESULTS: In total 1309 HIV/HCV co-infected patients who had received HCV therapy were included, of whom 490 (37 %) had achieved an SVR. No statistically significant...... to achieve an SVR compared to patients using a non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen (OR: 0.61, 95 % CI: 0.41-0.91). The backbone combinations zidovudine&lamivudine (AZT + 3TC) and stavudine&lamivudine (d4t + 3TC) were associated with lower SRV rates (0.45 (0.24-0.82) and 0...

  6. Computational sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Kersting, Kristian; Morik, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The book at hand gives an overview of the state of the art research in Computational Sustainability as well as case studies of different application scenarios. This covers topics such as renewable energy supply, energy storage and e-mobility, efficiency in data centers and networks, sustainable food and water supply, sustainable health, industrial production and quality, etc. The book describes computational methods and possible application scenarios.

  7. Sustainable transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nicolai Bo

    This paper is about sustainable transformation with a particular focus on listed buildings. It is based on the notion that sustainability is not just a question of energy conditions, but also about the building being robust. Robust architecture means that the building can be maintained and rebuilt...... theoretical lenses. It is proposed that three parameters concerning the ꞌtransformabilityꞌ of the building can contribute to a more nuanced understanding of sustainable transformation: technical aspects, programmatic requirements and narrative value. It is proposed that the concept of ꞌsustainable...

  8. Plasma interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 levels are associated with early, but not sustained virological response during treatment of acute or early chronic HCV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan J Feld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High plasma levels of interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10 have been shown to be associated with impaired treatment response in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Whether IP-10 levels predict treatment in acute HCV infection is unknown. METHODS: Patients with acute or early chronic HCV infection from the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC cohort were evaluated. Baseline and on-treatment plasma IP-10 levels were measured by ELISA. IL28B genotype was determined by sequencing. RESULTS: Overall, 74 HCV mono-infected and 35 HIV/HCV co-infected patients were treated in ATAHC, of whom 89 were adherent to therapy and were included for analysis. IP-10 levels correlated with HCV RNA levels at baseline (r = 0.48, P600 pg/mL achieved RVR. There was no association with IP-10 levels and early virological response (EVR or sustained virological response (SVR. CONCLUSIONS: Baseline IP-10 levels are associated with early viral kinetics but not ultimate treatment outcome in acute HCV infection. Given previous data showing that patients with high baseline IP-10 are unlikely to spontaneously clear acute HCV infection, they should be prioritized for early antiviral therapy.

  9. Adults with patellofemoral pain do not exhibit manifestations of peripheral and central sensitization when compared to healthy pain-free age and sex matched controls – An assessor blinded cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathleff, Camilla Rams; Stephenson, Aoife; Mellor, Rebecca; Matthews, Mark; Crossley, Kay; Vicenzino, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Patellofemoral Pain (PFP) is highly prevalent among adults and adolescents. Localized mechanical hyperalgesia around the knee and tibialis anterior have been observed in people with PFP, but limited knowledge of potential manifestations of central sensitisation exists. The aims of this study were to study conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and wide-spread hyperalgesia in adults with PFP. This assessor-blinded cross-sectional study design compared CPM and mechanical pressure pain thresholds (PPT) between 33 adults (23 females) diagnosed with PFP and 32 age and sex matched pain-free controls. The investigator taking the PPT measurements was blinded to which participants had PFP. PPTs were reliably measured using a Somedic hand-held pressure algometer at three sites: 1) The centre of the patella, 2) the tibialis anterior muscle and 3) a remote site on the lateral epicondyle. For the assessment of CPM, experimental pain was induced to the contralateral hand by immersion into a cold water bath (conditioning stimulus), and assessment of PPTs (the test stimulus) was performed before and immediately after the conditioning stimulation. On average, the CPM paradigm induced a significant increase in PPTs across the three sites (6.3–13.5%, Ppain-free controls. PMID:29220355

  10. Adults with patellofemoral pain do not exhibit manifestations of peripheral and central sensitization when compared to healthy pain-free age and sex matched controls - An assessor blinded cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Rathleff, Camilla Rams; Stephenson, Aoife; Mellor, Rebecca; Matthews, Mark; Crossley, Kay; Vicenzino, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Patellofemoral Pain (PFP) is highly prevalent among adults and adolescents. Localized mechanical hyperalgesia around the knee and tibialis anterior have been observed in people with PFP, but limited knowledge of potential manifestations of central sensitisation exists. The aims of this study were to study conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and wide-spread hyperalgesia in adults with PFP. This assessor-blinded cross-sectional study design compared CPM and mechanical pressure pain thresholds (PPT) between 33 adults (23 females) diagnosed with PFP and 32 age and sex matched pain-free controls. The investigator taking the PPT measurements was blinded to which participants had PFP. PPTs were reliably measured using a Somedic hand-held pressure algometer at three sites: 1) The centre of the patella, 2) the tibialis anterior muscle and 3) a remote site on the lateral epicondyle. For the assessment of CPM, experimental pain was induced to the contralateral hand by immersion into a cold water bath (conditioning stimulus), and assessment of PPTs (the test stimulus) was performed before and immediately after the conditioning stimulation. On average, the CPM paradigm induced a significant increase in PPTs across the three sites (6.3-13.5%, Ppain-free controls.

  11. Sustained virological response after a 17-day treatment with daclatasvir plus asunaprevir in a cirrhotic patient with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b and null response for peginterferon ribavirin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Akira; Ishii, Toshiya; Adachi, Kayo; Kumon, Daisuke; Tamura, Tomohiro; Noguchi, Youhei; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Okuse, Chiaki

    2016-04-01

    Daclatasvir (DCV) plus asunaprevir (ASV) treatment, an oral therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b infection, can achieve a high sustained viral response (SVR) rate within a 24-week treatment period. A 55-year-old Japanese female with cirrhosis and null response for peginterferon plus ribavirin therapy received DCV plus ASV therapy, but she reported a slight fever beginning on treatment day 4. The fever increased to >38.0 °C beginning on treatment day 15 and could not be controlled with antipyretics; thus, the treatment was discontinued on day 17. Although the patient was still positive for HCV RNA 6 days after treatment discontinuation, she achieved an SVR at week 24 after treatment cessation. In some patients with HCV genotype 1b infection, an SVR can be achieved with short-term DCV plus ASV treatment, and HCV RNA positivity at the end of treatment does not always indicate virological failure.

  12. Synthetic Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR7 ligands as influenza virus vaccine adjuvants induce rapid, sustained, and broadly protective responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Peter H; Hayashi, Tomoko; Martínez-Gil, Luis; Corr, Maripat; Crain, Brian; Yao, Shiyin; Cottam, Howard B; Chan, Michael; Ramos, Irene; Eggink, Dirk; Heshmati, Mitra; Krammer, Florian; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Palese, Peter; Carson, Dennis A

    2015-03-01

    Current vaccines against influenza virus infection rely on the induction of neutralizing antibodies targeting the globular head of the viral hemagglutinin (HA). Protection against seasonal antigenic drift or sporadic pandemic outbreaks requires further vaccine development to induce cross-protective humoral responses, potentially to the more conserved HA stalk region. Here, we present a novel viral vaccine adjuvant comprised of two synthetic ligands for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR7. 1Z105 is a substituted pyrimido[5,4-b]indole specific for the TLR4-MD2 complex, and 1V270 is a phospholipid-conjugated TLR7 agonist. Separately, 1Z105 induces rapid Th2-associated IgG1 responses, and 1V270 potently generates Th1 cellular immunity. 1Z105 and 1V270 in combination with recombinant HA from the A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 strain (rPR/8 HA) effectively induces rapid and sustained humoral immunity that is protective against lethal challenge with a homologous virus. More importantly, immunization with the combined adjuvant and rPR/8 HA, a commercially available split vaccine, or chimeric rHA antigens significantly improves protection against both heterologous and heterosubtypic challenge viruses. Heterosubtypic protection is associated with broadly reactive antibodies to HA stalk epitopes. Histological examination and cytokine profiling reveal that intramuscular (i.m.) administration of 1Z105 and 1V270 is less reactogenic than a squalene-based adjuvant, AddaVax. In summary, the combination of 1Z105 and 1V270 with a recombinant HA induces rapid, long-lasting, and balanced Th1- and Th2-type immunity; demonstrates efficacy in a variety of murine influenza virus vaccine models assaying homologous, heterologous, and heterosubtypic challenge viruses; and has an excellent safety profile. Novel adjuvants are needed to enhance immunogenicity and increase the protective breadth of influenza virus vaccines to reduce the seasonal disease burden and ensure pandemic preparedness. We show

  13. PATHWAYS TO SUSTAINABLE BANKING MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan (Santamarian Oana Raluca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes one of the major challenges of the future: the sustainable development of the society. Sustainability is now increasingly recognized as central to the growth of emerging market economies. For the banking sector, this represents both a demand for greater social and environmental responsibility as well as a new landscape of business opportunity. Several years ago, the main part of the banks did not consider the social and environmental problems relevant for their operations. Recently, the banks began to realize the major impact of the sustainable development over the way of ulterior development of the society and, implicitly over the way of creating of the banking value in the future. In this context, the development of a banking management system, based on sustainable principles represents one of the provocations of these days.Starting from literature in the sustainable banking management field in this paper are presented several relevant issues related to risk management in the context of sustainable banking financing: the need to implement the sustainable management principles in financial and banking industry; the role of banks in sustainable development of society; social and environmental risk management policies, events that have shaped the role of the banking sector in sustainable development; international standards regarding sustainable banking management such us: Equator Principles for sustainable investment projects’ financing or GRI principles for sustainable reporting. Furthermore, we developed a practical case study related to the implementation of sustainable banking management at Bank of America.

  14. Sustaining dairy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villarreal Herrera, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Dairy in Europe has undergone many changes in the last few years—the abolition of milk production quotas being a fundamental one. This study explores these changes in relation to the sustained social and environmental viability of the sector and how dairy processors' sustainability

  15. Sustainable Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2011-01-01

    . Declarations tend to have impact on three trends. Firstly, there is emerging international consensus on the university’s role and function in relation to sustainable development; secondly, the emergence of national legislation, and thirdly, an emerging international competition to be leader in sustainable...... campus performance....

  16. Sustainable Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole Erik; Søndergård, Bent

    2014-01-01

    of agendas/vision, technologies, actors and institutions in the emergent design of an urban mobility system based on an electric car sharing system. Why. Designing for sustainability is a fundamental challenge for future design practices; designers have to obtain an ability to contribute to sustainable...

  17. Sustainable Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwell, Louise; Dillon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Green schools have moved into a new era that focuses on building a culture of sustainability in every aspect of learning in schools. In the early stages of sustainability education, the focus was on recycling and turning off the lights. Now, students and adults together are moving into the areas of advocacy and action that are based on a deep…

  18. Sustainability in Fashion Business Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsan-Ming Choi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Under the global trend of sustainability, many companies selling fashion products have to reshape their operational strategies. Over the past few years, we have witnessed many fashion companies going green by re-engineering their business processes and establishing their formal sustainability programs. Many important topics, such as closed-loop supply chain management, corporate social responsibility, and economic sustainability, are all related to sustainable fashion business operations management. This paper provides a brief review of these critical topics, introduces the special issue, and proposes future research areas to achieve sustainable operations management in the fashion business.

  19. Common Variants of TLR1 Associate with Organ Dysfunction and Sustained Pro-Inflammatory Responses during Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Corrales, Almudena; Casula, Milena; Blanco, Jesús; Muriel, Arturo; Espinosa, Elena; García-Bello, Miguel; Torres, Antoni; Ferrer, Miguel; Zavala, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical components for host pathogen recognition and variants in genes participating in this response influence susceptibility to infections. Recently, TLR1 gene polymorphisms have been found correlated with whole blood hyper-inflammatory responses to pathogen-associated molecules and associated with sepsis-associated multiorgan dysfunction and acute lung injury (ALI). We examined the association of common variants of TLR1 gene with sepsis-derived complications in an independent study and with serum levels for four inflammatory biomarkers among septic patients. Methodology/Principal Findings Seven tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms of the TLR1 gene were genotyped in samples from a prospective multicenter case-only study of patients with severe sepsis admitted into a network of intensive care units followed for disease severity. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels were measured at study entry, at 48 h and at 7th day. Alleles -7202G and 248Ser, and the 248Ser-602Ile haplotype were associated with circulatory dysfunction among severe septic patients (0.001≤p≤0.022), and with reduced IL-10 (0.012≤p≤0.047) and elevated CRP (0.011≤p≤0.036) serum levels during the first week of sepsis development. Additionally, the -7202GG genotype was found to be associated with hospital mortality (p = 0.017) and ALI (p = 0.050) in a combined analysis with European Americans, suggesting common risk effects among studies. Conclusions/Significance These results partially replicate and extend previous findings, supporting that variants of TLR1 gene are determinants of severe complications during sepsis. PMID:21048935

  20. Evaluating Emergency Response Solutions for Sustainable Community Development by Using Fuzzy Multi-Criteria Group Decision Making Approaches: IVDHF-TOPSIS and IVDHF-VIKOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junling Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Emergency management is vital in implementing sustainable community development, for which community planning must include emergency response solutions to potential natural and manmade hazards. To help maintain such solution repository, we investigate effective fuzzy multi-criteria group decision making (FMCGDM approaches for the complex problems of evaluating alternative emergency response solutions, where weights for decision makers and criteria are unknown due to problem complexity. We employ interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy (IVDHF set to address decision hesitancy more effectively. Based on IVDHF assessments, we develop a deviation maximizing model to compute criteria weights and another compatibility maximizing model to calculate weights for decision makers. Then, two ideal-solution-based FMCGDM approaches are proposed: (i by introducing a synthesized IVDHF group decision matrix into TOPSIS, we develop an IVDHF-TOPSIS approach for fuzzy group settings; (ii when emphasizing both maximum group utility and minimum individual regret, we extend VIKOR to develop an IVDHF-VIKOR approach, where the derived decision makers’ weights are utilized to obtain group decision matrix and the determined criteria weights are integrated to reflect the relative importance of distances from the compromised ideal solution. Compared with aggregation-operators-based approach, IVDHF-TOPSIS and IVDHF-VIKOR can alleviate information loss and computational complexity. Numerical examples have validated the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  1. Regulatory on the corporate social responsibility in the context of sustainable development by mandatory in the world trade organization law perspective (case study in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH. M. Hum. TAUFIQURRAHMAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory on the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR by mandatory in Indonesia as stipulated in Article 74 of Law No. 40/2007 on the Limited Liability Company (hereafter the Company Law raises a contradiction. Those who agree argue that the company is not solely for profit, but more than that are participating in social issues and the preservation of the environment within the framework of sustainable development. Conversely, those who disagree view that social issues and the environment are the full responsibility of state. The involvement of a corporation in social and environmental activities is voluntary. Verdict of the Indonesian Constitutional Court in case no. 53/PUU-VI / / 2008 dated 13 April 2009 which rejected a requesting of material test of the Article 74 paragraph (1, (2 and (3 of the Company Law confirms the existence of the CSR by mandatory in international trade traffic today. The analytical results indicates that mandatory CSR regulation in the Company Law is not a form of a state intervention to the private activities. In addition, the arrangement is not contrary to the principles of free trade within the framework of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT / World Trade Organization (WTO.

  2. Effect of heterophoria type and myopia on accommodative and vergence responses during sustained near activity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Vidhyapriya; Irving, Elizabeth L; Bobier, William R

    2012-03-15

    The influence of phoria-type and myopia on changes to vergence and accommodation during prolonged near-task was examined in 53 children. Participants were classified into phoria and refractive categories based on near phoria and cycloplegic refraction respectively. Measures of near phoria, binocular (BA) and monocular accommodation (MA) were obtained before and during a 20 min task when children binocularly fixated a high-contrast target at 33 cm through best corrective lenses. Vergence adaptation and accommodative adaptation were quantified using changes to near phoria and tonic accommodation respectively. The direction and magnitude of vergence adaptation was modified by the phoria-type (pvergence adaptation for all phoria categories compared to emmetropes. Phoria-type also influenced the pattern of BA vs. MA (pMA while esophores showed MA>BA in both refractive groups. Accommodative adaptation was higher in myopes (p=0.010) but did not demonstrate a significant effect of phoria (p=0.4). The influence of phoria-type on vergence adaptation and the pattern of BA vs. MA relates primarily to the varying fusional vergence demands created by the direction of phoria. The greater divergent (or less convergent) shift in vergence adaptation seen in myopes (compared to emmetropes) could be attributed to their higher accommodative adaptation. Nevertheless, the adaptive patterns observed in myopic children do not appear to explain their high response AV/A ratios identified as a risk factor for myopia development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding plant defence responses against herbivore attacks: an essential first step towards the development of sustainable resistance against pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, M Estrella; Martínez, Manuel; Cambra, Inés; Grbic, Vojislava; Diaz, Isabel

    2013-08-01

    Plant-herbivore relationships are complex interactions encompassing elaborate networks of molecules, signals and strategies used to overcome defences developed by each other. Herbivores use multiple feeding strategies to obtain nutrients from host plants. In turn, plants respond by triggering defence mechanisms to inhibit, block or modify the metabolism of the pest. As part of these defences, herbivore-challenged plants emit volatiles to attract natural enemies and warn neighbouring plants of the imminent threat. In response, herbivores develop a variety of strategies to suppress plant-induced protection. Our understanding of the plant-herbivore interphase is limited, although recent molecular approaches have revealed the participation of a battery of genes, proteins and volatile metabolites in attack-defence processes. This review describes the intricate and dynamic defence systems governing plant-herbivore interactions by examining the diverse strategies plants employ to deny phytophagous arthropods the ability to breach newly developed mechanisms of plant resistance. A cornerstone of this understanding is the use of transgenic tools to unravel the complex networks that control these interactions.

  4. Sustained noradrenaline sulphate response in long-distance runners and untrained subjects up to 2 h after exhausting exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, G; Hack, V; Kinscherf, R; Weicker, H

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the response of plasma and platelet:free catecholamine ([CA]) and sulphated catecholamine ([CA-S]) concentrations after an incremental treadmill test to exhaustion and during recovery. In triathletes (n = 9) plasma and platelet [CA] and [CA-S] were measured before, immediately after and 0.5 and 24 h after exercise. In long-distance runners (n = 9) and in controls (n = 10) plasma [CA] and [CA-S] were determined 2 h instead of 24 h after exercise. Platelet [CA] and [CA-S] remained unchanged throughout the study. Plasma [CA] increased after exercise in all groups (P runners and in controls [9.96 (SEM 0.84) nmol.l-1, 11.8 (SEM 1.19) nmol.l-1, 9.53 (SEM 1.10) nmol.l-1, respectively; P runners and controls plasma [NA-S] remained elevated during 2 h of recovery [9.96 (SEM 0.76) nmol.l-1, 9.03 (SEM 0.88) nmol.l-1, respectively]. These results would indicate that plasma [NA-S] increases after sympathetic nervous system activation by an exhausting incremental exercise test and remain elevated up to 2 h after exercise.

  5. The macroecology of sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joseph R.; Allen, Craig D.; Brown, James H.; Burnside, William R.; Davidson, Ana D.; Fristoe, Trevor S.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; Mercado-Silva, Norman; Nekola, Jeffrey C.; Okie, Jordan G.; Zuo, Wenyun

    2012-01-01

    The discipline of sustainability science has emerged in response to concerns of natural and social scientists, policymakers, and lay people about whether the Earth can continue to support human population growth and economic prosperity. Yet, sustainability science has developed largely independently from and with little reference to key ecological principles that govern life on Earth. A macroecological perspective highlights three principles that should be integral to sustainability science: 1) physical conservation laws govern the flows of energy and materials between human systems and the environment, 2) smaller systems are connected by these flows to larger systems in which they are embedded, and 3) global constraints ultimately limit flows at smaller scales. Over the past few decades, decreasing per capita rates of consumption of petroleum, phosphate, agricultural land, fresh water, fish, and wood indicate that the growing human population has surpassed the capacity of the Earth to supply enough of these essential resources to sustain even the current population and level of socioeconomic development.

  6. The macroecology of sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joseph R; Allen, Craig D; Brown, James H; Burnside, William R; Davidson, Ana D; Fristoe, Trevor S; Hamilton, Marcus J; Mercado-Silva, Norman; Nekola, Jeffrey C; Okie, Jordan G; Zuo, Wenyun

    2012-01-01

    The discipline of sustainability science has emerged in response to concerns of natural and social scientists, policymakers, and lay people about whether the Earth can continue to support human population growth and economic prosperity. Yet, sustainability science has developed largely independently from and with little reference to key ecological principles that govern life on Earth. A macroecological perspective highlights three principles that should be integral to sustainability science: 1) physical conservation laws govern the flows of energy and materials between human systems and the environment, 2) smaller systems are connected by these flows to larger systems in which they are embedded, and 3) global constraints ultimately limit flows at smaller scales. Over the past few decades, decreasing per capita rates of consumption of petroleum, phosphate, agricultural land, fresh water, fish, and wood indicate that the growing human population has surpassed the capacity of the Earth to supply enough of these essential resources to sustain even the current population and level of socioeconomic development.

  7. Quantitative sensory response of the SCM muscle on sustained low level activation simulating co-contractions during bruxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Lydia; Terebesi, Sophia; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Hellmann, Daniel; Schindler, Hans-Jürgen; Schmitter, Marc; Pfau, Doreen

    2017-11-10

    Bruxism is discussed as an etiological factor in the pathogenesis of orofacial and cervical pain. As the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) is co-activated during clenching, our aim was to investigate, whether the muscle loading leads to peripheral or central sensitizations. In twenty-one healthy female volunteers, somatosensory profiles of the SCM were recorded according to the test battery of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS) prior to and after an isometric muscle exercise. QST comprised thermal and mechanical stimuli. A submaximal activation of the SCM (15% MVC) was kept for 10min in sitting position. In separate test sessions one month apart, one sham and one verum experiment were conducted in randomized order. During the muscle loading, the parameters cold detection threshold (CDT), mechanical pain sensitivity (MPS) and pressure pain treshold (PPT) were tested and experimental pain recorded by visual analogoue scales (VAS). All test sessions were performed during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (day 5), to avoid effects on pain perception. Data were analyzed with Repeated Measures ANOVA (SPSS 22.0) RESULTS: No significant changes were found during or after (sham) loading except for stimulus-response-function (SR, P=0.01) and PPT (P=0.02) in the sham test. No effect was observed in the verum experiment (P=0.12 up to 1.0). Prolonged low level contraction of the SCM does not evoke painful sensitization. In contrast, submaximal muscle activation seems to have a protective effect corresponding to a training effect preventing sensitization. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The mTORC2/PKC pathway sustains compensatory insulin secretion of pancreatic β cells in response to metabolic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yun; Cui, Canqi; Nie, Aifang; Wang, Yan; Ni, Qicheng; Liu, Yun; Yin, Qinglei; Zhang, Hongli; Li, Yong; Wang, Qidi; Gu, Yanyun; Ning, Guang

    2017-08-01

    Compensation of the pancreatic β cell functional mass in response to metabolic stress is key to the pathogenesis of Type 2 Diabetes. The mTORC2 pathway governs fuel metabolism and β cell functional mass. It is unknown whether mTORC2 is required for regulating metabolic stress-induced β cell compensation. We challenged four-week-old β-cell-specific Rictor (a key component of mTORC2)-knockout mice with a high fat diet (HFD) for 4weeks and measured metabolic and pancreatic morphological parameters. We performed ex vivo experiments to analyse β cell insulin secretion and electrophysiology characteristics. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression and lentiviral-ShRNA-mediated knocking down proteins were applied in Min6 cells and cultured primary mouse islets. βRicKO mice showed a significant glucose intolerance and a reduced plasma insulin level and an unchanged level β cell mass versus the control mice under HFD. A HFD or palmitate treatment enhanced both glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) and the PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate)-induced insulin secretion in the control islets but not in the βRicKO islets. The KO β cells showed similar glucose-induced Ca2+ influx but lower membrane capacitance increments versus the control cells. The enhanced mTORC2/PKC proteins levels in the control HFD group were ablated by Rictor deletion. Replenishing PKCα by overexpression of PKCα-T638D restored the defective GIIS in βRicKO islets. The mTORC2/Rictor pathway modulates β cell compensatory GIIS under nutrient overload mediated by its phosphorylation of PKCα. This study suggests that the mTORC2/PKC pathway in β cells is involved in the pathogenesis of T2D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Netrin-1 Protects Hepatocytes Against Cell Death Through Sustained Translation During the Unfolded Protein ResponseSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lahlali

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Netrin-1, a multifunctional secreted protein, is up-regulated in cancer and inflammation. Netrin-1 blocks apoptosis induced by the prototypical dependence receptors deleted in colorectal carcinoma and uncoordinated phenotype-5. Although the unfolded protein response (UPR triggers apoptosis on exposure to stress, it first attempts to restore endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis to foster cell survival. Importantly, UPR is implicated in chronic liver conditions including hepatic oncogenesis. Netrin-1's implication in cell survival on UPR in this context is unknown. Methods: Isolation of translational complexes, determination of RNA secondary structures by selective 2’-hydroxyl acylation and primer extension/dimethyl sulfate, bicistronic constructs, as well as conventional cell biology and biochemistry approaches were used on in vitro–grown hepatocytic cells, wild-type, and netrin-1 transgenic mice. Results: HepaRG cells constitute a bona fide model for UPR studies in vitro through adequate activation of the 3 sensors of the UPR (protein kinase RNA–like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK, inositol requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α, and activated transcription factor 6 (ATF6. The netrin-1 messenger RNA 5'-end was shown to fold into a complex double pseudoknot and bear E-loop motifs, both of which are representative hallmarks of related internal ribosome entry site regions. Cap-independent translation of netrin 5' untranslated region–driven luciferase was observed on UPR in vitro. Unlike several structurally related oncogenic transcripts (l-myc, c-myc, c-myb, netrin-1 messenger RNA was selected for translation during UPR both in human hepatocytes and in mice livers. Depletion of netrin-1 during UPR induces apoptosis, leading to cell death through an uncoordinated phenotype-5A/C–mediated involvement of protein phosphatase 2A and death-associated protein kinase 1 in vitro and in netrin

  10. Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a slow but more sustained chemokine and cytokine response in naïve foetal enterocytes compared to commensal Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nellemann Christine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first exposure to microorganisms at mucosal surfaces is critical for immune maturation and gut health. Facultative anaerobic bacteria are the first to colonise the infant gut, and the impact of these bacteria on intestinal epithelial cells (IEC may be determinant for how the immune system subsequently tolerates gut bacteria. Results To mirror the influence of the very first bacterial stimuli on infant IEC, we isolated IEC from mouse foetuses at gestational day 19 and from germfree neonates. IEC were stimulated with gut-derived bacteria, Gram-negative Escherichia coli Nissle and Gram-positive Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, and expression of genes important for immune regulation was measured together with cytokine production. E. coli Nissle and L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced chemokines and cytokines, but with different kinetics, and only E. coli Nissle induced down-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 and up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 2. The sensitivity to stimulation was similar before and after birth in germ-free IEC, although Toll-like receptor 2 expression was higher before birth than immediately after. Conclusions In conclusion, IEC isolated before gut colonisation occurs at birth, are highly responsive to stimulation with gut commensals, with L. acidophilus NCFM inducing a slower, but more sustained response than E. coli Nissle. E. coli may induce intestinal tolerance through very rapid up-regulation of chemokine and cytokine genes and down-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4, while regulating also responsiveness to Gram-positive bacteria.

  11. Reactive or proactive approach towards sustainability? A conceptual framework based on sustainable business models to increase stakeholders' sustainable value capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosati, Francesco; Morioka, Sandra; Monteiro de Carvalho, Marly

    2016-01-01

    to stakeholders' expectations is supported by motivations derived from marketing, corporate social responsibility, international standards, sustainability reporting, labelling, etc. However, these demands are not always aligned with sustainability, creating tensions between stakeholder satisfaction and corporate...... sustainability. In this sense, a proactive approach to foster sustainable value capture can complement the reactive approach by delivering value beyond stakeholders' expectations. In this case, companies use their capabilities to identify opportunities to create and deliver sustainable value that stakeholders...

  12. Sustainable consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prothero, Andrea; Dobscha, Susan; Freund, Jim

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores sustainable consumption and considers possible roles for marketing and consumer researchers and public policy makers in addressing the many sustainability challenges that pervade our planet. Future research approaches to this interdisciplinary topic need to be comprehensive...... and systematic and will benefit from a variety of different perspectives. There are a number of opportunities for future research, and three areas are explored in detail. First, the essay considers the inconsistency between the attitudes and behaviors of consumers with respect to sustainability; next, the agenda...... is broadened to explore the role of individual citizens in society; and finally, a macro institutional approach to fostering sustainability is explored. Each of these areas is examined in detail and possible research avenues and public policy initiatives are considered within each of these separate...

  13. Stabilizing Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reitan Andersen, Kirsti

    The publication of the Brundtland Report in 1987 put the topic of sustainable development on the political and corporate agenda. Defining sustainable development as “a development that meets the needs of the future without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs......” (WCED, 1987, p. 43), the Report also put a positive spin on the issue of sustainability by upholding capitalist beliefs in the possibility of infinite growth in a world of finite resources. While growth has delivered benefits, however, it has done so unequally and unsustainably. This thesis focuses...... on the textile and fashion industry, one of the world’s most polluting industries and an industry to some degree notorious for leading the ‘race to the bottom’ in global labour standards. Despite being faced with increasing demands to practise sustainability, most textile and fashion companies continue to fail...

  14. Sustainable Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georg, Susse; Garza de Linde, Gabriela Lucía

    Judging from the number of communities and cities striving or claiming to be sustainable and how often eco-development is invoked as the means for urban regeneration, it appears that sustainable and eco-development have become “the leading paradigm within urban development” (Whitehead 2003......), urban design competitions are understudied mechanisms for bringing about field level changes. Drawing on actor network theory, this paper examines how urban design competitions may bring about changes within the professional field through the use of intermediaries such as a sustainable planning....../assessment tool. The context for our study is urban regeneration in one Danish city, which had been suffering from industrial decline and which is currently investing in establishing a “sustainable city”. Based on this case study we explore how the insights and inspiration evoked in working with the tool...

  15. Agriculture: Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainability creates and maintains the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the food, feed, and fiber needs of our country and the social, economic and other requirements.

  16. Health-related quality of life in pain-free or mildly symptomatic patients with metastatic hormone-resistant prostate cancer following treatment with the specific endothelin A receptor antagonist zibotentan (ZD4054).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Nancy; Payne, Heather; Battersby, Clare; Taboada, Maria; James, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Zibotentan (ZD4054) is a specific endothelin A receptor antagonist in clinical development for the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC). In a Phase II trial in patients with pain-free or mildly symptomatic metastatic HRPC, zibotentan was well tolerated with a promising signal for prolonged overall survival compared with placebo. As part of this trial, the impact of zibotentan compared with placebo on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed. Patients were randomized to receive once-daily oral zibotentan 10 or 15 mg, or matching placebo. Patients were allocated to one of two questionnaires; the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) or the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), supplemented by PR25, specific for prostate cancer. Questionnaires were completed at baseline and every 4 weeks until disease progression when study treatment was discontinued. Compliance with questionnaire completion was >90% (286 of 312 patients) of the intention-to-treat population at baseline. Of baseline completers who were available for assessment (i.e., had not clinically progressed), 89% (164 of 184) and 83% (73 of 88) completed questionnaires at 12 and 24 weeks, respectively. HRQoL scores from both questionnaires were high at baseline and remained high throughout the study, with scores being similar in the zibotentan and placebo groups. However, some floor and ceiling effects were seen in the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. High-baseline HRQoL scores were maintained throughout treatment with zibotentan. The FACT-P instrument was selected to further assess the impact of zibotentan on HRQoL in the Phase III clinical trial program.

  17. Sustainable finance

    OpenAIRE

    Boersma-de Jong, Margreet F.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation for Springschool of Strategy, University of Groningen, 10 October 2012. The role of CSR is to stimulate ethical behaviour, and as a result, mutual trust in society. Advantage of CSR for the company and the evolution of CSR. From CSR to Sustainable Finance: how does CSR influence Sustainable Business Administration & Management Accounting, Financial Leadership and what is the importance of CSR in the financial sector

  18. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda STEG

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses possible contributions of psychologists to sustainable transportation. It is argued that in order to reach sustainable transportation, among others, behaviour changes of individual car users are needed. As transport policies will be more effective if they target important antecedents of travel behaviour, first, factors influencing such behaviour are discussed. It is argued that car use is very attractive and sometimes even necessary for many different reasons. This implies that a combination of policies is called for, each targeting different factors that support car use and hinder the use of more sustainable modes of transport. Next, the paper elaborates on policy strategies that may be employed to achieve sustainable transportation by changing car use. Increasing the attractiveness of sustainable transport modes by means of pull measures seems not sufficient to reduce the level of car use. Besides, car use should be made less attractive by means of push measures to force drivers to reconsider their travel behaviour. The acceptability of such policies may be increased by clearly communicating the aim of these policies, and the expected positive consequences (e.g., less congestion, improved environmental quality. Moreover, possible negative effects for individual freedom may be compensated by implementing additional policies aimed at facilitating the use of sustainable transport modes.

  19. Sustained virological response on second-line antiretroviral therapy following virological failure in HIV-infected patients in rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Schoffelen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: Over the last decade, a massive roll-out of antiretroviral drugs in resource-limited settings has taken place. In general, good virological responses on first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART are achieved in most HIV-infected patients residing there. Still, a growing number of patients experience virological failure over time, resulting in an increasing need for second-line regimens [1]. This study describes the clinical, immunological and virological efficacy of protease inhibitor (PI-based second-line ART in a clinic in rural South Africa. Methods: An observational cohort study was performed on 210 patients (including 39 children who initiated PI-based second-line ART at least 12 months prior to data collection. Biannual clinical, immunological and virological monitoring was performed. Primary endpoints were adequate virological response (HIV-RNA<400 copies/ml, full virological suppression (HIV-RNA<50 copies/ml, virological failure (HIV-RNA>1000 after initial virological response and on-going viremia (HIV-RNA never<400 copies/ml for more than six months. Data were analyzed by an on-treatment (OT and intention-to-treat (ITT approach. Results: Median duration of follow-up after switch to second-line treatment was 21 months [IQR 14–37]. 150/210 patients (71%, ITT were in care and on treatment at the end of follow-up and 16/210 (8%, ITT had died. After twelve months, an adequate virological response was seen in 106/143 patients (74%, OT, of which 86/143 (60%, OT experienced full virological suppression and 20/143 (14%, OT showed persisting low-level viremia (HIV-RNA between 50 and 400 copies/ml. Furthermore, virological responses remained stable after 24 months of second-line ART. Virological efficacy was similar amongst adult and pediatric patients. Median increase in CD4 counts from switch until end of follow-up was 145 cells/mm3 [IQR 1–397] in adults. As in first-line ART, we observed a lack of correlation between

  20. CD127 expression, exhaustion status and antigen specific proliferation predict sustained virologic response to IFN in HCV/HIV co-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen Kared

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the HIV co-infected population. Interferon-alpha (IFN-α remains a major component of anti-HCV therapy despite its deleterious effects on the immune system. Furthermore, IFN-α was recently shown to diminish the size of the latent HIV reservoir. The objectives of this study were to monitor the impact of IFN-α on T cell phenotype and proliferation of HIV and HCV-specific T cells during IFN therapy, and to identify immune markers that can predict the response to IFN in HICV/HIV co-infected patients. We performed longitudinal analyses of T cell numbers, phenotype and function in co-infected patients undergoing IFN-α therapy with different outcomes including IFN-α non-responders (NR (n = 9 and patients who achieved sustained virologic response (SVR (n = 19. We examined the expression of activation (CD38, HLA-DR, functional (CD127 and exhaustion markers (PD1, Tim-3, CD160 and CD244 on total CD4 and CD8 T cells before, during and after therapy. In addition, we examined the HIV- and HCV-specific proliferative responses against HIV-p24 and HCV-NS3 proteins. Frequencies of CD127+ CD4 T cells were higher in SVR than in NR patients at baseline. An increase in CD127 expression on CD8 T cells was observed after IFN-α therapy in all patients. In addition, CD8 T cells from NR patients expressed a higher exhaustion status at baseline. Finally, SVR patients exhibited higher proliferative response against both HIV and HCV antigens at baseline. Altogether, SVR correlated with higher expression of CD127, lower T cell exhaustion status and better HIV and HCV proliferative responses at baseline. Such factors might be used as non-invasive methods to predict the success of IFN-based therapies in co-infected individuals.

  1. Sustainable markets for sustainable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, J.; Smyser, C.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses how the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is involved in sustainable energy development. It presently has 50 loans and grants for non conventional renewable energy projects and ten grants for efficiency programs for $600 and $17 million respectively, representing 100 MW of power. The IDB is concerned with how to create a sustainable market for sustainable energy projects. The IDB is trying to work with government, private sector, NGOs, trading allies, credit sources, and regulators to find proper roles for such projects. He discusses how the IDB is working to expand its vision and objectives in renewable energy projects in Central and South America.

  2. Toward Sustainable Practices in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshof, Leo

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the problematic relationship between technology education, consumption and environmental sustainability. The emerging global sustainability crisis demands an educational response that moves beyond mere "tinkering" with classroom practices, toward technology education which embraces life cycle thinking and…

  3. Education for Sustainable development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that sustainability logically necessitates a deep learning response in educational thinking and practice and anticipative education, recognising the new conditions and discontinuities which face present generations. Faculty of Science and Agriculture. These are in fact two faculties, but they were considered as one for the ...

  4. Mind-wandering in Younger and Older Adults: Converging Evidence from the Sustained Attention to Response Task and Reading for Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jonathan D.; Balota, David A.

    2011-01-01

    One mechanism that has been hypothesized to contribute to older adults’ changes in cognitive performance is goal neglect or impairment in maintaining task set across time. Mind-wandering and task-unrelated thought may underlie these potential age-related changes. The present study investigated age-related changes in mind-wandering in three different versions of the Sustained Attention to Response task (SART), along with self-reported mind-wandering during a reading for comprehension task. In the SART, both younger and older adults produced similar levels of faster reaction times before No-Go errors of commission, whereas, older adults produced disproportionate post-error slowing. Subjective self-reports of mind-wandering recorded during the SART and the reading task indicated that older adults were less likely to report mind-wandering than younger adults. Discussion focuses on cognitive and motivational mechanisms that may account for older adults’ relatively low levels of reported mind-wandering. PMID:21707183

  5. Oslo Art and Design Education (University College 1966–1994 – An educational institution with corporate responsibility and sustainability in focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi Veiteberg Kvellestad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The artile chronicles the Department of Art, Design and Drama at Oslo and Akershus University College ca. 1950 to 1990. The school bore the name Oslo Art and Design Education College (SLFO from 1966 to 1975 and Oslo Art and Design Education University College from 1975 to 1994. The institution had a clear teaching focus while running extensive programs on professional training, pilot projects and guidance service. The tradition of quality in the choice of material as well as work with engineering and design was strong, but greater emphasis was eventually placed on experimentation with material, tools and techniques. The students were both encouraged and challenged to be creative and rely on their own ideas in experimentation. The article set its focus on change and training in textiles needlework teacher education. The source materials are annual reports, published texts found in the Institute's history collection and interviews of seven employees who worked at the school in part or the whole period. Informants’ arguments and the analysis of texts are related to recent research in Sweden and Norway. The article shows that the institution once stood for attitudes that one would today call sustainable, with strong quality requirements. Thus, the institution showed social responsibility through education and industrial initiatives.

  6. Factors regarding increase of platelet counts in chronic hepatitis C patients with sustained virological response to interferon-Relation to serum thrombopoietin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagura, Michiyasu; Tanaka, Akihisa; Tokita, Hajime; Kamitsukasa, Hiroshi; Harada, Hideharu

    2005-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia is frequently found in patients with chronic liver disease, and associated with advanced fibrosis stage and with decreased liver function. Serum thrombopoietin (TPO) levels also decrease as the disease progresses from mild fibrosis to cirrhosis. On the other hand, platelet counts increase associated with improvement of fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C (CH-C) patients with sustained virological response (SVR) to interferon (IFN) therapy. Then, we studied if the increase of platelet counts in SVR associate with elevated TPO production or a reduction of spleen size. Liver fibrosis, spleen size, serum TPO levels, albumin, zinc turbidity test (ZTT), platelet counts were compared in fifteen CH-C patients with SVR before and after IFN therapy. Albumin increased from 4.2+/-0.3 to 4.3+/-0.3g/dl (p=0.067), ZTT decreased from 17.7+/-5.9 to 8.9+/-3.9K-U (psize was measured by ultrasonography, and the spleen index was calculated by multiplication of the long and short axes from hilus, which decreased from 14.6+/-5.0 to 10+/-3.1 (preduction of spleen size and increased serum TPO levels associated with improvement of fibrosis after IFN therapy.

  7. Tackling Complex Emergency Response Solutions Evaluation Problems in Sustainable Development by Fuzzy Group Decision Making Approaches with Considering Decision Hesitancy and Prioritization among Assessing Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Jun-Ling; Zhao, Shu-Ping; Liang, Chang-Yong

    2017-10-02

    In order to be prepared against potential balance-breaking risks affecting economic development, more and more countries have recognized emergency response solutions evaluation (ERSE) as an indispensable activity in their governance of sustainable development. Traditional multiple criteria group decision making (MCGDM) approaches to ERSE have been facing simultaneous challenging characteristics of decision hesitancy and prioritization relations among assessing criteria, due to the complexity in practical ERSE problems. Therefore, aiming at the special type of ERSE problems that hold the two characteristics, we investigate effective MCGDM approaches by hiring interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy set (IVDHFS) to comprehensively depict decision hesitancy. To exploit decision information embedded in prioritization relations among criteria, we firstly define an fuzzy entropy measure for IVDHFS so that its derivative decision models can avoid potential information distortion in models based on classic IVDHFS distance measures with subjective supplementing mechanism; further, based on defined entropy measure, we develop two fundamental prioritized operators for IVDHFS by extending Yager's prioritized operators. Furthermore, on the strength of above methods, we construct two hesitant fuzzy MCGDM approaches to tackle complex scenarios with or without known weights for decision makers, respectively. Finally, case studies have been conducted to show effectiveness and practicality of our proposed approaches.

  8. CXCL9 associated with sustained virological response in chronic hepatitis B patients receiving peginterferon alfa-2a therapy: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Cheng Lee

    Full Text Available There is lack of a practical biomarker to predict sustained virological response (SVR in chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients undergoing peginterferon alfa-2a (PEG-IFN. The aim of this pilot study was to identify immunological features associated with SVR.Consecutive 74 CHB patients receiving 24 weeks (for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg-positive or 48 weeks (for HBeAg-negative PEG-IFN, were prospectively enrolled. Serum HBV viral loads, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, CXCL9, IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β were measured at baseline and week 12. SVR was defined as HBeAg seroconversion combined with viral load 80 pg/mL, HBV DNA 10% at week 12 were predictors of SVR. The performance of CXCL9 in predicting SVR was good in patients with HBV DNA <2.5 x 10(7 IU/mL, particularly in HBeAg-negative CHB cases (positive predictive value, PPV= 64.3%.Pre-treatment CXCL9 level has the potential to select CHB patients who can respond to PEG-IFN, especially in HBeAg-negative patients with low viral loads.

  9. Response of Seismically Isolated Steel Frame Buildings with Sustainable Lead-Rubber Bearing (LRB Isolator Devices Subjected to Near-Fault (NF Ground Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Wan Hu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Base isolation has been used as one of the most wildly accepted seismic protection systems that should substantially dissociate a superstructure from its substructure resting on a shaking ground, thereby sustainably preserving entire structures against earthquake forces as well as inside non-structural integrities. Base isolation devices can operate very effectively against near-fault (NF ground motions with large velocity pulses and permanent ground displacements. In this study, comparative advantages for using lead-rubber bearing (LRB isolation systems are mainly investigated by performing nonlinear dynamic time-history analyses with NF ground motions. The seismic responses with respects to base shears and inter-story drifts are compared according to the installation of LRB isolation systems in the frame building. The main function of the base LRB isolator is to extend the period of structural vibration by increasing lateral flexibility in the frame structure, and thus ground accelerations transferred into the superstructure can dramatically decrease. Therefore, these base isolation systems are able to achieve notable mitigation in the base shear. In addition, they make a significant contribution to reducing inter-story drifts distributed over the upper floors. Finally, the fact that seismic performance can be improved by installing isolation devices in the frame structure is emphasized herein through the results of nonlinear dynamic analyses.

  10. Tackling Complex Emergency Response Solutions Evaluation Problems in Sustainable Development by Fuzzy Group Decision Making Approaches with Considering Decision Hesitancy and Prioritization among Assessing Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wen Qi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be prepared against potential balance-breaking risks affecting economic development, more and more countries have recognized emergency response solutions evaluation (ERSE as an indispensable activity in their governance of sustainable development. Traditional multiple criteria group decision making (MCGDM approaches to ERSE have been facing simultaneous challenging characteristics of decision hesitancy and prioritization relations among assessing criteria, due to the complexity in practical ERSE problems. Therefore, aiming at the special type of ERSE problems that hold the two characteristics, we investigate effective MCGDM approaches by hiring interval-valued dual hesitant fuzzy set (IVDHFS to comprehensively depict decision hesitancy. To exploit decision information embedded in prioritization relations among criteria, we firstly define an fuzzy entropy measure for IVDHFS so that its derivative decision models can avoid potential information distortion in models based on classic IVDHFS distance measures with subjective supplementing mechanism; further, based on defined entropy measure, we develop two fundamental prioritized operators for IVDHFS by extending Yager’s prioritized operators. Furthermore, on the strength of above methods, we construct two hesitant fuzzy MCGDM approaches to tackle complex scenarios with or without known weights for decision makers, respectively. Finally, case studies have been conducted to show effectiveness and practicality of our proposed approaches.

  11. Factors Affecting Entrepreneurship and Business Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tur-Porcar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is becoming increasingly important for society, and the creation of business ventures is one area where sustainability is critical. We examined the factors affecting actions that are designed to foster business sustainability. These factors are related to the environment, behavior, human relations, and business activity. Based on questionnaire responses from experts, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP method was used to rank sustainable business criteria according to their importance for entrepreneurs starting sustainable businesses. The results indicate that the most important drivers of sustainable entrepreneurship are behavioral factors and business factors. Ethical principles and values, together with competitive intelligence, are crucial for undertaking actions that lead to sustainability.

  12. A Rationally Designed TNF-α Epitope-Scaffold Immunogen Induces Sustained Antibody Response and Alleviates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available The TNF-α biological inhibitors have significantly improved the clinical outcomes of many autoimmune diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis. However, the practical uses are limited due to high costs and the risk of anti-drug antibody responses. Attempts to develop anti-TNF-α vaccines have generated encouraging data in animal models, however, data from clinical trials have not met expectations. In present study, we designed a TNF-α epitope-scaffold immunogen DTNF7 using the transmembrane domain of diphtheria toxin, named DTT as a scaffold. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that the grafted TNF-α epitope is entirely surface-exposed and presented in a native-like conformation while the rigid helical structure of DTT is minimally perturbed, thereby rendering the immunogen highly stable. Immunization of mice with alum formulated DTNF7 induced humoral responses against native TNF-α, and the antibody titer was sustained for more than 6 months, which supports a role of the universal CD4 T cell epitopes of DTT in breaking self-immune tolerance. In a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, DTNF7-alum vaccination markedly delayed the onset of collagen-induced arthritis, and reduced incidence as well as clinical score. DTT is presumed safe as an epitope carrier because a catalytic inactive mutant of diphtheria toxin, CRM197 has good clinical safety records as an active vaccine component. Taken all together, we show that DTT-based epitope vaccine is a promising strategy for prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  13. Sustained virological response on second-line antiretroviral therapy following virological failure in HIV-infected patients in rural South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelot F Schoffelen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the virological, immunological and clinical efficacy of protease inhibitor (PI-based second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART in rural South Africa. METHODS: An observational cohort study was performed on 210 patients (including 39 children who initiated PI-based second-line therapy at least 12 months prior to data collection. Biannual clinical, immunological and virological monitoring was performed. Primary endpoints were adequate virological response (plasma HIV-1 RNA1000 after initial virological response or on-going viremia (plasma HIV-1 RNA never<400 copies/ml for more than six months. Data were analyzed by an on-treatment (OT and intention-to-treat (ITT approach. Analyses were primarily performed on the group of patients who switched following first-line virological failure. RESULTS: Median duration of follow-up after switch to second-line treatment was 20 months [IQR 11-35]. 191 patients had switched to second-line ART due to first-line virological failure. 139/191 of them (72.8%, ITT were in care and on treatment at the end of follow-up and 11/191 (5.8%, ITT had died. After twelve months, an adequate virological response was seen in 92/128 patients (71.9%, OT, of which 78/128 (60.9%, OT experienced full virological suppression. Virological response remained stable after 24 months. Virological efficacy was similar amongst adult and pediatric patients. As in first-line ART, we observed a lack of correlation between virological failure and WHO-defined immunological failure. CONCLUSIONS: Good virological outcomes following first-line failure can be achieved with PI-based, second-line antiretroviral therapy in both adult and pediatric patients in rural South Africa. Retention rates were high and virological outcomes were sustainable during the two-year follow-up period, although persisting low-level viremia occurred in a subset of patients. The observed viro-immunological dissociation emphasizes the need

  14. Influence of sustained viral response on the regression of fibrosis and portal hypertension in cirrhotic HCV patients treated with antiviral triple therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Puente

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The regression of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension (PH and their influence on the natural history of compensated hepatitis C virus (HCV-related cirrhosis has not been studied previously. Our objective was to evaluate the influence of sustained virologic response (SVR on the portal pressure gradient (HVPG and non-invasive parameters of PH and prognostic factors of response. Methods: Sixteen patients with compensated HCV genotype 1-related cirrhosis with PH (HVPG > 6 mmHg without beta-blocker therapy were considered as candidates for PEGα2a + RBV + BOC (48 weeks; lead-in and accepted stopping rules. A hemodynamic study and Fibroscan® were performed at baseline, at eight weeks and, in the case of SVR, 24 weeks after treatment. In each hemodynamic study, serum samples were analyzed for inflammatory biomarkers associated with PH. Results: In eight cases, SVR was obtained; five patients relapsed, and treatment was stopped early for non-response to lead in (one case and a decrease of < 3 log at week 8 (two patients. Compared to baseline, there was a significant decrease in HVPG and Fibroscan® at weeks 8 and 72 (10.31 ± 4.3 vs 9.4 ± 5.04 vs 6.1 ± 3.61 mmHg, p < 0.0001 and 21.3 ± 14.5 vs 16.2 ± 9.5 vs 6.4 ± 4.5 kPa, p < 0.0001, respectively. The average HVPG decrease in SVR was 40.8 ± 17.53%, achieving an HVPG < 6 mmHg in five patients (62.5% and a Fibroscan® < 7.1 kPa in three patients (37.5%. Conclusions: Complete hemodynamic response (HVPG < 6 mmHg and fibrosis regression (Fibroscan® < 7.1 kPa occur in more than half and one-third of patients achieving SVR, respectively, and must be another target in cirrhotic patients with SVR.

  15. Influence of sustained viral response on the regression of fibrosis and portal hypertension in cirrhotic HCV patients treated with antiviral triple therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Ángela; Cabezas, Joaquín; López Arias, María Jesús; Fortea, José Ignacio; Arias, María Teresa; Estébanez, Ángel; Casafont, Fernando; Fábrega, Emilio; Crespo, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The regression of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension (PH) and their influence on the natural history of compensated hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis has not been studied previously. Our objective was to evaluate the influence of sustained virologic response (SVR) on the portal pressure gradient (HVPG) and non-invasive parameters of PH and prognostic factors of response. Sixteen patients with compensated HCV genotype 1-related cirrhosis with PH (HVPG > 6 mmHg) without beta-blocker therapy were considered as candidates for PEGα2a + RBV + BOC (48 weeks; lead-in and accepted stopping rules). A hemodynamic study and Fibroscan® were performed at baseline, at eight weeks and, in the case of SVR, 24 weeks after treatment. In each hemodynamic study, serum samples were analyzed for inflammatory biomarkers associated with PH. In eight cases, SVR was obtained; five patients relapsed, and treatment was stopped early for non-response to lead in (one case) and a decrease of < 3 log at week 8 (two patients). Compared to baseline, there was a significant decrease in HVPG and Fibroscan® at weeks 8 and 72 (10.31 ± 4.3 vs 9.4 ± 5.04 vs 6.1 ± 3.61 mmHg, p < 0.0001 and 21.3 ± 14.5 vs 16.2 ± 9.5 vs 6.4 ± 4.5 kPa, p < 0.0001, respectively). The average HVPG decrease in SVR was 40.8 ± 17.53%, achieving an HVPG < 6 mmHg in five patients (62.5%) and a Fibroscan® < 7.1 kPa in three patients (37.5%). Complete hemodynamic response (HVPG < 6 mmHg) and fibrosis regression (Fibroscan® < 7.1 kPa) occur in more than half and one-third of patients achieving SVR, respectively, and must be another target in cirrhotic patients with SVR.

  16. Roundtabling Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponte, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The willingness of public authority to delegate social and environmental regulation to the private sector has varied from sector to sector, but has often led to the establishment of ‘voluntary’ standards and certifications on sustainability. Many of these have taken the form of ‘stewardship...... councils’ and ‘sustainability roundtables’ and have been designed around a set of institutional features seeking to establish legitimacy, fend off possible criticism, and ‘sell’ certifications to potential users. The concept of ‘roundtabling’ emphasizes the fitting a variety of commodity......-specific sustainability situations into a form that not only ‘hears more voices’ (as in ‘multi-stakeholder’), but also portrays to give them equal standing at the table of negotiations (roundtable), thus raising higher expectations on accountability, transparency and inclusiveness. In this article, I examine to what...

  17. Environment and sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paavola, Jouni; Røpke, Inge

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews socio-economic research on the environment and sustainability. The chapter first explores core aspects of socio-economics, examines how socio-economics has related to the agenda of research on the environment, and assesses how socio-economic research on the environment became...... to a research agenda for ‘socio-ecological economics’. Sustainable consumption and global environmental change are already important areas of research for it. But ecological macroeconomics is also needed to formulate coordinated responses to multiple crises such as economic downturn, climate change and loss...

  18. Managing Sustainable Information Systems Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kautz, Karlheinz

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable information systems development (ISD) in the context of this paper is not about products that support sustainability at large with its environmental, economic and social dimensions and little about the development of sustainable products, which are both without doubt important topics....... This paper is about a prerequisite for such products, namely, a sustainable ISD process, a process which exhibits reasonable and responsible stewardship and utilisation of the existing resources for ISD—people and information in the context of scope, time/schedule, budget/cost, quality and risk....

  19. Low levels of microbial translocation marker LBP are associated with sustained viral response after anti-HCV treatment in HIV-1/HCV co-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Nyström

    Full Text Available Microbial translocation (MT contributes to immune activation during HIV and HCV infections. We investigated the kinetics of MT markers during anti-HCV and anti-HIV treatments, and if baseline plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP and soluble CD14 (sCD14 could predict anti-HCV treatment outcome.Plasma from 78 HIV-infected patients was evaluated for LPS, LBP and sCD14. The patients starting anti-HCV treatment (with ongoing antiretroviral (ART treatment were categorized into sustained viral responders (SVR; n = 21 or non-responders (NR; n = 15 based on treatment outcome. ART starting subjects--were categorized into chronically HCV-infected (CH; n = 24 and mono-infected (HIV; n = 18, based on the HCV infection status. Samples were collected before start (at baseline of pegylated-interferon-alpha/ribavirin (peg-IFN/RBV or antiretroviral-therapy and two years after treatment start (at follow up. χ2-test, non-parametric statistics and logistic regression were applied to determine the associations with treatment response and changes of the soluble markers.Plasma levels of LPS and sCD14 were elevated in all subjects before antiviral-treatment but remained unchanged at follow-up. Elevated levels of LBP were present in patients with HIV and HIV/HCV co-infection and were reduced by ART. Additionally, higher levels of LBP were present at baseline in NR vs. SVR. Higher levels of LBP at baseline were associated with non-response to peg-IFN/RBV treatment in both bivariate (OR: 0.19 95% CI: 0.06-0.31, p = 0.004 and multivariate analysis (OR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.1-1.86, p = 0.07.In HIV/HCV co-infected patients high baseline LBP levels are associated with non-response to peg-IFN/RBV therapy. Plasma LBP (decreased by ART may be a more relevant MT marker than LPS and sCD14.

  20. Sustainable Soesterkwartier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahams, H.; Goosen, H.; Jong, de F.; Sickmann, J.; Prins, D.

    2010-01-01

    The municipality of Amersfoort wants to construct an endurable and sustainable eco-town in the Soesterkwartier neighbourhood, by taking future climate change into account. The impact of climate change at the location of the proposed eco-town was studied by a literature review.

  1. Sustainable agriculture

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    New farming techniques, better food security. Since 1970, IDRC-supported research has introduced sustainable agricultural practices to farmers and communities across the devel- oping world. The result: higher productivity, less poverty, greater food security, and a healthier environment. Opportunities grow on trees in ...

  2. Sustainable Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tsegai Berhane Ghebretekle

    Abstract. This article examines the concept of sustainable development after the Post-. 2015 Paris Climate Change Agreement with particular emphasis on Ethiopia. Various African countries are vulnerable to climate change, as is evidenced by recent droughts. Ethiopia is selected as a case study in light of its pace in.

  3. Sustainable machining

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an overview on current sustainable machining. Its chapters cover the concept in economic, social and environmental dimensions. It provides the reader with proper ways to handle several pollutants produced during the machining process. The book is useful on both undergraduate and postgraduate levels and it is of interest to all those working with manufacturing and machining technology.

  4. Architecture Sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avgeriou, Paris; Stal, Michael; Hilliard, Rich

    2013-01-01

    Software architecture is the foundation of software system development, encompassing a system's architects' and stakeholders' strategic decisions. A special issue of IEEE Software is intended to raise awareness of architecture sustainability issues and increase interest and work in the area. The

  5. Exergy sustainability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Wilson, David Gerald; Reed, Alfred W.

    2006-05-01

    Exergy is the elixir of life. Exergy is that portion of energy available to do work. Elixir is defined as a substance held capable of prolonging life indefinitely, which implies sustainability of life. In terms of mathematics and engineering, exergy sustainability is defined as the continuous compensation of irreversible entropy production in an open system with an impedance and capacity-matched persistent exergy source. Irreversible and nonequilibrium thermodynamic concepts are combined with self-organizing systems theories as well as nonlinear control and stability analyses to explain this definition. In particular, this paper provides a missing link in the analysis of self-organizing systems: a tie between irreversible thermodynamics and Hamiltonian systems. As a result of this work, the concept of ''on the edge of chaos'' is formulated as a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for stability and performance of sustainable systems. This interplay between exergy rate and irreversible entropy production rate can be described as Yin and Yang control: the dialectic synthesis of opposing power flows. In addition, exergy is shown to be a fundamental driver and necessary input for sustainable systems, since exergy input in the form of power is a single point of failure for self-organizing, adaptable systems.

  6. Sustainable processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Heine

    2004-01-01

    Kristensen_NH and_Beck A: Sustainable processing. In Otto Schmid, Alexander Beck and Ursula Kretzschmar (Editors) (2004): Underlying Principles in Organic and "Low-Input Food" Processing - Literature Survey. Research Institute of Organic Agriculture FiBL, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland. ISBN 3-906081-58-3...

  7. Sustainable finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Margreet F. Boersma-de Jong

    2012-01-01

    Presentation for Springschool of Strategy, University of Groningen, 10 October 2012. The role of CSR is to stimulate ethical behaviour, and as a result, mutual trust in society. Advantage of CSR for the company and the evolution of CSR. From CSR to Sustainable Finance: how does CSR influence

  8. Improvement of liver stiffness in patients with hepatitis C virus infection who received direct-acting antiviral therapy and achieved sustained virological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Toshifumi; Kumada, Takashi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Mizuno, Kazuyuki; Sone, Yasuhiro; Kataoka, Saki; Hashinokuchi, Shinichi

    2017-12-01

    There is insufficient research on whether direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy can improve liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). We evaluated sequential changes in liver stiffness using shear wave elastography in patients with HCV who received DAA therapy. A total of 210 patients with HCV who received daclatasvir and asunaprevir therapy and achieved sustained virological response (SVR) were analyzed. Liver stiffness, as evaluated by shear wave elastography, and laboratory data were assessed before treatment (baseline), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 24 weeks after EOT (SVR24). Alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT) decreased over time, and there were significant differences between baseline and EOT and between EOT and SVR24. Although platelet counts did not significantly differ between baseline and EOT, they increased significantly from EOT to SVR24. The median (interquartile range) liver stiffness values at baseline, EOT, and SVR24 were 10.2 (7.7-14.7), 8.8 (7.1-12.1), and 7.6 (6.3-10.3) kPa, respectively (P liver) and Fibrosis-4 index > 2.0 (n = 75), the liver stiffness values at baseline, EOT, and SVR24 were 9.6 (7.7-15.2), 9.2 (7.3-12.1), and 7.7 (6.3-10.1) kPa, respectively (P liver stiffness starts during the administration of DAAs in patients who achieve SVR, and this effect is particularly pronounced in patients with progressive liver fibrosis. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Peginterferon alfa-2a is associated with elevations in alanine aminotransferase at the end of treatment in chronic hepatitis C patients with sustained virologic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Tseng

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence and demographic/clinical factors of alanine aminotransferase (ALT abnormalities at the end of treatment (EOT in chronic hepatitis C (CHC patients with sustained virologic response (SVR.Seven hundred naïve CHC patients who underwent combination treatment between January 2003 and December 2010 were included in the study. The patients with SVR and serum ALT>upper limit of normal (ULN at the EOT were further analyzed. The effects of clinical characteristics, treatment regimen, and virologic variables were evaluated by logistic regression. Of the 700 included patients, 488 (69.7% achieved an SVR after treatment, and 235 (33.6% had serum ALT levels>ULN at the EOT. Of those 488 patients, 137 (28.1% had abnormal ALT values at the EOT. A multivariate analysis showed that the occurrence of ALT abnormalities at the EOT was significantly associated with pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN alfa-2a (odds ratio [OR], 2.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-3.45; P<0.001, baseline fatty liver (OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.16-2.76; P = 0.007, and baseline liver cirrhosis (OR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.35-4.09; P = 0.002.Use of PEG-IFN-alfa-2a, fatty liver, and cirrhosis are important factors associated with EOT-ALT abnormality in CHC patients receiving combination therapy that achieve an SVR. PEG-IFN-alfa-2a-related EOT-ALT elevation will become normal at the end of follow-up, but fatty liver and cirrhosis-related ALT elevation will not be resolved.

  10. Loss of Sustained Activity in the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex in Response to Repeated Stress in Individuals with Early-Life Emotional Abuse: Implications for Depression Vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong eWang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Repeated psychosocial stress in early life has significant impact on both behavior and neural function which, together, increase vulnerability to depression. However, neural mechanisms related to repeated stress remain unclear. We hypothesize that early-life stress may result in a reduced capacity for cognitive control in response to a repeated stressor, particularly in individuals who developed maladaptive emotional processing strategies, namely trait rumination. Individuals who encountered early-life stress but have adaptive emotional processing, namely trait mindfulness, may demonstrate an opposite pattern. Using a mental arithmetic task to induce mild stress and a mindful breathing task to induce a mindful state, we tested this hypothesis by examining blood perfusion changes over time in healthy young men. We found that subjects with early-life stress, particularly emotional abuse, failed to sustain neural activation in the orbitofrontal and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC over time. Given that the vmPFC is known to regulate amygdala activity during emotional processing, we subsequently compared the perfusion in the vmPFC and the amygdala in depression-vulnerable (having early life stress and high in rumination and resilient (having early life stress and high in mindfulness subjects. We found that depression-vulnerable subjects had increased amygdala perfusion and reduced vmPFC perfusion during the later runs than that during the earlier stressful task runs. In contrast, depression resilient individuals showed the reverse pattern. Our results indicate that the vmPFC of depression-vulnerable subjects may have a limited capacity to inhibit amygdala activation to repeated stress over time, whereas the vmPFC in resilient individuals may adapt to stress quickly. This pilot study warrants future investigation to clarify the stress-related neural activity pattern dynamically to identify depression vulnerability at an individual level.

  11. Temperature-dependent responses of the photosynthetic and chlorophyll fluorescence attributes of apple (Malus domestica) leaves during a sustained high temperature event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Dennis H

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to follow changes in the temperature-dependent responses of photosynthesis and photosystem II performance in leaves of field-grown trees of Malus domestica (Borkh.) cv. 'Red Gala' before and after exposure to a long-term heat event occurring late in the growing season. Light-saturated photosynthesis was optimal at 25 °C before the heat event. The high temperatures caused a reduction in rates at low temperatures (15-20 °C) but increased rates at high temperatures (30-40 °C) and a shift in optimum to 30 °C. Rates at all temperatures increased after the heat event and the optimum shifted to 33 °C, indicative of some acclimation to the high temperatures occurring. Photosystem II attributes were all highly temperature-dependent. The operating quantum efficiency of PSII during the heat event declined, but mostly at high temperatures, partly because of decreased photochemical quenching but also from increased non-photochemical quenching. However, a further reduction in PSII operating efficiency occurred after the heat event subsided. Non-photochemical quenching had subsided, whereas photochemical quenching had increased in the post-heat event period and consistent with a greater fraction of open PSII reaction centres. What remained uncertain was why these effects on PSII performance appeared to have no effect on the process of light-saturated photosynthesis. However, the results provide an enhanced understanding of the impacts of sustained high temperatures on the photosynthetic process and its underlying reactions, notably photochemistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Natural killer KIR3DS1 is closely associated with HCV viral clearance and sustained virological response in HIV/HCV patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rivero-Juarez

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the influence of the presence of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR 3DS1 on HCV treatment response in HIV/HCV genotype 1 co-infected patients. METHODS: HIV/HCV co-infected patients were included. KIR3DS1, their specific HLA-B ligands and IL28B gene were genotyped. Reductions of plasma HCV RNA levels between baseline and week 1, week 2 and week 4 were analyzed for IL28B genotype and KIR3DS1 (HLA Bw4 or Bw6. Rapid and sustained virological response (RVR and SVR rates were also analyzed. RESULTS: Sixty HIV/HCV genotype 1 co-infected patients were included. Patients with KIR3DS1 and Bw4 had higher rates of HCV viral decline than those who were not carriers of KIR3DS1 (week 1: p = 0.01; week 2: p = 0.038; week 4: p = 0.03. Patients carrying KIR3DS1/Bw4 had higher rates of RVR and SVR than those who did not carry KIR3DS1 (RVR: 46.15% versus 17.02%, p = 0.012; SVR: 63.6% versus 13 26.5%, p = 0.031. With respect to patients carrying the IL28B-CC genotype, those with KIR3DS1/Bw4 had greater rates of HCV viral clearance (week 1: p<0.001; week 2: p = 0.01; week 4: p = 0.02, RVR (p = 0.015 and SVR (p = 0.029 than those not carrying KIR3DS1. CONCLUSION: Our results show that the KIR3DS1 genotype has a positive effect on HCV viral clearance during the first weeks of Peg-IFN/RBV treatment in HCV/HCV co-infected patients bearing genotype 1, and higher RVR and SVR rates.

  13. Improving organizational sustainability using a quality perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuis, Manda; Vos, Janita F.J.

    2003-01-01

    This article derives lessons from the quality approach for further developing the organizational sustainability approach. Taking a responsibility perspective on organizational sustainability, four issues emerge that need to be resolved, i.e. what is the responsibility?, what is the responsibility

  14. Business Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability in management master programs : A qualitative study on the EQUIS-accredited business schools in four Nordic countries

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Linnéa; Massart, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    With today’s public debates concerning the environmental and social issues there is a need to educate the future business leaders how to run a business in a way that can contribute to sustainability and the protection of the world’s natural resources. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate to what extent management master programs at the EQUIS-accredited business schools in the Nordic countries include courses which address the concepts of Business Ethics, CSR and Sustainability. ...

  15. CONCEPTUAL DELIMITATIONS ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ienciu Ionel-Alin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a model for resource use meant to satisfy human needs, without polluting the environment, so that these needs can be satisfied not only in the present, but in the future as well. It is a concept of nowadays with no generally accepted definition, placing environment first and foremost, aiming at implementing the environmental policies in all structures and at all economic levels. Within the present study we have aimed at creating a conceptual delimitation on sustainable development, sustainability and socialresponsibility, concepts of present interest, that tend to become a mystery for the academic community and practitioners by their variety and complexity of approaches. During our scientific endeavor we believe that social responsibility is the foundation of sustainable development. Sustainable development is a concept used especially at macro-economic level, while social responsibility is used at entity level and incorporates the economic, environmental and social dimension, which has a voluntary character and tries to respond to the information needs of the society and other stakeholders. Sustainability at the entity\\'s level is the goal or final objective of sustainable development – satisfaction of present needs without compromising the possibility for future generations to satisfy their own needs, while social responsibility is an intermediate phase of sustainability wherein entities try to balance the economic, social and environmental dimension. Thus, we can state we include ourselves within social corporatism, slightly close to social institutionalism, which is characteristic to developed countries, giving a particular importance to social contract and relations between entity and society. We believe that in Romania, a POSDRU funded project should be regarded as a legal person with social values, which must be based on sustainable development and to promote, besides legal liability of automatically deriving

  16. Sustainable Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2015-01-01

    in wider social, economic and technological frameworks is emphasised. In particular, the chapter is inspired by practice theory and transition theory. First, various trends in consumption are outlined to highlight some of the challenges for sustainability transitions. Then, it is discussed how consumption...... patterns are shaped over time and what should be considered in sustainability strategies. While discussions on consumption often take their point of departure in the perspective of the individual and then zoom to the wider context, the present approach is the opposite. The outline starts with the basic...... biophysical, distributional and economic conditions for high consumption in rich countries and then zooms in on the coevolution of provision systems and consumption, and how consumption is shaped by practices and projects in everyday life. Furthermore, the paper discusses whether and how transition...

  17. Sustainable Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Elle, Morten

    The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems that ...... that need urgent action. The built environment is an obvious area to put effort into because of the large and cost-effective energy saving potential and potential for Renewable Energy-based supply systems for buildings.......The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems...

  18. Annual Sustainability Report FY 2014. Incorporates NREL Site Sustainability Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rukavina, Frank [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-07-01

    NREL's Sustainability Program is responsible for upholding all executive orders, federal regulations, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) orders, and goals related to sustainable and resilient facility operations. But NREL continues to expand sustainable practices above and beyond the laboratory's regulations and requirements to ensure that the laboratory fulfills its mission into the future, leaves the smallest possible legacy footprint, and models sustainable operations and behaviors on national, regional, and local levels. The report, per the GRI reporting format, elaborates on multi-year goals relative to executive orders, achievements, and challenges; and success stories provide specific examples. A section called 'Sustaining NREL's Future Through Integration' provides insight into how NREL is successfully expanding the adoption of renewable energy technologies through integration.

  19. Corporate Sustainability Management and Environmental Ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuler, Douglas; Rasche, Andreas; Etzion, Dror

    2017-01-01

    ecology). It then shows that the current scholarly discourse around corporate sustainability management—as reflected in environment management (EM), corporate social responsibility (CSR), and corporate political activity (CPA)—mostly favors an instrumental perspective on sustainability. Sustainable...... business practices are viewed as anthropocentric and are conceptualized as a means to achieve competitive advantage. Based on these observations, we speculate about what corporate sustainability management might look like if it applied ethical orientations that emphasize the intrinsic value of nature...

  20. Plurality or convergence in sustainability reporting standards?

    OpenAIRE

    Albu, Nadia; Albu, Catalin Nicolae; Dumitru, Madalina; Dumitru, Valentin Florentin

    2013-01-01

    Over the last years an increasing number of companies issued Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) or Sustainability Reports to complement their traditional financial reporting. Companies use various sustainability reporting standards or develop their own reporting frameworks starting from the existing ones. This variation of practices pointed out by empirical research raises questions about the quality and comparability of sustainability reporting, its role in the sustainable development, an...

  1. Impact of Safety-Related Dose Reductions or Discontinuations on Sustained Virologic Response in HCV-Infected Patients: Results from the GUARD-C Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Graham R.; Coppola, Carmine; Derbala, Moutaz; Ferenci, Peter; Orlandini, Alessandra; Reddy, K. Rajender; Tallarico, Ludovico; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Ahlers, Silke; Bakalos, Georgios; Hassanein, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, peginterferon alfa/ribavirin remains relevant in many resource-constrained settings. The non-randomized GUARD-C cohort investigated baseline predictors of safety-related dose reductions or discontinuations (sr-RD) and their impact on sustained virologic response (SVR) in patients receiving peginterferon alfa/ribavirin in routine practice. Methods A total of 3181 HCV-mono-infected treatment-naive patients were assigned to 24 or 48 weeks of peginterferon alfa/ribavirin by their physician. Patients were categorized by time-to-first sr-RD (Week 4/12). Detailed analyses of the impact of sr-RD on SVR24 (HCV RNA <50 IU/mL) were conducted in 951 Caucasian, noncirrhotic genotype (G)1 patients assigned to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin for 48 weeks. The probability of SVR24 was identified by a baseline scoring system (range: 0–9 points) on which scores of 5 to 9 and <5 represent high and low probability of SVR24, respectively. Results SVR24 rates were 46.1% (754/1634), 77.1% (279/362), 68.0% (514/756), and 51.3% (203/396), respectively, in G1, 2, 3, and 4 patients. Overall, 16.9% and 21.8% patients experienced ≥1 sr-RD for peginterferon alfa and ribavirin, respectively. Among Caucasian noncirrhotic G1 patients: female sex, lower body mass index, pre-existing cardiovascular/pulmonary disease, and low hematological indices were prognostic factors of sr-RD; SVR24 was lower in patients with ≥1 vs. no sr-RD by Week 4 (37.9% vs. 54.4%; P = 0.0046) and Week 12 (41.7% vs. 55.3%; P = 0.0016); sr-RD by Week 4/12 significantly reduced SVR24 in patients with scores <5 but not ≥5. Conclusions In conclusion, sr-RD to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin significantly impacts on SVR24 rates in treatment-naive G1 noncirrhotic Caucasian patients. Baseline characteristics can help select patients with a high probability of SVR24 and a low probability of sr-RD with

  2. IL28B SNP rs12979860 is the Critical Predictor for Sustained Viral Response in Chinese Children Aged 1 to 6 Years with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yan-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Shi, Yan-Min; Li, Yong-Li; Chu, Fang; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Da-Wei; Gan, Yu; Wang, Fu-Chuan; Gu, Mei-Lei; Dong, Yi; Zhu, Shi-Shu; Shi, Ce; Fan, Hua-Hao; Zhang, Xiu-Chang; Zhang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Clinical data on children with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) remain extremely limited. This study investigated sustained virologic response (SVR) to alfa-interferon 2b plus RBV treatment in children aged 1-6 years with unsafe injection-acquired CHC. 154 children with CHC aged 1 to 6 years were enrolled, 101 of them were male (65.6%) and 53 were female (34.4%), and they were treated with alfa-interferon at a dose of 1-5 MIU/m(2) 3 times weekly plus oral RBV (15 mg/kg/day) for 48 weeks. 57(39.3 %) of them were genotype 1b, 73(50.3%) were genotypes 2a, 15(10.3%) were undecided type. SVR was achieved in 53 of 57(93.0%) patients with genotype 1b, in 72 (98.6%) of 73 with genotype 2a, 15(100.0%) of 15 with undecided type. There was no significant statistical difference in SVR between male and female (98.0% vs 94.3%, p=0.340), genotype 2a and those with genotype 1b(98.6% vs 93.0%, p=0.160), ALT>40U/L group and ALT≤40U/L group(96.7% vs 96.8%, p=1.000), AST>40U/L group and AST≤40U/L group(95.9% vs 98.2%, p=0.654) as well as lower baseline viral load group (<6×10(5) IU/ml) and higher baseline viral load group(≥6×10(5) IU/ml)(97.3% vs 95.3%, p=0.916). Leucopenia, neutropenia, hemoglobin concentration decrease, fever, platelet count decrease and rash were 8.4%, 69.5%, 24.0%, 50.6%, 1.9% and 4.5%, respectively. And only 12(7.8%) individuals developed thyroid autoantibodies. The SVR was higher in patients with IL-28B genotype C/C than C/T (99.0% vs 80%, p=0.002). Compared with HCV viral genotype, ALT level and baseline viral load, IL-28B rs12979860 is more suitable for predicting antiviral efficacy in children with CHC. It is inappropriate to take the increase of ALT level as an essential indicator for antiviral treatment in children aged 1-6 years.

  3. Ribavirin Concentrations Do Not Predict Sustained Virological Response in HIV/HCV-Coinfected Patients Treated with Ribavirin and Pegylated Interferon in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Kovari

    Full Text Available Ribavirin (RBV is an essential component of most current hepatitis C (HCV treatment regimens and still standard of care in the combination with pegylated interferon (pegIFN to treat chronic HCV in resource limited settings. Study results in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients are contradicting as to whether RBV concentration correlates with sustained virological response (SVR.We included 262 HCV treatment naïve HIV/HCV-coinfected Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS participants treated with RBV and pegIFN between 01.01.2001-01.01.2010, 134 with HCV genotype (GT 1/4, and 128 with GT 2/3 infections. RBV levels were measured retrospectively in stored plasma samples obtained between HCV treatment week 4 and end of therapy. Uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between RBV concentration and SVR in GT 1/4 and GT 2/3 infections. The analyses were repeated stratified by treatment phase (week 4-12, 13-24, >24 and IL28B genotype (CC versus CT/TT.SVR rates were 35.1% in GT 1/4 and 70.3% in GT 2/3 infections. Overall, median RBV concentration was 2.0 mg/L in GT 1/4, and 1.9 mg/L in GT 2/3, and did not change significantly across treatment phases. Patients with SVR had similar RBV concentrations compared to patients without SVR in both HCV genotype groups. SVR was not associated with RBV levels ≥2.0 mg/L (GT 1/4, OR 1.19 [0.5-2.86]; GT 2/3, 1.94 [0.78-4.80] and ≥2.5 mg/L (GT 1/4, 1.56 [0.64-3.84]; GT 2/3 2.72 [0.85-8.73], regardless of treatment phase, and IL28B genotype.In HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with pegIFN/RBV, therapeutic drug monitoring of RBV concentrations does not enhance the chance of HCV cure, regardless of HCV genotype, treatment phase and IL28B genotype.

  4. Repeated Vaccination of Cows with HIV Env gp140 during Subsequent Pregnancies Elicits and Sustains an Enduring Strong Env-Binding and Neutralising Antibody Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Heydarchi

    Full Text Available An important feature of a potential vaccine against HIV is the production of broadly neutralising antibodies (BrNAbs capable of potentially blocking infectivity of a diverse array of HIV strains. BrNAbs naturally arise in some HIV infected individuals after several years of infection and their serum IgG can neutralise various HIV strains across different subtypes. We previously showed that vaccination of cows with HIV gp140 AD8 trimers resulted in a high titre of serum IgG against HIV envelope (Env that had strong BrNAb activity. These polyclonal BrNAbs concentrated into the colostrum during the late stage of pregnancy and can be harvested in vast quantities immediately after calving. In this study, we investigated the effect of prolonged HIV gp140 vaccination on bovine colostrum IgG HIV Env-binding and BrNAb activity over subsequent pregnancies. Repeated immunisation led to a maintained high titre of HIV Env specific IgG in the colostrum batches, but this did not increase through repeated cycles. Colostrum IgG from all batches also strongly competed with sCD4 binding to gp140 Env trimer and with human-derived monoclonal VRC01 and b12 BrNAbs that bind the CD4 binding site (CD4bs. Furthermore, competition neutralisation assays using RSC3 Env gp120 protein core and a derivative CD4bs mutant, RSC3 Δ371I/P363N, showed that CD4bs neutralising antibodies contribute to the neutralising activity of all batches of purified bovine colostrum IgG. This result indicates that the high IgG titre/avidity of anti-CD4bs antibodies with BrNAb activity was achieved during the first year of vaccination and was sustained throughout the years of repeated vaccinations in the cow tested. Although IgG of subsequent colostrum batches may have a higher avidity towards the CD4bs, the overall breadth in neutralisation was not enhanced. This implies that the boosting vaccinations over 4 years elicited a polyclonal antibody response that maintained the proportion of both

  5. Sustainable IT and IT for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenhua

    industry's first Net-zero Energy Data Center. The second thrust of this thesis is to use IT systems to improve the sustainability and efficiency of our energy infrastructure through data center demand response. The main challenges as we integrate more renewable sources to the existing power grid come from the fluctuation and unpredictability of renewable generation. Although energy storage and reserves can potentially solve the issues, they are very costly. One promising alternative is to make the cloud data centers demand responsive. The potential of such an approach is huge. To realize this potential, we need adaptive and distributed control of cloud data centers and new electricity market designs for distributed electricity resources. My work is progressing in both directions. In particular, I have designed online algorithms with theoretically guaranteed performance for data center operators to deal with uncertainties under popular demand response programs. Based on local control rules of customers, I have further designed new pricing schemes for demand response to align the interests of customers, utility companies, and the society to improve social welfare.

  6. SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY FOR SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rizzuto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foundry Alfe Chem is an industrial reality working in the field of lubrication and chemical auxiliaries for industrial processes, which falls within the framework of the emerging and increasingly important «green chemistry». The goal of the company is to develop products that are more environmentally friendly by using raw materials from renewable sources; specifically, Foundry Alfe Chem has a program of self-sustainability that contemplates, for the foreseeable future, the direct production of renewable raw materials. The company has developed a new dedicated product line, Olitema, whose purpose is to offer highly technological solutions with complete environmental sustainability. In this context, Foundry Alfe CHEM has created a new product which represents a breakthrough in the class of HFC hydraulic fluids: Ecosafe Plus is a biodegradable fire-resistant hydraulic fluid with high engineering and technological performances, high environmental sustainability and the best security guarantees in workplaces. Its formulation is glycols-free, and it allows for easier disposal of the exhausted fluid, compared to a traditional water/ glycol-based HFC hydraulic fluid. For what concern the technological properties, Ecosafe Plus has been tested by accredited laboratories with tribological trials (4 Ball wear test ASTM D 4172, Ball on disc test ASTM 6425, Brugger test DIN 51347, Vickers test ASTM D 2882, with elastomer compatibility test (ASTM D 471 and biodegradability test (OECD 310 F.

  7. Marketing Sustainable Retail Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Ilić

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary benefits of sustainable retail over the long run has to be the marketing gain from having something other competitors do not: lower operating costs, a more socially responsible public profile, ease of gaining planning approval for new projects, better access to certain investment pools, higher rents (in the case of developers, ease of recruiting and retaining key people. Each of these benefits needs marketing and public relations support; each benefits from a clear and consistent corporate message that promotes sustainable retail. To date, there are very few retailers or developers who have championed sustainability long enough, consistently enough and with enough actual demonstration of changes in standard operations to gain the benefits of green marketing, but the very paucity of examples serves to underscore the point: the green marketing space is wide open for large retailers and developers. What would be the marketing steps that a company could take to benefit from its “sustainability focus?” The key to any marketing program is to differentiate a company’s actions from those of competitors and to do it along lines that its various stakeholders care about. This practice of differentiation is often expressed as “finding a difference that makes a difference, to someone who makes difference to you.” For retail developers, the first differentiator should be to attract more and better tenants to all of their centers, tenants who value lower operating costs and the developer’s program of sustainable development and corporate social responsibility.

  8. From Sustainability-as-usual to Sustainability Excellence in Local Bioenergy Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Kasurinen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioenergy business operators can significantly contribute to the sustainability of bioenergy systems. While research has addressed the maturity of corporate responsibility for sustainability, the maturity levels of bioenergy business have not been determined. The objectives of this research were to characterise the maturity levels of bioenergy corporate responsibility for sustainability and outline an approach by which companies can operate at the most mature sustainability excellence level. Literature, three workshops attended by bioenergy experts and a case study on biobutanol production in Brazil were used to develop the maturity model and approach. The results characterise the profitability, acceptability, and sustainability orientation maturity levels through sustainability questions and methods, and list the components of a systemic, holistic approach. Although the shift of business mindset from sustainability-as-usual to sustainability excellence is challenging, a systemic approach is necessary to broadly identify sustainability questions and a multitude of methods by which they can be answered.

  9. Sustainable Procurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telles, Pedro; Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard

    2017-01-01

    and within it how sustainable requirements have increased the level of compliance required, particularly regulatory compliance. Compliance was already present in previous EU public procurement frameworks, but its extent on Directive 2014/24/EU leads the authors to consider the current legal framework...... as subject to substantial regulatory compliance obligations external to the process of procurement. In short, procurement has been transformed in a way to enforce regulatory obligations that are not intrinsic to the process of buying. This leads to the conclusion that questions such as the cost and trade...

  10. Sustainable consumption and marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable development in global food markets is hindered by the discrepancy between positive consumer attitudes towards sustainable development or sustainability and the lack of corresponding sustainable consumption by a majority of consumers. Apparently for many (light user) consumers the

  11. Intrahepatic mRNA levels of type I interferon receptor and interferon-stimulated genes in genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C. Association between IFNAR1 mRNA level and sustained response to interferon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hideaki; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Akira; Shimomura, Hiroyuki; Moriya, Akio; Yu, Piao Cheng; Umeoka, Fumi; Fujioka, Shin-ichi; Koide, Norio; Shiratori, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between pretreatment intrahepatic mRNA levels of interferon receptor and interferon-stimulated genes and response to interferon therapy for genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C. Forty-four patients with genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C who underwent liver biopsy and then received interferon therapy participated in this study. Pretreatment intrahepatic mRNA levels of interferon receptor genes (IFNAR1, IFNAR2b, and IFNAR2c) and interferon-stimulated genes (OAS1 and PKR) were quantified by competitive polymerase chain reaction. In the genes examined, only IFNAR1 mRNA level was significantly higher in patients with sustained virological and biochemical response to interferon therapy versus those with nonsustained response (p IFNAR1 to IFNAR2 were also significantly higher in patients with sustained virological and biochemical response to IFN therapy (p IFNAR1 and mRNA ratio of IFNAR1 to IFNAR2 before treatment may be associated with a favorable response to interferon therapy. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PARADIGM - SYNOPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinescu Andreea

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Even if sustainable development is a concept that gained quite recently its scientific prestige, through contribution of researchers its content has upgraded to a high degree of conceptual luggage and, through contribution from governance representatives, has gained an impressive good-practice background. Allowing the use of different methodological premises and conceptual tools, sustainable development paradigm is equipped with all the elements that would allow the opening of new horizons of knowledge. Based on the facility which can operate the concept of sustainable development, the European Union aims to develop both a more competitive economy based on environmental protection as well as a new governance of economic policy. This on one hand demonstrates the sustainable development ability to irradiate creativity towards the establishment of interdisciplinary bridges and on the other hand explains the growing interest of researchers interested in the problem of analyzing in detail this fruitful concept. Launched first as a theoretical framework to serve justify actions responsible for weighting economic growth, the concept of Sustainable Development has quickly become a topic of ethical debate circumscribed to the area of perfectibility of human nature to the necessity registry. In this regard, the philosophical content of this paradigm could not remain outside researchers concerns, who want to provide both policy makers and the general public a wide range of evidence to demonstrate the viability of this paradigm. Academia waits until maximization of the contribution of governance to achieve sustainable economic development, which consists in conjunction of this upward path with the momentum given by public policy sync, perfectly adapted for globalization era and all crises to come. However, because this concept based its structure and composition on three pillars, equally important economy, society and environment any attempt to strengthen

  13. The macroecology of sustainability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Burger

    Full Text Available The discipline of sustainability science has emerged in response to concerns of natural and social scientists, policymakers, and lay people about whether the Earth can continue to support human population growth and economic prosperity. Yet, sustainability science has developed largely independently from and with little reference to key ecological principles that govern life on Earth. A macroecological perspective highlights three principles that should be integral to sustainability science: 1 physical conservation laws govern the flows of energy and materials between human systems and the environment, 2 smaller systems are connected by these flows to larger systems in which they are embedded, and 3 global constraints ultimately limit flows at smaller scales. Over the past few decades, decreasing per capita rates of consumption of petroleum, phosphate, agricultural land, fresh water, fish, and wood indicate that the growing human population has surpassed the capacity of the Earth to supply enough of these essential resources to sustain even the current population and level of socioeconomic development.

  14. Sustainability in nursing: a concept analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anåker, Anna; Elf, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe, explore and explain the concept of sustainability in nursing. Background Although researchers in nursing and medicine have emphasised the issue of sustainability and health, the concept of sustainability in nursing is undefined and poorly researched. A need exists for theoretical and empirical studies of sustainability in nursing. Design Concept analysis as developed by Walker and Avant. Method Data were derived from dictionaries, international healthcare organisations and literature searches in the CINAHL and MEDLINE databases. Inclusive years for the search ranged from 1990 to 2012. A total of fourteen articles were found that referred to sustainability in nursing. Results Sustainability in nursing involves six defining attributes: ecology, environment, future, globalism, holism and maintenance. Antecedents of sustainability require climate change, environmental impact and awareness, confidence in the future, responsibility and a willingness to change. Consequences of sustainability in nursing include education in the areas of ecology, environment and sustainable development as well as sustainability as a part of nursing academic programs and in the description of the academic subject of nursing. Sustainability should also be part of national and international healthcare organisations. The concept was clarified herein by giving it a definition. Conclusion Sustainability in nursing was explored and found to contribute to sustainable development, with the ultimate goal of maintaining an environment that does not harm current and future generations′ opportunities for good health. This concept analysis provides recommendations for the healthcare sector to incorporate sustainability and provides recommendations for future research. PMID:24602178

  15. Environmentally Friendly Sustainable Housing Construction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore it is right time, and is now both a great incentive and a great opportunity to use sustainable building construction techniques. Housing is a major sector and is responsible for about 20-30% of green house gas emissions in developed countries. Therefore an effective response to climate change can be achieved ...

  16. Unravelling the causes of variability in crop yields and treatment responses for better tailoring of options for sustainable intensification in southern Mali

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falconnier, G.N.; Descheemaeker, Katrien; Mourik, Van T.A.; Giller, K.E.

    2016-01-01

    Options that contribute to sustainable intensification offer an avenue to improve crop yields and farmers' livelihoods. However, insufficient knowledge on the performance of various options in the context of smallholder farm systems impedes local adaptation and adoption. Therefore, together with

  17. Metabolic adaptation, a specialized leaf organ structure and vascular responses to diurnal N2 fixation by nostoc azollae sustain the astonishing productivity of azolla ferns without nitrogen fertilizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Paul; Bräutigam, Andrea; Buijs, Valerie A.; Tazelaar, Anne O.E.; van der Werf, Adrie; Schlüter, Urte; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bolger, Anthony; Usadel, Björn; Weber, Andreas P.M.; Schluepmann, Henriette

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable agriculture demands reduced input of man-made nitrogen (N) fertilizer, yet N2 fixation limits the productivity of crops with heterotrophic diazotrophic bacterial symbionts. We investigated floating ferns from the genus Azolla that host phototrophic diazotrophic Nostoc azollae in leaf

  18. What efficacy measures are clinically relevant and should be used in Cochrane Reviews of acute migraine trials?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cochrane Reviews are methodologically of high quality but the clinical relevance of analysed efficacy measures (EMs) should also be assessed. METHODS: The clinical relevance of EMs used in one systematic Cochrane review of oral zolmitriptan for migraine headache was evaluated. RESULTS......: The following EMs were used: pain free at two hours (30%), headache relief at two hours (60%), sustained pain free for 24 hours (19%) and sustained headache relief for 24 hours (39%). These EMs were also used in four other Cochrane reviews of acute migraine treatment. Of these EMs sustained headache relief...... for 24 h is not judged clinically relevant. CONCLUSION: Pain free and sustained pain free are clinically relevant, but the responses are rather low, demonstrating that there is a need for improvement of acute drug treatment in migraine....

  19. Strategic Leadership of Corporate Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Robert

    2014-01-01

    ? What effects do corporate sustainability TMT positions have at their organizations? We consider these questions through strategic leadership and neoinstitutional theoretical frameworks. Through the latter, we also engage with Weberian considerations of bureaucracy. We find that the reasons why...... corporate sustainability TMT positions are installed can be in response to a crisis at the corporation for which its legitimacy is challenged. We also find the corporate sustainability TMT position can be installed proactively in an effort to realize external opportunities that may have otherwise gone...

  20. Virtual Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Sims Bainbridge

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In four ways, massively multiplayer online role-playing games may serve as tools for advancing sustainability goals, and as laboratories for developing alternatives to current social arrangements that have implications for the natural environment. First, by moving conspicuous consumption and other usually costly status competitions into virtual environments, these virtual worlds might reduce the need for physical resources. Second, they provide training that could prepare individuals to be teleworkers, and develop or demonstrate methods for using information technology to replace much transportation technology, notably in commuting. Third, virtual worlds and online games build international cooperation, even blending national cultures, thereby inching us toward not only the world consciousness needed for international agreements about the environment, but also toward non-spatial government that cuts across archaic nationalisms. Finally, realizing the potential social benefits of this new technology may urge us to reconsider a number of traditional societal institutions.

  1. Sustainability; Sustentabilidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-10-15

    This chapter analyses the production chain of ethanol, considering the impacts on the quality of the air, water supplies, soil occupation and biodiversity, and the efforts for the soil preservation. It is pointed out the activities of the production cycle and use of bio ethanol due to great uncertainties as far the environmental impacts is concerning and that will deserve more attention in future evaluations. At same time, the chapter highlights another activities where the present acknowledge is sufficient to assure the control and/or prediction of consequences of the desired intervention on the environment media to accommodate the sugar and ethanol production expansion. The consideration is not conservative but to promote the sustainable development.

  2. Sustainability Science Needs Sustainable Data!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, R. R.; Chen, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Sustainability science (SS) is an 'emerging field of research dealing with the interactions between natural and social systems, and with how those interactions affect the challenge of sustainability: meeting the needs of present and future generations while substantially reducing poverty and conserving the planet's life support systems' (Kates, 2011; Clark, 2007). Bettencourt & Kaur (2011) identified more than 20,000 scientific papers published on SS topics since the 1980s with more than 35,000 distinct authors. They estimated that the field is currently growing exponentially, with the number of authors doubling approximately every 8 years. These scholars are undoubtedly using and generating a vast quantity and variety of data and information for both SS research and applications. Unfortunately we know little about what data the SS community is actually using, and whether or not the data that SS scholars generate are being preserved for future use. Moreover, since much SS research is conducted by cross-disciplinary, multi-institutional teams, often scattered around the world, there could well be increased risks of data loss, reduced data quality, inadequate documentation, and poor long-term access and usability. Capabilities and processes therefore need to be established today to support continual, reliable, and efficient preservation of and access to SS data in the future, especially so that they can be reused in conjunction with future data and for new studies not conceived in the original data collection activities. Today's long-term data stewardship challenges include establishing sustainable data governance to facilitate continuing management, selecting data to ensure that limited resources are focused on high priority SS data holdings, securing sufficient rights to allow unforeseen uses, and preparing data to enable use by future communities whose specific research and information needs are not yet known. Adopting sustainable models for archival

  3. Incentives in Rheumatology: the Potential Contribution of Physician Responses to Financial Incentives, Public Reporting, and Treatment Guidelines to Health Care Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Mark; Milbers, Katherine; Mihic, Tamara; Anis, Aslam H

    2016-07-01

    Concerns about the sustainability of current health care expenditure are focusing attention on the cost, quality and value of health care provision. Financial incentives, for example pay-for-performance (P4P), seek to reward quality and value in health care provision. There has long been an expectation that P4P schemes are coming to rheumatology. We review the available evidence about the use of incentives in this setting and provide two emerging examples of P4P schemes which may shape the future of service provision in rheumatology. Currently, there is limited and equivocal evidence in rheumatology about the impact of incentive schemes. However, reporting variation in the quality and provision of rheumatology services has highlighted examples of inefficiencies in the delivery of care. If financial incentives can improve the delivery of timely and appropriate care for rheumatology patients, then they may have an important role to play in the sustainability of health care provision.

  4. A qualitative investigation into nurses' perceptions of factors influencing staff injuries sustained during physical interventions employed in response to service user violence within one secure learning disability service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Andrew; Smith, Debra; Johnson, Paula

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to examine learning disability nurses' perceptions of incidents involving physical intervention, particularly factors contributing to injuries sustained by this group. This article reports on a qualitative study undertaken within one secure NHS Trust to respond to concerns about staff injuries sustained during physical interventions to prevent incidents of service user violence from escalating out of control. The context of the study relates to increasing debate about the most effective approaches to incidents of violence and agression. A qualitative research design was utilized for the study. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 20 participants, two from each of the 10 incidents involving staff injury sustained during physical intervention. Four themes were produced by the analysis, the first, knowledge and understanding, contextualized the other three, which related to the physical intervention techniques employed, the interpretation of the incident and the impact on staff. Service user violence consistently poses nurses with the challenge of balancing the need to respond in order to maintain the safety of everyone whilst simultaneous supporting and caring for people with complex needs. This study highlights the need for further exploration of the contributory factors to the escalation of potentially violent situations. Services may have good systems in place for responding to and managing service user violence but appear less effective in understanding the reasons for and developing strategies to prevent violence occurring. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. 36 CFR 219.21 - Social and economic sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sustainability. 219.21 Section 219.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Economic Sustainability § 219.21 Social and economic sustainability. To contribute to economic and social sustainability, the responsible official involves interested and affected people in planning for National Forest...

  6. Pengaruh Corporate Social Responsibility Terhadap Kinerja Keuangan Perusahaan (Studi Pada Perusahaan Winner of Sustainability Reporting Award (Sra) 2015 Yang Terdaftar Di PT Bei Periode 2010-2014)

    OpenAIRE

    Bhernadha, Yhovita Anggie; Topowijono, Topowijono; Azizah, Devi Farah

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of Corporate Social Responsibility on Corporate Financial Performance. Corporate Social Responsibility will be measured using the Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure Index (CSRI). Information about Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure Index (CSRI) that will be used in this research is based on General Reporting Initiatives (GRI) G4. Financial Performance which is proxied by Return On Asset (ROA) and Return on Equity (ROE). Research type was ...

  7. Sustainable Scientists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Evan

    2008-12-31

    Scientists are front and center in quantifying and solving environmental problems. Yet, as a spate of recent news articles in scientific journals point out, much can be done to enhance sustainability within the scientific enterprise itself, particularly by trimming the energy use associated with research facilities and the equipment therein (i,ii,iii, iv). Sponsors of research unwittingly spend on the order of $10 billion each year on energy in the U.S. alone, and the underlying inefficiencies drain funds from the research enterprise while causing 80 MT CO2-equivalent greenhouse-gas emissions (see Box). These are significant sums considering the opportunity costs in terms of the amount of additional research that could be funded and emissions that could be reduced if the underlying energy was used more efficiently. By following commercially proven best practices in facility design and operation, scientists--and the sponsors of science--can cost-effectively halve these costs, while doing their part to put society on alow-carbon diet.

  8. Sustainable agriculture - selected papers

    OpenAIRE

    Krasowicz, Stanisław; Wrzaszcz, Wioletta; Zegar, Jozef St.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of research on socially sustainable agriculture. Features of sustainable agriculture. Sustainability of private farms in the light of selected criteria. Subsistence agricultural holdings and the sustainable development of agriculture. Sustainable farms in the light of the FADN data. Description of organic holdings in Poland.

  9. Annual Sustainability Report FY2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-08-01

    NREL's Sustainability Program is responsible for upholding all executive orders, federal regulations, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) orders, and goals related to sustainable and resilient facility operations. But NREL continues to expand sustainable practices above and beyond the laboratory's regulations and requirements to ensure that the laboratory fulfills its mission into the future, leaves the smallest possible legacy footprint, and models sustainable operations and behaviors on national, regional, and local levels. The report, per the GRI reporting format, elaborates on multi-year goals relative to executive orders, achievements, and challenges; and success stories provide specific examples. A section called 'NREL's Resiliency is Taking Many Forms' provides insight into how NREL is drawing on its deep knowledge of renewable energy and energy efficiency to help mitigate or avoid climate change impacts.

  10. Managing Sustainability in Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2014-01-01

    concerning trade-offs and complexity. Thus, the paper proposes an approach to sustainability in management education which help to initiate such critical reflection and discussion by drawing attention to the complex network of relations in which a given business or industry is embedded.......Sustainability has until relatively recently been seen as irrelevant to business practice and, hence, has been largely missing from management education. But, environmental issues are increasingly becoming a key business concern at local, national, international and global levels. This conceptual...... paper addresses the question: How can sustainability be addresses within management education? It engages in a critical discussion of traditional models for teaching sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in order to develop an advanced framework that addresses the limitations...

  11. Sustainable NREL - Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-01-01

    NREL's Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 reports on sustainability plans for the lab for the year 2015 based on Executive Order Goals and provides the status on planned actions cited in the FY 2014 report.

  12. Sustainability in Transport Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Greve, Carsten

    Contribution to session J: Joint University Sustainability Initiatives. This session will provide an inspiring overview of interdisciplinary research and teaching activities on sustainability bridging DTU, KU, and CBS, and introduce the joint collaboration Copenhagen Sustainability Initiative (COSI...

  13. Sustainability : Politics and governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinrichs, Harald; Biermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    he article gives an overview of global sustainability policy and politics. It is shown how international policy making on sustainable development has progressed from environmental policy toward recent approaches of Earth system governance. Key challenges of international sustainability politics are

  14. Textiles and clothing sustainability sustainable technologies

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This is the first book to deal with the innovative technologies in the field of textiles and clothing sustainability. It details a number of sustainable and innovative technologies and highlights their implications in the clothing sector. There are currently various measures to achieve sustainability in the textiles and the clothing industry, including innovations in the manufacturing stage, which is the crux of this book.

  15. Education for Sustainable Development: Connecting the Dots for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokool-Ramdoo, Sushita; Rumjaun, Anwar Bhai

    2017-01-01

    Critical pedagogy, practitioner experience and a regulatory perspective are employed to scrutinize the notion of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) as it occurs in the literature. They promote understanding of the challenges impeding the completion of unfinished ESD businesses. In response to practitioner-expressed needs, this paper…

  16. Wild European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) adjust to captivity with sustained sympathetic nervous system drive and a reduced fight-or-flight response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Molly J; Romero, L Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although research on wild species typically involves capture, handling, and some degree of captivity, few studies examine how these actions affect and/or alter the animal's underlying stress physiology. Furthermore, we poorly understand the immediate changes that occur as wild animals adjust to captive conditions. Most studies to date have investigated relatively long-term changes in the glucocorticoid response to an acute stressor, but immediate changes in the fight-or-flight response are relatively understudied in wild-caught species. In this study, we investigated changes to the cardiovascular stress response during the first 10 d of captivity of freshly captured wild European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). We demonstrated that (1) baseline heart rate (HR) remains elevated for several days following transport into captivity, (2) the normal balance between sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and parasympathetic nervous system regulation of HR is disrupted, with the SNS exerting relatively greater control over baseline HR for the first days of captivity, and (3) the HR response to startle, a mild stressor, becomes significantly reduced compared to that of starlings maintained in captivity for several months and remains below the control response for at least 10 d. These data are the first to show that successive acute stressors and introduction to a captive setting significantly alter the physiology and responsiveness of the cardiovascular stress response system.

  17. Really sustainable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadjimichael, Maria; Hegland, Troels Jacob

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a proliferation in environmental, market-based product certification schemes. Typically, certifying bodies provide labels that assure that the products have been extracted or produced using environmentally (and sometimes socially) responsible practices. Ideally......, consumers can then make informed choices and select certified products over non-certified. We discuss the advantages as well as the limitations associated with such market-based certification systems drawing on three case studies of Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification: the Alaska Pollock Fishery......, the Faroe Islands' Saithe Fishery, and the Australian Northern Prawn Fishery. Based on our cases, a key indication is that incentives generated by market forces create a risk of certification schemes making questionable claims in order to increase and retain market shares. Monopolization of the concept...

  18. Transcriptome wide analyses reveal a sustained cellular stress response in the gill tissue of Trematomus bernacchii after acclimation to multiple stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Troy J; Place, Sean P

    2016-02-20

    As global climate change progresses, the Southern Ocean surrounding Antarctica is poised to undergo potentially rapid and substantial changes in temperature and pCO2. To survive in this challenging environment, the highly cold adapted endemic fauna of these waters must demonstrate sufficient plasticity to accommodate these changing conditions or face inexorable decline. Previous studies of notothenioids have focused upon the short-term response to heat stress; and more recently the longer-term physiological response to the combined stress of increasing temperatures and pCO2. This inquiry explores the transcriptomic response of Trematomus bernacchii to increased temperatures and pCO2 at 7, 28 and 56 days, in an attempt to discern the innate plasticity of T. bernacchii available to cope with a changing Southern Ocean. Differential gene expression analysis supported previous research in that T. bernacchii exhibits no inducible heat shock response to stress conditions. However, T. bernacchii did demonstrate a strong stress response to the multi-stressor condition in the form of metabolic shifts, DNA damage repair, immune system processes, and activation of apoptotic pathways combined with negative regulation of cell proliferation. This response declined in magnitude over time, but aspects of this response remained detectable throughout the acclimation period. When exposed to the multi-stressor condition, T. bernacchii demonstrates a cellular stress response that persists for a minimum of 7 days before returning to near basal levels of expression at longer acclimation times. However, subtle changes in expression persist in fish acclimated for 56 days that may significantly affect the fitness T. bernacchii over time.

  19. INNOVATION CONSTITUENT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zhylinska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper substantiates an innovation constituent of sustainable development along with environmental, social and economic pillars of the concept. Determining of implementation details of innovation activity by J. Schumpeter is a theoretical prerequisite to understanding of innovation constituent. An innovator-entrepreneur provides a customer with an information image of 'new combinations.' The image is created by identifying customer's future needs, which outline business aims, subject and appropriate means for creating the innovation products. However, consumer choice is largely motivated by values and specific rules of behavior. The rules of consumer society that in the industrial age become the motive, morality and institution, did not consider the reproductive capabilities of the environment. This disagreement was previously presented in The Limits to Growth by the Club of Rome and was reflected in the concept of sustainable development, which gained immense significance after the report of the World Commission on Environment and Development in 1987 (Our Common Future. The study highlights importance for establishment of new social values that motivate innovators to change their thinking, comprehend their responsibility not only to consumers but also to the environment and future generations. The Rio+20 Corporate Sustainability Forum: Innovation and Collaboration for the Future We want, organized by the UN Global Compact, demonstrates the interest of entrepreneurs in practical implementation of the concept of sustainable development, through an effective innovation activity. The paper summarizes management tools for implementing business commitments to action in priority areas of ensuring sustainable development: Energy & Climate, Water & Ecosystems, Agriculture & Food, Economics & Finance of Sustainable Development, Social Development, and Urbanization & Cities. Main stages of changes in companies are outlined for making responsible

  20. Assessing sustainable remediation frameworks using sustainability principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridsdale, D Reanne; Noble, Bram F

    2016-12-15

    The remediation industry has grown exponentially in recent decades. International organizations of practitioners and remediation experts have developed several frameworks for integrating sustainability into remediation projects; however, there has been limited attention to how sustainability is approached and operationalized in sustainable remediation frameworks and practices - or whether sustainability plays any meaningful role at all in sustainable remediation. This paper examines how sustainability is represented in remediation frameworks and the guidance provided for practical application. Seven broad sustainability principles and review criteria are proposed and applied to a sample of six international remediation frameworks. Not all review criteria were equally satisfied and none of the frameworks fully met all criteria; however, the best performing frameworks were those identified as sustainability remediation frameworks. Intra-generational equity was addressed by all frameworks. Integrating social, economic and biophysical components beyond triple-bottom-line indicators was explicitly addressed only by the sustainable remediation frameworks. No frameworks provided principle- or rule-based guidance for dealing with trade-offs in sustainability decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Making Fashion Sustainable : The Role of Designers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, N.M.

    2016-01-01

    The dissertation ‘Making Fashion Sustainable – The Role of Designers’ describes the PhD research of Natascha M. van der Velden on the envisioned role designers could take responsibility for in the transition towards a more sustainable fashion industry.
    The current worldwide textile and apparel

  2. Fourth annual student sustainability challenge slideshow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Brenna C [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gurule, Angelica V [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bradley, Miranda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2011-11-07

    Organized by the Environmental Protection Division, the Fourth Annual Student Sustainability Challenge was developed to encourage students to take an active role in contributing to LANL's environmental responsibility, raise awareness of critical environmental issues, and to inspire innovation and ingenuity for better and more sustainable science and technology.

  3. Sustainable practices in hospitality : A research framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rheede, van A.; Blomme, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The hospitality industry is starting to take responsibility for environmental sustainability. A strong focus on energy, waste, and water usage is directly linked with financial benefits in the operation of the hoteliers. Practices connected to the social aspect of sustainability are less developed.

  4. Organizing for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William M.; Hamburger, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    A successful campus sustainability effort catalyzes broad engagement of the campus community and integration of sustainability principles into the academic and operational components of campus life. Although many universities have embraced sustainability as a new core value, others have been more sluggish in adopting sustainability principles to…

  5. Technology and sustainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, C.; Boersema, J.J.; Tellegen, E.; Cremers, A.

    2011-01-01

    In ten essays, this book addresses a broad range of issues related to the interplay of sustainability and technology. How do population growth and technology relate to sustainable development? Can globalization be reconciled with sustainable development? Is sustainability a subjective or an

  6. Action Research for Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egmose, Jonas

    by analysing processes of social learning. The book addresses the need to move towards sustainability at societal level as a democratic challenge questioning the way we live on planet earth. By conceptualising sustain-ability as an immanent and emergent ability of ecological and social life, continuously...... to renew itself without eroding its own foundation of existence, it argues that since sustainability cannot be invented but only supported (or eroded) by science, we need to reframe science in the role of sustaining sustain-ability. Through analyses of a three year action research programme, aiming...

  7. Sustainable operations management: A typological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Michael Corbett

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the nature of sustainability and sustainable development as they relate to operations management. It proposes a typology for sustainable operations management that is based on the life cycle stages of a product and the three dimensions of corporate social responsibility. The aim is to show how this typology development could provide a useful approach to integrating the diverse strands of sustainability in operations, using industrial ecology and carbon neutrality as examples. It does this by providing a focused subset of environmental concerns for an industrial ecology approach, and some research propositions for the issue of carbon neutrality.

  8. Sustainability in nursing: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anåker, Anna; Elf, Marie

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe, explore and explain the concept of sustainability in nursing. Although researchers in nursing and medicine have emphasised the issue of sustainability and health, the concept of sustainability in nursing is undefined and poorly researched. A need exists for theoretical and empirical studies of sustainability in nursing. Concept analysis as developed by Walker and Avant. Data were derived from dictionaries, international healthcare organisations and literature searches in the CINAHL and MEDLINE databases. Inclusive years for the search ranged from 1990 to 2012. A total of fourteen articles were found that referred to sustainability in nursing. Sustainability in nursing involves six defining attributes: ecology, environment, future, globalism, holism and maintenance. Antecedents of sustainability require climate change, environmental impact and awareness, confidence in the future, responsibility and a willingness to change. Consequences of sustainability in nursing include education in the areas of ecology, environment and sustainable development as well as sustainability as a part of nursing academic programs and in the description of the academic subject of nursing. Sustainability should also be part of national and international healthcare organisations. The concept was clarified herein by giving it a definition. Sustainability in nursing was explored and found to contribute to sustainable development, with the ultimate goal of maintaining an environment that does not harm current and future generations' opportunities for good health. This concept analysis provides recommendations for the healthcare sector to incorporate sustainability and provides recommendations for future research. © 2014 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Therapeutic DNA vaccine induces broad T cell responses in the gut and sustained protection from viral rebound and AIDS in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Heydenburg Fuller

    Full Text Available Immunotherapies that induce durable immune control of chronic HIV infection may eliminate the need for life-long dependence on drugs. We investigated a DNA vaccine formulated with a novel genetic adjuvant that stimulates immune responses in the blood and gut for the ability to improve therapy in rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV. Using the SIV-macaque model for AIDS, we show that epidermal co-delivery of plasmids expressing SIV Gag, RT, Nef and Env, and the mucosal adjuvant, heat-labile E. coli enterotoxin (LT, during antiretroviral therapy (ART induced a substantial 2-4-log fold reduction in mean virus burden in both the gut and blood when compared to unvaccinated controls and provided durable protection from viral rebound and disease progression after the drug was discontinued. This effect was associated with significant increases in IFN-γ T cell responses in both the blood and gut and SIV-specific CD8+ T cells with dual TNF-α and cytolytic effector functions in the blood. Importantly, a broader specificity in the T cell response seen in the gut, but not the blood, significantly correlated with a reduction in virus production in mucosal tissues and a lower virus burden in plasma. We conclude that immunizing with vaccines that induce immune responses in mucosal gut tissue could reduce residual viral reservoirs during drug therapy and improve long-term treatment of HIV infection in humans.

  10. Ribavirin plasma concentration is a predictor of sustained virological response in patients treated for chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 2/3 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Alsiö, Å; Lagging, M

    2011-01-01

    is generally recommended. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between ribavirin concentration at day 29 and therapeutic response in patients with HCV genotype 2/3 infection. A total of 382 patients were randomized to 12 or 24 weeks of treatment with pegylated interferon-alfa 2a 180...

  11. Responsible Investing in the Asia-Pacific Region: Understanding Sustainability and Investments in Japan and Hong Kong/China in an Era of Global Climate and Environmental Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Park (Jacob)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The author of this thesis examined the concept and market development of responsible investing (RI), which can be defined as an investment process that integrates social and environmental considerations within the context of traditional investment processes. RI has

  12. Strategic Planning for Sustainability in Canadian Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bieler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews representations of sustainability in the strategic plans of Canadian higher education institutions (HEIs. A content analysis of the strategic plans of 50 HEIs was undertaken to determine the extent to which sustainability is included as a significant policy priority in the plans, including across the five domains of governance, education, campus operations, research, and community outreach. We found 41 strategic plans with some discussion of sustainability, and identified three characteristic types of response: (i accommodative responses that include sustainability as one of many policy priorities and address only one or two sustainability domains; (ii reformative responses that involve some alignment of policy priorities with sustainability values in at least a few domains; and (iii progressive responses that make connections across four or five domains and offer a more detailed discussion of sustainability and sustainability-specific policies. Accommodative responses were dominant. More progressive responses were typically from institutions participating in the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. The paper concludes with consideration of the political and economic contexts contributing to this relative prevalence of accommodative responses to sustainability.

  13. Memory T cell proliferative responses and IFN-γ productivity sustain long-lasting efficacy of a Cap-based PCV2 vaccine upon PCV2 natural infection and associated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Luca; Borghetti, Paolo; De Angelis, Elena; Martelli, Paolo

    2014-04-16

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccination represents an important measure to cope with PCV2 infection; however, data regarding the modulation of the immune cell compartment are still limited, especially under field conditions. This study is aimed at investigating the features of the cellular immune response in conventional piglets induced by vaccination using a capsid (Cap) protein-based PCV2 vaccine compared to unvaccinated animals when exposed to PCV2 natural infection. Immune reactivity was evaluated by quantifying peripheral cell subsets involved in the anti-viral response and characterizing the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) secreting cell (SC) responsiveness both in vivo and upon in vitro whole PCV2 recall. The vaccination triggered an early and intense IFN-γ secreting cell response and induced the activation of peripheral lymphocytes. The early increase of IFN-γ SC frequencies resulted in a remarkable and transient tendency to increased IFN-γ productivity in vaccinated pigs. In vaccinated animals, soon before the onset of infection occurred 15-16 weeks post-vaccination, the recalled PCV2-specific immune response was characterized by moderate PCV2-specific IFN-γ secreting cell frequencies and augmented productivity together with reactive CD4+CD8+ memory T cells. Conversely, upon infection, unvaccinated animals showed very high frequencies of IFN-γ secreting cells and a tendency to lower productivity, which paralleled with effector CD4-CD8+ cytotoxic cell responsiveness. The study shows that PCV2 vaccination induces a long-lasting immunity sustained by memory T cells and IFN-γ secreting cells that potentially played a role in preventing the onset of infection; the extent and duration of this reactivity can be an important feature for evaluating the protective immunity induced by vaccination.

  14. Toward a typology of sustainability for cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Doust

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability responses must accelerate to avoid major risks to cities. Climate change impact on cities, likely to be significant if global sustainability initiatives are not quickened, is a paramount example of the risk. World wide meetings of city planning practitioners and researchers agree that an urgent agenda is to work together to empower cities and their governments with funds, tools and mentoring to make the responses needed. In the spirit of this urgent agenda, this paper introduces some practical methods for assessing sustainability associated with transport and urban form in our cities. A concept of strategic scans of future scenarios, which underpins the backcasting approach, has been introduced at the 12 th World Conference on Transport Research (WCTR in 2010 and has broken urban and transport planning trend. These strategic scans are based on a sustainability framework, the elements of which provide evidence based drivers of sustainability. The framework culminates in metric visualisations for each of the three pillars of sustainability. The paper details some of the operational aspects of these metrics in the form of environmental sustainability-accessibility space, putting into practice measures of environmental stewardship, social equity, economic efficiency, and the relationship among them. The paper concludes with a call of developing a typology of sustainability performance using the strategic scan methodology to extend the principles of the methodology into a useful tool for city governments and contribute to assembling a daTablease of city forms, transport structures, and their sustainability performances.

  15. Individual competencies for managers engaged in corporate sustainable management practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselink, R.; Blok, V.; Leur, van S.; Lans, T.; Dentoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    Corporations increasingly acknowledge the importance of sustainable practices. Corporate social responsibility is therefore gaining significance in the business world. Since solving corporate social responsibility issues is not a routine job, every challenge in corporate social responsibility

  16. Modelling the distribution of tritium in groundwater across South Africa to assess the vulnerability and sustainability of groundwater resources in response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, Jared; Miller, Jodie; Watson, Andrew; Butler, Mike

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater is critical for sustaining human populations, especially in semi-arid to arid areas, where surface water availability is low. Shallow groundwater is usually abstracted for this purpose because it is the easiest to access and assumed to be renewable and regularly recharged by precipitation. Renewable, regularly recharged groundwater is also called modern groundwater, ie groundwater that has recently been in contact with the atmosphere. Tritium can be used to determine whether or not a groundwater resource is modern because the half-life of tritium is only 12.36 years and tritium is dominantly produced in the upper atmosphere and not in the rock mass. For this reason, groundwater with detectable tritium activities likely has a residence age of less than 50 years. In this study, tritium activities in 277 boreholes distributed across South Africa were used to develop a national model for tritium activity in groundwater in order to establish the extent of modern groundwater across South Africa. The tritium model was combined with modelled depth to water using 3079 measured static water levels obtained from the National Groundwater Archive and validated against a separate set of 40 tritium activities along the west coast of South Africa. The model showed good agreement with the distribution of rainfall which has been previously documented across the globe (Gleeson et al., 2015), although the arid Karoo basin in south west South Africa shows higher than expected tritium levels given the very low regional precipitation levels. To assess the vulnerability of groundwater to degradation in quality and quantity, the tritium model was incorporated into a multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) model which incorporated other indicators of groundwater stress including mean annual precipitation, mean annual surface temperature, electrical conductivity (as a proxy for groundwater salinization), potential evaporation, population density and cultivated land usage. The MCE model

  17. Plurality or convergence in sustainability reporting standards?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Albu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years an increasing number of companies issued Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR or Sustainability Reports to complement their traditional financial reporting. Companies use various sustainability reporting standards or develop their own reporting frameworks starting from the existing ones. This variation of practices pointed out by empirical research raises questions about the quality and comparability of sustainability reporting, its role in the sustainable development, and also about the suitability of accepting the plurality of reporting frameworks or the need for convergence. This study aims to investigate the issues of plurality and convergence in sustainability reporting standards, by mobilizing the discourses on regulation and the case of a group of companies in the IT industry in order to shed some light on the current challenges in this area. We frame a discussion on the opportunities and pitfalls of convergence in sustainability reporting regulations and contribute to a better understanding of this issue by academics, preparers, users and standard setters

  18. Sustainable Tourism: Progress Challenges and Opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budeanu, Adriana; Miller, Graham; Moscardo, Gianna

    2016-01-01

    are organised into four thematic areas of research: community stakeholders' perspectives and business approaches to sustainability in tourism, cultural responses, and methodological challenges related to sustainability. The articles shine a light on issues of importance within sustainable tourism, and in so......The term sustainable tourism emerged in the late 1980s and has become firmly established in both tourism policies and strategies and tourism research (Hall, 2011). After more than 25 years of attention it is timely to consider the state of research and practice in sustainable tourism. This special...... volume was established with exactly that goal in mind and this introduction seeks to set the context for this critical examination and reflection on sustainable tourism. Another objective of this introduction was to briefly describe the range of contributions selected for this SV. The articles...

  19. Evaluation of the current state of small pelagic fisheries in the Colombian Pacific: ensuring the sustainability of the resource and evaluating its response to climatic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, L. A.; Beltrán-León, B. S.; Herrera, J. C.; Jiménez-Tello, P.; Prieto, L. M.; Baos, R. A.; Guevara-Fletcher, C.; Zambrano, E.

    2013-04-01

    Commercial fishing of small pelagic species in Colombia, mainly "carduma" (Cetengraulis mysticetus) and "plumuda" (Opisthonema spp.), has been recorded since 1970. Both are used to produce fish meal for aquaculture and poultry and for canned foods. These two species are filter feeders, and therefore support higher levels of the food chain (other fish, birds and marine mammals), and artisanal fishermen use them as bait. Between 2005 and 2010, 86.131 t have been captured (X = 14.355 t yr-1), and a strong reduction was noticed in 2009 (6.969 t). Carduma is considered a total spawning species. However, from 1997 to 2000 and from 2008 to date, atypical reproductive behavior of the species has been observed, including partition of the spawning period and the reduction of the volume of eggs and larvae released to the environment. Both situations are linked to thermal anomalies such as El Niño and La Niña events. Therefore, the process of assigning the global quota of extraction has been revised to take into account the reduction of total capture during the last years and the inconsistencies of the reproductive processes. The Ministry of Agriculture reduced the quota by 10%, leaving available a total of 27 000 t for 2010 and reduced it again to 25 000 t for 2011. It is important to maintain the management measures that are already implemented on this resource (bans during reproduction seasons, catch quotas, regulation of mesh sizes for the fishing nets, and limiting the number of new vessels) and considering other measures such as season closure for recruitment and establishment of marine protected areas to further contribute to the sustainability of these fisheries.

  20. Sustaining Shipments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnardel-Azzarelli, Betty [World Nuclear Transport Institute, Remo House, 4th Floor, 310-312 Regent Street, London, London W1B 3AX (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    . Producer shippers accordingly are being denied options for competitive choice of services. Shippers too often are met by a lack of standardisation in documentation. And, of course, worst of all, is when shipping lines deny, or withdraw from services. This situation inevitably can drive consignors to consider charter options; but this is not a panacea. Charters can mean reduced shipping schedules, and a lack of delivery flexibility. This, in turn, results in increased overall inventory holdings, and increased total shipping and other related business costs. And of course, use of slower, smaller charter vessels increases the potential risk of security breaches by potentially diverting cargoes away from mainstream access terminals to small ports or terminals, and the potential for piracy. This paper examines reasons for increasing delays and denials of shipments. It examines the impact delays and denials are having on industry, and describes the various international initiatives to address the problem including industry efforts through the World Nuclear Transport Institute (WNTI). Just as the problems of denial and delay are varied and multi-layered, so too are the possibilities for responding to them at all levels - international, regional, national and local. A number of suggestions for further action are advanced. These include the need to cast the training net to a wider cross section of stakeholders; moves towards a more harmonised approach by the various authorities within a national jurisdiction; and the need for more regular, collective exchanges within countries between those whose job it is to develop and enforce the regulations and standards for Class 7 transport, and those whose job it is to operate within them. If denials and delays of shipments are to be overcome, then all stakeholders, intergovernmental organisations, national governments and industry must work together, without let up, to exchange experiences, and ideas to develop positive responses. (author)